Science.gov

Sample records for additive gene action

  1. Additive genetic variation and evolvability of a multivariate trait can be increased by epistatic gene action.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Cortland K

    2015-12-21

    Epistatic gene action occurs when mutations or alleles interact to produce a phenotype. Theoretically and empirically it is of interest to know whether gene interactions can facilitate the evolution of diversity. In this paper, we explore how epistatic gene action affects the additive genetic component or heritable component of multivariate trait variation, as well as how epistatic gene action affects the evolvability of multivariate traits. The analysis involves a sexually reproducing and recombining population. Our results indicate that under stabilizing selection conditions a population with a mixed additive and epistatic genetic architecture can have greater multivariate additive genetic variation and evolvability than a population with a purely additive genetic architecture. That greater multivariate additive genetic variation can occur with epistasis is in contrast to previous theory that indicated univariate additive genetic variation is decreased with epistasis under stabilizing selection conditions. In a multivariate setting, epistasis leads to less relative covariance among individuals in their genotypic, as well as their breeding values, which facilitates the maintenance of additive genetic variation and increases a population׳s evolvability. Our analysis involves linking the combinatorial nature of epistatic genetic effects to the ancestral graph structure of a population to provide insight into the consequences of epistasis on multivariate trait variation and evolution. PMID:26431770

  2. Heritability of heterozygosity offers a new way of understanding why dominant gene action contributes to additive genetic variance.

    PubMed

    Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Hadfield, Jarrod D

    2015-07-01

    Whenever allele frequencies are unequal, nonadditive gene action contributes to additive genetic variance and therefore the resemblance between parents and offspring. The reason for this has not been easy to understand. Here, we present a new single-locus decomposition of additive genetic variance that may give greater intuition about this important result. We show that the contribution of dominant gene action to parent-offspring resemblance only depends on the degree to which the heterozygosity of parents and offspring covary. Thus, dominant gene action only contributes to additive genetic variance when heterozygosity is heritable. Under most circumstances this is the case because individuals with rare alleles are more likely to be heterozygous, and because they pass rare alleles to their offspring they also tend to have heterozygous offspring. When segregating alleles are at equal frequency there are no rare alleles, the heterozygosities of parents and offspring are uncorrelated and dominant gene action does not contribute to additive genetic variance. PMID:26100570

  3. 7 CFR 1403.12 - Additional administrative collection action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional administrative collection action. 1403.12 Section 1403.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT... PROCEDURES § 1403.12 Additional administrative collection action. Nothing contained in this part...

  4. 7 CFR 1403.12 - Additional administrative collection action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional administrative collection action. 1403.12 Section 1403.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT... PROCEDURES § 1403.12 Additional administrative collection action. Nothing contained in this part...

  5. 7 CFR 1403.12 - Additional administrative collection action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional administrative collection action. 1403.12 Section 1403.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT... PROCEDURES § 1403.12 Additional administrative collection action. Nothing contained in this part...

  6. 7 CFR 1403.12 - Additional administrative collection action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional administrative collection action. 1403.12 Section 1403.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT... PROCEDURES § 1403.12 Additional administrative collection action. Nothing contained in this part...

  7. 7 CFR 1403.12 - Additional administrative collection action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional administrative collection action. 1403.12 Section 1403.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT... PROCEDURES § 1403.12 Additional administrative collection action. Nothing contained in this part...

  8. 5 CFR 179.218 - Additional administrative collection action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional administrative collection action. 179.218 Section 179.218 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Salary Offset § 179.218 Additional administrative collection...

  9. 5 CFR 179.218 - Additional administrative collection action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional administrative collection action. 179.218 Section 179.218 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Salary Offset § 179.218 Additional administrative collection...

  10. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Louise P.; Cross, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation. PMID:26209850

  11. 12 CFR 1238.8 - Additional implementing action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional implementing action. 1238.8 Section 1238.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY ENTITY REGULATIONS STRESS TESTING OF REGULATED..., require any regulated entity not subject to this part to conduct stress testing hereunder; and from...

  12. Refining Breast Cancer Risk Stratification: Additional Genes, Additional Information.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Allison W; Antoniou, Antonis C; Domchek, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology have enabled far more rapid, less expensive sequencing of multiple genes than was possible only a few years ago. Advances in bioinformatics also facilitate the interpretation of large amounts of genomic data. New strategies for cancer genetic risk assessment include multiplex sequencing panels of 5 to more than 100 genes (in which rare mutations are often associated with at least two times the average risk of developing breast cancer) and panels of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), combinations of which are generally associated with more modest cancer risks (more than twofold). Although these new multiple-gene panel tests are used in oncology practice, questions remain about the clinical validity and the clinical utility of their results. To translate this increasingly complex genetic information for clinical use, cancer risk prediction tools are under development that consider the joint effects of all susceptibility genes, together with other established breast cancer risk factors. Risk-adapted screening and prevention protocols are underway, with ongoing refinement as genetic knowledge grows. Priority areas for future research include the clinical validity and clinical utility of emerging genetic tests; the accuracy of developing cancer risk prediction models; and the long-term outcomes of risk-adapted screening and prevention protocols, in terms of patients' experiences and survival. PMID:27249685

  13. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin action: gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shishodia, Shishir

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. PMID:22996381

  14. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... Action Programs § 60-2.17 Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. In addition to the elements required by § 60-2.10 through § 60-2.16, an acceptable affirmative action program must include...

  15. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... Action Programs § 60-2.17 Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. In addition to the elements required by § 60-2.10 through § 60-2.16, an acceptable affirmative action program must include...

  16. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... Action Programs § 60-2.17 Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. In addition to the elements required by § 60-2.10 through § 60-2.16, an acceptable affirmative action program must include...

  17. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... Action Programs § 60-2.17 Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. In addition to the elements required by § 60-2.10 through § 60-2.16, an acceptable affirmative action program must include...

  18. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... Action Programs § 60-2.17 Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. In addition to the elements required by § 60-2.10 through § 60-2.16, an acceptable affirmative action program must include...

  19. 42 CFR 460.48 - Additional actions by CMS or the State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.48 Additional actions...

  20. 42 CFR 460.48 - Additional actions by CMS or the State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.48 Additional actions...

  1. 42 CFR 460.48 - Additional actions by CMS or the State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.48 Additional actions...

  2. 42 CFR 460.48 - Additional actions by CMS or the State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.48 Additional actions...

  3. 42 CFR 460.48 - Additional actions by CMS or the State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.48 Additional actions...

  4. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  5. Prevalence of gene expression additivity in genetically stable wheat allohexaploids.

    PubMed

    Chelaifa, Houda; Chagué, Véronique; Chalabi, Smahane; Mestiri, Imen; Arnaud, Dominique; Deffains, Denise; Lu, Yunhai; Belcram, Harry; Huteau, Virginie; Chiquet, Julien; Coriton, Olivier; Just, Jérémy; Jahier, Joseph; Chalhoub, Boulos

    2013-02-01

    The reprogramming of gene expression appears as the major trend in synthetic and natural allopolyploids where expression of an important proportion of genes was shown to deviate from that of the parents or the average of the parents. In this study, we analyzed gene expression changes in previously reported, highly stable synthetic wheat allohexaploids that combine the D genome of Aegilops tauschii and the AB genome extracted from the natural hexaploid wheat Triticum aestivum. A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of transcriptional changes using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array was conducted. Prevalence of gene expression additivity was observed where expression does not deviate from the average of the parents for 99.3% of 34,820 expressed transcripts. Moreover, nearly similar expression was observed (for 99.5% of genes) when comparing these synthetic and natural wheat allohexaploids. Such near-complete additivity has never been reported for other allopolyploids and, more interestingly, for other synthetic wheat allohexaploids that differ from the ones studied here by having the natural tetraploid Triticum turgidum as the AB genome progenitor. Our study gave insights into the dynamics of additive gene expression in the highly stable wheat allohexaploids. PMID:23278496

  6. Nanotechnology in action: overbased nanodetergents as lubricant oil additives.

    PubMed

    Hudson, L K; Eastoe, J; Dowding, P J

    2006-11-16

    The synthesis and study of oil-soluble metal carbonate colloids are of interest in the area of lubricant additives. These surfactant-stabilised nanoparticles are important components in marine and automotive engine oils. Recently introduced, environmentally driven legislation has focused on lowering of gaseous emissions by placing limits on the levels of phosphorous sulphur and ash allowed in engine oil systems. These chemical limits, coupled with improved engine performance and extended oil drainage intervals, have lead to renewed interest in the production of stable, efficient nanodetergent systems. To date, this has resulted in modification of existing surfactant structures and development of new generations of surfactants. This review covers the current state of research in the area of nanodetergents. PMID:16860284

  7. 21 CFR 58.215 - Alternative or additional actions to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. 58.215 Section 58.215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Facilities § 58.215 Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. (a) Disqualification of a...

  8. 21 CFR 58.215 - Alternative or additional actions to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. 58.215 Section 58.215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Facilities § 58.215 Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. (a) Disqualification of a...

  9. 21 CFR 58.215 - Alternative or additional actions to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. 58.215 Section 58.215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Facilities § 58.215 Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. (a) Disqualification of a...

  10. 21 CFR 58.215 - Alternative or additional actions to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. 58.215 Section 58.215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Facilities § 58.215 Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. (a) Disqualification of a...

  11. 21 CFR 58.215 - Alternative or additional actions to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. 58.215 Section 58.215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Facilities § 58.215 Alternative or additional actions to disqualification. (a) Disqualification of a...

  12. From gene action to reactive genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Evelyn Fox

    2014-01-01

    Poised at a critical turning point in the history of genetics, recent work (e.g. in genomics, epigenetics, genomic plasticity) obliges us to critically reexamine many of our most basic concepts. For example, I argue that genomic research supports a radical transformation in our understanding of the genome – a shift from an earlier conception of that entity as an effectively static collection of active genes to that of a dynamic and reactive system dedicated to the context specific regulation of protein-coding sequences. PMID:24882822

  13. 26 CFR 301.6110-5 - Notice and time requirements; actions to restrain disclosure; actions to obtain additional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Internal Revenue Service determines that the request constitutes a request for disclosure of the... the Internal Revenue Service has determined that additional disclosure of information other than the... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice and time requirements; actions...

  14. 21 CFR 56.124 - Actions alternative or additional to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Actions alternative or additional to disqualification. 56.124 Section 56.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... alternative or additional to disqualification. Disqualification of an IRB or of an institution is...

  15. 21 CFR 56.124 - Actions alternative or additional to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Actions alternative or additional to disqualification. 56.124 Section 56.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... alternative or additional to disqualification. Disqualification of an IRB or of an institution is...

  16. 21 CFR 56.124 - Actions alternative or additional to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Actions alternative or additional to disqualification. 56.124 Section 56.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... alternative or additional to disqualification. Disqualification of an IRB or of an institution is...

  17. 21 CFR 56.124 - Actions alternative or additional to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Actions alternative or additional to disqualification. 56.124 Section 56.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... alternative or additional to disqualification. Disqualification of an IRB or of an institution is...

  18. 21 CFR 56.124 - Actions alternative or additional to disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Actions alternative or additional to disqualification. 56.124 Section 56.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... alternative or additional to disqualification. Disqualification of an IRB or of an institution is...

  19. Flavonoid genes in petunia: addition of a limited number of gene copies may lead to a suppression of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    van der Krol, A R; Mur, L A; Beld, M; Mol, J N; Stuitje, A R

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of increased expression of genes involved in flower pigmentation, additional dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) or chalcone synthase (CHS) genes were transferred to petunia. In most transformants, the increased expression had no measurable effect on floral pigmentation. Surprisingly, however, in up to 25% of the transformants, a reduced floral pigmentation, accompanied by a dramatic reduction of DFR or CHS gene expression, respectively, was observed. This phenomenon was obtained with both chimeric gene constructs and intact CHS genomic clones. The reduction in gene expression was independent of the promoter driving transcription of the transgene and involved both the endogenous gene and the homologous transgene. The gene-specific collapse in expression was obtained even after introduction of only a single gene copy. The similarity between the sense transformants and regulatory CHS mutants suggests that this mechanism of gene silencing may operate in naturally occurring regulatory circuits. PMID:2152117

  20. Methods for detecting additional genes underlying Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, P.A.; Haines, J.L.; Ter-Minassian, M.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is a complex inherited disorder with proven genetic heterogeneity. To date, genes on chromosome 21 (APP) and 14 (not yet identified) are associated with early-onset familial AD, while the APOE gene on chromosome 19 is associated with both late onset familial and sporadic AD and early onset sporadic AD. Although these genes likely account for the majority of AD, many familial cases cannot be traced to any of these genes. From a set of 127 late-onset multiplex families screened for APOE, 43 (34%) families have at least one affected individual with no APOE-4 allele, suggesting an alternative genetic etiology. Simulation studies indicated that additional loci could be identified through a genomic screen with a 10 cM sieve on a subset of 21 well documented, non-APOE-4 families. Given the uncertainties in the mode of inheritance, reliance on a single analytical method could result in a missed linkage. Therefore, we have developed a strategy of using multiple overlapping yet complementary methods to detect linkage. These include sib-pair analysis and affected-pedigree-member analysis, neither of which makes assumptions about mode of inheritance, and lod score analysis (using two predefined genetic models). In order for a marker to qualify for follow-up, it must fit at least two of three criteria. These are nominal P values of 0.05 or less for the non-parametric methods, and/or a lod score greater than 1.0. Adjacent markers each fulfilling a single criterion also warrant follow-up. To date, we have screened 61 markers on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 18, 19, 21, and 22. One marker, D2S163, generated a lod score of 1.06 ({theta} = 0.15) and an APMT statistic of 3.68 (P < 0.001). This region is currently being investigated in more detail. Updated results of this region plus additional screening data will be presented.

  1. Explanation of non-additive effects in mixtures of similar mode of action chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masashi; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Many models have been developed to predict the combined effect of drugs and chemicals. Most models are classified into two additive models: independent action (IA) and concentration addition (CA). It is generally considered if the modes of action of chemicals are similar then the combined effect obeys CA; however, many empirical studies report nonlinear effects deviating from the predictions by CA. Such deviations are termed synergism and antagonism. Synergism, which leads to a stronger toxicity, requires more careful management, and hence it is important to understand how and which combinations of chemicals lead to synergism. In this paper, three types of chemical reactions are mathematically modeled and the cause of the nonlinear effects among chemicals with similar modes of action was investigated. Our results show that combined effects obey CA only when the modes of action are exactly the same. Contrary to existing knowledge, combined effects are generally nonlinear even if the modes of action of the chemicals are similar. Our results further show that the nonlinear effects vanish out when the chemical concentrations are low, suggesting that the current management procedure of assuming CA is rarely inappropriate because environmental concentrations of chemicals are generally low. PMID:26134580

  2. Gene action for adult-plant resistance to powdery mildew in wheat.

    PubMed

    Das, M K; Griffey, C A

    1995-04-01

    Gene action for adult-plant resistance to powdery mildew was studied using generation mean analyses of parents and of F1, F2, and backcross populations derived from a diallel cross of one susceptible and three adult-plant resistant wheat cultivars. Joint scaling tests showed that an additive-dominance model was sufficient to explain the variability in the expression of adult-plant resistance in one cross, while digenic epistasis was involved in the other five crosses. Additive gene effects were predominant; however, dominance was significant in four crosses, additive x additive interaction was significant in three crosses, additive x dominance interaction was significant in three crosses, and dominance x dominance interaction was significant in one cross. Therefore, selection for adult-plant resistance would likely be most effective in advanced generations derived from crosses among the adult-plant resistant cultivars Redcoat, Houser, and Massey. PMID:18470166

  3. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus – Nitrogen Synergism

    SciTech Connect

    Gaan, Sabyasachi; Sun, Gang; Hutches, Katherine; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen additives like urea, guanidine carbonate and melamine formaldehyde on the flame retardant efficacy of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of activation energy of decomposition of treated cotton indicated that nitrogen additives enhance the thermal stability during the burning process. SEM pictures of chars formed after LOI test showed the formation of protective polymeric coating on the surface. The surface of chars formed were evaluated using FTIR-ATR and XPS analysis which showed that the coating was composed of Phosphorus-Nitrogen-Oxygen containing species. Formation of this coating during the burning process could lead to the synergistic interaction of phosphorus and nitrogen. Based on the experimental data we have further proposed several reaction mechanisms which could contribute to synergistic action and formation of protective coating on the surface of char.

  4. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  5. Additivity of Pyrethroid Actions on Sodium Influx in Cerebrocortical Neurons in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Shafer, Timothy J.; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gennings, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Although previous work has tested the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo, this has not been assessed directly at the primary molecular target using a functional measure. Objectives: We investigated the potency and efficacy of 11 structurally diverse food-use pyrethroids to evoke sodium (Na+) influx in neurons and tested the hypothesis of dose additivity for a mixture of these same 11 compounds. Methods: We determined pyrethroid-induced increases in Na+ influx in primary cultures of cerebrocortical neurons using the Na+-sensitive dye sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI). Concentration-dependent responses for 11 pyrethroids were determined, and the response to dilutions of a mixture of all 11 compounds at an equimolar mixing ratio was assessed. Additivity was tested assuming a dose-additive model. Results: Seven pyrethroids produced concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ influx. The rank order of potency was deltamethrin > S-bioallethrin > β-cyfluthrin > λ-cyhalothrin > esfenvalerate > tefluthrin > fenpropathrin. Cypermethrin and bifenthrin produced modest increases in Na+ influx, whereas permethrin and resmethrin were inactive. When all 11 pyrethroids were present at an equimolar mixing ratio, their actions on Na+ influx were consistent with a dose-additive model. Conclusions: These data provide in vitro relative potency and efficacy measurements for 7 pyrethroid compounds in intact mammalian neurons. Despite differences in individual compound potencies, we found the action of a mixture of all 11 pyrethroids to be additive when we used an appropriate statistical model. These results are consistent with a previous report of the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo. PMID:21665567

  6. Hairy and Groucho mediate the action of juvenile hormone receptor Methoprene-tolerant in gene repression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tusar T; Shin, Sang Woon; Dou, Wei; Roy, Sourav; Zhao, Bo; Hou, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Li; Zou, Zhen; Girke, Thomas; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2016-02-01

    The arthropod-specific juvenile hormone (JH) controls numerous essential functions. Its involvement in gene activation is known to be mediated by the transcription factor Methoprene-tolerant (Met), which turns on JH-controlled genes by directly binding to E-box-like motifs in their regulatory regions. However, it remains unclear how JH represses genes. We used the Aedes aegypti female mosquito, in which JH is necessary for reproductive maturation, to show that a repressor, Hairy, is required for the gene-repressive action of JH and Met. The RNA interference (RNAi) screen for Met and Hairy in the Aedes female fat body revealed a large cohort of Met- and Hairy-corepressed genes. Analysis of selected genes from this cohort demonstrated that they are repressed by JH, but RNAi of either Met or Hairy renders JH ineffective in repressing these genes in an in vitro fat-body culture assay. Moreover, this JH action was prevented by the addition of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to the culture, indicating the existence of an indirect regulatory hierarchy. The lack of Hairy protein in the CHX-treated tissue was verified using immunoblot analysis, and the upstream regions of Met/Hairy-corepressed genes were shown to contain common binding motifs that interact with Hairy. Groucho (gro) RNAi silencing phenocopied the effect of Hairy RNAi knockdown, indicating that it is involved in the JH/Met/Hairy hierarchy. Finally, the requirement of Hairy and Gro for gene repression was confirmed in a cell transfection assay. Thus, our study has established that Hairy and its cofactor Gro mediate the repressive function of JH and Met. PMID:26744312

  7. Hairy and Groucho mediate the action of juvenile hormone receptor Methoprene-tolerant in gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Tusar T.; Shin, Sang Woon; Dou, Wei; Roy, Sourav; Zhao, Bo; Hou, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Li; Zou, Zhen; Girke, Thomas; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The arthropod-specific juvenile hormone (JH) controls numerous essential functions. Its involvement in gene activation is known to be mediated by the transcription factor Methoprene-tolerant (Met), which turns on JH-controlled genes by directly binding to E-box–like motifs in their regulatory regions. However, it remains unclear how JH represses genes. We used the Aedes aegypti female mosquito, in which JH is necessary for reproductive maturation, to show that a repressor, Hairy, is required for the gene-repressive action of JH and Met. The RNA interference (RNAi) screen for Met and Hairy in the Aedes female fat body revealed a large cohort of Met- and Hairy-corepressed genes. Analysis of selected genes from this cohort demonstrated that they are repressed by JH, but RNAi of either Met or Hairy renders JH ineffective in repressing these genes in an in vitro fat-body culture assay. Moreover, this JH action was prevented by the addition of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to the culture, indicating the existence of an indirect regulatory hierarchy. The lack of Hairy protein in the CHX-treated tissue was verified using immunoblot analysis, and the upstream regions of Met/Hairy-corepressed genes were shown to contain common binding motifs that interact with Hairy. Groucho (gro) RNAi silencing phenocopied the effect of Hairy RNAi knockdown, indicating that it is involved in the JH/Met/Hairy hierarchy. Finally, the requirement of Hairy and Gro for gene repression was confirmed in a cell transfection assay. Thus, our study has established that Hairy and its cofactor Gro mediate the repressive function of JH and Met. PMID:26744312

  8. Two GATA transcription factors are downstream effectors of floral homeotic gene action in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mara, Chloe D; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-06-01

    Floral organogenesis is dependent on the combinatorial action of MADS-box transcription factors, which in turn control the expression of suites of genes required for growth, patterning, and differentiation. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the specification of petal and stamen identity depends on the action of two MADS-box gene products, APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI). In a screen for genes whose expression was altered in response to the induction of AP3 activity, we identified GNC (GATA, nitrate-inducible, carbon-metabolism-involved) as being negatively regulated by AP3 and PI. The GNC gene encodes a member of the Arabidopsis GATA transcription factor family and has been implicated in the regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis as well as carbon and nitrogen metabolism. In addition, we found that the GNC paralog, GNL (GNC-like), is also negatively regulated by AP3 and PI. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that promoter sequences of both GNC and GNL are bound by PI protein, suggesting a direct regulatory interaction. Analyses of single and double gnc and gnl mutants indicated that the two genes share redundant roles in promoting chlorophyll biosynthesis, suggesting that in repressing GNC and GNL, AP3/PI have roles in negatively regulating this biosynthetic pathway in flowers. In addition, coexpression analyses of genes regulated by AP3, PI, GNC, and GNL indicate a complex regulatory interplay between these transcription factors in regulating a variety of light and nutrient responsive genes. Together, these results provide new insights into the transcriptional cascades controlling the specification of floral organ identities. PMID:18417639

  9. Lytic Action of the Truncated yncE Gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Xiong, Kun; Zou, Lingyun; Chen, Zhijin; Wang, Yiran; Hu, Xiaomei; Rao, Xiancai; Cong, Yanguang

    2016-04-01

    We recently found lytic action of the truncated yncE gene. When the truncated yncE gene of Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A was expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α under the control of the Ara promoter, bacterial growth was markedly inhibited. In the present study, we characterized this lytic action. The N-terminal 103 aa of YncE, containing a signal peptide, was demonstrated to be essential for inhibition. Microscopic observation showed that the bacterial envelope of E. coli was damaged by the expression of truncated yncE, resulting in the release of cytoplasmic content and the formation of bacterial ghosts. The addition of MgSO4 or spermine, which is the stabilizer of bacterial membrane structure, dramatically reversed the cell lysis induced by the toxic truncated YncE. In contrast, the lytic action was significantly enhanced by the addition of SDS or EDTA. Our data indicated that the toxic truncated YncE could cause cell lysis by the disruption of the bacterial membrane. PMID:26687463

  10. Linking Genes to Cardiovascular Diseases: Gene Action and Gene-Environment Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-12-01

    A unique myocardial characteristic is its ability to grow/remodel in order to adapt; this is determined partly by genes and partly by the environment and the milieu intérieur. In the "post-genomic" era, a need is emerging to elucidate the physiologic functions of myocardial genes, as well as potential adaptive and maladaptive modulations induced by environmental/epigenetic factors. Genome sequencing and analysis advances have become exponential lately, with escalation of our knowledge concerning sometimes controversial genetic underpinnings of cardiovascular diseases. Current technologies can identify candidate genes variously involved in diverse normal/abnormal morphomechanical phenotypes, and offer insights into multiple genetic factors implicated in complex cardiovascular syndromes. The expression profiles of thousands of genes are regularly ascertained under diverse conditions. Global analyses of gene expression levels are useful for cataloging genes and correlated phenotypes, and for elucidating the role of genes in maladies. Comparative expression of gene networks coupled to complex disorders can contribute insights as to how "modifier genes" influence the expressed phenotypes. Increasingly, a more comprehensive and detailed systematic understanding of genetic abnormalities underlying, for example, various genetic cardiomyopathies is emerging. Implementing genomic findings in cardiology practice may well lead directly to better diagnosing and therapeutics. There is currently evolving a strong appreciation for the value of studying gene anomalies, and doing so in a non-disjointed, cohesive manner. However, it is challenging for many-practitioners and investigators-to comprehend, interpret, and utilize the clinically increasingly accessible and affordable cardiovascular genomics studies. This survey addresses the need for fundamental understanding in this vital area. PMID:26545598

  11. Appraisal of gene action for indeterminate growth in mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Javed; Ahsan, Muhammad; Saleem, Muhammad; Ali, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the inheritance pattern of indeterminate growth in Vigna radiata, various related traits were studied. The techniques used for the purpose were generation mean and variance analyses. Narrow sense heritability estimates were also computed. Four out of fifty greengram accessions were selected during preliminary screen trial based on DDd2 and DDh2 values. Two cross combinations were made by utilizing four parents. Generation variance analysis demonstrated the engagement of additive and environmental components, with the pre-pondrance of additive gene action. Narrow sense heritability estimates (>67%) also supported the same. In generation mean analysis both cross combinations manifested non-allelic epistatic digenic interactions for the investigated traits except for plant height at first flower initiation and for seed yield per plant in one cross combination, where only additive and dominance components were important. For pyramiding the additive genes favoring determinate plant growth, higher harvest index and simultaneously purging the genes promoting twining growth habit escorted with low seed yield, any modified breeding scheme which could serve the said purpose may be opted. PMID:26388879

  12. Genes and Molecules of Lactobacilli Supporting Probiotic Action

    PubMed Central

    Lebeer, Sarah; Vanderleyden, Jos; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Lactobacilli have been crucial for the production of fermented products for centuries. They are also members of the mutualistic microbiota present in the human gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Recently, increasing attention has been given to their probiotic, health-promoting capacities. Many human intervention studies demonstrating health effects have been published. However, as not all studies resulted in positive outcomes, scientific interest arose regarding the precise mechanisms of action of probiotics. Many reported mechanistic studies have addressed mainly the host responses, with less attention being focused on the specificities of the bacterial partners, notwithstanding the completion of Lactobacillus genome sequencing projects, and increasing possibilities of genomics-based and dedicated mutant analyses. In this emerging and highly interdisciplinary field, microbiologists are facing the challenge of molecular characterization of probiotic traits. This review addresses the advances in the understanding of the probiotic-host interaction with a focus on the molecular microbiology of lactobacilli. Insight into the molecules and genes involved should contribute to a more judicious application of probiotic lactobacilli and to improved screening of novel potential probiotics. PMID:19052326

  13. Correlating chemical sensitivity and basal gene expression reveals mechanism of action | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Changes in cellular gene expression in response to small-molecule or genetic perturbations have yielded signatures that can connect unknown mechanisms of action (MoA) to ones previously established. We hypothesized that differential basal gene expression could be correlated with patterns of small-molecule sensitivity across many cell lines to illuminate the actions of compounds whose MoA are unknown.

  14. Demonstration of transcriptional regulation of specific genes by phytochrome action

    PubMed Central

    Silverthorne, Jane; Tobin, Elaine M.

    1984-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro transcription system that uses nuclei isolated from Lemna gibba G-3. The in vitro transcripts include sequences homologous to hybridization probes for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39], the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein, and rRNA. Light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein sequences are transcribed to a greater extent in nuclei isolated from plants grown in darkness with 2 min of red light every 8 hr than in nuclei isolated from dark-treated plants. Furthermore, the amount of these transcripts measured in plants given a single minute of red light after dark treatment is increased over the amount measured in dark-treated plants. The effect of red light is at least partially reversible by 10 min of far-red light given immediately after the red light pulse. Transcription of both rRNA and small subunit sequences is also stimulated by a single minute of red light as compared to dark-treated tissue. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases compared to the dark levels are smaller than the increase seen for the chlorophyll a/b-protein, possibly because of the higher level of transcription of these sequences in the dark. The effect of red light on the transcription of small subunit and rRNA sequences is also reversible by immediate treatment with 10 min of far-red light. Pulse chase studies of dark-treated nuclei for up to 110 min do not show substantial turnover of in vitro labeled small subunit and chlorophyll a/b-protein transcripts. We therefore conclude that phytochrome action has induced specific changes in transcription of these genes. Images PMID:16593420

  15. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Kulkarni, Kirti K.; Jana, Kuladip; Roy, Siddhartha; Das, Chandrima; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2014-01-01

    Mithramycin (MTR) is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode) or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode). The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25473595

  16. Epigenetic regulation of the expression of genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis and action

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones participate in organ development, reproduction, body homeostasis, and stress responses. The steroid machinery is expressed in a development- and tissue-specific manner, with the expression of these factors being tightly regulated by an array of transcription factors (TFs). Epigenetics provides an additional layer of gene regulation through DNA methylation and histone tail modifications. Evidence of epigenetic regulation of key steroidogenic enzymes is increasing, though this does not seem to be a predominant regulatory pathway. Steroid hormones exert their action in target tissues through steroid nuclear receptors belonging to the NR3A and NR3C families. Nuclear receptor expression levels and post-translational modifications regulate their function and dictate their sensitivity to steroid ligands. Nuclear receptors and TFs are more likely to be epigenetically regulated than proteins involved in steroidogenesis and have secondary impact on the expression of these steroidogenic enzymes. Here we review evidence for epigenetic regulation of enzymes, transcription factors, and nuclear receptors related to steroid biogenesis and action. PMID:20156469

  17. Additivity of Pyrethroid Actions on Sodium Influx in Cortical Neuronsin vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. While previous work has tested the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo, the additivity of these compounds at the major target si...

  18. Novel action of FOXL2 as mediator of Col1a2 gene autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Mara; Deiana, Manila; Marcia, Loredana; Sbardellati, Andrea; Asunis, Isadora; Meloni, Alessandra; Angius, Andrea; Cusano, Roberto; Loi, Angela; Crobu, Francesca; Fotia, Giorgio; Cucca, Francesco; Schlessinger, David; Crisponi, Laura

    2016-08-01

    FOXL2 belongs to the evolutionarily conserved forkhead box (FOX) superfamily and is a master transcription factor in a spectrum of developmental pathways, including ovarian and eyelid development and bone, cartilage and uterine maturation. To analyse its action, we searched for proteins that interact with FOXL2. We found that FOXL2 interacts with specific C-terminal propeptides of several fibrillary collagens. Because these propeptides can participate in feedback regulation of collagen biosynthesis, we inferred that FOXL2 could thereby affect the transcription of the cognate collagen genes. Focusing on COL1A2, we found that FOXL2 indeed affects collagen synthesis, by binding to a DNA response element located about 65Kb upstream of this gene. According to our hypothesis we found that in Foxl2(-/-) mouse ovaries, Col1a2 was elevated from birth to adulthood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) compartmentalizes the ovary during folliculogenesis, (with type I, type III and type IV collagens as primary components), and ECM composition changes during the reproductive lifespan. In Foxl2(-/-) mouse ovaries, in addition to up-regulation of Col1a2, Col3a1, Col4a1 and fibronectin were also upregulated, while laminin expression was reduced. Thus, by regulating levels of extracellular matrix components, FOXL2 may contribute to both ovarian histogenesis and the fibrosis attendant on depletion of the follicle reserve during reproductive aging and menopause. PMID:27212026

  19. Senescence Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with a Defect in Telomere Replication Identify Three Additional Est Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lendvay, T. S.; Morris, D. K.; Sah, J.; Balasubramanian, B.; Lundblad, V.

    1996-01-01

    The primary determinant for telomere replication is the enzyme telomerase, responsible for elongating the G-rich strand of the telomere. The only component of this enzyme that has been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the TLC1 gene, encoding the telomerase RNA subunit. However, a yeast strain defective for the EST1 gene exhibits the same phenotypes (progressively shorter telomeres and a senescence phenotype) as a strain deleted for TLC1, suggesting that EST1 encodes either a component of telomerase or some other factor essential for telomerase function. We designed a multitiered screen that led to the isolation of 22 mutants that display the same phenotypes as est1 and tlc1 mutant strains. These mutations mapped to four complementation groups: the previously identified EST1 gene and three additional genes, called EST2, EST3 and EST4. Cloning of the EST2 gene demonstrated that it encodes a large, extremely basic novel protein with no motifs that provide clues as to function. Epistasis analysis indicated that the four EST genes function in the same pathway for telomere replication as defined by the TLC1 gene, suggesting that the EST genes encode either components of telomerase or factors that positively regulate telomerase activity. PMID:8978029

  20. Additivity of Pyrethroid Actions on Sodium Influx in Cortical Neurons in Cerebrocortical Neurons in Primary Culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Although previous work has tested the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo, this has not been assessed directly at the primary molecular ...

  1. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:25030908

  2. Association of warfarin dose with genes involved in its action and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wadelius, Mia; Chen, Leslie Y.; Eriksson, Niclas; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Ghori, Jilur; Wadelius, Claes; Bentley, David; McGinnis, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    We report an extensive study of variability in genes encoding proteins that are believed to be involved in the action and biotransformation of warfarin. Warfarin is a commonly prescribed anticoagulant that is difficult to use because of the wide interindividual variation in dose requirements, the narrow therapeutic range and the risk of serious bleeding. We genotyped 201 patients for polymorphisms in 29 genes in the warfarin interactive pathways and tested them for association with dose requirement. In our study, polymorphisms in or flanking the genes VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, PROC, APOE, EPHX1, CALU, GGCX and ORM1-ORM2 and haplotypes of VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, PROC, F7, GGCX, PROZ, F9, NR1I2 and ORM1-ORM2 were associated with dose (P < 0.05). VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 were significant after experiment-wise correction for multiple testing (P < 0.000175), however, the association of CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 was fully explained by linkage disequilibrium with CYP2C9*2 and/or *3. PROC and APOE were both significantly associated with dose after correction within each gene. A multiple regression model with VKORC1, CYP2C9, PROC and the non-genetic predictors age, bodyweight, drug interactions and indication for treatment jointly accounted for 62% of variance in warfarin dose. Weaker associations observed for other genes could explain up to ∼10% additional dose variance, but require testing and validation in an independent and larger data set. Translation of this knowledge into clinical guidelines for warfarin prescription will be likely to have a major impact on the safety and efficacy of warfarin. Electronic supplementary material Supplementary material is available in the online version of this article at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-006-0260-8 and is accessible for authorized users. PMID:17048007

  3. A human alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH6) encoding an additional class of isozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yasunami, M; Chen, C S; Yoshida, A

    1991-01-01

    The human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) gene family consists of five known loci (ADH1-ADH5), which have been mapped close together on chromosome 4 (4q21-25). ADH isozymes encoded by these genes are grouped in three distinct classes in terms of their enzymological properties. A moderate structural similarity is observed between the members of different classes. We isolated an additional member of the ADH gene family by means of cross-hybridization with the ADH2 (class I) cDNA probe. cDNA clones corresponding to this gene were derived from PCR-amplified libraries as well. The coding sequence of a 368-amino-acid-long open reading frame was interrupted by introns into eight exons and spanned approximately 17 kilobases on the genome. The gene contains a glucocorticoid response element at the 5' region. The transcript was detected in the stomach and liver. The deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame showed about 60% positional identity with known human ADHs. This extent of homology is comparable to interclass similarity in the human ADH family. Thus, the newly identified gene, which is designated ADH6, governs the synthesis of an enzyme that belongs to another class of ADHs presumably with a distinct physiological role. Images PMID:1881901

  4. Recombinase-mediated reprogramming and dystrophin gene addition in mdx mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunli; Farruggio, Alfonso P; Bjornson, Christopher R R; Chavez, Christopher L; Geisinger, Jonathan M; Neal, Tawny L; Karow, Marisa; Calos, Michele P

    2014-01-01

    A cell therapy strategy utilizing genetically-corrected induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) may be an attractive approach for genetic disorders such as muscular dystrophies. Methods for genetic engineering of iPSC that emphasize precision and minimize random integration would be beneficial. We demonstrate here an approach in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy that focuses on the use of site-specific recombinases to achieve genetic engineering. We employed non-viral, plasmid-mediated methods to reprogram mdx fibroblasts, using phiC31 integrase to insert a single copy of the reprogramming genes at a safe location in the genome. We next used Bxb1 integrase to add the therapeutic full-length dystrophin cDNA to the iPSC in a site-specific manner. Unwanted DNA sequences, including the reprogramming genes, were then precisely deleted with Cre resolvase. Pluripotency of the iPSC was analyzed before and after gene addition, and ability of the genetically corrected iPSC to differentiate into myogenic precursors was evaluated by morphology, immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, FACS analysis, and intramuscular engraftment. These data demonstrate a non-viral, reprogramming-plus-gene addition genetic engineering strategy utilizing site-specific recombinases that can be applied easily to mouse cells. This work introduces a significant level of precision in the genetic engineering of iPSC that can be built upon in future studies. PMID:24781921

  5. Fine Mapping of Two Additive Effect Genes for Awn Development in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Ben; Zhang, Yanpei; Li, Jinjie; Yao, Guoxin; Pan, Huiqiao; Hu, Guanglong; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Zichao

    2016-01-01

    Awns, important domestication and agronomic traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.), are conferred by polygenes and the environment. Near isogenic line (NIL) pairs BM33 and BM38 were constructed from crosses between awnless japonica cv Nipponbare as recurrent parent, and lines SLG or Funingxiaohongmang (awned japonica accessions), respectively, as donors. In order to study the genetic and molecular mechanism of awning, two unknown, independent genes with additive effects were identified in a cross between the NILs. To map and clone the two genes, a BC4F4 population of 8,103 individuals and a BC4F6 population of 11,206 individuals were constructed. Awn3-1 was fine mapped to a 101.13 kb genomic region between Indel marker In316 and SNP marker S9-1 on chromosome 3. Nine predicted genes in the interval were annotated in the Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB), and Os03g0418600 was identified as the most likely candidate for Awn3-1 through sequence comparisons and RT-PCR assays. Awn4-2 was fine mapped to a 62.4 kb genomic region flanked by simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker M1126 and Indel maker In73 on chromosome 4L. This region contained the previously reported gene An-1 that regulates awn development. Thus, An-1 may be the candidate gene of Awn4-2. These results will facilitate cloning of the awn genes and thereby provide an understanding of the molecular basis of awn development. PMID:27494628

  6. Fine Mapping of Two Additive Effect Genes for Awn Development in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinjie; Yao, Guoxin; Pan, Huiqiao; Hu, Guanglong; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Zichao

    2016-01-01

    Awns, important domestication and agronomic traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.), are conferred by polygenes and the environment. Near isogenic line (NIL) pairs BM33 and BM38 were constructed from crosses between awnless japonica cv Nipponbare as recurrent parent, and lines SLG or Funingxiaohongmang (awned japonica accessions), respectively, as donors. In order to study the genetic and molecular mechanism of awning, two unknown, independent genes with additive effects were identified in a cross between the NILs. To map and clone the two genes, a BC4F4 population of 8,103 individuals and a BC4F6 population of 11,206 individuals were constructed. Awn3-1 was fine mapped to a 101.13 kb genomic region between Indel marker In316 and SNP marker S9-1 on chromosome 3. Nine predicted genes in the interval were annotated in the Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB), and Os03g0418600 was identified as the most likely candidate for Awn3-1 through sequence comparisons and RT-PCR assays. Awn4-2 was fine mapped to a 62.4 kb genomic region flanked by simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker M1126 and Indel maker In73 on chromosome 4L. This region contained the previously reported gene An-1 that regulates awn development. Thus, An-1 may be the candidate gene of Awn4-2. These results will facilitate cloning of the awn genes and thereby provide an understanding of the molecular basis of awn development. PMID:27494628

  7. Targeted gene addition into a specified location in the human genome using designed zinc finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Moehle, Erica A.; Rock, Jeremy M.; Lee, Ya-Li; Jouvenot, Yann; DeKelver, Russell C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient incorporation of novel DNA sequences into a specific site in the genome of living human cells remains a challenge despite its potential utility to genetic medicine, biotechnology, and basic research. We find that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can stimulate integration of long DNA stretches into a predetermined genomic location, resulting in high-efficiency site-specific gene addition. Using an extrachromosomal DNA donor carrying a 12-bp tag, a 900-bp ORF, or a 1.5-kb promoter-transcription unit flanked by locus-specific homology arms, we find targeted integration frequencies of 15%, 6%, and 5%, respectively, within 72 h of treatment, and with no selection for the desired event. Importantly, we find that the integration event occurs in a homology-directed manner and leads to the accurate reconstruction of the donor-specified genotype at the endogenous chromosomal locus, and hence presumably results from synthesis-dependent strand annealing repair of the break using the donor DNA as a template. This site-specific gene addition occurs with no measurable increase in the rate of random integration. Remarkably, we also find that ZFNs can drive the addition of an 8-kb sequence carrying three distinct promoter-transcription units into an endogenous locus at a frequency of 6%, also in the absence of any selection. These data reveal the surprising versatility of the specialized polymerase machinery involved in double-strand break repair, illuminate a powerful approach to mammalian cell engineering, and open the possibility of ZFN-driven gene addition therapy for human genetic disease. PMID:17360608

  8. Targeted gene addition into a specified location in the human genome using designed zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Moehle, Erica A; Moehle, E A; Rock, Jeremy M; Rock, J M; Lee, Ya-Li; Lee, Y L; Jouvenot, Yann; Jouvenot, Y; DeKelver, Russell C; Dekelver, R C; Gregory, Philip D; Gregory, P D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Urnov, F D; Holmes, Michael C; Holmes, M C

    2007-02-27

    Efficient incorporation of novel DNA sequences into a specific site in the genome of living human cells remains a challenge despite its potential utility to genetic medicine, biotechnology, and basic research. We find that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can stimulate integration of long DNA stretches into a predetermined genomic location, resulting in high-efficiency site-specific gene addition. Using an extrachromosomal DNA donor carrying a 12-bp tag, a 900-bp ORF, or a 1.5-kb promoter-transcription unit flanked by locus-specific homology arms, we find targeted integration frequencies of 15%, 6%, and 5%, respectively, within 72 h of treatment, and with no selection for the desired event. Importantly, we find that the integration event occurs in a homology-directed manner and leads to the accurate reconstruction of the donor-specified genotype at the endogenous chromosomal locus, and hence presumably results from synthesis-dependent strand annealing repair of the break using the donor DNA as a template. This site-specific gene addition occurs with no measurable increase in the rate of random integration. Remarkably, we also find that ZFNs can drive the addition of an 8-kb sequence carrying three distinct promoter-transcription units into an endogenous locus at a frequency of 6%, also in the absence of any selection. These data reveal the surprising versatility of the specialized polymerase machinery involved in double-strand break repair, illuminate a powerful approach to mammalian cell engineering, and open the possibility of ZFN-driven gene addition therapy for human genetic disease. PMID:17360608

  9. THE mPER2 CLOCK GENE MODULATES COCAINE ACTIONS IN THE MOUSE CIRCADIAN SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Stowie, Adam C.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is a potent disruptor of photic and non-photic pathways for circadian entrainment of the master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These actions of cocaine likely involve its modulation of molecular (clock gene) components for SCN clock timekeeping. At present, however, the physiological basis of such an interaction is unclear. To address this question, we compared photic and non-photic phase-resetting responses between wild-type (WT) and Per2 mutant mice expressing nonfunctional PER2 protein to systemic and intra-SCN cocaine administrations. In the systemic trials, cocaine was administered i.p. (20 mg/kg) either at midday or prior to a light pulse in the early night to assess its non-photic and photic behavioral phase-resetting actions, respectively. In the intra-SCN trial, cocaine was administered by reverse microdialysis at midday to determine if the SCN is a direct target for its non-photic phase-resetting action. Non-photic phase-advancing responses to i.p. cocaine at midday were significantly (~3.5-fold) greater in Per2 mutants than WTs. However, the phase-advancing action of intra-SCN cocaine perfusion at midday did not differ between genotypes. In the light pulse trial, Per2 mutants exhibited larger photic phase-delays than did WTs, and the attenuating action of cocaine on this response was proportionately larger than in WTs. These data indicate that the Per2 clock gene is a potent modulator of cocaine’s actions in the circadian system. With regard to non-photic phase-resetting, the SCN is confirmed as a direct target of cocaine action; however, Per2 modulation of this effect likely occurs outside of the SCN. PMID:23333842

  10. Extracellular complementation and the identification of additional genes involved in aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed Central

    Nodwell, J R; Yang, M; Kuo, D; Losick, R

    1999-01-01

    Morphogenesis in the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor involves the formation of a lawn of hair-like aerial hyphae on the colony surface that stands up in the air and differentiates into chains of spores. bld mutants are defective in the formation of this aerial mycelium and grow as smooth, hairless colonies. When certain pairs of bld mutants are grown close to one another on rich sporulation medium, they exhibit extracellular complementation such that one mutant restores aerial mycelium formation to the other. The extracellular complementation relationships of most of the previously isolated bld mutants placed them in a hierarchy of extracellular complementation groups. We have screened for further bld mutants with precautions intended to maximize the discovery of additional genes. Most of the 50 newly isolated mutant strains occupy one of three of the previously described positions in the hierarchy, behaving like bldK, bldC, or bldD mutants. We show that the mutations in some of the strains that behave like bldK are bldK alleles but that others fall in a cluster at a position on the chromosome distinct from that of any known bld gene. We name this locus bldL. By introducing cloned genes into the strains that exhibit bldC or bldD-like extracellular complementation phenotypes, we show that most of these strains are likely to contain mutations in genes other than bldC or bldD. These results indicate that the genetic control of aerial mycelium formation is more complex than previously recognized and support the idea that a high proportion of bld genes are directly or indirectly involved in the production of substances that are exchanged between cells during morphological differentiation. PMID:9927452

  11. Extracellular complementation and the identification of additional genes involved in aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Nodwell, J R; Yang, M; Kuo, D; Losick, R

    1999-02-01

    Morphogenesis in the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor involves the formation of a lawn of hair-like aerial hyphae on the colony surface that stands up in the air and differentiates into chains of spores. bld mutants are defective in the formation of this aerial mycelium and grow as smooth, hairless colonies. When certain pairs of bld mutants are grown close to one another on rich sporulation medium, they exhibit extracellular complementation such that one mutant restores aerial mycelium formation to the other. The extracellular complementation relationships of most of the previously isolated bld mutants placed them in a hierarchy of extracellular complementation groups. We have screened for further bld mutants with precautions intended to maximize the discovery of additional genes. Most of the 50 newly isolated mutant strains occupy one of three of the previously described positions in the hierarchy, behaving like bldK, bldC, or bldD mutants. We show that the mutations in some of the strains that behave like bldK are bldK alleles but that others fall in a cluster at a position on the chromosome distinct from that of any known bld gene. We name this locus bldL. By introducing cloned genes into the strains that exhibit bldC or bldD-like extracellular complementation phenotypes, we show that most of these strains are likely to contain mutations in genes other than bldC or bldD. These results indicate that the genetic control of aerial mycelium formation is more complex than previously recognized and support the idea that a high proportion of bld genes are directly or indirectly involved in the production of substances that are exchanged between cells during morphological differentiation. PMID:9927452

  12. Meleagrin, a new FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chryosogenum with at least one additional mode of action.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chang Ji; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Won-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) is a promising novel antibacterial target. We isolated a new class of FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chrysogenum, which produces various antibiotics, the mechanisms of some of them are unknown. The isolated FabI inhibitor was determined to be meleagrin by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, and its more active and inactive derivatives were chemically prepared. Consistent with their selective inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus FabI, meleagrin and its more active derivatives directly bound to S. aureus FabI in a fluorescence quenching assay, inhibited intracellular fatty acid biosynthesis and growth of S. aureus, and increased the minimum inhibitory concentration for fabI-overexpressing S. aureus. The compounds that were not effective against the FabK isoform, however, inhibited the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae that contained only the FabK isoform. Additionally no resistant mutant to the compounds was obtained. Importantly, fabK-overexpressing Escherichia coli was not resistant to these compounds, but was resistant to triclosan. These results demonstrate that the compounds inhibited another target in addition to FabI. Thus, meleagrin is a new class of FabI inhibitor with at least one additional mode of action that could have potential for treating multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24312171

  13. Meleagrin, a New FabI Inhibitor from Penicillium chryosogenum with at Least One Additional Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chang Ji; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Won-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) is a promising novel antibacterial target. We isolated a new class of FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chrysogenum, which produces various antibiotics, the mechanisms of some of them are unknown. The isolated FabI inhibitor was determined to be meleagrin by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, and its more active and inactive derivatives were chemically prepared. Consistent with their selective inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus FabI, meleagrin and its more active derivatives directly bound to S. aureus FabI in a fluorescence quenching assay, inhibited intracellular fatty acid biosynthesis and growth of S. aureus, and increased the minimum inhibitory concentration for fabI-overexpressing S. aureus. The compounds that were not effective against the FabK isoform, however, inhibited the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae that contained only the FabK isoform. Additionally no resistant mutant to the compounds was obtained. Importantly, fabK-overexpressing Escherichia coli was not resistant to these compounds, but was resistant to triclosan. These results demonstrate that the compounds inhibited another target in addition to FabI. Thus, meleagrin is a new class of FabI inhibitor with at least one additional mode of action that could have potential for treating multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24312171

  14. Additive effects of HLA alleles and innate immune genes determine viral outcome in HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Karen; Hurst, Jacob; Dring, Megan; Rauch, Andri; McLaren, Paul J; Günthard, Huldrych F; Gardiner, Clair; Klenerman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic HCV infection is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity globally. The innate and adaptive immune responses are thought to be important in determining viral outcomes. Polymorphisms associated with the IFNL3 (IL28B) gene are strongly associated with spontaneous clearance and treatment outcomes. Objective This study investigates the importance of HLA genes in the context of genetic variation associated with the innate immune genes IFNL3 and KIR2DS3. Design We assess the collective influence of HLA and innate immune genes on viral outcomes in an Irish cohort of women (n=319) who had been infected from a single source as well as a more heterogeneous cohort (Swiss Cohort, n=461). In the Irish cohort, a number of HLA alleles are associated with different outcomes, and the impact of IFNL3-linked polymorphisms is profound. Results Logistic regression was performed on data from the Irish cohort, and indicates that the HLA-A*03 (OR 0.36 (0.15 to 0.89), p=0.027) -B*27 (OR 0.12 (0.03 to 0.45), p=<0.001), -DRB1*01:01 (OR 0.2 (0.07 to 0.61), p=0.005), -DRB1*04:01 (OR 0.31 (0.12 to 0.85, p=0.02) and the CC IFNL3 rs12979860 genotypes (OR 0.1 (0.04 to 0.23), p<0.001) are significantly associated with viral clearance. Furthermore, DQB1*02:01 (OR 4.2 (2.04 to 8.66), p=0.008), KIR2DS3 (OR 4.36 (1.62 to 11.74), p=0.004) and the rs12979860 IFNL3 ‘T’ allele are associated with chronic infection. This study finds no interactive effect between IFNL3 and these Class I and II alleles in relation to viral clearance. There is a clear additive effect, however. Data from the Swiss cohort also confirms independent and additive effects of HLA Class I, II and IFNL3 genes in their prediction of viral outcome. Conclusions This data supports a critical role for the adaptive immune response in the control of HCV in concert with the innate immune response. PMID:24996883

  15. Gene expression signature-based approach identifies a pro-resolving mechanism of action for histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, T; Dalli, J; Perretti, M

    2013-01-01

    Despite several therapies being currently available to treat inflammatory diseases, new drugs to treat chronic conditions with less side effects and lower production costs are still needed. An innovative approach to drug discovery, the Connectivity Map (CMap), shows how integrating genome-wide gene expression data of drugs and diseases can accelerate this process. Comparison of genome-wide gene expression data generated with annexin A1 (AnxA1) with the CMap revealed significant alignment with gene profiles elicited by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), what made us to hypothesize that AnxA1 might mediate the anti-inflammatory actions of HDACIs. Addition of HDACIs (valproic acid, sodium butyrate and thricostatin A) to mouse macrophages caused externalization of AnxA1 with concomitant inhibition of cytokine gene expression and release, events that occurred independently as this inhibition was retained in AnxA1 null macrophages. In contrast, novel AnxA1-mediated functions for HDACIs could be unveiled, including promotion of neutrophil apoptosis and macrophage phagocytosis, both steps crucial for effective resolution of inflammation. In a model of acute resolving inflammation, administration of valproic acid and sodium butyrate to mice at the peak of disease accelerated resolution processes in wild type, but much more modestly in AnxA1 null mice. Deeper analyses revealed a role for endogenous AnxA1 in the induction of neutrophil death in vivo by HDACIs. In summary, interrogation of the CMap revealed an unexpected association between HDACIs and AnxA1 that translated in mechanistic findings with particular impact on the processes that regulate the resolution of inflammation. We propose non-genomic modulation of AnxA1 in immune cells as a novel mechanism of action for HDACIs, which may underlie their reported efficacy in models of chronic inflammatory pathologies. PMID:23222458

  16. Opposing action of estrogen receptors alpha and beta on cyclin D1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Min; Albanese, Chris; Anderson, Carol M; Hilty, Kristin; Webb, Paul; Uht, Rosalie M; Price, Richard H; Pestell, Richard G; Kushner, Peter J

    2002-07-01

    Induction of cyclin D1 gene transcription by estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) plays an important role in estrogen-mediated proliferation. There is no classical estrogen response element in the cyclin D1 promoter, and induction by ERalpha has been mapped to an alternative response element, a cyclic AMP-response element at -57, with possible participation of an activating protein-1 site at -954. The action of ERbeta at the cyclin D1 promoter is unknown, although evidence suggests that ERbeta may inhibit the proliferative action of ERalpha. We examined the response of cyclin D1 promoter constructs by luciferase assay and the response of the endogenous protein by Western blot in HeLa cells transiently expressing ERalpha, ERalphaK206A (a derivative that is superactive at alternative response elements), or ERbeta. In each case, ER activation at the cyclin D1 promoter is mediated by both the cyclic AMP-response element and the activating protein-1 site, which play partly redundant roles. The activation by ERbeta occurs only with antiestrogens. Estrogens, which activate cyclin D1 gene expression with ERalpha, inhibit expression with ERbeta. Strikingly, the presence of ERbeta completely inhibits cyclin D1 gene activation by estrogen and ERalpha or even by estrogen and the superactive ERalphaK206A. The observation of the opposing action and dominance of ERbeta over ERalpha in activation of cyclin D1 gene expression has implications for the postulated role of ERbeta as a modulator of the proliferative effects of estrogen. PMID:11986316

  17. Sparse Additive Ordinary Differential Equations for Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hulin; Lu, Tao; Xue, Hongqi; Liang, Hua

    2014-04-01

    The gene regulation network (GRN) is a high-dimensional complex system, which can be represented by various mathematical or statistical models. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) model is one of the popular dynamic GRN models. High-dimensional linear ODE models have been proposed to identify GRNs, but with a limitation of the linear regulation effect assumption. In this article, we propose a sparse additive ODE (SA-ODE) model, coupled with ODE estimation methods and adaptive group LASSO techniques, to model dynamic GRNs that could flexibly deal with nonlinear regulation effects. The asymptotic properties of the proposed method are established and simulation studies are performed to validate the proposed approach. An application example for identifying the nonlinear dynamic GRN of T-cell activation is used to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method. PMID:25061254

  18. Liver lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guoxun

    2007-09-28

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) plays key roles in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis, and cataplerosis. Experiments were designed to examine the effects of endogenous lipid molecules from rat livers on the expression of PEPCK-C gene in primary rat hepatocytes. The lipid extracts prepared from livers of Zucker fatty, lean, and Wistar rats induced the expression levels of PEPCK-C transcripts. Insulin-mediated reduction of PEPCK-C gene expression was attenuated by the same treatment. The lipid extracts induced the relative luciferase activity of reporter gene constructs that contain a 2.2-kb 5' promoter fragment of PEPCK-C gene, but not the construct that contains only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of its mRNA. The estimated half life of PEPCK-C transcripts in the presence of the lipid extract is the same as that in the absence of it. My results demonstrate for the first time that endogenous lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action in liver.

  19. Determination of the mechanism of action of repetitive halothane exposure on rat brain tissues using a combined method of microarray gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiansheng; Yang, Xiaojun; Xiao, Huan; Kong, Jianqiang; Bing, Miao

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the gene expression profiles of rats brain tissues treated with halothane compared with untreated controls to improve current understanding of the mechanism of action of the inhaled anesthetic. The GSE357 gene expression profile was dowloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and included six gene chips of samples repeatedly exposed to halothane and 12 gene chips of untreated controls. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between these two groups were identified using the Limma package in R language. Subsequently, the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery was used to annotate the function of these DEGs. In addition, the most significantly upregulated gene and downregulated gene were annotated, to reveal the functional interactions with other associated genes, in FuncBase database. A total of 44 DEGs were obtained between The control and halothane exposure samples. Following Gene Ontology functional classification, these DEGs were found to be involved predominantly in the circulatory system, regulation of cell proliferation and response to endogenous stimulus and corticosteroid stimulus processes. KRT31 and HMGCS2, which were identified as the most significantly downregulated and upregulated DEGs, respectively, were associated with the lipid metabolic process and T cell activation, respectively. These results provided a basis for the development of improved inhalational anesthetics with minimal side effects and are essential for optimization of inhaled anesthetic techniques for advanced surgical procedures. PMID:26497548

  20. Ribavirin Potentiates Interferon Action by Augmenting Interferon-Stimulated Gene Induction in Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Emmanuel; Feld, Jordan J.; Li, Qisheng; Hu, Zongyi; Fried, Michael W.; Liang, T. Jake

    2012-01-01

    The combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C. Our recent clinical study suggests that ribavirin augments the induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in patients treated for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In order to further characterize the mechanisms of action of ribavirin, we examined the effect of ribavirin treatment on ISG induction in cell culture. In addition, the effect of ribavirin on infectious HCV cell culture systems was studied. Similar to interferon (IFN)-α, ribavirin potently inhibits JFH-1 infection of Huh7.5.1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, which spans the physiological concentration of ribavirin in vivo. Microarray analysis and subsequent quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that ribavirin treatment resulted in the induction of a distinct set of ISGs. These ISGs, including IFN regulatory factors 7 and 9, are known to play an important role in anti-HCV responses. When ribavirin is used in conjunction with IFN-α, induction of specific ISGs is synergistic when compared with either drug applied separately. Direct up-regulation of these antiviral genes by ribavirin is mediated by a novel mechanism different from those associated with IFN signaling and intracellular double-stranded RNA sensing pathways such as RIG-I and MDA5. RNA interference studies excluded the activation of the Toll-like receptor and nuclear factor κB pathways in the action of ribavirin. Conclusion Our study suggests that ribavirin, acting by way of a novel innate mechanism, potentiates the anti-HCV effect of IFN. Understanding the mechanism of action of ribavirin would be valuable in identifying novel antivirals PMID:21254160

  1. Developments in sclerostin biology: regulation of gene expression, mechanisms of action, and physiological functions

    PubMed Central

    Weivoda, Megan M.; Oursler, Merry Jo

    2014-01-01

    The SOST gene, which encodes the protein sclerostin, was identified through genetic linkage analysis of sclerosteosis and van Buchem’s disease (VBD) patients. Sclerostin is a secreted glycoprotein that binds to the Low-density lipoprotein Receptor-related Proteins (LRP) 4, 5, and 6 to inhibit Wnt signaling. Since the initial discovery of sclerostin, much understanding has been gained into the role of this protein in the regulation of skeletal biology. In this article, we discuss the latest findings in the regulation of SOST expression, sclerostin mechanisms of action, and the potential utility of targeting sclerostin in conditions of low bone mass. PMID:24477413

  2. Gene-Environment Interactions in Stress Response Contribute Additively to a Genotype-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takeshi; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    How combinations of gene-environment interactions collectively give rise to genotype-environment interactions is not fully understood. To shed light on this problem, we genetically dissected an environment-specific poor growth phenotype in a cross of two budding yeast strains. This phenotype is detectable when certain segregants are grown on ethanol at 37°C (‘E37’), a condition that differs from the standard culturing environment in both its carbon source (ethanol as opposed to glucose) and temperature (37°C as opposed to 30°C). Using recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection, we identified 16 contributing loci. To examine how these loci interact with each other and the environment, we focused on a subset of four loci that together can lead to poor growth in E37. We measured the growth of all 16 haploid combinations of alleles at these loci in all four possible combinations of carbon source (ethanol or glucose) and temperature (30 or 37°C) in a nearly isogenic population. This revealed that the four loci act in an almost entirely additive manner in E37. However, we also found that these loci have weaker effects when only carbon source or temperature is altered, suggesting that their effect magnitudes depend on the severity of environmental perturbation. Consistent with such a possibility, cloning of three causal genes identified factors that have unrelated functions in stress response. Thus, our results indicate that polymorphisms in stress response can show effects that are intensified by environmental stress, thereby resulting in major genotype-environment interactions when multiple of these variants co-occur. PMID:27437938

  3. Gene expression profiling revealed novel mechanism of action of Taxotere and Furtulon in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Hussain, Maha; Sarkar, Sarah H; Eliason, James; Li, Ran; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2005-01-01

    Background Both Taxotere and Capecitabine have shown anti-cancer activity against various cancers including prostate cancer. In combination, Taxotere plus Capecitabine has demonstrated higher anti-cancer activity in advanced breast cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of Taxotere and Capecitabine have not been fully elucidated in prostate cancer. Methods The total RNA from PC3 and LNCaP prostate cells untreated and treated with 2 nM Taxotere, 110 μM Furtulon (active metabolite of Capecitabine), or 1 nM Taxotere plus 50 μM Furtulon for 6, 36, and 72 hours, was subjected to Affymetrix Human Genome U133A Array analysis. Real-time PCR and Western Blot analysis were conducted to confirm microarray data. Results Taxotere and Furtulon down-regulated some genes critical for cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, transcription factor, cell signaling, and oncogenesis, and up-regulated some genes related to the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation in both cell lines. Taxotere and Furtulon also up-regulated some genes responsible for chemotherapeutic resistance, suggesting the induction of cancer cell resistance to these agents. Conclusions Taxotere and Furtulon caused the alternation of a large number of genes, many of which may contribute to the molecular mechanisms by which Taxotere and Furtulon inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. This information could be utilized for further mechanistic research and for devising optimized therapeutic strategies against prostate cancer. PMID:15656911

  4. Thyroid hormone action in the adult brain: gene expression profiling of the effects of single and multiple doses of triiodo-L-thyronine in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Diez, Diego; Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Agretti, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; Tonacchera, Massimo; Pinchera, Aldo; de Escobar, Gabriella Morreale; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2008-08-01

    Thyroid hormones have profound effects on mood and behavior, but the molecular basis of thyroid hormone action in the adult brain is relatively unknown. In particular, few thyroid hormone-dependent genes have been identified in the adult brain despite extensive work carried out on the developing brain. In this work we performed global analysis of gene expression in the adult rat striatum in search for genomic changes taking place after administration of T(3) to hypothyroid rats. The hormone was administered in two different schedules: 1) a single, large dose of 25 microg per 100 g body weight (SD) or 2) 1.5 microg per 100 g body weight once daily for 5 d (RD). Twenty-four hours after the single or last of multiple doses, gene expression in the striatum was analyzed using Codelink microarrays. SD caused up-regulation of 149 genes and down-regulation of 88 genes. RD caused up-regulation of 18 genes and down-regulation of one gene. The results were confirmed by hybridization to Affymetrix microarrays and by TaqMan PCR. Among the genes identified are genes involved in circadian regulation and the regulation of signaling pathways in the striatum. These results suggest that thyroid hormone is involved in regulation of striatal physiology at multiple control points. In addition, they may explain the beneficial effects of large doses of thyroid hormone in bipolar disorders. PMID:18467437

  5. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    SciTech Connect

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W.

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Correlating chemical sensitivity and basal gene expression reveals mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Rees, Matthew G; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Cheah, Jaime H; Adams, Drew J; Price, Edmund V; Gill, Shubhroz; Javaid, Sarah; Coletti, Matthew E; Jones, Victor L; Bodycombe, Nicole E; Soule, Christian K; Alexander, Benjamin; Li, Ava; Montgomery, Philip; Kotz, Joanne D; Hon, C Suk-Yee; Munoz, Benito; Liefeld, Ted; Dančík, Vlado; Haber, Daniel A; Clish, Clary B; Bittker, Joshua A; Palmer, Michelle; Wagner, Bridget K; Clemons, Paul A; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2016-02-01

    Changes in cellular gene expression in response to small-molecule or genetic perturbations have yielded signatures that can connect unknown mechanisms of action (MoA) to ones previously established. We hypothesized that differential basal gene expression could be correlated with patterns of small-molecule sensitivity across many cell lines to illuminate the actions of compounds whose MoA are unknown. To test this idea, we correlated the sensitivity patterns of 481 compounds with ∼19,000 basal transcript levels across 823 different human cancer cell lines and identified selective outlier transcripts. This process yielded many novel mechanistic insights, including the identification of activation mechanisms, cellular transporters and direct protein targets. We found that ML239, originally identified in a phenotypic screen for selective cytotoxicity in breast cancer stem-like cells, most likely acts through activation of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2). These data and analytical tools are available to the research community through the Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal. PMID:26656090

  7. Correlating chemical sensitivity and basal gene expression reveals mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Matthew G.; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Cheah, Jaime H.; Adams, Drew J.; Price, Edmund V.; Gill, Shubhroz; Javaid, Sarah; Coletti, Matthew E.; Jones, Victor L.; Bodycombe, Nicole E.; Soule, Christian K.; Alexander, Benjamin; Li, Ava; Montgomery, Philip; Kotz, Joanne D.; Hon, C. Suk-Yee; Munoz, Benito; Liefeld, Ted; Dančík, Vlado; Haber, Daniel A.; Clish, Clary B.; Bittker, Joshua A.; Palmer, Michelle; Wagner, Bridget K.; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cellular gene expression in response to small-molecule or genetic perturbations have yielded signatures that can connect unknown mechanisms of action (MoA) to ones previously established. We hypothesized that differential basal gene expression could be correlated with patterns of small-molecule sensitivity across many cell lines to illuminate the actions of compounds whose MoA are unknown. To test this idea, we correlated the sensitivity patterns of 481 compounds with ~19,000 basal transcript levels across 823 different human cancer cell lines and identified selective outlier transcripts. This process yielded many novel mechanistic insights, including the identification of activation mechanisms, cellular transporters, and direct protein targets. We found that ML239, originally identified in a phenotypic screen for selective cytotoxicity in breast cancer stem-like cells, most likely acts through activation of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2). These data and analytical tools are available to the research community through the Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal. PMID:26656090

  8. Chemopreventive agents alters global gene expression pattern: predicting their mode of action and targets.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Bhagavathi A

    2006-12-01

    Chemoprevention has the potential to be a major component of colon, breast, prostate and lung cancer control. Epidemiological, experimental, and clinical studies provide evidence that antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and several other phytochemicals possess unique modes of action against cancer growth. However, the mode of action of several of these agents at the gene transcription level is not completely understood. Completion of the human genome sequence and the advent of DNA microarrays using cDNAs enhanced the detection and identification of hundreds of differentially expressed genes in response to anticancer drugs or chemopreventive agents. In this review, we are presenting an extensive analysis of the key findings from studies using potential chemopreventive agents on global gene expression patterns, which lead to the identification of cancer drug targets. The summary of the study reports discussed in this review explains the extent of gene alterations mediated by more than 20 compounds including antioxidants, fatty acids, NSAIDs, phytochemicals, retinoids, selenium, vitamins, aromatase inhibitor, lovastatin, oltipraz, salvicine, and zinc. The findings from these studies further reveal the utility of DNA microarray in characterizing and quantifying the differentially expressed genes that are possibly reprogrammed by the above agents against colon, breast, prostate, lung, liver, pancreatic and other cancer types. Phenolic antioxidant resveratrol found in berries and grapes inhibits the formation of prostate tumors by acting on the regulatory genes such as p53 while activating a cascade of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis including p300, Apaf-1, cdk inhibitor p21, p57 (KIP2), p53 induced Pig 7, Pig 8, Pig 10, cyclin D, DNA fragmentation factor 45. The group of genes significantly altered by selenium includes cyclin D1, cdk5, cdk4, cdk2, cdc25A and GADD 153. Vitamine D shows impact on p21(Waf1/Cip1) p27 cyclin B

  9. Additive insulinogenic action of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin extract and leucine after exercise in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral intake of a specific extract of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin (OpunDia™) (OFI) has been shown to increase serum insulin concentration while reducing blood glucose level for a given amount of glucose ingestion after an endurance exercise bout in healthy young volunteers. However, it is unknown whether OFI-induced insulin stimulation after exercise is of the same magnitude than the stimulation by other insulinogenic agents like leucine as well as whether OFI can interact with those agents. Therefore, the aims of the present study were: 1) to compare the degree of insulin stimulation by OFI with the effect of leucine administration; 2) to determine whether OFI and leucine have an additive action on insulin stimulation post-exercise. Methods Eleven subjects participated in a randomized double-blind cross-over study involving four experimental sessions. In each session the subjects successively underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after a 30-min cycling bout at ~70% VO2max. At t0 and t60 during the OGTT, subjects ingested 75 g glucose and capsules containing either 1) a placebo; 2) 1000 mg OFI; 3) 3 g leucine; 4) 1000 mg OFI + 3 g leucine. Blood samples were collected before and at 30-min intervals during the OGTT for determination of blood glucose and serum insulin. Results Whereas no effect of leucine was measured, OFI reduced blood glucose at t90 by ~7% and the area under the glucose curve by ~15% and increased serum insulin concentration at t90 by ~35% compared to placebo (P<0.05). From t60 to the end of the OGTT, serum insulin concentration was higher in OFI+leucine than in placebo which resulted in a higher area under the insulin curve (+40%, P<0.05). Conclusion Carbohydrate-induced insulin stimulation post-exercise can be further increased by the combination of OFI with leucine. OFI and leucine could be interesting ingredients to include together in recovery drinks to resynthesize muscle glycogen faster post

  10. Cardiovascular actions of DOPA mediated by the gene product of ocular albinism 1.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Yoshio; Nakamura, Fumio; Masukawa, Daiki; Chen, Sandy; Koga, Motokazu

    2014-01-01

    l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is the metabolic precursor of dopamine, and the single most effective agent in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. One problem with DOPA therapy for Parkinson's disease is its cardiovascular side effects including hypotension and syncope, the underlying mechanisms of which are largely unknown. We proposed that DOPA is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, but specific receptors for DOPA had not been identified. Recently, the gene product of ocular albinism 1 (OA1) was shown to possess DOPA-binding activity. It was unknown, however, whether or not OA1 is responsible for the actions of DOPA itself. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that OA1 was expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). OA1-positive cells adjacent to tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cell bodies and nerve fibers were detected in the depressor sites of the NTS. OA1 knockdown using oa1-specific shRNA-adenovirus vectors in the NTS reduced the expression levels of OA1 in the NTS. The prior injection of the shRNA against OA1 suppressed the depressor and bradycardic responses to DOPA but not to glutamate in the NTS of anesthetized rats. Thus OA-1 is a functional receptor of DOPA in the NTS, which warrants reexamination of the mechanisms for the therapeutic and untoward actions of DOPA. PMID:25185585

  11. Additional Evidence of the Trypanocidal Action of (−)-Elatol on Amastigote Forms through the Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2014-01-01

    Chagas’ disease, a vector-transmitted infectious disease, is caused by the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Drugs that are currently available for the treatment of this disease are unsatisfactory, making the search for new chemotherapeutic agents a priority. We recently described the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol, extracted from the macroalga Laurencia dendroidea. However, nothing has been described about the mechanism of action of this compound on amastigotes that are involved in the chronic phase of Chagas’ disease. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of (−)-elatol on the formation of superoxide anions (O2•−), DNA fragmentation, and autophagy in amastigotes of T. cruzi to elucidate the possible mechanism of the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol. Treatment of the amastigotes with (−)-elatol increased the formation of O2•− at all concentrations of (−)-elatol assayed compared with untreated parasites. Increased fluorescence was observed in parasites treated with (−)-elatol, indicating DNA fragmentation and the formation of autophagic compartments. The results suggest that the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol might involve the induction of the autophagic and apoptotic death pathways triggered by an imbalance of the parasite’s redox metabolism. PMID:25257785

  12. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  13. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  14. The identification of additional zebrafish DICP genes reveals haplotype variation and linkage to MHC class I genes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nunez, Ivan; Wcisel, Dustin J; Litman, Ronda T; Litman, Gary W; Yoder, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Bony fish encode multiple multi-gene families of membrane receptors that are comprised of immunoglobulin (Ig) domains and are predicted to function in innate immunity. One of these families, the diverse immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing protein (DICP) genes, maps to three chromosomal loci in zebrafish. Most DICPs possess one or two Ig ectodomains and include membrane-bound and secreted forms. Membrane-bound DICPs include putative inhibitory and activating receptors. Recombinant DICP Ig domains bind lipids with varying specificity, a characteristic shared with mammalian CD300 and TREM family members. Numerous DICP transcripts amplified from different lines of zebrafish did not match the zebrafish reference genome sequence suggesting polymorphic and haplotypic variation. The expression of DICPs in three different lines of zebrafish has been characterized employing PCR-based strategies. Certain DICPs exhibit restricted expression in adult tissues whereas others are expressed ubiquitously. Transcripts of a subset of DICPs can be detected during embryonic development suggesting roles in embryonic immunity or other developmental processes. Transcripts representing 11 previously uncharacterized DICP sequences were identified. The assignment of two of these sequences to an unplaced genomic scaffold resulted in the identification of an alternative DICP haplotype that is linked to a MHC class I Z lineage haplotype on zebrafish chromosome 3. The linkage of DICP and MHC class I genes also is observable in the genomes of the related grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) suggesting that this is a shared character with the last common Cyprinidae ancestor. PMID:26801775

  15. Four additional mouse crosses improve the lipid QTL landscape and identify Lipg as a QTL gene.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhiguang; Ishimori, Naoki; Chen, Yaoyu; Leiter, Edward H; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly; Stylianou, Ioannis M

    2009-10-01

    To identify genes controlling plasma HDL and triglyceride levels, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed in one backcross, (NZO/H1Lt x NON/LtJ) x NON/LtJ, and three intercrosses, C57BL/6J x DBA/2J, C57BL/6J x C3H/HeJ, and NZB/B1NJ x NZW/LacJ. HDL concentrations were affected by 25 QTL distributed on most chromosomes (Chrs); those on Chrs 1, 8, 12, and 16 were newly identified, and the remainder were replications of previously identified QTL. Triglyceride concentrations were controlled by nine loci; those on Chrs 1, 2, 3, 7, 16, and 18 were newly identified QTL, and the remainder were replications. Combining mouse crosses with haplotype analysis for the HDL QTL on Chr 18 reduced the list of candidates to six genes. Further expression analysis, sequencing, and quantitative complementation testing of these six genes identified Lipg as the HDL QTL gene on distal Chr 18. The data from these crosses further increase the ability to perform haplotype analyses that can lead to the identification of causal lipid genes. PMID:19436067

  16. Augmented Annotation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Genome Reveals Additional Genes Required for Growth and Viability

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Danny A.; Wood, Valerie; Scutt, Paul J.; Grallert, Agnes; Yates, Tim; Smith, Duncan L.; Hagan, Iain M.; Miller, Crispin J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome annotation is a synthesis of computational prediction and experimental evidence. Small genes are notoriously difficult to detect because the patterns used to identify them are often indistinguishable from chance occurrences, leading to an arbitrary cutoff threshold for the length of a protein-coding gene identified solely by in silico analysis. We report a systematic reappraisal of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome that ignores thresholds. A complete six-frame translation was compared to a proteome data set, the Pfam domain database, and the genomes of six other fungi. Thirty-nine novel loci were identified. RT-PCR and RNA-Seq confirmed transcription at 38 loci; 33 novel gene structures were delineated by 5′ and 3′ RACE. Expression levels of 14 transcripts fluctuated during meiosis. Translational evidence for 10 genes, evolutionary conservation data supporting 35 predictions, and distinct phenotypes upon ORF deletion (one essential, four slow-growth, two delayed-division phenotypes) suggest that all 39 predictions encode functional proteins. The popularity of S. pombe as a model organism suggests that this augmented annotation will be of interest in diverse areas of molecular and cellular biology, while the generality of the approach suggests widespread applicability to other genomes. PMID:21270388

  17. Detection of additional genes of the patulin biosynthetic pathway in Penicillium griseofulvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes in the patulin biosynthetic pathway are likely to be arranged in a cluster as has been found for biosynthetic pathways of other mycotoxins. The mycotoxin patulin, common in apples and apple juice, is most often associated with Penicillium expansum. However, of 15 fungal species capable of sy...

  18. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases during rat liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Qian-Ji; Qin, Shao-Wei; Xu, Cun-Shuan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the action of the genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases at the gene transcriptional level during liver regeneration (LR) in rats. METHODS: The genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases were obtained by collecting the data from databases and literature, and the gene expression changes in the regenerating liver were checked by the Rat Genome 230 2.0 array. RESULTS: The initial and total expression numbers of genes occurring in phases of 0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH), 4-6 h after PH (G0/G1 transition), 6-66 h after PH (cell proliferation), 66-168 h after PH (cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction) were 21, 3, 9, 2 and 21, 9, 19, 18, respectively. It is illustrated that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initial stage of LR and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 types: only up-regulated (12 genes), predominantly up-regulated (4 genes), only down-regulated (11 genes), predominantly down-regulated (3 genes), and approximately up-/down-regulated (2 genes). The total times of their up- and down-expression were 130 and 79, respectively, demonstrating that expression of most of the genes was increased during LR, while a few decreased. The cell physiological and biochemical activities during LR were staggered according to the time relevance and were diverse and complicated in gene expression patterns. CONCLUSION: Drug metabolic capacity in regenerating liver was enhanced. Thirty-two genes play important roles during liver regeneration in rats. PMID:17109518

  19. Cortisol regulates the paracrine action of macrophages by inducing vasoactive gene expression in endometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvam, Uma; Maybin, Jacqueline A; Armstrong, Gregory M; Greaves, Erin; Saunders, Philippa T K; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-06-01

    The human endometrium undergoes inflammation and tissue repair during menstruation. We hypothesized that the local availability of bioactive glucocorticoids plays an important role in immune cell-vascular cell interactions in endometrium during tissue repair at menstruation, acting either directly or indirectly via tissue resident macrophages. We sought to determine whether endometrial macrophages are direct targets for glucocorticoids; whether cortisol-treated macrophages have a paracrine effect on angiogenic gene expression by endometrial endothelial cells; and whether endometrial macrophages express angiogenic factors. Human endometrium (n = 41) was collected with ethical approval and subject consent. Donor peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were treated with estradiol, progesterone, or cortisol. The effect of peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophage secretory products on the expression of angiogenic RNAs by endothelial cells was examined. Immunofluorescence was used to examine localization in macrophages and other endometrial cell types across the menstrual cycle. Endometrial macrophages express the glucocorticoid receptor. In vitro culture with supernatants from cortisol-treated peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages resulted in altered endometrial endothelial cell expression of the angiogenic genes, CXCL2, CXCL8, CTGF, and VEGFC These data highlight the importance of local cortisol in regulating paracrine actions of macrophages in the endometrium. CXCL2 and CXCL8 were detected in endometrial macrophages in situ. The expression of these factors was highest in the endometrium during the menstrual phase, consistent with these factors having a role in endometrial repair. Our data have indicated that activation of macrophages with glucocorticoids might have paracrine effects by increasing angiogenic factor expression by endometrial endothelial cells. This might reflect possible roles for macrophages in endometrial repair of the vascular bed

  20. Supplementing High-Density SNP Microarrays for Additional Coverage of Disease-Related Genes: Addiction as a Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    SacconePhD, Scott F; Chesler, Elissa J; Bierut, Laura J; Kalivas, Peter J; Lerman, Caryn; Saccone, Nancy L; Uhl, George R; Li, Chuan-Yun; Philip, Vivek M; Edenberg, Howard; Sherry, Steven; Feolo, Michael; Moyzis, Robert K; Rutter, Joni L

    2009-01-01

    Commercial SNP microarrays now provide comprehensive and affordable coverage of the human genome. However, some diseases have biologically relevant genomic regions that may require additional coverage. Addiction, for example, is thought to be influenced by complex interactions among many relevant genes and pathways. We have assembled a list of 486 biologically relevant genes nominated by a panel of experts on addiction. We then added 424 genes that showed evidence of association with addiction phenotypes through mouse QTL mappings and gene co-expression analysis. We demonstrate that there are a substantial number of SNPs in these genes that are not well represented by commercial SNP platforms. We address this problem by introducing a publicly available SNP database for addiction. The database is annotated using numeric prioritization scores indicating the extent of biological relevance. The scores incorporate a number of factors such as SNP/gene functional properties (including synonymy and promoter regions), data from mouse systems genetics and measures of human/mouse evolutionary conservation. We then used HapMap genotyping data to determine if a SNP is tagged by a commercial microarray through linkage disequilibrium. This combination of biological prioritization scores and LD tagging annotation will enable addiction researchers to supplement commercial SNP microarrays to ensure comprehensive coverage of biologically relevant regions.

  1. Supplementing High-Density SNP Microarrays for Additional Coverage of Disease-Related Genes: Addiction as a Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Scott F.; Bierut, Laura J.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Kalivas, Peter W.; Lerman, Caryn; Saccone, Nancy L.; Uhl, George R.; Li, Chuan-Yun; Philip, Vivek M.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Feolo, Michael; Moyzis, Robert K.; Rutter, Joni L.

    2009-01-01

    Commercial SNP microarrays now provide comprehensive and affordable coverage of the human genome. However, some diseases have biologically relevant genomic regions that may require additional coverage. Addiction, for example, is thought to be influenced by complex interactions among many relevant genes and pathways. We have assembled a list of 486 biologically relevant genes nominated by a panel of experts on addiction. We then added 424 genes that showed evidence of association with addiction phenotypes through mouse QTL mappings and gene co-expression analysis. We demonstrate that there are a substantial number of SNPs in these genes that are not well represented by commercial SNP platforms. We address this problem by introducing a publicly available SNP database for addiction. The database is annotated using numeric prioritization scores indicating the extent of biological relevance. The scores incorporate a number of factors such as SNP/gene functional properties (including synonymy and promoter regions), data from mouse systems genetics and measures of human/mouse evolutionary conservation. We then used HapMap genotyping data to determine if a SNP is tagged by a commercial microarray through linkage disequilibrium. This combination of biological prioritization scores and LD tagging annotation will enable addiction researchers to supplement commercial SNP microarrays to ensure comprehensive coverage of biologically relevant regions. PMID:19381300

  2. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heneweer, Marjoke . E-mail: M.Heneweer@iras.uu.nl; Muusse, Martine; Berg, Martin van den; Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 {mu}M). Therefore, instead of using EC{sub 50} values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC{sub 50} value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 {mu}M, 0.5 {mu}M, 1.9 {mu}M, and 1.0 {mu}M for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol

  3. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heneweer, Marjoke; Muusse, Martine; van den Berg, Martin; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 microM). Therefore, instead of using EC50 values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC50 value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 microM, 0.5 microM, 1.9 microM, and 1.0 microM for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol (E2

  4. Simvastatin and Dipentyl Phthalate Lower Ex Vivo Testicular Testosterone Production and Exhibit Additive Effects on Testicular Testosterone and Gene Expression Via Distinct Mechanistic Pathways in the Fetal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Beverly, Brandiese E. J.; Lambright, Christy S.; Furr, Johnathan R.; Sampson, Hunter; Wilson, Vickie S.; McIntyre, Barry S.; Foster, Paul M. D.; Travlos, Gregory; Gray, L. Earl

    2014-01-01

    Sex differentiation of the male reproductive tract in mammals is driven, in part, by fetal androgen production. In utero, some phthalate esters (PEs) alter fetal Leydig cell differentiation, reducing the expression of several genes associated with steroid synthesis/transport, and consequently, lowering fetal androgen and Insl3 hormone levels. Simvastatin (SMV) is a cholesterol-lowering drug that directly inhibits HMG-CoA reductase. SMV may also disrupt steroid biosynthesis, but through a different mode of action (MOA) than the PEs. As cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormone biosynthesis, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to SMV during the critical period of sex differentiation would lower fetal testicular testosterone (T) production without affecting genes involved in cholesterol and androgen synthesis and transport. Secondly, we hypothesized that a mixture of SMV and a PE, which may have different MOAs, would reduce testosterone levels in an additive manner. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were dosed orally with SMV, dipentyl phthalate (DPeP), or SMV plus DPeP from gestational days 14-18, and fetuses were evaluated on GD18. On GD18, SMV lowered fetal T production and serum triglycerides, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol levels, and downregulated two genes in the fetal testis that were different from those altered by PEs. When SMV and DPeP were administered as a mixture, fetal T production was significantly reduced in an additive manner, thus demonstrating that a mixture of chemicals can induce additive effects on fetal T production even though they display different MOAs. PMID:25055962

  5. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2010-01-01

    Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx) in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of the bithoraxoid (bxd) locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly.Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp) has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods.Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda. PMID:20849647

  6. Action dynamics in multitasking: the impact of additional task factors on the execution of the prioritized motor movement

    PubMed Central

    Scherbaum, Stefan; Gottschalk, Caroline; Dshemuchadse, Maja; Fischer, Rico

    2015-01-01

    In multitasking, the execution of a prioritized task is in danger of crosstalk by the secondary task. Task shielding allows minimizing this crosstalk. However, the locus and temporal dynamics of crosstalk effects and further sources of influence on the execution of the prioritized task are to-date only vaguely understood. Here we combined a dual-task paradigm with an action dynamics approach and studied how and according to which temporal characteristics crosstalk, previously experienced interference and previously executed responses influenced participants' mouse movements in the prioritized task's execution. Investigating continuous mouse movements of the prioritized task, our results indicate a continuous crosstalk from secondary task processing until the endpoint of the movement was reached, although the secondary task could only be executed after finishing execution of the prioritized task. The motor movement in the prioritized task was further modulated by previously experienced interference between the prioritized and the secondary task. Furthermore, response biases from previous responses of the prioritized and the secondary task in movements indicate different sources of such biases. The bias by previous responses to the prioritized task follows a sustained temporal pattern typical for a contextual reactivation, while the bias by previous responses to the secondary task follows a decaying temporal pattern indicating residual activation of previously activated spatial codes. PMID:26217267

  7. Computational investigations on polymerase actions in gene transcription and replication: Combining physical modeling and atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases are protein enzymes that move along nucleic acid chains and catalyze template-based polymerization reactions during gene transcription and replication. The polymerases also substantially improve transcription or replication fidelity through the non-equilibrium enzymatic cycles. We briefly review computational efforts that have been made toward understanding mechano-chemical coupling and fidelity control mechanisms of the polymerase elongation. The polymerases are regarded as molecular information motors during the elongation process. It requires a full spectrum of computational approaches from multiple time and length scales to understand the full polymerase functional cycle. We stay away from quantum mechanics based approaches to the polymerase catalysis due to abundant former surveys, while addressing statistical physics modeling approaches along with all-atom molecular dynamics simulation studies. We organize this review around our own modeling and simulation practices on a single subunit T7 RNA polymerase, and summarize commensurate studies on structurally similar DNA polymerases as well. For multi-subunit RNA polymerases that have been actively studied in recent years, we leave systematical reviews of the simulation achievements to latest computational chemistry surveys, while covering only representative studies published very recently, including our own work modeling structure-based elongation kinetic of yeast RNA polymerase II. In the end, we briefly go through physical modeling on elongation pauses and backtracking activities of the multi-subunit RNAPs. We emphasize on the fluctuation and control mechanisms of the polymerase actions, highlight the non-equilibrium nature of the operation system, and try to build some perspectives toward understanding the polymerase impacts from the single molecule level to a genome-wide scale. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 11275022).

  8. Genome-wide meta-analysis of maize heterosis reveals the potential role of additive gene expression at pericentromeric loci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of QTL involved in heterosis formation is one approach to unravel the not yet fully understood genetic basis of heterosis - the improved agronomic performance of hybrid F1 plants compared to their inbred parents. The identification of candidate genes underlying a QTL is important both for developing markers and determining the molecular genetic basis of a trait, but remains difficult owing to the large number of genes often contained within individual QTL. To address this problem in heterosis analysis, we applied a meta-analysis strategy for grain yield (GY) of Zea mays L. as example, incorporating QTL-, hybrid field-, and parental gene expression data. Results For the identification of genes underlying known heterotic QTL, we made use of tight associations between gene expression pattern and the trait of interest, identified by correlation analyses. Using this approach genes strongly associated with heterosis for GY were discovered to be clustered in pericentromeric regions of the complex maize genome. This suggests that expression differences of sequences in recombination-suppressed regions are important in the establishment of heterosis for GY in F1 hybrids and also in the conservation of heterosis for GY across genotypes. Importantly functional analysis of heterosis-associated genes from these genomic regions revealed over-representation of a number of functional classes, identifying key processes contributing to heterosis for GY. Based on the finding that the majority of the analyzed heterosis-associated genes were addtitively expressed, we propose a model referring to the influence of cis-regulatory variation on heterosis for GY by the compensation of fixed detrimental expression levels in parents. Conclusions The study highlights the utility of a meta-analysis approach that integrates phenotypic and multi-level molecular data to unravel complex traits in plants. It provides prospects for the identification of genes relevant for

  9. Estrogen and progesterone receptor-binding sites on the chicken vitellogenin II gene: synergism of steroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Cato, A C; Heitlinger, E; Ponta, H; Klein-Hitpass, L; Ryffel, G U; Bailly, A; Rauch, C; Milgrom, E

    1988-12-01

    The chicken vitellogenin II gene is transcriptionally activated by estrogens. In transient transfection experiments in human T47D cells that contain receptors for various steroids, we showed estradiol, progestin, and androgen responses of a chimeric chicken vitellogenin II construct. This construct consists of DNA sequences from -626 to -590 upstream of the start of transcription of the chicken vitellogenin gene linked to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter driving the transcription of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Treatment of the transfected T47D cells with a combination of estradiol and the progestin R5020 led to a superinduction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity, showing a synergistic action of these two steroids. This synergism was not observed upon treatment of the transfected cells with estradiol and the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Using point mutations in the vitellogenin gene fragment, we showed in functional and in in vitro DNase I footprinting assays with a purified progesterone receptor that, for the synergistic action of estradiol and R5020 to occur, the progesterone receptor must be bound to the vitellogenin gene fragment. The progesterone receptor-binding site was localized at -610 to -590, close to the consensus sequence (-626 to -613) for estrogen receptor binding and function. We therefore demonstrate here that two different steroid hormones can be functionally synergistic through the interaction of their corresponding receptors with two different binding sites adjacent to one another. PMID:3244357

  10. Estrogen and progesterone receptor-binding sites on the chicken vitellogenin II gene: synergism of steroid hormone action.

    PubMed Central

    Cato, A C; Heitlinger, E; Ponta, H; Klein-Hitpass, L; Ryffel, G U; Bailly, A; Rauch, C; Milgrom, E

    1988-01-01

    The chicken vitellogenin II gene is transcriptionally activated by estrogens. In transient transfection experiments in human T47D cells that contain receptors for various steroids, we showed estradiol, progestin, and androgen responses of a chimeric chicken vitellogenin II construct. This construct consists of DNA sequences from -626 to -590 upstream of the start of transcription of the chicken vitellogenin gene linked to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter driving the transcription of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Treatment of the transfected T47D cells with a combination of estradiol and the progestin R5020 led to a superinduction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity, showing a synergistic action of these two steroids. This synergism was not observed upon treatment of the transfected cells with estradiol and the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Using point mutations in the vitellogenin gene fragment, we showed in functional and in in vitro DNase I footprinting assays with a purified progesterone receptor that, for the synergistic action of estradiol and R5020 to occur, the progesterone receptor must be bound to the vitellogenin gene fragment. The progesterone receptor-binding site was localized at -610 to -590, close to the consensus sequence (-626 to -613) for estrogen receptor binding and function. We therefore demonstrate here that two different steroid hormones can be functionally synergistic through the interaction of their corresponding receptors with two different binding sites adjacent to one another. Images PMID:3244357

  11. Gene expression patterns of wheat rust resistance gene Lr34/Yr18 indicate novel mode of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lr34/Yr18 resistance gene provides durable, adult-plant, slow-rusting resistance to leaf rust and yellow rust of wheat. Patterns of gene expression were examined by microarray analysis in inoculated and mock-inoculated flag leaves of two pairs of near isogenic lines for Lr34/Yr18 (Thatcher/Thatc...

  12. The Association of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ and Additional Gene-Gene Interaction with C-Reactive Protein in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao-Ying; Yuan, Hao-Zheng; Gu, Ru; Gao, Yan-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Gao, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To examine the association between 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors δ (PPARδ) polymorphisms and C-reactive protein (CRP) level and additional gene-gene interaction. Methods. Line regression analysis was performed to verify polymorphism association between SNP and CRP levels. Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) was employed to analyze the interaction. Results. A total of 1028 subjects (538 men, 490 women) were selected. The carriers of the C allele (TC or CC) of rs2016520 were associated with a significant decreased level of CRP, regression coefficients was −0.338, and standard error was 0.104 (p = 0.001). The carriers of the G allele (CG or GG) of rs9794 were also significantly associated with decreased level of CRP, regression coefficients was −0.219, and standard error was 0.114 (p = 0.012). We also found a potential gene-gene interaction between rs2016520 and rs9794. Subjects with rs2016520-TC or CC, rs9794-CG or GG genotypes have lowest CRP level, difference (95% CI) = −0.50 (−0.69 to −0.21) (p < 0.001), compared to subjects with rs2016520-TT and rs9794-CC genotypes. Conclusions. rs2016520 and rs9794 minor allele of PPARδ and combined effect between the two SNP were associated with decreased CRP level. PMID:26884762

  13. Sequence Analysis of Insecticide Action and Detoxification-Related Genes in the Insect Pest Natural Enemy Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangkun; Zhang, Yixi; Bao, Haibo; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important natural predatory enemy of rice planthoppers, is found widely distributed in paddy fields. However, data on the genes involved in insecticide action, detoxification, and response are very limited for P. pseudoannulata, which inhibits the development and appropriate use of selective insecticides to control insect pests on rice. We used transcriptome construction from adult spider cephalothoraxes to analyze and manually identify genes enconding metabolic enzymes and target receptors related to insecticide action and detoxification, including 90 cytochrome P450s, 14 glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), 17 acetylcholinesterases (AChEs), 17 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and 17 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, as well as 12 glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) unigenes. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed the different subclassifications of P450s and GSTs, some important sequence diversities in nAChRs and GABA receptors, polymorphism in AChEs, and high similarities in GluCls. For P450s in P. pseudoannulata, the number of unigenes belonging to the CYP2 clade was much higher than that in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. The results differed from insects in which most P450 genes were in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. For GSTs, most unigenes belonged to the delta and sigma classes, and no epsilon GST class gene was found, which differed from the findings for insects and acarina. Our results will be useful for studies on insecticide action, selectivity, and detoxification in the spider and other related animals, and the sequence differences in target genes between the spider and insects will provide important information for the design of selective insecticides. PMID:25923714

  14. Sequence Analysis of Insecticide Action and Detoxification-Related Genes in the Insect Pest Natural Enemy Pardosa pseudoannulata

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Haibo; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The pond wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important natural predatory enemy of rice planthoppers, is found widely distributed in paddy fields. However, data on the genes involved in insecticide action, detoxification, and response are very limited for P. pseudoannulata, which inhibits the development and appropriate use of selective insecticides to control insect pests on rice. We used transcriptome construction from adult spider cephalothoraxes to analyze and manually identify genes enconding metabolic enzymes and target receptors related to insecticide action and detoxification, including 90 cytochrome P450s, 14 glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), 17 acetylcholinesterases (AChEs), 17 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and 17 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, as well as 12 glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) unigenes. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed the different subclassifications of P450s and GSTs, some important sequence diversities in nAChRs and GABA receptors, polymorphism in AChEs, and high similarities in GluCls. For P450s in P. pseudoannulata, the number of unigenes belonging to the CYP2 clade was much higher than that in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. The results differed from insects in which most P450 genes were in CYP3 and CYP4 clades. For GSTs, most unigenes belonged to the delta and sigma classes, and no epsilon GST class gene was found, which differed from the findings for insects and acarina. Our results will be useful for studies on insecticide action, selectivity, and detoxification in the spider and other related animals, and the sequence differences in target genes between the spider and insects will provide important information for the design of selective insecticides. PMID:25923714

  15. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

    PubMed

    Paço, Ana; Brígido, Clarisse; Alexandre, Ana; Mateos, Pedro F; Oliveira, Solange

    2016-01-01

    The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials). The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds) were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants, particularly under

  16. Genetic dissection of dome formation in a mammary cell line: Identification of two genes with opposing action

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, Ileana; Montagna, Cristina; Susani, Lucia; Montesano, Roberto; Affer, Maurizio; Zanotti, Simona; Redolfi, Elena; Vezzoni, Paolo; Dulbecco, Renato

    1999-01-01

    In this work, we extend the study of the genes controlling the formation of domes in the rat mammary cell line LA7 under the influence of DMSO. The role of the rat8 gene has already been demonstrated. We have now studied two additional genes. The first, called 133, is the rat ortholog of the human epithelial membrane protein 3 (EMP3), a member of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22)/EMP/lens-specific membrane protein 20 (MP20) gene family that encodes for tetratransmembrane proteins; it is expressed in the LA7 line in the absence of DMSO but not in its presence. The second gene is the β subunit of the amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel. Studies with antisense oligonucleotides show that the formation of domes is under the control of all three genes: the expression of rat8 is required for both their formation and their persistence; the expression of the Na+ channel β subunit is required for their formation; and the expression of gene 133 blocks the expression of the Na+ channel genes, thus preventing formation of the domes. The formation of these structures is also accompanied by the expression of α6β1 integrin, followed by that of E-cadherin and cytokeratin 8. It appears, therefore, that dome formation requires the activity of the Na+ channel and the rat8-encoded protein and is under the negative control of gene 133. DMSO induces dome formation by blocking this control. PMID:10570147

  17. The TBP-PP2A mitotic complex bookmarks genes by preventing condensin action.

    PubMed

    Xing, Hongyan; Vanderford, Nathan L; Sarge, Kevin D

    2008-11-01

    To maintain phenotypes of cell lineages, cells must 'remember' which genes were active before mitosis entry and transmit this information to their daughter cells so that expression patterns can be faithfully re-established in G1. This phenomenon is called gene bookmarking. However, during mitosis transcription ceases, most sequence-specific proteins dissociate from DNA and the chromatin is tightly compacted, making it difficult to understand how gene activity 'memory' is maintained through this stage of the cell cycle. A feature of gene bookmarking is that in mitotic cells, the promoters of formerly active genes lack compaction, but how compaction of these regions is inhibited is unknown. Here we show that during mitosis, TATA-binding protein (TBP), which remains bound to DNA during mitosis, recruits PP2A. TBP also interacts with condensin to allow efficient dephosphorylation and inactivation of condensin near these promoters to inhibit their compaction. Further, ChIP-on-chip data show that TBP is bound to many chromosomal sites during mitosis, and is higher in transcribed regions but low in regions containing pseudogenes and genes whose expression is tissue-restricted. These results suggest that TBP is involved not only in gene transcription during interphase but also in preserving the memory of gene activity through mitosis to daughter cells. PMID:18931662

  18. Simvastatin and t-butylhydroquinone suppress KLF1 and BCL11A gene expression and additively increase fetal hemoglobin in primary human erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Macari, Elizabeth R.; Schaeffer, Emily K.; West, Rachel J.

    2013-01-01

    Although increased fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels have proven benefit for people with β-hemoglobinopathies, all current HbF-inducing agents have limitations. We previously reported that drugs that activate the NRF2 antioxidant response signaling pathway increase HbF in primary human erythroid cells. In an attempt to increase HbF levels achieved with NRF2 activators, in the present study, we investigated potential complementary activity between these agents and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) based on their ability to induce KLF2 protein levels. Experiments in K562 cells showed that simvastatin increased KLF2 mRNA and protein and KLF2 binding to HS2 of the β-globin locus control region and enhanced γ-globin mRNA production by the NRF2 activator Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). When tested in differentiating primary human erythroid cells, simvastatin induced HbF alone and additively with tBHQ, but it did not increase KLF2 mRNA or locus control region binding above levels seen with normal differentiation. Investigating alternative mechanisms of action, we found that both simvastatin and tBHQ suppress β-globin mRNA and KLF1 and BCL11A mRNA and protein, similar to what is seen in people with an HPFH phenotype because of KLF1 haploinsufficiency. These findings identify statins as a potential class of HbF-inducing agents and suggest a novel mechanism of action based on pharmacologic suppression of KLF1 and BCL11A gene expression. PMID:23223429

  19. Improving nutrient management practices in agriculture: The role of risk-based beliefs in understanding farmers' attitudes toward taking additional action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robyn S.; Howard, Gregory; Burnett, Elizabeth A.

    2014-08-01

    A recent increase in the amount of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) entering the western Lake Erie basin is likely due to increased spring storm events in combination with issues related to fertilizer application and timing. These factors in combination with warmer lake temperatures have amplified the spread of toxic algal blooms. We assessed the attitudes of farmers in northwest Ohio toward taking at least one additional action to reduce nutrient loss on their farm. Specifically, we (1) identified to what extent farm and farmer characteristics (e.g., age, gross farm sales) as well as risk-based beliefs (e.g., efficacy, risk perception) influenced attitudes, and (2) assessed how these characteristics and beliefs differ in their predictive ability based on unobservable latent classes of farmers. Risk perception, or a belief that negative impacts to profit and water quality from nutrient loss were likely, was the most consistent predictor of farmer attitudes. Response efficacy, or a belief that taking action on one's farm made a difference, was found to significantly influence attitudes, although this belief was particularly salient for the minority class of farmers who were older and more motivated by profit. Communication efforts should focus on the negative impacts of nutrient loss to both the farm (i.e., profit) and the natural environment (i.e., water quality) to raise individual perceived risk among the majority, while the minority need higher perceived efficacy or more specific information about the economic effectiveness of particular recommended practices.

  20. Coexpression of Nuclear Receptors and Histone Methylation Modifying Genes in the Testis: Implications for Endocrine Disruptor Modes of Action

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Alison M.; Carter, Kim W.; Anderson, Denise; Wise, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Endocrine disruptor chemicals elicit adverse health effects by perturbing nuclear receptor signalling systems. It has been speculated that these compounds may also perturb epigenetic mechanisms and thus contribute to the early origin of adult onset disease. We hypothesised that histone methylation may be a component of the epigenome that is susceptible to perturbation. We used coexpression analysis of publicly available data to investigate the combinatorial actions of nuclear receptors and genes involved in histone methylation in normal testis and when faced with endocrine disruptor compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression patterns of a set of genes were profiled across testis tissue in human, rat and mouse, plus control and exposed samples from four toxicity experiments in the rat. Our results indicate that histone methylation events are a more general component of nuclear receptor mediated transcriptional regulation in the testis than previously appreciated. Coexpression patterns support the role of a gatekeeper mechanism involving the histone methylation modifiers Kdm1, Prdm2, and Ehmt1 and indicate that this mechanism is a common determinant of transcriptional integrity for genes critical to diverse physiological endpoints relevant to endocrine disruption. Coexpression patterns following exposure to vinclozolin and dibutyl phthalate suggest that coactivity of the demethylase Kdm1 in particular warrants further investigation in relation to endocrine disruptor mode of action. Conclusions/Significance This study provides proof of concept that a bioinformatics approach that profiles genes related to a specific hypothesis across multiple biological settings can provide powerful insight into coregulatory activity that would be difficult to discern at an individual experiment level or by traditional differential expression analysis methods. PMID:22496781

  1. C2 and CFB Genes in Age-Related Maculopathy and Joint Action with CFH and LOC387715 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Conley, Yvette P.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Gorin, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is a common cause of visual impairment in the elderly populations of industrialized countries and significantly affects the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Variants within two genes, the complement factor H (CFH) and the poorly characterized LOC387715 (ARMS2), are widely recognized as ARM risk factors. CFH is important in regulation of the alternative complement pathway suggesting this pathway is involved in ARM pathogenesis. Two other complement pathway genes, the closely linked complement component receptor (C2) and complement factor B (CFB), were recently shown to harbor variants associated with ARM. Methods/Principal Findings We investigated two SNPs in C2 and two in CFB in independent case-control and family cohorts of white subjects and found rs547154, an intronic SNP in C2, to be significantly associated with ARM in both our case-control (P-value 0.00007) and family data (P-value 0.00001). Logistic regression analysis suggested that accounting for the effect at this locus significantly (P-value 0.002) improves the fit of a genetic risk model of CFH and LOC387715 effects only. Modeling with the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method showed that adding C2 to the two-factor model of CFH and LOC387715 increases the sensitivity (from 63% to 73%). However, the balanced accuracy increases only from 71% to 72%, and the specificity decreases from 80% to 72%. Conclusions/Significance C2/CFB significantly influences AMD susceptibility and although accounting for effects at this locus does not dramatically increase the overall accuracy of the genetic risk model, the improvement over the CFH-LOC387715 model is statistically significant. PMID:18493315

  2. Next-generation sequencing identifies high frequency of mutations in potentially clinically actionable genes in sebaceous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Singh, Rajesh R; Seviour, Elena G; Curry, Jonathan L; Hudgens, Courtney W; Bell, Diana; Wimmer, Daniel A; Ning, Jing; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Zhang, Li; Davies, Michael A; Prieto, Victor G; Broaddus, Russell R; Ram, Prahlad; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Esmaeli, Bita

    2016-09-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma (SC) is a rare but aggressive malignancy with frequent recurrence and metastases. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy, but effective systemic therapies are lacking because the molecular alterations driving SC remain poorly understood. To identify these, we performed whole-exome next-generation sequencing of 409 cancer-associated genes on 27 SCs (18 primary/locally recurrent ocular, 5 paired metastatic ocular, and 4 primary extraocular) from 20 patients. In ocular SC, we identified 139 non-synonymous somatic mutations (median/lesion 3; range 0-23). Twenty-five of 139 mutations (18%) occurred in potentially clinically actionable genes in 6 of 16 patients. The most common mutations were mutations in TP53 (n = 9), RB1 (n = 6), PIK3CA (n = 2), PTEN (n = 2), ERBB2 (n = 2), and NF1 (n = 2). TP53 and RB1 mutations were restricted to ocular SC and correlated with aberrant TP53 and RB protein expression. Systematic pathway analyses demonstrated convergence of these mutations to activation of the PI3K signalling cascade, and PI3K pathway activation was confirmed in tumours with PTEN and/or PIK3CA mutations. Considerable inter-tumoural heterogeneity was observed between paired primary and metastatic ocular SCs. In primary extraocular SC, we identified 77 non-synonymous somatic mutations (median/lesion 22.5; range 3-29). This overall higher mutational load was attributed to a microsatellite instability phenotype in three of four patients and somatically acquired mutations in mismatch repair genes in two of four patients. Eighteen of 77 mutations (23%) were in potentially clinically actionable genes in three of four patients, including BTK, FGFR2, PDGFRB, HRAS, and NF1 mutations. Identification of potentially clinically actionable mutations in 9 of 20 SC patients (45%) underscores the importance of next-generation sequencing to expand the spectrum of genotype-matched targeted therapies. Frequent activation of PI3K signalling pathways provides a strong

  3. The facilitating roles and uses of gene banks in addressing the global plan of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contractions of livestock genetic resources are occurring as countries strive to meet increasing demand for livestock products. The Global Plan of Action’s (GPA) Strategic Priority Area 3 – Conservation, calls for governments to establish gene banks for ex-situ cryogenic conservation. Establishment ...

  4. Elevational speciation in action? Restricted gene flow associated with adaptive divergence across an altitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Funk, W C; Murphy, M A; Hoke, K L; Muths, E; Amburgey, S M; Lemmon, E M; Lemmon, A R

    2016-02-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that divergent selection pressures across elevational gradients could cause adaptive divergence and reproductive isolation in the process of ecological speciation. Although there is substantial evidence for adaptive divergence across elevation, there is less evidence that this restricts gene flow. Previous work in the boreal chorus frog (Pseudacris maculata) has demonstrated adaptive divergence in morphological, life history and physiological traits across an elevational gradient from approximately 1500-3000 m in the Colorado Front Range, USA. We tested whether this adaptive divergence is associated with restricted gene flow across elevation - as would be expected if incipient speciation were occurring - and, if so, whether behavioural isolation contributes to reproductive isolation. Our analysis of 12 microsatellite loci in 797 frogs from 53 populations revealed restricted gene flow across elevation, even after controlling for geographic distance and topography. Calls also varied significantly across elevation in dominant frequency, pulse number and pulse duration, which was partly, but not entirely, due to variation in body size and temperature across elevation. However, call variation did not result in strong behavioural isolation: in phonotaxis experiments, low-elevation females tended to prefer an average low-elevation call over a high-elevation call, and vice versa for high-elevation females, but this trend was not statistically significant. In summary, our results show that adaptive divergence across elevation restricts gene flow in P. maculata, but the mechanisms for this potential incipient speciation remain open. PMID:26363130

  5. Elevational speciation in action? Restricted gene flow associated with adaptive divergence across an altitudinal gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, W. C.; Murphy, M.A.; Hoke, K. L.; Muths, Erin L.; Amburgey, Staci M.; Lemmon, Emily M.; Lemmon, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that divergent selection pressures across elevational gradients could cause adaptive divergence and reproductive isolation in the process of ecological speciation. Although there is substantial evidence for adaptive divergence across elevation, there is less evidence that this restricts gene flow. Previous work in the boreal chorus frog (Pseudacris maculata) has demonstrated adaptive divergence in morphological, life history and physiological traits across an elevational gradient from approximately 1500–3000 m in the Colorado Front Range, USA. We tested whether this adaptive divergence is associated with restricted gene flow across elevation – as would be expected if incipient speciation were occurring – and, if so, whether behavioural isolation contributes to reproductive isolation. Our analysis of 12 microsatellite loci in 797 frogs from 53 populations revealed restricted gene flow across elevation, even after controlling for geographic distance and topography. Calls also varied significantly across elevation in dominant frequency, pulse number and pulse duration, which was partly, but not entirely, due to variation in body size and temperature across elevation. However, call variation did not result in strong behavioural isolation: in phonotaxis experiments, low-elevation females tended to prefer an average low-elevation call over a high-elevation call, and vice versa for high-elevation females, but this trend was not statistically significant. In summary, our results show that adaptive divergence across elevation restricts gene flow in P. maculata, but the mechanisms for this potential incipient speciation remain open.

  6. Control of developmentally primed erythroid genes by combinatorial co-repressor actions

    PubMed Central

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Cico, Alba; Stephen, Tharshana; Thongjuea, Supat; Kolovos, Petros; Baymaz, H. Irem; Yu, Xiao; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maas, Alex; Barroca, Vilma; Kockx, Christel; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Lenhard, Boris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    How transcription factors (TFs) cooperate within large protein complexes to allow rapid modulation of gene expression during development is still largely unknown. Here we show that the key haematopoietic LIM-domain-binding protein-1 (LDB1) TF complex contains several activator and repressor components that together maintain an erythroid-specific gene expression programme primed for rapid activation until differentiation is induced. A combination of proteomics, functional genomics and in vivo studies presented here identifies known and novel co-repressors, most notably the ETO2 and IRF2BP2 proteins, involved in maintaining this primed state. The ETO2–IRF2BP2 axis, interacting with the NCOR1/SMRT co-repressor complex, suppresses the expression of the vast majority of archetypical erythroid genes and pathways until its decommissioning at the onset of terminal erythroid differentiation. Our experiments demonstrate that multimeric regulatory complexes feature a dynamic interplay between activating and repressing components that determines lineage-specific gene expression and cellular differentiation. PMID:26593974

  7. Mechanism of Action of 2-Aminobenzamide HDAC Inhibitors in Reversing Gene Silencing in Friedreich’s Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Soragni, Elisabetta; Chou, C. James; Rusche, James R.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic defect in Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is the hyperexpansion of a GAA•TTC triplet in the first intron of the FXN gene, encoding the essential mitochondrial protein frataxin. Histone post-translational modifications near the expanded repeats are consistent with heterochromatin formation and consequent FXN gene silencing. Using a newly developed human neuronal cell model, derived from patient-induced pluripotent stem cells, we find that 2-aminobenzamide histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase FXN mRNA levels and frataxin protein in FRDA neuronal cells. However, only compounds targeting the class I HDACs 1 and 3 are active in increasing FXN mRNA in these cells. Structural analogs of the active HDAC inhibitors that selectively target either HDAC1 or HDAC3 do not show similar increases in FXN mRNA levels. To understand the mechanism of action of these compounds, we probed the kinetic properties of the active and inactive inhibitors, and found that only compounds that target HDACs 1 and 3 exhibited a slow-on/slow-off mechanism of action for the HDAC enzymes. HDAC1- and HDAC3-selective compounds did not show this activity. Using siRNA methods in the FRDA neuronal cells, we show increases in FXN mRNA upon silencing of either HDACs 1 or 3, suggesting the possibility that inhibition of each of these class I HDACs is necessary for activation of FXN mRNA synthesis, as there appears to be redundancy in the silencing mechanism caused by the GAA•TTC repeats. Moreover, inhibitors must have a long residence time on their target enzymes for this activity. By interrogating microarray data from neuronal cells treated with inhibitors of different specificity, we selected two genes encoding histone macroH2A (H2AFY2) and Polycomb group ring finger 2 (PCGF2) that were specifically down-regulated by the inhibitors targeting HDACs1 and 3 versus the more selective inhibitors for further investigation. Both genes are involved in transcriptional repression and we

  8. Increased gene copy number of the vesicle SNARE VAMP7 disrupts human male urogenital development through altered estrogen action

    PubMed Central

    Tannour-Louet, Mounia; Han, Shuo; Louet, Jean-Francois; Zhang, Bin; Romero, Karina; Addai, Josephine; Sahin, Aysegul; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lamb, Dolores J

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle transport is intimately connected with key nuclear functions and transcriptional regulation. Here, children born with congenital genitourinary tract masculinization disorders were analyzed by array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization, which revealed the presence of de novo copy number gains on Xq28 encompassing the VAMP7 gene encoding a vesicle-trafficking protein. Humanized VAMP7 BAC transgenic mice displayed cryptorchidism, urethral defects, and hypospadias. Mutant mice exhibited reduced penile length, focal spermatogenic anomalies, diminished sperm motility, and subfertility. VAMP7 colocalized with estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) in the presence of ligand. Elevated levels of VAMP7 markedly intensified ESR1 transcriptional activity by increasing ESR1 protein cellular content upon ligand stimulation and up-regulated the expression of estrogen-responsive genes including ATF3, CYR61, and CTGF, all of which are implicated in human hypospadias. Hence, increased gene dosage of the SNARE protein, VAMP7, enhances estrogen receptor action in male genitourinary tissues, affects the virilization of the reproductive tract, and results in genitourinary birth defects in humans. PMID:24880616

  9. Mutation-Selection Balance in Multi-Locus Systems. I. Duplicate Gene Action

    PubMed Central

    Pritchett-Ewing, Evelyn

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented that extends the case of selection against homozygous recessives counterbalanced by mutation to a system of n loci. This extension allows analysis of the role of gene duplication in the evolution of new function. The aspect of retention of function for sufficiently long periods of time to allow for divergence vs. silencing of nonfunctional loci is discussed in relation to examples in salmonid and catastomid fishes and in the globin-like clusters. PMID:17249091

  10. Proinflammatory actions of glucocorticoids: glucocorticoids and TNFα coregulate gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Erica A; Galliher-Beckley, Amy J; Scoltock, Alyson B; Cidlowski, John A

    2012-08-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are widely used for treatment of many inflammatory diseases. However, long-term glucocorticoid treatment can cause a variety of negative side effects. A genome-wide microarray analysis was performed in human lung A549 cells to identify genes regulated by both the antiinflammatory steroid dexamethasone (Dex) and the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. Unexpectedly, we discovered that numerous genes were coregulated by treatment with both Dex and TNFα. We evaluated the mechanism of coregulation of one of these genes, serpinA3 (α-1 antichymotrypsin), a secreted, acute phase protein strongly associated with numerous inflammatory diseases. Up-regulation of serpinA3 requires the presence of both the glucocorticoid receptor and TNFα soluble receptor 1. Treatment with Dex or TNFα resulted in a 10- to 25-fold increase of serpinA3 mRNA, whereas coadministration of Dex and TNFα led to a synergistic increase in serpinA3 mRNA. The naturally occurring glucocorticoid, cortisol, also resulted in a synergistic increase in serpinA3 mRNA levels in A549 cells. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of C57BL/6 mice with Dex and TNFα resulted in coregulation of serpinA3 mRNA levels in both lung and liver tissues. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses suggest that glucocorticoid receptor binding to the serpinA3 transcriptional start site can be enhanced by the combination of Dex plus TNFα treatment of A549 cells. These studies demonstrate that glucocorticoids and proinflammatory compounds can coregulate genes associated with human disease. This discovery may underlie the basis of some of the adverse effects associated with long-term glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:22673229

  11. Branching in Pea (Action of Genes Rms3 and Rms4).

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, C. A.; Ross, J. J.; Murfet, I. C.

    1996-01-01

    The nonallelic ramosus mutations rms3-2 and rms4 of pea (Pisum sativum L.) cause extensive release of vegetative axillary buds and lateral growth in comparison with wild-type (cv Torsdag) plants, in which axillary buds are not normally released under the conditions utilized. Grafting studies showed that the expression of the rms4 mutation in the shoot is independent of the genotype of the root-stock. In contrast, the length of the branches at certain nodes of rms3-2 plants was reduced by grafting to wild-type stocks, indicating that the wild-type Rms3 gene may control the level of a mobile substance produced in the root. This substance also appears to be produced in the shoot because Rms3 shoots did not branch when grafted to mutant rms3-2 rootstocks. However, the end product of the Rms3 gene appears to differ from that of the Rms2 gene (C.A. Beveridge, J.J. Ross, and I.C. Murfet [1994] Plant Physiol 104: 953-959) because reciprocal grafts between rms3-2 and rms2 seedlings produced mature shoots with apical dominance similar to that of rms3-2 and rms2 shoots grafted to wild-type stocks. Indole-3-acetic acid levels were not reduced in apical or nodal portions of rms4 plants and were actually elevated (up to 2-fold) in rms3-2 plants. It is suggested that further studies with these branching mutants may enable significant progress in understanding the normal control of apical dominance and the related communication between the root and shoot. PMID:12226224

  12. Action of BTN1, the yeast orthologue of the gene mutated in Batten disease.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A; Ferea, T; Nosel, S A; Das, B; Sherman, F

    1999-05-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL) are autosomal recessive disorders that form the most common group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases in children, with an incidence as high as 1 in 12,500 live births, and with approximately 440,000 carriers in the United States. Disease progression is characterized by a decline in mental abilities, increased severity of untreatable seizures, blindness, loss of motor skills and premature death. The CLN3 gene, which is responsible for Batten disease, has been positionally cloned. The yeast gene, denoted BTN1, encodes a non-essential protein that is 39% identical and 59% similar to human CLN3. Strains lacking Btn1p, btn1-delta, are resistant to D-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1,3-propanediol (ANP) in a pH-dependent manner. This phenotype was complemented by expression of human CLN3, demonstrating that yeast Btn1p and human CLN3 share the same function. Here, we report that btn1-delta yeast strains have an abnormally acidic vacuolar pH in the early phases of growth. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis of BTN1 and btn1-delta strains revealed differential expression of two genes, with at least one, HSP30, involved in pH control. Because Btn1p is located in the vacuole, we suggest that Batten disease is caused by a defect in vacuolar (lysosomal) pH control. Our findings draw parallels between fundamental biological processes in yeast and previously observed characteristics of neurodegeneration in humans. PMID:10319861

  13. Phytate addition to soil induces changes in the abundance and expression of Bacillus β-propeller phytase genes in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Milko A; Saavedra, Nicolás; Maruyama, Fumito; Richardson, Alan E; Crowley, David E; del C Catrilaf, Rosa; Henriquez, Evelyn J; de la Luz Mora, María

    2013-02-01

    Phytate-mineralizing rhizobacteria (PMR) perform an essential function for the mineralization of organic phosphorus but little is known about their ecology in soils and rhizosphere. In this study, PCR-based methods were developed for detection and quantification of the Bacillus β-propeller phytase (BPP) gene. Experiments were conducted to monitor the presence and persistence of a phytate-mineralizing strain, Bacillus sp. MQH19, after inoculation of soil microcosms and within the rhizosphere. The occurrence of the BPP gene in natural pasture soils from Chilean Andisols was also examined. The results showed that the Bacillus BPP gene was readily detected in sterile and nonsterile microcosms, and that the quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods could be used to monitor changes in the abundance of the BPP gene over time. Our results also show that the addition of phytate to nonsterile soils induced the expression of the BPP gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass and the BPP gene was detected in all pasture soils sampled. This study shows that phytate addition soils induced changes in the abundance and expression of Bacillus BPP to genes in the rhizosphere and demonstrates that Bacillus BPP gene is cosmopolitan in pasture soils from Chilean Andisols. PMID:22928980

  14. Identification of Gene Expression Signatures in the Chicken Intestinal Intraepithelial Lymphocytes in Response to Herb Additive Supplementations.

    PubMed

    Won, Kyeong-Hye; Song, Ki-Duk; Park, Jong-Eun; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Na, Chong-Sam

    2016-10-01

    Anethole and garlic have an immune modulatory effects on avian coccidiosis, and these effects are correlated with gene expression changes in intestinal epithelial lymphocytes (IELs). In this study, we integrated gene expression datasets from two independent experiments and investigated gene expression profile changes by anethole and garlic respectively, and identified gene expression signatures, which are common targets of these herbs as they might be used for the evaluation of the effect of plant herbs on immunity toward avian coccidiosis. We identified 4,382 and 371 genes, which were differentially expressed in IELs of chickens supplemented with garlic and anethole respectively. The gene ontology (GO) term of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from garlic treatment resulted in the biological processes (BPs) related to proteolysis, e.g., "modification-dependent protein catabolic process", "proteolysis involved in cellular protein catabolic process", "cellular protein catabolic process", "protein catabolic process", and "ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process". In GO analysis, one BP term, "Proteolysis", was obtained. Among DEGs, 300 genes were differentially regulated in response to both garlic and anethole, and 234 and 59 genes were either up- or down-regulated in supplementation with both herbs. Pathway analysis resulted in enrichment of the pathways related to digestion such as "Starch and sucrose metabolism" and "Insulin signaling pathway". Taken together, the results obtained in the present study could contribute to the effective development of evaluation system of plant herbs based on molecular signatures related with their immunological functions in chicken IELs. PMID:26954117

  15. Bioreducible Liposomes for Gene Delivery: From the Formulation to the Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Candiani, Gabriele; Pezzoli, Daniele; Ciani, Laura; Chiesa, Roberto; Ristori, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Background A promising strategy to create stimuli-responsive gene delivery systems is to exploit the redox gradient between the oxidizing extracellular milieu and the reducing cytoplasm in order to disassemble DNA/cationic lipid complexes (lipoplexes). On these premises, we previously described the synthesis of SS14 redox-sensitive gemini surfactant for gene delivery. Although others have attributed the beneficial effects of intracellular reducing environment to reduced glutathione (GSH), these observations cannot rule out the possible implication of the redox milieu in its whole on transfection efficiency of bioreducible transfectants leaving the determinants of DNA release largely undefined. Methodology/Principal Findings With the aim of addressing this issue, SS14 was here formulated into binary and ternary 100 nm-extruded liposomes and the effects of the helper lipid composition and of the SS14/helper lipids molar ratio on chemical-physical and structural parameters defining transfection effectiveness were investigated. Among all formulations tested, DOPC/DOPE/SS14 at 25∶50∶25 molar ratio was the most effective in transfection studies owing to the presence of dioleoyl chains and phosphatidylethanolamine head groups in co-lipids. The increase in SS14 content up to 50% along DOPC/DOPE/SS14 liposome series yielded enhanced transfection, up to 2.7-fold higher than that of the benchmark Lipofectamine 2000, without altering cytotoxicity of the corresponding lipoplexes at charge ratio 5. Secondly, we specifically investigated the redox-dependent mechanisms of gene delivery into cells through tailored protocols of transfection in GSH-depleted and repleted vs. increased oxidative stress conditions. Importantly, GSH specifically induced DNA release in batch and in vitro. Conclusions/Significance The presence of helper lipids carrying unsaturated dioleoyl chains and phosphatidylethanolamine head groups significantly improved transfection efficiencies of DOPC/DOPE/SS14

  16. A model for antagonistic pleiotropic gene action for mortality and advanced age.

    PubMed

    Toupance, B; Godelle, B; Gouyon, P H; Schächter, F

    1998-06-01

    Association or linkage studies involving control and long-lived populations provide information on genes that influence longevity. However, the relationship between allele-specific differences in survival and the genetic structure of aging cohorts remains unclear. We model a heterogeneous cohort comprising several genotypes differing in age-specific mortality. In its most general form, without any specific assumption regarding the shape of mortality curves, the model permits derivation of a fundamental property underlying abrupt age-related changes in the composition of a cohort. The model is applied to sex-specific survival curves taken from period life tables, and Gompertz-Makeham mortality coefficients are calculated for the French population. Then, adjustments are performed under Gompertz-Makeham mortality functions for three genotypes composing a heterogeneous cohort, under the constraint of fitting the resultant mortality to the real French population mortality obtained from life tables. Multimodal curves and divergence after the 8th decade appear as recurrent features of the frequency trajectories. Finally, a fit to data previously obtained at the angiotensin-converting-enzyme locus is realized, explaining what had seemed to be paradoxical results-namely, that the frequency of a genotype known as a cardiovascular risk factor was increased in centenarians. Our results help explain the well-documented departure from Gompertz-Makeham mortality kinetics at older ages. The implications of our model are discussed in the context of known genetic effects on human longevity and age-related pathologies. Since antagonistic pleiotropy between early and late survival emerges as a general rule, extrapolating the effects measured for a gene in a particular age class to other ages could be misleading. PMID:9585593

  17. Yeast-containing feed additive alters gene expression profiles associated with innate immunity in whole blood of a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Branson, Jennifer A; McLean, Derek J; Forsberg, Neil E; Bobe, Gerd

    2016-05-01

    Feeding a yeast-containing additive (YCA; OmniGen-AF) improves immune responses in ruminant livestock and reduces subsequent production losses. The objective was to identify molecular pathways by which dietary YCA may modify immune responses using a rodent model. Thirty-seven healthy, unchallenged CD rats received a diet containing 0 (control; n = 5, only 28 d), 0.5% (n = 15) or 1% (n = 17) YCA for 7 (n = 4/group), 14 (n = 3 or 4/group), 21 (n = 3 or 4/group) or 28 (n = 5/group) d. At the end of the feeding periods, whole blood was collected and the isolated RNA was analyzed for the expression of 84 genes involved in innate and cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. Three bacterial pattern recognition receptors TLR1 (0.5%: + 2.01; 1%: + 2.38), TLR6 (0.5%: + 2.11; 1%: + 2.34) and NOD2 (0.5%: + 2.32; 1%: + 2.23), two APC surface receptors CD1D1 (0.5%: + 1.75; 1%: + 2.33) and CD80 (0.5%: +2.45; 1%: +3.00), and the cell signaling molecule MAPK8 (0.5%: +1.87; 1%: +2.35) were significantly up-regulated by YCA at both inclusion rates. In conclusion, feeding YCA may potentially increase recognition and responses to bacterial pathogens and T-cell activation and differentiation and thereby maintain health and prevent production losses. PMID:27033362

  18. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2014-01-01

    Recurring floods in Asia cause poor crop establishment. Yields decline drastically when plants are completely submerged for a few days. Traditional rice cultivars predominate because they have acquired moderate tolerance to flooding but they carry the penalty of inherently lower grain yields. In contrast, modern high-yielding varieties are highly susceptible to flooding. Cultivars with tolerance to complete submergence were recently developed in the background of popular varieties by transferring the submergence tolerance gene SUBMERGENCE1 (SUB1) from the highly tolerant Indian landrace FR13A. The present study evaluated three pairs of Sub1 near-isogenic lines (NILs) together with FR13A and two of its submergence-tolerant derivatives under field conditions to assess the survival and growth processes occurring during submergence and recovery that are associated with SUB1. Under control conditions, the NILs showed similar growth and biomass accumulation, indicating that SUB1 had no apparent effects. Submergence substantially decreased biomass accumulation but with greater reduction in the genotypes lacking SUB1, particularly when submergence was prolonged for 17 days. When submerged, the lines lacking SUB1 showed greater elongation and lower or negative biomass accumulation. Sub1 lines maintained higher chlorophyll concentrations during submergence and lost less non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) after submergence. This indicates that the introgression of SUB1 resulted in better regulation of NSC during submergence and that high pre-submergence NSC is not essential for the submergence tolerance conferred by SUB1. During recovery, chlorophyll degradation was faster in genotypes lacking SUB1 and any surviving plants showed poorer and delayed emergence of tillers and leaves. Sub1 lines restored new leaf and tiller production faster. During submergence, FR13A showed not only slower leaf elongation but also accumulated extra biomass and was able to recover faster than Sub

  19. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2014-01-01

    Recurring floods in Asia cause poor crop establishment. Yields decline drastically when plants are completely submerged for a few days. Traditional rice cultivars predominate because they have acquired moderate tolerance to flooding but they carry the penalty of inherently lower grain yields. In contrast, modern high-yielding varieties are highly susceptible to flooding. Cultivars with tolerance to complete submergence were recently developed in the background of popular varieties by transferring the submergence tolerance gene SUBMERGENCE1 (SUB1) from the highly tolerant Indian landrace FR13A. The present study evaluated three pairs of Sub1 near-isogenic lines (NILs) together with FR13A and two of its submergence-tolerant derivatives under field conditions to assess the survival and growth processes occurring during submergence and recovery that are associated with SUB1. Under control conditions, the NILs showed similar growth and biomass accumulation, indicating that SUB1 had no apparent effects. Submergence substantially decreased biomass accumulation but with greater reduction in the genotypes lacking SUB1, particularly when submergence was prolonged for 17 days. When submerged, the lines lacking SUB1 showed greater elongation and lower or negative biomass accumulation. Sub1 lines maintained higher chlorophyll concentrations during submergence and lost less non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) after submergence. This indicates that the introgression of SUB1 resulted in better regulation of NSC during submergence and that high pre-submergence NSC is not essential for the submergence tolerance conferred by SUB1. During recovery, chlorophyll degradation was faster in genotypes lacking SUB1 and any surviving plants showed poorer and delayed emergence of tillers and leaves. Sub1 lines restored new leaf and tiller production faster. During submergence, FR13A showed not only slower leaf elongation but also accumulated extra biomass and was able to recover faster than Sub

  20. Differential actions of fibroblast growth factors on intracellular pathways and target gene expression in bovine ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Price, Christopher A

    2012-11-01

    Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), including FGF1, FGF4 and FGF10, alter ovarian granulosa cell function. These ligands exhibit different patterns of receptor activation, and their mechanisms of action on granulosa cells remain unknown. The objective of this study was to identify the major pathways and target genes activated by FGF1, FGF4 and FGF10 in primary oestrogenic granulosa cells cultured under serum-free conditions. FGF1 and FGF4 increased levels of mRNA encoding Sprouty family members, SPRY2 and SPRY4, and the orphan nuclear receptors NR4A1 and NR4A3. Both FGF1 and FGF4 decreased levels of mRNA encoding SPRY3 and the pro-apoptotic factor BAX. FGF1 but not FGF4 stimulated expression of the cell cycle regulator, GADD45B. In contrast, FGF10 altered the expression of none of these genes. Western blot demonstrated that FGF4 activated ERK1/2 and Akt signalling rapidly and transiently, whereas FGF10 elicited a modest and delayed activation of ERK1/2. These data show that FGF1 and FGF4 activate typical FGF signalling pathways in granulosa cells, whereas FGF10 activates atypical pathways. PMID:22956519

  1. Prediction of joint algal toxicity of nano-CeO2/nano-TiO2 and florfenicol: Independent action surpasses concentration addition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuang; Wang, Se; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2016-08-01

    Co-exposure of aquatic organisms to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) and antibiotics is likely to take place in the environment. However, the impacts of co-exposure on aquatic organisms are virtually unknown and understanding the joint toxicity of ENPs and antibiotics is a topic of importance. The independent action (IA) model and the concentration addition (CA) model are two of the most common approaches to mixture toxicity assessment. In this study, the joint toxicity of two ENPs (nCeO2 and nTiO2) and one antibiotic (florfenicol, FLO) to Chlorella pyrenoidosa was determined to compare the applicability of the IA and the CA model. Concentration-response analyses were performed for single toxicants and for binary mixtures containing FLO and one of the ENPs at two suspended particle concentrations. The effect concentrations and the observed effects of the binary mixtures were compared to the predictions of the joint toxicity. The observed toxicity associated with the nCeO2 or nTiO2 exposure was enhanced by the concomitant FLO exposure. The joint toxicity of nCeO2 and FLO was significantly higher than that of nTiO2 and FLO. Predictions based on the IA and CA models tend to underestimate the overall toxicity (in terms of median effect concentration) of the binary mixtures, but IA performs better than CA, irrespective of the effect level under consideration and the types of mixtures studied. This result underpins the need to consider the effects of mixtures of ENPs and organic chemicals on aquatic organisms, and the practicability of the IA and CA methods in toxicity assessment of ENPs. PMID:27156210

  2. Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae kap108Δ Mutants upon Addition of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, Kenneth D.; Larson, Nathaniel; Kahn, Jonathan; Tkachev, Dmitry; Ay, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Protein transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells is tightly regulated, providing a mechanism for controlling intracellular localization of proteins, and regulating gene expression. In this study, we have investigated the importance of nucleocytoplasmic transport mediated by the karyopherin Kap108 in regulating cellular responses to oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We carried out microarray analyses on wild-type and kap108 mutant cells grown under normal conditions, shortly after introduction of oxidative stress, after 1 hr of oxidative stress, and 1 hr after oxidative stress was removed. We observe more than 500 genes that undergo a 40% or greater change in differential expression between wild-type and kap108Δ cells under at least one of these conditions. Genes undergoing changes in expression can be categorized in two general groups: 1) those that are differentially expressed between wild-type and kap108Δ cells, no matter the oxidative stress conditions; and 2) those that have patterns of response dependent upon both the absence of Kap108, and introduction or removal of oxidative stress. Gene ontology analysis reveals that, among the genes whose expression is reduced in the absence of Kap108 are those involved in stress response and intracellular transport, while those overexpressed are largely involved in mating and pheromone response. We also identified 25 clusters of genes that undergo similar patterns of change in gene expression when oxidative stresses are added and subsequently removed, including genes involved in stress response, oxidation–reduction processing, iron homeostasis, ascospore wall assembly, transmembrane transport, and cell fusion during mating. These data suggest that Kap108 is important for regulating expression of genes involved in a variety of specific cell functions. PMID:26888869

  3. Modular cis-regulatory organization of developmentally expressed genes: two genes transcribed territorially in the sea urchin embryo, and additional examples.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhamer, C V; Yuh, C H; Davidson, E H

    1996-01-01

    The cis-regulatory systems that control developmental expression of two sea urchin genes have been subjected to detailed functional analysis. Both systems are modular in organization: specific, separable fragments of the cis-regulatory DNA each containing multiple transcription factor target sites execute particular regulatory subfunctions when associated with reporter genes and introduced into the embryo. The studies summarized here were carried out on the CyIIIa gene, expressed in the embryonic aboral ectoderm and on the Endo16 gene, expressed in the embryonic vegetal plate, archenteron, and then midgut. The regulatory systems of both genes include modules that control particular aspects of temporal and spatial expression, and in both the territorial boundaries of expression depend on a combination of negative and positive functions. In both genes different regulatory modules control early and late embryonic expression. Modular cis-regulatory organization is widespread in developmentally regulated genes, and we present a tabular summary that includes many examples from mouse and Drosophila. We regard cis-regulatory modules as units of developmental transcription control, and also of evolution, in the assembly of transcription control systems. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8790328

  4. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of four additional genes of the hydrogenase structural operon from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, E; Palacios, J M; Murillo, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 2.5-kbp region following the hydrogenase structural genes (hupSL) in the H2 uptake gene cluster from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 was determined. Four closely linked genes encoding peptides of 27.9 (hupC), 22.1 (hupD), 19.0 (hupE), and 10.4 (hupF) kDa were identified immediately downstream of hupL. Proteins with comparable apparent molecular weights were detected by heterologous expression of these genes in Escherichia coli. The six genes, hupS to hupF, are arranged as an operon, and by mutant complementation analysis, it was shown that genes hupSLCD are cotranscribed. A transcription start site preceded by the -12 to -24 consensus sequence characteristic of NtrA-dependent promoters was identified upstream of hupS. On the basis of the lack of oxygen-dependent H2 uptake activity of a hupC::Tn5 mutant and on structural characteristics of the protein, we postulate that HupC is a b-type cytochrome involved in electron transfer from hydrogenase to oxygen. The product from hupE, which is needed for full hydrogenase activity, exhibited characteristics typical of a membrane protein. The features of HupC and HupE suggest that they form, together with the hydrogenase itself, a membrane-bound protein complex involved in hydrogen oxidation. Images PMID:1597428

  5. Additive effect of polymorphisms in the β2 -adrenoceptor and NADPH oxidase p22 phox genes contributes to the loss of estimated glomerular filtration rate in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Yan; Ma, JingTao; Feng, Zhen; Niu, Kai; Liu, Bing

    2014-09-01

    Because increased oxidative stress may mediate the detrimental actions of enhanced sympathetic nervous activity on renal function and vice versa, we investigated the effect of the polymorphic Arg16Gly in the β2 -adrenoceptor (ADRB2) gene, Trp64Arg in the β3 -adrenoceptor (ADRB3) gene and C242T in the NADPH oxidase p22phox (CYBA) gene on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in a Chinese population. Initially recruited from different outpatient services of HeBei General Hospital in northern China, 668 individuals were finally included in the study, with complete demographic information. Laboratory tests were performed and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was derived from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation for the Chinese population. Plasma noradrenaline levels and genotype were determined by HPLC and the TaqMan method, respectively. Only across the Arg16Gly polymorphism did eGFR show significant difference: it was lower in individuals with the Gly16Gly variation, who also had the highest plasma noradrenaline levels. This polymorphism remained a significant determinant of eGFR after multivariate analysis. Of importance, the multifactor dimensionality reduction method further detected a significant synergism between the Arg16Gly and C242T polymorphisms in reducing eGFR. These observations clarify the effects of the studied polymorphisms on eGFR and exemplify gene-gene interactions influencing renal function. PMID:24890187

  6. Gene electrotransfer of plasmid AMEP, an integrin-targeted therapy, has antitumor and antiangiogenic action in murine B16 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, M; Dolinsek, T; Cemazar, M; Kranjc, S; Blagus, T; Markelc, B; Stimac, M; Zavrsnik, J; Kamensek, U; Heller, L; Bouquet, C; Turk, B; Sersa, G

    2015-07-01

    Gene therapy with Plasmid AMEP (antiangiogenic metargidin peptide) has recently been studied as a potential targeted therapy for melanoma. This plasmid is designed to downregulate α5β1 and αvβ3 integrins. In our study, electroporation was used as a nonviral delivery system. We investigated the antiangiogenic and direct antitumor effectiveness of this gene therapy on low and highly metastatic B16 melanoma variants. In vitro, the antiangiogenic effectiveness as determined by tube formation assay on endothelial cells was predominantly dependent on AMEP expression levels. In vivo, antitumor effectiveness was mediated by the inhibition of proliferation, migration and invasion of melanoma cells and correlated with the expression of integrins on tumor cells after intratumor delivery. In addition, reduced metastatic potential was shown. Intramuscular gene electrotransfer of Plasmid AMEP, for AMEP systemic distribution, had no antitumor effect with this specific preventive treatment protocol, confirming that direct tumor delivery was more effective. This study confirms our previous in vitro data that the expression levels of integrins on melanoma cells could be used as a biomarker for antitumor effectiveness in integrin-targeted therapies, whereas the expression levels of AMEP peptide could be a predictive factor for antiangiogenic effectiveness of Plasmid AMEP in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25781650

  7. pdc1(0) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae give evidence for an additional structural PDC gene: cloning of PDC5, a gene homologous to PDC1.

    PubMed Central

    Seeboth, P G; Bohnsack, K; Hollenberg, C P

    1990-01-01

    The PDC1 gene coding for a pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) was deleted from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The resulting pdc1(0) mutants were able to grow on glucose and still contained 60 to 70% of the wild-type PDC activity. Two DNA fragments with sequences homologous to that of the PDC1 gene were cloned from the yeast genome. One of the cloned genes (PDC5) was expressed at high rates predominantly in pdc1(0) strains and probably encodes the remaining PDC activity in these strains. Expression from the PDC1 promoter in PDC1 wild-type and pdc1(0) strains was examined by the use of two reporter genes. Deletion of PDC1 led to increased expression of the two reporter genes regardless of whether the fusions were integrated into the genome or present on autonomously replicating plasmids. The results suggested that this effect was due to feedback regulation of the PDC1 promoter-driven expression in S. cerevisiae pdc1(0) strains. The yeast PDC1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, leading to an active PDC. This result shows that the PDC1-encoded subunit alone can form an active tetramer without yeast-specific processing steps. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:2404950

  8. DOSE RESPONSE FROM HIGH THROUGHPUT GENE EXPRESSION STUDIES AND THE INFLUENCE OF TIME AND CELL LINE ON INFERRED MODE OF ACTION BY ONTOLOGIC ENRICHMENT (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression with ontologic enrichment and connectivity mapping tools is widely used to infer modes of action (MOA) for therapeutic drugs. Despite progress in high-throughput (HT) genomic systems, strategies suitable to identify industrial chemical MOA are needed. The L1000 is...

  9. [Study on action mechanism and material base of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis based on techniques of gene expression profile and molecular fingerprint].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Song, Xiang-gang; Chen, Chao; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang

    2015-08-01

    Action mechanism and material base of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis were discussed based on gene expression profile and molecular fingerprint in this paper. First, gene expression profiles of atherosclerotic carotid artery tissues and histologically normal tissues in human body were collected, and were screened using significance analysis of microarray (SAM) to screen out differential gene expressions; then differential genes were analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and KEGG pathway analysis; to avoid some genes with non-outstanding differential expression but biologically importance, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) were performed, and 7 chemical ingredients with higher negative enrichment score were obtained by Cmap method, implying that they could reversely regulate the gene expression profiles of pathological tissues; and last, based on the hypotheses that similar structures have similar activities, 336 ingredients of compound Danshen dripping pills were compared with 7 drug molecules in 2D molecular fingerprints method. The results showed that 147 differential genes including 60 up-regulated genes and 87 down regulated genes were screened out by SAM. And in GO analysis, Biological Process ( BP) is mainly concerned with biological adhesion, response to wounding and inflammatory response; Cellular Component (CC) is mainly concerned with extracellular region, extracellular space and plasma membrane; while Molecular Function (MF) is mainly concerned with antigen binding, metalloendopeptidase activity and peptide binding. KEGG pathway analysis is mainly concerned with JAK-STAT, RIG-I like receptor and PPAR signaling pathway. There were 10 compounds, such as hexadecane, with Tanimoto coefficients greater than 0.85, which implied that they may be the active ingredients (AIs) of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis (CAs). The present method can be applied to the research on material

  10. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Theories of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior in Physical Activity: Predictive Validity and the Contribution of Additional Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagger, Martin S.; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.; Biddle, Stuart J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Examined relations between behavior, intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, and past behaviors using the Theories of Reasoned Action (TRA) and Planned Behavior (TPB) in physical activity. This quantitative integration of the physical activity literature supported the major relationships of the…

  11. Mutation analysis of TMC1 identifies four new mutations and suggests an additional deafness gene at locus DFNA36-DFNB7/11

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Nele; Alasti, Fatemeh; Dieltjens, Nele; Pawlik, Barbara; Wollnik, Bernd; Uyguner, Oya; Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Weil, Dominique; Petit, Christine; Danis, Evi; Yang, Tao; Pandelia, Efthimia; Petersen, Michael B.; Goossens, Dirk; Favero, Jurgen Del; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Smith, Richard JH; Van Camp, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most frequent sensorineural disorder, affecting 1 in 1000 newborns. In more than half of these babies, the hearing loss is inherited. Hereditary hearing loss is a very heterogeneous trait, with about 100 gene localizations and 44 gene identifications for nonsyndromic hearing loss. TMC1 has been identified as the disease-causing gene for autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss at the DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 loci, respectively. To date, two dominant and 18 recessive TMC1 mutations have been reported as the cause of hearing loss in 34 families. In this report, we describe linkage to DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 in one family with dominant and 10 families with recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. In addition, mutation analysis of TMC1 was performed in 51 familial Turkish patients with autosomal recessive hearing loss. TMC1 mutations were identified in seven of the families segregating recessive hearing loss. The pathogenic variants we found included two known mutations, c.100C>T and c.1165C>T, and four new mutations, c.2350C>T, c.776+1G>A, c.767_768del and c.1166G>A. The absence of TMC1 mutations in the remaining six linked families implies the presence of mutations outside the coding region of this gene, or alternatively, at least one additional deafness-causing gene in this region. The analysis of copy number variations in TMC1 as well as DNA sequencing of 15 additional candidate genes did not reveal any proven pathogenic changes, leaving both hypotheses open. PMID:18616530

  12. Organization of the flaFG gene cluster and identification of two additional genes involved in flagellum biogenesis in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Schoenlein, P V; Gallman, L S; Ely, B

    1989-01-01

    In Caulobacter crescentus, mutations have been isolated in more than 30 flagellar genes (fla, flb, and flg) which are required in the cell cycle event of flagellum biogenesis. The flaF and flaG mutations and two newly identified mutations, flbT and flbA (P.V. Schoenlein and B. Ely, J. Bacteriol. 171:000-000, 1989), have been localized to the flaFG region. In this study, the genetic and physical organization of this region was analyzed, using the cloned 4.0-kilobase flaFG region in the recombinant plasmid pPLG727. Plasmid pPLG727 complemented flaF, flaG, flbA, and flbT mutations. Further complementation studies with pPLG727 derivatives indicated that flaF and flbT are unique but overlapping transcription units, whereas flbA and flaG constitute a single transcription unit. To determine the direction of transcription of the putative flbA-flaG operon, the promoterless chloramphenicol transacetylase gene was inserted into various positions in the flbA-flaG region, and merodiploid strains containing these transcriptional fusions were assayed for gene function and expression of chloramphenicol resistance. These studies showed that transcription proceeds from flbA to flaG. To confirm the complementation analysis, Southern analyses were performed on chromosomal DNAs isolated from strains containing insertion and deletion mutations. Taken together, these studies defined the relative gene order at one end of the flaYG flagellar gene cluser as flgL-flaF-flbT-flbA-flaG. PMID:2921244

  13. Addition of Escherichia coli K-12 Growth Observation and Gene Essentiality Data to the EcoCyc Database

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Amanda; Paley, Suzanne; Keseler, Ingrid M.; Shearer, Alexander; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    The sets of compounds that can support growth of an organism are defined by the presence of transporters and metabolic pathways that convert nutrient sources into cellular components and energy for growth. A collection of known nutrient sources can therefore serve both as an impetus for investigating new metabolic pathways and transporters and as a reference for computational modeling of known metabolic pathways. To establish such a collection for Escherichia coli K-12, we have integrated data on the growth or nongrowth of E. coli K-12 obtained from published observations using a variety of individual media and from high-throughput phenotype microarrays into the EcoCyc database. The assembled collection revealed a substantial number of discrepancies between the high-throughput data sets, which we investigated where possible using low-throughput growth assays on soft agar and in liquid culture. We also integrated six data sets describing 16,119 observations of the growth of single-gene knockout mutants of E. coli K-12 into EcoCyc, which are relevant to antimicrobial drug design, provide clues regarding the roles of genes of unknown function, and are useful for validating metabolic models. To make this information easily accessible to EcoCyc users, we developed software for capturing, querying, and visualizing cellular growth assays and gene essentiality data. PMID:24363340

  14. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML. PMID:26375248

  15. Smoking and polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolism and DNA repair genes are additive risk factors affecting bladder cancer in Northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rouissi, Kamel; Ouerhani, Slah; Hamrita, Bechr; Bougatef, Karim; Marrakchi, Raja; Cherif, Mohamed; Ben Slama, Mohamed Riadh; Bouzouita, Mohamed; Chebil, Mohamed; Ben Ammar Elgaaied, Amel

    2011-12-01

    Cancer epidemiology has undergone marked development since the nineteen-fifties. One of the most spectacular and specific contributions was the demonstration of the massive effect of smoking and genetic polymorphisms on the occurrence of bladder cancer. The tobacco carcinogens are metabolized by various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the super-families of N-acetyltransferases (NAT) and glutathione S-transferases (GST). DNA repair is essential to an individual's ability to respond to damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Alterations in DNA repair genes may affect cancer risk by influencing individual susceptibility to this environmental exposure. Polymorphisms in NAT2, GST and DNA repair genes alter the ability of these enzymes to metabolize carcinogens or to repair alterations caused by this process. We have conducted a case-control study to assess the role of smoking, slow NAT2 variants, GSTM1 and GSTT1 null, and XPC, XPD, XPG nucleotide excision-repair (NER) genotypes in bladder cancer development in North Tunisia. Taken alone, each gene unless NAT2 did not appear to be a factor affecting bladder cancer susceptibility. For the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, the NAT2*5/*7 diplotype was found to have a 7-fold increased risk to develop bladder cancer (OR = 7.14; 95% CI: 1.30-51.41). However, in tobacco consumers, we have shown that Null GSTM1, Wild GSTT1, Slow NAT2, XPC (CC) and XPG (CC) are genetic risk factors for the disease. When combined together in susceptible individuals compared to protected individuals these risk factors give an elevated OR (OR = 61). So, we have shown a strong cumulative effect of tobacco and different combinations of studied genetic risk factors which lead to a great susceptibility to bladder cancer. PMID:21647780

  16. Evolution of the CD4 family: teleost fish possess two divergent forms of CD4 in addition to lymphocyte activation gene-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Zou, J.J.; Purcell, M.K.; Phillips, R.; Secombes, C.J.; Hansen, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The T cell coreceptor CD4 is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the Ig superfamily and is essential for cell-mediated immunity. Two different genes were identified in rainbow trout that resemble mammalian CD4. One (trout CD4) encodes four extracellular Ig domains reminiscent off mammalian CD4, whereas the other (CD4REL) codes for two Ig domains. Structural motifs within the amino acid sequences suggest that the two Ig domains of CD4REL duplicated to generate the four-domain molecule of CD4 and the related gene, lymphocyte activation gene-3. Here we present evidence that both of these molecules in trout are homologous to mammalian CD4 and that teleosts encode an additional CD4 family member, lymphocyte activation gene-3, which is a marker for activated T cells. The syntenic relationships of similar genes in other teleost and non-fish genomes provide evidence for the likely evolution of CD4-related molecules in vertebrates, with CD4REL likely representing the primordial form in fish. Expression of both CD4 genes is highest in the thymus and spleen, and mRNA expression of these genes is limited to surface IgM- lymphocytes, consistent with a role for T cell functionality. Finally, the intracellular regions of both CD4 and CD4REL possess the canonical CXC motif involved in the interaction off CD4 with p56LCK, implying that similar mechanisms for CD4 + T cell activation are present in all vertebrates. Our results therefore raise new questions about T cell development and functionality in lower vertebrates that cannot be answered by current mammalian models and, thus, is of fundamental importance for understanding the evolution of cell-mediated immunity in gnathosomes. Copyright ?? 2006 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and comparative analysis with five additional insects.

    PubMed

    Shi, Houxia; Pei, Lianghong; Gu, Shasha; Zhu, Shicheng; Wang, Yanyun; Zhang, Yi; Li, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases are important detoxification enzymes involved in insecticide resistance. Sequencing the Tribolium castaneum genome provides an opportunity to investigate the structure, function, and evolution of GSTs on a genome-wide scale. Thirty-six putative cytosolic GSTs and 5 microsomal GSTs have been identified in T. castaneum. Furthermore, 40, 35, 13, 23, and 32 GSTs have been discovered the other insects, Drosophila, Anopheles, Apis, Bombyx, and Acyrthosiphon, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that insect-specific GSTs, Epsilon and Delta, are the largest species-specific expanded GSTs. In T. castaneum, most GSTs are tandemly arranged in three chromosomes. Particularly, Epsilon GSTs have an inverted long-fragment duplication in the genome. Other four widely distributed classes are highly conserved in all species. Given that GSTs specially expanded in Tribolium castaneum, these genes might help to resist poisonous chemical environments and produce resistance to kinds of different insecticides. PMID:22824654

  18. The effect of nitrate addition on abundance of nirK, nirS and gln genes in acidified Norway spruce forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárta, Jiří; Tahovská, Karolina; Kaåa, Jiří; Antrå¯Čková, Hana Å.

    2010-05-01

    The denitrification is the main biotic process leading to loses of fixed nitrogen as well as removal of excess of nitrate (NO3-) from the soil environment. The reduction of NO2- to nitric oxide (NO) distinguishes the 'true' denitrifiers from other nitrate-respiring bacteria. This reaction is catalyzed by two different types of nitrite reductases, either a cytochrome cd1 encoded by nirS gene (nirS denitrifiers) or a Cu-containing enzyme encoded by nirK gene (nirK denitrifiers). The nirS denitrifiers are located mostly in rhizosphere, while the nirK denitrifiers are more abundant in bulk soil. These two groups can be also classified as markers of denitrification. Glutamine synthetase is one of the main bacterial NH4+ assimilating enzymes; it is coded by glnI gene. Glutamine synthetase is mostly active when N is the limiting factor for bacterial growth. There is recent evidence that the activity may be affected by the presence of alternative N source (i.e. NO3-). However, in anaerobic condition NO3- can be used also by the denitrifying bacteria so there may be strong competition for this nutrient. The laboratory experiment was performed to evaluate the effect of nitrates (NO3-) on abundance of nirK, nirS and gln gene copy numbers. The amount of NO3- corresponded to the actual atmospheric depositions on experimental sites in the Bohemian Forest. Litter organic layer (0-5cm of soil) was used for laboratory incubation experiment. Four replicates of control (no addition of NO3-), and NO3-addition were incubated anaerobically for one month. After the incubation DNA was extracted and the number of nirK, nirS and gln gene copies was determined using qPCR (SYBRGreen methodology). Results showed that the addition of NO3- significantly increased the number of nirK and nirS denitrifiers from 5.9x106 to 1.1x107 and from not detectable amount to 1.4x106, respectively. The gln gene copy number was also higher after NO3-addition. However, the difference was not statistically

  19. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia. PMID:27020472

  20. Targeted gene addition in human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells for correction of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Reik, Andreas; Liu, Pei-Qi; Li, Linhong; Wu, Xiaolin; Su, Ling; Raley, Castle; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Song, Alexander H; Chan, Andy; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Paschon, David E; Lee, Janet; Newcombe, Hannah; Koontz, Sherry; Sweeney, Colin; Shivak, David A; Zarember, Kol A; Peshwa, Madhusudan V; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-01

    Gene therapy with genetically modified human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) may be safer using targeted integration (TI) of transgenes into a genomic 'safe harbor' site rather than random viral integration. We demonstrate that temporally optimized delivery of zinc finger nuclease mRNA via electroporation and adeno-associated virus (AAV) 6 delivery of donor constructs in human HSPCs approaches clinically relevant levels of TI into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. Up to 58% Venus(+) HSPCs with 6-16% human cell marking were observed following engraftment into mice. In HSPCs from patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), caused by mutations in the gp91phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase, TI of a gp91phox transgene into AAVS1 resulted in ∼15% gp91phox expression and increased NADPH oxidase activity in ex vivo-derived neutrophils. In mice transplanted with corrected HSPCs, 4-11% of human cells in the bone marrow expressed gp91phox. This method for TI into AAVS1 may be broadly applicable to correction of other monogenic diseases. PMID:26950749

  1. Action of multiple intra-QTL genes concerted around a co-localized transcription factor underpins a large effect QTL.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shalabh; Kumar Biswal, Akshaya; Min, Aye; Henry, Amelia; Oane, Rowena H; Raorane, Manish L; Longkumer, Toshisangba; Pabuayon, Isaiah M; Mutte, Sumanth K; Vardarajan, Adithi R; Miro, Berta; Govindan, Ganesan; Albano-Enriquez, Blesilda; Pueffeld, Mandy; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Slamet-Loedin, Inez; Sundarvelpandian, Kalaipandian; Tsai, Yuan-Ching; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Hsing, Yue-Ie C; Kumar, Arvind; Kohli, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Sub-QTLs and multiple intra-QTL genes are hypothesized to underpin large-effect QTLs. Known QTLs over gene families, biosynthetic pathways or certain traits represent functional gene-clusters of genes of the same gene ontology (GO). Gene-clusters containing genes of different GO have not been elaborated, except in silico as coexpressed genes within QTLs. Here we demonstrate the requirement of multiple intra-QTL genes for the full impact of QTL qDTY12.1 on rice yield under drought. Multiple evidences are presented for the need of the transcription factor 'no apical meristem' (OsNAM12.1) and its co-localized target genes of separate GO categories for qDTY12.1 function, raising a regulon-like model of genetic architecture. The molecular underpinnings of qDTY12.1 support its effectiveness in further improving a drought tolerant genotype and for its validity in multiple genotypes/ecosystems/environments. Resolving the combinatorial value of OsNAM12.1 with individual intra-QTL genes notwithstanding, identification and analyses of qDTY12.1has fast-tracked rice improvement towards food security. PMID:26507552

  2. Action of multiple intra-QTL genes concerted around a co-localized transcription factor underpins a large effect QTL

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Shalabh; Kumar Biswal, Akshaya; Min, Aye; Henry, Amelia; Oane, Rowena H.; Raorane, Manish L.; Longkumer, Toshisangba; Pabuayon, Isaiah M.; Mutte, Sumanth K.; Vardarajan, Adithi R.; Miro, Berta; Govindan, Ganesan; Albano-Enriquez, Blesilda; Pueffeld, Mandy; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Slamet-Loedin, Inez; Sundarvelpandian, Kalaipandian; Tsai, Yuan-Ching; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Hsing, Yue-Ie C.; Kumar, Arvind; Kohli, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Sub-QTLs and multiple intra-QTL genes are hypothesized to underpin large-effect QTLs. Known QTLs over gene families, biosynthetic pathways or certain traits represent functional gene-clusters of genes of the same gene ontology (GO). Gene-clusters containing genes of different GO have not been elaborated, except in silico as coexpressed genes within QTLs. Here we demonstrate the requirement of multiple intra-QTL genes for the full impact of QTL qDTY12.1 on rice yield under drought. Multiple evidences are presented for the need of the transcription factor ‘no apical meristem’ (OsNAM12.1) and its co-localized target genes of separate GO categories for qDTY12.1 function, raising a regulon-like model of genetic architecture. The molecular underpinnings of qDTY12.1 support its effectiveness in further improving a drought tolerant genotype and for its validity in multiple genotypes/ecosystems/environments. Resolving the combinatorial value of OsNAM12.1 with individual intra-QTL genes notwithstanding, identification and analyses of qDTY12.1has fast-tracked rice improvement towards food security. PMID:26507552

  3. Array-Based Transcript Profiling and Limiting-Dilution Reverse Transcription-PCR Analysis Identify Additional Latent Genes in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chandriani, Sanjay; Ganem, Don

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a B-lymphotropic herpesvirus strongly linked to both lymphoproliferative diseases and Kaposi's sarcoma. The viral latency program of KSHV is central to persistent infection and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of KSHV-related tumors. Up to six polypeptides and 18 microRNAs are known to be expressed in latency, but it is unclear if all major latency genes have been identified. Here, we have employed array-based transcript profiling and limiting-dilution reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) methodologies to explore this issue in several KSHV-infected cell lines. Our results show that RNAs encoding the K1 protein are found at low levels in most latently infected cell lines. The gene encoding v-IL-6 is also expressed as a latent transcript in some contexts. Both genes encode powerful signaling molecules with particular relevance to B cell biology: K1 mimics signaling through the B cell receptor, and v-IL-6 promotes B cell survival. These data resolve earlier controversies about K1 and v-IL-6 expression and indicate that, in addition to core latency genes, some transcripts can be expressed in KSHV latency in a context-dependent manner. PMID:20219929

  4. Contributions of 18 Additional DNA Sequence Variations in the Gene Encoding Apolipoprotein E to Explaining Variation in Quantitative Measures of Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Stengård, Jari H.; Clark, Andrew G.; Weiss, Kenneth M.; Kardia, Sharon; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ehnholm, Christian; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is a major constituent of many lipoprotein particles. Previous genetic studies have focused on six genotypes defined by three alleles, denoted ε2, ε3, and ε4, encoded by two variable exonic sites that segregate in most populations. We have reported studies of the distribution of alleles of 20 biallelic variable sites in the gene encoding the ApoE molecule within and among samples, ascertained without regard to health, from each of three populations: African Americans from Jackson, Miss.; Europeans from North Karelia, Finland; and non-Hispanic European Americans from Rochester, Minn. Here we ask (1) how much variation in blood levels of ApoE (lnApoE), of total cholesterol (TC), of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and of triglyceride (lnTG) is statistically explained by variation among APOE genotypes defined by the ε2, ε3, and ε4 alleles; (2) how much additional variation in these traits is explained by genotypes defined by combining the two variable sites that define these three alleles with one or more additional variable sites; and (3) what are the locations and relative allele frequencies of the sites that define multisite genotypes that significantly improve the statistical explanation of variation beyond that provided by the genotypes defined by the ε2, ε3, and ε4 alleles, separately for each of the six gender-population strata. This study establishes that the use of only genotypes defined by the ε2, ε3, and ε4 alleles gives an incomplete picture of the contribution that the variation in the APOE gene makes to the statistical explanation of interindividual variation in blood measurements of lipid metabolism. The addition of variable sites to the genotype definition significantly improved the ability to explain variation in lnApoE and in TC and resulted in the explanation of variation in HDL-C and in lnTG. The combination of additional sites that explained the greatest amount of trait variation was different for

  5. Impacts of addition of natural zeolite or a nitrification inhibitor on antibiotic resistance genes during sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junya; Chen, Meixue; Sui, Qianwen; Tong, Juan; Jiang, Chao; Lu, Xueting; Zhang, Yuxiu; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-03-15

    Composting is commonly used for the treatment and resource utilization of sewage sludge, and natural zeolite and nitrification inhibitors can be used for nitrogen conservation during sludge composting, while their impacts on ARGs control are still unclear. Therefore, three lab-scale composting reactors, A (the control), B (natural zeolite addition) and C (nitrification inhibitor addition of 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate, DMPP), were established. The impacts of natural zeolite and DMPP on the levels of ARGs were investigated, as were the roles that heavy metals, mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and the bacterial community play in ARGs evolution. The results showed that total ARGs copies were enriched 2.04 and 1.95 times in reactors A and C, respectively, but were reduced by 1.5% in reactor B due to the reduction of conjugation and co-selection of heavy metals caused by natural zeolite. Although some ARGs (blaCTX-M, blaTEM, ermB, ereA and tetW) were reduced by 0.3-2 logs, others (ermF, sulI, sulII, tetG, tetX, mefA and aac(6')-Ib-cr) increased by 0.3-1.3 logs after sludge composting. Although the contributors for the ARGs profiles in different stages were quite different, the results of a partial redundancy analysis, Mantel test and Procrustes analysis showed that the bacterial community was the main contributor to the changes in ARGs compared to MGEs and heavy metals. Network analysis determined the potential host bacteria for various ARGs and further confirmed our results. PMID:26808292

  6. Chromosomal locations and modes of action of genes of the retinoid (vitamin A) system support their involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, A.B.

    1995-08-14

    Vitamin A (retinoid), an essential nutrient for fetal and subsequent mammalian development, is involved in gene expression, cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, and death. Retinoic acid (RA) the morphogenic derivative of vitamin A is highly teratogenic. In humans retinoid excess or deficit can result in brain anomalies and psychosis. This review discusses chromosomal loci of genes that control the retinoid cascade in relation to some candidate genes in schizophrenia. The paper relates the knowledge about the transport, delivery, and action of retinoids to what is presently known about the pathology of schizophrenia, with particular reference to the dopamine hypothesis, neurotransmitters, the glutamate hypothesis, neurotransmitters, the glutamate hypothesis, retinitis pigmentosa, dermatologic disorders, and craniofacial anomalies. 201 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Possible mechanisms of action of the compounds injected intralesionally in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis, in addition to their direct effects on the parasites.

    PubMed

    Najim, R A; Sharquie, K E; Al-Zubaidy, S A A

    2006-01-01

    By injecting uninfected rabbits intradermally with one of the test compounds or the isotonic saline (0.9% NaCl) used as a control, the possible mechanisms of the indirect action of some drugs used intralesionally in the treatment of human cutaneous leishmaniasis [sodium stibogluconate, 2% zinc sulphate, and hypertonic (7% NaCL) saline] were explored. The 24 injected rabbits (six for the control and six for each test compound) were followed up for 30 days, both macroscopically, with checks for erythema and increases in skin thickness, and microscopically, with the histopathological examination of sections of biopsies from the injection sites. Although the microscopy revealed inflammatory-cell infiltration, beginning with eosinophils, followed by lymphocytes and finally by the proliferation of fibroblasts, at all of the injection sites, these changes were most intense with the sodium stibogluconate and 2% zinc sulphate, less marked with the hypertonic saline, and minimal and relatively short-lived with the isotonic saline. Presumably as a result of their metal content, sodium stibogluconate and zinc sulphate each probably induce tissue damage and, subsequently, severe inflammatory changes. The antileishmanial activity of hypertonic saline, however, may be entirely attributable to its osmotic effects. PMID:16417711

  8. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  9. The Wnt and Delta-Notch signalling pathways interact to direct pair-rule gene expression via caudal during segment addition in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Anna; Paese, Christian L B; Hilbrant, Maarten; Leite, Daniel J; Schwager, Evelyn E; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Eibner, Cornelius; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-07-01

    In short-germ arthropods, posterior segments are added sequentially from a segment addition zone (SAZ) during embryogenesis. Studies in spiders such as Parasteatoda tepidariorum have provided insights into the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying segment addition, and revealed that Wnt8 is required for dynamic Delta (Dl) expression associated with the formation of new segments. However, it remains unclear how these pathways interact during SAZ formation and segment addition. Here, we show that Delta-Notch signalling is required for Wnt8 expression in posterior SAZ cells, but represses the expression of this Wnt gene in anterior SAZ cells. We also found that these two signalling pathways are required for the expression of the spider orthologues of even-skipped (eve) and runt-1 (run-1), at least in part via caudal (cad). Moreover, it appears that dynamic expression of eve in this spider does not require a feedback loop with run-1, as is found in the pair-rule circuit of the beetle Tribolium Taken together, our results suggest that the development of posterior segments in Parasteatoda is directed by dynamic interactions between Wnt8 and Delta-Notch signalling that are read out by cad, which is necessary but probably not sufficient to regulate the expression of eve and run-1 Our study therefore provides new insights towards better understanding the evolution and developmental regulation of segmentation in other arthropods, including insects. PMID:27287802

  10. Effect of red mud addition on tetracycline and copper resistance genes and microbial community during the full scale swine manure composting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Junya; Sui, Qianwen; Wan, Hefeng; Tong, Juan; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong; Wei, Dongbin

    2016-09-01

    Swine manure has been considered as the reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Composting is one of the most suitable technologies for treating livestock manures, and red mud was proved to have a positive effect on nitrogen conservation during composting. This study investigated the abundance of eight tetracycline and three copper resistance genes, the bacterial community during the full scale swine manure composting with or without addition of red mud. The results showed that ARGs in swine manure could be effectively removed through composting (reduced by 2.4log copies/g TS), especially during the thermophilic phase (reduced by 1.5log copies/g TS), which the main contributor might be temperature. Additionally, evolution of bacterial community could also have a great influence on ARGs. Although addition of red mud could enhance nitrogen conservation, it obviously hindered removal of ARGs (reduced by 1.7log copies/g TS) and affected shaping of bacterial community during composting. PMID:27367291

  11. Conserved intron positions in FGFR genes reflect the modular structure of FGFR and reveal stepwise addition of domains to an already complex ancestral FGFR.

    PubMed

    Rebscher, Nicole; Deichmann, Christina; Sudhop, Stefanie; Fritzenwanker, Jens Holger; Green, Stephen; Hassel, Monika

    2009-10-01

    We have analyzed the evolution of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase genes throughout a wide range of animal phyla. No evidence for an FGFR gene was found in Porifera, but we tentatively identified an FGFR gene in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The gene encodes a protein with three immunoglobulin-like domains, a single-pass transmembrane, and a split tyrosine kinase domain. By superimposing intron positions of 20 FGFR genes from Placozoa, Cnidaria, Protostomia, and Deuterostomia over the respective protein domain structure, we identified ten ancestral introns and three conserved intron groups. Our analysis shows (1) that the position of ancestral introns correlates to the modular structure of FGFRs, (2) that the acidic domain very likely evolved in the last common ancestor of triploblasts, (3) that splicing of IgIII was enabled by a triploblast-specific insertion, and (4) that IgI is subject to substantial loss or duplication particularly in quickly evolving genomes. Moreover, intron positions in the catalytic domain of FGFRs map to the borders of protein subdomains highly conserved in other serine/threonine kinases. Nevertheless, these introns were introduced in metazoan receptor tyrosine kinases exclusively. Our data support the view that protein evolution dating back to the Cambrian explosion took place in such a short time window that only subtle changes in the domain structure are detectable in extant representatives of animal phyla. We propose that the first multidomain FGFR originated in the last common ancestor of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. Additional domains were introduced mainly in the ancestor of triploblasts and in the Ecdysozoa. PMID:20016912

  12. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  13. Fatty Acid Profiles and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase Gene Expression in Longissimus dorsi Muscle of Growing Lambs Influenced by Addition of Tea Saponins and Soybean Oil

    PubMed Central

    Mao, H. L.; Wang, J. K.; Lin, J.; Liu, J. X.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary addition of tea saponins (TS) and soybean oil (SO) on fatty acid profile and gene expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of growing lambs. Thirty-two Huzhou lambs were assigned to four dietary treatments in a 2×2 factorial arrangement with main effects of TS (0 or 3 g/d) and SO (0 or 30 g/kg of diet DM). The diet without additives was considered as NTNS (no TS or SO). After a feeding trial for 60 d, four lambs of each treatment were slaughtered to collect the samples of LD muscle. Percentage of trans-11 vaccenic acid was enhanced (p<0.05) in muscle of lambs fed TS and SO. The proportion of total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was increased (p<0.05) by SO, but decreased (p<0.05) by TS in LD muscle. The percentage of total saturated fatty acids in muscle was decreased (p<0.05) by addition of TS and SO, while addition of SO increased (p<0.05) the percentage of total polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ratio of cis-9, trans-11 CLA to tran-11 vaccenic acid was decreased (p<0.05) by TS, but increased (p<0.05) by SO. The same effects were observed in SCD mRNA expression. From these results it is indicated that including TS and SO in the diet of growing lambs affect the fatty acid profiles of LD muscle and that the proportion of cis-9, trans-11 CLA in the muscle influenced by TS and SO may be related to the SCD gene expression. PMID:25049609

  14. A multigene phylogeny of the fly superfamily Asiloidea (Insecta): Taxon sampling and additional genes reveal the sister-group to all higher flies (Cyclorrhapha).

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Michelle D; Wiegmann, Brian M; Yeates, David K

    2010-09-01

    Asiloidea are a group of 9 lower brachyceran fly families, considered to be the closest relative to the large Metazoan radiation Eremoneura (Cyclorrhapha+Empidoidea). The evidence for asiloid monophyly is limited, and few characters define the relationships between the families of Asiloidea and Eremoneura. Additionally, enigmatic genera, Hilarimorpha and Apystomyia, retain morphological characters of both asiloids and higher flies. We use the nuclear protein-coding gene CAD and 28S rDNA to test the monophyly of Asiloidea and to resolve its relationship to Eremoneura. We explore the effects of taxon sampling on support values and topological stability, the resolving power of additional genes, and hypothesis testing using four-cluster likelihood mapping. We find that: (1) the 'asiloid' genus Apystomyia is sister to Cyclorrhapha, (2) the remaining asiloids are monophyletic at the exclusion of the family Bombyliidae, and (3) our best estimate of relationships places the asiloid flies excluding Bombyliidae as the sister-group to Eremoneura, though high support is lacking. PMID:20399874

  15. Induction of Olfaction and Cancer-Related Genes in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet as Assessed through the Mode-of-Action by Network Identification Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngshim; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Park, Taesun

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of obesity and metabolic diseases are not well understood. To gain more insight into the genetic mediators associated with the onset and progression of diet-induced obesity and metabolic diseases, we studied the molecular changes in response to a high-fat diet (HFD) by using a mode-of-action by network identification (MNI) analysis. Oligo DNA microarray analysis was performed on visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues and muscles of male C57BL/6N mice fed a normal diet or HFD for 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Each of these data was queried against the MNI algorithm, and the lists of top 5 highly ranked genes and gene ontology (GO)-annotated pathways that were significantly overrepresented among the 100 highest ranked genes at each time point in the 3 different tissues of mice fed the HFD were considered in the present study. The 40 highest ranked genes identified by MNI analysis at each time point in the different tissues of mice with diet-induced obesity were subjected to clustering based on their temporal patterns. On the basis of the above-mentioned results, we investigated the sequential induction of distinct olfactory receptors and the stimulation of cancer-related genes during the development of obesity in both adipose tissues and muscles. The top 5 genes recognized using the MNI analysis at each time point and gene cluster identified based on their temporal patterns in the peripheral tissues of mice provided novel and often surprising insights into the potential genetic mediators for obesity progression. PMID:23555558

  16. Assessment of Estrogenic Endocrine-Disrupting Chemical Actions in the Brain Using in Vivo Somatic Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, Vance L.; Turque, Nathalie; Le Mével, Sébastien; Alliot, Caroline; Gallant, Natacha; Coen, Laurent; Pakdel, Farzad; Demeneix, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals abnormally stimulate vitellogenin gene expression and production in the liver of many male aquatic vertebrates. However, very few studies demonstrate the effects of estrogenic pollutants on brain function. We have used polyethylenimine-mediated in vivo somatic gene transfer to introduce an estrogen response element–thymidine kinase–luciferase (ERE-TK-LUC) construct into the brain. To determine if waterborne estrogenic chemicals modulate gene transcription in the brain, we injected the estrogen-sensitive construct into the brains of Nieuwkoop-Faber stage 54 Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Both ethinylestradiol (EE2; p < 0.002) and bisphenol A (BPA; p < 0.03) increased luciferase activity by 1.9- and 1.5-fold, respectively. In contrast, low physiologic levels of 17β-estradiol had no effect (p > 0.05). The mixed antagonist/agonist tamoxifen was estrogenic in vivo and increased (p < 0.003) luciferase activity in the tadpole brain by 2.3-fold. There have been no previous reports of somatic gene transfer to the fish brain; therefore, it was necessary to optimize injection and transfection conditions for the adult goldfish (Carassius auratus). Following third brain ventricle injection of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-green fluorescent protein or CMV-LUC gene constructs, we established that cells in the telencephalon and optic tectum are transfected. Optimal transfections were achieved with 1 μg DNA complexed with 18 nmol 22 kDa polyethylenimine 4 days after brain injections. Exposure to EE2 increased brain luciferase activity by 2-fold in males (p < 0.05) but not in females. Activation of an ERE-dependent luciferase reporter gene in both tadpole and fish indicates that waterborne estrogens can directly modulate transcription of estrogen-responsive genes in the brain. We provide a method adaptable to aquatic organisms to study the direct regulation of estrogen-responsive genes in vivo. PMID:15743723

  17. Gene Regulation of Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells IPEC-J2 Is Dependent on the Site of Deoxynivalenol Toxicological Action

    PubMed Central

    Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Nossol, Constanze; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wimmers, Klaus; Kluess, Jeannette; Walk, Nicole; Post, Andreas; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Kahlert, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cell layer represents the border between the luminal and systemic side of the gut. The decision between absorption and exclusion of substances is the quintessential function of the gut and varies along the gut axis. Consequently, potentially toxic substances may reach the basolateral domain of the epithelial cell layer via blood stream. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a Fusarium derived secondary metabolite known to enter the blood stream and displaying a striking toxicity on the basolateral side of polarised epithelial cell layers in vitro. Here we analysed potential mechanisms of apical and basolateral DON toxicity reflected in the gene expression. We used the jejunum-derived, polarised intestinal porcine epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 as an in vitro cell culture model. Luminal and systemic DON challenge of the epithelial cell layer was mimicked by a DON application from the apical or basolateral compartment of membrane inserts for 72 h. We compared the genome-wide gene expression of untreated and DON-treated IPEC-J2 cells with the GeneChip® Porcine Genome Array of Affymetrix. Low basolateral DON (200 ng/mL) application triggered 10 times more gene transcripts in comparison to the corresponding apical application (2539 versus 267) despite the intactness of the challenged cell layer as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Analysis of the regulated genes by bioinformatic resource DAVID identified several groups of biochemical pathways modulated by concentration and orientation of DON application. Selected genes representing pathways of the cellular metabolism, information processing and structural design were analysed in detail by quantitative PCR. Our findings clearly show that apical and basolateral challenge of epithelial cell layers trigger different gene response profiles paralleled with a higher susceptibility towards basolateral challenge. The evaluation of toxicological potentials of mycotoxins should take this

  18. The action of a dietary retinoid on gene expression and cancer induction in electron-irradiated rat skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Fredric J.; Chen, Shuaili; Xu, Guijuan; Wu, Feng; Tang, Moon-Shong

    2002-01-01

    Current models of radiation carcinogenesis generally assume that the DNA is damaged in a variety of ways by the radiation and that subsequent cell divisions contribute to the conversion of the damage to heritable mutations. Cancer may seem complex and intractable, but its complexity provides multiple opportunities for preventive interventions. Mitotic inhibitors are among the strongest cancer preventive agents, not only slowing the growth rate of preneoplasias but also increasing the fidelity of DNA repair processes. Ionizing radiation, including electrons, is a strong inducer of cancer in rat skin, and dietary retinoids have shown potent cancer preventive activity in the same system. A non-toxic dietary dose of retinyl acetate altered gene expression levels 24 hours after electron irradiation of rat skin. Of the 8740 genes on an Affymetrix rat expression array, the radiation significantly (5 fold or higher) altered 188, while the retinoid altered 231, including 16 radiation-altered genes that were reversely altered. While radiation strongly affected the expression of stress response, immune/inflammation and nucleic acid metabolism genes, the retinoid most strongly affected proliferation-related genes, including some significant reversals, such as, keratin 14, retinol binding protein, and calcium binding proteins. These results point to reversal of proliferation-relevant genes as a likely basis for the anti-radiogenic effects of dietary retinyl acetate.

  19. Co-addition of manure increases the dissipation rates of tylosin A and the numbers of resistance genes in laboratory incubation experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yong-De; Liao, Xin-Di; Liang, Juan-Boo; Xin, Wen; Wu, Yin-Bao

    2015-09-15

    The behavior of veterinary antibiotics in the soil is commonly studied using the following methods to add antibiotics to the soil: (A) adding manure collected from animals fed a diet that includes antibiotics; (B) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics; and (C) the direct addition of antibiotics. However, most studies have only used methods (B) and (C) in their research, and few studies have simultaneously compared the different antibiotic addition methods. This study used tylosin A (TYLA) as a model antibiotic to compare the effects of these three commonly used antibiotic addition methods on the dissipation rates of TYLA and the numbers of resistance genes in laboratory incubation experiments. The results showed that the three treatment methods produced similar TYLA degradation trends; however, there were significant differences (P<0.05) in the TYLA degradation half-life (t1/2) among the three methods. The half-life of TYLA degradation in treatments A, B and C was 2.44 ± 0.04, 1.21 ± 0.03 and 5.13 ± 0.11 days, respectively. The presence of manure resulted in a higher electrical conductivity (EC), higher relative abundance of Citrobacter amalonaticus, higher macrolide resistant gene (ermB, ermF and ermT) count and lower ecological toxicity in the soil, which could partially explain the higher TYLA degradation rate in the treatments containing manure. The higher degradation rate of TYLA in treatment B when compared to treatment A could be due to the lower concentrations of tylosin B (TYLB) and tylosin D (TYLD). The main route for veterinary antibiotics to enter the soil is via the manure of animals that have been administered antibiotics. Therefore, the more appropriate method to study the degradation and ecotoxicity of antibiotic residues in the soil is by using manure from animals fed/administered the particular antibiotic rather than by adding the antibiotic directly to the soil. PMID:25958362

  20. Neuroblast lineage identification and lineage-specific Hox gene action during postembryonic development of the subesophageal ganglion in the Drosophila central brain.

    PubMed

    Kuert, Philipp A; Hartenstein, Volker; Bello, Bruno C; Lovick, Jennifer K; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    The central brain of Drosophila consists of the supraesophageal ganglion (SPG) and the subesophageal ganglion (SEG), both of which are generated by neural stem cell-like neuroblasts during embryonic and postembryonic development. Considerable information has been obtained on postembryonic development of the neuroblasts and their lineages in the SPG. In contrast, very little is known about neuroblasts, neural lineages, or any other aspect of the postembryonic development in the SEG. Here we characterize the neuroanatomy of the larval SEG in terms of tracts, commissures, and other landmark features as compared to a thoracic ganglion. We then use clonal MARCM labeling to identify all adult-specific neuroblast lineages in the late larval SEG and find a surprisingly small number of neuroblast lineages, 13 paired and one unpaired. The Hox genes Dfd, Scr, and Antp are expressed in a lineage-specific manner in these lineages during postembryonic development. Hox gene loss-of-function causes lineage-specific defects in axonal targeting and reduction in neural cell numbers. Moreover, it results in the formation of novel ectopic neuroblast lineages. Apoptosis block also results in ectopic lineages suggesting that Hox genes are required for lineage-specific termination of proliferation through programmed cell death. Taken together, our findings show that postembryonic development in the SEG is mediated by a surprisingly small set of identified lineages and requires lineage-specific Hox gene action to ensure the correct formation of adult-specific neurons in the Drosophila brain. PMID:24713419

  1. Transcriptome analysis of genes related to resistance against powdery mildew in wheat-Thinopyrum alien addition disomic line germplasm SN6306.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanquan; Niu, Zubiao; Bao, Yinguang; Tian, Qiuju; Wang, Honggang; Kong, Lingrang; Feng, Deshun

    2016-09-15

    Wheat powdery mildew, which is mainly caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), seriously damages wheat production. The wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium alien addition disomic line germplasm SN6306, being one of the important sources of genes for wheat resistance, is highly resistant to Bgt E09 and to many other powdery mildew physiological races. However, knowledge on the resistance mechanism of SN6306 remains limited. Our study employed high-throughput RNA sequencing based on next-generation sequencing technology (Illumina) to obtain an overview of the transcriptome characteristics of SN6306 and its parent wheat Yannong 15 (YN15) during Bgt infection. The sequencing generated 104,773 unigenes, 9909 of which showed varied expression levels. Among the 9909 unigenes, 1678 unigenes showed 0 reads in YN15. The expression levels in Bgt-inoculated SN6306 and YN15 of exactly 39 unigenes that showed 0 or considerably low reads in YN15 were validated to identify the genes involved in Bgt resistance. Among the 39 unigenes, 12 unigenes were upregulated in SN6306 by 3-45 times. These unigenes mainly encoded kinase, synthase, proteases, and signal transduction proteins, which may play an important role in the resistance against Bgt. To confirm whether the unigenes that showed 0 reads in YN15 are really unique to SN6306, 8 unigenes were cloned and sequenced. Results showed that the selected unigenes are more similar to SN6306 and Th. intermedium than to the wheat cultivar YN15. The sequencing results further confirmed that the unigenes showing 0 reads in YN15 are unique to SN6306 and are most likely derived from Th. intermedium (Host) Nevski. Thus, the genes from Th. intermedium most probably conferred the resistance of SN6306 to Bgt. PMID:27265028

  2. Opposite action of R2R3-MYBs from different subgroups on key genes of the shikimate and monolignol pathways in spruce.

    PubMed

    Bomal, Claude; Duval, Isabelle; Giguère, Isabelle; Fortin, Élise; Caron, Sébastien; Stewart, Don; Boyle, Brian; Séguin, Armand; MacKay, John J

    2014-02-01

    Redundancy and competition between R2R3-MYB activators and repressors on common target genes has been proposed as a fine-tuning mechanism for the regulation of plant secondary metabolism. This hypothesis was tested in white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] by investigating the effects of R2R3-MYBs from different subgroups on common targets from distinct metabolic pathways. Comparative analysis of transcript profiling data in spruces overexpressing R2R3-MYBs from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), PtMYB1, PtMYB8, and PtMYB14, defined a set of common genes that display opposite regulation effects. The relationship between the closest MYB homologues and 33 putative target genes was explored by quantitative PCR expression profiling in wild-type P. glauca plants during the diurnal cycle. Significant Spearman's correlation estimates were consistent with the proposed opposite effect of different R2R3-MYBs on several putative target genes in a time-related and tissue-preferential manner. Expression of sequences coding for 4CL, DHS2, COMT1, SHM4, and a lipase thio/esterase positively correlated with that of PgMYB1 and PgMYB8, but negatively with that of PgMYB14 and PgMYB15. Complementary electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and transactivation assay provided experimental evidence that these different R2R3-MYBs are able to bind similar AC cis-elements in the promoter region of Pg4CL and PgDHS2 genes but have opposite effects on their expression. Competitive binding EMSA experiments showed that PgMYB8 competes more strongly than PgMYB15 for the AC-I MYB binding site in the Pg4CL promoter. Together, the results bring a new perspective to the action of R2R3-MYB proteins in the regulation of distinct but interconnecting metabolism pathways. PMID:24336492

  3. Alcohol Regulates Genes that Are Associated with Response to Endocrine Therapy and Attenuates the Actions of Tamoxifen in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Candelaria, Nicholes R.; Weldon, Ryan; Muthusamy, Selvaraj; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Addanki, Sridevi; Yoffou, Paule-Helena; Karaboga, Husna; Blessing, Alicia M.; Bollu, Lakshmi Reddy; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Lin, Chin-Yo

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary, hormonal, and behavioral factors contribute to the development of breast cancer. Alcohol consumption is a modifiable behavior that is linked to increased breast cancer risks and is associated with the development of hormone-dependent breast cancers as well as disease progression and recurrence following endocrine treatment. In this study we examined the molecular mechanisms of action of alcohol by applying molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches in characterizing its effects on estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cells. Treatments with alcohol promoted cell proliferation, increased growth factor signaling, and up-regulated the transcription of the ER target gene GREB1 but not the canonical target TFF1/pS2. Microarray analysis following alcohol treatment identified a large number of alcohol-responsive genes, including those which function in apoptotic and cell proliferation pathways. Furthermore, expression profiles of the responsive gene sets in tumors were strongly associated with clinical outcomes in patients who received endocrine therapy. Correspondingly, alcohol treatment attenuated the anti-proliferative effects of the endocrine therapeutic drug tamoxifen in ER-positive breast cancer cells. To determine the contribution and functions of responsive genes, their differential expression in tumors were assessed between outcome groups. The proto-oncogene BRAF was identified as a novel alcohol- and estrogen-induced gene that showed higher expression in patients with poor outcomes. Knock-down of BRAF, moreover, prevented the proliferation of breast cancer cells. These findings not only highlight the mechanistic basis of the effects of alcohol on breast cancer cells and increased risks for disease incidents and recurrence, but may facilitate the discovery and characterization of novel oncogenic pathways and markers in breast cancer research and therapeutics. PMID:26661278

  4. Gene Expression Profiling on the Molecular Action of Danshen-Gegen Formula in a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Postmenopausal Women with Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Chi-Man; Ko, Chun-Hay; Sun, Xu-Xu; Hoi, Sandy Wan-Heng; Tam, Jacqueline Chor-Wing; Cheung, David Wing-Shing; Cheng, King-Fai; Pang, Suet-Yee; Lo, Wing-Man; Chook, Ping; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Chan, Wai-Yee; Leung, Ping-Chung; Kwok, Timothy Chi-Yui; Fung, Kwok-Pui

    2013-01-01

    The Danshen-Gegen formula (DG) is a traditional Chinese herbal formula which has long been used to treat cardiovascular disease. DG was found to be a cardiovascular tonic in our recent research. However, a comprehensive investigation of the molecular mechanism of DG in cardiovascular disease has not been performed. The aim of this study was to clarify the transcriptional profiling of genes modulated by DG on postmenopausal women by using DNAmicroarray technology. We obtained 29 whole blood samples both from DG-treated and placebo-treated subjects. Blood lipid profile and intima-media thickness (IMT) were measured. Affymetrix GeneChip was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs), followed by validation by the real-time PCR method. The results showed that DG-treated group has a significant improvement in IMT and lipid profile as compared to placebo-treated group. For the genomic study, the DG-treated group has a higher number of DEGs identified as compared to the placebo-treated group. Two important biological processes of “regulation of systemic arterial blood pressure by hormone” and “regulation of smooth muscle proliferation” have been identified by GePS in the DG-treated group. No significant biological process and cellular components were identified in the placebo-treated group. This genomic study on the molecular action of DG in postmenopausal women gathered sufficient molecular targets and pathways to reveal that DG could improve neointima thickening and hypertension. PMID:24174980

  5. Induced mutagenesis of plasmid and chromosomal genes inserted into the plasmid DNA. II. Mutagenic action of chemical factors

    SciTech Connect

    Esipova, V.V.; Vedunova, S.L.; Kriviskii, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    Following the study of the mutagenic action of UV and ..gamma..-radiation on plasmid DNA in vitro, they investigated the induction of mutations under the influence of chemical mutagens on the same DNA of plasmid RSF2124, determining the synthesis of colicine E1 and resistance to ampicillin. The inactivating action of the mutagen was assessed from the yield of transformants resistant to the antibiotic and the mutagenic effect from the loss by colonies of transformants that were capable of releasing colicine into the external medium. In these experiments they mainly used chemical compounds whose mutagenic effect if well known in other systems (transforming and transfecting DNA, microbial viruses). As a result all mutagens tested for their activity were divided into four groups: first group, those exceeding the level of mutagenesis by more than 100-fold above the spontaneous background (hydroxylamine, O-methylhydroxylamine); second group, those exceeding it by a factor of 10 (UV radiation (lambda = 254 nm), W-mutagenesis, ionizing radiation, nitrous acid, mitomycin C); third group, those exceeding it by a factor of <10 (indirect UV mutagenesis, nitrous acid, ..beta..-chloroethyldiethylamine hydrochloride, nitrosoguanidine); fourth group, no mutagenic effect (acridine orange, ethyl methane sulfonate, sodium azide, 0-..beta..-diethylaminoethylhydroxylamine).

  6. STAT4 Associates with SLE Through Two Independent Effects that Correlate with Gene Expression and Act Additively with IRF5 to Increase Risk

    PubMed Central

    Abelson, Anna-Karin; Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Sánchez, Elena; Velázquez-Cruz, Rafael; Eriksson, Niclas; Wojcik, Jerome; Reddy, Prasad Linga; Lima, Guadalupe; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Migliaresi, Sergio; Baca, Vicente; Orozco, Lorena; Witte, Torsten; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Abderrahim, Hadi; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Gutiérrez, Carmen; Suárez, Ana; González-Escribano, Maria Francisca; Martin, Javier; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To confirm and define the genetic association of STAT4 and systemic lupus erythematosus, investigate the possibility of correlations with differential splicing and/or expression levels, and genetic interaction with IRF5. Methods 30 tag SNPs were genotyped in an independent set of Spanish cases and controls. SNPs surviving correction for multiple tests were genotyped in 5 new sets of cases and controls for replication. STAT4 cDNA was analyzed by 5’-RACE PCR and sequencing. Expression levels were measured by quantitative PCR. Results In the fine-mapping, four SNPs were significant after correction for multiple testing, with rs3821236 and rs3024866 as the strongest signals, followed by the previously associated rs7574865, and by rs1467199. Association was replicated in all cohorts. After conditional regression analyses, two major independent signals represented by SNPs rs3821236 and rs7574865, remained significant across the sets. These SNPs belong to separate haplotype blocks. High levels of STAT4 expression correlated with SNPs rs3821236, rs3024866 (both in the same haplotype block) and rs7574865 but not with other SNPs. We also detected transcription of alternative tissue-specific exons 1, indicating presence of tissue-specific promoters of potential importance in the expression of STAT4. No interaction with associated SNPs of IRF5 was observed using regression analysis. Conclusions These data confirm STAT4 as a susceptibility gene for SLE and suggest the presence of at least two functional variants affecting levels of STAT4. Our results also indicate that both genes STAT4 and IRF5 act additively to increase risk for SLE. PMID:19019891

  7. Gene expression profiles following exposure to a developmental neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254: Pathway analysis for possible mode(s) of action

    SciTech Connect

    Royland, Joyce E.; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2008-09-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that low levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure can adversely affect neurocognitive development. In animal models, perturbations in calcium signaling, neurotransmitters, and thyroid hormones have been postulated as potential mechanisms for PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. In order to understand the role of these proposed mechanisms and to identify other mechanisms in PCB-induced neurotoxicity, we have chosen a global approach utilizing oligonucleotide microarrays to examine gene expression profiles in the brain following developmental exposure to Aroclor 1254 (0 or 6 mg/kg/day from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21) in Long-Evans rats. Gene expression levels in the cerebellum and hippocampus from PNDs 7 and 14 animals were determined on Affymetrix rat 230A{sub 2}.0 chips. In the cerebellum, 87 transcripts were altered at PND7 compared to 27 transcripts at PND14 by Aroclor 1254 exposure, with only one transcript affected at both ages. In hippocampus, 175 transcripts and 50 transcripts were altered at PND7 and PND14, respectively, by Aroclor 1254 exposure with five genes commonly affected. Functional analysis suggests that pathways related to calcium homeostasis (Gng3, Ryr2, Trdn, Cacna1a), intracellular signaling (Camk2d, Stk17b, Pacsin2, Ryr2, Trio, Fert2, Ptk2b), axonal guidance (Lum, Mxd3, Akap11, Gucy1b3), aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling (Nfia, Col1a2), and transcripts involved in cell proliferation (Gspt2, Cdkn1c, Ptk2b) and differentiation (Ifitm31, Hpca, Zfp260, Igsf4a, Hes5) leading to the development of nervous system were significantly altered by Aroclor 1254 exposure. Of the two brain regions examined, Aroclor 1254-induced genomic changes were greater in the hippocampus than the cerebellum. The genomic data suggests that PCB-induced neurotoxic effects were due to disruption of normal ontogenetic pattern of nervous system growth and development by altering intracellular signaling pathways

  8. Flavobacterium johnsoniae sprB Is Part of an Operon Spanning the Additional Gliding Motility Genes sprC, sprD, and sprF ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Ryan G.; Nelson, Shawn S.; Pochiraju, Soumya; McBride, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae move rapidly over surfaces by a process known as gliding motility. Gld proteins are thought to comprise the gliding motor that propels cell surface adhesins, such as the 669-kDa SprB. A novel protein secretion apparatus called the Por secretion system (PorSS) is required for assembly of SprB on the cell surface. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that sprB is part of a seven-gene operon spanning 29.3 kbp of DNA. In addition to sprB, three other genes of this operon (sprC, sprD, and sprF) are involved in gliding. Mutations in sprB, sprC, sprD, and sprF resulted in cells that failed to form spreading colonies on agar but that exhibited some motility on glass in wet mounts. SprF exhibits some similarity to Porphyromonas gingivalis PorP, which is required for secretion of gingipain protease virulence factors via the P. gingivalis PorSS. F. johnsoniae sprF mutants produced SprB protein but were defective in localization of SprB to the cell surface, suggesting a role for SprF in secretion of SprB. The F. johnsoniae PorSS is involved in secretion of extracellular chitinase in addition to its role in secretion of SprB. SprF was not needed for chitinase secretion and may be specifically required for SprB secretion by the PorSS. Cells with nonpolar mutations in sprC or sprD produced and secreted SprB and propelled it rapidly along the cell surface. Multiple paralogs of sprB, sprC, sprD, and sprF are present in the genome, which may explain why mutations in sprB, sprC, sprD, and sprF do not result in complete loss of motility and suggests the possibility that semiredundant SprB-like adhesins may allow movement of cells over different surfaces. PMID:21131497

  9. Compound EGFR mutation is frequently detected with co-mutations of actionable genes and associated with poor clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Eun Na; Park, Heae Surng; Hong, Ji Young; Lim, Seri; Youn, Jong Pil; Hwang, Seung Yong; Chang, Yoon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Compound EGFR mutations, defined as double or multiple mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, are frequently detected with advances in sequencing technology but its clinical significance is unclear. This study analyzed 61 cases of EGFR mutation positive lung adenocarcinoma using next-generation sequencing (NGS) based repeated deep sequencing panel of 16 genes that contain actionable mutations and investigated clinical implication of compound EGFR mutations. Compound EGFR mutation was detected in 15 (24.6%) of 61 cases of EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. The majority (12/15) of compound mutations are combination of the atypical mutation and typical mutations such as exon19 deletion, L858R or G719X substitutions, or exon 20 insertion whereas 3 were combinations of rare atypical mutations. The patients with compound mutation showed shorter overall survival than those with simple mutations (83.7 vs. 72.8 mo; P = 0.020, Breslow test). Among the 115 missense mutations discovered in the tested genes, a few number of actionable mutations were detected irrelevant to the subtype of EGFR mutations, including ALK rearrangement, BCL2L11 intron 2 deletion, KRAS c.35G>A, PIK3CA c.1633G>A which are possible target of crizotinib, BH3 mimetics, MEK inhibitors, and PI3K-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, respectively. 31 missense mutations were detected in the cases with simple mutations whereas 84 in those with compound mutation, showing that the cases with compound missense mutation have higher burden of missense mutations (P = 0.001, independent sample t-test). Compound EGFR mutations are detected at a high frequency using NGS-based repeated deep sequencing. Because patients with compound EGFR mutations showed poor clinical outcomes, they should be closely monitored during follow-up. PMID:26785607

  10. Gene action analysis by inheritance and QTL mapping of resistance to root-knot nematodes in cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host-plant resistance is highly effective in controlling crop loss from nematode infection. In addition, molecular markers can be powerful tools for marker-assisted selection (MAS), where they reduce laborious greenhouse phenotype evaluation to identify root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita...

  11. Androgen action.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ralf; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2014-01-01

    Androgens are important for male sex development and physiology. Their actions are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor. The activity of the AR is controlled at multiple stages due to ligand binding and induced structural changes assisted by the foldosome, compartmentalization, recruitment of coregulators, posttranslational modifications and chromatin remodeling, leading to subsequent transcription of androgen-responsive target genes. Beside these short-term androgen actions, there is phenomenological and experimental evidence of long-term androgen programming in mammals and in the human during sensitive programming time windows, both pre- and postnatally. At the molecular level, research into androgen insensitivity syndrome has unmasked androgen programming at the transcriptome level, in genital fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and at the epigenome level. Androgens are crucial for male sex development and physiology during embryogenesis, at puberty and in adult life. Testosterone and its more potent metabolite, dihydrotestosterone, which is converted from testosterone within the target cell by 5α-reductase II, are the main androgens involved in male sex differentiation. Androgen action is mediated by a single AR. The AR belongs to the nuclear receptor 3 group C, composed of the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2), progesterone receptor (NR3C3) and AR (NR3C4), and acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. PMID:25247642

  12. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  13. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  14. Cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and mechanism of action (via gene expression analysis) of the indole alkaloid aspidospermine (antiparasitic) extracted from Aspidosperma polyneuron in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Coatti, Giuliana Castello; Marcarini, Juliana Cristina; Sartori, Daniele; Fidelis, Queli Cristina; Ferreira, Dalva Trevisan; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-08-01

    Aspidospermine is an indole alkaloid with biological properties associated with combating parasites included in the genera Plasmodium, Leishmania and Trypanossoma. The present study evaluated the cytotoxicity (resazurin test), genotoxicity (comet assay) and mechanism of action (gene expression analysis via qRT-PCR) of this alkaloid in human HepG2 cells. The results demonstrated that treatment with aspidospermine was both cytotoxic (starting at 75 μM) and genotoxic (starting at 50 μM). There was no significant modulation of the expression of the following genes: GSTP1 and GPX1 (xenobiotic metabolism); CAT (oxidative stress); TP53 and CCNA2 (cell cycle); HSPA5, ERN1, EIF2AK3 and TRAF2 (endoplasmic reticulum stress); CASP8, CASP9, CASP3, CASP7, BCL-2, BCL-XL BAX and BAX (apoptosis); and PCBP4, ERCC4, OGG1, RAD21 and MLH1 (DNA repair). At a concentration of 50 μM (non-cytotoxic, but genotoxic), there was a significant increase in the expression of CYP1A1 (xenobiotic metabolism) and APC (cell cycle), and at a concentration of 100 μM, a significant increase in the expression of CYP1A1 (xenobiotic metabolism), GADD153 (endoplasmic reticulum stress) and SOD (oxidative stress) was detected, with repression of the expression of GR (xenobiotic metabolism and oxidative stress). The results of treatment with aspidospermine at a 100 μM concentration (the dose indicated in the literature to achieve 89 % reduction of the growth of L. amazonensis) suggest that increased oxidative stress and an unfolded protein response (UPR) occurred in HepG2 cells. For the therapeutic use of aspidospermine (antiparasitic), chemical alteration of the molecule to achieve a lower cytotoxicity/genotoxicity in host cells is recommended. PMID:25894792

  15. Understanding affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Faye J; Iyer, Aarti; Sincharoen, Sirinda

    2006-01-01

    Affirmative action is a controversial and often poorly understood policy. It is also a policy that has been widely studied by social scientists. In this review, we outline how affirmative action operates in employment and education settings and consider the major points of controversy. In addition, we detail the contributions of psychologists and other social scientists in helping to demonstrate why affirmative action is needed; how it can have unintended negative consequences; and how affirmative action programs can be most successful. We also review how psychologists have examined variations in people's attitudes toward affirmative action, in part as a means for testing different theories of social behavior. PMID:16318608

  16. ISR meets SAR outside: additive action of the endophyte Bacillus pumilus INR7 and the chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole, on induced resistance against bacterial spot in field-grown pepper

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hwe-Su; Yang, Jung Wook; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Induced resistance has been recognized as an attractive tool for plant disease management in modern agriculture. During the last two decades, studies on chemically- and biologically elicited induced resistance have revealed previously unknown features of the plant defense response including defense priming. As a biological trigger for induced resistance, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a group of root-associated bacteria that can reduce plant disease severity and incidence, and augment plant growth and yield under greenhouse and field conditions. We evaluated the potential of an endophytic PGPR, Bacillus pumilus INR7, to induce systemic resistance against bacterial spot caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in pepper. Trials in the greenhouse showed significantly less symptom development in pepper plants inoculated with strain INR7 compared to a water treatment. Furthermore, a single dipping treatment with INR7 before transplantation of pepper plants into the field elicited an induced systemic resistance response against bacterial spot caused by artificially infiltration of X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria and even against naturally occurring bacterial spot disease. We identified an additive effect on induced resistance after administration of a combination treatment composed of strain INR7 with a chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole (BTH) in the field. The combination treatment stimulated expression of pepper defense marker genes CaPR1, CaTin1, and CaPR4 to a greater extent than did treatment with either agent alone. Similar experiments conducted with tobacco revealed no additive effects under field conditions. Interestingly, co-application of plants with INR7 lifted the growth repressing effect of BTH. Application of BTH onto pepper and tobacco did not affect rhizosphere colonization but supported a higher population density inside plant roots when compared to water-treated control plants. Our results indicate that PGPR can be used in

  17. ISR meets SAR outside: additive action of the endophyte Bacillus pumilus INR7 and the chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole, on induced resistance against bacterial spot in field-grown pepper.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hwe-Su; Yang, Jung Wook; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Induced resistance has been recognized as an attractive tool for plant disease management in modern agriculture. During the last two decades, studies on chemically- and biologically elicited induced resistance have revealed previously unknown features of the plant defense response including defense priming. As a biological trigger for induced resistance, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a group of root-associated bacteria that can reduce plant disease severity and incidence, and augment plant growth and yield under greenhouse and field conditions. We evaluated the potential of an endophytic PGPR, Bacillus pumilus INR7, to induce systemic resistance against bacterial spot caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in pepper. Trials in the greenhouse showed significantly less symptom development in pepper plants inoculated with strain INR7 compared to a water treatment. Furthermore, a single dipping treatment with INR7 before transplantation of pepper plants into the field elicited an induced systemic resistance response against bacterial spot caused by artificially infiltration of X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria and even against naturally occurring bacterial spot disease. We identified an additive effect on induced resistance after administration of a combination treatment composed of strain INR7 with a chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole (BTH) in the field. The combination treatment stimulated expression of pepper defense marker genes CaPR1, CaTin1, and CaPR4 to a greater extent than did treatment with either agent alone. Similar experiments conducted with tobacco revealed no additive effects under field conditions. Interestingly, co-application of plants with INR7 lifted the growth repressing effect of BTH. Application of BTH onto pepper and tobacco did not affect rhizosphere colonization but supported a higher population density inside plant roots when compared to water-treated control plants. Our results indicate that PGPR can be used in

  18. Polygenic inheritance of Tourette syndrome, stuttering, attention deficit hyperactivity, conduct, and oppositional defiant disorder: The additive and subtractive effect of the three dopaminergic genes - DRD2, D{beta}H, and DAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Comings, D.E.; Wu, S.; Chiu, C.; Ring, R.H.; Gade, R.; Ahn, C.; Dietz, G.; Muhleman, D.

    1996-05-31

    Polymorphisms of three different dopaminergic genes, dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (DRD2), dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase (D{beta}H), and dopamine transporter (DAT1), were examined in Tourette syndrome (TS) probands, their relatives, and controls. Each gene individually showed a significant correlation with various behavioral variables in these subjects. The additive and subtractive effects of the three genes were examined by genotyping all three genes in the same set of subjects. For 9 of 20 TS associated comorbid behaviors there was a significant linear association between the degree of loading for markers of three genes and the mean behavior scores. The behavior variables showing the significant associations were, in order, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), stuttering, oppositional defiant, tics, conduct, obsessive-compulsive, mania, alcohol abuse, and general anxiety - behaviors that constitute the most overt clinical aspects of TS. For 16 of the 20 behavior scores there was a linear progressive decrease in the mean score with progressively lesser loading for the three gene markers. These results suggest that TS, ADHD, stuttering, oppositional defiant and conduct disorder, and other behaviors associated with TS, are polygenic, due in part to these three dopaminergic genes, and that the genetics of other polygenic psychiatric disorders may be deciphered using this technique. 144 refs., 2 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  20. Simvastatin and Dipentyl Phthalate Lower Ex vivo Testicular Testosterone Production and Exhibit Additive Effects on Testicular Testosterone and Gene Expression Via Distinct Mechanistic Pathways in the Fetal Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sex differentiation of the male reproductive tract in mammals is driven, in part, by fetal androgen production. In utero, some phthalate esters (PEs) alter fetal Leydig cell differentiation, reducing the expression of several genes associated with steroid synthesis/transport, and...

  1. Preemptive Pharmacogenomic Testing for Precision Medicine: A Comprehensive Analysis of Five Actionable Pharmacogenomic Genes Using Next-Generation DNA Sequencing and a Customized CYP2D6 Genotyping Cascade.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Skierka, Jennifer M; Blommel, Joseph H; Moore, Brenda E; VanCuyk, Douglas L; Bruflat, Jamie K; Peterson, Lisa M; Veldhuizen, Tamra L; Fadra, Numrah; Peterson, Sandra E; Lagerstedt, Susan A; Train, Laura J; Baudhuin, Linnea M; Klee, Eric W; Ferber, Matthew J; Bielinski, Suzette J; Caraballo, Pedro J; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Black, John L

    2016-05-01

    Significant barriers, such as lack of professional guidelines, specialized training for interpretation of pharmacogenomics (PGx) data, and insufficient evidence to support clinical utility, prevent preemptive PGx testing from being widely clinically implemented. The current study, as a pilot project for the Right Drug, Right Dose, Right Time-Using Genomic Data to Individualize Treatment Protocol, was designed to evaluate the impact of preemptive PGx and to optimize the workflow in the clinic setting. We used an 84-gene next-generation sequencing panel that included SLCO1B1, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, and VKORC1 together with a custom-designed CYP2D6 testing cascade to genotype the 1013 subjects in laboratories approved by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act. Actionable PGx variants were placed in patient's electronic medical records where integrated clinical decision support rules alert providers when a relevant medication is ordered. The fraction of this cohort carrying actionable PGx variant(s) in individual genes ranged from 30% (SLCO1B1) to 79% (CYP2D6). When considering all five genes together, 99% of the subjects carried an actionable PGx variant(s) in at least one gene. Our study provides evidence in favor of preemptive PGx testing by identifying the risk of a variant being present in the population we studied. PMID:26947514

  2. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  3. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  4. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  5. Additive effects of eukaryotic co‑expression plasmid carrying GRIM‑19 and LKB1 genes on breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shao, Ying; Du, Ye; Geng, Wei; Jiang, Tong; Liu, Haipeng; Zhang, Duo

    2015-11-01

    Gene associated with retinoid‑interferon‑induced mortality 19 (GRIM‑19) and the liver kinase B1 (LKB1) gene, two types of tumor suppressor gene, have been demonstrated to have important roles in breast carcinogenesis. The present study developed a dual expression plasmid that co‑expressed GRIM‑19 and LKB1, and evaluated the combined effects of the two genes against breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with a plasmid for the simultaneous expression of GRIM‑19 and LKB1 (pGRIM19‑LKB1) into MCF‑7 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited the proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion compared with the effects of transfection with either pGRIM‑19 or pLKB1 alone. Furthermore, transfection with pGRIM19‑LKB1 induced enhanced levels of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 stage in MCF7 cells compared to the effects of pGRIM‑19 or pLKB1 alone. An in vivo experiment using an MCF‑7 xenograft tumor model demonstrated that intravenous injection of pGRIM19‑LKB1 had an enhanced effect on tumor growth inhibition compared to that of pGRIM‑19 or pLKB1 alone. In conclusion the findings of the present study suggested that transfection with eukaryotic plasmid for the simultaneous expression of GRIM‑19 and LKB1 more effectively suppressed the growth of breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, and may therefore have therapeutic potential for the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:26458553

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide protects rats from cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via a mechanism of action in the MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SI; YUAN, YONGJIE; JIAO, SHAN; LUO, QI; YU, JINLU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective function and underlying mechanism of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion damage in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were selected for the establishment of an ischemia/reperfusion injury model through the application of a middle cerebral artery occlusion. Animals were randomly divided into 6 groups of 24 animals. Drugs were administered according to the design of each group; animals were administered CGRP, CGRP8–37, PD98059 and SB20358. The neurobehavioral scores of the rat cerebral ischemia model in each group were calculated. The infarction range of the rat brain tissues was observed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The expression levels of three proteins, phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/JNK, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)/ERK and p-p38/p38, in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in the brain tissues was detected by western blotting. The results showed that CGRP could improve the neurobehavioral function of the ischemic rats and reduce the infarction range. Western blotting results confirmed that the function of the CGRP was mediated mainly through the reduction of the JNK and p38 phosphorylation and the promotion of ERK phosphorylation. Therefore, the present study confirmed that an increase in the exogenous CRGP could effectively improve ischemia/reperfusion injury of the brain tissue. The mechanisms of action were achieved through a reduction in JNK and p38 phosphorylation and an increase in ERL phosphorylation in the MAPK pathway. These mechanisms were interdependent. PMID:27284409

  7. Characterization of Three mnp Genes of Fomitiporia mediterranea and Report of Additional Class II Peroxidases in the Order Hymenochaetales ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Ingo; Robertson, Deborah L.; Hibbett, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We report the sequence-based characterization and expression patterns of three manganese peroxidase genes from the white rot fungus and grape vine pathogen Fomitiporia mediterranea (Agaricomycotina, Hymenochaetales), termed Fmmnp1, Fmmnp2, and Fmmnp3. The predicted open reading frames (ORFs) are 1,516-, 1,351-, and 1,345-bp long and are interrupted by seven, four, and four introns, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences encode manganese peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.13) containing 371, 369, and 371 residues, respectively, and are similar to the manganese peroxidases of the model white rot organism Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The expression of the genes is most likely differentially regulated, as revealed by real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that other members of the order Hymenochaetales harbor mnp genes encoding proteins that are related only distantly to those of F. mediterranea. Furthermore, multiple partial lip- and mnp-like sequences obtained for Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Agaricomycotina, Polyporales) suggest that lignin degradation by white rot taxa relies heavily on ligninolytic peroxidases and is not efficiently achieved by laccases only. PMID:20675443

  8. Intentional Action and Action Slips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Heinz; Beckmann, Jurgen

    1990-01-01

    An explanation of action slips is offered that examines controlled actions in the context of an intentional behavior theory. Actions are considered guided by mentally represented intentions, subdivided into goal intentions and contingent instrumental intentions. Action slips are categorized according to problem areas in the enactment of goal…

  9. Direct comparison between genomic constitution and flavonoid contents in Allium multiple alien addition lines reveals chromosomal locations of genes related to biosynthesis from dihydrokaempferol to quercetin glucosides in scaly leaf of shallot (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, S; Shigyo, M; Yamauchi, N

    2006-02-01

    The extrachromosome 5A of shallot (Allium cepa L., genomes AA) has an important role in flavonoid biosynthesis in the scaly leaf of Allium fistulosum-shallot monosomic addition lines (FF+nA). This study deals with the production and biochemical characterisation of A. fistulosum-shallot multiple alien addition lines carrying at least 5A to determine the chromosomal locations of genes for quercetin formation. The multiple alien additions were selected from the crossing between allotriploid FFA (female symbol) and A. fistulosum (male symbol). The 113 plants obtained from this cross were analysed by a chromosome 5A-specific PGI isozyme marker of shallot. Thirty plants were preliminarily selected for an alien addition carrying 5A. The chromosome numbers of the 30 plants varied from 18 to 23. The other extrachromosomes in 19 plants were completely identified by using seven other chromosome markers of shallot. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of the 19 multiple additions were conducted to identify the flavonoid compounds produced in the scaly leaves. Direct comparisons between the chromosomal constitution and the flavonoid contents of the multiple alien additions revealed that a flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) gene for the synthesis of quercetin from kaempferol was located on 7A and that an anonymous gene involved in the glucosidation of quercetin was on 3A or 4A. As a result of supplemental SCAR analyses by using genomic DNAs from two complete sets of A. fistulosum-shallot monosomic additions, we have assigned F3'H to 7A and flavonol synthase to 4A. PMID:16411131

  10. Long-term nutrient addition differentially alters community composition and diversity of genes that control nitrous oxide flux from salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Patrick J.; Angell, John H.; Feinman, Sarah G.; Bowen, Jennifer L.

    2015-03-01

    Enrichment of natural waters, soils, and sediments by inorganic nutrients, including nitrogen, is occurring at an increasing rate and has fundamentally altered global biogeochemical cycles. Salt marshes are critical for the removal of land-derived nitrogen before it enters coastal waters. This is accomplished via multiple microbially mediated pathways, including denitrification. Many of these pathways, however, are also a source of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). We used clone libraries and quantative PCR (qPCR) to examine the effect of fertilization on the diversity and abundance of two functional genes associated with denitrification and N2O production (norB and nosZ) in experimental plots at the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh (Falmouth, MA, USA) that have been enriched with nutrients for over 40 years. Our data showed distinct nosZ and norB community structures at different nitrogen loads, especially at the highest level of fertilization. Furthermore, calculations of the Shannon Diversity Index and Chao1 Richness Estimator indicated that nosZ gene diversity and richness increased with increased nitrogen supply, however no such relationship existed with regard to richness and diversity of the norB gene. Results from qPCR demonstrated that nosZ gene abundance was an order of magnitude lower in the extra-highly fertilized plots compared to the other plots, but the abundance of norB was not affected by fertilization. The majority of sequences obtained from the marsh plots had no close cultured relatives and they were divergent from previously sequenced norB and nosZ fragments. Despite their divergence from any cultured representatives, most of the norB and nosZ sequences appeared to be from members of the Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria, suggesting that these classes are particularly important in salt marsh nitrogen cycling. Our results suggest that both norB and nosZ containing microbes are affected by fertilization and that the Great Sippewissett Marsh may

  11. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression.

    PubMed

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; Bruijn, Ino De; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-03-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs; six, six and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs, respectively, and their matched normal tissue, were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (eg TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (-124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%) to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; p < 0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (p < 0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38-100%) and 100% (CI 85.86-100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65-51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21-75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential diagnosis

  12. The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus Tat binding protein is a transcriptional activator belonging to an additional family of evolutionarily conserved genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohana, B; Moore, P A; Ruben, S M; Southgate, C D; Green, M R; Rosen, C A

    1993-01-01

    The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus Tat protein is a powerful transcriptional activator when bound to an RNA structure (TAR) present at the extreme 5' terminus of viral mRNA. Since transcriptional activation requires binding of Tat to RNA, it has been suggested that Tat enhances initiation or elongation through a direct interaction with cellular transcription factors. Here we show through protein fusion experiments that the previously identified cellular Tat binding protein, TBP-1, although unable to bind DNA, is a strong transcriptional activator when brought into proximity of several promoter elements. Transcriptional activity depends upon the integrity of at least two highly conserved domains: one resembling a nucleotide-binding motif and the other motif common to proteins with helicase activity. Our studies further reveal that TBP-1 represents one member of a large, highly conserved gene family that encodes proteins demonstrating strong amino acid conservation across species. Finally, we identified a second family member that, although 77% similar to TBP-1, does not activate transcription from the promoters examined. This finding, together with the observation that TBP-1 does not activate each promoter examined, suggests that this gene family may encode promoter-specific transcriptional activators. Images PMID:8419915

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies variants at CLU and PICALM associated with Alzheimer's disease, and shows evidence for additional susceptibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Harold, Denise; Abraham, Richard; Hollingworth, Paul; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Hamshere, Marian; Singh Pahwa, Jaspreet; Moskvina, Valentina; Dowzell, Kimberley; Williams, Amy; Jones, Nicola; Thomas, Charlene; Stretton, Alexandra; Morgan, Angharad; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John; Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Brayne, Carol; Rubinsztein, David C.; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Morgan, Kevin; Brown, Kristelle; Passmore, Peter; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Holmes, Clive; Mann, David; Smith, A. David; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Hardy, John; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick; Rossor, Martin; Collinge, John; Maier, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Schürmann, Britta; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Heuser, Isabella; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Dichgans, Martin; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Hüll, Michael; Rujescu, Dan; Goate, Alison; Kauwe, John S.K.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nowotny, Petra; Morris, John C.; Mayo, Kevin; Sleegers, Kristel; Bettens, Karolien; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J.; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Tsolaki, Magda; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Klopp, Norman; Wichmann, H-Erich; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Younkin, Steven G.; Holmans, Peter; O'Donovan, Michael; Owen, Michael J.; Williams, Julie

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a two-stage genome-wide association study of Alzheimer's disease involving over 16,000 individuals. In stage 1 (3,941 cases and 7,848 controls), we replicated the established association with the APOE locus (most significant SNP: rs2075650, p= 1.8×10−157) and observed genome-wide significant association with SNPs at two novel loci: rs11136000 in the CLU or APOJ gene (p= 1.4×10−9) and rs3851179, a SNP 5′ to the PICALM gene (p= 1.9×10−8). Both novel associations were supported in stage 2 (2,023 cases and 2,340 controls), producing compelling evidence for association with AD in the combined dataset (rs11136000: p= 8.5×10−10, odds ratio= 0.86; rs3851179: p= 1.3×10−9, odds ratio= 0.86). We also observed more variants associated at p< 1×10−5 than expected by chance (p=7.5×10−6), including polymorphisms at the BIN1, DAB1 and CR1 loci. PMID:19734902

  14. 15 CFR 990.66 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Implementation Phase § 990.66 Additional considerations... restoration success and the need for corrective action. (b) The reasonable costs of such actions are...

  15. 15 CFR 990.66 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Implementation Phase § 990.66 Additional considerations... restoration success and the need for corrective action. (b) The reasonable costs of such actions are...

  16. 15 CFR 990.66 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Implementation Phase § 990.66 Additional considerations... restoration success and the need for corrective action. (b) The reasonable costs of such actions are...

  17. Environmental Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Jesse; Allen, Rodney F.

    This booklet, a general guide to citizen eco-action, discusses a plan of action on community environmental problems. It offers factors to be considered in any community eco-action situation, but it is not a rigid set of rules. An overview identifies seven key ideas of environmental issues, including the universal participation of all humans in the…

  18. Effects of Addition of Linseed and Marine Algae to the Diet on Adipose Tissue Development, Fatty Acid Profile, Lipogenic Gene Expression, and Meat Quality in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Olaia; Mendizabal, José Antonio; Insausti, Kizkitza; Soret, Beatriz; Purroy, Antonio; Arana, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of linseed and algae on growth and carcass parameters, adipocyte cellularity, fatty acid profile and meat quality and gene expression in subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues (AT) in lambs. After weaning, 33 lambs were fed three diets up to 26.7 ± 0.3 kg: Control diet (barley and soybean); L diet (barley, soybean and 10% linseed) and L-A diet (barley, soybean, 5% linseed and 3.89% algae). Lambs fed L-A diet showed lower average daily gain and greater slaughter age compared to Control and L (P < 0.001). Carcass traits were not affected by L and L-A diets, but a trend towards greater adipocyte diameter was observed in L and L-A in the subcutaneous AT (P = 0.057). Adding either linseed or linseed and algae increased α-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid contents in both AT (P < 0.001); however, docosahexaenoic acid was increased by L-A (P < 0.001). The n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001). Algae had adverse effects on meat quality, with greater lipid oxidation and reduced ratings for odor and flavor. The expression of lipogenic genes was downregulated in the subcutaneous AT (P < 0.05): acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACACA) in L and L-A and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in L-A. Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) and fatty acid elongase 5 (ELOVL5) were unaffected. In the subcutaneous AT, supplementing either L or L-A increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and CAAT-enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) (P < 0.05), although it had no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 (SREBF1). In the intramuscular AT, expression of ACACA, SCD, FADS1 and FADS2 decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001) and LPL in L (P < 0.01), but PPARG, CEBPA and SREBF1 were unaffected. PMID:27253325

  19. Effects of Addition of Linseed and Marine Algae to the Diet on Adipose Tissue Development, Fatty Acid Profile, Lipogenic Gene Expression, and Meat Quality in Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Urrutia, Olaia; Mendizabal, José Antonio; Insausti, Kizkitza; Soret, Beatriz; Purroy, Antonio; Arana, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of linseed and algae on growth and carcass parameters, adipocyte cellularity, fatty acid profile and meat quality and gene expression in subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues (AT) in lambs. After weaning, 33 lambs were fed three diets up to 26.7 ± 0.3 kg: Control diet (barley and soybean); L diet (barley, soybean and 10% linseed) and L-A diet (barley, soybean, 5% linseed and 3.89% algae). Lambs fed L-A diet showed lower average daily gain and greater slaughter age compared to Control and L (P < 0.001). Carcass traits were not affected by L and L-A diets, but a trend towards greater adipocyte diameter was observed in L and L-A in the subcutaneous AT (P = 0.057). Adding either linseed or linseed and algae increased α-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid contents in both AT (P < 0.001); however, docosahexaenoic acid was increased by L-A (P < 0.001). The n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001). Algae had adverse effects on meat quality, with greater lipid oxidation and reduced ratings for odor and flavor. The expression of lipogenic genes was downregulated in the subcutaneous AT (P < 0.05): acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACACA) in L and L-A and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in L-A. Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) and fatty acid elongase 5 (ELOVL5) were unaffected. In the subcutaneous AT, supplementing either L or L-A increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and CAAT-enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) (P < 0.05), although it had no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 (SREBF1). In the intramuscular AT, expression of ACACA, SCD, FADS1 and FADS2 decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001) and LPL in L (P < 0.01), but PPARG, CEBPA and SREBF1 were unaffected. PMID:27253325

  20. Analysis of rdxA and Involvement of Additional Genes Encoding NAD(P)H Flavin Oxidoreductase (FrxA) and Ferredoxin-Like Protein (FdxB) in Metronidazole Resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dong-Hyeon; El-Zaatari, Fouad A. K.; Kato, Mototsugu; Osato, Michael S.; Reddy, Rita; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y.

    2000-01-01

    Metronidazole (Mtz) is a critical ingredient of modern multidrug therapies for Helicobacter pylori infection. Mtz resistance reduces the effectiveness of these combinations. Although null mutations in a rdxA gene that encodes oxygen-insensitive NAD(P)H nitroreductase was reported in Mtz-resistant H. pylori, an intact rdxA gene has also been reported in Mtz-resistant H. pylori, suggesting that additional Mtz resistance mechanisms exist in H. pylori. We explored the nature of Mtz resistance among 544 clinical H. pylori isolates to clarify the role of rdxA inactivation in Mtz resistance and to identify another gene(s) responsible for Mtz resistance in H. pylori. Mtz resistance was present in 33% (181 of 544) of the clinical isolates. There was marked heterogeneity of resistance, with Mtz MICs ranging from 8 to ≥256 μg/ml. rdxA inactivation resulted in Mtz MICs of up to 32 μg/ml for 6 Mtz-sensitive H. pylori strains and 128 μg/ml for one Mtz-sensitive strain. Single or dual (with rdxA) inactivation of genes that encode ferredoxin-like protein (designated fdxB) and NAD(P)H flavin oxidoreductase (frxA) also increased the MICs of Mtz for sensitive and resistant strains with low to moderate levels of Mtz resistance. fdxB inactivation resulted in a lower level of resistance than that from rdxA inactivation, whereas frxA inactivation resulted in MICs similar to those seen with rdxA inactivation. Further evidence for involvement of the frxA gene in Mtz resistance included the finding of a naturally inactivated frxA but an intact rdxA in an Mtz-resistant strain, complementation of Mtz sensitivity from an Mtz-sensitive strain to an Mtz-resistant strain or vice versa by use of naturally inactivated or functional frxA genes, respectively, and transformation of an Mtz-resistant Escherichia coli strain to an Mtz sensitive strain by a naturally functional frxA gene but not an inactivated frxA gene. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that null mutations in fdx

  1. Non-additive hepatic gene expression elicited by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) co-treatment in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, Anna K.; D'Souza, Michelle L.; Mets, Bryan D.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Reese, Sarah E.; Archer, Kellie J.; Potter, Dave; Tashiro, Colleen; Sharratt, Bonnie; Harkema, Jack R.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2011-10-15

    Interactions between environmental contaminants can lead to non-additive effects that may affect the toxicity and risk assessment of a mixture. Comprehensive time course and dose-response studies with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), non-dioxin-like 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) and their mixture were performed in immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice. Mice were gavaged once with 30 {mu}g/kg TCDD, 300 mg/kg PCB153, a mixture of 30 {mu}g/kg TCDD with 300 mg/kg PCB153 (MIX) or sesame oil vehicle for 4,12, 24,72 or 168 h. In the 24 h dose-response study, animals were gavaged with TCDD (0.3,1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 30, 45 {mu}g/kg), PCB153 (3,10, 30, 60, 100, 150, 300, 450 mg/kg), MIX (0.3 + 3, 1 + 10, 3 + 30, 6 + 60, 10 + 100, 15 + 150, 30 + 300, 45 {mu}g/kg TCDD + 450 mg/kg PCB153, respectively) or vehicle. All three treatments significantly increased relative liver weights (RLW), with MIX eliciting significantly greater increases compared to TCDD and PCB153 alone. Histologically, MIX induced hepatocellular hypertrophy, vacuolization, inflammation, hyperplasia and necrosis, a combination of TCDD and PCB153 responses. Complementary lipid analyses identified significant increases in hepatic triglycerides in MIX and TCDD samples, while PCB153 had no effect on lipids. Hepatic PCB153 levels were also significantly increased with TCDD co-treatment. Microarray analysis identified 167 TCDD, 185 PCB153 and 388 MIX unique differentially expressed genes. Statistical modeling of quantitative real-time PCR analysis of Pla2g12a, Serpinb6a, Nqo1, Srxn1, and Dysf verified non-additive expression following MIX treatment compared to TCDD and PCB153 alone. In summary, TCDD and PCB153 co-treatment elicited specific non-additive gene expression effects that are consistent with RLW increases, histopathology, and hepatic lipid accumulation. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > MIX (TCDD:PCB153 at 1:10,000 ratio) exposure leads to non-additive gene expression

  2. Replication of a Gene-Environment Interaction via Multimodel Inference: Additive-Genetic Variance in Adolescents’ General Cognitive Ability Increases with Family-of-Origin Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES—an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research. PMID:25539975

  3. Replication of a gene-environment interaction Via Multimodel inference: additive-genetic variance in adolescents' general cognitive ability increases with family-of-origin socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2015-03-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES-an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research. PMID:25539975

  4. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  5. The potential role of PR-8 gene of apple fruit in the mode of action of yeast antagonist, Candida oleophila, in postharvest biocontrol of Botrytis cinerea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several pathogenesis-related (PR) genes of apple have been cloned and identified in response to specific pathogens. However, different PR genes in certain organs of specific host may be involved in specific interaction with different microbes. Current research is aimed at characterizing specific P...

  6. Frequent N addition and clonal relatedness among immunoglobulin lambda light chains expressed in rheumatoid arthritis synovia and PBL, and the influence of V lambda gene segment utilization on CDR3 length.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), B-lineage cells in the synovial membrane secrete large amounts of immunoglobulin that contribute to tissue destruction. The CDR3 of an immunoglobulin light chain is formed by rearrangements of VL and JL gene segments. Addition of non-germline-encoded (N) nucleotides at V(D)J joins by the enzyme terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) enhances antibody diversity. TdT was previously thought to be active in B cells only during heavy chain rearrangement, but we and others reported unexpectedly high levels of N addition in kappa light chains. We also found clonally related kappa chains bearing unusually long CDR3 intervals in RA synovium, suggesting oligoclonal expansion of a set of atypical B lymphocytes. In this study, we analyzed lambda light chain expression to determine if N addition occurs throughout immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and to compare CDR3 lengths of lambda and kappa light chains in RA patients and normal individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of V lambda III transcripts was performed on RA synovia and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and normal PBL for which kappa repertoires were previously analyzed. Representative lambda + PCR products were cloned and sequenced. RESULTS: Analysis of 161 cDNA clones revealed that N addition occurs in lambda light chains of RA patients and normal controls. The lambda light chain repertoires in RA were enriched for long CDR3 intervals. In both RA and controls, CDR3 lengths were strongly influenced by which V lambda gene segment was present in the rearrangement. Five sets of clonally related sequences were found in RA synovia and PBL; one set was found in normal PBL. CONCLUSIONS: In humans, unlike mice, N addition enhances antibody diversity at all stages of immunoglobulin assembly, and the structural diversity of lambda CDR3 intervals is greater than that of kappa light chains. Clonally related V lambda

  7. Gene delivery using calcium phosphate nanoparticles: Optimization of the transfection process and the effects of citrate and poly(l-lysine) as additives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed A; Wu, Victoria M; Ghosh, Shreya; Uskoković, Vuk

    2016-06-01

    Despite the long history of nanoparticulate calcium phosphate (CaP) as a non-viral transfection agent, there has been limited success in attempts to optimize its properties for transfection comparable in efficiency to that of viral vectors. Here we focus on the optimization of: (a) CaP nanoparticle precipitation conditions, predominantly supersaturation and Ca/P molar ratios; (b) transfection conditions, mainly the concentrations of the carrier and plasmid DNA; (c) the presence of surface additives, including citrate anion and cationic poly(l-lysine) (PLL). CaP nanoparticles significantly improved transfection with plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells compared to a commercial non-viral carrier. At the same time they elicited significantly lesser cytotoxicity than the commercial carrier. Plasmid DNA acted as a nucleation promoter, decreasing the nucleation lag time of metastable CaP solutions and leading to a higher rate of nucleation and a lower size of the precipitated particles. The degree of supersaturation (DS) of 15 was found to be more optimal for transfection than that of 12.5 or 17.5 and higher. Because CaP particles precipitated at DS 15 were spherical, while DS 17.5 and 21 yielded acicular particles, it was concluded that spherical particle morphologies were more conducive to transfection than the anisotropic ones. Even though the yield at DS 15 was 10 and 100 times lower than that at DS 17.5 and 21, respectively, transfection rates were higher using CaP nanoparticle colloids prepared at DS 15 than using those made at higher or lower DS, indicating that the right particle morphology can outweigh the difference in the amount of the carrier, even when this difference is close to 100×. In contrast to the commercial carrier, the concentration of CaP-pDNA delivered to the cells was directly proportional to the transfection rate. Osteosarcoma K7M2 cells were four times more easily transfectable with

  8. Galileons from Lovelock actions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Acoleyen, Karel; Van Doorsselaere, Jos

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate how, for an arbitrary number of dimensions, the Galileon actions and their covariant generalizations can be obtained through a standard Kaluza-Klein compactification of higher-dimensional Lovelock gravity. In this setup, the dilaton takes on the role of the Galileon. In addition, such compactifications uncover other more general Galilean actions, producing purely second-order equations in the weak-field limit, now both for the Galileon and the metric perturbations.

  9. Corrective Action Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The glossary of technical terms was prepared to facilitate the use of the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) issued by OSWER on November 14, 1986. The CAP presents model scopes of work for all phases of a corrective action program, including the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI), Corrective Measures Study (CMS), Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI), and interim measures. The Corrective Action Glossary includes brief definitions of the technical terms used in the CAP and explains how they are used. In addition, expected ranges (where applicable) are provided. Parameters or terms not discussed in the CAP, but commonly associated with site investigations or remediations are also included.

  10. Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on action learning moderated by Lex Dilworth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Developing an Infrastructure for Individual and Organizational Change: Transfer of Learning from an Action Reflection Learning (ARL) Program" (ARL Inquiry) reports findings from a study…

  11. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  12. Analysis of the dissociated steroid RU24858 does not exclude a role for inducible genes in the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Joanna E; Gong, Wei; King, Elizabeth M; Seybold, Joachim; Mak, Judith C; Donnelly, Louise E; Holden, Neil S; Newton, Robert

    2006-12-01

    Although repression of inflammatory gene expression makes glucocorticoids powerful anti-inflammatory agents, side effects limit usage and drive the search for improved glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligands. In A549 pulmonary cells, dexamethasone and the prototypical dissociated ligand RU24858 (Mol Endocrinol 11:1245-1255, 1997) repress interleukin (IL)-1beta-induced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and IL-8. Although RU24858 is a weaker GR ligand, both glucocorticoids showed similar efficacies on transrepression of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent transcription, whereas RU24858 yielded less than 12% of the response to dexamethasone on a classic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) reporter (transactivation). Modest NF-kappaB-dependent transrepression ( approximately 40%), along with analysis of IL-8 transcription rate and the accumulation of unspliced nuclear RNA, indicates that transrepression does not fully account for the repression of genes such as IL-8. This was confirmed by the finding that mRNA degradation is increased by both dexamethasone and RU24858. Analysis of IL-1beta-induced steady-state mRNA levels for IL-8 and COX-2 show that dexamethasone- and RU24858-dependent repression of these genes is attenuated by inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis. Because similar effects were observed with respect to COX-2 and IL-8 protein expression, we conclude that glucocorticoid-dependent gene expression is necessary for repression by both glucocorticoids. Despite RU24858 being defective at classic GRE-dependent transactivation, both dexamethasone and RU24858 induced the expression of potentially anti-inflammatory genes and metabolic genes, suggesting the importance of nontraditional glucocorticoid-dependent gene expression. Thus, classic transactivation- and transrepressionbased screens for anti-inflammatory "dissociated" GR ligands may be flawed because they may not reflect the effects on real glucocorticoid-inducible genes. PMID:16988013

  13. Genome-scale analysis of the cotton KCS gene family revealed a binary mode of action for gibberellin A regulated fiber growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Hui; Wang, Kun; Huang, Gai; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Production of β-ketoacyl-CoA, which is catalyzed by 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), is the first step in very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis. Here we identified 58 KCS genes from Gossypium hirsutum, 31 from G. arboreum and 33 from G. raimondii by searching the assembled cotton genomes. The gene family was divided into the plant-specific FAE1-type and the more general ELO-type. KCS transcripts were widely expressed and 32 of them showed distinct subgenome-specific expressions in one or more cotton tissues/organs studied. Six GhKCS genes rescued the lethality of elo2Δelo3Δ yeast double mutant, indicating that this gene family possesses diversified functions. Most KCS genes with GA-responsive elements (GAREs) in the promoters were significantly upregulated by gibberellin A3 (GA). Exogenous GA3 not only promoted fiber length, but also increased the thickness of cell walls significantly. GAREs present also in the promoters of several cellulose synthase (CesA) genes required for cell wall biosynthesis and they were all induced significantly by GA3 . Because GA treatment resulted in longer cotton fibers with thicker cell walls and higher dry weight per unit cell length, we suggest that it may regulate fiber elongation upstream of the VLCFA-ethylene pathway and also in the downstream steps towards cell wall synthesis. PMID:26399709

  14. Increased yield of actionable mutations using multi-gene panels to assess hereditary cancer susceptibility in an ethnically diverse clinical cohort.

    PubMed

    Ricker, Charité; Culver, Julie O; Lowstuter, Katrina; Sturgeon, Duveen; Sturgeon, Julia D; Chanock, Christopher R; Gauderman, William J; McDonnell, Kevin J; Idos, Gregory E; Gruber, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to assess multi-gene panel testing in an ethnically diverse clinical cancer genetics practice. We conducted a retrospective study of individuals with a personal or family history of cancer undergoing clinically indicated multi-gene panel tests of 6-110 genes, from six commercial laboratories. The 475 patients in the study included 228 Hispanics (47.6%), 166 non-Hispanic Whites (35.4%), 55 Asians (11.6%), 19 Blacks (4.0%), and seven others (1.5%). Panel testing found that 15.6% (74/475) of patients carried deleterious mutations for a total of 79 mutations identified. This included 7.4% (35/475) of patients who had a mutation identified that would not have been tested with a gene-by-gene approach. The identification of a panel-added mutation impacted clinical management for most of cases (69%, 24/35), and genetic testing was recommended for the first degree relatives of nearly all of them (91%, 32/35). Variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) were identified in a higher proportion of tests performed in ethnic minorities. Multi-gene panel testing increases the yield of mutations detected and adds to the capability of providing individualized cancer risk assessment. VUSs represent an interpretive challenge due to less data available outside of White, non-Hispanic populations. Further studies are necessary to expand understanding of the implementation and utilization of panels across broad clinical settings and patient populations. PMID:26908360

  15. Analysis of Five Gene Sets in Chimpanzees Suggests Decoupling between the Action of Selection on Protein-Coding and on Noncoding Elements

    PubMed Central

    Santpere, Gabriel; Carnero-Montoro, Elena; Petit, Natalia; Serra, François; Hvilsom, Christina; Rambla, Jordi; Heredia-Genestar, Jose Maria; Halligan, Daniel L.; Dopazo, Hernan; Navarro, Arcadi; Bosch, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We set out to investigate potential differences and similarities between the selective forces acting upon the coding and noncoding regions of five different sets of genes defined according to functional and evolutionary criteria: 1) two reference gene sets presenting accelerated and slow rates of protein evolution (the Complement and Actin pathways); 2) a set of genes with evidence of accelerated evolution in at least one of their introns; and 3) two gene sets related to neurological function (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases). To that effect, we combine human–chimpanzee divergence patterns with polymorphism data obtained from target resequencing 20 central chimpanzees, our closest relatives with largest long-term effective population size. By using the distribution of fitness effect-alpha extension of the McDonald–Kreitman test, we reproduce inferences of rates of evolution previously based only on divergence data on both coding and intronic sequences and also obtain inferences for other classes of genomic elements (untranslated regions, promoters, and conserved noncoding sequences). Our results suggest that 1) the distribution of fitness effect-alpha method successfully helps distinguishing different scenarios of accelerated divergence (adaptation or relaxed selective constraints) and 2) the adaptive history of coding and noncoding sequences within the gene sets analyzed is decoupled. PMID:25977458

  16. Analysis of Five Gene Sets in Chimpanzees Suggests Decoupling between the Action of Selection on Protein-Coding and on Noncoding Elements.

    PubMed

    Santpere, Gabriel; Carnero-Montoro, Elena; Petit, Natalia; Serra, François; Hvilsom, Christina; Rambla, Jordi; Heredia-Genestar, Jose Maria; Halligan, Daniel L; Dopazo, Hernan; Navarro, Arcadi; Bosch, Elena

    2015-06-01

    We set out to investigate potential differences and similarities between the selective forces acting upon the coding and noncoding regions of five different sets of genes defined according to functional and evolutionary criteria: 1) two reference gene sets presenting accelerated and slow rates of protein evolution (the Complement and Actin pathways); 2) a set of genes with evidence of accelerated evolution in at least one of their introns; and 3) two gene sets related to neurological function (Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases). To that effect, we combine human-chimpanzee divergence patterns with polymorphism data obtained from target resequencing 20 central chimpanzees, our closest relatives with largest long-term effective population size. By using the distribution of fitness effect-alpha extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, we reproduce inferences of rates of evolution previously based only on divergence data on both coding and intronic sequences and also obtain inferences for other classes of genomic elements (untranslated regions, promoters, and conserved noncoding sequences). Our results suggest that 1) the distribution of fitness effect-alpha method successfully helps distinguishing different scenarios of accelerated divergence (adaptation or relaxed selective constraints) and 2) the adaptive history of coding and noncoding sequences within the gene sets analyzed is decoupled. PMID:25977458

  17. 77 FR 37659 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... interested persons an opportunity to submit comments on the proposed actions. Revision On 5/25/2012 (77 FR... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the procurement...

  18. Delving into Egocentric Actions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yin; Ye, Zhefan; Rehg, James M.

    2016-01-01

    We address the challenging problem of recognizing the camera wearer's actions from videos captured by an egocentric camera. Egocentric videos encode a rich set of signals regarding the camera wearer, including head movement, hand pose and gaze information. We propose to utilize these mid-level egocentric cues for egocentric action recognition. We present a novel set of egocentric features and show how they can be combined with motion and object features. The result is a compact representation with superior performance. In addition, we provide the first systematic evaluation of motion, object and egocentric cues in egocentric action recognition. Our benchmark leads to several surprising findings. These findings uncover the best practices for egocentric actions, with a significant performance boost over all previous state-of-the-art methods on three publicly available datasets. PMID:26973427

  19. A novel gene EaF82a from variegated Epipremnum aureum and its potential involvement in light associated auxin action in shoot meristems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    EaF82, a gene identified in previous studies of the variegated plant Epipremnum aureum, exhibited a unique expression pattern with greater transcript abundance in yellow sectors than green sectors of variegated leaves, but lower abundance in regenerated pale yellow plants than in green plants derive...

  20. Action, human.

    PubMed

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term "human action" designates the intentional and deliberate movement that is proper and exclusive to mankind. Human action is a unified structure: knowledge, intention or volition, deliberation, decision or choice of means and execution. The integration between these dimensions appears as a task that demands strength of will to achieve the synthesis of self-possession and self-control that enables full personal realisation. Recently, the debate about the dynamism of human action has been enriched by the contribution of neurosciences. Thanks to techniques of neuroimaging, neurosciences have expanded the field of investigation to the nature of volition, to the role of the brain in decision-making processes and to the notion of freedom and responsibility. PMID:20393686

  1. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin analog (DM1): Effect on iNOS and COX-2 gene expression and autophagy pathways.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Niraldo; Paulino, Amarilis Scremin; Diniz, Susana N; de Mendonça, Sergio; Gonçalves, Ivair D; Faião Flores, Fernanda; Santos, Reginaldo Pereira; Rodrigues, Carina; Pardi, Paulo Celso; Quincoces Suarez, José Agustin

    2016-04-15

    This work describes the anti-inflammatory effect of the curcumin-analog compound, sodium 4-[5-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-oxo-penta-1,4-dienyl]-2-methoxy-phenolate (DM1), and shows that DM1 modulates iNOS and COX-2 gene expression in cultured RAW 264.7 cells and induces autophagy on human melanoma cell line A375. PMID:27010501

  2. The Non-Genomic Actions of Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Hii, Charles S; Ferrante, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1920, a great deal of effort has gone into investigating the physiological actions of vitamin D and the impact its deficiency has on human health. Despite this intense interest, there is still disagreement on what constitutes the lower boundary of adequacy and on the Recommended Dietary Allowance. There has also been a major push to elucidate the biochemistry of vitamin D, its metabolic pathways and the mechanisms that mediate its action. Originally thought to act by altering the expression of target genes, it was realized in the mid-1980s that some of the actions of vitamin D were too rapid to be accounted for by changes at the genomic level. These rapid non-genomic actions have attracted as much interest as the genomic actions and they have spawned additional questions in an already busy field. This mini-review attempts to summarise the in vitro and in vivo work that has been conducted to characterise the rapid non-genomic actions, the mechanisms that give rise to these properties and the roles that these play in the overall action of vitamin D at the cellular level. Understanding the effects of vitamin D at the cellular level should enable the design of elegant human studies to extract the full potential of vitamin D to benefit human health. PMID:26950144

  3. Protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation blocks juvenile hormone action.

    PubMed

    Kethidi, Damu R; Li, Yiping; Palli, Subba R

    2006-03-01

    Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate a wide variety of developmental and physiological processes in insects. Although the biological actions of JH are well documented, the molecular mechanisms underlying JH action are poorly understood. We studied the molecular basis of JH action using a JH response element (JHRE) identified in the promoter region of JH esterase gene cloned from Choristoneura fumiferana, which is responsive to JH and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). In Drosophila melanogaster L57 cells, the JHRE-regulated reporter gene was induced by JH I, JH III, methoprene, and hydroprene. Nuclear proteins isolated from L57 cells bound to the JHRE and exposure of these proteins to ATP resulted in a reduction in their DNA binding. Either JH III or calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) was able to restore the binding of nuclear proteins to the DNA. In addition, protein kinase C inhibitors increased and protein kinase C activators reduced the binding of nuclear proteins to the JHRE. In transactivation assays, protein kinase C inhibitors induced the luciferase gene placed under the control of a minimal promoter and the JHRE. These data suggest that protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation prevents binding of nuclear proteins to juvenile hormone responsive promoters resulting in suppression of JH action. PMID:16448742

  4. Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton-Brkich, Katie Lynn; Shumbera, Kristen; Beran, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Defined as "any systemic inquiry conducted by teachers... for the purpose of gathering information about how their particular schools operate, how they teach, and how their students learn" (Mertler, 2009), "action research" is empowering and professional research done by teachers to inform and improves their own practices. Although there are many…

  5. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  6. The good-genes and compatible-genes benefits of mate choice.

    PubMed

    Puurtinen, Mikael; Ketola, Tarmo; Kotiaho, J S

    2009-11-01

    Genetic benefits from mate choice could be attained by choosing mates with high heritable quality ("good genes") and that are genetically compatible ("compatible genes"). We clarify the conceptual and empirical framework for estimating genetic benefits of mate choice, stressing that benefits must be measured from offspring fitness because there are no unequivocal surrogates for genetic quality of individuals or for compatibility of parents. We detail the relationship between genetic benefits and additive and nonadditive genetic variance in fitness, showing that the benefits have been overestimated in previous verbal treatments. We point out that additive benefits readily arise from nonadditive gene action and that the idea of "heritable nonadditive benefits" is a misconception. We review the empirical evidence of the magnitude of benefits of good genes and compatible genes in animal populations, and we outline the most promising future directions for empirical research on the genetic benefits of mate choice. PMID:19772439

  7. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives.... (b) Action on a request for exemption for investigational use of a food additive if the food...

  8. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives.... (b) Action on a request for exemption for investigational use of a food additive if the food...

  9. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives.... (b) Action on a request for exemption for investigational use of a food additive if the food...

  10. 21 CFR 25.32 - Foods, food additives, and color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foods, food additives, and color additives. 25.32... ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Categorical Exclusions § 25.32 Foods, food additives, and color additives.... (b) Action on a request for exemption for investigational use of a food additive if the food...

  11. Citizen's actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The role played by individual citizens as consumers of energy was examined, with emphasis on studying ways in which their action could result in energy conservation. It was shown that there are ways that energy can be conserved in this way, with citizens acting either individually or in groups. The potential savings are significant, but the actual savings may be quite small. The citizens need to be motivated to save and to believe in a conservation ethic; developing such an ethic is difficult, and perhaps not responsive to the shotgun approach now being attempted. The true course of action may be to synthesize new societal structures that provide the maximum evolution of culture within the limitation of scarce energy resources.

  12. Actionable Nuggets

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Smith, Karen; McColl, Alexander; Green, Michael; Godwin, Marshall; Birtwhistle, Richard; Norman, Kathleen; Brankston, Gabrielle; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice. Design Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets’ effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility. Setting Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia. Participants Forty-nine primary care physicians. Methods Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants’ opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews. Main findings With Actionable Nuggets, participants’ knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians’ practices was 72%. Participants’ awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent. Conclusion Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian

  13. Nongenomic actions of neurosteroid pregnenolone and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jui-Hsia; Chung, Bon-Chu

    2016-07-01

    Steroids have been widely used in the clinical setting. They bind and activate nuclear receptors to regulate gene expression. In addition to activating genomic transcription, steroids also exert nongenomic actions. The current article focuses on the nongenomic actions of neurosteroids, including pregnenolone (P5), 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, pregnenolone sulfate and allopregnanolone. Pregnenolone and its derivatives promote neuronal activity by enhancing learning and memory, relieving depression, enhancing locomotor activity, and promoting neuronal cell survival. They exert these effects by activating various target proteins located in the cytoplasm or cell membrane. Pregnenolone and its metabolites bind to receptors such as microtubule-associated proteins and neurotransmitter receptors to elicit a series of reactions including stabilization of microtubules, increase of ion flux into cells, and dopamine release. The wide actions of neurosteroids indicate that pregnenolone derivatives have great potential in future treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:26844377

  14. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  15. 77 FR 49783 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  16. 78 FR 9386 - Procurement List; Addition

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  17. 78 FR 45183 - Procurement List Additions

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  1. 75 FR 54114 - Procurement List Additions

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    2010-09-03

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  5. 75 FR 39497 - Procurement List; Additions

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  6. 78 FR 59658 - Procurement List; Additions

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  7. 77 FR 12816 - Procurement List; Additions

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  8. 76 FR 80345 - Procurement List; Additions

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 2/26/2010 (75 FR 8927), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  10. 75 FR 43152 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 5/28/2010 (75 FR 29994-29995) and 6/4/2010 (75 FR 31768-31769), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  11. 75 FR 29995 - Procurement List Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 12/18/2009 (74 FR 67176-67177), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  12. 78 FR 4133 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Addition On 11/9/2012 (77 FR 67343-67344), the Committee for Purchase From People Who... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List....

  13. 76 FR 23997 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 2/25/2011 (76 FR 10571), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  14. 77 FR 59595 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 7/9/2012 (77 FR 40344-40345) and 7/20/2012 (77 FR 42701-42702), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  15. 76 FR 35415 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 4/29/2011 (76 FR 23998), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  16. 78 FR 2378 - Procurement List, Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/9/2012 (77 FR 67343-67344), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  17. 75 FR 72815 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/4/2010 (75 FR 31768-31769) and 10/1/2010 (75 FR 60739-60740), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  18. 78 FR 16476 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ...: Additions On 1/18/2013 (78 FR 4133-4134), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  19. 75 FR 70908 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 9/24/2010 (75 FR 58367), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  20. 75 FR 58366 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/11/2010 (75 FR 33270-33271) and 7/16/2010 (75 FR 41451), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  1. 75 FR 52723 - Procurement List Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 7/9/2010 (75 FR 39497-39499), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  2. Deoxynivalenol Impairs Hepatic and Intestinal Gene Expression of Selected Oxidative Stress, Tight Junction and Inflammation Proteins in Broiler Chickens, but Addition of an Adsorbing Agent Shifts the Effects to the Distal Parts of the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Osselaere, Ann; Santos, Regiane; Hautekiet, Veerle; De Backer, Patrick; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Croubels, Siska

    2013-01-01

    Broiler chickens are rather resistant to deoxynivalenol and thus, clinical signs are rarely seen. However, effects of subclinical concentrations of deoxynivalenol on both the intestine and the liver are less frequently studied at the molecular level. During our study, we investigated the effects of three weeks of feeding deoxynivalenol on the gut wall morphology, intestinal barrier function and inflammation in broiler chickens. In addition, oxidative stress was evaluated in both the liver and intestine. Besides, the effect of a clay-based mycotoxin adsorbing agent on these different aspects was also studied. Our results show that feeding deoxynivalenol affects the gut wall morphology both in duodenum and jejenum of broiler chickens. A qRT-PCR analysis revealed that deoxynivalenol acts in a very specific way on the intestinal barrier, since only an up-regulation in mRNA expression of claudin 5 in jejunum was observed, while no effects were seen on claudin 1, zona occludens 1 and 2. Addition of an adsorbing agent resulted in an up-regulation of all the investigated genes coding for the intestinal barrier in the ileum. Up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 and two markers of oxidative stress (heme-oxigenase or HMOX and xanthine oxidoreductase or XOR) were mainly seen in the jejunum and to a lesser extent in the ileum in response to deoxynivalenol, while in combination with an adsorbing agent main effect was seen in the ileum. These results suggest that an adsorbing agent may lead to higher concentrations of deoxynivalenol in the more distal parts of the small intestine. In the liver, XOR was up-regulated due to DON exposure. HMOX and HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) were down-regulated due to feeding DON but also due to feeding the adsorbing agent alone or in combination with DON. PMID:23922676

  3. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  4. Evaluation of the butter flavoring chemical diacetyl and a fluorochemical paper additive for mutagenicity and toxicity using the mammalian cell gene mutation assay in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Paul; Clarke, Jane J; San, Richard H C; Begley, Timothy H; Dunkel, Virginia C

    2008-08-01

    Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) is a yellowish liquid that is usually mixed with other ingredients to produce butter flavor or other flavors in a variety of food products. Inhalation of butter flavoring vapors was first associated with clinical bronchiolitis obliterans among workers in microwave popcorn production. Recent findings have shown irreversible obstructive lung disease among workers not only in the microwave popcorn industry, but also in flavoring manufacture, and in chemical synthesis of diacetyl, a predominant chemical for butter flavoring. It has been reported that perfluorochemicals utilized in food packaging are migrating into foods and may be sources of oral exposure. Relatively small quantities of perfluorochemicals are used in the manufacturing of paper or paperboard that is in direct contact with food to repel oil or grease and water. Because of recent concerns about perfluorochemicals such as those found on microwave popcorn bags (e.g. Lodyne P208E) and diacetyl in foods, we evaluated both compounds for mutagenicity using the mammalian cell gene mutation assay in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. Lodyne P208E was less toxic than diacetyl and did not induce a mutagenic response. Diacetyl induced a highly mutagenic response in the L5178Y mouse lymphoma mutation assay in the presence of human liver S9 for activation. The increase in the frequency of small colonies in the assay with diacetyl indicates that diacetyl causes damage to multiple loci on chromosome 11 in addition to functional loss of the thymidine kinase locus. PMID:18585428

  5. 76 FR 78021 - Description of Boundary Addition, Noatak National Preserve

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... National Park Service Description of Boundary Addition, Noatak National Preserve AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of boundary addition description. SUMMARY: This notice sets out the legal description of the Noatak National Preserve and Wilderness Addition. FOR FURTHER...

  6. Social Action As An Objective of Social Studies Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Charles K.

    This paper presents a rationale for making social action a major goal of elementary and secondary school social studies education. In addition, it describes social action models, suggests social action approaches appropriate for students at various grade levels, and reviews literature on social action by public school students. Social action is…

  7. 15 CFR 752.16 - Administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative actions. 752.16 Section... COMPREHENSIVE LICENSE § 752.16 Administrative actions. (a)(1) If BIS is not satisfied that you or other parties... parties to such licenses are not adequate, BIS may, in addition to any enforcement action pursuant to...

  8. Enabling comparative gene expression studies of thyroid hormone action through the development of a flexible real-time quantitative PCR assay for use across multiple anuran indicator and sentinel species.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Propper, Catherine R; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-03-01

    Studies performed across diverse frog species have made substantial contributions to our understanding of basic vertebrate development and the natural or anthropogenic environmental factors impacting sensitive life stages. Because, anurans are developmental models, provide ecosystems services, and act as sentinels for the identification of environmental chemical contaminants that interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action during postembryonic development, there is demand for flexible assessment techniques that can be applied to multiple species. As part of the "thyroid assays across indicator and sentinel species" (TAXISS) initiative, we have designed and validated a series of cross-species real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) primer sets that provide information on transcriptome components in evolutionarily distant anurans. Validation for fifteen gene transcripts involved a rigorous three-tiered quality control within tissue/development-specific contexts. Assay performance was confirmed on multiple tissues (tail fin, liver, brain, and intestine) of Rana catesbeiana and Xenopus laevis tadpoles enabling comparisons between tissues and generation of response profiles to exogenous TH. This revealed notable differences in TH-responsive gene transcripts including thra, thrb, thibz, klf9, col1a2, fn1, plp1, mmp2, timm50, otc, and dio2, suggesting differential regulation and susceptibility to contaminant effects. Evidence for the applicability of the TAXISS anuran qPCR assay across seven other species is also provided with five frog families represented and its utility in defining genome structure was demonstrated. This novel validated approach will enable meaningful comparative studies between frog species and aid in extending knowledge of developmental regulatory pathways and the impact of environmental factors on TH signaling in frog species for which little or no genetic information is currently available. PMID:24503578

  9. CCSDS Mission Operations Action Service Core Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Walter F.; Lucord, Steven A.; Stevens, John E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the operations concepts of the command (action) services. Since the consequences of sending the wrong command are unacceptable, the command system provides a collaborative and distributed work environment for flight controllers and operators. The system prescribes a review and approval process where each command is viewed by other individuals before being sent to the vehicle. The action service needs additional capabilities to support he operations concepts of manned space flight. These are : (1) Action Service methods (2) Action attributes (3) Action parameter/argument attributes (4 ) Support for dynamically maintained action data. (5) Publish subscri be capabilities.

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans dnj-14, the orthologue of the DNAJC5 gene mutated in adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, provides a new platform for neuroprotective drug screening and identifies a SIR-2.1-independent action of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sudhanva S; Johnson, James R; McCue, Hannah V; Chen, Xi; Edmonds, Matthew J; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Graham, Margaret E; Jenn, Robert C; Barclay, Jeff W; Burgoyne, Robert D; Morgan, Alan

    2014-11-15

    Adult onset neuronal lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is a human neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction and premature death. Recently, the mutations that cause ANCL were mapped to the DNAJC5 gene, which encodes cysteine string protein alpha. We show here that mutating dnj-14, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of DNAJC5, results in shortened lifespan and a small impairment of locomotion and neurotransmission. Mutant dnj-14 worms also exhibited age-dependent neurodegeneration of sensory neurons, which was preceded by severe progressive chemosensory defects. A focussed chemical screen revealed that resveratrol could ameliorate dnj-14 mutant phenotypes, an effect mimicked by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram. In contrast to other worm neurodegeneration models, activation of the Sirtuin, SIR-2.1, was not required, as sir-2.1; dnj-14 double mutants showed full lifespan rescue by resveratrol. The Sirtuin-independent neuroprotective action of resveratrol revealed here suggests potential therapeutic applications for ANCL and possibly other human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24947438

  11. 75 FR 3714 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the procurement list... Must Be Received On or Before: 2/22/2010. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are...

  12. 75 FR 81235 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List... Must Be Received On or Before: 1/23/2011. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are...

  13. 77 FR 35942 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List...: Comments Must be Received on or Before: 7/16/2012. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who...

  14. 78 FR 40727 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and a service to the Procurement List that will...

  15. 76 FR 59117 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will...

  16. 75 FR 34701 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will...

  17. 78 FR 34351 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... (78 FR 21916), the Committee for Purchase from People Who are Blind or Severely Disabled published... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People Who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  18. 75 FR 38467 - Procurement List: Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List: Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products to the Procurement List that will be furnished...

  19. 77 FR 47823 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a product to the Procurement List that will be furnished by...

  20. 75 FR 60739 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the procurement list. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement List that will be provided...

  1. 78 FR 40727 - Procurement List Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... (78 FR 25970-25971), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  2. 76 FR 45542 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed addition to the procurement list. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a product to the Procurement List that will be furnished by...

  3. 75 FR 14575 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add to the Procurement List products and a service to be...

  4. 78 FR 19248 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be provided...

  5. 76 FR 76952 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by...

  6. 78 FR 52512 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and a service to the Procurement List that will...

  7. 76 FR 75536 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by...

  8. 75 FR 69639 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by...

  9. 78 FR 22209 - Additional Synthetic Drug Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 26 Additional Synthetic Drug Testing AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... NRC amend its Fitness for Duty program regulations to amend drug testing requirements to test for additional synthetic drugs currently not included in the regulations. The NRC determined that the...

  10. 75 FR 2510 - Procurement List: Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List: Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add to the Procurement List services to be provided by...

  11. 76 FR 19978 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be furnished...

  12. 78 FR 65617 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... 9/13/2013 (78 FR 56680) and 9/20/2013 (78 FR 57844), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  13. 76 FR 5142 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Procurement List. Service Type/Location: Base Operations Support Service Directorate of Public Works (DPW... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement...

  14. 76 FR 26279 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement List that will be provided...

  15. 77 FR 69598 - Procurement List Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed addition to the procurement list. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by...

  16. 75 FR 68328 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed addition to the Procurement List... Received on or Before: 12/6/2010. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or...

  17. 75 FR 8927 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed addition to the Procurement List... before: March 29, 2010. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely...

  18. 78 FR 32632 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... 4/5/2013 (78 FR 20622-20623), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People Who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  19. 77 FR 44220 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List... nonprofit agency employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities. DATES: Comments Must...

  20. 78 FR 63967 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... 8/9/2013 (78 FR 48656-48657), 8/16/2013 (78 FR 50040), and 8/23/ 2013 (78 FR 52512-52513), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  1. 77 FR 29596 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the... that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other...

  2. 78 FR 7412 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List... nonprofit agency employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities. DATES: Comments Must...

  3. 77 FR 77038 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List... furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities....

  4. 77 FR 49784 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the... provided by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities....

  5. 77 FR 56813 - Procurement List, Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List... furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe...

  6. 77 FR 41377 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

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  7. 78 FR 50040 - Procurement List, Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  8. 76 FR 14943 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

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  9. 76 FR 41767 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

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  10. 77 FR 27737 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

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  11. 75 FR 58367 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  12. 78 FR 25971 - Procurement List, Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

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  13. 78 FR 35874 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

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  14. 75 FR 55309 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  15. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBPα, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Stacy; Guo, Hong; Friedman, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBPα binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBPα, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid transformation. PMID:25938608

  16. The role of action prediction and inhibitory control for joint action coordination in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Haartsen, R; Stapel, J C; Hunnius, S

    2015-11-01

    From early in life, young children eagerly engage in social interactions. Yet, they still have difficulties in performing well-coordinated joint actions with others. Adult literature suggests that two processes are important for smooth joint action coordination: action prediction and inhibitory control. The aim of the current study was to disentangle the potential role of these processes in the early development of joint action coordination. Using a simple turn-taking game, we assessed 2½-year-old toddlers' joint action coordination, focusing on timing variability and turn-taking accuracy. In two additional tasks, we examined their action prediction capabilities with an eye-tracking paradigm and examined their inhibitory control capabilities with a classic executive functioning task (gift delay task). We found that individual differences in action prediction and inhibitory action control were distinctly related to the two aspects of joint action coordination. Toddlers who showed more precision in their action predictions were less variable in their action timing during the joint play. Furthermore, toddlers who showed more inhibitory control in an individual context were more accurate in their turn-taking performance during the joint action. On the other hand, no relation between timing variability and inhibitory control or between turn-taking accuracy and action prediction was found. The current results highlight the distinct role of action prediction and inhibitory action control for the quality of joint action coordination in toddlers. Underlying neurocognitive mechanisms and implications for processes involved in joint action coordination in general are discussed. PMID:26150055

  17. Gene expression endophenotypes: a novel approach for gene discovery in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2011-01-01

    Uncovering the underlying genetic component of any disease is key to the understanding of its pathophysiology and may open new avenues for development of therapeutic strategies and biomarkers. In the past several years, there has been an explosion of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) resulting in the discovery of novel candidate genes conferring risk for complex diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this success, there still remains a substantial genetic component for many complex traits and conditions that is unexplained by the GWAS findings. Additionally, in many cases, the mechanism of action of the newly discovered disease risk variants is not inherently obvious. Furthermore, a genetic region with multiple genes may be identified via GWAS, making it difficult to discern the true disease risk gene. Several alternative approaches are proposed to overcome these potential shortcomings of GWAS, including the use of quantitative, biologically relevant phenotypes. Gene expression levels represent an important class of endophenotypes. Genetic linkage and association studies that utilize gene expression levels as endophenotypes determined that the expression levels of many genes are under genetic influence. This led to the postulate that there may exist many genetic variants that confer disease risk via modifying gene expression levels. Results from the handful of genetic studies which assess gene expression level endophenotypes in conjunction with disease risk suggest that this combined phenotype approach may both increase the power for gene discovery and lead to an enhanced understanding of their mode of action. This review summarizes the evidence in support of gene expression levels as promising endophenotypes in the discovery and characterization of novel candidate genes for complex diseases, which may also represent a novel approach in the genetic studies of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21569597

  18. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  19. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  20. The Take Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The Take Action Project (TAP) was created to help middle school students take informed and effective action on science-related issues. The seven steps of TAP ask students to (1) choose a science-related problem of interest to them, (2) research their problem, (3) select an action to take on the problem, (4) plan that action, (5) take action, (6)…

  1. Attention, biological motion, and action recognition.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James; Parasuraman, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Interacting with others in the environment requires that we perceive and recognize their movements and actions. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have indicated that a number of brain regions, particularly the superior temporal sulcus, are involved in a number of processes essential for action recognition, including the processing of biological motion and processing the intentions of actions. We review the behavioral and neuroimaging evidence suggesting that while some aspects of action recognition might be rapid and effective, they are not necessarily automatic. Attention is particularly important when visual information about actions is degraded or ambiguous, or if competing information is present. We present evidence indicating that neural responses associated with the processing of biological motion are strongly modulated by attention. In addition, behavioral and neuroimaging evidence shows that drawing inferences from the actions of others is attentionally demanding. The role of attention in action observation has implications for everyday social interactions and workplace applications that depend on observing, understanding and interpreting actions. PMID:21640836

  2. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  3. Mechanism of action of and resistance to quinolones

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna; Madurga, Sergi; Giralt, Ernest; Vila, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Summary Fluoroquinolones are an important class of wide‐spectrum antibacterial agents. The first quinolone described was nalidixic acid, which showed a narrow spectrum of activity. The evolution of quinolones to more potent molecules was based on changes at positions 1, 6, 7 and 8 of the chemical structure of nalidixic acid. Quinolones inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activities, two enzymes essential for bacteria viability. The acquisition of quinolone resistance is frequently related to (i) chromosomal mutations such as those in the genes encoding the A and B subunits of the protein targets (gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE), or mutations causing reduced drug accumulation, either by a decreased uptake or by an increased efflux, and (ii) quinolone resistance genes associated with plasmids have been also described, i.e. the qnr gene that encodes a pentapeptide, which blocks the action of quinolones on the DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV; the aac(6′)‐Ib‐cr gene that encodes an acetylase that modifies the amino group of the piperazin ring of the fluoroquinolones and efflux pump encoded by the qepA gene that decreases intracellular drug levels. These plasmid‐mediated mechanisms of resistance confer low levels of resistance but provide a favourable background in which selection of additional chromosomally encoded quinolone resistance mechanisms can occur. PMID:21261881

  4. Heterologous expression of the Monilinia fructicola CYP51 (MfCYP51) gene in Pichia pastoris confirms the mode of action of the novel fungicide, SYP-Z048

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fengping; Lin, Dong; Wang, Jingyuan; Li, Botao; Duan, Hongxia; Liu, Junli; Liu, Xili

    2015-01-01

    The novel agricultural fungicide 3-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,3-dimethyl-3-isoxazolidinyl] pyridine (SYP-Z048) developed by China Shenyang Research Institute of Chemical Industry has been confirmed to be an ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor (EBI). Previous studies have shown that EBIs target the proteins from a range of genes, including CYP51, ERG2 and/or ERG24, and ERG27, which are involved in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. In the current study the ERG2, ERG24, and ERG27 genes were cloned from wild type and resistant mutants of Monilinia fructicola in an attempt to clarify the target site of SYP-Z048. Comparative analysis of the deduced aa sequence of these genes, as well as CYP51, revealed several point mutations that resulted in amino acid variation among the sensitive and resistant isolates. However, sensitivity assays indicated that only one, the substitution of phenylalanine (F) for the tyrosine (Y) at 136 in CYP51, was correlated with reduced sensitivity to SYP-Z048. Heterologous expression of MfCYP51-136Y (MfCYP136Y) and MfCYP51-136F (MfCYP136F) in Pichia pastoris revealed that MfCYP136F significantly reduced sensitivity to SYP-Z048, increasing the average EC50 of the transformants 11-fold relative to those carrying MfCYP136Y. However, neither the additional copy of MfCYP136Y nor multiple copies of MfCYP136F were found to reduce sensitivity relative to the empty vector control or single copy transformants, respectively. Molecular docking experiments using SYP-Z048 with HsCYP145Y and the mutated version HsCYP145F as substitutes for MfCYP136Y and MfCYP136F, respectively, indicated that the reduced affinity of HsCYP145F for SYP-Z048 resulted from the loss of a hydrogen bond between the fungicide and the active site. Taken together these results indicate that MfCYP51 is the major target site of SYP-Z048 in M. fructicola, which has important implications for the resistance management of this fungicide in the field. PMID:26042103

  5. Heterologous expression of the Monilinia fructicola CYP51 (MfCYP51) gene in Pichia pastoris confirms the mode of action of the novel fungicide, SYP-Z048.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengping; Lin, Dong; Wang, Jingyuan; Li, Botao; Duan, Hongxia; Liu, Junli; Liu, Xili

    2015-01-01

    The novel agricultural fungicide 3-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,3-dimethyl-3-isoxazolidinyl] pyridine (SYP-Z048) developed by China Shenyang Research Institute of Chemical Industry has been confirmed to be an ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor (EBI). Previous studies have shown that EBIs target the proteins from a range of genes, including CYP51, ERG2 and/or ERG24, and ERG27, which are involved in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. In the current study the ERG2, ERG24, and ERG27 genes were cloned from wild type and resistant mutants of Monilinia fructicola in an attempt to clarify the target site of SYP-Z048. Comparative analysis of the deduced aa sequence of these genes, as well as CYP51, revealed several point mutations that resulted in amino acid variation among the sensitive and resistant isolates. However, sensitivity assays indicated that only one, the substitution of phenylalanine (F) for the tyrosine (Y) at 136 in CYP51, was correlated with reduced sensitivity to SYP-Z048. Heterologous expression of MfCYP51-136Y (MfCYP136Y) and MfCYP51-136F (MfCYP136F) in Pichia pastoris revealed that MfCYP136F significantly reduced sensitivity to SYP-Z048, increasing the average EC50 of the transformants 11-fold relative to those carrying MfCYP136Y. However, neither the additional copy of MfCYP136Y nor multiple copies of MfCYP136F were found to reduce sensitivity relative to the empty vector control or single copy transformants, respectively. Molecular docking experiments using SYP-Z048 with HsCYP145Y and the mutated version HsCYP145F as substitutes for MfCYP136Y and MfCYP136F, respectively, indicated that the reduced affinity of HsCYP145F for SYP-Z048 resulted from the loss of a hydrogen bond between the fungicide and the active site. Taken together these results indicate that MfCYP51 is the major target site of SYP-Z048 in M. fructicola, which has important implications for the resistance management of this fungicide in the field. PMID:26042103

  6. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  7. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  8. Gene Expression Levels Are Correlated with Synonymous Codon Usage, Amino Acid Composition, and Gene Architecture in the Red Flour Beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Williford, Anna; Demuth, Jeffery P.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression levels correlate with multiple aspects of gene sequence and gene structure in phylogenetically diverse taxa, suggesting an important role of gene expression levels in the evolution of protein-coding genes. Here we present results of a genome-wide study of the influence of gene expression on synonymous codon usage, amino acid composition, and gene structure in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Consistent with the action of translational selection, we find that synonymous codon usage bias increases with gene expression. However, the correspondence between tRNA gene copy number and optimal codons is weak. At the amino acid level, translational selection is suggested by the positive correlation between tRNA gene numbers and amino acid usage, which is stronger for highly expressed genes. In addition, there is a clear trend for increased use of metabolically cheaper, less complex amino acids as gene expression increases. tRNA gene numbers also correlate negatively with amino acid size/complexity (S/C) score indicating the coupling between translational selection and selection to minimize the use of large/complex amino acids. Interestingly, the analysis of 10 additional genomes suggests that the correlation between tRNA gene numbers and amino acid S/C score is widespread and might be explained by selection against negative consequences of protein misfolding. At the level of gene structure, three major trends are detected: 1) complete coding region length increases across low and intermediate expression levels but decreases in highly expressed genes; 2) the average intron size shows the opposite trend, first decreasing with expression, followed by a slight increase in highly expressed genes; and 3) intron density remains nearly constant across all expression levels. These changes in gene architecture are only in partial agreement with selection favoring reduced cost of biosynthesis. PMID:22826459

  9. The quest for genes causing complex traits in ocular medicine: successes, interpretations, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Sudha K

    2007-01-01

    Gene mapping and positional cloning have gained acceptance as state-of-the-art methods to identify molecules that cause common complex diseases. However, the use of specialized technology, varying study designs, and misconceptions about the role of novel findings in genetics has led to confusion among basic scientists and health care professionals alike regarding the importance of these findings in molecular diagnostics and individualized medicine. To alleviate this confusion, the successes achieved in the past few years in mapping of genes for complex traits such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma are interpreted in the context of the appropriate population biology framework. The current article veers away from propagating the overly simplistic belief of a linear relationship between a specific gene and age-related macular degeneration, particularly one that equates possession of a specific risk allele as the only precursor to end-stage disease. Ascribing predictive properties to a single gene without consideration of its network partners, timing of action, or environmental correlates argues for a static view of gene action. Modern viewpoints of the mechanisms of action of a gene are contextual and encompass more cohesive frameworks, ranging from the developmental timing of action, to the genomic and environmental milieu. In this regard, gene mapping studies that have been so immensely successful in the gene detection phase of a study provide biased perspectives on the importance of these genes and the corresponding risk alleles in the general population because of their limited sample size and constrained design. To move the field of gene-based diagnosis forward, it will be necessary to conduct additional cohort and longitudinal studies using the original gene finding studies as a knowledge base to develop predictive models. In summary, while we have achieved great successes in finding genes for complex traits, the application of these findings to

  10. GENE METHYLATION CHANGES IN TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES INDUCED BY ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of a dose-response model used for extrapolation can be influenced by knowledge of mechanism of action. We have already showed that arsenic affects methylation of the human p53 gene promoter. Evidence that genes other than the p53 tumor suppressor gene are affected woul...

  11. Action Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of action learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "Action Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing Action Learning and Action Research in Context" (Cliff…

  12. Action Research Facilitator's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro-Bruce, Cathy

    This handbook is a roadmap for action research facilitators to help groups as they work through the research process. It offers quotations, handouts, strategies, resources, and insights from actual experiences. The sections of the handbook follow the action research cycle, focusing on: "What is Action Research?"; "What is the Action Research…

  13. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  14. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  15. 77 FR 71400 - Procurement List, Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 8/24/2012 (77 FR 51522-51523) and 10/5/2012 (77 FR 60969), the Committee.... Regulatory Flexibility Act Certification I certify that the following action will not have a significant impact on a substantial number of small entities. The major factors considered for this...

  16. 77 FR 67343 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM... Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List... Must Be Received on or Before: 12/10/2012. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are...

  17. 76 FR 55883 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM... Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List... received on or before: 10/10/2011. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or...

  18. Ovarian actions of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Israel; Duleba, Antoni J

    2015-08-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in grapes, berries, and medicinal plants, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and has been proposed to be a longevity-prolonging agent. There is also growing evidence that resveratrol has cardioprotective properties and beneficial effects on both glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, several studies have examined the use of resveratrol as a therapeutic agent to treat numerous pathological and metabolic disorders. Herein, we present insights into the mechanisms of action, biological effects, and current evidence of actions of resveratrol on the ovary. In vitro, resveratrol inhibits proliferation and androgen production by theca-interstitial cells. Resveratrol also exerts a cytostatic, but not cytotoxic, effect on granulosa cells, while decreasing aromatization and vascular endothelial growth factor expression. In vivo, resveratrol treatment reduced the size of adipocytes and improved estrus cyclicity in the previously acyclic rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In addition, resveratrol increased the ovarian follicular reserve and prolonged the ovarian life span in rats. Taken together, resveratrol emerges as a potential therapeutic agent to treat conditions associated with androgen excess, such as PCOS. The efficacy of resveratrol in the treatment of gynecological conditions requires further investigation. PMID:26315293

  19. Dancing rhinos in stilettos: The amazing saga of the genomic and nongenomic actions of STAT3 in the heart.

    PubMed

    Zouein, Fouad A; Kurdi, Mazen; Booz, George W

    2013-07-01

    A substantial body of evidence has shown that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has an important role in the heart in protecting the myocardium from ischemia and oxidative stress. These actions are attributed to STAT3 functioning as a transcription factor in upregulating cardioprotective genes. Loss of STAT3 has been implicated as well in the pathogenesis of heart failure and, in that context and in addition to the loss of a cardioprotective gene program, nuclear STAT3 has been identified as a transcriptional repressor important for the normal functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome system for protein degradation. The later finding establishes a genomic role for STAT3 in controlling cellular homeostasis in cardiac myocytes independent of stress. Surprisingly, although a well-studied area, very few downstream gene targets of STAT3 in the heart have been definitively identified. In addition, STAT3 is now known to induce gene expression by noncanonical means that are not well characterized in the heart. On the other hand, recent evidence has shown that STAT3 has important nongenomic actions in cardiac myocytes that affect microtubule stability, mitochondrial respiration, and autophagy. These extranuclear actions of STAT3 involve protein-protein interactions that are incompletely understood, as is their regulation in both the healthy and injured heart. Moreover, how the diverse genomic and nongenomic actions of STAT3 crosstalk with each other is unchartered territory. Here we present an overview of what is and is not known about both the genomic and nongenomic actions of STAT3 in the heart from a structure-function perspective that focuses on the impact of posttranslational modifications and oxidative stress in regulating the actions and interactions of STAT3. Even though we have learnt a great deal about the role played by STAT3 in the heart, much more awaits to be discovered. PMID:24069556

  20. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  1. Dosing time-dependent actions of psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-01

    The concept of the dosing time-dependent (DTD) actions of drugs has been used to describe the effects of diurnal rhythms on pharmacological responsiveness. Notwithstanding the importance of diurnal variability in drug pharmacokinetics and bioavailability, it appears that in the central nervous system (CNS), the DTD actions of psychotropic drugs involve diurnal changes in the CNS-specific expression of genes encoding for psychotropic drug targets and transcription factors known as clock genes. In this review, we focused our discussion on the DTD effects of the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines. Both cocaine and amphetamines produce differential lasting behavioral alterations, that is, locomotor sensitization, depending on the time of the day they are administered. This exemplifies a DTD action of these drugs. The DTD effects of these psychostimulants correlate with diurnal changes in the system of transcription factors termed clock genes, for example, Period 1, and with changes in the availability of certain subtypes of dopamine receptors, for example, D2 and D3. Diurnal synthesis and release of the pineal hormone melatonin influence the DTD behavioral actions of cocaine and amphetamines. The molecular mechanism of melatonin's effects on the responsiveness of CNS to psychostimulants appears to involve melatonin receptors and clock genes. It is proposed that the DTD characteristics of psychostimulant action and the contributions of the melatonergic system may have clinical implications that include treatments for the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and possibly neurotoxicity/neuroprotection. PMID:19897073

  2. 32 CFR 865.4 - Board actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Board actions. 865.4 Section 865.4 National... PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARDS Air Force Board for Correction of Military Records § 865.4 Board actions. (a) Board... or injustice. However, the Board: (1) May get additional information and advisory opinions on...

  3. Clinical actionability enhanced through deep targeted sequencing of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ken; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Zhao, Hao; Zhang, Qingxiu; Ezzeddine, Nader; Tang, Lin-ya; Qi, Yuan; Mao, Yong; Chen, Tenghui; Chong, Zechen; Zhou, Wanding; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Johnson, Amber; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Routbort, Mark J.; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Kopetz, Scott; Davies, Michael A.; de Groot, John; Moulder, Stacy; Vinod, Ravi; Farhangfar, Carol J.; Shaw, Kenna Mills; Mendelsohn, John; Mills, Gordon B.; Eterovic, Agda Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background Further advances of targeted cancer therapy require comprehensive in-depth profiling of somatic mutations that are present in subpopulations of tumor cells in a clinical tumor sample. However, it is unclear to what extent such intra-tumor heterogeneity is present and whether it may affect clinical decision making. To unravel this challenge, we established a deep targeted sequencing platform to identify potentially actionable DNA alterations in tumor samples. Methods We assayed 515 FFPE tumor samples and matched germline (475 patients) from 11 disease sites by capturing and sequencing all the exons in 201 cancer related genes. Mutations, indels and copy number data were reported. Results We obtained a 1000-fold average sequencing depth and identified 4794 non-synonymous mutations in the samples analyzed, which 15.2% were present at less than 10% allele frequency. Most of these low level mutations occurred at known oncogenic hotspots and are likely functional. Identifying low level mutations improved identification of mutations in actionable genes in 118 (24.84%) patients, among which 47 (9.8%) would otherwise be unactionable. In addition, acquiring ultra-high depth also ensured a low false discovery rate (less than 2.2%) from FFPE samples. Conclusion Our results were as accurate as a commercially available CLIA-compliant hotspot panel, but allowed the detection of a higher number of mutations in actionable genes. Our study revealed the critical importance of acquiring and utilizing high depth in profiling clinical tumor samples and presented a very useful platform for implementing routine sequencing in a cancer care institution. PMID:25626406

  4. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  5. Objects tell us what action we can expect: dissociating brain areas for retrieval and exploitation of action knowledge during action observation in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Schubotz, Ricarda I.; Wurm, Moritz F.; Wittmann, Marco K.; von Cramon, D. Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objects are reminiscent of actions often performed with them: knife and apple remind us on peeling the apple or cutting it. Mnemonic representations of object-related actions (action codes) evoked by the sight of an object may constrain and hence facilitate recognition of unrolling actions. The present fMRI study investigated if and how action codes influence brain activation during action observation. The average number of action codes (NAC) of 51 sets of objects was rated by a group of n = 24 participants. In an fMRI study, different volunteers were asked to recognize actions performed with the same objects presented in short videos. To disentangle areas reflecting the storage of action codes from those exploiting them, we showed object-compatible and object-incompatible (pantomime) actions. Areas storing action codes were considered to positively co-vary with NAC in both object-compatible and object-incompatible action; due to its role in tool-related tasks, we here hypothesized left anterior inferior parietal cortex (aIPL). In contrast, areas exploiting action codes were expected to show this correlation only in object-compatible but not incompatible action, as only object-compatible actions match one of the active action codes. For this interaction, we hypothesized ventrolateral premotor cortex (PMv) to join aIPL due to its role in biasing competition in IPL. We found left anterior intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) to co-vary with NAC. In addition to these areas, action codes increased activity in object-compatible action in bilateral PMv, right IPS, and lateral occipital cortex (LO). Findings suggest that during action observation, the brain derives possible actions from perceived objects, and uses this information to shape action recognition. In particular, the number of expectable actions quantifies the activity level at PMv, IPL, and pMTG, but only PMv reflects their biased competition while observed action unfolds

  6. Action plan for the Tiger Team assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-30

    This document contains responses and planned actions that address the findings of the Tiger Team Assessment of Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1990. In addition, the document contains descriptions of the management and organizational structure to be used in conducting planned actions, root causes for the problems identified in the findings, responses, planned actions, schedules and milestones for completing planned actions, and, where known, costs associated with planned actions.

  7. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  8. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  9. Developmental perception of the self and action.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Ryo; Metta, Giorgio; Sandini, Giulio; Natale, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a developmental framework for action-driven perception in anthropomorphic robots. The key idea of the framework is that action generation develops the agent's perception of its own body and actions. Action-driven development is critical for identifying changing body parts and understanding the effects of actions in unknown or nonstationary environments. We embedded minimal knowledge into the robot's cognitive system in the form of motor synergies and actions to allow motor exploration. The robot voluntarily generates actions and develops the ability to perceive its own body and the effect that it generates on the environment. The robot, in addition, can compose this kind of learned primitives to perform complex actions and characterize them in terms of their sensory effects. After learning, the robot can recognize manipulative human behaviors with cross-modal anticipation for recovery of unavailable sensory modality, and reproduce the recognized actions afterward. We evaluated the proposed framework in the experiments with a real robot. In the experiments, we achieved autonomous body identification, learning of fixation, reaching and grasping actions, and developmental recognition of human actions as well as their reproduction. PMID:24806653

  10. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  11. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  12. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  13. Pharmacogenetics of FSH action

    PubMed Central

    Laan, Maris; Grigorova, Marina; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the review To review the current knowledge of genetic variants in the two genes affecting the individual responsiveness to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) action—the FSH beta-subunit (FSHB) and the FSH receptor (FSHR), as well as the pharmacogenetic ramifications of the findings. Recent findings Four common variants in FSHB/FSHR were shown to exhibit significant effect on FSH action: linked FSHR variants Thr307Ala and Asn680Ser determining common receptorisoforms, andgene expression affecting polymorphisms FSHR –29G/A and FSHB–211G/T. In women, the FSHR Thr307Ala/Asn680Ser polymorphisms show consistent predictive value for estimating the most optimal rFSH dosage in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation(COH).The same variants exhibit a potential for the pharmacogenetic assessment of the treatment ofPCOS. The FSHR–29G/A variant was also shown to contribute to ovarian response to COH. Pilot studies have suggestedthe FSHB–211TT-homozygous oligozoospermicmen with genetically determined low concentration of FSH, as potentially the best responders to FSH treatment; furthermore, modulation of this response by FSHR polymorphisms is possible. Summary Genetic variants in FSHB/FSHRexhibit a potential for pharmacogenetic applications in selecting appropriate treatment options (timing and dosage) in male and female conditions requiring or benefitting from FSH therapy. PMID:22499219

  14. Additive for deep-well cement slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Hubner, W.; Schroers, O.; Sladeck, H.J.

    1982-07-20

    An additive is disclosed for deep-well cement slurries comprising a water soluble anionic copolymer having a molecular weight from about 50,000 to 500,000 and comprising about 1 to 60 mole % of anionic structural units and about 99 to 40 mole % of nonanionic structural units. A preferred additive comprises a terpolymer of acrylamide, sodium acrylate and sodium vinylsulphonate. The additives retard the setting action of the slurry, stabilize the slurry, prevent the swelling of clays and are resistant to electrolytes which would accelerate setting and seepage of water from the slurry.

  15. Pharmacological and Chemical Effects of Cigarette Additives

    PubMed Central

    Rabinoff, Michael; Caskey, Nicholas; Rissling, Anthony; Park, Candice

    2007-01-01

    We investigated tobacco industry documents and other sources for evidence of possible pharmacological and chemical effects of tobacco additives. Our findings indicated that more than 100 of 599 documented cigarette additives have pharmacological actions that camouflage the odor of environmental tobacco smoke emitted from cigarettes, enhance or maintain nicotine delivery, could increase the addictiveness of cigarettes, and mask symptoms and illnesses associated with smoking behaviors. Whether such uses were specifically intended for these agents is unknown. Our results provide a clear rationale for regulatory control of tobacco additives. PMID:17666709

  16. Identification of Medically Actionable Secondary Findings in the 1000 Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Olfson, Emily; Cottrell, Catherine E.; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Heusel, Jonathan W.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Chen, Li-Shiun; Hartz, Sarah; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Saccone, Nancy L.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommends that clinical sequencing laboratories return secondary findings in 56 genes associated with medically actionable conditions. Our goal was to apply a systematic, stringent approach consistent with clinical standards to estimate the prevalence of pathogenic variants associated with such conditions using a diverse sequencing reference sample. Candidate variants in the 56 ACMG genes were selected from Phase 1 of the 1000 Genomes dataset, which contains sequencing information on 1,092 unrelated individuals from across the world. These variants were filtered using the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) Professional version and defined parameters, appraised through literature review, and examined by a clinical laboratory specialist and expert physician. Over 70,000 genetic variants were extracted from the 56 genes, and filtering identified 237 variants annotated as disease causing by HGMD Professional. Literature review and expert evaluation determined that 7 of these variants were pathogenic or likely pathogenic. Furthermore, 5 additional truncating variants not listed as disease causing in HGMD Professional were identified as likely pathogenic. These 12 secondary findings are associated with diseases that could inform medical follow-up, including cancer predisposition syndromes, cardiac conditions, and familial hypercholesterolemia. The majority of the identified medically actionable findings were in individuals from the European (5/379) and Americas (4/181) ancestry groups, with fewer findings in Asian (2/286) and African (1/246) ancestry groups. Our results suggest that medically relevant secondary findings can be identified in approximately 1% (12/1092) of individuals in a diverse reference sample. As clinical sequencing laboratories continue to implement the ACMG recommendations, our results highlight that at least a small number of potentially important secondary findings can be selected for

  17. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  18. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  19. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  20. Putting Action in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Sandra C.; Hard, Bridgette Martin; Tversky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognition propose that our own actions influence our understanding of the world. Do other people's actions also have this influence? The present studies show that perceiving another person's actions changes the way people think about objects in a scene. In Study 1, participants viewed a photograph and answered a question…

  1. Conservation Action Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rifle Association, Washington, DC.

    Conservation problems are identified, with some suggestions for action. General areas covered are: Wildlife Conservation, Soil Conservation, Clean Water, Air Pollution Action, and Outdoor Recreation Action. Appendices list private organizations or agencies concerned with natural resource use and/or management, congressional committees considering…

  2. Action in Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that cognitive development has to be understood in the functional perspective provided by actions. Actions reflect all aspects of cognitive development including the motives of the child, the problems to be solved, and the constraints and possibilities of the child's body and sensorimotor system. Actions are directed into the future…

  3. Planning as Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Gonzalez, Carmen Beatriz; Hernandez, Teresa; Kusch, Jim; Ryan, Charly

    2004-01-01

    Planning contains so much more than the written plan. Early in 2000, an invitation came from the Collaborative Action Research Network (CARN), to people experienced in action research who might want to help plan and present an action research event for elementary school science teachers in Venezuela, South America, in Autumn 2000. This article…

  4. Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Martha Lentz

    1993-01-01

    Describes aspects of participatory action research and considers advantages of using participatory action research in research by disabilities and rehabilitation researchers. Notes that participatory action research can be built into any rehabilitation research design but that it rests upon the recognition of persons with disabilities as integral…

  5. Integrated gene set analysis for microRNA studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Panadero, Joaquin; Dopazo, Joaquin; Montaner, David

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Functional interpretation of miRNA expression data is currently done in a three step procedure: select differentially expressed miRNAs, find their target genes, and carry out gene set overrepresentation analysis. Nevertheless, major limitations of this approach have already been described at the gene level, while some newer arise in the miRNA scenario. Here, we propose an enhanced methodology that builds on the well-established gene set analysis paradigm. Evidence for differential expression at the miRNA level is transferred to a gene differential inhibition score which is easily interpretable in terms of gene sets or pathways. Such transferred indexes account for the additive effect of several miRNAs targeting the same gene, and also incorporate cancellation effects between cases and controls. Together, these two desirable characteristics allow for more accurate modeling of regulatory processes. Results: We analyze high-throughput sequencing data from 20 different cancer types and provide exhaustive reports of gene and Gene Ontology-term deregulation by miRNA action. Availability and Implementation: The proposed methodology was implemented in the Bioconductor library mdgsa. http://bioconductor.org/packages/mdgsa. For the purpose of reproducibility all of the scripts are available at https://github.com/dmontaner-papers/gsa4mirna Contact: david.montaner@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27324197

  6. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  7. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  8. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  9. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  10. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  11. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  12. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  13. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  14. 75 FR 7451 - Procurement List Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 12/18/2009 (74 FR 67176-67177), the Committee for Purchase From People... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions and Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List....

  15. 78 FR 14664 - Food and Color Additives; Technical Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... and Color Additives; Technical Amendments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final... regulations regarding food and color additives to correct minor errors (such as misspelled chemical names) and... Subjects 21 CFR Part 73 Color additives, Cosmetics, Drugs, Medical devices. 21 CFR Part 172 Food...

  16. Enhancer additivity and non-additivity are determined by enhancer strength in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bothma, Jacques P; Garcia, Hernan G; Ng, Samuel; Perry, Michael W; Gregor, Thomas; Levine, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan genes are embedded in a rich milieu of regulatory information that often includes multiple enhancers possessing overlapping activities. In this study, we employ quantitative live imaging methods to assess the function of pairs of primary and shadow enhancers in the regulation of key patterning genes-knirps, hunchback, and snail-in developing Drosophila embryos. The knirps enhancers exhibit additive, sometimes even super-additive activities, consistent with classical gene fusion studies. In contrast, the hunchback enhancers function sub-additively in anterior regions containing saturating levels of the Bicoid activator, but function additively in regions where there are diminishing levels of the Bicoid gradient. Strikingly sub-additive behavior is also observed for snail, whereby removal of the proximal enhancer causes a significant increase in gene expression. Quantitative modeling of enhancer–promoter interactions suggests that weakly active enhancers function additively while strong enhancers behave sub-additively due to competition with the target promoter. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07956.001 PMID:26267217

  17. Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Folic Acid. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-04-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending the food additive regulations to provide for the safe use of folic acid in corn masa flour. We are taking this action in response to a food additive petition filed jointly by Gruma Corporation, Spina Bifida Association, March of Dimes Foundation, American Academy of Pediatrics, Royal DSM N.V., and National Council of La Raza. PMID:27101640

  18. Microbial Functional Gene Diversity with a Shift of Subsurface Redox Conditions during In Situ Uranium Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuting; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; N′Guessan, Lucie A.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Deng, Ye; Long, Philip E.; Resch, C. Tom; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Li, Guanghe; Hazen, Terry C.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the microbial functional diversity changes with subsurface redox conditions during in situ uranium bioremediation, key functional genes were studied with GeoChip, a comprehensive functional gene microarray, in field experiments at a uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) site (Rifle, CO). The results indicated that functional microbial communities altered with a shift in the dominant metabolic process, as documented by hierarchical cluster and ordination analyses of all detected functional genes. The abundance of dsrAB genes (dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes) and methane generation-related mcr genes (methyl coenzyme M reductase coding genes) increased when redox conditions shifted from Fe-reducing to sulfate-reducing conditions. The cytochrome genes detected were primarily from Geobacter sp. and decreased with lower subsurface redox conditions. Statistical analysis of environmental parameters and functional genes indicated that acetate, U(VI), and redox potential (Eh) were the most significant geochemical variables linked to microbial functional gene structures, and changes in microbial functional diversity were strongly related to the dominant terminal electron-accepting process following acetate addition. The study indicates that the microbial functional genes clearly reflect the in situ redox conditions and the dominant microbial processes, which in turn influence uranium bioreduction. Microbial functional genes thus could be very useful for tracking microbial community structure and dynamics during bioremediation. PMID:22327592

  19. 76 FR 41687 - Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Hydroxypropyl Cellulose

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... In a notice published in the Federal Register of April 8, 2010 (75 FR 17928), FDA announced that Nisso America Inc., 45 Broadway, Suite 2120, New York, NY 10006, filed a food additive petition (FAP.... ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the food...

  20. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  1. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  2. The neural substrates of action identification

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Megan N.; Wegner, Daniel M.; Reid, Marguerite E.; Yu, Henry H.; Blair, R. J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Mentalization is the process by which an observer views a target as possessing higher cognitive faculties such as goals, intentions and desires. Mentalization can be assessed using action identification paradigms, in which observers choose mentalistic (goals-focused) or mechanistic (action-focused) descriptions of targets’ actions. Neural structures that play key roles in inferring goals and intentions from others’ observed or imagined actions include temporo-parietal junction, ventral premotor cortex and extrastriate body area. We hypothesized that these regions play a role in action identification as well. Data collected using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed our predictions that activity in ventral premotor cortex and middle temporal gyrus near the extrastriate body area varies both as a function of the valence of the target and the extent to which actions are identified as goal-directed. In addition, the inferior parietal lobule is preferentially engaged when participants identify the actions of mentalized targets. Functional connectivity analyses suggest support from other regions, including the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala, during mentalization. We found correlations between action identification and Autism Quotient scores, suggesting that understanding the neural correlates of action identification may enhance our understanding of the underpinnings of essential social cognitive processes. PMID:20150343

  3. Nonclassical Vitamin D Action

    PubMed Central

    Zittermann, Armin; Gummert, Jan F.

    2010-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that vitamin D has a broad range of actions in the human body. Besides its well-known effects on calcium/phosphate homeostasis, vitamin D influences muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nervous function, and the immune response. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency has been associated with muscle weakness and a high incidence of various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes. Most importantly, low vitamin D status has been found to be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Several recent randomized controlled trials support the assumption that vitamin D can improve muscle strength, glucose homeostasis, and cardiovascular risk markers. In addition, vitamin D may reduce cancer incidence and elevated blood pressure. Since the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is high throughout the world, there is a need to improve vitamin D status in the general adult population. However, the currently recommended daily vitamin D intake of 5-15 µg is too low to achieve an adequate vitamin D status in individuals with only modest skin synthesis. Thus, there is a need to recommend a vitamin D intake that is effective for achieving adequate circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>75 nmol/L). PMID:22254030

  4. Putting Actions in Context: Visual Action Adaptation Aftereffects Are Modulated by Social Contexts

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Stephan; Streuber, Stephan; Giese, Martin; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Curio, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    The social context in which an action is embedded provides important information for the interpretation of an action. Is this social context integrated during the visual recognition of an action? We used a behavioural visual adaptation paradigm to address this question and measured participants’ perceptual bias of a test action after they were adapted to one of two adaptors (adaptation after-effect). The action adaptation after-effect was measured for the same set of adaptors in two different social contexts. Our results indicate that the size of the adaptation effect varied with social context (social context modulation) although the physical appearance of the adaptors remained unchanged. Three additional experiments provided evidence that the observed social context modulation of the adaptation effect are owed to the adaptation of visual action recognition processes. We found that adaptation is critical for the social context modulation (experiment 2). Moreover, the effect is not mediated by emotional content of the action alone (experiment 3) and visual information about the action seems to be critical for the emergence of action adaptation effects (experiment 4). Taken together these results suggest that processes underlying visual action recognition are sensitive to the social context of an action. PMID:24466123

  5. Acute alteration of cardiac ECG, action potential, I{sub Kr} and the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K{sup +} channel by PCB 126 and PCB 77

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi-Hyeong; Park, Won Sun; Jo, Su-Hyun

    2012-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been known as serious persistent organic pollutants (POPs), causing developmental delays and motor dysfunction. We have investigated the effects of two PCB congeners, 3,3′,4,4′-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77) and 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) on ECG, action potential, and the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K{sup +} current (I{sub Kr}) of guinea pigs' hearts, and hERG K{sup +} current expressed in Xenopus oocytes. PCB 126 shortened the corrected QT interval (QTc) of ECG and decreased the action potential duration at 90% (APD{sub 90}), and 50% of repolarization (APD{sub 50}) (P < 0.05) without changing the action potential duration at 20% (APD{sub 20}). PCB 77 decreased APD{sub 20} (P < 0.05) without affecting QTc, APD{sub 90}, and APD{sub 50}. The PCB 126 increased the I{sub Kr} in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes held at 36 °C and hERG K{sup +} current amplitude at the end of the voltage steps in voltage-dependent mode (P < 0.05); however, PCB 77 did not change the hERG K{sup +} current amplitude. The PCB 77 increased the diastolic Ca{sup 2+} and decreased Ca{sup 2+} transient amplitude (P < 0.05), however PCB 126 did not change. The results suggest that PCB 126 shortened the QTc and decreased the APD{sub 90} possibly by increasing I{sub Kr}, while PCB 77 decreased the APD{sub 20} possibly by other modulation related with intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The present data indicate that the environmental toxicants, PCBs, can acutely affect cardiac electrophysiology including ECG, action potential, intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, and channel activity, resulting in toxic effects on the cardiac function in view of the possible accumulation of the PCBs in human body. -- Highlights: ► PCBs are known as serious environmental pollutants and developmental disruptors. ► PCB 126 shortened QT interval of ECG and action potential duration. ► PCB 126 increased human ether-a-go-go-related K{sup +} current and I{sub Kr}. ► PCB

  6. Decoding actions at different levels of abstraction.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Moritz F; Lingnau, Angelika

    2015-05-20

    Brain regions that mediate action understanding must contain representations that are action specific and at the same time tolerate a wide range of perceptual variance. Whereas progress has been made in understanding such generalization mechanisms in the object domain, the neural mechanisms to conceptualize actions remain unknown. In particular, there is ongoing dissent between motor-centric and cognitive accounts whether premotor cortex or brain regions in closer relation to perceptual systems, i.e., lateral occipitotemporal cortex, contain neural populations with such mapping properties. To date, it is unclear to which degree action-specific representations in these brain regions generalize from concrete action instantiations to abstract action concepts. However, such information would be crucial to differentiate between motor and cognitive theories. Using ROI-based and searchlight-based fMRI multivoxel pattern decoding, we sought brain regions in human cortex that manage the balancing act between specificity and generality. We investigated a concrete level that distinguishes actions based on perceptual features (e.g., opening vs closing a specific bottle), an intermediate level that generalizes across movement kinematics and specific objects involved in the action (e.g., opening different bottles with cork or screw cap), and an abstract level that additionally generalizes across object category (e.g., opening bottles or boxes). We demonstrate that the inferior parietal and occipitotemporal cortex code actions at abstract levels whereas the premotor cortex codes actions at the concrete level only. Hence, occipitotemporal, but not premotor, regions fulfill the necessary criteria for action understanding. This result is compatible with cognitive theories but strongly undermines motor theories of action understanding. PMID:25995462

  7. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  8. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  9. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  10. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  11. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, S.; Pauwels, K.; Rizzolatti, G.; Orban, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors “stimulus type” (action, static control, and dynamic control), “stereopsis” (present, absent) and “viewpoint” (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  12. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S; Pauwels, K; Rizzolatti, G; Orban, G A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors "stimulus type" (action, static control, and dynamic control), "stereopsis" (present, absent) and "viewpoint" (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350

  13. Hormones in Synergy: Regulation of the Pituitary Gonadotropin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Coss, Djurdjica

    2009-01-01

    The precise interplay of hormonal influences that governs gonadotropin hormone production by the pituitary includes endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activin and steroids. However, most studies of hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary gonadotrope have been limited to analyses of the isolated actions of individual hormones. LHβ and FSHβ subunits have distinct patterns of expression during the menstrual/estrous cycle as a result of the integration of activin, GnRH, and steroid hormone action. In this review, we focus on studies that delineate the interplay among these hormones in the regulation of LHβ and FSHβ gene expression in gonadotrope cells and discuss how signaling cross-talk contributes to differential expression. We also discuss how recent technological advances will help identify additional factors involved in the differential hormonal regulation of LH and FSH. PMID:19747958

  14. Points of regulation for auxin action.

    PubMed

    Zazimalova, E; Napier, R M

    2003-03-01

    There have been few examples of the application of our growing knowledge of hormone action to crop improvement. In this review we discuss what is known about the critical points regulating auxin action. We examine auxin metabolism, transport, perception and signalling and identify genes and proteins that might be keys to regulation, particularly the rate-limiting steps in various pathways. Certain mutants show that substrate flow in biosynthesis can be limiting. To date there is little information available on the genes and proteins of catabolism. There have been several auxin transport proteins and some elegant transport physiology described recently, and the potential for using transport proteins to manage free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) concentrations is discussed. Free IAA is very mobile, and so while it may be more practical to control auxin action through managing the receptor and signalling pathways, the candidate genes and proteins through which this can be done remain largely unknown. From the available evidence, it is clear that the reason for so few commercial applications arising from the control of auxin action is that knowledge is still limited. PMID:12789411

  15. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  16. Inferring gene targets of drugs and chemical compounds from gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Heeju; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Finding genes which are directly perturbed or targeted by drugs is of great interest and importance in drug discovery. Several network filtering methods have been created to predict the gene targets of drugs from gene expression data based on an ordinary differential equation model of the gene regulatory network (GRN). A critical step in these methods involves inferring the GRN from the expression data, which is a very challenging problem on its own. In addition, existing network filtering methods require computationally intensive parameter tuning or expression data from experiments with known genetic perturbations or both. Results: We developed a method called DeltaNet for the identification of drug targets from gene expression data. Here, the gene target predictions were directly inferred from the data without a separate step of GRN inference. DeltaNet formulation led to solving an underdetermined linear regression problem, for which we employed least angle regression (DeltaNet-LAR) or LASSO regularization (DeltaNet-LASSO). The predictions using DeltaNet for expression data of Escherichia coli, yeast, fruit fly and human were significantly more accurate than those using network filtering methods, namely mode of action by network identification (MNI) and sparse simultaneous equation model (SSEM). Furthermore, DeltaNet using LAR did not require any parameter tuning and could provide computational speed-up over existing methods. Conclusion: DeltaNet is a robust and numerically efficient tool for identifying gene perturbations from gene expression data. Importantly, the method requires little to no expert supervision, while providing accurate gene target predictions. Availability and implementation: DeltaNet is available on http://www.cabsel.ethz.ch/tools/DeltaNet. Contact: rudi.gunawan@chem.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153589

  17. Genes and gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, N.

    1988-01-01

    Genetics has long been a central topic for biologists, and recent progress has captured the public imagination as well. This book addresses questions that are at the leading edge of this continually advancing discipline. In tune with the increasing emphasis on molecular biology and genetic engineering, this text emphasizes the molecular aspects of gene expression, and the evolution of gene sequence organization and control. It reviews the genetic material of viruses, bacteria, and of higher organisms. Cells and organisms are compared in terms of gene numbers, their arrangements within a cell, and the control mechanisms which regulate the activity of genes.

  18. Action Learning in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquardt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Action learning was introduced into China less than 20 years ago, but has rapidly become a valuable tool for organizations seeking to solve problems, develop their leaders, and become learning organizations. This article provides an historical overview of action learning in China, its cultural underpinnings, and five case studies. It concludes…

  19. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)

  20. Affirmative Action in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Natan

    This paper examines issues of equality, discrimination, affirmative action, and preferential treatment in Israel. An introduction provides a broad outline of topics addressed in the paper: the status of the Jewish sector, with treatment of Jewish immigrants to serve as an example of affirmative action; the policies of the state in relation to the…

  1. Community-Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sarah; Mattern, Mark; Telin, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes an undergraduate course entitled Public Interest Research in which students learn research methods by conducting research on behalf of one or more community organizations. Students' work is conceived of as community action learning, a combination of participatory action research and service learning, emphasizing…

  2. Social Action Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores intersections among art, action, and community. It describes sociopolitical aspects of the author's art therapy work with survivors of repressive regimes living in Brazil, China, and Denmark and considers ways that unique historical and social processes influenced her conceptualization and practice of social action art therapy.

  3. Training for Nonviolent Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Theodore W.; Shivers, Lynne

    The theory and practice of nonviolent action training as it exists to date are reviewed in this pamphlet. A response to a renewal of interest in alternative forms of social action, the pamphlet results specifically from an international seminar of experienced organizers and trainers held at Preston Patrick, Westmorland, England, June 27 - July 2,…

  4. Renormalized action improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1984-01-01

    Finite lattice spacing artifacts are suppressed on the renormalized actions. The renormalized action trajectories of SU(N) lattice gauge theories are considered from the standpoint of the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation. The minor renormalized trajectories which involve representations invariant under the center are discussed and quantified. 17 references.

  5. Action Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman-Peck, Lorraine; Murray, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between action research and policy and the kind of confidence teachers, policy makers and other potential users may have in such research. Many published teacher action research accounts are criticised on the grounds that they do not fully meet the conventional standards for reporting social scientific…

  6. Affirmative Action Report, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada Univ. and Community Coll. System, Reno. Office of the Chancellor.

    All campuses and units of the University and Community College System of Nevada annually submit data to the Chancellor's Office on affirmative action. This report provides tables of affirmative action data for students enrolled during fall 1992 and professional and classified staff employed during 1992. First, student data is provided on gender…

  7. Action spectrum for photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    de Gruijl, F R

    1995-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the carcinogenicity of ultraviolet (UV) radiation needs to be known in order to assess the carcinogenic risks of various UV sources, most notably the different solar UV spectra at ground level under depleting stratospheric ozone. This wavelength dependence cannot be extracted from human data (e.g., from epidemiology); it can, however, be directly obtained from animal experiments. Precise information on the wavelength dependence, the so-called action spectrum, was not available until recently: erythemal or mutagenic action spectra have been used as substitutes. However, experimental data on skin tumors induced in hairless mice (Skh:HR1) with various polychromatic sources have been building up. Our group has found that none of the substitute action spectra yield a statistically acceptable description of our data, and we have, therefore, derived a new action spectrum, dubbed the SCUP action spectrum (SCUP stands for Skin Cancer Utrecht-Philadelphia, because the action spectrum also fits experimental data from the former Skin and Cancer Hospital in Philadelphia). The SCUP action spectrum has a maximum at 293 nm, and in the UVA region above 340 nm the relative carcinogenicity per J/m2 drops to about 10(-4) of this maximum. The effects of an ozone depletion on solar UV doses weighted with these different action spectra are compared: the erythemal and SCUP weighted dose come out as least sensitive with a 1.3% and 1.4% increase, respectively, for every 1% decrease in ozone. PMID:7597292

  8. Handbook for Ecology Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eber, Ronald

    This handbook has been compiled to aid concerned individuals and ecology groups more adequately define their goals, initiate good programs, and take effective action. It examines the ways a group of working individuals can become involved in action programs for ecological change. Part 1 deals with organization, preliminary organizing, structuring,…

  9. ACTION. Annual Report 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    In this report are described projects and activities undertaken by ACTION's volunteer programs in 1974. After an introduction that notes accomplishments of the past year, a review of domestic operations discusses such programs as VISTA, University Year for ACTION, National Student Volunteer Program, Foster Grandparent Program, and others according…

  10. Toxic action/toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hathway, D E

    2000-02-01

    ,Z-muconaldehyde forms cyclic products containing a pyrrole residue linked to purine. Increased HbCO concentrations reduce the O2-carrying capacity of the blood, and the changed shape of the O2-Hb dissociation curve parallels disturbance in O2 unloading. CN- acts on electron transport and paralyses respiration. In telodrin poisoning, preconvulsive glutamine formation abstracts tricarboxylic acid intermediates incommensurately with normal cerebral respiration. Antigen-antibody complexing depletes the antibody titre, available against infection. At high doses of Cd, Cd-thionein filtered through the kidneys is reabsorbed and tubular lesions produced. Some organophosphate insecticides promote irreversible acetylcholinesterase phosphorylation and blockade nerve function, and others react with neurotoxic esterase to cause delayed neuropathy. The evidence for Paraquat pulmonary poisoning suggests a radical mechanism involving three interrelated cyclic reaction stages. The action of N- and O8 (O substituent in 6-position of the purine) demethylases explains deletion mechanisms for DNA-alkyl adducts. DNA-directed synthesis in the presence of ultimate carcinogens provides for an estimation of misincorporations, which implicate the same transversions as those found by direct mutagenicity testing. Chemical carcinogens recognize tissue-sensitive cells and modify their heritable genetic complement. Oncoproteins encoded by activated oncogenes signal the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. The importance of the H-ras oncogene and p53 tumour-suppressor gene is stressed. Antidotal action is analysed; for example, parenteral glutamine administration to telodrin-intoxicated rats restores the depleted cerebral glutamate level and prevents seizures. Glutamate acts as anticonvulsant in petit mal epilepsy. In general, therefore, the reaction of the toxicant-related substance with the relevant target-tissue macromolecule accounts for the biochemical/biological events at a cellular level a PMID

  11. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  12. Conscious Vision in Action.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Robert; Schwenkler, John

    2015-09-01

    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH), according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a "zombie" processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious (Clark, 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner, 1992, 2004a; Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006, 2008). In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to "recognizing objects, selecting targets for action, and determining what kinds of action, broadly speaking, to perform" (Clark, 2007, p. 570). Our aim in this study is to show that the available evidence not only fails to support this dichotomous view but actually reveals a significant role for conscious vision in motor programming, especially for actions that require deliberate attention. PMID:25845648

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) mechanisms of action: emerging insights

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Initially regarded as “epigenetic modifiers” acting predominantly through chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation, HDACIs, alternatively referred to as lysine deacetylase or simply deacetylase inhibitors, have since been recognized to exert multiple cytotoxic actions in cancer cells, often through acetylation of non-histone proteins. Some well-recognized mechanisms of HDACI lethality include, in addition to relaxation of DNA and de-repression of gene transcription, interference with chaperone protein function, free radical generation, induction of DNA damage, up-regulation of endogenous inhibitors of cell cycle progression, e.g., p21, and promotion of apoptosis. Intriguingly, this class of agents is relatively selective for transformed cells, at least in pre-clinical studies. In recent years, additional mechanisms of action of these agents have been uncovered. For example, HDACIs interfere with multiple DNA repair processes, as well as disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity in the face of diverse genotoxic insults. Despite their pre-clinical potential, the clinical use of HDACIs remains restricted to certain subsets of T-cell lymphoma. Currently, it appears likely that the ultimate role of these agents will lie in rational combinations, only a few of which have been pursued in the clinic to date. This review focuses on relatively recently identified mechanisms of action of HDACIs, with particular emphasis on those that relate to the DNA damage response (DDR), and discuss synergistic strategies combining HDACIs with several novel targeted agents that disrupt the DDR or antagonize anti-apoptotic proteins that could have implications for the future use of HDACIs in patients with cancer. PMID:24769080

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit 563, Septic Systems, is located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 563 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) below: • 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank • 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool • 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks • 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  15. Following the Action in Action Learning: Towards Ethnomethodological Studies of (Critical) Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Action learning is a pedagogical practice that helps participants learn by talking about their workplace action with fellow participants ("comrades in adversity") in their action learning set. This paper raises questions about the action in action learning, such as: how do members of an action learning set learn from and through each other? How do…

  16. Nuclear receptor coactivators: Essential players in steroid hormone action in brain and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tetel, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    Steroid hormones act in brain and throughout the body to influence behavior and physiology. Many of these effects of steroid hormones are elicited by transcriptional events mediated by their respective receptors. A variety of cell culture studies reveal that nuclear receptor coactivators are critical in modulating steroid receptor-dependent transcription. Thus, in addition to the availability of the hormone and the expression of its receptor, nuclear receptor coactivators are essential for steroid-dependent transactivation of genes. This review will discuss the mounting evidence that nuclear receptor coactivators are critical in modulating steroid hormone action in brain and the regulation of behavior. PMID:19207820

  17. Similarity of actions depends on the functionality of previously observed actions.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Eijgermans, Wessel; Herman, Anne-Sophie; Bergman, Annemiek; Hommel, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    People have a tendency to imitate the behavior of others, sometimes even automatically. And yet, evidence suggests that many of our actions are controlled, mediated by current goals and careful considerations. Here, we investigated whether the observation and evaluation of previous actions of another person modulates the similarity of actions between people in present trials. We manipulated the functionality of a confederate's actions and the interactive context in 2 behavioral tasks, which consisted of games that participants played against a confederate or a virtual computer opponent. To measure effects of working memory load on imitation rates, participants additionally performed an easy or difficult auditory n-back task in parallel to the tasks. We show that participants occasionally produced rather bizarre and dysfunctional behavior when the confederate had done so as well. Even more importantly, results from both tasks show that participants most likely copied dysfunctional behavior in the present trial when the confederate performed functional actions in the previous trial. Thus, the positive evaluation of action consequences in previous trials increases the probability of similarity between the participant's and confederate's actions in present trials despite a chance to copy improper actions. Furthermore, we found a trend of increased action similarities when participants were under high working memory load in Experiment 1 but not in Experiment 2. These results suggest that copying an observed action is an efficient and effortless behavioral and social strategy to achieve similar goals as others, though with an increased risk of maladaptive behavior. PMID:26618624

  18. Symmetry and Stochastic Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Alexandre F.; Hornos, José E. M.

    2007-09-01

    Lorentz-like noncompact Lie symmetry SO(2,1) is found in a spin-boson stochastic model for gene expression. The invariant of the algebra characterizes the switch decay to equilibrium. The azimuthal eigenvalue describes the affinity between the regulatory protein and the gene operator site. Raising and lowering operators are constructed and their actions increase or decrease the affinity parameter. The classification of the noise regime of the gene arises from the group theoretical numbers.

  19. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  20. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  1. BhSGAMP-1, a gene that encodes an antimicrobial peptide, is developmentally regulated by the direct action of 20-OH ecdysone in the salivary gland of Bradysia hygida (Diptera, Sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Zanarotti, Gabriela Morilha; Cândido-Silva, Juliana A; de Almeida, Jorge Cury

    2009-12-01

    Recently we have shown that BhSGAMP-1 is a developmentally regulated reiterated gene that encodes an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) and is expressed exclusively in the salivary glands, at the end of the larval stage. We show, for the first time, that a gene for an AMP is directly activated by 20-OH ecdysone. This control probably involves the participation of short-lived repressor(s). We also found that the promoter of BhSGAMP-1 is not equipped with elements that respond to infection, provoked by the injection of microorganisms, in the salivary glands or in the fat body. We produced polyclonal antibodies against the synthetic peptide and found that the BhSGAMP-1 peptide is secreted in the saliva. The BhSGAMP-1 gene was also activated during the third larval molt. These facts confirm our hypothesis that this preventive system of defense was selected to produce an environment free of harmful microorganisms in the insect's immediate vicinity, during molts. PMID:19882668

  2. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  3. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  4. Conscious Control over Action

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The extensive involvement of nonconscious processes in human behaviour has led some to suggest that consciousness is much less important for the control of action than we might think. In this article I push against this trend, developing an understanding of conscious control that is sensitive to our best models of overt (that is, bodily) action control. Further, I assess the cogency of various zombie challenges—challenges that seek to demote the importance of conscious control for human agency. I argue that though nonconscious contributions to action control are evidently robust, these challenges are overblown. PMID:26113753

  5. Additional Continuing Appropriations Amendments, 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Rogers, Harold [R-KY-5

    2011-03-11

    03/18/2011 Became Public Law No: 112-6. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: Continuing appropriations through 4/8/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Political action committee for scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Spurred by budget proposals that could severely reduce science funding (Eos, March 24, March 3, February 10), seven scientists currently serving as Congressional Science or State Department Fellows recently founded a political action committee (PAC) for scientists. The Science and Technology Political Action Committee (SCITEC-PAC) aims to make scientists more politically aware and better informed about potential legislative actions that affect research. It will also serve to ‘establish a political presence’ with respect to science, said Donald Stein, SCITEC-PAC's chairman.The organization is not a lobbying group, explained Stein, professor of neurology and psychology at Clark University and the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. ‘Lobbyists seek to influence officials by presenting information to them,’ he said, ‘while a PAC tries to influence the outcome of elections through campaign contributions of money, time, and effort in behalf of candidates that share similar goals and aspirations.’ In other words, the PAC will be a vehicle for promoting candidates for federal office who advocate strong support for scientific research and training. In addition, the PAC will develop and study science policy and budget issues and will attempt to stimulate government and private sector interest in these issues.

  7. 76 FR 23998 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

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  8. 78 FR 75568 - Notice of Request for Additional Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Notice of Request for Additional Information The Commission gives notice that it has formally requested that the parties to the below listed agreement provide additional information pursuant to 46 U.S.C. 40304(d). This action prevents the...

  9. 76 FR 60810 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    2010-05-28

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  7. Genomic Analysis Reveals Contrasting PIFq Contribution to Diurnal Rhythmic Gene Expression in PIF-Induced and -Repressed Genes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Guiomar; Soy, Judit; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the PIF quartet (PIFq; PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5) collectively contribute to induce growth in Arabidopsis seedlings under short day (SD) conditions, specifically promoting elongation at dawn. Their action involves the direct regulation of growth-related and hormone-associated genes. However, a comprehensive definition of the PIFq-regulated transcriptome under SD is still lacking. We have recently shown that SD and free-running (LL) conditions correspond to "growth" and "no growth" conditions, respectively, correlating with greater abundance of PIF protein in SD. Here, we present a genomic analysis whereby we first define SD-regulated genes at dawn compared to LL in the wild type, followed by identification of those SD-regulated genes whose expression depends on the presence of PIFq. By using this sequential strategy, we have identified 349 PIF/SD-regulated genes, approximately 55% induced and 42% repressed by both SD and PIFq. Comparison with available databases indicates that PIF/SD-induced and PIF/SD-repressed sets are differently phased at dawn and mid-morning, respectively. In addition, we found that whereas rhythmicity of the PIF/SD-induced gene set is lost in LL, most PIF/SD-repressed genes keep their rhythmicity in LL, suggesting differential regulation of both gene sets by the circadian clock. Moreover, we also uncovered distinct overrepresented functions in the induced and repressed gene sets, in accord with previous studies in other examined PIF-regulated processes. Interestingly, promoter analyses showed that, whereas PIF/SD-induced genes are enriched in direct PIF targets, PIF/SD-repressed genes are mostly indirectly regulated by the PIFs and might be more enriched in ABA-regulated genes. PMID:27458465

  8. Genomic Analysis Reveals Contrasting PIFq Contribution to Diurnal Rhythmic Gene Expression in PIF-Induced and -Repressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Guiomar; Soy, Judit; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the PIF quartet (PIFq; PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5) collectively contribute to induce growth in Arabidopsis seedlings under short day (SD) conditions, specifically promoting elongation at dawn. Their action involves the direct regulation of growth-related and hormone-associated genes. However, a comprehensive definition of the PIFq-regulated transcriptome under SD is still lacking. We have recently shown that SD and free-running (LL) conditions correspond to “growth” and “no growth” conditions, respectively, correlating with greater abundance of PIF protein in SD. Here, we present a genomic analysis whereby we first define SD-regulated genes at dawn compared to LL in the wild type, followed by identification of those SD-regulated genes whose expression depends on the presence of PIFq. By using this sequential strategy, we have identified 349 PIF/SD-regulated genes, approximately 55% induced and 42% repressed by both SD and PIFq. Comparison with available databases indicates that PIF/SD-induced and PIF/SD-repressed sets are differently phased at dawn and mid-morning, respectively. In addition, we found that whereas rhythmicity of the PIF/SD-induced gene set is lost in LL, most PIF/SD-repressed genes keep their rhythmicity in LL, suggesting differential regulation of both gene sets by the circadian clock. Moreover, we also uncovered distinct overrepresented functions in the induced and repressed gene sets, in accord with previous studies in other examined PIF-regulated processes. Interestingly, promoter analyses showed that, whereas PIF/SD-induced genes are enriched in direct PIF targets, PIF/SD-repressed genes are mostly indirectly regulated by the PIFs and might be more enriched in ABA-regulated genes. PMID:27458465

  9. Redox-dependent anti-inflammatory signaling actions of unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Delmastro-Greenwood, Meghan; Freeman, Bruce A; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids are metabolized to reactive products that can act as pro- or anti-inflammatory signaling mediators. Electrophilic fatty acid species, including nitro- and oxo-containing fatty acids, display salutary anti-inflammatory and metabolic actions. Electrophilicity can be conferred by both enzymatic and oxidative reactions, via the homolytic addition of nitrogen dioxide to a double bond or via the formation of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and epoxide substituents. The endogenous formation of electrophilic fatty acids is significant and influenced by diet, metabolic, and inflammatory reactions. Transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes can sense the redox status of the surrounding environment upon electrophilic fatty acid adduction of functionally significant, nucleophilic cysteines. Through this covalent and often reversible posttranslational modification, gene expression and metabolic responses are induced. At low concentrations, the pleiotropic signaling actions that are regulated by these protein targets suggest that some classes of electrophilic lipids may be useful for treating metabolic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24161076

  10. Redox-Dependent Anti-Inflammatory Signaling Actions of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Delmastro-Greenwood, Meghan; Freeman, Bruce A.; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids are metabolized to reactive products that can act as pro- or anti-inflammatory signaling mediators. Electrophilic fatty acid species, including nitro- and oxo-containing fatty acids, display salutary anti-inflammatory and metabolic actions. Electrophilicity can be conferred by both enzymatic and oxidative reactions, via the homolytic addition of nitrogen dioxide to a double bond or via the formation of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and epoxide substituents. The endogenous formation of electrophilic fatty acids is significant and influenced by diet, metabolic, and inflammatory reactions. Transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes can sense the redox status of the surrounding environment upon electrophilic fatty acid adduction of functionally significant, nucleophilic cysteines. Through this covalent and often reversible posttranslational modification, gene expression and metabolic responses are induced. At low concentrations, the pleiotropic signaling actions that are regulated by these protein targets suggest that some classes of electrophilic lipids may be useful for treating metabolic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24161076

  11. Evaluation of growth hormone (GH) action in mice: discovery of GH receptor antagonists and clinical indications.

    PubMed

    Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S; Berryman, Darlene E

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of a growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) was initially established via expression of mutated GH genes in transgenic mice. Following this discovery, development of the compound resulted in a drug termed pegvisomant, which has been approved for use in patients with acromegaly. Pegvisomant treatment in a dose dependent manner results in normalization of IGF-1 levels in most patients. Thus, it is a very efficacious and safe drug. Since the GH/IGF-1 axis has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancers, many have suggested the use of pegvisomant as an anti-cancer therapeutic. In this manuscript, we will review the use of mouse strains that possess elevated or depressed levels of GH action for unraveling many of GH actions. Additionally, we will describe experiments in which the GHA was discovered, review results of pegvisomant's preclinical and clinical trials, and provide data suggesting pegvisomant's therapeutic value in selected types of cancer. PMID:24035867

  12. The Case for Durative Actions: A Commentary on PDDL2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The addition of durative actions to PDDL2.1 sparked some controversy. Fox and Long argued that actions should be considered as instantaneous, but can start and stop processes. Ultimately, a limited notion of durative actions was incorporated into the language. I argue that this notion is impoverished, and that the underlying philosophical position of regarding durative actions as being a shorthand for a start action, process, and stop action ignores the realities of modelling and execution for complex systems.

  13. Immunization Action Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Handouts for Patients & Staff A-Z ... Index Supplies Checklist Administering Vaccines Temperature Logs Adult Vaccination Topics of Interest Documenting Vaccination Translations Parent Handouts ...

  14. Caregiver Action Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content Caregiver Action Network Toggle navigation Toolbox Forum Volunteers Donate About Us Join National Family Caregivers ... for caring for a loved one Family Caregiver Forum Share and talk with other caregivers Rare Disease ...

  15. Postpartum Depression Action Plan

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Postpartum Depression | Postpartum Depression Action Plan Patient __________________________ Physician/NP/PA __________________ Clinic ____________________________ Phone Number ____________________ Choose one area and add other areas as you begin to ...

  16. Affirmative Action's Contradictory Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Madeline E.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses affirmative action's success at creating a more equal workplace. Explores some potential psychological costs of this policy--costs that paradoxically may undermine its objectives--and their implications for achieving the goal of workplace equality. (GR)

  17. Action-based effects on music perception

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Leman, Marc; Palmer, Caroline; Wanderley, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral processes. In contrast, embodied accounts of music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework that captures the ways in which the human motor system and its actions can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory, postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modeling), and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modeling). Embodied accounts typically refer to inverse modeling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007). We extend this account by pinpointing forward modeling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system and its actions suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music) cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamical process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial importance. PMID:24454299

  18. Action-based effects on music perception.

    PubMed

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Leman, Marc; Palmer, Caroline; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2014-01-01

    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral processes. In contrast, embodied accounts of music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework that captures the ways in which the human motor system and its actions can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory, postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modeling), and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modeling). Embodied accounts typically refer to inverse modeling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007). We extend this account by pinpointing forward modeling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system and its actions suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music) cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamical process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial importance. PMID:24454299

  19. Investigating conceptions of intentional action by analyzing participant generated scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Skulmowski, Alexander; Bunge, Andreas; Cohen, Bret R.; Kreilkamp, Barbara A. K.; Troxler, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    We describe and report on results of employing a new method for analyzing lay conceptions of intentional and unintentional action. Instead of asking people for their conceptual intuitions with regard to construed scenarios, we asked our participants to come up with their own scenarios and to explain why these are examples of intentional or unintentional actions. By way of content analysis, we extracted contexts and components that people associated with these action types. Our participants associated unintentional actions predominantly with bad outcomes for all persons involved and linked intentional actions more strongly to positive outcomes, especially concerning the agent. People’s conceptions of intentional action seem to involve more aspects than commonly assumed in philosophical models of intentional action that solely stress the importance of intentions, desires, and beliefs. The additional aspects include decisions and thoughts about the action. In addition, we found that the criteria that participants generated for unintentional actions are not a mere inversion of those used in explanations for intentional actions. Associations between involuntariness and unintentional action seem to be stronger than associations between aspects of voluntariness and intentional action. PMID:26594182

  20. Commitment to action. Population Action International.

    PubMed

    Squires, S

    1994-01-01

    The national chair of Population Action International (formerly the Population Crisis Committee), Robin Chandler Duke, is a crusader for women's reproductive rights. She was in Bangladesh in 1971 during its civil war. Soldiers would rape young Muslim women, and their families would reject them when they became pregnant. The head of the exiled government agreed to let physicians from IPPF perform abortions on these women, which allowed families to take them back. Opposition to the abortions arose, however. This experience in Bangladesh sparked Ms. Duke's interest in population control. Her years as the wife of a US diplomat granted her access to powerful people worldwide. Her predecessor, retired US Army General Bill Draper, called Ms. Duke from his death bed in 1974 to ask her to be national chair of PAI. She served as a delegate in various international meetings, e.g., the 1980 UNESCO meetings in Belgrade. Spain and Luxembourg honored her for her work of campaigning for women's reproductive rights. She believes that rapid population growth is the most significant problem in the world today. It exacerbates poverty, environmental destruction, and political instability. She believes that universal availability of high quality, voluntary family planning services, including safe abortion, is needed to save humanity from the vicious cycle. Since family planning, sex education, and abortion are the most personal and sensitive parts of people's lives, Population Action frames family planning in the context of basic health care. AIDS complicates the issue, because contraception is no longer limited to birth control. Even though the organization realizes that sexual abstinence is the best way to avoid AIDS, it tries to educate female teenagers not to let boys coerce them to have sex. If they do, have sex Population Action advocates condom use. Ms. Duke cites the family planning successes of Indonesia, Zimbabwe, and Thailand. PMID:12319083

  1. Action Learning as Invigoration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chivers, Terence S.

    2011-01-01

    The present account of action learning describes its adoption for pragmatic reasons by the University of the Third Age (U3A). The reason for the existence of this movement is the education of retired people. The account seeks to explain why the action learning method spread from one local U3A to another and across it to other local U3As. The case…

  2. [Addictions and action systems].

    PubMed

    Loonis, E; Apter, M J

    2000-01-01

    Generalizing from some previous analyses of addiction, and introducing the concept of an action system which governs all actions which are focussed on what Brown (1988) calls "hedonic management", we argue that addictions of every kind involve an action system that displays high salience, low variety and low vicariance. Addictions also involve what Apter (1982) calls the "paratelic state". A study was carried out comparing 31 drug addicts with 29 control subjects in terms of action system variables. To measure these variables, we constructed a new instrument, the Activity-System Drawing Test, and also used the Telic Dominance Scale to measure frequency of paratelic states. Dysphoria was measured by means of the BATE (anxiety), IDA-13 (depression), SEI (self-esteem), and TAS-20 (alexithymia) instruments. Strongly significant differences were found between groups for both action system variables and dysphoria, and there were also strong correlations between both groups of variables. This supports the idea that addictions emerge from systemic properties of the action system. PMID:10858918

  3. Insights into the Mode of Action of Chitosan as an Antibacterial Compound▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Raafat, Dina; von Bargen, Kristine; Haas, Albert; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2008-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide biopolymer that combines a unique set of versatile physicochemical and biological characteristics which allow for a wide range of applications. Although its antimicrobial activity is well documented, its mode of action has hitherto remained only vaguely defined. In this work we investigated the antimicrobial mode of action of chitosan using a combination of approaches, including in vitro assays, killing kinetics, cellular leakage measurements, membrane potential estimations, and electron microscopy, in addition to transcriptional response analysis. Chitosan, whose antimicrobial activity was influenced by several factors, exhibited a dose-dependent growth-inhibitory effect. A simultaneous permeabilization of the cell membrane to small cellular components, coupled to a significant membrane depolarization, was detected. A concomitant interference with cell wall biosynthesis was not observed. Chitosan treatment of Staphylococcus simulans 22 cells did not give rise to cell wall lysis; the cell membrane also remained intact. Analysis of transcriptional response data revealed that chitosan treatment leads to multiple changes in the expression profiles of Staphylococcus aureus SG511 genes involved in the regulation of stress and autolysis, as well as genes associated with energy metabolism. Finally, a possible mechanism for chitosan's activity is postulated. Although we contend that there might not be a single classical target that would explain chitosan's antimicrobial action, we speculate that binding of chitosan to teichoic acids, coupled with a potential extraction of membrane lipids (predominantly lipoteichoic acid) results in a sequence of events, ultimately leading to bacterial death. PMID:18456858

  4. Evidence for gene conversion in the amylase multigene family of Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Popadić, A; Anderson, W W

    1995-07-01

    The alpha-amylase (Amy) multigene family in Drosophila pseudoobscura is located on the third chromosome, which is polymorphic for more than 40 inverted gene arrangements. The number of copies in this family ranges from one to three, depending on the arrangement in question. A previous study of the three Amy genes from the Standard (ST) arrangement suggested either that duplicated copies (Amy2 and Amy3) are functionally constrained or that they are undergoing gene conversion with Amy1. In order to elucidate further the pattern of molecular evolution in this family, we cloned and sequenced four additional Amy genes, two from the Santa Cruz (SC) and two from the Chiricahua (CH) gene arrangement. Of the two alternatives, only the hypothesis of gene conversion is supported by the sequence analysis. The homogenization effect of gene conversion has been strongest in SC, whose copies differ by only two nucleotides, less noticeable in ST, and negligible in the CH. Furthermore, the action of gene conversion is apparently localized, occurring only in the coding region. Interestingly, these results concur with the findings of other workers for the duplicated Amy genes in the Drosophila melanogaster group. Thus, the occurrence of gene conversion in the Amy multigene family seems to be a common feature in the Drosophila species studied so far. PMID:7659012

  5. Dapagliflozin: glucuretic action and beyond.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sundram, Karupiah; Dhanaraj, Sokkalingam A

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a greatly challenging disease of the 21 century, and the mortality rate due to this insidious disease is increasing worldwide in spite of availability of effective oral hypoglycemic agents. Satisfactory management of glycemic control in patients afflicted with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains a major clinical challenge. Identification of potential pharmacological target sites is therefore continuing as an integral part of the diabetic research. The sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) expressed in the renal proximal tubule plays an essential role in glucose reabsorption. Pharmacological blockade of SGLT2 prevents glucose reabsorption and subsequently induces the elimination of filtered glucose via urine, the process is known as 'glucuresis'. Dapagliflozin is a selective inhibitor of SGLT2. The US FDA approved dapagliflozin in January 2014 to improve glycemic control along with diet and exercise in adult patients afflicted with T2DM. It has a potential to decrease glycated hemoglobin and to promote weight loss. Although the mechanism of action of dapagliflozin is not directly linked with insulin or insulin sensitivity, reduction of plasma glucose by dapagliflozin via induction of glucosuria could improve muscle insulin sensitivity. Moreover, dapagliflozin could cause diuresis and subsequently fall in blood pressure. In addition to general discussion on the pharmacology of dapagliflozin, we propose in this review the possibilities of dual antidiabetic effect of dapagliflozin and its possible additional beneficial actions in hypertensive-obese-T2DM patients through its indirect blood pressure-lowering action and reduction of body calories and weight. Long-term clinical studies are however needed to clarify this contention. PMID:24705156

  6. National Security Technology Incubator Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    2008-02-28

    This report documents the action plan for developing the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) program for southern New Mexico. The NSTI program is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). This action plan serves as a tool in measuring progress in the development process and delivery of services for the NSTI program. Continuous review and evaluation of the action plan is necessary in the development process of the NSTI. The action plan includes detailed steps in developing the NSTI program based on recommended best practices in incubator development by the National Business Incubation Association (NBIA). Included are tasks required to implement the NSTI, developed within a work breakdown structure. In addition, a timeline is identified for each task.

  7. Genes for sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, D; Nakano, Y

    1998-05-01

    The mating behavior of Drosophila melanogaster is a stereotyped sequence of fixed action patterns, composed of orientation, tapping, singing, licking, attempted copulation and copulation. Mutations that block a unique aspect of mating behavior were isolated and analyzed at the cellular and molecular levels. The wild-type counterparts of the mutated genes were shown to rescue the phenotypes by their ubiquitous or targeted expression in some of the mutants. This strategy of artificial control of fly behavior opens up an avenue for studies to identify the neural center for individual behavioral actions. PMID:9600058

  8. Genes That Bias Mendelian Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Grognet, Pierre; Lalucque, Hervé; Malagnac, Fabienne; Silar, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Mendel laws of inheritance can be cheated by Meiotic Drive Elements (MDs), complex nuclear genetic loci found in various eukaryotic genomes and distorting segregation in their favor. Here, we identify and characterize in the model fungus Podospora anserina Spok1 and Spok2, two MDs known as Spore Killers. We show that they are related genes with both spore-killing distorter and spore-protecting responder activities carried out by the same allele. These alleles act as autonomous elements, exert their effects independently of their location in the genome and can act as MDs in other fungi. Additionally, Spok1 acts as a resistance factor to Spok2 killing. Genetical data and cytological analysis of Spok1 and Spok2 localization during the killing process suggest a complex mode of action for Spok proteins. Spok1 and Spok2 belong to a multigene family prevalent in the genomes of many ascomycetes. As they have no obvious cellular role, Spok1 and Spok2 Spore Killer genes represent a novel kind of selfish genetic elements prevalent in fungal genome that proliferate through meiotic distortion. PMID:24830502

  9. Action of methyl-, propyl- and butylparaben on GPR30 gene and protein expression, cAMP levels and activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and MCF-10A non-transformed breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Anna Maria; Gregoraszczuk, Ewa Łucja

    2015-10-14

    In the present study, we examined cAMP levels and activation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in response to the actions of parabens on GPR30 in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. Cells were exposed to methyl-, propyl- or butylparaben at a concentration of 20nM; 17-β-estradiol (10nM) was used as a positive control. 17β-estradiol and all tested parabens increased GPR30 gene and protein expression in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. No parabens affected cAMP levels in either cell line, with the exception of propylparaben in MCF-10A cells. 17β-estradiol, propylparaben, and butylparaben increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in MCF-7 cells, whereas 17β-estradiol, methyl- and butylparaben, but not propylparaben, increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in MCF-10A cells. Akt activation was noted only in MCF-7 cells and only with propylparaben treatment. Collectively, the data presented here point to a nongenomic mechanism of action of parabens in activation GPR30 in both cancer and non-cancer breast cell lines through βγ dimer-mediated activation of the ERK1/2 pathway, but not the cAMP/PKA pathway. Moreover, among investigated parabens, propylparaben appears to inhibit apoptosis in cancer cells through activation of Akt kinases, confirming conclusions suggested by our previously published data. Nevertheless, continuing research on the carcinogenic action of parabens is warranted. PMID:26253279

  10. Investigations to the Antibacterial Mechanism of Action of Kendomycin

    PubMed Central

    A. Elnakady, Yasser; Chatterjee, Indranil; Bischoff, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Josten, Michaele; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Herrmann, Mathias; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The emergence of bacteria that are resistant to many currently used drugs emphasizes the need to discover and develop new antibiotics that are effective against such multi-resistant strains. Kendomycin is a novel polyketide that has a unique quinone methide ansa structure and various biological properties. This compound exhibits strong antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Despite the promise of kendomycinin in several therapeutic areas, its mode of action has yet to be identified. Methods In this study, we used a multidisciplinary approach to gain insight into the antibacterial mechanism of this compound. Results The antibacterial activity of kendomycin appears to be bacteriostatic rather than bactericidal. Kendomycin inhibited the growth of the MRSA strain COL at a low concentration (MIC of 5 μg/mL). Proteomic analysis and gene transcription profiling of kendomycin-treated cells indicated that this compound affected the regulation of numerous proteins and genes involved in central metabolic pathways, such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (SdhA) and gluconeogenesis (PckA and GapB), cell wall biosynthesis and cell division (FtsA, FtsZ, and MurAA), capsule production (Cap5A and Cap5C), bacterial programmed cell death (LrgA and CidA), the cellular stress response (ClpB, ClpC, ClpP, GroEL, DnaK, and GrpE), and oxidative stress (AhpC and KatA). Electron microscopy revealed that kendomycin strongly affected septum formation during cell division. Most kendomycin-treated cells displayed incomplete septa with abnormal morphology. Conclusions Kendomycin might directly or indirectly affect the cell division machinery, protein stability, and programmed cell death in S. aureus. Additional studies are still needed to obtain deeper insight into the mode of action of kendomycin. PMID:26795276

  11. Vitamin D: Metabolism, Molecular Mechanism of Action, and Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Verlinden, Lieve; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is the hormonally active form of vitamin D. The genomic mechanism of 1,25(OH)2D3 action involves the direct binding of the 1,25(OH)2D3 activated vitamin D receptor/retinoic X receptor (VDR/RXR) heterodimeric complex to specific DNA sequences. Numerous VDR co-regulatory proteins have been identified, and genome-wide studies have shown that the actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 involve regulation of gene activity at a range of locations many kilobases from the transcription start site. The structure of the liganded VDR/RXR complex was recently characterized using cryoelectron microscopy, X-ray scattering, and hydrogen deuterium exchange. These recent technological advances will result in a more complete understanding of VDR coactivator interactions, thus facilitating cell and gene specific clinical applications. Although the identification of mechanisms mediating VDR-regulated transcription has been one focus of recent research in the field, other topics of fundamental importance include the identification and functional significance of proteins involved in the metabolism of vitamin D. CYP2R1 has been identified as the most important 25-hydroxylase, and a critical role for CYP24A1 in humans was noted in studies showing that inactivating mutations in CYP24A1 are a probable cause of idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. In addition, studies using knockout and transgenic mice have provided new insight on the physiological role of vitamin D in classical target tissues as well as evidence of extraskeletal effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 including inhibition of cancer progression, effects on the cardiovascular system, and immunomodulatory effects in certain autoimmune diseases. Some of the mechanistic findings in mouse models have also been observed in humans. The identification of similar pathways in humans could lead to the development of new therapies to prevent and treat disease. PMID:26681795

  12. The Increase in Signaling by Kisspeptin Neurons in the Preoptic Area and Associated Changes in Clock Gene Expression That Trigger the LH Surge in Female Rats Are Dependent on the Facilitatory Action of a Noradrenaline Input.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Bruna; Ribeiro, Aline B; Leite, Cristiane M; Uchôa, Ernane T; Carolino, Ruither O; Cardoso, Thais S R; Elias, Lucila L K; Rodrigues, José A; Plant, Tony M; Poletini, Maristela O; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, kisspeptin neurons in the rostral periventricular area of the third ventricle (RP3V) of the preoptic area are considered to provide a major stimulatory input to the GnRH neuronal network that is responsible for triggering the preovulatory LH surge. Noradrenaline (NA) is one of the main modulators of GnRH release, and NA fibers are found in close apposition to kisspeptin neurons in the RP3V. Our objective was to interrogate the role of NA signaling in the kisspeptin control of GnRH secretion during the estradiol induced LH surge in ovariectomized rats, using prazosin, an α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist. In control rats, the estradiol-induced LH surge at 17 hours was associated with a significant increase in GnRH and kisspeptin content in the median eminence with the increase in kisspeptin preceding that of GnRH and LH. Prazosin, administered 5 and 3 hours prior to the predicted time of the LH surge truncated the LH surge and abolished the rise in GnRH and kisspeptin in the median eminence. In the preoptic area, prazosin blocked the increases in Kiss1 gene expression and kisspeptin content in association with a disruption in the expression of the clock genes, Per1 and Bmal1. Together these findings demonstrate for the first time that NA modulates kisspeptin synthesis in the RP3V through the activation of α1-adrenergic receptors prior to the initiation of the LH surge and indicate a potential role of α1-adrenergic signaling in the circadian-controlled pathway timing of the preovulatory LH surge. PMID:26556532

  13. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  14. Environmentally friendly batteries by addition of chitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, L.; Dragone, R.; Grossi, R.; Meo, A. E.; Visco, G.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we describe the results of a research performed on pen alkaline-manganese batteries with the aim of checking the possibility of minimizing the release of metals from them when, exhausted, are disposed. This goal was temptatively looked for on inserting in the batteries a certain amount of chitin able to bind the metal ions formed by the natural oxidation of the metals contained in the batteries and by the acid rain dissolving action. The obtained results show that 1.2 g of chitin for each middle size pen model alkaline-manganese battery practically prevent any release of metals, without relevant change of the discharge curve of the battery. The effect of the addition is particularly marked if realised by thé additive as contained in a PVC membrane.

  15. Gene therapy approaches to regenerating the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.; Huard, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the musculoskeletal system are common, debilitating and expensive. In many cases, healing is imperfect, which leads to chronic impairment. Gene transfer might improve repair and regeneration at sites of injury by enabling the local, sustained and potentially regulated expression of therapeutic gene products; such products include morphogens, growth factors and anti-inflammatory proteins. Proteins produced endogenously as a result of gene transfer are nascent molecules that have undergone post-translational modification. In addition, gene transfer offers particular advantages for the delivery of products with an intracellular site of action, such as transcription factors and noncoding RNAs, and proteins that need to be inserted into a cell compartment, such as a membrane. Transgenes can be delivered by viral or nonviral vectors via in vivo or ex vivo protocols using progenitor or differentiated cells. The first gene transfer clinical trials for osteoarthritis and cartilage repair have already been completed. Various bone-healing protocols are at an advanced stage of development, including studies with large animals, and human trials are envisaged. Other applications in the repair and regeneration of skeletal muscle, intervertebral disc, meniscus, ligament and tendon are in preclinical development. In addition to scientific, medical and safety considerations, clinical translation is constrained by social, financial and logistical issues. PMID:25776949

  16. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  17. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  18. Learning to take actions

    SciTech Connect

    Khardon, R.

    1996-12-31

    We formalize a model for supervised learning of action strategies in dynamic stochastic domains, and show that pac-learning results on Occam algorithms hold in this model as well. We then identify a particularly useful bias for action strategies based on production rule systems. We show that a subset of production rule systems, including rules in predicate calculus style, small hidden state, and unobserved support predicates, is properly learnable. The bias we introduce enables the learning algorithm to invent the recursive support predicates which are used in the action strategy, and to reconstruct the internal state of the strategy. It is also shown that hierarchical strategies are learnable if a helpful teacher is available, but that otherwise the problem is computationally hard.

  19. Improving Learning and Teaching through Action Learning and Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skeriit, Ortrun

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical framework for action learning and action research is presented, as a basis for better understanding college instruction and learning. Action research is viewed as a philosophy, theory of learning, research methodology, and teaching technique. It is argued that action research both increases knowledge and improves teaching.…

  20. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406