Science.gov

Sample records for additive genetic component

  1. Additive and non-additive genetic components of the jack male life history in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Forest, Adriana R; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Heath, Daniel D; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-08-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, exhibit alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males exist in two phenotypes: large "hooknose" males and smaller "jacks" that reach sexual maturity after only 1 year in seawater. The mechanisms that determine "jacking rate"-the rate at which males precociously sexually mature-are known to involve both genetics and differential growth rates, where individuals that become jacks exhibit higher growth earlier in life. The additive genetic components have been studied and it is known that jack sires produce significantly more jack offspring than hooknose sires, and vice versa. The current study was the first to investigate both additive and non-additive genetic components underlying jacking through the use of a full-factorial breeding design using all hooknose sires. The effect of dams and sires descendant from a marker-assisted broodstock program that identified "high performance" and "low performance" lines using growth- and survival-related gene markers was also studied. Finally, the relative growth of jack, hooknose, and female offspring was examined. No significant dam, sire, or interaction effects were observed in this study, and the maternal, additive, and non-additive components underlying jacking were small. Differences in jacking rates in this study were determined by dam performance line, where dams that originated from the low performance line produced significantly more jacks. Jack offspring in this study had a significantly larger body size than both hooknose males and females starting 1 year post-fertilization. This study provides novel information regarding the genetic architecture underlying ARTs in Chinook salmon that could have implications for the aquaculture industry, where jacks are not favoured due to their small body size and poor flesh quality.

  2. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  3. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  4. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  5. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T Ashton; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  6. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  7. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  8. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Feasibility and Testing of Additive Manufactured Components

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Hummelt, Ed; Solovyeva, Lyudmila

    2016-09-01

    This project focused on demonstrating the ability to fabricate two parts with different geometry: an arc flash interrupter and a hydraulic manifold. Eaton Corporation provided ORNL solid models, information related to tolerances and sensitive parameters of the parts and provided testing and evaluation. ORNL successfully manufactured both components, provided cost models of the manufacturing (materials, labor, time and post processing) and delivered test components for Eaton evaluation. The arc flash suppressor was fabricated using the Renishaw laser powder bed technology in CoCrMo while the manifold was produced from Ti-6Al-4V using the Arcam electron beam melting technology. These manufacturing techniques were selected based on the design and geometrical tolerances required. A full-scale manifold was produced on the Arcam A2 system (nearly 12 inches tall). A portion of the manifold was also produced in the Arcam Q10 system. Although a full scale manifold could not be produced in the system, a full scale manifold is expected to have similar material properties, geometric accuracy, and surface finish as could be fabricated on an Arcam Q20 system that is capable of producing four full scale manifolds in a production environment. In addition to the manifold, mechanical test specimens, geometric tolerance artifacts, and microstructure samples were produced alongside the manifold. The development and demonstration of these two key components helped Eaton understand the impact additive manufacturing can have on many of their existing products. By working within the MDF and leveraging ORNL’s manufacturing and characterization capabilities, the work will ensure the rapid insertion and commercialization of this technology.

  10. Inspection of additive-manufactured layered components.

    PubMed

    Cerniglia, D; Scafidi, M; Pantano, A; Rudlin, J

    2015-09-01

    Laser powder deposition (LPD) is a rapid additive manufacturing process to produce, layer upon layer, 3D geometries or to repair high-value components. Currently there is no nondestructive technique that can guarantee absence of flaws in LPD products during manufacturing. In this paper a laser ultrasonic technique for in-line inspection of LPD components is proposed. Reference samples were manufactured from Inconel and machined flaws were created to establish the sensitivity of the technique. Numerical models of laser-generated ultrasonic waves have been created to gain a deeper understanding of physics, to optimize the set-up and to verify the experimental measurements. Results obtained on two sets of reference samples are shown. A proof-of-concept prototype has been demonstrated on some specific deposition samples with induced flaws, that were confirmed by an ultra-high sensitivity X-ray technique. Experimental outcomes prove that typical micro-defects due to the layer-by-layer deposition process, such as near-surface and surface flaws in a single layer deposit, can be detected.

  11. Non-additive and additive genetic effects on extraversion in 3314 Dutch adolescent twins and their parents.

    PubMed

    Rettew, David C; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Hudziak, James J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2008-05-01

    The influence of non-additive genetic influences on personality traits has been increasingly reported in adult populations. Less is known, however, with respect to younger samples. In this study, we examine additive and non-additive genetic contributions to the personality trait of extraversion in 1,689 Dutch twin pairs, 1,505 mothers and 1,637 fathers of the twins. The twins were on average 15.5 years (range 12-18 years). To increase statistical power to detect non-additive genetic influences, data on extraversion were also collected in parents and simultaneously analyzed. Genetic modeling procedures incorporating age as a potential modifier of heritability showed significant influences of additive (20-23%) and non-additive genetic factors (31-33%) in addition to unshared environment (46-48%) for adolescents and for their parents. The additive genetic component was slightly and positively related to age. No significant sex differences were found for either extraversion means or for the magnitude of the genetic and environmental influences. There was no evidence of non-random mating for extraversion in the parental generation. Results show that in addition to additive genetic influences, extraversion in adolescents is influenced by non-additive genetic factors.

  12. Explaining additional genetic variation in complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew R.; Wray, Naomi R.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of complex traits, discovering >6000 variants associated with >500 quantitative traits and common complex diseases in humans. The associations identified so far represent only a fraction of those which influence phenotype, as there are likely to be very many variants across the entire frequency spectrum, each of which influences multiple traits, with only a small average contribution to the phenotypic variance. This presents a considerable challenge to further dissection of the remaining unexplained genetic variance within populations, which limits our ability to predict disease risk, identify new drug targets, improve and maintain food sources, and understand natural diversity. This challenge will be met within the current framework through larger sample size, better phenotyping including recording of non-genetic risk factors, focused study designs, and an integration of multiple sources of phenotypic and genetic information. The current evidence supports the application of quantitative genetic approaches, and we argue that one should retain simpler theories until simplicity can be traded for greater explanatory power. PMID:24629526

  13. Latent common genetic components of obesity traits

    PubMed Central

    Harders, R; Luke, A; Zhu, X; Cooper, RS

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is rapidly becoming a global epidemic. Unlike many complex human diseases, obesity is defined not just by a single trait or phenotype, but jointly by measures of anthropometry and metabolic status. Methods We applied maximum likelihood factor analysis to identify common latent factors underlying observed covariance in multiple obesity-related measures. Both the genetic components and the mode of inheritance of the common factors were evaluated. A total of 1775 participants from 590 families for whom measures on obesity-related traits were available were included in this study. Results The average age of participants was 37 years, 39% of the participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30.0 kg/m2) and 26% were overweight (body mass index 25.0 - 29.9 kg/m2). Two latent common factors jointly accounting for over 99% of the correlations among obesity-related traits were identified. Complex segregation analysis of the age and sex-adjusted latent factors provide evidence for a Mendelian mode of inheritance of major genetic effect with heritability estimates of 40.4% and 47.5% for the first and second factors, respectively. Conclusions These findings provide a support for multivariate-based approach for investigating pleiotropic effects on obesity-related traits which can be applied in both genetic linkage and association mapping. PMID:18936762

  14. The Genetic Architecture of Quantitative Traits Cannot Be Inferred from Variance Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2016-01-01

    Classical quantitative genetic analyses estimate additive and non-additive genetic and environmental components of variance from phenotypes of related individuals without knowing the identities of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Many studies have found a large proportion of quantitative trait variation can be attributed to the additive genetic variance (VA), providing the basis for claims that non-additive gene actions are unimportant. In this study, we show that arbitrarily defined parameterizations of genetic effects seemingly consistent with non-additive gene actions can also capture the majority of genetic variation. This reveals a logical flaw in using the relative magnitudes of variance components to indicate the relative importance of additive and non-additive gene actions. We discuss the implications and propose that variance component analyses should not be used to infer the genetic architecture of quantitative traits. PMID:27812106

  15. Computed Tomography Inspection and Analysis for Additive Manufacturing Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection was performed on test articles additively manufactured from metallic materials. Metallic AM and machined wrought alloy test articles with programmed flaws were inspected using a 2MeV linear accelerator based CT system. Performance of CT inspection on identically configured wrought and AM components and programmed flaws was assessed using standard image analysis techniques to determine the impact of additive manufacturing on inspectability of objects with complex geometries.

  16. The genetics of East African populations: a Nilo-Saharan component in the African genetic landscape

    PubMed Central

    Dobon, Begoña; Hassan, Hisham Y.; Laayouni, Hafid; Luisi, Pierre; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Wijmenga, Cisca; Tahir, Hanan; Comas, David; Netea, Mihai G.; Bertranpetit, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    East Africa is a strategic region to study human genetic diversity due to the presence of ethnically, linguistically, and geographically diverse populations. Here, we provide new insight into the genetic history of populations living in the Sudanese region of East Africa by analysing nine ethnic groups belonging to three African linguistic families: Niger-Kordofanian, Nilo-Saharan and Afro-Asiatic. A total of 500 individuals were genotyped for 200,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Principal component analysis, clustering analysis using ADMIXTURE, FST statistics, and the three-population test were used to investigate the underlying genetic structure and ancestry of the different ethno-linguistic groups. Our analyses revealed a genetic component for Sudanese Nilo-Saharan speaking groups (Darfurians and part of Nuba populations) related to Nilotes of South Sudan, but not to other Sudanese populations or other sub-Saharan populations. Populations inhabiting the North of the region showed close genetic affinities with North Africa, with a component that could be remnant of North Africans before the migrations of Arabs from Arabia. In addition, we found very low genetic distances between populations in genes important for anti-malarial and anti-bacterial host defence, suggesting similar selective pressures on these genes and stressing the importance of considering functional pathways to understand the evolutionary history of populations. PMID:26017457

  17. Application of Additively Manufactured Components in Rocket Engine Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, Marty, Jr.; Hanks, Andrew; Schmauch, Preston; Delessio, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The use of additive manufacturing technology has the potential to revolutionize the development of turbopump components in liquid rocket engines. When designing turbomachinery with the additive process there are several benefits and risks that are leveraged relative to a traditional development cycle. This topic explores the details and development of a 90,000 RPM Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump from which 90% of the parts were derived from the additive process. This turbopump was designed, developed and will be tested later this year at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  18. Additive Manufacturing Design Considerations for Liquid Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, Dave; Hissam, Andy; Baker, Kevin; Rice, Darron

    2014-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department has gained significant experience in the last year designing, building, and testing liquid engine components using additive manufacturing. The department has developed valve, duct, turbo-machinery, and combustion device components using this technology. Many valuable lessons were learned during this process. These lessons will be the focus of this presentation. We will present criteria for selecting part candidates for additive manufacturing. Some part characteristics are 'tailor made' for this process. Selecting the right parts for the process is the first step to maximizing productivity gains. We will also present specific lessons we learned about feature geometry that can and cannot be produced using additive manufacturing machines. Most liquid engine components were made using a two-step process. The base part was made using additive manufacturing and then traditional machining processes were used to produce the final part. The presentation will describe design accommodations needed to make the base part and lessons we learned about which features could be built directly and which require the final machine process. Tolerance capabilities, surface finish, and material thickness allowances will also be covered. Additive Manufacturing can produce internal passages that cannot be made using traditional approaches. It can also eliminate a significant amount of manpower by reducing part count and leveraging model-based design and analysis techniques. Information will be shared about performance enhancements and design efficiencies we experienced for certain categories of engine parts.

  19. Materials Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRC's Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  20. Material Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRCs Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  1. Additive manufacturing method for SRF components of various geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Frigola, Pedro E; Murokh, Alex Y

    2015-05-05

    An additive manufacturing method for forming nearly monolithic SRF niobium cavities and end group components of arbitrary shape with features such as optimized wall thickness and integral stiffeners, greatly reducing the cost and technical variability of conventional cavity construction. The additive manufacturing method for forming an SRF cavity, includes atomizing niobium to form a niobium powder, feeding the niobium powder into an electron beam melter under a vacuum, melting the niobium powder under a vacuum in the electron beam melter to form an SRF cavity; and polishing the inside surface of the SRF cavity.

  2. Five-Axis Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing for Nuclear Component Manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Adam; Wenning, Justin; Terrani, Kurt; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Norfolk, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a three-dimensional metal printing technology which uses high-frequency vibrations to scrub and weld together both similar and dissimilar metal foils. There is no melting in the process and no special atmosphere requirements are needed. Consequently, dissimilar metals can be joined with little to no intermetallic compound formation, and large components can be manufactured. These attributes have the potential to transform manufacturing of nuclear reactor core components such as control elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These components are hybrid structures consisting of an outer cladding layer in contact with the coolant with neutron-absorbing materials inside, such as neutron poisons for reactor control purposes. UAM systems are built into a computer numerical control (CNC) framework to utilize intermittent subtractive processes. These subtractive processes are used to introduce internal features as the component is being built and for net shaping. The CNC framework is also used for controlling the motion of the welding operation. It is demonstrated here that curved components with embedded features can be produced using a five-axis code for the welder for the first time.

  3. Five-axis ultrasonic additive manufacturing for nuclear component manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Adam; Wenning, Justin; Terrani, Kurt A.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Norfolk, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a three-dimensional metal printing technology which uses high-frequency vibrations to scrub and weld together both similar and dissimilar metal foils. There is no melting in the process and no special atmosphere requirements are needed. Consequently, dissimilar metals can be joined with little to no intermetallic compound formation, and large components can be manufactured. These attributes have the potential to transform manufacturing of nuclear reactor core components such as control elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These components are hybrid structures consisting of an outer cladding layer in contact with the coolant with neutron-absorbing materials inside, such as neutron poisons for reactor control purposes. UAM systems are built into a computer numerical control (CNC) framework to utilize intermittent subtractive processes. These subtractive processes are used to introduce internal features as the component is being built and for net shaping. The CNC framework is also used for controlling the motion of the welding operation. Lastly, it is demonstrated here that curved components with embedded features can be produced using a five-axis code for the welder for the first time.

  4. Five-axis ultrasonic additive manufacturing for nuclear component manufacture

    DOE PAGES

    Hehr, Adam; Wenning, Justin; Terrani, Kurt A.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a three-dimensional metal printing technology which uses high-frequency vibrations to scrub and weld together both similar and dissimilar metal foils. There is no melting in the process and no special atmosphere requirements are needed. Consequently, dissimilar metals can be joined with little to no intermetallic compound formation, and large components can be manufactured. These attributes have the potential to transform manufacturing of nuclear reactor core components such as control elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These components are hybrid structures consisting of an outer cladding layer in contact withmore » the coolant with neutron-absorbing materials inside, such as neutron poisons for reactor control purposes. UAM systems are built into a computer numerical control (CNC) framework to utilize intermittent subtractive processes. These subtractive processes are used to introduce internal features as the component is being built and for net shaping. The CNC framework is also used for controlling the motion of the welding operation. Lastly, it is demonstrated here that curved components with embedded features can be produced using a five-axis code for the welder for the first time.« less

  5. Five-Axis Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing for Nuclear Component Manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Adam; Wenning, Justin; Terrani, Kurt; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Norfolk, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a three-dimensional metal printing technology which uses high-frequency vibrations to scrub and weld together both similar and dissimilar metal foils. There is no melting in the process and no special atmosphere requirements are needed. Consequently, dissimilar metals can be joined with little to no intermetallic compound formation, and large components can be manufactured. These attributes have the potential to transform manufacturing of nuclear reactor core components such as control elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These components are hybrid structures consisting of an outer cladding layer in contact with the coolant with neutron-absorbing materials inside, such as neutron poisons for reactor control purposes. UAM systems are built into a computer numerical control (CNC) framework to utilize intermittent subtractive processes. These subtractive processes are used to introduce internal features as the component is being built and for net shaping. The CNC framework is also used for controlling the motion of the welding operation. It is demonstrated here that curved components with embedded features can be produced using a five-axis code for the welder for the first time.

  6. Ontogeny of additive and maternal genetic effects: lessons from domestic mammals.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alastair J; Reale, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Evolution of size and growth depends on heritable variation arising from additive and maternal genetic effects. Levels of heritable (and nonheritable) variation might change over ontogeny, increasing through "variance compounding" or decreasing through "compensatory growth." We test for these processes using a meta-analysis of age-specific weight traits in domestic ungulates. Generally, mean standardized variance components decrease with age, consistent with compensatory growth. Phenotypic convergence among adult sheep occurs through decreasing environmental and maternal genetic variation. Maternal variation similarly declines in cattle. Maternal genetic effects are thus reduced with age (both in absolute and relative terms). Significant trends in heritability (decreasing in cattle, increasing in sheep) result from declining maternal and environmental components rather than from changing additive variation. There was no evidence for increasing standardized variance components. Any compounding must therefore be masked by more important compensatory processes. While extrapolation of these patterns to processes in natural population is difficult, our results highlight the inadequacy of assuming constancy in genetic parameters over ontogeny. Negative covariance between direct and maternal genetic effects was common. Negative correlations with additive and maternal genetic variances indicate that antagonistic pleiotropy (between additive and maternal genetic effects) may maintain genetic variance and limit responses to selection.

  7. Additive Manufacturing of Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Bowman, Randy; Cooper, Ken; Fikes, John; Taminger, Karen; Wright, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies and design tools aimed at reducing the costs and manufacturing time of regeneratively cooled rocket engine components. These Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) tasks are funded through NASA's Game Changing Development Program in the Space Technology Mission Directorate. The LCUSP project will develop a copper alloy additive manufacturing design process and develop and optimize the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) manufacturing process to direct deposit a nickel alloy structural jacket and manifolds onto an SLM manufactured GRCop chamber and Ni-alloy nozzle. In order to develop these processes, the project will characterize both the microstructural and mechanical properties of the SLMproduced GRCop-84, and will explore and document novel design techniques specific to AM combustion devices components. These manufacturing technologies will be used to build a 25K-class regenerative chamber and nozzle (to be used with tested DMLS injectors) that will be tested individually and as a system in hot fire tests to demonstrate the applicability of the technologies. These tasks are expected to bring costs and manufacturing time down as spacecraft propulsion systems typically comprise more than 70% of the total vehicle cost and account for a significant portion of the development schedule. Additionally, high pressure/high temperature combustion chambers and nozzles must be regeneratively cooled to survive their operating environment, causing their design to be time consuming and costly to build. LCUSP presents an opportunity to develop and demonstrate a process that can infuse these technologies into industry, build competition, and drive down costs of future engines.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Although meningitis can be life-threatening, individuals with complement component ... leaves affected individuals prone to recurrent episodes of meningitis. Learn more about the genes associated with complement ...

  9. Genetic component in learning ability in bees.

    PubMed

    Kerr, W E; Moura Duarte, F A; Oliveira, R S

    1975-10-01

    Twenty-five bees, five from each of five hives, were trained to collect food at a table. When the bee reached the table, time was recorded for 12 visits. Then a blue and yellow pan was substituted for the original metal pan, and time and correct responses were recorded for 30 trips (discrimination phase). Finally, food was taken from the pan and extinction was recorded as incorrect responses for 20 visits. Variance analysis was carried out, and genetic variance was undetected for discrimination, but was detected for extinction. It is concluded that learning is very important for bees, so that any impairment in such ability affects colony survival.

  10. The genetic component of Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten W.; Holst, Anders G.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Olesen, Morten S.

    2013-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a clinical entity first described in 1992. BrS is characterized by ST-segment elevations in the right precordial leads and susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. It affects young subjects, predominantly males, with structurally normal hearts. The prevalence varies with ethnicity ranging from 1:2,000 to 1:100,000 in different parts of the world. Today, hundreds of variants in 17 genes have been associated with BrS of which mutations in SCN5A, coding for the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, accounts for the vast majority. Despite this, approximately 70% of BrS cases cannot be explained genetically with the current knowledge. Moreover, the monogenic role of some of the variants previously described as being associated with BrS has been questioned by their occurrence in about 4% (1:23) of the general population as found in NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) currently including approximately 6500 individuals. If we add the variants described in the five newest identified genes associated with BrS, they appear at an even higher prevalence in the ESP (1:21). The current standard treatment of BrS is an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). The risk stratification and indications for ICD treatment are based on the ECG and on the clinical and family history. In this review we discuss the genetic basis of BrS. PMID:23874304

  11. The Expression of Additive and Nonadditive Genetic Variation under Stress

    PubMed Central

    Blows, M. W.; Sokolowski, M. B.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental lines of Drosophila melanogaster derived from a natural population, which had been isolated in the laboratory for ~70 generations, were crossed to determine if the expression of additive, dominance and epistatic genetic variation in development time and viability was associated with the environment. No association was found between the level of additive genetic effects and environmental value for either trait, but nonadditive genetic effects increased at both extremes of the environmental range for development time. The expression of high levels of dominance and epistatic genetic variation at environmental extremes may be a general expectation for some traits. The disruption of the epistatic gene complexes in the parental lines resulted in hybrid breakdown toward faster development and there was some indication of hybrid breakdown toward higher viability. A combination of genetic drift and natural selection had therefore resulted in different epistatic gene complexes being selected after ~70 generations from a common genetic base. After crossing, the hybrid populations were observed for 10 generations. Epistasis contributed on average 12 hr in development time. Fluctuating asymmetry in sternopleural bristle number also evolved in the hybrid populations, decreasing by >18% in the first seven generations after hybridization. PMID:7672585

  12. Neutron Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components. Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Thomas R.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a collection of promising manufacturing methods that industry is beginning to explore and adopt. Macroscopically complicated and near net shape components are being built using AM, but how the material behaves in service is a big question for industry. Consequently, AM components/materials need further research into exactly what is made and how it will behave in service. This one and a half day workshop included a series of invited presentations from academia, industry and national laboratories (see Appendix A for the workshop agenda and list of talks). The workshop was welcomed by Alan Tennant, Chief Scientist, Neutron Sciences Directorate, ORNL, and opened remotely by Rob Ivestor, Deputy Director, Advanced Manufacturing Office-DOE, who declared AM adoptees as titans who will be able to create customized 3-D structures with 1 million to 1 billion micro welds with locally tailored microstructures. Further he stated that characterization with neutrons is key to be able to bring critical insight/information into the AM process/property/behavior relationship. Subsequently, the presentations spanned a slice of the current state of the art AM techniques and many of the most relevant characterization techniques using neutrons. After the talks, a panel discussion was held; workshop participants (see Appendix B for a list of attendees) providing questions and the panel answers. The main purpose of the panel discussion was to build consensus regarding the critical research needs in AM that can be addressed with neutrons. These needs were placed into three categories: modes of access for neutrons, new capabilities needed, new AM material issues and neutrons. Recommendations from the workshop were determined based on the panel discussion.

  13. Additive genetic contribution to symptom dimensions in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Rahel; Palmer, Rohan H C; Brick, Leslie A; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S; Beevers, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder with a complex genetic architecture. In this study, genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum-likelihood analysis (GREML) was used to investigate the extent to which variance in depression symptoms/symptom dimensions can be explained by variation in common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of individuals with MDD (N = 1,558) who participated in the National Institute of Mental Health Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. A principal components analysis of items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) obtained prior to treatment revealed 4 depression symptom components: (a) appetite, (b) core depression symptoms (e.g., depressed mood, anhedonia), (c) insomnia, and (d) anxiety. These symptom dimensions were associated with SNP-based heritability (hSNP2) estimates of 30%, 14%, 30%, and 5%, respectively. Results indicated that the genetic contribution of common SNPs to depression symptom dimensions were not uniform. Appetite and insomnia symptoms in MDD had a relatively strong genetic contribution whereas the genetic contribution was relatively small for core depression and anxiety symptoms. While in need of replication, these results suggest that future gene discovery efforts may strongly benefit from parsing depression into its constituent parts. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Additively Manufactured Combustion Devices Components for LOX/Methane Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Sandra Elam; Protz, Christopher; Garcia, Chance; Goodman, Dwight; Baker, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has designed, fabricated, and hot-fire tested a variety of successful injectors, chambers, and igniters for potential liquid oxygen (LOX) and methane (CH4) systems since 2005. The most recent efforts have focused on components with additive manufacturing (AM) to include unique design features, minimize joints, and reduce final machining efforts. Inconel and copper alloys have been used with AM processes to produce a swirl coaxial injector and multiple methane cooled thrust chambers. The initial chambers included unique thermocouple ports for measuring local coolant channel temperatures along the length of the chamber. Results from hot-fire testing were used to anchor thermal models and generate a regeneratively cooled thruster for a 4,000 lbf LOX/CH4 engine. The completed thruster will be hot-fire tested in the summer of 2016 at MSFC. The thruster design can also be easily scaled and used on a 25,000 lbf engine. To further support the larger engine design, an AM gas generator injector has been designed. Hot-fire testing on this injector is planned for the summer of 2016 at MSFC.

  15. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions.

  16. Additive and nonadditive genetic variation in avian personality traits.

    PubMed

    van Oers, K; Drent, P J; de Jong, G; van Noordwijk, A J

    2004-11-01

    Individuals of all vertebrate species differ consistently in their reactions to mildly stressful challenges. These typical reactions, described as personalities or coping strategies, have a clear genetic basis, but the structure of their inheritance in natural populations is almost unknown. We carried out a quantitative genetic analysis of two personality traits (exploration and boldness) and the combination of these two traits (early exploratory behaviour). This study was carried out on the lines resulting from a two-directional artificial selection experiment on early exploratory behaviour (EEB) of great tits (Parus major) originating from a wild population. In analyses using the original lines, reciprocal F(1) and reciprocal first backcross generations, additive, dominance, maternal effects ands sex-dependent expression of exploration, boldness and EEB were estimated. Both additive and dominant genetic effects were important determinants of phenotypic variation in exploratory behaviour and boldness. However, no sex-dependent expression was observed in either of these personality traits. These results are discussed with respect to the maintenance of genetic variation in personality traits, and the expected genetic structure of other behavioural and life history traits in general.

  17. Additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Miguel; Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Calero, Olga; Soriano, Eduardo; Avila, Jesús; Medina, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mostly associated with early onset, is caused by mutations in three genes (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) involved in the production of the amyloid β peptide. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the most common late onset sporadic AD remain largely unknown. With the implementation of an increasing number of case-control studies and the upcoming of large-scale genome-wide association studies there is a mounting list of genetic risk factors associated with common genetic variants that have been associated with sporadic AD. Besides apolipoprotein E, that presents a strong association with the disease (OR∼4), the rest of these genes have moderate or low degrees of association, with OR ranging from 0.88 to 1.23. Taking together, these genes may account only for a fraction of the attributable AD risk and therefore, rare variants and epistastic gene interactions should be taken into account in order to get the full picture of the genetic risks associated with AD. Here, we review recent whole-exome studies looking for rare variants, somatic brain mutations with a strong association to the disease, and several studies dealing with epistasis as additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to AD. Altogether, recent evidence underlines the importance of defining molecular and genetic pathways, and networks rather than the contribution of specific genes. PMID:25914626

  18. [Hygienic characteristics of foodstuffs containing genetically modified components].

    PubMed

    Beliaev, E N; Ivanov, A A; Fokin, M V

    2006-01-01

    The paper analyzes the results of the investigations of raw foods, foodstuffs for genetically modified components, conducted by the state sanitary and epidemiological service of the Russian Federation during its current sanitary inspection. The presented materials cover 2003-2004. The findings suggest that there is a great deal of foods containing genetically modified sources on the market and show the priority groups of foodstuffs and the distribution of these foods on the territory of the Russian Federation.

  19. Genetic overlap between schizophrenia and selective components of executive function.

    PubMed

    Owens, Sheena F; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Picchioni, Marco M; Stahl, Daniel; Nenadic, Igor; Murray, Robin M; Toulopoulou, Timothea

    2011-04-01

    Impairments in selective components of executive function are seen in unaffected family members of patients with schizophrenia and may represent the biological expression of increased genetic risk. However no study has quantified the extent to which liability to schizophrenia overlaps genetically with that of executive dysfunction. We studied a total of 418 monozygotic and dizygotic twins, including pairs concordant and discordant for schizophrenia. Participants completed the trail making test part A and verbal fluency tasks to assess initiation, TMT part B to test mental flexibility, and the WAIS-III to assess general intellectual function. Bivariate genetic modeling was used to investigate whether selective measures of executive processing are genetically linked to schizophrenia and to quantify the genetic (i.e. heritability) and environmental contributions to their variability. Genetic influences contributed substantially to test variance for initiation and mental flexibility. Genetic factors were the main source of the phenotypic correlations between schizophrenia and these processes. Verbal fluency tasks shared a large genetic correlation with IQ whilst TMT scales did not, suggesting that they measure discreet processes, and therefore indexing discreet endophenotypes. Both verbal fluency and mental flexibility meet some of the criteria for endophenotypes, but our data suggest that mental flexibility is a purer cognitive process sharing very little common variance with general intellectual functioning. The inclusion of this mental flexibility phenotype in linkage or association analysis should improve the power to detect susceptibility genes for schizophrenia.

  20. Efficient Improvement of Silage Additives by Using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Zoe S.; Gilbert, Richard J.; Merry, Roger J.; Kell, Douglas B.; Theodorou, Michael K.; Griffith, Gareth W.

    2000-01-01

    The enormous variety of substances which may be added to forage in order to manipulate and improve the ensilage process presents an empirical, combinatorial optimization problem of great complexity. To investigate the utility of genetic algorithms for designing effective silage additive combinations, a series of small-scale proof of principle silage experiments were performed with fresh ryegrass. Having established that significant biochemical changes occur over an ensilage period as short as 2 days, we performed a series of experiments in which we used 50 silage additive combinations (prepared by using eight bacterial and other additives, each of which was added at six different levels, including zero [i.e., no additive]). The decrease in pH, the increase in lactate concentration, and the free amino acid concentration were measured after 2 days and used to calculate a “fitness” value that indicated the quality of the silage (compared to a control silage made without additives). This analysis also included a “cost” element to account for different total additive levels. In the initial experiment additive levels were selected randomly, but subsequently a genetic algorithm program was used to suggest new additive combinations based on the fitness values determined in the preceding experiments. The result was very efficient selection for silages in which large decreases in pH and high levels of lactate occurred along with low levels of free amino acids. During the series of five experiments, each of which comprised 50 treatments, there was a steady increase in the amount of lactate that accumulated; the best treatment combination was that used in the last experiment, which produced 4.6 times more lactate than the untreated silage. The additive combinations that were found to yield the highest fitness values in the final (fifth) experiment were assessed to determine a range of biochemical and microbiological quality parameters during full-term silage

  1. Efficient improvement of silage additives by using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Davies, Z S; Gilbert, R J; Merry, R J; Kell, D B; Theodorou, M K; Griffith, G W

    2000-04-01

    The enormous variety of substances which may be added to forage in order to manipulate and improve the ensilage process presents an empirical, combinatorial optimization problem of great complexity. To investigate the utility of genetic algorithms for designing effective silage additive combinations, a series of small-scale proof of principle silage experiments were performed with fresh ryegrass. Having established that significant biochemical changes occur over an ensilage period as short as 2 days, we performed a series of experiments in which we used 50 silage additive combinations (prepared by using eight bacterial and other additives, each of which was added at six different levels, including zero [i.e. , no additive]). The decrease in pH, the increase in lactate concentration, and the free amino acid concentration were measured after 2 days and used to calculate a "fitness" value that indicated the quality of the silage (compared to a control silage made without additives). This analysis also included a "cost" element to account for different total additive levels. In the initial experiment additive levels were selected randomly, but subsequently a genetic algorithm program was used to suggest new additive combinations based on the fitness values determined in the preceding experiments. The result was very efficient selection for silages in which large decreases in pH and high levels of lactate occurred along with low levels of free amino acids. During the series of five experiments, each of which comprised 50 treatments, there was a steady increase in the amount of lactate that accumulated; the best treatment combination was that used in the last experiment, which produced 4.6 times more lactate than the untreated silage. The additive combinations that were found to yield the highest fitness values in the final (fifth) experiment were assessed to determine a range of biochemical and microbiological quality parameters during full-term silage fermentation. We

  2. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Stainless Steel Components

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, William H.; Lou, Xiaoyuan; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Webber, David

    2016-09-01

    This collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric Company aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties, microstructure, and porosity of the additively manufactured 316L stainless steel by ORNL’s Renishaw AM250 machine for nuclear application. The program also evaluated the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the same material in high temperature water environments. Results show the properties of this material to be similar to the properties of 316L stainless steel fabricated additively with equipment from other manufacturers with slightly higher porosity. The stress corrosion crack growth rate is similar to that for wrought 316L stainless steel for an oxygenated high temperature water environment and slightly higher for a hydrogenated high temperature water environment. Optimized heat treatment of this material is expected to improve performance in high temperature water environments.

  3. Motor stator using corner scraps for additional electrical components

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Su, Gui-Jia; Adams, Donald J.; Nagashima, James M.; Stancu, Constantin; Carlson, Douglas S.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2004-03-16

    A method for making a motor and auxiliary devices with a unified stator body comprises providing a piece of material (10) having an area larger than a cross section of the stator (11), removing material from the piece of material (10) to form a pattern for a cross section of a core (11) for the stator, and removing material from the piece of material (10) outside the cross section of the core of the stator (11) to allow positioning of cores (22, 23, 24) for supporting windings (25, 26, 27) of least one additional electromagnetic device, such as a transformer (62) in a dc-to-dc converter (61, 62) that provides a low. voltage dc output. An article of manufacture made according to the invention is also disclosed and apparatus made with the method and article of manufacture are also disclosed.

  4. Female and male genetic effects on offspring paternity: additive genetic (co)variances in female extra-pair reproduction and male paternity success in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia).

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-08-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically.

  5. Power analysis of principal components regression in genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan-feng; Zhu, Jun

    2009-10-01

    Association analysis provides an opportunity to find genetic variants underlying complex traits. A principal components regression (PCR)-based approach was shown to outperform some competing approaches. However, a limitation of this method is that the principal components (PCs) selected from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be unrelated to the phenotype. In this article, we investigate the theoretical properties of such a method in more detail. We first derive the exact power function of the test based on PCR, and hence clarify the relationship between the test power and the degrees of freedom (DF). Next, we extend the PCR test to a general weighted PCs test, which provides a unified framework for understanding the properties of some related statistics. We then compare the performance of these tests. We also introduce several data-driven adaptive alternatives to overcome difficulties in the PCR approach. Finally, we illustrate our results using simulations based on real genotype data. Simulation study shows the risk of using the unsupervised rule to determine the number of PCs, and demonstrates that there is no single uniformly powerful method for detecting genetic variants.

  6. Genetic Assessment of Additional Endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Calkins, Monica E.; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F.; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.; Light, Gregory A.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D.; Seidman, Larry J.; Siever, Larry J.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Stone, William S.; Sugar, Catherine A.; Swerdlow, Neal R.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Braff, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation. PMID:26597662

  7. Variation in the peacock's train shows a genetic component.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Marion; Cotgreave, Peter; Pike, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    Female peafowl (Pavo cristatus) show a strong mating preference for males with elaborate trains. This, however, poses something of a paradox because intense directional selection should erode genetic variation in the males' trains, so that females will no longer benefit by discriminating among males on the basis of these traits. This situation is known as the 'lek paradox', and leads to the theoretical expectation of low heritability in the peacock's train. We used two independent breeding experiments, involving a total of 42 sires and 86 of their male offspring, to estimate the narrow sense heritabilities of male ornaments and other morphometric traits. Contrary to expectation, we found significant levels of heritability in a trait known to be used by females during mate choice (train length), while no significant heritabilities were evident for other, non-fitness related morphological traits (tarsus length, body weight or spur length). This study adds to the building body of evidence that high levels of additive genetic variance can exist in secondary sexual traits under directional selection, but further emphasizes the main problem of what maintains this variation.

  8. Most common 'sporadic' cancers have a significant germline genetic component.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Ek, Weronica E; Whiteman, David; Vaughan, Thomas L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D; Thompson, Deborah J; Dunning, Alison M; Hayward, Nicholas K; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Macgregor, Stuart

    2014-11-15

    Common cancers have been demarcated into 'hereditary' or 'sporadic' ('non-hereditary') types historically. Such distinctions initially arose from work identifying rare, highly penetrant germline mutations causing 'hereditary' cancer. While rare mutations are important in particular families, most cases in the general population are 'sporadic'. Twin studies have suggested that many 'sporadic' cancers show little or no heritability. To quantify the role of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility, we applied a method for estimating the importance of common genetic variants (array heritability, h(2)g) to twelve cancer types. The following cancers showed a significant (P < 0.05) array heritability: melanoma USA set h(2)g = 0.19 (95% CI = 0.01-0.37) and Australian set h(2)g = 0.30 (0.10-0.50); pancreatic h(2)g = 0.18 (0.06-0.30); prostate h(2)g = 0.81 (0.32-1); kidney h(2)g = 0.18 (0.04-0.32); ovarian h(2)g = 0.30 (0.18-0.42); esophageal adenocarcinoma h(2)g = 0.24 (0.14-0.34); esophageal squamous cell carcinoma h(2)g = 0.19 (0.07-0.31); endometrial UK set h(2)g = 0.23 (0.01-0.45) and Australian set h(2)g = 0.39 (0.02-0.76). Three cancers showed a positive but non-significant effect: breast h(2) g = 0.13 (0-0.56); gastric h(2)g = 0.11 (0-0.27); lung h(2)g = 0.10 (0-0.24). One cancer showed a small effect: bladder h(2)g = 0.01 (0-0.11). Among these cancers, previous twin studies were only able to show heritability for prostate and breast cancer, but we can now make much stronger statements for several common cancers which emphasize the important role of genetic variants in cancer susceptibility. We have demonstrated that several 'sporadic' cancers have a significant inherited component. Larger genome-wide association studies in these cancers will continue to find more loci, which explain part of the remaining polygenic component.

  9. 76 FR 5370 - Potential Addition of Vapor Intrusion Component to the Hazard Ranking System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Potential Addition of Vapor Intrusion Component to the Hazard Ranking System AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Opportunity for Public Input. SUMMARY: The...

  10. Subjective and objective components of resource value additively increase aggression in parasitoid contests

    PubMed Central

    Stockermans, Bernard C.; Hardy, Ian C. W.

    2013-01-01

    Two major categories of factors are predicted to influence behaviour in dyadic contests; differences in the abilities of the contestants to acquire and retain resources (resource holding potential), and the value of the contested resource (resource value, RV; which comprises objective and subjective components). Recent studies indicate that subjective components affect contest behaviour in several animal taxa but few have simultaneously investigated objective RV components. We find that both an objective (host size) and a subjective (contestant age) component of RV affect contest intensity in the parasitoid wasp Goniozus legneri. These additively influence aggressiveness, with a larger effect from the subjective component than the objective component. The greater influence of subjective RV adds weight to the recent surge of recognition of this RV component's importance in contest behaviour. PMID:23697643

  11. Genetic Evaluation of Dual-Purpose Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Colombia Using Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo-Gómez, Divier; Pineda-Sierra, Sebastian; Cerón-Muñoz, Mario Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Genealogy and productive information of 48621 dual-purpose buffaloes born in Colombia between years 1996 and 2014 was used. The following traits were assessed using one-trait models: milk yield at 270 days (MY270), age at first calving (AFC), weaning weight (WW), and weights at the following ages: first year (W12), 18 months (W18), and 2 years (W24). Direct additive genetic and residual random effects were included in all the traits. Maternal permanent environmental and maternal additive genetic effects were included for WW and W12. The fixed effects were: contemporary group (for all traits), sex (for WW, W12, W18, and W24), parity (for WW, W12, and MY270). Age was included as covariate for WW, W12, W18 and W24. Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted using the genetic values of 133 breeding males whose breeding-value reliability was higher than 50% for all the traits in order to define the number of principal components (PC) which would explain most of the variation. The highest heritabilities were for W18 and MY270, and the lowest for AFC; with 0.53, 0.23, and 0.17, respectively. The first three PCs represented 66% of the total variance. Correlation of the first PC with meat production traits was higher than 0.73, and it was -0.38 with AFC. Correlations of the second PC with maternal genetic component traits for WW and W12 were above 0.75. The third PC had 0.84 correlation with MY270. PCA is an alternative approach for analyzing traits in dual-purpose buffaloes and reduces the dimension of the traits. PMID:26230093

  12. 78 FR 41840 - Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 175 Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending the food additive regulations to no longer provide for...

  13. Feasibility of a multi-component additive for efficient control of activated sludge filamentous bulking.

    PubMed

    Seka, A M; Van De Wiele, T; Verstraete, W

    2001-08-01

    Instantaneous improvement of the settling of bulking filamentous activated sludge can be achieved by the addition of a polymer or a large amount (up to 100% of the MLSS concentration) of talc powder to the sludge. Long-term improvement relies on repeated additions, as these additives have no adverse effects on the causative filaments. A multi-component additive was compared to the traditional additives in lab-scale activated sludge units using three highly filamentous sludges from different industrial treatment plants. The study demonstrated that the multi-component additive was superior to the traditional remedies. It was shown that, in the case of severe filamentous bulking, a single addition of the new additive immediately improved sludge settling and exerted a destructive effect on the causative filamentous bacteria. Thus, the latter additive also ensured a long-term sludge sedimentation improvement. The traditional additives exhibited an immediate and short-term effect. The novel additive also retarded sludge rising due to denitrification and it improved sludge dewaterability. The study revealed Nostocoido limicola II, with slightly hydrophobic cell wall, to be somewhat resistant to the quaternary ammonium salt present as biocide in the additive.

  14. Estimating Modifying Effect of Age on Genetic and Environmental Variance Components in Twin Models

    PubMed Central

    He, Liang; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pitkäniemi, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Twin studies have been adopted for decades to disentangle the relative genetic and environmental contributions for a wide range of traits. However, heritability estimation based on the classical twin models does not take into account dynamic behavior of the variance components over age. Varying variance of the genetic component over age can imply the existence of gene–environment (G × E) interactions that general genome-wide association studies (GWAS) fail to capture, which may lead to the inconsistency of heritability estimates between twin design and GWAS. Existing parametric G × E interaction models for twin studies are limited by assuming a linear or quadratic form of the variance curves with respect to a moderator that can, however, be overly restricted in reality. Here we propose spline-based approaches to explore the variance curves of the genetic and environmental components. We choose the additive genetic, common, and unique environmental variance components (ACE) model as the starting point. We treat the component variances as variance functions with respect to age modeled by B-splines or P-splines. We develop an empirical Bayes method to estimate the variance curves together with their confidence bands and provide an R package for public use. Our simulations demonstrate that the proposed methods accurately capture dynamic behavior of the component variances in terms of mean square errors with a data set of >10,000 twin pairs. Using the proposed methods as an alternative and major extension to the classical twin models, our analyses with a large-scale Finnish twin data set (19,510 MZ twins and 27,312 DZ same-sex twins) discover that the variances of the A, C, and E components for body mass index (BMI) change substantially across life span in different patterns and the heritability of BMI drops to ∼50% after middle age. The results further indicate that the decline of heritability is due to increasing unique environmental variance, which provides

  15. Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS{trademark}) for additive component processing

    SciTech Connect

    Keicher, D.M.; Romero, J.A.; Atwood, C.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Jeantette, F.P.; Harwell, L.D.; Greene, D.L.; Smugeresky, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is presently developing an additive component processing technology called Laser Engineered Net Shaping, (LENS{trademark}). This process allows complex 3-dimensional solid metallic objects to be directly fabricated from a CAD solid model. Currently, this process functions similar to the Stereo Lithography process in which a faceted file is generated from the CAD solid model and then sliced into a sequence of layers. The sliced file is then input into another interpreter program which converts the sliced file into a series of tool path patterns required to build the entire layer. The component is fabricated by first generating an outline of the key component features and then filled using a rastering technique. This file is then used to drive the laser system to produce the desired component one layer at a time. This process differs from present rapid prototyping (RP) processes in that a fully dense, metallic component can be produced using this process.

  16. Genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma with a micropapillary component

    PubMed Central

    FURUKAWA, MASASHI; TOYOOKA, SHINICHI; ICHIMURA, KOUICHI; YAMAMOTO, HIROMASA; SOH, JUNICHI; HASHIDA, SHINSUKE; OUCHIDA, MAMORU; SHIEN, KAZUHIKO; ASANO, HIROAKI; TSUKUDA, KAZUNORI; MIYOSHI, SHINICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary adenocarcinoma (PA) with a micropapillary component (PA-MPC) is known as an aggressive subtype of PA. The molecular profiles of PA-MPC have not been well characterized. the pathological reports of patients who underwent surgical resection for lung cancer between April, 2004 and May, 2012 were reviewed. Of the 674 patients diagnosed with PA, 28 were found to have MPC. A total of 138 resected PAs without MPC were selected in the same period to serve as age-, gender- and smoking status-matched controls to the PA-MPC group. Mutational status was determined by the following two methods: SNaPshot assay based on multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), primer extension and capillary electrophoresis that was designed to assess 38 somatic mutations in 8 genes [AKT1, BRAF, endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1, neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA) and phosphatase and tensin homolog]; and a PCR-based sizing assay that assesses EGFR exon 19 (deletions), EGFR exon 20 (insertions) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 exon 20 (insertions). echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion gene (EML4-ALK) was screened by ALK immunohistochemistry and confirmed using the reverse transcription PCR assay and the break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. Regarding genetic alterations, 13 (46.4%) of the 28 PA-MPCs harbored mutually exclusive mutations: 9 (32.1%) EGFR mutations, 1 (3.6%) KRAS mutation and 3 (10.7%) EML4-ALK fusion genes. PAs without MPC harbored 42 (30.4%) EGFR mutations, 17 (12.3%) KRAS mutations, 3 (2.2%) EML4-ALK fusion genes and 1 (0.7%) PIK3CA mutation. EML4-ALK fusion genes appeared to occur significantly more frequently in PA-MPCs compared with PAs without MPC (P=0.027). Although the sample size was small, our study

  17. 78 FR 52429 - Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 175 Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings CFR Correction In Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 170 to...

  18. EPA Seeks Public Comments on Addition of Subsurface Intrusion Component to the Superfund Hazard Ranking System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking public comment on the proposed addition of a subsurface intrusion (SsI) component to the Superfund Hazard Ranking System (HRS). The HRS is a scoring system EPA uses to identify

  19. Insight into the genetic components of community genetics: QTL mapping of insect association in a fast-growing forest tree.

    PubMed

    DeWoody, Jennifer; Viger, Maud; Lakatos, Ferenc; Tuba, Katalin; Taylor, Gail; Smulders, Marinus J M

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic sequences underlying insect associations on forest trees will improve the understanding of community genetics on a broad scale. We tested for genomic regions associated with insects in hybrid poplar using quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses conducted on data from a common garden experiment. The F2 offspring of a hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) cross were assessed for seven categories of insect leaf damage at two time points, June and August. Positive and negative correlations were detected among damage categories and between sampling times. For example, sap suckers on leaves in June were positively correlated with sap suckers on leaves (P<0.001) but negatively correlated with skeletonizer damage (P<0.01) in August. The seven forms of leaf damage were used as a proxy for seven functional groups of insect species. Significant variation in insect association occurred among the hybrid offspring, including transgressive segregation of susceptibility to damage. NMDS analyses revealed significant variation and modest broad-sense heritability in insect community structure among genets. QTL analyses identified 14 genomic regions across 9 linkage groups that correlated with insect association. We used three genomics tools to test for putative mechanisms underlying the QTL. First, shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway genes co-located to 9 of the 13 QTL tested, consistent with the role of phenolic glycosides as defensive compounds. Second, two insect association QTL corresponded to genomic hotspots for leaf trait QTL as identified in previous studies, indicating that, in addition to biochemical attributes, leaf morphology may influence insect preference. Third, network analyses identified categories of gene models over-represented in QTL for certain damage types, providing direction for future functional studies. These results provide insight into the genetic components involved in insect community structure in a fast-growing forest tree.

  20. Insight into the Genetic Components of Community Genetics: QTL Mapping of Insect Association in a Fast-Growing Forest Tree

    PubMed Central

    DeWoody, Jennifer; Viger, Maud; Lakatos, Ferenc; Tuba, Katalin; Taylor, Gail; Smulders, Marinus J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic sequences underlying insect associations on forest trees will improve the understanding of community genetics on a broad scale. We tested for genomic regions associated with insects in hybrid poplar using quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses conducted on data from a common garden experiment. The F2 offspring of a hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) cross were assessed for seven categories of insect leaf damage at two time points, June and August. Positive and negative correlations were detected among damage categories and between sampling times. For example, sap suckers on leaves in June were positively correlated with sap suckers on leaves (P<0.001) but negatively correlated with skeletonizer damage (P<0.01) in August. The seven forms of leaf damage were used as a proxy for seven functional groups of insect species. Significant variation in insect association occurred among the hybrid offspring, including transgressive segregation of susceptibility to damage. NMDS analyses revealed significant variation and modest broad-sense heritability in insect community structure among genets. QTL analyses identified 14 genomic regions across 9 linkage groups that correlated with insect association. We used three genomics tools to test for putative mechanisms underlying the QTL. First, shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway genes co-located to 9 of the 13 QTL tested, consistent with the role of phenolic glycosides as defensive compounds. Second, two insect association QTL corresponded to genomic hotspots for leaf trait QTL as identified in previous studies, indicating that, in addition to biochemical attributes, leaf morphology may influence insect preference. Third, network analyses identified categories of gene models over-represented in QTL for certain damage types, providing direction for future functional studies. These results provide insight into the genetic components involved in insect community structure in a fast-growing forest tree

  1. The Evolution of Human Intelligence and the Coefficient of Additive Genetic Variance in Human Brain Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geoffrey F.; Penke, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Most theories of human mental evolution assume that selection favored higher intelligence and larger brains, which should have reduced genetic variance in both. However, adult human intelligence remains highly heritable, and is genetically correlated with brain size. This conflict might be resolved by estimating the coefficient of additive genetic…

  2. Common and Distinct Genetic Properties of ESCRT-II Components in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Chen, Zhihong; Bolduc, Clare; Bergmann, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic studies in yeast have identified class E vps genes that form the ESCRT complexes required for protein sorting at the early endosome. In Drosophila, mutations of the ESCRT-II component vps25 cause endosomal defects leading to accumulation of Notch protein and increased Notch pathway activity. These endosomal and signaling defects are thought to account for several phenotypes. Depending on the developmental context, two different types of overgrowth can be detected. Tissue predominantly mutant for vps25 displays neoplastic tumor characteristics. In contrast, vps25 mutant clones in a wild-type background trigger hyperplastic overgrowth in a non-autonomous manner. In addition, vps25 mutant clones also promote apoptotic resistance in a non-autonomous manner. Principal Findings Here, we genetically characterize the remaining ESCRT-II components vps22 and vps36. Like vps25, mutants of vps22 and vps36 display endosomal defects, accumulate Notch protein and – when the tissue is predominantly mutant – show neoplastic tumor characteristics. However, despite these common phenotypes, they have distinct non-autonomous phenotypes. While vps22 mutations cause strong non-autonomous overgrowth, they do not affect apoptotic resistance. In contrast, vps36 mutations increase apoptotic resistance, but have little effect on non-autonomous proliferation. Further characterization reveals that although all ESCRT-II mutants accumulate Notch protein, only vps22 and vps25 mutations trigger Notch activity. Conclusions/Significance The ESCRT-II components vps22, vps25 and vps36 display common and distinct genetic properties. Our data redefine the role of Notch for hyperplastic and neoplastic overgrowth in these mutants. While Notch is required for hyperplastic growth, it appears to be dispensable for neoplastic transformation. PMID:19132102

  3. Genetic and phenotypically flexible components of seasonal variation in immune function.

    PubMed

    Versteegh, M A; Helm, B; Kleynhans, E J; Gwinner, E; Tieleman, B I

    2014-05-01

    Animals cope with seasonal variation in environmental factors by adjustments of physiology and life history. When seasonal variation is partly predictable, such adjustments can be based on a genetic component or be phenotypically flexible. Animals have to allocate limited resources over different demands, including immune function. Accordingly, immune traits could change seasonally, and such changes could have a genetic component that differs between environments. We tested this hypothesis in genotypically distinct groups of a widespread songbird, the stonechat (Saxicola torquata). We compared variation in immunity during 1 year in long-distance migrants, short-distance migrants, tropical residents and hybrids in a common garden environment. Additionally, we investigated phenotypically flexible responses to temperature by applying different temperature regimes to one group. We assessed constitutive immunity by measuring hemagglutination, hemolysis, haptoglobin and bactericidal ability against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Genotypic groups differed in patterns of variation of all measured immune indices except haptoglobin. Hybrids differed from, but were rarely intermediate to, parental subspecies. Temperature treatment only influenced patterns of hemolysis and bactericidal ability against E. coli. We conclude that seasonal variation in constitutive immunity has a genetic component, that heredity does not follow simple Mendelian rules, and that some immune measures are relatively rigid while others are more flexible. Furthermore, our results support the idea that seasonal variability in constitutive immunity is associated with variability in environment and annual-cycle demands. This study stresses the importance of considering seasonal variation in immune function in relation to the ecology and life history of the organism of interest.

  4. Accounting for additive genetic mutations on litter size in Ripollesa sheep.

    PubMed

    Casellas, J; Caja, G; Piedrafita, J

    2010-04-01

    Little is known about mutational variability in livestock, among which only a few mutations with relatively large effects have been reported. In this manuscript, mutational variability was analyzed in 1,765 litter size records from 404 Ripollesa ewes to characterize the magnitude of this genetic source of variation and check the suitability of including mutational effects in genetic evaluations of this breed. Threshold animal models accounting for additive genetic mutations were preferred to models without mutational contributions, with an average difference in the deviance information criterion of more than 5 units. Moreover, the statistical relevance of the additive genetic mutation term was checked through a Bayes factor approach, which showed that the models with mutational variability were 8.5 to 22.7 times more probable than the others. The mutational heritability (percentage of the phenotypic variance accounted for by mutational variance) was 0.6 or 0.9%, depending on whether genetic dominance effects were accounted for by the analytical model. The inclusion of mutational effects in the genetic model for evaluating litter size in Ripollesa ewes called for some minor modifications in the genetic merit order of the individuals evaluated, which suggested that the continuous uploading of new additive mutations could be taken into account to optimize the selection scheme. This study is the first attempt to estimate mutational variances in a livestock species and thereby contribute to better characterization of the genetic background of productive traits of interest.

  5. Load-dependent Optimization of Honeycombs for Sandwich Components - New Possibilities by Using Additive Layer Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riss, Fabian; Schilp, Johannes; Reinhart, Gunther

    Due to their feasible geometric complexity, additive layer manufacturing (ALM) processes show a highpotential for the production of lightweight components.Therefore, ALM processes enable the realization of bionic-designedcomponents like honeycombs, which are optimized depending upon load and outer boundary conditions.This optimization is based on a closed-loop, three-steps methodology: At first, each honeycomb is conformed to the surface of the part. Secondly, the structure is optimizedfor lightweight design.It is possible to achieve a homogeneous stress distribution in the part by varying the wall thickness, honeycombdiameter and the amount of honeycombs, depending on the subjected stresses and strains. At last, the functional components like threads or bearing carriers are integrated directly into the honeycomb core.Using all these steps as an iterative process, it is possible to reduce the mass of sandwich components about 50 percent compared to conventional approaches.

  6. Genome-Enabled Estimates of Additive and Nonadditive Genetic Variances and Prediction of Apple Phenotypes Across Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Molloy, Claire; Muñoz, Patricio; Daetwyler, Hans; Chagné, David; Volz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The nonadditive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of phenotypes, so estimates of both the additive and nonadditive effects are desirable for breeding and selection purposes. Our main objectives were to: estimate additive, dominance and epistatic variances of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) phenotypes using relationship matrices constructed from genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; and compare the accuracy of genomic predictions using genomic best linear unbiased prediction models with or without including nonadditive genetic effects. A set of 247 clonally replicated individuals was assessed for six fruit quality traits at two sites, and also genotyped using an Illumina 8K SNP array. Across several fruit quality traits, the additive, dominance, and epistatic effects contributed about 30%, 16%, and 19%, respectively, to the total phenotypic variance. Models ignoring nonadditive components yielded upwardly biased estimates of additive variance (heritability) for all traits in this study. The accuracy of genomic predicted genetic values (GEGV) varied from about 0.15 to 0.35 for various traits, and these were almost identical for models with or without including nonadditive effects. However, models including nonadditive genetic effects further reduced the bias of GEGV. Between-site genotypic correlations were high (>0.85) for all traits, and genotype-site interaction accounted for <10% of the phenotypic variability. The accuracy of prediction, when the validation set was present only at one site, was generally similar for both sites, and varied from about 0.50 to 0.85. The prediction accuracies were strongly influenced by trait heritability, and genetic relatedness between the training and validation families. PMID:26497141

  7. Genetic analysis of seed yield, oil content and their components in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

    PubMed

    Ramachandram, M; Goud, J V

    1981-05-01

    The genetic architecture of seed yield, oil content and their components was studied in a diallel cross of F1 and F2: eleven parents, representing an adequate diversity for all considered characters in safflower were used. Combining ability analysis revealed the predominance of gca variance for plant height, total capitula, seed weight, seed number and seed yield in F1 and F2 generations and for days to flowering and oil content in F1. The analysis of components of variance indicated that the non-additive factor was the major influence on total capitula and seed yield in F1s, and F2s, and on plant height, seed weight and seed number in the F2 alone. The heterogeneity of the dominance component over generations has been attributed to coupling phase linkage. All four Indian parents, namely S 144, A1, MS 49 and 6 spl, together with G 1157 and US 104 in the exotic group, were the best combiners for seed yield and/or for one of its components while the remainder of the exotic parents were characterized by high gca effects for oil content. VFstp 1 and Frio were the only parents approximating both properties of oil content and seed yield. Breeding methods, such as biparental mating followed by reciprocal recurrent selection, were suggested for the simultaneous improvement of seed yield and oil content.

  8. Value addition in sesame: A perspective on bioactive components for enhancing utility and profitability

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Niti; Rai, A.K.; Kumari, Ratna; Bhat, K.V.

    2014-01-01

    Sesame seed is a reservoir of nutritional components with numerous beneficial effects along with health promotion in humans. The bioactive components present in the seed include vital minerals, vitamins, phytosterols, polyunsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols and unique class of lignans such as sesamin and sesamolin. The presence of phenylpropanoid compounds namely lignans along with tocopherols and phytosterols provide defense mechanism against reactive oxygen species and increases keeping quality of oil by preventing oxidative rancidity. In this article, we have reviewed the nutraceutical, pharmacological, traditional and industrial value of sesame seeds with respect to bioactive components that hold high antioxidant value. Valuable information on superior functional components of sesame will strongly promote the use of sesame seeds in the daily diet world-wide. In spite of huge repertoire of sesame germplasm collection, limited research efforts on the use of conventional and biotechnological methodologies have resulted in minimal success in developing nutritionally superior cultivars. In consequence, value addition efforts in sesame would enable development of genotypes with high antioxidant activity and subsequently prevention of free radical related diseases. Modification of bioactive components in sesame would enable production of stabilized sesame oil with enhanced shelf life and better market value. PMID:25125886

  9. Mutations in the Spliceosome Component CWC27 Cause Retinal Degeneration with or without Additional Developmental Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Xie, Yajing Angela; Abouzeid, Hana; Gordon, Christopher T; Fiorentino, Alessia; Sun, Zixi; Lehman, Anna; Osman, Ihab S; Dharmat, Rachayata; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Bapst-Wicht, Linda; Babino, Darwin; Arno, Gavin; Busetto, Virginia; Zhao, Li; Li, Hui; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel A; Azevedo, Liliana F; Hubert, Laurence; Pontikos, Nikolas; Eblimit, Aiden; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Kheir, Valeria; Plagnol, Vincent; Oufadem, Myriam; Soens, Zachry T; Yang, Lizhu; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Pfundt, Rolph; Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Nitschké, Patrick; Cheetham, Michael E; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Agrawal, Smriti A; Li, Huajin; Pinton, Gaëtan; Michaelides, Michel; Besmond, Claude; Li, Yumei; Yuan, Zhisheng; von Lintig, Johannes; Webster, Andrew R; Le Hir, Hervé; Stoilov, Peter; Amiel, Jeanne; Hardcastle, Alison J; Ayuso, Carmen; Sui, Ruifang; Chen, Rui; Allikmets, Rando; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2017-04-06

    Pre-mRNA splicing factors play a fundamental role in regulating transcript diversity both temporally and spatially. Genetic defects in several spliceosome components have been linked to a set of non-overlapping spliceosomopathy phenotypes in humans, among which skeletal developmental defects and non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are frequent findings. Here we report that defects in spliceosome-associated protein CWC27 are associated with a spectrum of disease phenotypes ranging from isolated RP to severe syndromic forms. By whole-exome sequencing, recessive protein-truncating mutations in CWC27 were found in seven unrelated families that show a range of clinical phenotypes, including retinal degeneration, brachydactyly, craniofacial abnormalities, short stature, and neurological defects. Remarkably, variable expressivity of the human phenotype can be recapitulated in Cwc27 mutant mouse models, with significant embryonic lethality and severe phenotypes in the complete knockout mice while mice with a partial loss-of-function allele mimic the isolated retinal degeneration phenotype. Our study describes a retinal dystrophy-related phenotype spectrum as well as its genetic etiology and highlights the complexity of the spliceosomal gene network.

  10. Estimation of Additive, Dominance, and Imprinting Genetic Variance Using Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marcos S.; Bastiaansen, John W. M.; Janss, Luc; Knol, Egbert F.; Bovenhuis, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, exploration of genetic variance in humans, plants, and livestock species has been limited mostly to the use of additive effects estimated using pedigree data. However, with the development of dense panels of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the exploration of genetic variation of complex traits is moving from quantifying the resemblance between family members to the dissection of genetic variation at individual loci. With SNPs, we were able to quantify the contribution of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance to the total genetic variance by using a SNP regression method. The method was validated in simulated data and applied to three traits (number of teats, backfat, and lifetime daily gain) in three purebred pig populations. In simulated data, the estimates of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance were very close to the simulated values. In real data, dominance effects account for a substantial proportion of the total genetic variance (up to 44%) for these traits in these populations. The contribution of imprinting to the total phenotypic variance of the evaluated traits was relatively small (1–3%). Our results indicate a strong relationship between additive variance explained per chromosome and chromosome length, which has been described previously for other traits in other species. We also show that a similar linear relationship exists for dominance and imprinting variance. These novel results improve our understanding of the genetic architecture of the evaluated traits and shows promise to apply the SNP regression method to other traits and species, including human diseases. PMID:26438289

  11. The contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation: heritability of personality.

    PubMed

    Dochtermann, Ned A; Schwab, Tori; Sih, Andrew

    2015-01-07

    Individual animals frequently exhibit repeatable differences from other members of their population, differences now commonly referred to as 'animal personality'. Personality differences can arise, for example, from differences in permanent environmental effects--including parental and epigenetic contributors--and the effect of additive genetic variation. Although several studies have evaluated the heritability of behaviour, less is known about general patterns of heritability and additive genetic variation in animal personality. As overall variation in behaviour includes both the among-individual differences that reflect different personalities and temporary environmental effects, it is possible for personality to be largely genetically influenced even when heritability of behaviour per se is quite low. The relative contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation can be estimated whenever both repeatability and heritability are estimated for the same data. Using published estimates to address this issue, we found that approximately 52% of animal personality variation was attributable to additive genetic variation. Thus, while the heritability of behaviour is often moderate or low, the heritability of personality is much higher. Our results therefore (i) demonstrate that genetic differences are likely to be a major contributor to variation in animal personality and (ii) support the phenotypic gambit: that evolutionary inferences drawn from repeatability estimates may often be justified.

  12. Genetic algorithm-guided discovery of additive combinations that direct quantum dot assembly.

    PubMed

    Bawazer, Lukmaan A; Ihli, Johannes; Comyn, Timothy P; Critchley, Kevin; Empson, Christopher J; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2015-01-14

    The use of combinations of organic additives to control crystallization, as occurs in biomineralization, is rarely investigated due to the vast potential reaction space. It is demonstrated here that combinatorial approaches led by genetic algorithm heuristics can enable identification of active additive combinations, and four key organic molecules are rapidly identified, which generate highly fluorescent CdS quantum dot superstructures.

  13. Addition Formulae of Discrete KP, q-KP and Two-Component BKP Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xu; Li, Chuan-Zhong; He, Jing-Song

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we construct the addition formulae for several integrable hierarchies, including the discrete KP, the q-deformed KP, the two-component BKP and the D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies. With the help of the Hirota bilinear equations and τ functions of different kinds of KP hierarchies, we prove that these addition formulae are equivalent to these hierarchies. These studies show that the addition formula in the research of the integrable systems has good universality. Supported by the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. LY15A010004, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11201251, 11571192 and the Natural Science Foundation of Ningbo under Grant No. 2015A610157. Jingsong He is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11271210, K.C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University

  14. The genetic and environmental etiologies of the relations between cognitive skills and components of reading ability.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Micaela E; Keenan, Janice M; Hulslander, Jacqueline; DeFries, John C; Miyake, Akira; Wadsworth, Sally J; Willcutt, Erik; Pennington, Bruce; Olson, Richard K

    2016-04-01

    Although previous research has shown cognitive skills to be important predictors of reading ability in children, the respective roles for genetic and environmental influences on these relations is an open question. The present study explored the genetic and environmental etiologies underlying the relations between selected executive functions and cognitive abilities (working memory, inhibition, processing speed, and naming speed) with 3 components of reading ability (word reading, reading comprehension, and listening comprehension). Twin pairs drawn from the Colorado Front Range (n = 676; 224 monozygotic pairs; 452 dizygotic pairs) between the ages of 8 and 16 (M = 11.11) were assessed on multiple measures of each cognitive and reading-related skill. Each cognitive and reading-related skill was modeled as a latent variable, and behavioral genetic analyses estimated the portions of phenotypic variance on each latent variable due to genetic, shared environmental, and nonshared environmental influences. The covariance between the cognitive skills and reading-related skills was driven primarily by genetic influences. The cognitive skills also shared large amounts of genetic variance, as did the reading-related skills. The common cognitive genetic variance was highly correlated with the common reading genetic variance, suggesting that genetic influences involved in general cognitive processing are also important for reading ability. Skill-specific genetic variance in working memory and processing speed also predicted components of reading ability. Taken together, the present study supports a genetic association between children's cognitive ability and reading ability.

  15. Addition of alarm pheromone components improves the effectiveness of desiccant dusts against Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Joshua B; Phillips, Seth A; Croxall, Travis J; Christensen, Brady S; Yoder, Jay A; Denlinger, David L

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate that the addition of bed bug, Cimex lectularius, alarm pheromone to desiccant formulations greatly enhances their effectiveness during short-term exposure. Two desiccant formulations, diatomaceous earth (DE) and Dri-die (silica gel), were applied at the label rate with and without bed bug alarm pheromone components, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, and a (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend. First-instar nymphs and adult females were subjected to 10-min exposures, and water loss rates were used to evaluate the response. Optimal effectiveness was achieved with a pheromone concentration of 0.01 M. With Dri-die alone, the water loss was 21% higher than in untreated controls, and water loss increased nearly two times with (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal and three times with the (E)-2-hexenal: (E)-2-octenal blend. This shortened survival of first-instar nymphs from 4 to 1 d, with a similar reduction noted in adult females. DE was effective only if supplemented with pheromone, resulting in a 50% increase in water loss over controls with the (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend, and a survival decrease from 4 to 2 d in first-instar nymphs. Consistently, the addition of the pheromone blend to desiccant dust was more effective than adding either component by itself or by using Dri-die or DE alone. Based on observations in a small microhabitat, the addition of alarm pheromone components prompted bed bugs to leave their protective harborages and to move through the desiccant, improving the use of desiccants for control. We concluded that short exposure to Dri-die is a more effective treatment against bed bugs than DE and that the effectiveness of the desiccants can be further enhanced by incorporation of alarm pheromone. Presumably, the addition of alarm pheromone elevates excited crawling activity, thereby promoting cuticular changes that increase water loss.

  16. LOX/GOX sensitivity of fluoroelastomers. [effect of formulation components and addition of fire retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of formulation components and the addition of fire retardants on the impact sensitivity of Viton B fluoroelastomer in liquid oxygen was studied with the objective of developing a procedure for reliably reducing this sensitivity. Component evaluation, carried out on more than 40 combinations of components and cure cycles, showed that almost all the standard formulation agents, including carbon, MgO, Diak-3, and PbO2, will sensitize the Viton stock either singly or in combinations, some combinations being much more sensitive than others. Cure and postcure treatments usually reduced the sensitivity of a given formulation, often dramatically, but no formulated Viton was as insensitive as the pure Viton B stock. Coating formulated Viton with a thin layer of pure Viton gave some indication of reduced sensitivity, but additional tests are needed. It is concluded that sensitivity in formulated Viton arises from a variety of sources, some physical and some chemical in origin. Elemental analyses for all the formulated Vitons are reported as are the results of a literature search on the subject of LOX impact sensitivity.

  17. Written debriefing: Evaluating the impact of the addition of a written component when debriefing simulations.

    PubMed

    Reed, Shelly J

    2015-11-01

    Debriefing, the reflective period following a simulation, is said to be where the bulk of simulation learning takes place. Many expert opinions regarding debriefing exist, but evidence-based best practices have yet to be identified. Written debriefing is one of these practices; experts state learning can be extended through the addition of a written component to the debriefing process, but no evidence exists to support this. This study compares three debriefing types: discussion alone, and discussion followed by journaling or blogging. Undergraduate nursing students participating in a simulation were randomized as a simulation group to one of these three debriefing types. Following completion of debriefing activities, students completed a Debriefing Experience Scale, a tool designed to evaluate the student experience during debriefing. Data obtained from completed scales were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Fisher LSD post hoc testing. The results showed the students preferred their experience with discussion debriefing over discussion debriefing with a written component added.

  18. Genetic Modifier Screens Reveal New Components that Interact with the Drosophila Dystroglycan-Dystrophin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yatsenko, Andriy S.; Shcherbata, Halyna R.; Fischer, Karin A.; Maksymiv, Dariya V.; Chernyk, Yaroslava I.; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2008-01-01

    The Dystroglycan-Dystrophin (Dg-Dys) complex has a capacity to transmit information from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton inside the cell. It is proposed that this interaction is under tight regulation; however the signaling/regulatory components of Dg-Dys complex remain elusive. Understanding the regulation of the complex is critical since defects in this complex cause muscular dystrophy in humans. To reveal new regulators of the Dg-Dys complex, we used a model organism Drosophila melanogaster and performed genetic interaction screens to identify modifiers of Dg and Dys mutants in Drosophila wing veins. These mutant screens revealed that the Dg-Dys complex interacts with genes involved in muscle function and components of Notch, TGF-β and EGFR signaling pathways. In addition, components of pathways that are required for cellular and/or axonal migration through cytoskeletal regulation, such as Semaphorin-Plexin, Frazzled-Netrin and Slit-Robo pathways show interactions with Dys and/or Dg. These data suggest that the Dg-Dys complex and the other pathways regulating extracellular information transfer to the cytoskeletal dynamics are more intercalated than previously thought. PMID:18545683

  19. [Analysis of components in natural food additive "grapefruit seed extract" by HPLC and LC/MS].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, S; Sato, K; Maitani, T; Yamada, T

    1996-01-01

    The components in a commercial natural food additive "Grapefruit seed extract" and the ethanol extract of grapefruit seeds were analyzed by HPLC and LC/MS. The HPLC chromatogram of the commercial grapefruit seed extract was quite different from that of the ethanol extract of grapefruit seeds. Three main peaks were observed in the chromatogram of the commercial grapefruit seed extract. By comparison of the retention times and the absorption spectra with those of authentic samples, two peaks were ascribed to methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate and 2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenylether (triclosan). Triclosan was also identified by LC/MS by using the negative electrospray ionization method.

  20. Multi-material additive manufacturing of robot components with integrated sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Matt; Cox, Bryan; Galla, Matt; Krueger, Paul S.; Richer, Edmond; Cohen, Adam L.

    2015-06-01

    Fabricating a robotic component comprising 100s of distributed, connected sensors can be very difficult with current approaches. To address these challenges, we are developing a novel additive manufacturing technology to enable the integrated fabrication of robotic structural elements with distributed, interconnected sensors and actuators. The focus is on resistive and capacitive sensors and electromagnetic actuators, though others are anticipated. Anticipated applications beyond robotics include advanced prosthetics, wearable electronics, and defense electronics. This paper presents preliminary results for printing polymers and conductive material simultaneously to form small sensor arrays. Approaches to optimizing sensor performance are discussed.

  1. Additive Manufacture (3D Printing) of Plasma Diagnostic Components and Assemblies for Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinley, Morgan; Chun, Katherine; Melnik, Paul; Sieck, Paul; Smith, Trevor; Stuber, James; Woodruff, Simon; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; Card, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating the potential impact of additive manufacturing (3D printing) on the cost and complexity of plasma diagnostics. We present a survey of the current state-of-the-art in additive manufacture of metals, as well as the design of diagnostic components that have been optimized for and take advantage of these processes. Included among these is a set of retarding field analyzer probe heads that have been printed in tungsten with internal heat sinks and cooling channels. Finite element analysis of these probe heads shows the potential for a 750K reduction in peak temperature, allowing the probe to take data twice as often without melting. Results of the evaluation of these probe heads for mechanical strength and outgassing, as well as their use on Alcator C-Mod will be presented. Supported by DOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0011858.

  2. Comparing GWAS Results of Complex Traits Using Full Genetic Model and Additive Models for Revealing Genetic Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Monir, Md. Mamun; Zhu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Most of the genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for human complex diseases have ignored dominance, epistasis and ethnic interactions. We conducted comparative GWASs for total cholesterol using full model and additive models, which illustrate the impacts of the ignoring genetic variants on analysis results and demonstrate how genetic effects of multiple loci could differ across different ethnic groups. There were 15 quantitative trait loci with 13 individual loci and 3 pairs of epistasis loci identified by full model, whereas only 14 loci (9 common loci and 5 different loci) identified by multi-loci additive model. Again, 4 full model detected loci were not detected using multi-loci additive model. PLINK-analysis identified two loci and GCTA-analysis detected only one locus with genome-wide significance. Full model identified three previously reported genes as well as several new genes. Bioinformatics analysis showed some new genes are related with cholesterol related chemicals and/or diseases. Analyses of cholesterol data and simulation studies revealed that the full model performs were better than the additive-model performs in terms of detecting power and unbiased estimations of genetic variants of complex traits. PMID:28079101

  3. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  4. Genetic components of litter size variability in sheep

    PubMed Central

    SanCristobal-Gaudy, Magali; Bodin, Loys; Elsen, Jean-Michel; Chevalet, Claude

    2001-01-01

    Classical selection for increasing prolificacy in sheep leads to a concomitant increase in its variability, even though the objective of the breeder is to maximise the frequency of an intermediate litter size rather than the frequency of high litter sizes. For instance, in the Lacaune sheep breed raised in semi-intensive conditions, ewes lambing twins represent the economic optimum. Data for this breed, obtained from the national recording scheme, were analysed. Variance components were estimated in an infinitesimal model involving genes controlling the mean level as well as its environmental variability. Large heritability was found for the mean prolificacy, but a high potential for increasing the percentage of twins at lambing while reducing the environmental variability of prolificacy is also suspected. Quantification of the response to such a canalising selection was achieved. PMID:11403747

  5. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L.; Cowin, James P.; Jung, Kyung-hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM2.5 filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R2 = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  6. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components.

    PubMed

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L; Cowin, James P; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P; Kinney, Patrick L; Chillrud, Steven N

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM(2.5) filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R(2) = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  7. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L.; Cowin, James P.; Jung, Kyung-hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM 2.5 filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R2 = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  8. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integrates engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.

  9. Additive Manufacturing of Multifunctional Components Using High Density Carbon Nanotube Yarn Filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, John M.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Working, Dennis C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for design freedom and part complexity not currently attainable using traditional manufacturing technologies. Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), for example, can yield novel component geometries and functionalities because the method provides a high level of control over material placement and processing conditions. This is achievable by extrusion of a preprocessed filament feedstock material along a predetermined path. However if fabrication of a multifunctional part relies only on conventional filament materials, it will require a different material for each unique functionality printed into the part. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an attractive material for many applications due to their high specific strength as well as good electrical and thermal conductivity. The presence of this set of properties in a single material presents an opportunity to use one material to achieve multifunctionality in an additively manufactured part. This paper describes a recently developed method for processing continuous CNT yarn filaments into three-dimensional articles, and summarizes the mechanical, electrical, and sensing performance of the components fabricated in this way.

  10. Additive manufacture (3d printing) of plasma diagnostic components and assemblies for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Paul; Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; You, Setthivoine; Card, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) is now becoming sufficiently accurate with a large range of materials for use in printing sensors needed universally in fusion energy research. Decreasing production cost and significantly lowering design time of energy subsystems would realize significant cost reduction for standard diagnostics commonly obtained through research grants. There is now a well-established set of plasma diagnostics, but these expensive since they are often highly complex and require customization, sometimes pace the project. Additive manufacturing (3D printing) is developing rapidly, including open source designs. Basic components can be printed for (in some cases) less than 1/100th costs of conventional manufacturing. We have examined the impact that AM can have on plasma diagnostic cost by taking 15 separate diagnostics through an engineering design using Conventional Manufacturing (CM) techniques to determine costs of components and labor costs associated with getting the diagnostic to work as intended. With that information in hand, we set about optimizing the design to exploit the benefits of AM. Work performed under DOE Contract DE-SC0011858.

  11. 4-Trifluoromethyl-p-quinols as dielectrophiles: three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reactions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhuan; Shi, Lou; Pan, Ling; Xu, Xianxiu; Liu, Qun

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, numerous methods have emerged for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the late-stage introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an aryl ring. In sharp comparison, the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an "aromatic to be" carbon has rarely been addressed. It has been found that 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers, the readily available and relatively stable compounds, can act as dielectrophiles to be applied to multi-component reactions for the synthesis of various trifluoromethylated arenes. Catalyzed by In(OTf)3, 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers react with C-, N-, and S-nucleophiles, respectively, in a regiospecific 1,2-addition manner to generate the corresponding highly reactive electrophilic intermediates. Further reaction of the in-situ generated electrophiles with a C-nucleophile followed by spontaneous aromatization enables the construction of functionalized trifluoromethyl arenes. This three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reaction based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an "aromatic to be" carbon provides a divergent strategy for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes under mild reaction conditions in a single operation.

  12. 4-Trifluoromethyl-p-quinols as dielectrophiles: three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reactions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jinhuan; Shi, Lou; Pan, Ling; Xu, Xianxiu; Liu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, numerous methods have emerged for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the late-stage introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an aryl ring. In sharp comparison, the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an “aromatic to be” carbon has rarely been addressed. It has been found that 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers, the readily available and relatively stable compounds, can act as dielectrophiles to be applied to multi-component reactions for the synthesis of various trifluoromethylated arenes. Catalyzed by In(OTf)3, 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers react with C-, N-, and S-nucleophiles, respectively, in a regiospecific 1,2-addition manner to generate the corresponding highly reactive electrophilic intermediates. Further reaction of the in-situ generated electrophiles with a C-nucleophile followed by spontaneous aromatization enables the construction of functionalized trifluoromethyl arenes. This three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reaction based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an “aromatic to be” carbon provides a divergent strategy for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes under mild reaction conditions in a single operation. PMID:27246540

  13. Product versus additive threshold models for analysis of reproduction outcomes in animal genetics.

    PubMed

    David, I; Bodin, L; Gianola, D; Legarra, A; Manfredi, E; Robert-Granié, C

    2009-08-01

    The phenotypic observation of some reproduction traits (e.g., insemination success, interval from lambing to insemination) is the result of environmental and genetic factors acting on 2 individuals: the male and female involved in a mating couple. In animal genetics, the main approach (called additive model) proposed for studying such traits assumes that the phenotype is linked to a purely additive combination, either on the observed scale for continuous traits or on some underlying scale for discrete traits, of environmental and genetic effects affecting the 2 individuals. Statistical models proposed for studying human fecundability generally consider reproduction outcomes as the product of hypothetical unobservable variables. Taking inspiration from these works, we propose a model (product threshold model) for studying a binary reproduction trait that supposes that the observed phenotype is the product of 2 unobserved phenotypes, 1 for each individual. We developed a Gibbs sampling algorithm for fitting a Bayesian product threshold model including additive genetic effects and showed by simulation that it is feasible and that it provides good estimates of the parameters. We showed that fitting an additive threshold model to data that are simulated under a product threshold model provides biased estimates, especially for individuals with high breeding values. A main advantage of the product threshold model is that, in contrast to the additive model, it provides distinct estimates of fixed effects affecting each of the 2 unobserved phenotypes.

  14. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex) versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. Methods By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. Results By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Conclusions Our results, when viewed in the context of results from genome

  15. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention. PMID:26068647

  16. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-06-09

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention.

  17. Molecular genetics of the fourth component of human complement

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.C.

    1987-05-15

    The fourth component of complement in humans is coded for by two closely linked loci, i.e., C4A and C4B, that have been positioned within the class III region of the human major histocompatibility complex along with the genes for C2, Bf, and steroid 21-OH. Both C4 loci are highly polymorphic and certain alleles, particularly the nulls, are associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disease. About one-half of the null alleles are due to a large deletion that includes both a C4 and flanking 21-OH gene. Despite the near identity of the products of the two loci, the proteins differ dramatically in their efficiency of covalent binding to antigen. The amino acid substitutions responsible for the functional differences have been identified and they are clustered relatively near the covalent binding site within the C4d region of the ..cap alpha.. chain. These observations support the hypothesis that the susceptibility to autoimmune disease is related to the structural variation of the C4 protein.

  18. Additive genetic breeding values correlate with the load of partially deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Joseph L; Penrose, Marissa A; Greeff, Johan; LeBas, Natasha R

    2010-05-14

    The mutation-selection-balance model predicts most additive genetic variation to arise from numerous mildly deleterious mutations of small effect. Correspondingly, "good genes" models of sexual selection and recent models for the evolution of sex are built on the assumption that mutational loads and breeding values for fitness-related traits are correlated. In support of this concept, inbreeding depression was negatively genetically correlated with breeding values for traits under natural and sexual selection in the weevil Callosobruchus maculatus. The correlations were stronger in males and strongest for condition. These results confirm the role of existing, partially recessive mutations in maintaining additive genetic variation in outbred populations, reveal the nature of good genes under sexual selection, and show how sexual selection can offset the cost of sex.

  19. fullfact: an R package for the analysis of genetic and maternal variance components from full factorial mating designs.

    PubMed

    Houde, Aimee Lee S; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-03-01

    Full factorial breeding designs are useful for quantifying the amount of additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, and maternal variance that explain phenotypic traits. Such variance estimates are important for examining evolutionary potential. Traditionally, full factorial mating designs have been analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance, which may produce negative variance values and is not suited for unbalanced designs. Mixed-effects models do not produce negative variance values and are suited for unbalanced designs. However, extracting the variance components, calculating significance values, and estimating confidence intervals and/or power values for the components are not straightforward using traditional analytic methods. We introduce fullfact - an R package that addresses these issues and facilitates the analysis of full factorial mating designs with mixed-effects models. Here, we summarize the functions of the fullfact package. The observed data functions extract the variance explained by random and fixed effects and provide their significance. We then calculate the additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, and maternal variance components explaining the phenotype. In particular, we integrate nonnormal error structures for estimating these components for nonnormal data types. The resampled data functions are used to produce bootstrap-t confidence intervals, which can then be plotted using a simple function. We explore the fullfact package through a worked example. This package will facilitate the analyses of full factorial mating designs in R, especially for the analysis of binary, proportion, and/or count data types and for the ability to incorporate additional random and fixed effects and power analyses.

  20. Genetic variability of milk components based on mid-infrared spectral data.

    PubMed

    Soyeurt, H; Misztal, I; Gengler, N

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic parameters of the mid-infrared (MIR) milk spectrum represented by 1,060 data points per sample. The dimensionality of traits was reduced by principal components analysis. Therefore, 46 principal components describing 99.03% of the phenotypic variability were used to create 46 new traits. Variance components were estimated using canonical transformation. Heritability ranged from 0 to 0.35. Twenty-five out of 46 studied traits showed a permanent environment variance greater than genetic variance. Eight traits showed heritability greater than 0.10. Variances of original spectral traits were obtained by back transformation. Heritabilities for each spectral data points ranged from 0.003 to 0.42. In particular, 3 MIR regions showing moderate to high heritability estimates were of potential genetic interest. Heritabilities for specific wave numbers, linked with common milk traits (e.g., lipids, lactose), were similar to those estimated for these traits. This research confirms the genetic variability of the MIR milk spectrum and, therefore, the genetic variation of milk components. The objective of this study was to better understand the genetics of milk composition and, maybe in the future, to select animals to improve milk quality.

  1. An Assessment of Nondestructive Evaluation Capability for Complex Additive Manufacturing Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Beshears, Ron; Lambert, Dennis; Tilson, William

    2016-01-01

    The primary focus of this work is to investigate some of the fundamental relationships between processing, mechanical testing, materials characterization, and NDE for additively manufactured (AM) components using the powder bed fusion direct melt laser sintered process. The goal is to understand the criticality of defects unique to the AM process and then how conventional nondestructive evaluation methods as well as some of the more non-traditional methods such as computed tomography, are effected by the AM material. Specific defects including cracking, porosity and partially/unfused powder will be addressed. Besides line-of-site NDE, as appropriate these inspection capabilities will be put into the context of complex AM geometries where hidden features obscure, or inhibit traditional NDE methods.

  2. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; ...

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integratesmore » engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.« less

  3. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing Part I: System Analysis, Component Identification, Additive Manufacturing, and Testing of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Haller, William J.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Schnulo, Sydney L.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Weir, Don; Wali, Natalie; Vinup, Michael; Jones, Michael G.; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The research and development activities reported in this publication were carried out under NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) funded project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing." The objective of the project was to conduct evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. The results of the activities are described in three part report. The first part of the report contains the data and analysis of engine system trade studies, which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. The technical scope of activities included an assessment of the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composites, which were accomplished by fabricating prototype engine components and testing them in simulated engine operating conditions. The manufacturing process parameters were developed and optimized for polymer and ceramic composites (described in detail in the second and third part of the report). A number of prototype components (inlet guide vane (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included turbine nozzle components. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  4. Biokinetics of food additive silica nanoparticles and their interactions with food components.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-A; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Song, Jae Ho; Jo, Mi-Rae; Yu, Jin; Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Young-Rok; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials have been widely utilized in the food industry in production, packaging, sensors, nutrient delivery systems, and food additives. However, research on the interactions between food-grade nanoparticles and biomolecules as well as their potential toxicity is limited. In the present study, the in vivo solubility, oral absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion kinetics of one of the most extensively used food additives, silica (SiO2) were evaluated with respect to particle size (nano vs bulk) following single-dose oral administration to rats. Intestinal transport mechanism was investigated using a 3D culture system, in vitro model of human intestinal follicle-associated epithelium (FAE). The effect of the presence of food components, such as sugar and protein, on the oral absorption of nanoparticles was also evaluated with focus on their interactions. The results obtained demonstrated that the oral absorption of nanoparticles (3.94±0.38%) was greater than that of bulk materials (2.95±0.37%), possibly due to intestinal transport by microfold (M) cells. On the other hand, particle size was found to have no significant effect on in vivo dissolution property, biodistribution, or excretion kinetics. Oral absorption profile of silica nanoparticles was highly dependent on the presence of sugar or protein, showing rapid absorption rate in glucose, presumably due to their surface interaction on nanoparticles. These findings will be useful for predicting the potential toxicity of food-grade nanoparticles and for understanding biological interactions.

  5. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses.

  6. Direct and maternal (co)variance components, genetic parameters, and annual trends for growth traits of Makooei sheep in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Shahrebabak, Mohammad Moradi; Vatankhah, Mahmood; Shahrebabak, Hossein Moradi

    2013-01-01

    Genetic parameters and genetic trends for birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WW), 6-month weight (6MW), and yearling weight (YW) traits were estimated by using records of 5,634 Makooei lambs, descendants of 289 sires and 1,726 dams, born between 1996 and 2009 at the Makooei sheep breeding station, West Azerbaijan, Iran. The (co)variance components were estimated with different animal models using a restricted maximum likelihood procedure and the most appropriate model for each trait was determined by Akaike's Information Criterion. Breeding values of animals were predicted with best linear unbiased prediction methodology under multi-trait animal models and genetic trends were estimated by regression mean breeding values on birth year. The most appropriate model for BW was a model including direct and maternal genetic effects, regardless of their covariance. The model for WW and 6MW included direct additive genetic effects. The model for YW included direct genetic effects only. Direct heritabilities based on the best model were estimated 0.15 ± 0.04, 0.16 ± 0.03, 0.21 ± 0.04, and 0.22 ± 0.06 for BW, WW, 6MW, and YW, respectively, and maternal heritability obtained 0.08 ± 0.02 for BW. Genetic correlations among the traits were positive and varied from 0.28 for BW-YW to 0.66 for BW-WW and phenotypic correlations were generally lower than the genetic correlations. Genetic trends were 8.1 ± 2, 67.4 ± 5, 38.7 ± 4, and 47.6 ± 6 g per year for BW, WW, 6MW, and YW, respectively.

  7. The correlation between reading and mathematics ability at age twelve has a substantial genetic component

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Oliver S. P.; Band, Gavin; Pirinen, Matti; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Kovas, Yulia; Harlaar, Nicole; Docherty, Sophia J.; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Curtis, Charles J. C.; Strange, Amy; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Céline; Su, Zhan; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz A. Z.; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Barroso, Ines; Peltonen, Leena; Dale, Philip S.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Schalkwyk, Leonard S.; Craig, Ian W.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Price, Thomas S.; Donnelly, Peter; Plomin, Robert; Spencer, Chris C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Dissecting how genetic and environmental influences impact on learning is helpful for maximizing numeracy and literacy. Here we show, using twin and genome-wide analysis, that there is a substantial genetic component to children’s ability in reading and mathematics, and estimate that around one half of the observed correlation in these traits is due to shared genetic effects (so-called Generalist Genes). Thus, our results highlight the potential role of the learning environment in contributing to differences in a child’s cognitive abilities at age twelve. PMID:25003214

  8. The correlation between reading and mathematics ability at age twelve has a substantial genetic component.

    PubMed

    Davis, Oliver S P; Band, Gavin; Pirinen, Matti; Haworth, Claire M A; Meaburn, Emma L; Kovas, Yulia; Harlaar, Nicole; Docherty, Sophia J; Hanscombe, Ken B; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Curtis, Charles J C; Strange, Amy; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Céline; Su, Zhan; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz A Z; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; Palmer, Colin N A; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Wood, Nicholas W; Barroso, Ines; Peltonen, Leena; Dale, Philip S; Petrill, Stephen A; Schalkwyk, Leonard S; Craig, Ian W; Lewis, Cathryn M; Price, Thomas S; Donnelly, Peter; Plomin, Robert; Spencer, Chris C A

    2014-07-08

    Dissecting how genetic and environmental influences impact on learning is helpful for maximizing numeracy and literacy. Here we show, using twin and genome-wide analysis, that there is a substantial genetic component to children's ability in reading and mathematics, and estimate that around one half of the observed correlation in these traits is due to shared genetic effects (so-called Generalist Genes). Thus, our results highlight the potential role of the learning environment in contributing to differences in a child's cognitive abilities at age twelve.

  9. Simultaneous Estimation of Additive and Mutational Genetic Variance in an Outbred Population of Drosophila serrata

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Katrina; Aguirre, J. David; Blows, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    How new mutations contribute to genetic variation is a key question in biology. Although the evolutionary fate of an allele is largely determined by its heterozygous effect, most estimates of mutational variance and mutational effects derive from highly inbred lines, where new mutations are present in homozygous form. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, middle-class neighborhood (MCN) experiments have been used to assess the fitness effect of new mutations in heterozygous form. However, because MCN populations harbor substantial standing genetic variance, estimates of mutational variance have not typically been available from such experiments. Here we employ a modification of the animal model to analyze data from 22 generations of Drosophila serrata bred in an MCN design. Mutational heritability, measured for eight cuticular hydrocarbons, 10 wing-shape traits, and wing size in this outbred genetic background, ranged from 0.0006 to 0.006 (with one exception), a similar range to that reported from studies employing inbred lines. Simultaneously partitioning the additive and mutational variance in the same outbred population allowed us to quantitatively test the ability of mutation-selection balance models to explain the observed levels of additive and mutational genetic variance. The Gaussian allelic approximation and house-of-cards models, which assume real stabilizing selection on single traits, both overestimated the genetic variance maintained at equilibrium, but the house-of-cards model was a closer fit to the data. This analytical approach has the potential to be broadly applied, expanding our understanding of the dynamics of genetic variance in natural populations. PMID:26384357

  10. A New Look at the Genetic and Environmental Coherence of Metabolic Syndrome Components

    PubMed Central

    Panizzon, Matthew; Hauger, Richard L.; Sailors, Megan; Lyons, Michael J.; Jacobson, Kristen C.; Murray, Ruth E.; Rana, Brinda; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Xian, Hong; Kremen, William S.; Franz, Carol E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, central obesity and hypertension, increases risk for cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline. The etiology of the risk factors’ cohesion remains unclear. We examined how genetic and environmental influences explained co-occurrence of metabolic syndrome components. Methods Continuous measures of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure (BP), fasting insulin and glucose, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and triglycerides from 1193 middle-aged twin men participating in the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging at average age 62 (range 56-67) were analyzed using multivariate biometrical modeling. Results We found four heritable factors: adiposity (BMI, waist circumference), insulin resistance (glucose, insulin), lipids (HDL, triglycerides), and BP (systolic, diastolic). Heritabilities were .42-.68. In the best-fitting model, insulin resistance, lipids, and adiposity comprised a higher-order latent genetic factor. Adiposity and BP shared genetic influences independent of the latent genetic factor. All factors aggregated on a latent unique environmental factor. Conclusions Metabolic syndrome components form the equivalent of two genetic factors. BP was genetically unrelated to insulin resistance and lipids. Adiposity was the only characteristic genetically and environmentally related to all other factors. These results inform strategies for gene discovery and prediction of health outcomes. PMID:26524476

  11. Pattern of inbreeding depression, condition dependence, and additive genetic variance in Trinidadian guppy ejaculate traits

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Clelia; Devigili, Alessandro; Dosselli, Ryan; Pilastro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In polyandrous species, a male's reproductive success depends on his fertilization capability and traits enhancing competitive fertilization success will be under strong, directional selection. This leads to the prediction that these traits should show stronger condition dependence and larger genetic variance than other traits subject to weaker or stabilizing selection. While empirical evidence of condition dependence in postcopulatory traits is increasing, the comparison between sexually selected and ‘control’ traits is often based on untested assumption concerning the different strength of selection acting on these traits. Furthermore, information on selection in the past is essential, as both condition dependence and genetic variance of a trait are likely to be influenced by the pattern of selection acting historically on it. Using the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing fish with high levels of multiple paternity, we performed three independent experiments on three ejaculate quality traits, sperm number, velocity, and size, which have been previously shown to be subject to strong, intermediate, and weak directional postcopulatory selection, respectively. First, we conducted an inbreeding experiment to determine the pattern of selection in the past. Second, we used a diet restriction experiment to estimate their level of condition dependence. Third, we used a half-sib/full-sib mating design to estimate the coefficients of additive genetic variance (CVA) underlying these traits. Additionally, using a simulated predator evasion test, we showed that both inbreeding and diet restriction significantly reduced condition. According to predictions, sperm number showed higher inbreeding depression, stronger condition dependence, and larger CVA than sperm velocity and sperm size. The lack of significant genetic correlation between sperm number and velocity suggests that the former may respond to selection independently one from other ejaculate quality traits

  12. Incorporating a New Bioinformatics Component into Genetics at a Historically Black College: Outcomes and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzclaw, J. David; Eisen, Arri; Whitney, Erika M.; Penumetcha, Meera; Hoey, J. Joseph; Kimbro, K. Sean

    2006-01-01

    Many students at minority-serving institutions are underexposed to Internet resources such as the human genome project, PubMed, NCBI databases, and other Web-based technologies because of a lack of financial resources. To change this, we designed and implemented a new bioinformatics component to supplement the undergraduate Genetics course at…

  13. Multi-system Component Phenotypes of Bipolar Disorder for Genetic Investigations of Extended Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Fears, Scott C.; Service, Susan K.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Ramirez, Margarita; Castrillón, Gabriel; Gomez-Franco, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C.; Montoya, Gabriel; Montoya, Patricia; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M.; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B.; Ericson, Marissa; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Luykx, Jurjen J.; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A.; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier; Glahn, David C.; Ospina-Duque, Jorge; Risch, Neil; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Thompson, Paul M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I.; Sabatti, Chiara; Freimer, Nelson B.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Genetic factors contribute to risk for bipolar disorder (BP), yet its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. A focus on measuring multi-system quantitative traits that may be components of BP psychopathology may enable genetic dissection of this complex disorder, and investigation of extended pedigrees from genetically isolated populations may facilitate the detection of specific genetic variants that impact on BP as well as its component phenotypes. OBJECTIVE To identify quantitative neurocognitive, temperament-related, and neuroanatomic phenotypes that appear heritable and associated with severe bipolar disorder (BP-I), and therefore suitable for genetic linkage and association studies aimed at identifying variants contributing to BP-I risk. DESIGN Multi-generational pedigree study in two closely related, genetically isolated populations: the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR) and Antioquia, Colombia (ANT). PARTICIPANTS 738 individuals, all from CVCR and ANT pedigrees, of whom 181 are affected with BP-I. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Familial aggregation (heritability) and association with BP-I of 169 quantitative neurocognitive, temperament, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) phenotypes. RESULTS Seventy-five percent (126) of the phenotypes investigated were significantly heritable, and 31% (53) were associated with BP-I. About 1/4 of the phenotypes, including measures from each phenotype domain, were both heritable and associated with BP-I. Neuroimaging phenotypes, particularly cortical thickness in prefrontal and temporal regions, and volume and microstructural integrity of the corpus callosum, represented the most promising candidate traits for genetic mapping related to BP based on strong heritability and association with disease. Analyses of phenotypic and genetic covariation identified substantial correlations among the traits, at least some of which share a common underlying genetic architecture. CONCLUSIONS AND

  14. Random regression test day models to estimate genetic parameters for milk yield and milk components in Philippine dairy buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Flores, E B; van der Werf, J

    2015-08-01

    Heritabilities and genetic correlations for milk production traits were estimated from first-parity test day records on 1022 Philippine dairy buffalo cows. Traits analysed included milk (MY), fat (FY) and protein (PY) yields, and fat (Fat%) and protein (Prot%) concentrations. Varying orders of Legendre polynomials (Leg(m)) as well as the Wilmink function (Wil) were used in random regression models. These various models were compared based on log likelihood, Akaike's information criterion, Bayesian information criterion and genetic variance estimates. Six residual variance classes were sufficient for MY, FY, PY and Fat%, while seven residual classes for Prot%. Multivariate analysis gave higher estimates of genetic variance and heritability compared with univariate analysis for all traits. Heritability estimates ranged from 0.25 to 0.44, 0.13 to 0.31 and 0.21 to 0.36 for MY, FY and PY, respectively. Wilmink's function was the better fitting function for additive genetic effects for all traits. It was also the preferred function for permanent environment effects for Fat% and Prot%, but for MY, FY and PY, the Legm was the appropriate function. Genetic correlations of MY with FY and PY were high and they were moderately negative with Fat% and Prot%. To prevent deterioration in Fat% and Prot% and improve milk quality, more weight should be applied to milk component traits.

  15. Additive genetic variation in schizophrenia risk is shared by populations of African and European descent.

    PubMed

    de Candia, Teresa R; Lee, S Hong; Yang, Jian; Browning, Brian L; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Mowry, Bryan J; Hewitt, John K; Goddard, Michael E; O'Donovan, Michael C; Purcell, Shaun M; Posthuma, Danielle; Visscher, Peter M; Wray, Naomi R; Keller, Matthew C

    2013-09-05

    To investigate the extent to which the proportion of schizophrenia's additive genetic variation tagged by SNPs is shared by populations of European and African descent, we analyzed the largest combined African descent (AD [n = 2,142]) and European descent (ED [n = 4,990]) schizophrenia case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) data set available, the Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia (MGS) data set. We show how a method that uses genomic similarities at measured SNPs to estimate the additive genetic correlation (SNP correlation [SNP-rg]) between traits can be extended to estimate SNP-rg for the same trait between ethnicities. We estimated SNP-rg for schizophrenia between the MGS ED and MGS AD samples to be 0.66 (SE = 0.23), which is significantly different from 0 (p(SNP-rg = 0) = 0.0003), but not 1 (p(SNP-rg = 1) = 0.26). We re-estimated SNP-rg between an independent ED data set (n = 6,665) and the MGS AD sample to be 0.61 (SE = 0.21, p(SNP-rg = 0) = 0.0003, p(SNP-rg = 1) = 0.16). These results suggest that many schizophrenia risk alleles are shared across ethnic groups and predate African-European divergence.

  16. Genetic parameter estimates and principal component analysis of breeding values of reproduction and growth traits in female Canchim cattle.

    PubMed

    Buzanskas, M E; Savegnago, R P; Grossi, D A; Venturini, G C; Queiroz, S A; Silva, L O C; Júnior, R A A Torres; Munari, D P; Alencar, M M

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic data from female Canchim beef cattle were used to obtain estimates of genetic parameters for reproduction and growth traits using a linear animal mixed model. In addition, relationships among animal estimated breeding values (EBVs) for these traits were explored using principal component analysis. The traits studied in female Canchim cattle were age at first calving (AFC), age at second calving (ASC), calving interval (CI), and bodyweight at 420 days of age (BW420). The heritability estimates for AFC, ASC, CI and BW420 were 0.03±0.01, 0.07±0.01, 0.06±0.02, and 0.24±0.02, respectively. The genetic correlations for AFC with ASC, AFC with CI, AFC with BW420, ASC with CI, ASC with BW420, and CI with BW420 were 0.87±0.07, 0.23±0.02, -0.15±0.01, 0.67±0.13, -0.07±0.13, and 0.02±0.14, respectively. Standardised EBVs for AFC, ASC and CI exhibited a high association with the first principal component, whereas the standardised EBV for BW420 was closely associated with the second principal component. The heritability estimates for AFC, ASC and CI suggest that these traits would respond slowly to selection. However, selection response could be enhanced by constructing selection indices based on the principal components.

  17. Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W; van der Voet, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders-attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10(-5)). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes-common to five of six disorders-included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20-30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders.

  18. Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W.; van der Voet, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10−5). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes—common to five of six disorders–included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20–30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders. PMID:25414627

  19. Estimation of (co)variance components and genetic parameters of greasy fleece weights in Muzaffarnagari sheep.

    PubMed

    Mandal, A; Neser, F W C; Roy, R; Rout, P K; Notter, D R

    2009-02-01

    Variance components and genetic parameters for greasy fleece weights of Muzaffarnagari sheep maintained at the Central Institute for Research on Goats, Makhdoom, Mathura, India, over a period of 29 years (1976 to 2004) were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood (REML), fitting six animal models including various combinations of maternal effects. Data on body weights at 6 (W6) and 12 months (W12) of age were also included in the study. Records of 2807 lambs descended from 160 rams and 1202 ewes were used for the study. Direct heritability estimates for fleece weight at 6 (FW6) and 12 months of age (FW12), and total fleece weights up to 1 year of age (TFW) were 0.14, 0.16 and 0.25, respectively. Maternal genetic and permanent environmental effects did not significantly influence any of the traits under study. Genetic correlations among fleece weights and body weights were obtained from multivariate analyses. Direct genetic correlations of FW6 with W6 and W12 were relatively large, ranging from 0.61 to 0.67, but only moderate genetic correlations existed between FW12 and W6 (0.39) and between FW12 and W12 (0.49). The genetic correlation between FW6 and FW12 was very high (0.95), but the corresponding phenotypic correlation was much lower (0.28). Heritability estimates for all traits were at least 0.15, indicating that there is potential for their improvement by selection. The moderate to high positive genetic correlations between fleece weights and body weights at 6 and 12 months of age suggest that some of the genetic factors that influence animal growth also influence wool growth. Thus selection to improve the body weights or fleece weights at 6 months of age will also result in genetic improvement of fleece weights at subsequent stages of growth.

  20. Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal.

    PubMed

    Huchard, E; Charmantier, A; English, S; Bateman, A; Nielsen, J F; Clutton-Brock, T

    2014-09-01

    Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a cooperative mongoose. Our results indicate that (i) the correlation between early growth (prior to nutritional independence) and adult mass is positive but weak, and there are frequent changes (compensatory growth) in post-independence growth trajectories; (ii) among parameters describing growth trajectories, those describing growth rate (prior to and at nutritional independence) show undetectable heritability while associated size parameters (mass at nutritional independence and asymptotic mass) are moderately heritable (0.09 ≤ h(2) < 0.3); and (iii) additive genetic effects, rather than early environmental effects, mediate the covariance between early growth and adult mass. These results reveal that meerkat growth trajectories remain plastic throughout development, rather than showing early and irreversible divergence, and that the weak effects of early growth on adult mass, an important determinant of breeding success, are partly genetic. In contrast to most cooperative invertebrates, the acquisition of breeding status is often determined after sexual maturity and strongly impacted by chance in many cooperative vertebrates, who may therefore retain the ability to adjust their morphology to environmental changes and social opportunities arising throughout their development, rather than specializing early.

  1. Additive, Multi-Component Treatment of Emerging Refusal Topographies in a Pediatric Feeding Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, William G.; Jaquess, David L.; Bogard, Jennifer D.; Morton, Jane F.

    2010-01-01

    This case study describes inter-disciplinary treatment of chronic food refusal and tube dependency in a 2-year-old female with a pediatric feeding disorder. Evidence-based behavioral components--including escape extinction (EE), differential reinforcement of alterative mealtime behavior (DRA), and stimulus fading--were introduced sequentially as…

  2. Carbonate fuel cell and components thereof for in-situ delayed addition of carbonate electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Johnsen, Richard; Yuh, Chao-Yi; Farooque, Mohammad

    2011-05-10

    An apparatus and method in which a delayed carbonate electrolyte is stored in the storage areas of a non-electrolyte matrix fuel cell component and is of a preselected content so as to obtain a delayed time release of the electrolyte in the storage areas in the operating temperature range of the fuel cell.

  3. NDE of additively manufactured components with embedded defects (reference standards) using conventional and advanced ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, L.; Roberts, R. A.; Barnard, D. J.; Chakrapani, S.; Singh, S.; Hogan, R.; Bond, L. J.

    2017-02-01

    Additive manufacturing provides a unique opportunity to embed defects of known size and shape to produce reference samples for inspection and quality control purposes. This paper reports defect detectability studies with cylindrical additively manufactured cobalt-chromium alloy specimens which contain defects of known sizes and distributions. The specimens were characterized using immersion, synthetic aperture focusing (SAFT), phased array, and nonlinear ultrasonic techniques. Results include detectability, signal to noise ratios, and comparison of results between the methods and what is believed to be the first determination of a non-linearity (beta) parameter for an additively manufactured material. The results indicate that additive manufacturing provides a valuable method to produce reference samples, though additional work is required to validate the shape and morphology of the defects specified.

  4. Workshop Report on Additive Manufacturing for Large-Scale Metal Components - Development and Deployment of Metal Big-Area-Additive-Manufacturing (Large-Scale Metals AM) System

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Love, Lonnie J.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is considered an emerging technology that is expected to transform the way industry can make low-volume, high value complex structures. This disruptive technology promises to replace legacy manufacturing methods for the fabrication of existing components in addition to bringing new innovation for new components with increased functional and mechanical properties. This report outlines the outcome of a workshop on large-scale metal additive manufacturing held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on March 11, 2016. The charter for the workshop was outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office program manager. The status and impact of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for polymer matrix composites was presented as the background motivation for the workshop. Following, the extension of underlying technology to low-cost metals was proposed with the following goals: (i) High deposition rates (approaching 100 lbs/h); (ii) Low cost (<$10/lbs) for steel, iron, aluminum, nickel, as well as, higher cost titanium, (iii) large components (major axis greater than 6 ft) and (iv) compliance of property requirements. The above concept was discussed in depth by representatives from different industrial sectors including welding, metal fabrication machinery, energy, construction, aerospace and heavy manufacturing. In addition, DOE’s newly launched High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4MFG) program was reviewed. This program will apply thermo-mechanical models to elucidate deeper understanding of the interactions between design, process, and materials during additive manufacturing. Following these presentations, all the attendees took part in a brainstorming session where everyone identified the top 10 challenges in large-scale metal AM from their own perspective. The feedback was analyzed and grouped in different categories including, (i) CAD to PART software, (ii) selection of energy source, (iii

  5. Widespread evidence for non-additive genetic variation in Cloninger's and Eysenck's personality dimensions using a twin plus sibling design.

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthew C; Coventry, William L; Heath, Andrew C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2005-11-01

    Studies using the classical twin design often conclude that most genetic variation underlying personality is additive in nature. However, studies analyzing only twins are very limited in their ability to detect non-additive genetic variation and are unable to detect sources of variation unique to twins, which can mask non-additive genetic variation. The current study assessed 9672 MZ and DZ twin individuals and 3241 of their siblings to investigate the environmental and genetic architecture underlying eight dimensions of personality: four from Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire and four from Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory. Broad-sense heritability estimates from best-fitting models were two to three times greater than the narrow-sense heritability estimates for Harm Avoidance, Novelty Seeking, Reward Dependence, Persistence, Extraversion, and Neuroticism. This genetic non-additivity could be due to dominance, additive-by-additive epistasis, or to additive genetic effects combined with higher-order epistasis. Environmental effects unique to twins were detected for both Lie and Psychoticism but accounted for little overall variation. Our results illustrate the increased sensitivity afforded by extending the classical twin design to include siblings, and may provide clues to the evolutionary origins of genetic variation underlying personality.

  6. Mechanical properties of three-component additive manufactured composites at elevated and cool temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumaevskii, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Eliseev, A. A.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    Elevated and cool temperature tensile tests on three-component composite materials made of carbon fibers, thermoplastic and thermosetting bonding agents have been carried out. The results of tests testify the increasing the composite strength at negative temperature -120°C and reducing it at elevated temperature +120°C. The low temperature fracture of samples resulted in formation of numerous small fragments by cracking and delamination in deformation. The high temperature tests produced numerous delaminated fibers.

  7. Association analysis of historical bread wheat germplasm using additive genetic covariance of relatives and population structure.

    PubMed

    Crossa, José; Burgueño, Juan; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Vargas, Mateo; Herrera-Foessel, Sybil A; Lillemo, Morten; Singh, Ravi P; Trethowan, Richard; Warburton, Marilyn; Franco, Jorge; Reynolds, Matthew; Crouch, Jonathan H; Ortiz, Rodomiro

    2007-11-01

    Linkage disequilibrium can be used for identifying associations between traits of interest and genetic markers. This study used mapped diversity array technology (DArT) markers to find associations with resistance to stem rust, leaf rust, yellow rust, and powdery mildew, plus grain yield in five historical wheat international multienvironment trials from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT). Two linear mixed models were used to assess marker-trait associations incorporating information on population structure and covariance between relatives. An integrated map containing 813 DArT markers and 831 other markers was constructed. Several linkage disequilibrium clusters bearing multiple host plant resistance genes were found. Most of the associated markers were found in genomic regions where previous reports had found genes or quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing the same traits, providing an independent validation of this approach. In addition, many new chromosome regions for disease resistance and grain yield were identified in the wheat genome. Phenotyping across up to 60 environments and years allowed modeling of genotype x environment interaction, thereby making possible the identification of markers contributing to both additive and additive x additive interaction effects of traits.

  8. Different responses of soil respiration and its components to nitrogen addition among biomes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyan; Zhou, Xuhui; Zhang, Baocheng; Lu, Meng; Luo, Yiqi; Liu, Lingli; Li, Bo

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenic activities have increased nitrogen (N) deposition by threefold to fivefold over the last century, which may considerably affect soil respiration (Rs). Although numerous individual studies and a few meta-analyses have been conducted, it remains controversial as to how N addition affects Rs and its components [i.e., autotrophic (Ra) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh)]. To reconcile the difference, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 295 published studies to examine the responses of Rs and its components to N addition in terrestrial ecosystems. We also assessed variations in their responses in relation to ecosystem types, environmental conditions, and experimental duration (DUR). Our results show that N addition significantly increased Rs by 2.0% across all biomes but decreased by 1.44% in forests and increased by 7.84% and 12.4% in grasslands and croplands, respectively (P < 0.05). The differences may largely result from diverse responses of Ra to N addition among biomes with more stimulation of Ra in croplands and grasslands compared with no significant change in forests. Rh exhibited a similar negative response to N addition among biomes except that in croplands, tropical and boreal forests. Methods of partitioning Rs did not induce significant differences in the responses of Ra or Rh to N addition, except that Ra from root exclusion and component integration methods exhibited the opposite responses in temperate forests. The response ratios (RR) of Rs to N addition were positively correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT), with being more significant when MAT was less than 15 °C, but negatively with DUR. In addition, the responses of Rs and its components to N addition largely resulted from the changes in root and microbial biomass and soil C content as indicated by correlation analysis. The response patterns of Rs to N addition as revealed in this study can be benchmarks for future modeling and experimental studies.

  9. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  10. Chromatographic Evaluation and Characterization of Components of Gentian Root Extract Used as Food Additives.

    PubMed

    Amakura, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Morimoto, Sara; Yoshida, Takashi; Tada, Atsuko; Ito, Yusai; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Gentian root extract is used as a bitter food additive in Japan. We investigated the constituents of this extract to acquire the chemical data needed for standardized specifications. Fourteen known compounds were isolated in addition to a mixture of gentisin and isogentisin: anofinic acid, 2-methoxyanofinic acid, furan-2-carboxylic acid, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, isovitexin, gentiopicroside, loganic acid, sweroside, vanillic acid, gentisin 7-O-primeveroside, isogentisin 3-O-primeveroside, 6'-O-glucosylgentiopicroside, and swertiajaposide D. Moreover, a new compound, loganic acid 7-(2'-hydroxy-3'-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)benzoate (1), was also isolated. HPLC was used to analyze gentiopicroside and amarogentin, defined as the main constituents of gentian root extract in the List of Existing Food Additives in Japan.

  11. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and major changes to the final management plan, including state laws or regulations promulgated specifically for the... management plan change. Changes in the boundary of a Reserve involving the acquisition of properties...

  12. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and major changes to the final management plan, including state laws or regulations promulgated specifically for the... management plan change. Changes in the boundary of a Reserve involving the acquisition of properties...

  13. Genetic analysis of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum (Panicoidae) and comparative genetics with rice (Oryzoidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dong; Kong, Wenqian; Robertson, Jon; Goff, Valorie H; Epps, Ethan; Kerr, Alexandra; Mills, Gabriel; Cromwell, Jay; Lugin, Yelena; Phillips, Christine; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-12-01

    Domestication has played an important role in shaping characteristics of the inflorescence and plant height in cultivated cereals. Taking advantage of meta-analysis of QTLs, phylogenetic analyses in 502 diverse sorghum accessions, GWAS in a sorghum association panel (n = 354) and comparative data, we provide insight into the genetic basis of the domestication traits in sorghum and rice. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 6 traits related to inflorescence morphology and 6 traits related to plant height in sorghum, comparing the genomic regions implicated in these traits by GWAS and QTL mapping, respectively. In a search for signatures of selection, we identify genomic regions that may contribute to sorghum domestication regarding plant height, flowering time and pericarp color. Comparative studies across taxa show functionally conserved ‘hotspots’ in sorghum and rice for awn presence and pericarp color that do not appear to reflect corresponding single genes but may indicate co-regulated clusters of genes. We also reveal homoeologous regions retaining similar functions for plant height and flowering time since genome duplication an estimated 70 million years ago or more in a common ancestor of cereals. In most such homoeologous QTL pairs, only one QTL interval exhibits strong selection signals in modern sorghum. Intersections among QTL, GWAS and comparative data advance knowledge of genetic determinants of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum, and add new dimensions to comparisons between sorghum and rice.

  14. Genetic analysis of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum (Panicoidae) and comparative genetics with rice (Oryzoidae)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Dong; Kong, Wenqian; Robertson, Jon; ...

    2015-12-01

    Domestication has played an important role in shaping characteristics of the inflorescence and plant height in cultivated cereals. Taking advantage of meta-analysis of QTLs, phylogenetic analyses in 502 diverse sorghum accessions, GWAS in a sorghum association panel (n = 354) and comparative data, we provide insight into the genetic basis of the domestication traits in sorghum and rice. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 6 traits related to inflorescence morphology and 6 traits related to plant height in sorghum, comparing the genomic regions implicated in these traits by GWAS and QTL mapping, respectively. In a search for signatures ofmore » selection, we identify genomic regions that may contribute to sorghum domestication regarding plant height, flowering time and pericarp color. Comparative studies across taxa show functionally conserved ‘hotspots’ in sorghum and rice for awn presence and pericarp color that do not appear to reflect corresponding single genes but may indicate co-regulated clusters of genes. We also reveal homoeologous regions retaining similar functions for plant height and flowering time since genome duplication an estimated 70 million years ago or more in a common ancestor of cereals. In most such homoeologous QTL pairs, only one QTL interval exhibits strong selection signals in modern sorghum. Intersections among QTL, GWAS and comparative data advance knowledge of genetic determinants of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum, and add new dimensions to comparisons between sorghum and rice.« less

  15. Three-way parallel independent component analysis for imaging genetics using multi-objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Alvaro; Jingyu Liu; Vergara, Victor; Jiayu Chen; Calhoun, Vince; Pattichis, Marios

    2014-01-01

    In the biomedical field, current technology allows for the collection of multiple data modalities from the same subject. In consequence, there is an increasing interest for methods to analyze multi-modal data sets. Methods based on independent component analysis have proven to be effective in jointly analyzing multiple modalities, including brain imaging and genetic data. This paper describes a new algorithm, three-way parallel independent component analysis (3pICA), for jointly identifying genomic loci associated with brain function and structure. The proposed algorithm relies on the use of multi-objective optimization methods to identify correlations among the modalities and maximally independent sources within modality. We test the robustness of the proposed approach by varying the effect size, cross-modality correlation, noise level, and dimensionality of the data. Simulation results suggest that 3p-ICA is robust to data with SNR levels from 0 to 10 dB and effect-sizes from 0 to 3, while presenting its best performance with high cross-modality correlations, and more than one subject per 1,000 variables. In an experimental study with 112 human subjects, the method identified links between a genetic component (pointing to brain function and mental disorder associated genes, including PPP3CC, KCNQ5, and CYP7B1), a functional component related to signal decreases in the default mode network during the task, and a brain structure component indicating increases of gray matter in brain regions of the default mode region. Although such findings need further replication, the simulation and in-vivo results validate the three-way parallel ICA algorithm presented here as a useful tool in biomedical data decomposition applications.

  16. Baldwin Effect and Additional BLR Component in AGN with Superluminal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño Álvarez, Víctor; Torrealba, Janet; Chavushyan, Vahram; Cruz González, Irene; Arshakian, Tigran; León Tavares, Jonathan; Popovic, Luka

    2016-06-01

    We study the Baldwin Effect (BE) in 96 core-jet blazars with optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data from a radio-loud AGN sample obtained from the MOJAVE 2cm survey. A statistical analysis is presented of the equivalent widths W_lambda of emission lines H beta 4861, Mg II 2798, C IV 1549, and continuum luminosities at 5100, 3000, and 1350 angstroms. The BE is found statistically significant (with confidence level c.l. > 95%) in H beta and C IV emission lines, while for Mg II the trend is slightly less significant (c.l. = 94.5%). The slopes of the BE in the studied samples for H beta and Mg II are found steeper and with statistically significant difference than those of a comparison radio-quiet sample. We present simulations of the expected BE slopes produced by the contribution to the total continuum of the non-thermal boosted emission from the relativistic jet, and by variability of the continuum components. We find that the slopes of the BE between radio-quiet and radio-loud AGN should not be different, under the assumption that the broad line is only being emitted by the canonical broad line region around the black hole. We discuss that the BE slope steepening in radio AGN is due to a jet associated broad-line region.

  17. Genetic relationship between lodging and lodging components in barley (Hordeum vulgare) based on unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, W Y; Liu, Z M; Deng, G B; Pan, Z F; Liang, J J; Zeng, X Q; Tashi, N M; Long, H; Yu, M Q

    2014-03-17

    Lodging (LD) is a major constraint limiting the yield and forage quality of barley. Detailed analyses of LD component (LDC) traits were conducted using 246 F2 plants generated from a cross between cultivars ZQ320 and 1277. Genetic relationships between LD and LDC were evaluated by unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Ultimately, 53 unconditional QTL related to LD were identified on seven barley chromosomes. Up to 15 QTL accounted for over 10% of the phenotypic variation, and up to 20 QTL for culm strength were detected. Six QTL with pleiotropic effects showing significant negative correlations with LD were found between markers Bmag353 and GBM1482 on chromosome 4H. These alleles and alleles of QTL for wall thickness, culm strength, plant height, and plant weight originated from ZQ320. Conditional mapping identified 96 additional QTL for LD. Conditional QTL analysis demonstrated that plant height, plant height center of gravity, and length of the sixth internode had the greatest contribution to LD, whereas culm strength and length of the fourth internode, and culm strength of the second internode were the key factors for LD-resistant. Therefore, lodging resistance in barley can be improved based on selection of alleles affecting culm strength, wall thickness, plant height, and plant weight. The conditional QTL mapping method can be used to evaluate possible genetic relationships between LD and LDC while efficiently and precisely determining counteracting QTL, which will help in understanding the genetic basis of LD in barley.

  18. The influence of landmark salience in a navigation task: an additive effect between its components.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, V D; Rodrigo, T; Peris, J M; Grau, M

    2006-07-01

    In 2 experiments, rats were trained in a Morris pool to find a hidden platform in the presence of 1 landmark. After acquisition, the rats were tested without the platform. Experiment 1 tested whether the size of a landmark and its relative distance from the platform are additive effects. On test, the rats' best performance was with a near and big landmark; intermediate performance was with either a near and small landmark or a far and big one; and the worst performance was with a far and small landmark. The results of Experiment 2 suggested that the different distances from the goal of the 2 landmarks might not be sufficient to explain the previous results.

  19. Estimates of (co)variance components and genetic parameters for growth traits of Avikalin sheep.

    PubMed

    Prince, Leslie Leo L; Gowane, Gopal R; Chopra, Ashish; Arora, Amrit L

    2010-08-01

    (Co)variance components and genetic parameters for various growth traits of Avikalin sheep maintained at Central Sheep and Wool Research Institute, Avikanagar, Rajasthan, India, were estimated by Restricted Maximum Likelihood, fitting six animal models with various combinations of direct and maternal effects. Records of 3,840 animals descended from 257 sires and 1,194 dams were taken for this study over a period of 32 years (1977-2008). Direct heritability estimates (from best model as per likelihood ratio test) for weight at birth, weaning, 6 and 12 months of age, and average daily gain from birth to weaning, weaning to 6 months, and 6 to 12 months were 0.28 +/- 0.03, 0.20 +/- 0.03, 0.28 +/- 0.07, 0.15 +/- 0.04, 0.21 +/- 0.03, 0.16 and 0.03 +/- 0.03, respectively. Maternal heritability for traits declined as animal grows older and it was not at all evident at adult age and for post-weaning daily gain. Maternal permanent environmental effect (c(2)) declined significantly with advancement of age of animal. A small effect of c(2) on post-weaning weights was probably a carryover effect of pre-weaning maternal influence. A significant large negative genetic correlation was observed between direct and maternal genetic effects for all the traits, indicating antagonistic pleiotropy, which needs special care while formulating breeding plans. A fair rate of genetic progress seems possible in the flock by selection for all traits, but direct and maternal genetic correlation needs to be taken in to consideration.

  20. Towards the optimal design of an uncemented acetabular component using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Rajesh; Pratihar, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    Aseptic loosening of the acetabular component (hemispherical socket of the pelvic bone) has been mainly attributed to bone resorption and excessive generation of wear particle debris. The aim of this study was to determine optimal design parameters for the acetabular component that would minimize bone resorption and volumetric wear. Three-dimensional finite element models of intact and implanted pelvises were developed using data from computed tomography scans. A multi-objective optimization problem was formulated and solved using a genetic algorithm. A combination of suitable implant material and corresponding set of optimal thicknesses of the component was obtained from the Pareto-optimal front of solutions. The ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component generated considerably greater volumetric wear but lower bone density loss compared to carbon-fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) and ceramic. CFR-PEEK was located in the range between ceramic and UHMWPE. Although ceramic appeared to be a viable alternative to cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, CFR-PEEK seems to be the most promising alternative material.

  1. Computational and Genetic Reduction of a Cell Cycle to Its Simplest, Primordial Components

    PubMed Central

    Fumeaux, Coralie; Viollier, Patrick H.; Howard, Martin

    2013-01-01

    What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ΔgcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ΔgcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles. PMID:24415923

  2. Two Genetic Loci Produce Distinct Carbohydrate-Rich Structural Components of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lisa; Kolter, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms, which are cellular aggregates encased in an extracellular matrix. Molecular genetics studies of three common autoaggregative phenotypes, namely wrinkled colonies, pellicles, and solid-surface-associated biofilms, led to the identification of two loci, pel and psl, that are involved in the production of carbohydrate-rich components of the biofilm matrix. The pel gene cluster is involved in the production of a glucose-rich matrix material in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 (L. Friedman and R. Kolter, Mol. Microbiol. 51:675-690, 2004). Here we investigate the role of the pel gene cluster in P. aeruginosa strain ZK2870 and identify a second genetic locus, termed psl, involved in the production of a mannose-rich matrix material. The 11 predicted protein products of the psl genes are homologous to proteins involved in carbohydrate processing. P. aeruginosa is thus able to produce two distinct carbohydrate-rich matrix materials. Either carbohydrate-rich matrix component appears to be sufficient for mature biofilm formation, and at least one of them is required for mature biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa strains PA14 and ZK2870. PMID:15231777

  3. Genetic and chemical components analysis of Papaver setigerum naturalized in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Eunjung; Jin, Gang-nam; Lee, Yang Han; Kim, Soo Young; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Suncheun

    2012-10-10

    Of the 110 species of genus Papaver, only Papaver somniferum and P. setigerum are controlled poppies in Korea. All poppy samples share similar morphology therefore it is important to check if they contain controlled substances such as morphine and codeine for forensic purpose. Since the alkaloid content of Papaver plants varies according to their growing stage, chemical components analysis alone is not enough to identify exact species. In 2010, hundreds of poppy plants suspected to be P. somniferum were found in Jeju Island, South Korea. They had a slightly different but overall similar appearance to P. somniferum. Using GC-MS analysis, codeine, rhoeadine, papaverine, protopine, noscapine, setigeridine and trace amounts of morphine were detected in these samples. Although their chemical components were different from what has been described in literatures for P. setigerum, they could be assumed to be P. setigerum based on their morphological features and GC-MS results. Also, chromosome numbers using their seeds showed 2n=44 and the numbers were in accordance with those of P. setigerum. Nucleotide substitution or insertion/deletion of ITS (internal transcribed spacer), 18S rRNA (ribosomal RNA), rbcL (large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase), trnL-trnF IGS (intergenic spacer), trnL intron and psbA-trnH were assessed as universal genetic markers for P. setigerum. Also, genetic analysis using six target genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, including TYDC (tyrosine/dopa decarboxylase), SAT (salutaridinol-7-O-acetyltransferase), BBE (berberine bridge enzyme), COR (codeinone reductase), CYP80B1 ((S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase) and NCS (norcoclaurine synthase) were tested as Papaver-specific genetic markers by the existence of their PCR products. From the results, the sequences of the 6 universal genetic markers and 6 Papaver-specific genetic markers for P. setigerum were identified and then Genbank accession numbers of

  4. Toxicological safety assessment of genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis with additional N-acyl homoserine lactonase gene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Donghai; Zhou, Chenfei; Chen, Shouwen; Ruan, Lifang; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the toxicology safety to mammals of a genetically modified (GM) Bacillus thuringiensis with an additional N-acyl homoserine lactones gene (aiiA), which possesses insecticidal activity together with restraint of bacterial pathogenicity and is intended for use as a multifunctional biopesticide. Safety assessments included an acute oral toxicity test and 28-d animal feeding study in Wistar rats, primary eye and dermal irritation in Zealand White rabbits, and delayed contact hypersensitivity in guinea pigs. Tests were conducted using spray-dried powder preparation. This GM product showed toxicity neither in oral acute toxicity test nor in 28-d animal feeding test at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight. During the animal feeding test, there were no significant differences in growth, food and water consumption, hematology, blood biochemical indices, organ weights, and histopathology finding between rats in controls and tested groups. Tested animals in primary eye and dermal irritation and delayed contact hypersensitivity test were also devoid of any toxicity compared to controls. All the above results demonstrated that the GM based multifunctional B. thuringiensis has low toxicity and low eye and dermal irritation and would not cause hypersensitivity to laboratory mammals and therefore could be regarded as safe for use as a pesticide.

  5. Overdominant epistatic loci are the primary genetic basis of inbreeding depression and heterosis in rice. II. Grain yield components.

    PubMed

    Luo, L J; Li, Z K; Mei, H W; Shu, Q Y; Tabien, R; Zhong, D B; Ying, C S; Stansel, J W; Khush, G S; Paterson, A H

    2001-08-01

    The genetic basis underlying inbreeding depression and heterosis for three grain yield components of rice was investigated in five interrelated mapping populations using a complete RFLP linkage map, replicated phenotyping, and the mixed model approach. The populations included 254 F(10) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between Lemont (japonica) and Teqing (indica), two backcross (BC) and two testcross populations derived from crosses between the RILs and the parents plus two testers (Zhong413 and IR64). For the yield components, the RILs showed significant inbreeding depression and hybrid breakdown, and the BC and testcross populations showed high levels of heterosis. The average performance of the BC or testcross hybrids was largely determined by heterosis. The inbreeding depression values of individual RILs were negatively associated with the heterosis measurements of the BC or testcross hybrids. We identified many epistatic QTL pairs and a few main-effect QTL responsible for >65% of the phenotypic variation of the yield components in each of the populations. Most epistasis occurred between complementary loci, suggesting that grain yield components were associated more with multilocus genotypes than with specific alleles at individual loci. Overdominance was also an important property of most loci associated with heterosis, particularly for panicles per plant and grains per panicle. Two independent groups of genes appeared to affect grain weight: one showing primarily nonadditive gene action explained 62.1% of the heterotic variation of the trait, and the other exhibiting only additive gene action accounted for 28.1% of the total trait variation of the F(1) mean values. We found no evidence suggesting that pseudo-overdominance from the repulsive linkage of completely or partially dominant QTL for yield components resulted in the overdominant QTL for grain yield. Pronounced overdominance resulting from epistasis expressed by multilocus

  6. Additive antimicrobial [corrected] effects of the active components of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris--chemotype carvacrol.

    PubMed

    Iten, Felix; Saller, Reinhard; Abel, Gudrun; Reichling, Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Herbal remedies are multicomponent mixtures by their nature as well as by pharmaceutical definition. Being a multicomponent mixture is not only a crucial property of herbal remedies, it also represents a precondition for interactions such as synergism or antagonism. Until now, only a few phytomedicines are accurately described concerning the interactions of their active components. The aim of this study was to search for interactions within such a naturally given multi-component mixture and to discuss the pharmaceutical and clinical impacts. The thyme oil chosen for the examination belongs to the essential oils with the most pronounced antimicrobial activity. Antibiotic activity of thyme oil and single active components were tested against six different strains of microorganisms. The checkerboard assay was used to search for interactions. The time-kill assay was used to verify the observed effects and to get information about the temporal resolution of the antimicrobial activity. The degree of the detected interactions corresponded with the demarcating FICI measure of 0.5, which separates the additive from the over-additive (synergistic) effects. Therefore, the observed effect was called a "borderline case of synergism" or, respectively, "partial synergism". Partial synergism was observed only in the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Additive antimicrobial activity was observed for the combination of the two monosubstances carvacrol plus linalool and thymol plus linalool as well as with the combination of the two essential oils of the carvacrol and linalool chemotypes. An increase of the carvacrol oil concentration from one to two times the MIC resulted in a considerable acceleration of the kill-rate. Thyme oil is composed of several different components that show antimicrobial activity (at least: carvacrol, thymol and linalool). The antimicrobial activity of thyme oil is partly based on additive effects, which might especially enhance the rapidity of the

  7. [Questions safety and tendency of using genetically modified microorganisms in food, food additives and food derived].

    PubMed

    Khovaev, A A

    2008-01-01

    In this article analysis questions of using genetically modified microorganisms in manufacture food production, present new GMM used in manufacture -food ferments; results of medical biological appraisal/ microbiological and genetic expert examination/ of food, getting by use microorganisms or there producents with indication modern of control methods.

  8. Planning additional drilling campaign using two-space genetic algorithm: A game theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Ozer, Umit

    2013-03-01

    Grade and tonnage are the most important technical uncertainties in mining ventures because of the use of estimations/simulations, which are mostly generated from drill data. Open pit mines are planned and designed on the basis of the blocks representing the entire orebody. Each block has different estimation/simulation variance reflecting uncertainty to some extent. The estimation/simulation realizations are submitted to mine production scheduling process. However, the use of a block model with varying estimation/simulation variances will lead to serious risk in the scheduling. In the medium of multiple simulations, the dispersion variances of blocks can be thought to regard technical uncertainties. However, the dispersion variance cannot handle uncertainty associated with varying estimation/simulation variances of blocks. This paper proposes an approach that generates the configuration of the best additional drilling campaign to generate more homogenous estimation/simulation variances of blocks. In other words, the objective is to find the best drilling configuration in such a way as to minimize grade uncertainty under budget constraint. Uncertainty measure of the optimization process in this paper is interpolation variance, which considers data locations and grades. The problem is expressed as a minmax problem, which focuses on finding the best worst-case performance i.e., minimizing interpolation variance of the block generating maximum interpolation variance. Since the optimization model requires computing the interpolation variances of blocks being simulated/estimated in each iteration, the problem cannot be solved by standard optimization tools. This motivates to use two-space genetic algorithm (GA) approach to solve the problem. The technique has two spaces: feasible drill hole configuration with minimization of interpolation variance and drill hole simulations with maximization of interpolation variance. Two-space interacts to find a minmax solution

  9. Estimation of variance components and genetic trends for twinning rate in Holstein dairy cattle of Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghavi Hossein-Zadeh, N; Nejati-Javaremi, A; Miraei-Ashtiani, S R; Kohram, H

    2009-07-01

    Calving records from the Animal Breeding Center of Iran, collected from January 1991 to December 2007 and comprising 1,163,594 Holstein calving events from 2,552 herds, were analyzed using a linear animal model, linear sire model, threshold animal model, and threshold sire model to estimate variance components, heritabilities, genetic correlations, and genetic trends for twinning rate in the first, second, and third parities. The overall twinning rate was 3.01%. Mean incidence of twins increased from first to fourth and later parities: 1.10, 3.20, 4.22, and 4.50%, respectively. For first-parity cows, a maximum frequency of twinning was observed from January through April (1.36%), and second- and third-parity cows showed peaks from July to September (at 3.35 and 4.55%, respectively). The phenotypic rate of twinning decreased from 1991 to 2007 for the first, second, and third parities. Sire predicted transmitting abilities were estimated using linear sire model and threshold sire model analyses. Sire transmitting abilities for twinning rate in the first, second, and third parities ranged from -0.30 to 0.42, -0.32 to 0.31, and -0.27 to 0.30, respectively. Heritability estimates of twinning rate for parities 1, 2, and 3 ranged from 1.66 to 10.6%, 1.35 to 9.0%, and 1.10 to 7.3%, respectively, using different models for analysis. Heritability estimates for twinning rate, obtained from the analysis of threshold models, were greater than the estimates of linear models. Solutions for age at calving for the first, second, and third parities demonstrated that cows older at calving were more likely to have twins. Genetic correlations for twinning rate between parities 2 and 3 were greater than correlations between parities 1 and 2 and between parities 1 and 3. There was a slightly increasing trend for twinning rate in parities 1, 2, and 3 over time with the analysis of linear animal and linear sire models, but the trend for twinning rate in parities 1, 2, and 3 with threshold

  10. Comparison of electron beam and laser beam powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process for high temperature turbine component materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A; Ryan, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolving 3D printer technology is now at the point where some turbine components could be additive manufactured (AM) for both development and production purposes. However, this will require a significant evaluation program to qualify the process and components to meet current design and quality standards. The goal of the project was to begin characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nickel Alloy X (Ni-22Cr-18Fe-9Mo) test bars fabricated by powder bed fusion (PBF) AM processes that use either an electron beam (EB) or laser beam (LB) power source. The AM materials produced with the EB and LB processes displayed significant differences in microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. Accordingly, during the design analysis of AM turbine components, the specific mechanical behavior of the material produced with the selected AM process should be considered. Comparison of the mechanical properties of both the EB and LB materials to those of conventionally processed Nickel Alloy X materials indicates the subject AM materials are viable alternatives for manufacture of some turbine components.

  11. A genetic component of resistance to fungal infection in frog embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sagvik, Jörgen; Uller, Tobias; Olsson, Mats

    2008-01-01

    The embryo has traditionally been considered to completely rely upon parental strategies to prevent threats to survival posed by predators and pathogens, such as fungi. However, recent evidence suggests that embryos may have hitherto neglected abilities to counter pathogens. Using artificial fertilization, we show that among-family variation in the number of Saprolegnia-infected eggs and embryos in the moor frog, Rana arvalis, cannot be explained by maternal effects. However, analysed as a within-females effect, sire identity had an effect on the degree of infection. Furthermore, relatively more eggs and embryos were infected when eggs were fertilized by sperm from the same, compared with a different, population. These effects were independent of variation in fertilization success. Thus, there is likely to be a significant genetic component in embryonic resistance to fungal infection in frog embryos. Early developmental stages may show more diverse defences against pathogens than has previously been acknowledged. PMID:18319211

  12. A genetic component of resistance to fungal infection in frog embryos.

    PubMed

    Sagvik, Jörgen; Uller, Tobias; Olsson, Mats

    2008-06-22

    The embryo has traditionally been considered to completely rely upon parental strategies to prevent threats to survival posed by predators and pathogens, such as fungi. However, recent evidence suggests that embryos may have hitherto neglected abilities to counter pathogens. Using artificial fertilization, we show that among-family variation in the number of Saprolegnia-infected eggs and embryos in the moor frog, Rana arvalis, cannot be explained by maternal effects. However, analysed as a within-females effect, sire identity had an effect on the degree of infection. Furthermore, relatively more eggs and embryos were infected when eggs were fertilized by sperm from the same, compared with a different, population. These effects were independent of variation in fertilization success. Thus, there is likely to be a significant genetic component in embryonic resistance to fungal infection in frog embryos. Early developmental stages may show more diverse defences against pathogens than has previously been acknowledged.

  13. Prohibitin family members interact genetically with mitochondrial inheritance components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Berger, K H; Yaffe, M P

    1998-07-01

    Phb2p, a homolog of the tumor suppressor protein prohibitin, was identified in a genetic screen for suppressors of the loss of Mdm12p, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein required for normal mitochondrial morphology and inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Phb2p and its homolog, prohibitin (Phb1p), were localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane and characterized as integral membrane proteins which depend on each other for their stability. In otherwise wild-type genetic backgrounds, null mutations in PHB1 and PHB2 did not confer any obvious phenotypes. However, loss of function of either PHB1 or PHB2 in cells with mitochondrial DNA deleted led to altered mitochondrial morphology, and phb1 or phb2 mutations were synthetically lethal when combined with a mutation in any of three mitochondrial inheritance components of the mitochondrial outer membrane, Mdm12p, Mdm10p, and Mmm1p. These results provide the first evidence of a role for prohibitin in mitochondrial inheritance and in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology.

  14. Genetic structure and AFLP variation of remnant populations in the rare plant Pedicularis palustris (Scrophulariaceae) and its relation to population size and reproductive components.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K; Jensen, K

    2000-05-01

    We investigated plant reproduction in relation to genetic structure, population size, and habitat quality in 13 populations of the rare biennial plant Pedicularis palustris with 3-28500 flowering individuals. We used AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) profiles to analyze genetic similarities among 129 individuals (3-15 per population). In a cluster analysis of genetic similarities most individuals (67%) were arranged in population-specific clusters. Analysis of molecular variance indicated significant genetic differentiation among populations and among and within subpopulations (P < 0.001). Gene flow (N(e) m) was low (0.298). On average, plants produced 55 capsules, 17 seeds per fruit, and 42 seedlings in the following growing season. The number of seeds per capsule was independent of population size and of genetic variability. In contrast, the number of capsules per plant (P < 0.05) and the number of seedlings per plant (P < 0.05) were positively correlated with population size. The relation between population size and the number of seeds per plant was not significant (P = 0.075). The number of capsules and of seeds and seedlings per plant (P < 0.01) were positively correlated with genetic variability. Genetic variability was independent of actual population size, suggesting that historical population processes have to be taken into account, too. Stepwise multiple regressions revealed additional significant relationships of habitat parameters (soil pH, C:N ratio), vegetation composition, and standing crop on reproductive components. We conclude that populations of P. palustris are genetically isolated and that reproductive success most likely is influenced by population size, genetic variability, and habitat quality. Management strategies such as moderate grazing, mowing, and artificial gene flow should endeavor to increase population size as well as genetic variation.

  15. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  16. Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

    2013-04-30

    A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Basis of Stalk Cell Wall Components in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojiao; Liu, Zhifang; Wu, Yujin; Huang, Changling

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose are the three main components of the plant cell wall and can impact stalk quality by affecting cell wall structure and strength. In this study, we evaluated the lignin (LIG), cellulose (CEL) and hemicellulose (HC) contents in maize using an association mapping panel that included 368 inbred lines in seven environments. A genome-wide association study using approximately 0.56 million SNPs with a minor allele frequency of 0.05 identified 22, 18 and 24 loci significantly associated with LIG, CEL and HC at P < 1.0×10−4, respectively. The allelic variation of each significant association contributed 4 to 7% of the phenotypic variation. Candidate genes identified by GWAS mainly encode enzymes involved in cell wall metabolism, transcription factors, protein kinase and protein related to other biological processes. Among the association signals, six candidate genes had pleiotropic effects on lignin and cellulose content. These results provide valuable information for better understanding the genetic basis of stalk cell wall components in maize. PMID:27479588

  18. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  19. Investigation of plasma arc welding as a method for the additive manufacturing of titanium-(6)aluminum-(4)vanadium alloy components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinoha, Joe N.

    The process of producing near net-shape components by material deposition is known as additive manufacturing. All additive manufacturing processes are based on the addition of material with the main driving forces being cost reduction and flexibility in both manufacturing and product design. With wire metal deposition, metal is deposited as beads side-by-side and layer-by-layer in a desired pattern to build a complete component or add features on a part. There are minimal waste products, low consumables, and an efficient use of energy and feedstock associated with additive manufacturing processes. Titanium and titanium alloys are useful engineering materials that possess an extraordinary combination of properties. Some of the properties that make titanium advantageous for structural applications are its high strength-to-weight ratio, low density, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and good corrosion resistance. The most commonly used titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, is typically used in aerospace applications, pressure vessels, aircraft gas turbine disks, cases and compressor blades, and surgical implants. Because of the high material prices associated with titanium alloys, the production of near net-shape components by additive manufacturing is an attractive option for the manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy components. In this thesis, the manufacturing of cylindrical Ti-6Al-4V alloy specimens by wire metal deposition utilizing the plasma arc welding process was demonstrated. Plasma arc welding is a cost effective additive manufacturing technique when compared to other current additive manufacturing methods such as laser beam welding and electron beam welding. Plasma arc welding is considered a high-energy-density welding processes which is desirable for the successful welding of titanium. Metal deposition was performed using a constant current plasma arc welding power supply, flow-purged welding chamber, argon shielding and orifice gas, ERTi-5 filler metal, and Ti-6Al

  20. The slow component of oxygen uptake during intense, sub-maximal exercise in man is associated with additional fibre recruitment.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, Peter; Söderlund, Karin; Mohr, Magni; Bangsbo, Jens

    2004-03-01

    Single muscle fibre metabolites and pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) were measured during moderate and intense, sub-maximal exercise to test the hypothesis that additional fibre recruitment is associated with the slow component of VO2. Seven healthy, male subjects performed 20 min moderate (MOD, approximately 50% of VO(2,max)) and intense (INT, approximately 80% VO(2,max)) cycling at 70 rpm. Glycogen content decreased significantly in type I and IIa fibres during INT, but only in type I fibres during MOD. During INT, creatine phosphate (CP) content decreased significantly both in types I and II fibres in the first 3 min (DeltaCP: 16.0+/-2.7 and 16.8+/-4.7 mmol kg(-1) d.w., respectively) and in the next 3 min (DeltaCP: 16.2+/-4.9 and 25.7+/-6.7 mmol kg(-1) d.w., respectively) with no further change from 6-20 min. CP content was below the pre-exercise level (mean-1 SD) in 11, 37, 70 and 74% of the type I fibres after 0, 3, 6 and 20 min of INT, respectively, and in 13, 45, 83 and 74% of the type II fibres. During INT, VO2 increased significantly by 6+/-1 and 4+/-1% in the periods 3-6 and 6-20 min, respectively (Delta VO(2,(6-3 min)): 0.14+/-0.02 l min(-1)), whereas VO2 was unchanged from 3 to 20 min of MOD. Exponential fitting revealed a slow component of VO2 during INT that appeared after approximately 2.6 min and amounted to 0.24 l min(-1). The present study demonstrates that additional type I and II fibres are recruited with time during intense sub-maximal exercise in temporal association with a significant slow component of VO2.

  1. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... diabetes. A begins to experience excessive sweating, thirst, and fatigue. A's physician examines A and... adult onset diabetes mellitus (Type 2 diabetes). (ii) Conclusion. In this Example 1, A has been... involved. The diagnosis is not based principally on genetic information. Thus, Type 2 diabetes...

  2. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... diabetes. A begins to experience excessive sweating, thirst, and fatigue. A's physician examines A and... adult onset diabetes mellitus (Type 2 diabetes). (ii) Conclusion. In this Example 1, A has been... involved. The diagnosis is not based principally on genetic information. Thus, Type 2 diabetes...

  3. The Effects of Pre-Fermentative Addition of Oenological Tannins on Wine Components and Sensorial Qualities of Red Wine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Escott, Carlos; Loira, Iris; Del Fresno, Juan Manuel; Morata, Antonio; Tesfaye, Wendu; Calderon, Fernando; Benito, Santiago; Suárez-Lepe, Jose Antonio

    2016-10-31

    Today in the wine industry, oenological tannins are widely used to improve wine quality and prevent oxidation in wine aging. With the development of tannin products, new oenological tannins are developed with many specific functions, such as modifying antioxidant effect, colour stabilization and aroma modifications. The aim of this work is to investigate effects of pre-fermentative addition of oenological tannins on wine colour, anthocyanins, volatile compounds and sensorial properties. In this case, Syrah juice was extracted with classic flash thermovinification from fresh must in order to release more colour and tannins. Three types of oenological tannins, which are, respectively, derived from grape skin, seed (Vitis vinifera) and French oak (Quercus robur and Querrus petraea), were selected to carry out the experiments with seven treatments. Results indicated that tannin treatments significantly improved wine aroma complexity and sensorial properties. However, the concentration of some stable pigments such as Vitisin A, Vitisin A-Ac and Vitisin B was negatively affected by tannin additions. Nevertheless, by means of cluster analysis and principal component analysis, it was observed that higher alcohols were significantly promoted by grape seed tannin while most anthocyanins can be improved by addition of grape tannins. In conclusion, low amount of oenological tannin derived from grape seed is a promising method to be applied especially for young red wine making.

  4. Development of a genetic sexing strain in Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) by introgression of sex sorting components from B. dorsalis, Salaya1 strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock is a high profile key pest that is widely distributed in the southwestern ASEAN region. In addition, it has trans-continentally invaded Suriname, where it has been expanding east and southward since 1975. This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex. The development and application of a genetic sexing strain (Salaya1) of B. dorsalis sensu stricto (s.s.) (Hendel) for the sterile insect technique (SIT) has improved the fruit fly control. However, matings between B. dorsalis s.s. and B. carambolae are incompatible, which hinder the application of the Salaya1 strain to control the carambola fruit fly. To solve this problem, we introduced genetic sexing components from the Salaya1 strain into the B. carambolae genome by interspecific hybridization. Results Morphological characteristics, mating competitiveness, male pheromone profiles, and genetic relationships revealed consistencies that helped to distinguish Salaya1 and B. carambolae strains. A Y-autosome translocation linking the dominant wild-type allele of white pupae gene and a free autosome carrying a recessive white pupae homologue from the Salaya1 strain were introgressed into the gene pool of B. carambolae. A panel of Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci of the Salaya1 strain served as markers for the introgression experiments. This resulted in a newly derived genetic sexing strain called Salaya5, with morphological characteristics corresponding to B. carambolae. The rectal gland pheromone profile of Salaya5 males also contained a distinctive component of B. carambolae. Microsatellite DNA analyses confirmed the close genetic relationships between the Salaya5 strain and wild B. carambolae populations. Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions. Conclusions Introgression of sex sorting components from the Salaya1 strain to a

  5. Components of yeast (Sacchromyces cervisiae) extract as defined media additives that support the growth and productivity of CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Spearman, Maureen; Chan, Sarah; Jung, Vince; Kowbel, Vanessa; Mendoza, Meg; Miranda, Vivian; Butler, Michael

    2016-09-10

    Yeast and plant hydrolysates are used as media supplements to support the growth and productivity of CHO cultures for biopharmaceutical production. Through fractionation of a yeast lysate and metabolic analysis of a fraction that had bioactivity equivalent to commercial yeast extract (YE), bioactive components were identified that promoted growth and productivity of two recombinant CHO cell lines (CHO-Luc and CHO-hFcEG2) equivalent to or greater than YE-supplemented media. Autolysis of the yeast lysate was not necessary for full activity, suggesting that the active components are present in untreated yeast cells. A bioactive fraction (3KF) of the yeast lysate was isolated from the permeate using a 3kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filter. Supplementation of this 3KF fraction into the base media supported growth of CHO-Luc cells over eight passages equivalent to YE-supplemented media. The 3KF fraction was fractionated further by a cation exchange spin column using a stepwise pH elution. Metabolomic analysis of a bioactive fraction isolated at high pH identified several arginine and lysine-containing peptides as well as two polyamines, spermine and spermidine, with 3.5× and 4.5× higher levels compared to a fraction showing no bioactivity. The addition of a mixture of polyamines and their precursors (putrescine, spermine, spermidine, ornithine and citrulline) as well as increasing the concentration of some of the components of the original base medium resulted in a chemically-defined (CD) formulation that produced an equivalent viable cell density (VCD) and productivity of the CHO-Luc cells as the YE-supplemented medium. The VCD of the CHO-hFcEG2 culture in the CD medium was 1.9× greater and with equivalent productivity to the YE-supplemented media.

  6. Non-equilibrium fluctuations and metastability arising from non-additive interactions in dissipative multi-component Rydberg gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Garrahan, Juan P.; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2016-09-01

    We study the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of dissipative gases of atoms excited to two or more high-lying Rydberg states. This situation bears interesting similarities to classical binary (in general p-ary) mixtures of particles. The effective forces between the components are determined by the inter-level and intra-level interactions of Rydberg atoms. These systems permit to explore new parameter regimes which are physically inaccessible in a classical setting, for example one in which the mixtures exhibit non-additive interactions. In this situation the out-of-equilibrium evolution is characterized by the formation of metastable domains that reach partial equilibration long before the attainment of stationarity. In experimental settings with mesoscopic sizes, this collective behavior may in fact take the appearance of dynamic symmetry breaking.

  7. Apollo 16 regolith breccias and soils - Recorders of exotic component addition to the Descartes region of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, S. B.; Papike, J. J.; Laul, J. C.; Hughes, S. S.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Using the subdivision of Apollo 16 regolith breccias into ancient (about 4 Gyr) and younger samples (McKay et al., 1986), with the present-day soils as a third sample, a petrologic and chemical determination of regolith evolution and exotic component addition at the A-16 site was performed. The modal petrologies and mineral and chemical compositions of the regolith breccias in the region are presented. It is shown that the early regolith was composed of fragments of plutonic rocks, impact melt rocks, and minerals and impact glasses. It is found that KREEP lithologies and impact melts formed early in lunar history. The mare components, mainly orange high-TiO2 glass and green low-TiO2 glass, were added to the site after formation of the ancient breccias and prior to the formation of young breccias. The major change in the regolith since the formation of the young breccias is an increase in maturity represented by the formation of fused soil particles with prolonged exposure to micrometeorite impacts.

  8. Genetic changes in the RNA components of RNase MRP and RNase P in Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ridanpaa, M; Ward, L; Rockas, S; Sarkioja, M; Makela, H; Susic, M; Glorieux, F; Cole, W; Makitie, O

    2003-01-01

    Background: The Schmid type of metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (MCDS) is generally due to mutations in COL10A1 encoding for type X collagen of cartilage. Methods: We performed a study on the genes coding for the RNA components of RNase MRP (MRPR) and RNase P (H1RNA) among 20 patients with diagnosis of MCDS and no mutations in COL10A1. Results: Two patients were found to be homozygous for a base substitution G for A at nucleotide 70 of RMRP, which is the major mutation causing cartilage–hair hypoplasia. No pathogenic mutations were detected in H1RNA. Conclusion: Cartilage–hair hypoplasia diagnosis should be considered in patients with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia even in the absence of any extra-skeletal manifestations if no mutation in COL10A1 can be found and the family history is compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Correct diagnosis is important for genetic counselling and for proper follow up of the patients. PMID:14569119

  9. Principal component analysis under population genetic models of range expansion and admixture.

    PubMed

    François, Olivier; Currat, Mathias; Ray, Nicolas; Han, Eunjung; Excoffier, Laurent; Novembre, John

    2010-06-01

    In a series of highly influential publications, Cavalli-Sforza and colleagues used principal component (PC) analysis to produce maps depicting how human genetic diversity varies across geographic space. Within Europe, the first axis of variation (PC1) was interpreted as evidence for the demic diffusion model of agriculture, in which farmers expanded from the Near East approximately 10,000 years ago and replaced the resident hunter-gatherer populations with little or no interbreeding. These interpretations of the PC maps have been recently questioned as the original results can be reproduced under models of spatially covarying allele frequencies without any expansion. Here, we study PC maps for data simulated under models of range expansion and admixture. Our simulations include a spatially realistic model of Neolithic farmer expansion and assume various levels of interbreeding between farmer and resident hunter-gatherer populations. An important result is that under a broad range of conditions, the gradients in PC1 maps are oriented along a direction perpendicular to the axis of the expansion, rather than along the same axis as the expansion. We propose that this surprising pattern is an outcome of the "allele surfing" phenomenon, which creates sectors of high allele-frequency differentiation that align perpendicular to the direction of the expansion.

  10. Genetic conjugation of components in two pneumococcal fusion protein vaccines enhances paediatric mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pope, Caroline; Oliver, Elizabeth H; Ma, Jiangtao; Langton Hewer, Claire; Mitchell, Tim J; Finn, Adam

    2015-03-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonises the upper respiratory tract and can cause pneumonia, meningitis and otitis media. Existing pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are expensive to produce and only protect against 13 of the 90+ pneumococcal serotypes; hence there is an urgent need for the development of new vaccines. We have shown previously in mice that pneumolysin (Ply) and a non-toxic variant (Δ6Ply) enhance antibody responses when genetically fused to pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA), a potentially valuable effect for future vaccines. We investigated this adjuvanticity in human paediatric mucosal primary immune cell cultures. Adenoidal mononuclear cells (AMNC) from children aged 0-15 years (n=46) were stimulated with conjugated, admixed or individual proteins, cell viability and CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses were assessed using flow cytometry and cytokine secretion was measured using multiplex technology. Proliferation of CD4+ T-cells in response to PsaAPly, was significantly higher than responses to individual or admixed proteins (p=0.002). In contrast, an enhanced response to PsaAΔ6Ply compared to individual or admixed proteins only occurred at higher concentrations (p<0.01). Evaluation of cytotoxicity suggested that responses occurred when Ply-induced cytolysis was inhibited, either by fusion or mutation, but importantly an additional toxicity independent immune enhancing effect was also apparent as a result of fusion. Responses were MHC class II dependent and had a Th1/Th17 profile. Genetic fusion of Δ6Ply to PsaA significantly modulates and enhances pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cell responses without the cytolytic effects of some other pneumolysoids. Membrane binding activity of such proteins may confer valuable adjuvant properties as fusion may assist Δ6Ply to deliver PsaA to the APC surface effectively, contributing to the initiation of anti-pneumococcal CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  11. A high density consensus genetic map of tetraploid cotton that integrates multiple component maps through molecular marker redundancy check

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ultra-dense consensus (UDC) genetic map of tetraploid cotton was constructed using six high-density component maps and after the integration of a sequence-based marker redundancy check. Public cotton SSR libraries (17,343 markers) were curated for sequence redundancy using 90% as a similarity cut...

  12. Genetic variation at the TPH2 gene influences impulsivity in addition to eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Slof-Op't Landt, Margarita C T; Bartels, Meike; Middeldorp, Christel M; van Beijsterveldt, Catherina E M; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Furth, Eric F; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Genes are involved in eating disorders (EDs) and self-induced vomiting (SV), a key symptom of different types of EDs. Perfectionism and impulsivity are potential risk factors for EDs. TPH2 (tryptophan hydroxylase 2) SNP rs1473473 was previously associated with anorexia nervosa and EDs characterized by SV. Could perfectionism or impulsivity be underlying the association between rs1473473 and EDs? Genetic association between TPH2 SNP rs1473473 and perfectionism or impulsivity was first evaluated in a random control group (N = 512). The associations obtained in this control group were subsequently tested in a group of patients with an ED (N = 267). The minor allele of rs1473473 (OR = 1.49) was more frequent in impulsive controls, but also in impulsive patients with an ED (OR = 1.83). The largest effect was found in the patients with an ED characterized by SV (OR = 2.51, p = 0.02). Genetic variation at the TPH2 gene appeared to affect impulsivity which, in turn, might predispose to the SV phenotype.

  13. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-11-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution.

  14. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  15. Genetic deletion of the desmosomal component desmoplakin promotes tumor microinvasion in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chun, Matthew G H; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-09-16

    We used the RIP1-Tag2 (RT2) mouse model of islet cell carcinogenesis to profile the transcriptome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) that were either non-invasive or highly invasive, seeking to identify pro- and anti-invasive molecules. Expression of multiple components of desmosomes, structures that help maintain cellular adhesion, was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas. Genetic deletion of one of these desmosomal components, desmoplakin, resulted in increased local tumor invasion without affecting tumor growth parameters in RT2 PNETs. Expression of cadherin 1, a component of the adherens junction adhesion complex, was maintained in these tumors despite the genetic deletion of desmoplakin. Our results demonstrate that loss of desmoplakin expression and resultant disruption of desmosomal adhesion can promote increased local tumor invasion independent of adherens junction status.

  16. Estimates of (co)variance components and genetic parameters for growth traits in Sirohi goat.

    PubMed

    Gowane, Gopal R; Chopra, Ashish; Prakash, Ved; Arora, A L

    2011-01-01

    Data were collected over a period of 21 years (1988-2008) to estimate (co)variance components for birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WWT), 6-month weight (6WT), 9-month weight (9WT), 12-month weight (12WT), average daily gain from birth to weaning (ADG1), weaning to 6WT (ADG2), and from 6WT to 12WT (ADG3) in Sirohi goats maintained at the Central Sheep and Wool Research Institute, Avikanagar, Rajasthan, India. Analyses were carried out by restricted maximum likelihood, fitting six animal models with various combinations of direct and maternal effects. The best model was chosen after testing the improvement of the log-likelihood values. Heritability estimates for BWT, WWT, 6WT, 9WT, 12WT, ADG1, ADG2, and ADG3 were 0.39 ± 0.05, 0.09 ± 0.03, 0.06 ± 0.02, 0.09 ± 0.03, 0.11 ± 0.03, 0.10 ± 0.3, 0.04 ± 0.02, and 0.01 ± 0.01, respectively. For BWT and ADG1, only direct effects were significant. Estimate of maternal permanent environmental effect were important for body weights from weaning to 12WT and also for ADG2 and ADG3. However, direct maternal effects were not significant throughout. Estimate of c (2) were 0.06 ± 0.02, 0.03 ± 0.02, 0.06 ± 0.02, 0.05 ± 0.02, 0.02 ± 0.02, and 0.02 ± 0.02 for 3WT, 6WT, 9WT, 12WT, ADG2, and ADG3, respectively. The estimated repeatabilities across years of ewe effects on kid body weights were 0.10, 0.08, 0.05, 0.08, and 0.08 at birth, weaning, 6, 9, and 12 months of age, respectively. Results suggest possibility of modest rate of genetic progress for body weight traits and ADG1 through selection, whereas only slow progress will be possible for post-weaning gain. Genetic and phenotypic correlations between body weight traits were high and positive. High genetic correlation between 6WT and 9WT suggests that selection of animals at 6 months can be carried out instead of present practice of selection at 9 months.

  17. Variance components and genetic parameters for milk production and lactation pattern in an ethiopian multibreed dairy cattle population.

    PubMed

    Gebreyohannes, Gebregziabher; Koonawootrittriron, Skorn; Elzo, Mauricio A; Suwanasopee, Thanathip

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate variance components and genetic parameters for lactation milk yield (LY), lactation length (LL), average milk yield per day (YD), initial milk yield (IY), peak milk yield (PY), days to peak (DP) and parameters (ln(a) and c) of the modified incomplete gamma function (MIG) in an Ethiopian multibreed dairy cattle population. The dataset was composed of 5,507 lactation records collected from 1,639 cows in three locations (Bako, Debre Zeit and Holetta) in Ethiopia from 1977 to 2010. Parameters for MIG were obtained from regression analysis of monthly test-day milk data on days in milk. The cows were purebred (Bos indicus) Boran (B) and Horro (H) and their crosses with different fractions of Friesian (F), Jersey (J) and Simmental (S). There were 23 breed groups (B, H, and their crossbreds with F, J, and S) in the population. Fixed and mixed models were used to analyse the data. The fixed model considered herd-year-season, parity and breed group as fixed effects, and residual as random. The single and two-traits mixed animal repeatability models, considered the fixed effects of herd-year-season and parity subclasses, breed as a function of cow H, F, J, and S breed fractions and general heterosis as a function of heterozygosity, and the random additive animal, permanent environment, and residual effects. For the analysis of LY, LL was added as a fixed covariate to all models. Variance components and genetic parameters were estimated using average information restricted maximum likelihood procedures. The results indicated that all traits were affected (p<0.001) by the considered fixed effects. High grade B×F cows (3/16B 13/16F) had the highest least squares means (LSM) for LY (2,490±178.9 kg), IY (10.5±0.8 kg), PY (12.7±0.9 kg), YD (7.6±0.55 kg) and LL (361.4±31.2 d), while B cows had the lowest LSM values for these traits. The LSM of LY, IY, YD, and PY tended to increase from the first to the fifth parity. Single

  18. Genetic association of complement component 2 polymorphism with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chen, H-H; Tsai, L-J; Lee, K-R; Chen, Y-M; Hung, W-T; Chen, D-Y

    2015-08-01

    Complement component 2 (C2), an early member of the classical pathway, mainly participates in apoptotic cell clearance. We hypothesize that C2 polymorphism may confer genetic susceptibility to complement dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The major aim of our study was to investigate the clinical and serological associations of C2 variants in Chinese patients with SLE. The single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2844455, G/A SNP) located in the intron region of C2 gene was genotyped by direct sequencing in 95 SLE patients and 95 matched normal control subjects. The gene expression profiles were generated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription PCR. Our results showed that the AA genotype was observed more frequently in SLE patients than in normal control subjects (22.1% vs 9.5%, P < 0.05). The A allele was strongly associated with the occurrence of hair loss, photosensitivity and anti-cardiolipin antibodies; whereas, the G allele was associated with lower frequencies of these clinical presentations. Relative expression levels were significantly lower in patients with the AA genotype [median: 18.86, interquartile range (IQR) 11.36-22.43, P = 0.002] than in those with the GG genotype (35.76, IQR: 19.33-49.71). As expected, we confirmed the A allele as a risk factor for SLE development in a Chinese population, in contrast, the G allele might be a protective factor against the pathogenic autoantibody formation and cutaneous manifestations in SLE patients.

  19. Influence of silica matrix composition and functional component additives on the bioactivity and viability of encapsulated living cells

    DOE PAGES

    Savage, Travis J.; Dunphy, Darren R.; Harbaugh, Svetlana; ...

    2015-11-06

    The remarkable impact encapsulation matrix chemistry can have on the bioactivity and viability of integrated living cells is reported. Two silica chemistries (aqueous silicate and alkoxysilane), and a functional component additive (glycerol), are employed to generate three distinct silica matrices. These matrices are used to encapsulate living E. coli cells engineered with a synthetic riboswitch for cell-based biosensing. Following encapsulation, membrane integrity, reproductive capability, and riboswitch-based protein expression levels and rates are measured over a 5 week period. Striking differences in E. coli bioactivity, viability, and biosensing performance are observed for cells encapsulated within the different matrices. E. coli cellsmore » encapsulated for 35 days in aqueous silicate-based (AqS) matrices showed relatively low membrane integrity, but high reproductive capability in comparison to cells encapsulated in glycerol containing sodium silicate-based (AqS + g) and alkoxysilane-based (PGS) gels. Further, cells in sodium silicate-based matrices showed increasing fluorescence output over time, resulting in a 1.8-fold higher fluorescence level, and a faster expression rate, over cells free in solution. Furthermore, this unusual and unique combination of biological properties demonstrates that careful design of the encapsulation matrix chemistry can improve functionality of the biocomposite material, and result in new and unexpected physiological states.« less

  20. Influence of Silica Matrix Composition and Functional Component Additives on the Bioactivity and Viability of Encapsulated Living Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Savage, Travis J.; Dunphy, Darren R.; Harbaugh, Svetlana; ...

    2015-11-06

    We report the remarkable impact encapsulation matrix chemistry can have on the bioactivity and viability of integrated living cells. Two silica chemistries (aqueous silicate and alkoxysilane), and a functional component additive (glycerol), are employed to generate three distinct silica matrices. Moreover, these matrices are used to encapsulate living E. coli cells engineered with a synthetic riboswitch for cell-based biosensing. Following encapsulation, membrane integrity, reproductive capability, and riboswitch-based protein expression levels and rates are measured over a 5 week period. Striking differences in E. coli bioactivity, viability, and biosensing performance are observed for cells encapsulated within the different matrices. E. colimore » cells encapsulated for 35 days in aqueous silicate-based (AqS) matrices showed relatively low membrane integrity, but high reproductive capability in comparison to cells encapsulated in glycerol containing sodium silicate-based (AqS + g) and alkoxysilane-based (PGS) gels. Further, cells in sodium silicate-based matrices showed increasing fluorescence output over time, resulting in a 1.8-fold higher fluorescence level, and a faster expression rate, over cells free in solution. Finally, this unusual and unique combination of biological properties demonstrates that careful design of the encapsulation matrix chemistry can improve functionality of the biocomposite material, and result in new and unexpected physiological states.« less

  1. Influence of Silica Matrix Composition and Functional Component Additives on the Bioactivity and Viability of Encapsulated Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Travis J.; Dunphy, Darren R.; Harbaugh, Svetlana; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Harper, Jason C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2015-11-06

    We report the remarkable impact encapsulation matrix chemistry can have on the bioactivity and viability of integrated living cells. Two silica chemistries (aqueous silicate and alkoxysilane), and a functional component additive (glycerol), are employed to generate three distinct silica matrices. Moreover, these matrices are used to encapsulate living E. coli cells engineered with a synthetic riboswitch for cell-based biosensing. Following encapsulation, membrane integrity, reproductive capability, and riboswitch-based protein expression levels and rates are measured over a 5 week period. Striking differences in E. coli bioactivity, viability, and biosensing performance are observed for cells encapsulated within the different matrices. E. coli cells encapsulated for 35 days in aqueous silicate-based (AqS) matrices showed relatively low membrane integrity, but high reproductive capability in comparison to cells encapsulated in glycerol containing sodium silicate-based (AqS + g) and alkoxysilane-based (PGS) gels. Further, cells in sodium silicate-based matrices showed increasing fluorescence output over time, resulting in a 1.8-fold higher fluorescence level, and a faster expression rate, over cells free in solution. Finally, this unusual and unique combination of biological properties demonstrates that careful design of the encapsulation matrix chemistry can improve functionality of the biocomposite material, and result in new and unexpected physiological states.

  2. Influence of silica matrix composition and functional component additives on the bioactivity and viability of encapsulated living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Travis J.; Dunphy, Darren R.; Harbaugh, Svetlana; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Harper, Jason C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2015-11-06

    The remarkable impact encapsulation matrix chemistry can have on the bioactivity and viability of integrated living cells is reported. Two silica chemistries (aqueous silicate and alkoxysilane), and a functional component additive (glycerol), are employed to generate three distinct silica matrices. These matrices are used to encapsulate living E. coli cells engineered with a synthetic riboswitch for cell-based biosensing. Following encapsulation, membrane integrity, reproductive capability, and riboswitch-based protein expression levels and rates are measured over a 5 week period. Striking differences in E. coli bioactivity, viability, and biosensing performance are observed for cells encapsulated within the different matrices. E. coli cells encapsulated for 35 days in aqueous silicate-based (AqS) matrices showed relatively low membrane integrity, but high reproductive capability in comparison to cells encapsulated in glycerol containing sodium silicate-based (AqS + g) and alkoxysilane-based (PGS) gels. Further, cells in sodium silicate-based matrices showed increasing fluorescence output over time, resulting in a 1.8-fold higher fluorescence level, and a faster expression rate, over cells free in solution. Furthermore, this unusual and unique combination of biological properties demonstrates that careful design of the encapsulation matrix chemistry can improve functionality of the biocomposite material, and result in new and unexpected physiological states.

  3. Quantifying multivariate plasticity: genetic variation in resource acquisition drives plasticity in resource allocation to components of life history.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew R; Beckerman, Andrew P

    2013-03-01

    Acquisition and allocation of resources are central to life-history theory. However, empirical work typically focuses only on allocation despite the fact that relationships between fitness components may be governed by differences in the ability of individuals to acquire resources across environments. Here, we outline a statistical framework to partition the genetic basis of multivariate plasticity into independent axes of genetic variation, and quantify for the first time, the extent to which specific traits drive multitrait genotype-environment interactions. Our framework generalises to analyses of plasticity, growth and ageing. We apply this approach to a unique, large-scale, multivariate study of acquisition, allocation and plasticity in the life history of the cricket, Gryllus firmus. We demonstrate that resource acquisition and allocation are genetically correlated, and that plasticity in trade-offs between allocation to components of fitness is 90% dependent on genetic variance for total resource acquisition. These results suggest that genotype-environment effects for resource acquisition can maintain variation in life-history components that are typically observed in the wild.

  4. Additional studies of sheep haemopexin: genetic control, frequencies and postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Stratil, A; Bobák, P; Margetín, M; Glasnák, V

    1989-01-01

    This study presents evidence that sheep haemopexin phenotypes are genetically controlled by three alleles, HpxA, HpxB1 and HpxB2, of a single autosomal locus. Frequencies of two alleles, HpxA and HpxB (HpxB encompasses two isoalleles, HpxB1 and HpxB2), were studied in eight sheep breeds in Czechoslovakia. The frequency of the HpxA allele was highest (ranging from 0.81 in Merino to 1.0 in East Friesian sheep). Qualitative and quantitative changes in haemopexin during postnatal development were studied by starch gel electrophoresis and rocket immunoelectrophoresis respectively. In electrophoresis, 1- or 2-day-old lambs had two very weak zones corresponding in mobility to two slower zones of adult animals. Later, the third more anodic zone appeared and gradually increased in intensity. In 1-month-old lambs the patterns were practically identical with those of adult animals. Using rocket immunoelectrophoresis, the level of haemopexin shortly after birth was practically zero. It rose sharply till the sixth day of life; then the level continued to rise slowly till about 1 month of age. The mean haemopexin level in adult sheep was 64.5 +/- 18.26 (SD) mg/100ml serum, ranging from 30.5 to 116.5 mg/100ml.

  5. [Genetic components and the uncertainty of the phenotypic realization of the mass of newborns in domestic pigs Sus scrofa L].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, S V; Kniazev, S P; Ermolaev, V I

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the features of the genetic determination of a continuous quantitative trait, the mass of newborn offspring in populations of the domestic pig. We defined several components that determine the phenotypic trait, such as the maternal effect, complete dominance, interaction of the parental alleles in the genotype of the offspring, and the uncertainty of phenotypic realization of genotype. We found that a phenotypic trait of high genetic determinacy can also have a maximum range in phenotypic realization, in which case each genotype encountered in the population can realize within the entire range of possible phenotypes.

  6. Genetic Model Fitting in IQ, Assortative Mating & Components of IQ Variance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capron, Christiane; Vetta, Adrian R.; Vetta, Atam

    1998-01-01

    The biometrical school of scientists who fit models to IQ data traces their intellectual ancestry to R. Fisher (1918), but their genetic models have no predictive value. Fisher himself was critical of the concept of heritability, because assortative mating, such as for IQ, introduces complexities into the study of a genetic trait. (SLD)

  7. Assessing Attitudes about Genetic Testing as a Component of Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrazek, Michael; Koenig, Barbara; Skime, Michelle; Snyder, Karen; Hook, Christopher; Black, John, III; Mrazek, David

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the attitudes among mental health professionals regarding the use of genetic testing. Methods: Psychiatrists and other mental health professionals (N = 41) who were enrolled in a week-long course in psychiatric genomics completed questionnaires before and after the course designed to assess how diagnostic genetic tests…

  8. Bayesian inference of genetic parameters and selection response for litter size components in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, A; Sorensen, D; Bidanel, J P

    1998-01-01

    Three contemporary lines were formed from the progeny of 50 French Large White sows. In the first line, gilts were selected for ovulation rate at puberty. In the second line, they were selected for prenatal survival of the first two parities, corrected for ovulation rate. The control constituted the third line. Ovulation rate at puberty was analyzed using an animal model with a batch effect. Prenatal survival was analyzed with a repeatability animal model that included batch and parity effects. Flat priors were used to represent vague previous knowledge about parity and batch effects. Additive and residual effects were represented assuming that they were a priori normally distributed. Variance components were assumed to follow either uniform or inverted chi-square distributions, a priori. The use of different priors did not affect the results substantially. Heritabilities for ovulation rate ranged from 0.32 to 0.39, and from 0.11 to 0.16 for prenatal survival, depending on the prior used. The mean of the marginal posterior distribution of response to four generations of selection ranged from 0.38 to 0.40 ova per generation, and from 1.1 to 1.3% of the mean survival rate for average survival per generation. PMID:9584104

  9. Differences in genetic variation in antigen-processing machinery components and association with cervical carcinoma risk in two Indonesian populations.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Akash M; Spaans, Vivian M; Mahendra, Nyoman Bayu; Osse, Elisabeth M; Vet, Jessica N I; Purwoto, Gatot; Surya, I G D; Cornian, Santoso; Peters, Alexander A; Fleuren, Gert J; Jordanova, Ekaterina S

    2015-06-01

    Genetic variation of antigen-processing machinery (APM) components has been shown to be associated with cervical carcinoma risk and outcome in a genetically homogeneous Dutch population. However, the role of APM component single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genetically heterogeneous populations with different distributions of human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes remains unclear. Eleven non-synonymous, coding SNPs in the TAP1, TAP2, LMP2, LMP7 and ERAP1 genes were genotyped in cervical carcinoma patients and healthy controls from two distinct Indonesian populations (Balinese and Javanese). Individual genotype and allele distributions were investigated using single-marker analysis, and combined SNP effects were assessed by haplotype construction and haplotype interaction analysis. Allele distribution patterns in Bali and Java differed in relation to cervical carcinoma risk, with four ERAP1 SNPs and one TAP2 SNP in the Javanese population showing significant association with cervical carcinoma risk, while in the Balinese population, only one TAP2 SNP showed this association. Multimarker analysis demonstrated that in the Javanese patients, one specific haplotype, consisting of the ERAP1-575 locus on chromosome 5 and the TAP2-379 and TAP2-651 loci on chromosome 6, was significantly associated with cervical carcinoma risk (global P = 0.008); no significant haplotype associations were found in the Balinese population. These data indicate not only that genetic variation in APM component genes is associated with cervical carcinoma risk in Indonesia but also that the patterns of association differ depending on background genetic composition and possibly on differences in HPV type distribution.

  10. Genetic evidence for an additional function of phage T4 gene 32 protein: interaction with ligase.

    PubMed

    Mosig, G; Breschkin, A M

    1975-04-01

    Gene 32 of bacteriophage T4 is essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In an attempt to clarify the role of the corresponding gene product, we have looked for mutations that specifically inactivate one but not all of its functions and for compensating suppressor mutations in other genes. Here we describe a gene 32 ts mutant that does not produce progeny, but in contrast to an am mutant investigated by others, is capable of some primary and secondary DNA replication and of forming "joint" recombinational intermediates after infection of Escherichia coli B at the restrictive temperature. However, parental and progeny DNA strands are not ligated to covalently linked "recombinant" molecules, and single strands of vegetative DNA do not exceed unit length. Progeny production as well as capacity for covalent linkage in this gene 32 ts mutant are partially restored by additional rII mutations. Suppression by rII depends on functioning host ligase [EC 6.5.1.2; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming, NMN-forming)]. This gene 32 ts mutation (unlike some others) in turn suppresses the characteristic plaque morphology of rII mutants. We conclude that gene 32 protein, in addition to its role in DNA replication and in the formation of "joint" recombinational intermediates, interacts with T4 ligase [EC 6.5.1.1; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming)] when recombining DNA strands are covalently linked. The protein of the mutant that we describe here is mainly defective in this interaction, thus inactivating T4 ligase in recombination. Suppressing rII mutations facilitate substitution of host ligase. There is suggestive evidence that these interactions occur at the membrane.

  11. The synthetic genetic network around PKC1 identifies novel modulators and components of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sue A; Xu, Hong; Gray, Joseph V

    2008-11-01

    Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains one protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme encoded by the essential gene PKC1. Pkc1 is activated by the small GTPase Rho1 and plays a central role in the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway acts primarily to remodel the cell surface throughout the normal life cycle and upon various environmental stresses. The pathway is heavily branched, with multiple nonessential branches feeding into and out of the central essential Rho1-Pkc1 module. In an attempt to identify novel components and modifiers of CWI signaling, we determined the synthetic lethal genetic network around PKC1 by using dominant-negative synthetic genetic array analysis. The resulting mutants are hypersensitive to lowered Pkc1 activity. The corresponding 21 nonessential genes are closely related to CWI function: 14 behave in a chemical-genetic epistasis test as acting in the pathway, and 6 of these genes encode known components. Twelve of the 21 null mutants display elevated CWI reporter activity, consistent with the idea that the pathway is activated by and compensates for loss of the gene products. Four of the 21 mutants display low CWI reporter activity, consistent with the idea that the pathway is compromised in these mutants. One of the latter group of mutants lacks Ack1(Ydl203c), an uncharacterized SEL-1 domain-containing protein that we find modulates pathway activity. Epistasis analysis places Ack1 upstream of Pkc1 in the CWI pathway and dependent on the upstream Rho1 GTP exchange factors Rom2 and Tus1. Overall, the synthetic genetic network around PKC1 directly and efficiently identifies known and novel components of PKC signaling in yeast.

  12. Phenotypic and genetic dissection of component traits for early vigour in rice using plant growth modelling, sugar content analyses and association mapping

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, M. C.; Dingkuhn, M.; Courtois, B.; Gibon, Y.; Clément-Vidal, A.; Cruz, D. F.; Duitama, J.; Lorieux, M.; Luquet, D.

    2015-01-01

    Early vigour of rice, defined as seedling capacity to accumulate shoot dry weight (SDW) rapidly, is a complex trait. It depends on a genotype propensity to assimilate, store, and/or use non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) for producing large and/or numerous leaves, involving physiological trade-offs in the expression of component traits and, possibly, physiological and genetic linkages. This study explores a plant-model-assisted phenotyping approach to dissect the genetic architecture of rice early vigour, applying the Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) to morphological and NSC measurements, as well as fitted parameters for the functional–structural plant model, Ecomeristem. Leaf size, number, SDW, and source-leaf NSC concentration were measured on a panel of 123 japonica accessions. The data were used to estimate Ecomeristem genotypic parameters driving organ appearance rate, size, and carbon dynamics. GWAS was performed based on 12 221 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Twenty-three associations were detected at P <1×10–4 and 64 at P <5×10–4. Associations for NSC and model parameters revealed new regions related to early vigour that had greater significance than morphological traits, providing additional information on the genetic control of early vigour. Plant model parameters were used to characterize physiological and genetic trade-offs among component traits. Twelve associations were related to loci for cloned genes, with nine related to organogenesis, plant height, cell size or cell number. The potential use of these associations as markers for breeding is discussed. PMID:26022255

  13. Implementation of the Realized Genomic Relationship Matrix to Open-Pollinated White Spruce Family Testing for Disentangling Additive from Nonadditive Genetic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gamal El-Dien, Omnia; Ratcliffe, Blaise; Klápště, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Charles; El-Kassaby, Yousry A.

    2016-01-01

    The open-pollinated (OP) family testing combines the simplest known progeny evaluation and quantitative genetics analyses as candidates’ offspring are assumed to represent independent half-sib families. The accuracy of genetic parameter estimates is often questioned as the assumption of “half-sibling” in OP families may often be violated. We compared the pedigree- vs. marker-based genetic models by analysing 22-yr height and 30-yr wood density for 214 white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] OP families represented by 1694 individuals growing on one site in Quebec, Canada. Assuming half-sibling, the pedigree-based model was limited to estimating the additive genetic variances which, in turn, were grossly overestimated as they were confounded by very minor dominance and major additive-by-additive epistatic genetic variances. In contrast, the implemented genomic pairwise realized relationship models allowed the disentanglement of additive from all nonadditive factors through genetic variance decomposition. The marker-based models produced more realistic narrow-sense heritability estimates and, for the first time, allowed estimating the dominance and epistatic genetic variances from OP testing. In addition, the genomic models showed better prediction accuracies compared to pedigree models and were able to predict individual breeding values for new individuals from untested families, which was not possible using the pedigree-based model. Clearly, the use of marker-based relationship approach is effective in estimating the quantitative genetic parameters of complex traits even under simple and shallow pedigree structure. PMID:26801647

  14. Implementation of the Realized Genomic Relationship Matrix to Open-Pollinated White Spruce Family Testing for Disentangling Additive from Nonadditive Genetic Effects.

    PubMed

    Gamal El-Dien, Omnia; Ratcliffe, Blaise; Klápště, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Charles; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2016-01-22

    The open-pollinated (OP) family testing combines the simplest known progeny evaluation and quantitative genetics analyses as candidates' offspring are assumed to represent independent half-sib families. The accuracy of genetic parameter estimates is often questioned as the assumption of "half-sibling" in OP families may often be violated. We compared the pedigree- vs. marker-based genetic models by analysing 22-yr height and 30-yr wood density for 214 white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] OP families represented by 1694 individuals growing on one site in Quebec, Canada. Assuming half-sibling, the pedigree-based model was limited to estimating the additive genetic variances which, in turn, were grossly overestimated as they were confounded by very minor dominance and major additive-by-additive epistatic genetic variances. In contrast, the implemented genomic pairwise realized relationship models allowed the disentanglement of additive from all nonadditive factors through genetic variance decomposition. The marker-based models produced more realistic narrow-sense heritability estimates and, for the first time, allowed estimating the dominance and epistatic genetic variances from OP testing. In addition, the genomic models showed better prediction accuracies compared to pedigree models and were able to predict individual breeding values for new individuals from untested families, which was not possible using the pedigree-based model. Clearly, the use of marker-based relationship approach is effective in estimating the quantitative genetic parameters of complex traits even under simple and shallow pedigree structure.

  15. Genetic and Environmental Components of Adolescent Adjustment and Parental Behavior: A Multivariate Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, John C.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Reiss, David

    2005-01-01

    Adolescent adjustment measures may be related to each other and to the social environment in various ways. Are these relationships similar in genetic and environmental sources of covariation, or different? A multivariate behaviorgenetic analysis was made of 6 adjustment and 3 treatment composites from the study Nonshared Environment in Adolescent…

  16. (Co)variance components, genetic parameters and annual trends for calf weights in a Brahman herd kept on floodable savanna.

    PubMed

    Plasse, Dieter; Verde, Omar; Arango, Jesús; Camaripano, Luis; Fossi, Hugo; Romero, Rafael; Rodriguez, Carlos M; Rumbos, José L

    2002-12-31

    (Co)variance components and genetic parameters were estimated for body weights of an elite Brahman herd under a designed, supervised management and genetic program, including strategic artificial insemination (AI). Restricted maximum likelihood methods were used with a univariate animal model for birth weight (BW) and a bivariate model for weaning weight (205-day weight, 205W) and 18-month weight (548-day weight, 548W). Models included random animal direct and maternal genetic effects, maternal permanent environmental effect (c2), and sex-year-month of birth-age of dam and genetic group (identified and unidentified paternity), as fixed effects. Analysis A1 included all calves and analysis A2 included only those with identified sires. Of the 8,066 calves born, 36% were progeny of AI, 11% from single sire and 53% from multi-sire herds. They were born from 1985 to 1998, from 2559 dams and 146 sires (78 identified). Estimates of direct, maternal and total heritabilities from A1 for BW, 205W and 548W were: 0.23, 0.07 and 0.30; 0.08, 0.14 and 0.16; 0.16, 0.04 and 0.28, respectively. Corresponding estimates of direct maternal genetic correlations were 0.22, 0.07 and 0.86, and c2 estimates were 0.04, 0.14 and 0.04, respectively. Estimates of direct and maternal genetic, and permanent environmental correlations between 205W and 548W were: 0.66, 0.70 and 1.00. Variances and genetic parameters from A1 and A2 were, in general, very similar. Estimates of phenotypic, and direct and maternal genetic trends per year from A1 were: 0.393, 0.004 and 0.003 kg (BW), 3.367, 0.142 and 0.115 kg (205W), 1.813, 0.263 and 0.095 kg (548W). Estimates of direct and maternal genetic trends from A2 were: 0.033 and -0.002 kg (BW); 0.186 and 0.276 kg (205W); 0.471 and 0.136 kg (548W). The modern selection methods that have been used recently should be continued, with emphasis on the improvement of cow efficiency for sustainable beef production on floodable savanna combined with improved pasture.

  17. Evaluation of genetic components in traits related to superovulation, in vitro fertilization, and embryo transfer in Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Parker Gaddis, K L; Dikmen, S; Null, D J; Cole, J B; Hansen, P J

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate variance components and identify regions of the genome associated with traits related to embryo transfer in Holsteins. Reproductive technologies are used in the dairy industry to increase the reproductive rate of superior females. A drawback of these methods remains the variability of animal responses to the procedures. If some variability can be explained genetically, selection can be used to improve animal response. Data collected from a Holstein dairy farm in Florida from 2008 to 2015 included 926 superovulation records (number of structures recovered and number of good embryos), 628 in vitro fertilization records (number of oocytes collected, number of cleaved embryos, number of high- and low-quality embryos, and number of transferrable embryos), and 12,089 embryo transfer records (pregnancy success). Two methods of transformation (logarithmic and Anscombe) were applied to count variables and results were compared. Univariate animal models were fitted for each trait with the exception of pregnancy success after embryo transfer. Due to the binary nature of the latter trait, a threshold liability model was fitted that accounted for the genetic effect of both the recipient and the embryo. Both transformation methods produced similar results. Single-step genomic BLUP analyses were performed and SNP effects estimated for traits with a significant genetic component. Heritability of number of structures recovered and number of good embryos when log-transformed were 0.27 ± 0.08 and 0.15 ± 0.07, respectively. Heritability estimates from the in vitro fertilization data ranged from 0.01 ± 0.08 to 0.21 ± 0.15, but were not significantly different from zero. Recipient and embryo heritability (standard deviation) of pregnancy success after embryo transfer was 0.03 (0.01) and 0.02 (0.01), respectively. The 10-SNP window explaining the largest proportion of variance (0.37%) for total structures collected was located on

  18. Evolution of the additive genetic variance–covariance matrix under continuous directional selection on a complex behavioural phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Careau, Vincent; Wolak, Matthew E.; Carter, Patrick A.; Garland, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Given the pace at which human-induced environmental changes occur, a pressing challenge is to determine the speed with which selection can drive evolutionary change. A key determinant of adaptive response to multivariate phenotypic selection is the additive genetic variance–covariance matrix (G). Yet knowledge of G in a population experiencing new or altered selection is not sufficient to predict selection response because G itself evolves in ways that are poorly understood. We experimentally evaluated changes in G when closely related behavioural traits experience continuous directional selection. We applied the genetic covariance tensor approach to a large dataset (n = 17 328 individuals) from a replicated, 31-generation artificial selection experiment that bred mice for voluntary wheel running on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test. Selection on this subset of G induced proportional changes across the matrix for all 6 days of running behaviour within the first four generations. The changes in G induced by selection resulted in a fourfold slower-than-predicted rate of response to selection. Thus, selection exacerbated constraints within G and limited future adaptive response, a phenomenon that could have profound consequences for populations facing rapid environmental change. PMID:26582016

  19. Selection for increased desiccation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: Additive genetic control and correlated responses for other stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, A.A.; Parsons, P.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Previously we found that Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for increased desiccation resistance have lowered metabolic rate and behavioral activity levels, and show correlated responses for resistance to starvation and a toxic ethanol level. These results were consistent with a prediction that increased resistance to many environmental stresses may be genetically correlated because of a reduction in metabolic energy expenditure. Here we present experiments on the genetic basis of the selection response and extend the study of correlated responses to other stresses. The response to selection was not sex-specific and involved X-linked and autosomal genes acting additively. Activity differences contributed little to differences in desiccation resistance between selected and control lines. Selected lines had lower metabolic rates than controls in darkness when activity was inhibited. Adults from selected lines showed increased resistance to a heat shock, {sup 60}Co-gamma-radiation, and acute ethanol and acetic acid stress. The desiccation, ethanol and starvation resistance of isofemale lines set up from the F2s of a cross between one of the selected and one of the control lines were correlated. Selected and control lines did not differ in ether-extractable lipid content or in resistance to acetone, ether or a cold shock.

  20. Evolution of the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix under continuous directional selection on a complex behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Wolak, Matthew E; Carter, Patrick A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-11-22

    Given the pace at which human-induced environmental changes occur, a pressing challenge is to determine the speed with which selection can drive evolutionary change. A key determinant of adaptive response to multivariate phenotypic selection is the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix ( G: ). Yet knowledge of G: in a population experiencing new or altered selection is not sufficient to predict selection response because G: itself evolves in ways that are poorly understood. We experimentally evaluated changes in G: when closely related behavioural traits experience continuous directional selection. We applied the genetic covariance tensor approach to a large dataset (n = 17 328 individuals) from a replicated, 31-generation artificial selection experiment that bred mice for voluntary wheel running on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test. Selection on this subset of G: induced proportional changes across the matrix for all 6 days of running behaviour within the first four generations. The changes in G: induced by selection resulted in a fourfold slower-than-predicted rate of response to selection. Thus, selection exacerbated constraints within G: and limited future adaptive response, a phenomenon that could have profound consequences for populations facing rapid environmental change.

  1. [The impact of components of conventional and genetically modified soybeans on parameters of the immune and reproductive systems in female rats].

    PubMed

    Dolaĭchuk, O P; Fedoruk, R S; Koval'chuk, I I

    2013-01-01

    The article presents results of research of the content of glycoproteins and their specific carbohydrate components, total protein, hemoglobin, erythrocyte, leucocytes molecules of average mass and circulating immune complexes in the blood of female rats under conditions feeding of conventional and transgenic soybeans. Also the reproductive function and mass coefficient of fetus of the studied animals was analyzed. The studies were conducted in three groups of female rats aged 3 months. Animals of I group (control) were kept on a balanced diet during the study period. Animals of groups II and III (research) received a diet according to the scheme of the control group with the addition of 30% from the nutritional value diet native or transgenic soybean, respectively. We found that soy feeding had no significant effect on hematological data in the second and third experimental groups versus control. However, addition to the diet of soybeans, including genetically modified, has a significant impact on the content of glycoproteins and their specific carbohydrate components, female's fertility and less pronounced impact on the data of functional status of their immune system. A generalized analysis of the results of research leads to the conclusion that there is no definite negative or positive impact of GM soy components on their physiological state compared with animals fed native soybeans.

  2. Insomnia, sleep quality, pain, and somatic symptoms: sex differences and shared genetic components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Siu-Ping; Li, S X; Tang, N L; Yu, M W M; Li, A M; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the sex differences, and the shared genetic and environmental factors underlying the associations of sleep disturbances (insomnia and sleep quality) with pain and somatic symptoms in both adolescents and middle-aged adults. We recruited 259 adolescents (69 with current insomnia) and their parents (256 middle-aged adults, 78 with current insomnia). Insomnia severity and sleep quality were measured by the Insomnia Severity Inventory (ISI) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), respectively. Pain and somatic symptoms were measured by the Somatic Symptom Inventory and Visual Analogue Scale for overall pain. Subjects with insomnia scored higher on all measures of pain and somatic symptoms than non-insomnia patients, in both adolescents and adults (P<.001). Both pain and somatic measures were associated with ISI and PSQI scores after controlling for age, sex, depressive and anxiety symptoms. There was an interaction effect between insomnia and female sex on pain and somatic symptoms (P<.05), especially in adults. Pain and somatic symptoms ran in family with moderate heritability (range h(2)=0.15-0.42). The phenotypic associations of ISI and PSQI with pain and somatic measures were both contributed by genetic (range p(G)=0.41-0.96) and environmental (range p(E)=0.27-0.40) factors with a major genetic contribution. In summary, insomnia and poor sleep quality are closely associated with pain and somatic symptoms. Insomnia seems to modulate the sex differences in pain and somatic symptoms, especially in the adult population. A shared genetic predisposition might underlie the associations of insomnia and sleep quality with pain and somatic symptoms.

  3. Additive-dominance genetic model analyses for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in a bread wheat factorial crossing population.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Ibrahim, Amir M H

    2015-12-01

    Elevated level of late maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) can result in low falling number scores, reduced grain quality, and downgrade of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) class. A mating population was developed by crossing parents with different levels of LMAA. The F2 and F3 hybrids and their parents were evaluated for LMAA, and data were analyzed using the R software package 'qgtools' integrated with an additive-dominance genetic model and a mixed linear model approach. Simulated results showed high testing powers for additive and additive × environment variances, and comparatively low powers for dominance and dominance × environment variances. All variance components and their proportions to the phenotypic variance for the parents and hybrids were significant except for the dominance × environment variance. The estimated narrow-sense heritability and broad-sense heritability for LMAA were 14 and 54%, respectively. High significant negative additive effects for parents suggest that spring wheat cultivars 'Lancer' and 'Chester' can serve as good general combiners, and that 'Kinsman' and 'Seri-82' had negative specific combining ability in some hybrids despite of their own significant positive additive effects, suggesting they can be used as parents to reduce LMAA levels. Seri-82 showed very good general combining ability effect when used as a male parent, indicating the importance of reciprocal effects. High significant negative dominance effects and high-parent heterosis for hybrids demonstrated that the specific hybrid combinations; Chester × Kinsman, 'Lerma52' × Lancer, Lerma52 × 'LoSprout' and 'Janz' × Seri-82 could be generated to produce cultivars with significantly reduced LMAA level.

  4. Molecular basis of inherited antithrombin deficiency in Portuguese families: identification of genetic alterations and screening for additional thrombotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    David, Dezsö; Ribeiro, Sofia; Ferrão, Lénia; Gago, Teresa; Crespo, Francisco

    2004-06-01

    Antithrombin (AT), the most important coagulation serine proteases inhibitor, plays an important role in maintaining the hemostatic balance. Inherited AT deficiency, mainly characterized by predisposition to recurrent venous thromboembolism, is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this study, we analyzed the underlying genetic alterations in 12 unrelated Portuguese thrombophilic families with AT deficiency. At the same time, the modulating effect of the FV Leiden mutation, PT 20210A, PAI-1 4G, and MTHFR 677T allelic variants, on the thrombotic risk of AT deficient patients was also evaluated. Three novel frameshift alterations, a 4-bp deletion in exon 4 and two 1-bp insertions in exon 6, were identified in six unrelated type I AT deficient families. A novel missense mutation in exon 3a, which changes the highly conserved F147 residue, and a novel splice site mutation in the invariant acceptor AG dinucleotide of intron 2 were also identified in unrelated type I AT deficient families. In addition to these, two previously reported missense mutations changing the AT reactive site bond (R393-S394) and leading to type II-RS deficiency, and a previously reported cryptic splice site mutation (IVS4-14G-->A), were also identified. In these families, increased thrombotic risk associated with co-inheritance of the FV Leiden mutation and of the PAI-1 4G variant was also observed. In conclusion, we present the first data regarding the underlying genetic alterations in Portuguese thrombophilic families with AT deficiency, and confirm that the FV Leiden mutation and probably the PAI-1 4G variant represent additional thrombotic risk factors in these families.

  5. A Hybrid Color Space for Skin Detection Using Genetic Algorithm Heuristic Search and Principal Component Analysis Technique

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Color is one of the most prominent features of an image and used in many skin and face detection applications. Color space transformation is widely used by researchers to improve face and skin detection performance. Despite the substantial research efforts in this area, choosing a proper color space in terms of skin and face classification performance which can address issues like illumination variations, various camera characteristics and diversity in skin color tones has remained an open issue. This research proposes a new three-dimensional hybrid color space termed SKN by employing the Genetic Algorithm heuristic and Principal Component Analysis to find the optimal representation of human skin color in over seventeen existing color spaces. Genetic Algorithm heuristic is used to find the optimal color component combination setup in terms of skin detection accuracy while the Principal Component Analysis projects the optimal Genetic Algorithm solution to a less complex dimension. Pixel wise skin detection was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed color space. We have employed four classifiers including Random Forest, Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine and Multilayer Perceptron in order to generate the human skin color predictive model. The proposed color space was compared to some existing color spaces and shows superior results in terms of pixel-wise skin detection accuracy. Experimental results show that by using Random Forest classifier, the proposed SKN color space obtained an average F-score and True Positive Rate of 0.953 and False Positive Rate of 0.0482 which outperformed the existing color spaces in terms of pixel wise skin detection accuracy. The results also indicate that among the classifiers used in this study, Random Forest is the most suitable classifier for pixel wise skin detection applications. PMID:26267377

  6. One component metal sintering additive for {beta}-SiC based on thermodynamic calculation and experimental observations

    SciTech Connect

    Noviyanto, Alfian; Yoon, Dang-Hyok

    2011-08-15

    Graphical abstract: . Standard Gibbs formation free energies vs. temperature for various metal carbides. The heavy line represents the standard Gibbs free energy for {beta}-SiC. The hatched area denotes the typical liquid phase hot pressing temperature of {beta}-SiC (1973-2123 K). Highlights: {yields} Various metal elements were examined as a sintering additive for {beta}-SiC. {yields} Al and Mg enhanced the density significantly without decomposing {beta}-SiC, as predicted by thermodynamic simulation. {yields} Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W additives formed metal carbide and/or silicide compounds by decomposing {beta}-SiC. {yields} This approach would be useful for selecting effective sintering additive for high temperature ceramics. -- Abstract: Various types of metals were examined as sintering additives for {beta}-SiC by considering the standard Gibbs formation free energy and vapor pressure under hot pressing conditions (1973-2123 K), particularly for applications in nuclear reactors. Metallic elements having the low long-term activation under neutron irradiation condition, such as Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W, as well as widely used elements, Al, Mg and B, were considered. The conclusions drawn from thermodynamic considerations were compared with the experimental observations. Al and Mg were found to be effective sintering additives, whereas the others were not due to the formation of metal carbides or silicides from the decomposition of SiC under hot pressing conditions.

  7. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-08-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2], and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history.

  8. Exploiting Genetic Variation of Fiber Components and Morphology in Juvenile Loblolly Pine

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hou-Min; Kadia, John F.; Li, Bailian; Sederoff, Ron

    2005-06-30

    In order to ensure the global competitiveness of the Pulp and Paper Industry in the Southeastern U.S., more wood with targeted characteristics have to be produced more efficiently on less land. The objective of the research project is to provide a molecular genetic basis for tree breeding of desirable traits in juvenile loblolly pine, using a multidisciplinary research approach. We developed micro analytical methods for determine the cellulose and lignin content, average fiber length, and coarseness of a single ring in a 12 mm increment core. These methods allow rapid determination of these traits in micro scale. Genetic variation and genotype by environment interaction (GxE) were studied in several juvenile wood traits of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Over 1000 wood samples of 12 mm increment cores were collected from 14 full-sib families generated by a 6-parent half-diallel mating design (11-year-old) in four progeny tests. Juvenile (ring 3) and transition (ring 8) for each increment core were analyzed for cellulose and lignin content, average fiber length, and coarseness. Transition wood had higher cellulose content, longer fiber and higher coarseness, but lower lignin than juvenile wood. General combining ability variance for the traits in juvenile wood explained 3 to 10% of the total variance, whereas the specific combining ability variance was negligible or zero. There were noticeable full-sib family rank changes between sites for all the traits. This was reflected in very high specific combining ability by site interaction variances, which explained from 5% (fiber length) to 37% (lignin) of the total variance. Weak individual-tree heritabilities were found for cellulose, lignin content and fiber length at the juvenile and transition wood, except for lignin at the transition wood (0.23). Coarseness had moderately high individual-tree heritabilities at both the juvenile (0.39) and transition wood (0.30). Favorable genetic correlations of volume and stem

  9. Affinity and Specificity of Protein U1A-RNA Complex Formation Based on an Additive Component Free Energy Model

    PubMed Central

    Kormos, Bethany L.; Benitex, Yulia; Baranger, Anne M.; Beveridge, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary A MM-GBSA computational protocol was used successfully to account for wild type U1A-RNA and F56 U1A mutant experimental binding free energies. The trend in mutant binding free energies compared to wild type is well-reproduced. Following application of a linear-response-like equation to scale the various energy components, the binding free energies agree quantitatively with observed experimental values. Conformational adaptation contributes to the binding free energy for both the protein and the RNA in these systems. Small differences in ΔGs are the result of different and sometimes quite large relative contributions from various energetic components. Residual free energy decomposition indicates differences not only at the site of mutation, but throughout the entire protein. MM-GBSA and ab initio calculations performed on model systems suggest that stacking interactions may nearly, but not completely, account for observed differences in mutant binding affinities. This study indicates that there may be different underlying causes of ostensibly similar experimentally observed binding affinities of different mutants, and thus recommends caution in the interpretation of binding affinities and specificities purely by inspection. PMID:17603075

  10. Prevention of fatigue cracks in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene joint components by the addition of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Tomita, N; Kitakura, T; Onmori, N; Ikada, Y; Aoyama, E

    1999-01-01

    Flaking-type wear, so-called delamination, is often observed in polyethylene joint components. This is thought to occur partly due to crack formation and propagation at grain boundaries. This study examined the effect of vitamin E on the crack formation and/or propagation in UHMWPE by using 2-dimensional sliding fatigue testing and micro indenter testing. An in vitro sliding fatigue test was performed under two simplified articulating movements, and the cracks produced were observed by scanning acoustic tomography (SAT). Gamma-irradiated ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) specimens demonstrated a smaller area of accumulated cracks as compared to virgin specimens, when the loading movement was reciprocated on a single linear locus. However, four out of five gamma-irradiated UHMWPE specimens exhibited severe flaking-like destruction under the complicated sliding condition, suggesting that gamma irradiation accelerated crack propagation under multidirectional loading. All the gamma-irradiated vitamin-E-containing specimens demonstrated no subsurface crack formation and no flaking-like destruction. Results using micro indenter testing showed that the dynamic hardness at grain boundary was higher than that in grain, and was increased by gamma irradiation. This hardening at grain boundary was reduced by adding vitamin E. It is possible that the presence of vitamin E prevents crack propagation partly due to reduced hardness at grain boundaries. The gamma-irradiated vitamin-E-containing UHMWPE is a promising material to prevent flaking-like destruction of polyethylene joint components.

  11. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  12. Incorporating deep and shallow components of genetic structure into the management of Alaskan red king crab

    PubMed Central

    Grant, William Stewart; Cheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Observed patterns of genetic variability among marine populations are shaped not only by contemporary levels of gene flow, but also by divergences during historical isolations. We examined variability at 15 SNP loci and in mtDNA sequences (COI, 665 bp) in red king crab from 17 localities in the North Pacific. These markers define three geographically distinct evolutionary lineages (SNPs, FCT = 0.054; mtDNA ΦCT = 0.222): (i) Okhotsk Sea–Norton Sound–Aleutian Islands, (ii) southeastern Bering Sea–western Gulf of Alaska, and (iii) Southeast Alaska. Populations in the Bering Sea and in Southeast Alaska are genetically heterogeneous, but populations in the center of the range are homogeneous. Mitochondrial DNA diversity drops from h = 0.91 in the northwestern Pacific to h = 0.24 in the Southeast Alaska. Bayesian skyline plots (BSPs) indicate postglacial population expansions, presumably from ice-age refugia. BSPs of sequences simulated under a demographic model defined by late Pleistocene temperatures failed to detect demographic variability before the last glacial maximum. These results sound a note of caution for the interpretation of BSPs. Population fragmentation in the Bering Sea and in Southeast Alaskan waters requires population management on a small geographic scale, and deep evolutionary partitions between the three geographic groups mandate regional conservation measures. PMID:23346227

  13. Allergic rhinitis and genetic components: focus on Toll-like receptors (TLRs) gene polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiwei; Rennie, Donna C; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis represents a global health issue affecting 10% to 25% of the population worldwide. Over the years, studies have found that allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, are associated with immunological responses to antigens driven by a Th2-mediated immune response. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses to a broad variety of antigens, the association between polymorphisms of TLRs and allergic diseases has been the focus in many animal and human studies. Although the etiology of allergic rhinitis is still unknown, extensive research over the years has confirmed that the underlying causes of allergic diseases are due to many genetic and environmental factors, along with the interactions among them, which include gene–environment, gene–gene, and environment–environment interactions. Currently, there is great inconsistency among studies mainly due to differences in genetic background and unique gene–environment interactions. This paper reviews studies focusing on the association between TLR polymorphisms and allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, which would help researchers better understand the role of TLR polymorphisms in the development of allergic rhinitis, and ultimately lead to more efficient therapeutic interventions being developed. PMID:23776356

  14. Analysis of the common genetic component of large-vessel vasculitides through a meta-Immunochip strategy.

    PubMed

    Carmona, F David; Coit, Patrick; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, María C; Solans, Roser; Castañeda, Santos; Vaglio, Augusto; Direskeneli, Haner; Merkel, Peter A; Boiardi, Luigi; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A; Martín, Javier; Sawalha, Amr H

    2017-03-09

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu's arteritis (TAK) are major forms of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV) that share clinical features. To evaluate their genetic similarities, we analysed Immunochip genotyping data from 1,434 LVV patients and 3,814 unaffected controls. Genetic pleiotropy was also estimated. The HLA region harboured the main disease-specific associations. GCA was mostly associated with class II genes (HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQA1) whereas TAK was mostly associated with class I genes (HLA-B/MICA). Both the statistical significance and effect size of the HLA signals were considerably reduced in the cross-disease meta-analysis in comparison with the analysis of GCA and TAK separately. Consequently, no significant genetic correlation between these two diseases was observed when HLA variants were tested. Outside the HLA region, only one polymorphism located nearby the IL12B gene surpassed the study-wide significance threshold in the meta-analysis of the discovery datasets (rs755374, P = 7.54E-07; ORGCA = 1.19, ORTAK = 1.50). This marker was confirmed as novel GCA risk factor using four additional cohorts (PGCA = 5.52E-04, ORGCA = 1.16). Taken together, our results provide evidence of strong genetic differences between GCA and TAK in the HLA. Outside this region, common susceptibility factors were suggested, especially within the IL12B locus.

  15. Analysis of the common genetic component of large-vessel vasculitides through a meta-Immunochip strategy

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, F. David; Coit, Patrick; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, María C.; Solans, Roser; Castañeda, Santos; Vaglio, Augusto; Direskeneli, Haner; Merkel, Peter A.; Boiardi, Luigi; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier; Sawalha, Amr H.; Martínez-Berriochoa, Agustín; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Vuelta, Ana Belén Madroñero; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordóñez-Cañizares, M. Carmen; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Escalante, Begoña; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Sopeña, Bernardo; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Raya, Enrique; Grau, Elena; Román, José A.; Vicente, Esther F.; de Miguel, Eugenio; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Martínez, Lina; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Díaz-López, J. Bernardino; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Martínez-Zapico, Aleida; Narváez, Javier; Monfort, Jordi; Tío, Laura; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; García-Villanueva, María Jesús; Guijarro Rojas, Mercedes; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos Fernández, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Sanchez Pernaute, Olga; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Blanco, Ricardo; Prieto-González, Sergio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Soriano, Alessandra; Lunardi, Claudio; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Bonatti, Francesco; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Emmi, Giacomo; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marcello; Cimmino, Marco A.; Mesut Onat, Ahmet; Cefle, Ayse; Yazici, Ayten; Kısacık, Bünyamin; Dalkilic, Ediz; Seyahi, Emire; Fresko, Izzet; Tunc, Ercan; Erken, Eren; TE Ozer, Hüseyin; Aksu, Kenan; Keser, Gokhan; Ozturk, Mehmet A.; Bıcakcıgil, Muge; Duzgun, Nurşen; Karadag, Omer; Kiraz, Sedat; Pamuk, Ömer N.; Akar, Servet; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah; Kamali, Sevil; Inanc, Murat; Yentür, Sibel P.; Aydin, Sibel Z.; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Cobankara, Veli; Ozbalkan, Zeynep; Ates, Askin; Karaaslan, Yasar; Carette, Simon; Chung, Sharon A.; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsay J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; McKinnon-Maksimowicz, Kathleen; Monach, Paul A.; Moreland, Larry; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu’s arteritis (TAK) are major forms of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV) that share clinical features. To evaluate their genetic similarities, we analysed Immunochip genotyping data from 1,434 LVV patients and 3,814 unaffected controls. Genetic pleiotropy was also estimated. The HLA region harboured the main disease-specific associations. GCA was mostly associated with class II genes (HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQA1) whereas TAK was mostly associated with class I genes (HLA-B/MICA). Both the statistical significance and effect size of the HLA signals were considerably reduced in the cross-disease meta-analysis in comparison with the analysis of GCA and TAK separately. Consequently, no significant genetic correlation between these two diseases was observed when HLA variants were tested. Outside the HLA region, only one polymorphism located nearby the IL12B gene surpassed the study-wide significance threshold in the meta-analysis of the discovery datasets (rs755374, P = 7.54E-07; ORGCA = 1.19, ORTAK = 1.50). This marker was confirmed as novel GCA risk factor using four additional cohorts (PGCA = 5.52E-04, ORGCA = 1.16). Taken together, our results provide evidence of strong genetic differences between GCA and TAK in the HLA. Outside this region, common susceptibility factors were suggested, especially within the IL12B locus. PMID:28277489

  16. Telomerase RNA Component (TERC) genetic variants interact with the mediterranean diet modifying the inflammatory status and its relationship with aging: CORDIOPREV study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) attrition has been associated with age-related diseases. Telomerase RNA Component (TERC) genetic variants have been associated with LTL; whereas fatty acids (FAs) can interact with genetic factors and influence in aging. We explore whether variability at t...

  17. Collaborative Technology Assessments Of Transient Field Processing And Additive Manufacturing Technologies As Applied To Gas Turbine Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Szabo, Attila; Ucok, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    ORNL partnered with GE Power & Water to investigate the effect of thermomagnetic processing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of GE Power & Water newly developed wrought Ni-Fe-Cr alloys. Exploration of the effects of high magnetic field process during heat treatment of the alloys indicated conditions where applications of magnetic fields yields significant property improvements. The alloy aged using high magnetic field processing exhibited 3 HRC higher hardness compared to the conventionally-aged alloy. The alloy annealed at 1785 F using high magnetic field processing demonstrated an average creep life 2.5 times longer than that of the conventionally heat-treated alloy. Preliminary results show that high magnetic field processing can improve the mechanical properties of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys and potentially extend the life cycle of the gas turbine components such as nozzles leading to significant energy savings.

  18. Recommendations for Additional Design Development of Components for the SpinTek Rotary Microfilter Prior to Radioactive Service

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.T.

    2004-02-13

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter is being considered as an alternative to crossflow filtration. Prior testing evaluated the vendor's standard design for a 1-disk and 3-disk design. We noted several areas of improvement during the testing of the two filter systems that can be included in the 25-disk plant size unit.This report outlines several potential enhancements and improvements to the vendor's standard design which would extend the lifetime of the unit and increase the ability to perform maintenance for units deployed in radioactive service. The enhancements proposed in this report can be implemented to the current design with minimal impact to the cost and schedule of the purchase of the standard unit. An example of this is the replacement of the current mechanical seal with a bellows seal. The improvements proposed will require an extensive redesign of components found in the current system such as the filter chamber.

  19. Web-Based Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Two Novel Loci and a Substantial Genetic Component for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Do, Chuong B.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Dorfman, Elizabeth; Kiefer, Amy K.; Drabant, Emily M.; Francke, Uta; Mountain, Joanna L.; Goldman, Samuel M.; Tanner, Caroline M.; Langston, J. William; Wojcicki, Anne; Eriksson, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Although the causes of Parkinson's disease (PD) are thought to be primarily environmental, recent studies suggest that a number of genes influence susceptibility. Using targeted case recruitment and online survey instruments, we conducted the largest case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) of PD based on a single collection of individuals to date (3,426 cases and 29,624 controls). We discovered two novel, genome-wide significant associations with PD–rs6812193 near SCARB2 (, ) and rs11868035 near SREBF1/RAI1 (, )—both replicated in an independent cohort. We also replicated 20 previously discovered genetic associations (including LRRK2, GBA, SNCA, MAPT, GAK, and the HLA region), providing support for our novel study design. Relying on a recently proposed method based on genome-wide sharing estimates between distantly related individuals, we estimated the heritability of PD to be at least 0.27. Finally, using sparse regression techniques, we constructed predictive models that account for 6%–7% of the total variance in liability and that suggest the presence of true associations just beyond genome-wide significance, as confirmed through both internal and external cross-validation. These results indicate a substantial, but by no means total, contribution of genetics underlying susceptibility to both early-onset and late-onset PD, suggesting that, despite the novel associations discovered here and elsewhere, the majority of the genetic component for Parkinson's disease remains to be discovered. PMID:21738487

  20. Different genetic components in the Norwegian population revealed by the analysis of mtDNA and Y chromosome polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Passarino, Giuseppe; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Lin, Alice A; Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi Luca; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Underhill, Peter A

    2002-09-01

    The genetic composition of the Norwegian population was investigated by analysing polymorphisms associated with both the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome loci in a sample of 74 Norwegian males. The combination of their uniparental mode of inheritance and the absence of recombination make these haplotypic stretches of DNA the tools of choice in evaluating the different components of a population's gene pool. The sequencing of the Dloop and two diagnostic RFLPs (AluI 7025 and HinfI at 12 308) allowed us to classify the mtDNA molecules in 10 previously described groups. As for the Y chromosome the combination of binary markers and microsatellites allowed us to compare our results to those obtained elsewhere in Europe. Both mtDNA and Y chromosome polymorphisms showed a noticeable genetic affinity between Norwegians and central Europeans, especially Germans. When the phylogeographic analysis of the Y chromosome haplotypes was attempted some interesting clues on the peopling of Norway emerged. Although Y chromosome binary and microsatellite data indicate that 80% of the haplotypes are closely related to Central and western Europeans, the remainder share a unique binary marker (M17) common in eastern Europeans with informative microsatellite haplotypes suggesting a different demographic history. Other minor genetic influences on the Norwegian population from Uralic speakers and Mediterranean populations were also highlighted.

  1. Enhancing CBT for Chronic Insomnia: A Randomised Clinical Trial of Additive Components of Mindfulness or Cognitive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Mei Yin; Ree, Melissa J; Lee, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Although cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia has resulted in significant reductions in symptoms, most patients are not classified as good sleepers after treatment. The present study investigated whether additional sessions of cognitive therapy (CT) or mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) could enhance CBT in 64 participants with primary insomnia. All participants were given four sessions of standard CBT as previous research had identified this number of sessions as an optimal balance between therapist guidance and patient independence. Participants were then allocated to further active treatment (four sessions of CT or MBT) or a no further treatment control. The additional treatments resulted in significant improvements beyond CBT on self-report and objective measures of sleep and were well tolerated as evidenced by no dropouts from either treatment. The effect sizes for each of these additional treatments were large and clinically significant. The mean scores on the primary outcome measure, the Insomnia Severity Index, were 5.74 for CT and 6.69 for MBT, which are within the good-sleeper range. Treatment effects were maintained at follow-up. There were no significant differences between CT and MBT on any outcome measure. These results provide encouraging data on how to enhance CBT for treatment of insomnia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Decomposition dynamics and structural plant components of genetically modified Bt maize leaves do not differ from leaves of conventional hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zurbrügg, Corinne; Hönemann, Linda; Meissle, Michael; Romeis, Jörg; Nentwig, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified Bt maize has raised environmental concerns, as large amounts of plant residues remain in the field and may negatively impact the soil ecosystem. In a field experiment, decomposition of leaf residues from three genetically modified (two expressing the Cry1Ab, one the Cry3Bb1 protein) and six non-transgenic hybrids (the three corresponding non-transformed near-isolines and three conventional hybrids) was investigated using litterbags. To elucidate the mechanisms that cause differences in plant decomposition, structural plant components (i.e., C:N ratio, lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose) were examined. Furthermore, Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb1 protein concentrations in maize leaf residues were measured from harvest to the next growing season. While leaf residue decomposition in transgenic and non-transgenic plants was similar, differences among conventional cultivars were evident. Similarly, plant components among conventional hybrids differed more than between transgenic and non-transgenic hybrids. Moreover, differences in senescent plant material collected directly from plants were larger than after exposure to soil for 5 months. While the concentration of Cry3Bb1 was higher in senescent maize leaves than that of Cry1Ab, degradation was faster, indicating that Cry3Bb1 has a shorter persistence in plant residues. As decomposition patterns of Bt-transgenic maize were shown to be well within the range of common conventional hybrids, there is no indication of ecologically relevant, adverse effects on the activity of the decomposer community.

  3. Genetics of immunological and inflammatory components in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Grob, Seanna; Zhang, Kang; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting 30 to 50 million elder individuals worldwide, is a disease affecting the macular retina and choroid that can lead to irreversible central vision loss and blindness. Recent findings support a role for immunologic processes in AMD pathogenesis, including generation of inflammatory related molecules in the Bruch's membrane, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation in the macular lesions. Pro-inflammatory effects of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress can result in abnormal retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor atrophy and choroidal neovascularization. The associations of immunological and inflammatory genes, in particular the genes related to innate immunity with AMD support the involvement of various immunological pathways in the AMD pathogenesis. We review the literature on the involvements of inflammatory genes in AMD, highlight recent genetic discoveries, and discuss the potential application of such knowledge in the management of patients with AMD.

  4. Autosomal and X-Linked Additive Genetic Variation for Lifespan and Aging: Comparisons Within and Between the Sexes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Robert M; Schielzeth, Holger; Friberg, Urban

    2016-12-07

    Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should: (i) typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, (ii) exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and (iii) potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here, we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster To achieve unbiased estimates of X and autosomal additive genetic variance, we use 80 chromosome substitution lines; 40 for the X chromosome and 40 combining the two major autosomes, which we assay for sex-specific and cross-sex genetic (co)variation. We find significant X and autosomal additive genetic variance for both traits in both sexes (with reservation for X-linked variation of aging in females), but no conclusive evidence for depletion of X-linked variation (measured through females). Males display more X-linked variation for lifespan than females, but it is unclear if this is due to dosage compensation since also autosomal variation is larger in males. Finally, our results suggest that the X chromosome is enriched for sex-specific genetic variation in lifespan but results were less conclusive for aging overall. Collectively, these results suggest that the X chromosome has reduced capacity to respond to sexually concordant selection on lifespan from standing genetic variation, while its ability to respond to sexually antagonistic selection may be augmented.

  5. Autosomal and X-Linked Additive Genetic Variation for Lifespan and Aging: Comparisons Within and Between the Sexes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Robert M.; Schielzeth, Holger; Friberg, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should: (i) typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, (ii) exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and (iii) potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here, we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster. To achieve unbiased estimates of X and autosomal additive genetic variance, we use 80 chromosome substitution lines; 40 for the X chromosome and 40 combining the two major autosomes, which we assay for sex-specific and cross-sex genetic (co)variation. We find significant X and autosomal additive genetic variance for both traits in both sexes (with reservation for X-linked variation of aging in females), but no conclusive evidence for depletion of X-linked variation (measured through females). Males display more X-linked variation for lifespan than females, but it is unclear if this is due to dosage compensation since also autosomal variation is larger in males. Finally, our results suggest that the X chromosome is enriched for sex-specific genetic variation in lifespan but results were less conclusive for aging overall. Collectively, these results suggest that the X chromosome has reduced capacity to respond to sexually concordant selection on lifespan from standing genetic variation, while its ability to respond to sexually antagonistic selection may be augmented. PMID:27678519

  6. Systematic genetic array analysis links the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SAGA/SLIK and NuA4 component Tra1 to multiple cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Hoke, Stephen MT; Guzzo, Julie; Andrews, Brenda; Brandl, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    Background Tra1 is an essential 437-kDa component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SAGA/SLIK and NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complexes. It is a member of a group of key signaling molecules that share a carboxyl-terminal domain related to phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase but unlike many family members, it lacks kinase activity. To identify genetic interactions for TRA1 and provide insight into its function we have performed a systematic genetic array analysis (SGA) on tra1SRR3413, an allele that is defective in transcriptional regulation. Results The SGA analysis revealed 114 synthetic slow growth/lethal (SSL) interactions for tra1SRR3413. The interacting genes are involved in a range of cellular processes including gene expression, mitochondrial function, and membrane sorting/protein trafficking. In addition many of the genes have roles in the cellular response to stress. A hierarchal cluster analysis revealed that the pattern of SSL interactions for tra1SRR3413 most closely resembles deletions of a group of regulatory GTPases required for membrane sorting/protein trafficking. Consistent with a role for Tra1 in cellular stress, the tra1SRR3413 strain was sensitive to rapamycin. In addition, calcofluor white sensitivity of the strain was enhanced by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, a phenotype shared with the Ada components of the SAGA/SLIK complex. Through analysis of a GFP-Tra1 fusion we show that Tra1 is principally localized to the nucleus. Conclusion We have demonstrated a genetic association of Tra1 with nuclear, mitochondrial and membrane processes. The identity of the SSL genes also connects Tra1 with cellular stress, a result confirmed by the sensitivity of the tra1SRR3413 strain to a variety of stress conditions. Based upon the nuclear localization of GFP-Tra1 and the finding that deletion of the Ada components of the SAGA complex result in similar phenotypes as tra1SRR3413, we suggest that the effects of tra1SRR3413 are mediated, at least in

  7. Chemosensory responsiveness to ethanol and its individual sensory components in alcohol-preferring, alcohol-nonpreferring and genetically heterogeneous rats.

    PubMed

    Brasser, Susan M; Silbaugh, Bryant C; Ketchum, Myles J; Olney, Jeffrey J; Lemon, Christian H

    2012-03-01

    Alcohol activates orosensory circuits that project to motivationally relevant limbic forebrain areas that control appetite, feeding and drinking. To date, limited data exists regarding the contribution of chemosensory-derived ethanol reinforcement to ethanol preference and consumption. Measures of taste reactivity to intra-orally infused ethanol have not found differences in initial orofacial responses to alcohol between alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-non-preferring (NP) genetically selected rat lines. Yet, in voluntary intake tests, P rats prefer highly concentrated ethanol upon initial exposure, suggesting an early sensory-mediated attraction. Here, we directly compared self-initiated chemosensory responding for alcohol and prototypic sweet, bitter and oral trigeminal stimuli among selectively bred P, NP and non-selected Wistar (WI) outbred lines to determine whether differential sensory responsiveness to ethanol and its putative sensory components are phenotypically associated with genetically influenced alcohol preference. Rats were tested for immediate short-term lick responses to alcohol (3-40%), sucrose (0.01-1 M), quinine (0.01-3 mM) and capsaicin (0.003-1 mM) in a brief-access assay designed to index orosensory-guided behavior. P rats exhibited elevated short-term lick responses to both alcohol and sucrose relative to NP and WI lines across a broad range of concentrations of each stimulus and in the absence of blood alcohol levels that would produce significant post-absorptive effects. There was no consistent relationship between genetically mediated alcohol preference and orosensory avoidance of quinine or capsaicin. These data indicate that enhanced initial chemosensory attraction to ethanol and sweet stimuli are phenotypes associated with genetic alcohol preference and are considered within the framework of downstream activation of oral appetitive reward circuits.

  8. Effects of additives on the phase transformation, occurrence state, and the interface of the Ti component in Ti-bearing blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wu; Zhang, Ju-hua; Li, Guang-qiang

    2016-09-01

    The influences of additives on the phase transformation, occurrence state, and the interface of the Ti component in Ti-bearing blast furnace slag were investigated. After oxidation, most of the Ti component in the slag was enriched into the perovskite phase, which served as the Ti-rich phase during the crystallization process. The phase transformation, occurrence state, and the interface of the Ti component were observed to be affected by the addition of different types of agents. During the oxidation process, titanaugite and Ti-rich diopside phases gradually transformed into non-Ti phases (anorthite: CaMgSi2O6 and CaAl2Si2O8) in the form of dendrites or columns, which were observed to be distributed at the surface of the perovskite phase. Several more cracks appeared along the grain boundaries of the perovskite phase after the addition of P2O5, facilitating the liberation of the perovskite phase. Composite additives combining both an acid and a base, such as CaO + CaF2 or P2O5 + CaF2, were used. We observed that the disadvantages of using single additives were successfully overcome.

  9. Additional tangential and normal stress close to the wall in the motion of a two-component flow

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosov, A.V.; Fedotovskii, V.S.; Orlov, S.Y.; Serov, V.E.

    1986-09-01

    Industrial tests of the cleaning of a T-100-130 turbine by a twocomponent condenser flow for sludgy deposits of thickness 0.5-1.2.10/sup -3/ m have been carried out for the operating conditions of water-circulation systems at atomic power plants. The additional pulsations of the tangential and normal stress arising in the deposits under the action of the water-air flow proved sufficient for their destruction. Visual inspection of the system after the tests showed the absence of deposits on the inlet sections of the forward and backward tubes and reduction in thickness of the deposits on the outlet sections to low values: (0.1-0.2) .10/sup -3/ m.

  10. Pairwise additivity of energy components in protein-ligand binding: The HIV II protease-Indinavir case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Faver, John C.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-08-01

    An energy expansion (binding energy decomposition into n-body interaction terms for n ≥ 2) to express the receptor-ligand binding energy for the fragmented HIV II protease-Indinavir system is described to address the role of cooperativity in ligand binding. The outcome of this energy expansion is compared to the total receptor-ligand binding energy at the Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and semiempirical levels of theory. We find that the sum of the pairwise interaction energies approximates the total binding energy to ˜82% for HF and to >95% for both the M06-L density functional and PM6-DH2 semiempirical method. The contribution of the three-body interactions amounts to 18.7%, 3.8%, and 1.4% for HF, M06-L, and PM6-DH2, respectively. We find that the expansion can be safely truncated after n = 3. That is, the contribution of the interactions involving more than three parties to the total binding energy of Indinavir to the HIV II protease receptor is negligible. Overall, we find that the two-body terms represent a good approximation to the total binding energy of the system, which points to pairwise additivity in the present case. This basic principle of pairwise additivity is utilized in fragment-based drug design approaches and our results support its continued use. The present results can also aid in the validation of non-bonded terms contained within common force fields and in the correction of systematic errors in physics-based score functions.

  11. Study of sorption of two sulfonylurea type of herbicides and their additives on soils and soil components.

    PubMed

    Földényi, Rita; Tóth, Zoltán; Samu, Gyöngyi; Érsek, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of two sulfonylurea type herbicides (chlorsulfuron: (1-(2-chlorophenylsulfonyl)-3-(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)urea; tribenuron methyl: (methyl-2-[N-(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-3-(methyl-ureido)-sulfonyl]-benzoate) was studied on sand and chernozem soil adsorbents. Experimental results for solutions prepared from the pure ingredients were compared to those prepared from the appropriate formulated commercial products. At small concentrations, the extent of adsorption of the active ingredient was higher than from the formulation containing solutions. Environmental fate and effects of the forming agents are less investigated because they rarely have concentration limits recommended by authorities. In addition to the adsorption of active ingredients, therefore, the sorption behavior of a widely used additive Supragil WP (sodium diisopropyl naphthalene sulphonate) was also studied. This dispersant is an anionic forming agent applied in a lot of pesticide formulations. Using three different soils (sand, brown forest, chernozem) as adsorbents two-step isotherms were obtained. The role of the soil organic matter (OM) was significant in the adsorption mechanism because the adsorbed amounts of the dispersant correlated with the specific surface area as well as with the total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soils. The sorption behavior indicates the operation of hydrophobic interaction mechanism between the soil OM and the dispersant. These results are supported by our further sorption experiments on clays, too. Zeta potential measurements seem to be promising for the interpretation of multi-step isotherms. The application of this technique proved that higher concentrations of the anionic forming agent assisted the peptization of soil organic matter (SOM) resulting in stable colloidal solution dominated by negative charges. Since the pesticides investigated are also anionic at the studied pH (7 and 8.3) the dissolved organics lead to the

  12. Genetic dissection of yield and its component traits using high-density composite map of wheat chromosome 3A: bridging gaps between QTLs and underlying genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Earlier we identified wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chromosome 3A as a major determinant of grain yield and its component traits. In the present study, a high-density genetic linkage map of 81 chromosome 3A-specific markers was developed to increase the precision of previously identified yield compon...

  13. Process-Structure-Property Relationships for 316L Stainless Steel Fabricated by Additive Manufacturing and Its Implication for Component Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, J.; Zheng, B.; Gaiser, K.; Reynolds, T.; Clemon, L.; Lu, W. Y.; Schoenung, J. M.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the process-structure-property relationships for 316L stainless steel prototyping utilizing 3-D laser engineered net shaping (LENS), a commercial direct energy deposition additive manufacturing process. The study concluded that the resultant physical metallurgy of 3-D LENS 316L prototypes is dictated by the interactive metallurgical reactions, during instantaneous powder feeding/melting, molten metal flow and liquid metal solidification. The study also showed 3-D LENS manufacturing is capable of building high strength and ductile 316L prototypes due to its fine cellular spacing from fast solidification cooling, and the well-fused epitaxial interfaces at metal flow trails and interpass boundaries. However, without further LENS process control and optimization, the deposits are vulnerable to localized hardness variation attributed to heterogeneous microstructure, i.e., the interpass heat-affected zone (HAZ) from repetitive thermal heating during successive layer depositions. Most significantly, the current deposits exhibit anisotropic tensile behavior, i.e., lower strain and/or premature interpass delamination parallel to build direction (axial). This anisotropic behavior is attributed to the presence of interpass HAZ, which coexists with flying feedstock inclusions and porosity from incomplete molten metal fusion. The current observations and findings contribute to the scientific basis for future process control and optimization necessary for material property control and defect mitigation.

  14. Apology in the criminal justice setting: evidence for including apology as an additional component in the legal system.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Carrie J

    2002-01-01

    The criminal justice system has reached unprecedented scope in the United States, with over 6.4 million people under some type of supervision. Remedies that have the potential to reduce this number are continually being sought. This article analyzes an innovative strategy currently being reconsidered in criminal justice: the apology. Despite a legal system that only sporadically acknowledges it, evidence for the use of apology is supported by social science research, current criminal justice theories, case law, and empirical studies. Social psychological, sociological and socio-legal studies pinpoint the elements and function of apology, what makes apologies effective, and concerns about apology if it were implemented in the criminal justice system. Theoretical evidence is examined (including restorative justice, therapeutic jurisprudence, crime, shame, and reintegration) to explore the process of apology in the criminal justice context. Attribution theory and social conduct theory are used to explain the apology process specifically for victims and offenders. A brief examination of case law reveals that though apology has no formal place in criminal law, it has surfaced recently under the federal sentencing guidelines. Finally, empirical evidence in criminal justice settings reveals that offenders want to apologize and victims desire an apology. Moreover, by directly addressing the harmful act, apology may be the link to reduced recidivism for offenders, as well as empowerment for victims. This evidence combined suggests that apology is worthy of further study as a potentially valuable addition to the criminal justice process.

  15. A genetic screen targeted on the FO component of mitochondrial ATP synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Godard, François; Tetaud, Emmanuel; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; di Rago, Jean-Paul

    2011-05-20

    In yeast, the two main F(O) proton-translocating subunits of the ATP synthase (subunits 6/a and 9/c) are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Unfortunately, mutations that inactivate the F(O) typically result in loss of mtDNA under the form of ρ(-)/ρ(0) cells. Thus, we have designed a novel genetic strategy to circumvent this problem. It exploits previous findings that a null mutation in the nuclear ATP16 gene encoding ATP synthase subunit δ results in massive and lethal F(O)-mediated protons leaks across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mutations that inactivate the F(O) can thus, in these conditions, be selected positively as cell viability rescuing events. A first set of seven mutants was analyzed and all showed, as expected, very severe F(O) deficiencies. Two mutants carried nuclear mutations in known genes (AEP1, AEP2) required for subunit c expression. The five other mutations were located in mtDNA. Of these, three affect synthesis or stability of subunit a transcripts and the two last consisted in a single amino acid replacement in subunit c. One of the subunit c mutations is particularly interesting. It consists in an alanine to valine change at position 60 of subunit c adjacent to the essential glutamate of subunit c (at position 59) that interacts with the essential arginine 186 of subunit a. The properties of this mutant suggest that the contact zone between subunit a and the ten subunits c-ring structure only involves critical transient interactions confined to the region where protons are exchanged between the subunit a and the c-ring.

  16. Energy efficiency and energy homeostasis as genetic and epigenetic components of plant performance and crop productivity.

    PubMed

    De Block, Marc; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2011-06-01

    The importance of energy metabolism in plant performance and plant productivity is conceptually well recognized. In the eighties, several independent studies in Lolium perenne (ryegrass), Zea mays (maize), and Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) correlated low respiration rates with high yields. Similar reports in the nineties largely confirmed this correlation in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). However, selection for reduced respiration does not always result in high-yielding cultivars. Indeed, the ratio between energy content and respiration, defined here as energy efficiency, rather than respiration on its own, has a major impact on the yield potential of a crop. Besides energy efficiency, energy homeostasis, representing the balance between energy production and consumption in a changing environment, also contributes to an enhanced plant performance and this happens mainly through an increased stress tolerance. Although a few single gene approaches look promising, probably whole interacting networks have to be modulated, as is done by classical breeding, to improve the energy status of plants. Recent developments show that both energy efficiency and energy homeostasis have an epigenetic component that can be directed and stabilized by artificial selection (i.e. selective breeding). This novel approach offers new opportunities to improve yield potential and stress tolerance in a wide variety of crops.

  17. A High Density Consensus Genetic Map of Tetraploid Cotton That Integrates Multiple Component Maps through Molecular Marker Redundancy Check

    PubMed Central

    Blenda, Anna; Fang, David D.; Rami, Jean-François; Garsmeur, Olivier; Luo, Feng; Lacape, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    A consensus genetic map of tetraploid cotton was constructed using six high-density maps and after the integration of a sequence-based marker redundancy check. Public cotton SSR libraries (17,343 markers) were curated for sequence redundancy using 90% as a similarity cutoff. As a result, 20% of the markers (3,410) could be considered as redundant with some other markers. The marker redundancy information had been a crucial part of the map integration process, in which the six most informative interspecific Gossypium hirsutum×G. barbadense genetic maps were used for assembling a high density consensus (HDC) map for tetraploid cotton. With redundant markers being removed, the HDC map could be constructed thanks to the sufficient number of collinear non-redundant markers in common between the component maps. The HDC map consists of 8,254 loci, originating from 6,669 markers, and spans 4,070 cM, with an average of 2 loci per cM. The HDC map presents a high rate of locus duplications, as 1,292 markers among the 6,669 were mapped in more than one locus. Two thirds of the duplications are bridging homoeologous AT and DT chromosomes constitutive of allopolyploid cotton genome, with an average of 64 duplications per AT/DT chromosome pair. Sequences of 4,744 mapped markers were used for a mutual blast alignment (BBMH) with the 13 major scaffolds of the recently released Gossypium raimondii genome indicating high level of homology between the diploid D genome and the tetraploid cotton genetic map, with only a few minor possible structural rearrangements. Overall, the HDC map will serve as a valuable resource for trait QTL comparative mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and better understanding of the genome structure and evolution of tetraploid cotton. PMID:23029214

  18. Genetic separation of autonomous endosperm formation (AutE) from the two other components of apomixis in Hieracium.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Johnson, Susan D; Henderson, Steven T; Koltunow, Anna M G

    2013-06-01

    In apomictic Hieracium subgenus Pilosella species, embryo sacs develop in ovules without meiosis. Embryo and endosperm formation then occur without fertilization, producing seeds with a maternal genotype encased in a fruit (achene). Genetic analyses in H. praealtum indicate a dominant locus (LOA) controls meiotic avoidance, and another dominant locus (LOP) controls both fertilization-independent embryogenesis and endosperm formation. While cytologically examining developmental events in ovules of progeny from crosses between different wild-type and mutant Hieracium apomicts, and a sexual Hieracium species, we identified two plants, AutE196 and AutE24, which have lost the capacity for meiotic avoidance and fertilization-independent embryo formation. AutE196 and AutE24 exhibit autonomous endosperm formation and set parthenocarpic, seedless achenes at a penetrance of 18 %. Viable seed form after pollination. Cytological examination of 102 progeny from a backcross of AutE196 with sexual H. pilosella showed that autonomous endosperm formation is a heritable, dominant, qualitative trait, detected in 51 % of progeny. Variation in quantitative trait penetrance indicates other factors influence its expression. The correlation between autonomous endosperm development and mature parthenocarpic achene formation suggests the former is sufficient to trigger fruit maturation in Hieracium. The developmental component of autonomous endosperm formation is therefore genetically separable from those controlling meiotic avoidance and autonomous embryogenesis in Hieracium and has been denoted as AutE. We postulate that tight linkage of AutE and genes controlling autonomous embryogenesis at the LOP locus in H. praealtum may explain why inheritance of autonomous seed formation is typically observed as a single component.

  19. Additive genetic variation in resistance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae capsular type Ib: is genetic resistance correlated?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus (S.) iniae and S. agalactiae are both economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens affecting the globally farmed tilapia (Oreochromis spp.). Historically control of these bacteria in tilapia culture has included biosecurity, therapeutants and vaccination strategies. Genet...

  20. Evidence of Shared Genome-Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rohan H C; Nugent, Nicole R; Brick, Leslie A; Bidwell, Cinnamon L; McGeary, John E; Keller, Matthew C; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which additive genetic effects on trauma are shared with additive genetic effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate additive genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with additive genetic effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

  1. A pathway-based analysis provides additional support for an immune-related genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holmans, Peter; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Lesley; Sharma, Manu; Vedernikov, Alexey; Buchel, Finja; Saad, Mohamad; Sadd, Mohamad; Bras, Jose M; Bettella, Francesco; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Mittag, Florian; Gibbs, J Raphael; Schulte, Claudia; Durr, Alexandra; Guerreiro, Rita; Hernandez, Dena; Brice, Alexis; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Majamaa, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nicholas W; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B; Nalls, Michael A; Hardy, John; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel M

    2013-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease affecting 1-2% in people >60 and 3-4% in people >80. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have now implicated significant evidence for association in at least 18 genomic regions. We have studied a large PD-meta analysis and identified a significant excess of SNPs (P < 1 × 10(-16)) that are associated with PD but fall short of the genome-wide significance threshold. This result was independent of variants at the 18 previously implicated regions and implies the presence of additional polygenic risk alleles. To understand how these loci increase risk of PD, we applied a pathway-based analysis, testing for biological functions that were significantly enriched for genes containing variants associated with PD. Analysing two independent GWA studies, we identified that both had a significant excess in the number of functional categories enriched for PD-associated genes (minimum P = 0.014 and P = 0.006, respectively). Moreover, 58 categories were significantly enriched for associated genes in both GWA studies (P < 0.001), implicating genes involved in the 'regulation of leucocyte/lymphocyte activity' and also 'cytokine-mediated signalling' as conferring an increased susceptibility to PD. These results were unaltered by the exclusion of all 178 genes that were present at the 18 genomic regions previously reported to be strongly associated with PD (including the HLA locus). Our findings, therefore, provide independent support to the strong association signal at the HLA locus and imply that the immune-related genetic susceptibility to PD is likely to be more widespread in the genome than previously appreciated.

  2. Roles of vascular and metabolic components in cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: short- and long-term modification by non-genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoyuki; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-11-05

    It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD). Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of (1) compromised vascular reactivity, (2) vascular lesions, (3) hypo/hyperglycemia, and (4) exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. β-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: (1) functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, (2) MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, (3) clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, (4) amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  3. Individual responsiveness to shock and colony-level aggression in honey bees: evidence for a genetic component.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Arian; Rodríguez-Cruz, Yoselyn; Giray, Tugrul

    2014-05-01

    The phenotype of the social group is related to phenotypes of individuals that form that society. We examined how honey bee colony aggressiveness relates to individual response of male drones and foraging workers. Although the natural focus in colony aggression has been on the worker caste, the sterile females engaged in colony maintenance and defense, males carry the same genes. We measured aggressiveness scores of colonies and examined components of individual aggressive behavior in workers and haploid sons of workers from the same colony. We describe for the first time, that males, although they have no stinger, do bend their abdomen (abdominal flexion) in a posture similar to stinging behavior of workers in response to electric shock. Individual worker sting response and movement rates in response to shock were significantly correlated with colony scores. In the case of drones, sons of workers from the same colonies, abdominal flexion significantly correlated but their movement rates did not correlate with colony aggressiveness. Furthermore, the number of workers responding at increasing levels of voltage exhibits a threshold-like response, whereas the drones respond in increasing proportion to shock. We conclude that there are common and caste-specific components to aggressive behavior in honey bees. We discuss implications of these results on social and behavioral regulation and genetics of aggressive response.

  4. Individual responsiveness to shock and colony-level aggression in honey bees: evidence for a genetic component

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, Arian; Rodríguez-Cruz, Yoselyn; Giray, Tugrul

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype of the social group is related to phenotypes of individuals that form that society. We examined how honey bee colony aggressiveness relates to individual response of male drones and foraging workers. Although the natural focus in colony aggression has been on the worker caste, the sterile females engaged in colony maintenance and defense, males carry the same genes. We measured aggressiveness scores of colonies and examined components of individual aggressive behavior in workers and haploid sons of workers from the same colony. We describe for the first time, that males, although they have no stinger, do bend their abdomen (abdominal flexion) in a posture similar to stinging behavior of workers in response to electric shock. Individual worker sting response and movement rates in response to shock were significantly correlated with colony scores. In the case of drones, sons of workers from the same colonies, abdominal flexion significantly correlated but their movement rates did not correlate with colony aggressiveness. Furthermore, the number of workers responding at increasing levels of voltage exhibits a threshold-like response, whereas the drones respond in increasing proportion to shock. We conclude that there are common and caste-specific components to aggressive behavior in honey bees. We discuss implications of these results on social and behavioral regulation and genetics of aggressive response. PMID:25729126

  5. Genetic Interactions Between the Meiosis-Specific Cohesin Components, STAG3, REC8, and RAD21L

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Ayobami; Hopkins, Jessica; Mckay, Matthew; Murray, Steve; Jordan, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Cohesin is an essential structural component of chromosomes that ensures accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Previous studies have shown that there are cohesin complexes specific to meiosis, required to mediate homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, recombination, and segregation. Meiosis-specific cohesin complexes consist of two structural maintenance of chromosomes proteins (SMC1α/SMC1β and SMC3), an α-kleisin protein (RAD21, RAD21L, or REC8), and a stromal antigen protein (STAG1, 2, or 3). STAG3 is exclusively expressed during meiosis, and is the predominant STAG protein component of cohesin complexes in primary spermatocytes from mouse, interacting directly with each α-kleisin subunit. REC8 and RAD21L are also meiosis-specific cohesin components. Stag3 mutant spermatocytes arrest in early prophase (“zygotene-like” stage), displaying failed homolog synapsis and persistent DNA damage, as a result of unstable loading of cohesin onto the chromosome axes. Interestingly, Rec8, Rad21L double mutants resulted in an earlier “leptotene-like” arrest, accompanied by complete absence of STAG3 loading. To assess genetic interactions between STAG3 and α-kleisin subunits RAD21L and REC8, our lab generated Stag3, Rad21L, and Stag3, Rec8 double knockout mice, and compared them to the Rec8, Rad21L double mutant. These double mutants are phenotypically distinct from one another, and more severe than each single knockout mutant with regards to chromosome axis formation, cohesin loading, and sister chromatid cohesion. The Stag3, Rad21L, and Stag3, Rec8 double mutants both progress further into prophase I than the Rec8, Rad21L double mutant. Our genetic analysis demonstrates that cohesins containing STAG3 and REC8 are the main complex required for centromeric cohesion, and RAD21L cohesins are required for normal clustering of pericentromeric heterochromatin. Furthermore, the STAG3/REC8 and STAG3/RAD21L cohesins are the primary cohesins required

  6. Genetic Sources of Sub-components of Event-Related Potential in the Dimension of Psychosis analyzed from the BSNIP Study

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Balaji; Ethridge, Lauren E.; O'Neil, Kasey; Dunn, Sabra; Mathew, Ian; Tandon, Neeraj; Calhoun, Vince D.; Ruaño, Gualberto; Kocherla, Mohan; Windemuth, Andreas; Clementz, Brett A.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Sweeney, John A.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Biological risk factors underlying psychosis are poorly understood. Biological underpinnings of the dimension of psychosis can be derived using genetic associations with intermediate phenotypes such as sub-components of auditory event related potentials (ERPs). Various ERP sub-component abnormalities in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder with psychosis (PBP) are heritable and expressed in unaffected relatives. Prior studies investigating genetic contributions to ERP abnormalities are limited. We used a novel parallel independent component analysis (Para-ICA) to determine which empirically-derived gene clusters are associated with data-driven ERP sub-components, assuming a complex etiology underlying psychosis. Methods We examined the multivariate polygenic association of ERP sub-components from 64-channel auditory oddball data in 144 SZ, 210 PBP probands and 95 healthy individuals from the multi-site BSNIP study. Data were reduced by principal component analysis to 2 target and 1 standard ERP waveforms. Multivariate association of compressed ERP waveforms with a set of 20,329 SNPs (reduced from a one million SNP array) was examined using Para-ICA. Genes associated with SNPs were further examined using pathway analysis tools. Results Para-ICA identified 4 ERP components that were significantly correlated with 3 genetic components. Enrichment analysis revealed complement immune response pathway and multiple processes including synaptic cell adhesion, axon guidance and neurogenesis significantly mediating ERP abnormalities in psychosis. Conclusions We identified three genetic components comprising multiple genes mediating ERP sub-component abnormalities in SZ and PBP. Our data suggest a possible polygenic structure comprised of genes influencing key neurodevelopmental processes, neural circuitry, brain function mediating biological pathways plausibly associated with psychoses. PMID:25615564

  7. Dissecting the genetic components of a quantitative trait locus for blood pressure and renal pathology on rat chromosome 3

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Tan, H.H. Caline; Dashti, Mohammed; Wang, Ting; Beattie, Wendy; Mcclure, John; Young, Barbara; Dominiczak, Anna F.; McBride, Martin W.; Graham, Delyth

    2017-01-01

    Background: We have previously confirmed the importance of rat chromosome 3 (RNO3) genetic loci on blood pressure elevation, pulse pressure (PP) variability and renal pathology during salt challenge in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHRSP) rat. The aims of this study were to generate a panel of RNO3 congenic sub-strains to genetically dissect the implicated loci and identify positional candidate genes by microarray expression profiling and analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Method and results: A panel of congenic sub-strains were generated containing Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)-introgressed segments of varying size on the SHRSP genetic background, focused within the first 50 Mbp of RNO3. Haemodynamic profiling during salt challenge demonstrated significantly reduced systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and PP variability in SP.WKYGla3a, SP.WKYGla3c, SP.WKYGla3d and SP.WKYGla3e sub-strains. Only SBP and DBP were significantly reduced during salt challenge in SP.WKYGla3b and SP.WKYGla3f sub-strains, whereas SP.WKYGla3g rats did not differ in haemodynamic response to SHRSP. Those sub-strains demonstrating significantly reduced PP variability during salt challenge also demonstrated significantly reduced renal pathology and proteinuria. Microarray expression profiling prioritized two candidate genes for blood pressure regulation (Dnm1, Tor1b), localized within the common congenic interval shared by SP.WKYGla3d and SP.WKYGla3f strains, and one candidate gene for salt-induced PP variability and renal pathology (Rabgap1), located within the region unique to the SP.WKYGla3d strain. Comparison of next-generation sequencing data identified variants within additional positional genes that are likely to affect protein function. Conclusion: This study has identified distinct intervals on RNO3-containing genes that may be important for blood pressure regulation and renal pathology during salt challenge. PMID:27755386

  8. Identification of exotic genetic components and DNA methylation pattern analysis of three cotton introgression lines from Gossypium bickii.

    PubMed

    He, Shou-Pu; Sun, Jun-Ling; Zhang, Chao; Du, Xiong-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The impact of alien DNA fragments on plant genome has been studied in many species. However, little is known about the introgression lines of Gossypium. To study the consequences of introgression in Gossypium, we investigated 2000 genomic and 800 epigenetic sites in three typical cotton introgression lines, as well as their cultivar (Gossypium hirsutum) and wild parents (Gossypium bickii), by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP). The results demonstrate that an average of 0.5% of exotic DNA segments from wild cotton is transmitted into the genome of each introgression line, with the addition of other forms of genetic variation. In total, an average of 0.7% of genetic variation sites is identified in introgression lines. Simultaneously, the overall cytosine methylation level in each introgression line is very close to that of the upland cotton parent (an average of 22.6%). Further dividing patterns reveal that both hypomethylation and hypermethylation occurred in introgression lines in comparison with the upland cotton parent. Sequencing of nine methylation polymorphism fragments showed that most (7 of 9) of the methylation alternations occurred in the noncoding sequences. The molecular evidence of introgression from wild cotton into introgression lines in our study is identified by AFLP. Moreover, the causes of petal variation in introgression lines are discussed.

  9. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for severa...

  10. Genetic and environmental components of phenotypic variation in immune response and body size of a colonial bird, Delichon urbica (the house martin).

    PubMed

    Christe, P; Moller, A P; Saino, N; De Lope, F

    2000-07-01

    Directional selection for parasite resistance is often intense in highly social host species. Using a partial cross-fostering experiment we studied environmental and genetic variation in immune response and morphology in a highly colonial bird species, the house martin (Delichon urbica). We manipulated intensity of infestation of house martin nests by the haematophagous parasitic house martin bug Oeciacus hirundinis either by spraying nests with a weak pesticide or by inoculating them with 50 bugs. Parasitism significantly affected tarsus length, T cell response, immunoglobulin and leucocyte concentrations. We found evidence of strong environmental effects on nestling body mass, body condition, wing length and tarsus length, and evidence of significant additive genetic variance for wing length and haematocrit. We found significant environmental variance, but no significant additive genetic variance in immune response parameters such as T cell response to the antigenic phytohemagglutinin, immunoglobulins, and relative and absolute numbers of leucocytes. Environmental variances were generally greater than additive genetic variances, and the low heritabilities of phenotypic traits were mainly a consequence of large environmental variances and small additive genetic variances. Hence, highly social bird species such as the house martin, which are subject to intense selection by parasites, have a limited scope for immediate microevolutionary response to selection because of low heritabilities, but also a limited scope for long-term response to selection because evolvability as indicated by small additive genetic coefficients of variation is weak.

  11. Introgression of genomic components from Chinese Brassica rapa contributes to widening the genetic diversity in rapeseed (B. napus L.), with emphasis on the evolution of Chinese rapeseed.

    PubMed

    Qian, W; Meng, J; Li, M; Frauen, M; Sass, O; Noack, J; Jung, C

    2006-06-01

    In spite of its short history of being an oil crop in China, the Chinese semi-winter rapeseed (Brassica napus L., 2n = 38, AACC) has been improved rapidly by intentional introgression of genomic components from Chinese B. rapa (2n = 20, AA). As a result, the Chinese semi-winter rapeseed has diversified genetically from the spring and winter rapeseed grown in the other regions such as Europe and North America. The objectives of this study were to investigate the roles of the introgression of the genomic components from the Chinese B. rapa in widening the genetic diversity of rapeseed and to verify the role of this introgression in the evolution of the Chinese rapeseed. Ten lines of the new type of rapeseed, which were produced by introgression of Chinese B. rapa to Chinese normal rapeseed, were compared for genetic diversity using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) with three groups of 35 lines of the normal rapeseed, including 9 semi-winter rapeseed lines from China, 9 winter rapeseed lines from Europe and 17 spring rapeseed lines from Northern Europe, Canada and Australia. Analysis of 799 polymorphic fragments revealed that within the groups, the new type rapeseed had the highest genetic diversity, followed by the semi-winter normal rapeseed from China. Spring and winter rapeseed had the lowest genetic diversity. Among the groups, the new type rapeseed group had the largest average genetic distance to the other three groups. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis, however, could not separate the new type rapeseed group from Chinese normal rapeseed group. Our data suggested that the introgression of Chinese B. rapa could significantly diversify the genetic basis of the rapeseed and play an important role in the evolution of Chinese rapeseed. The use of new genetic variation for the exploitation of heterosis in Brassica hybrid breeding is discussed.

  12. An improved independent component analysis model for 3D chromatogram separation and its solution by multi-areas genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The 3D chromatogram generated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) has been researched widely in the field of herbal medicine, grape wine, agriculture, petroleum and so on. Currently, most of the methods used for separating a 3D chromatogram need to know the compounds' number in advance, which could be impossible especially when the compounds are complex or white noise exist. New method which extracts compounds from 3D chromatogram directly is needed. Methods In this paper, a new separation model named parallel Independent Component Analysis constrained by Reference Curve (pICARC) was proposed to transform the separation problem to a multi-parameter optimization issue. It was not necessary to know the number of compounds in the optimization. In order to find all the solutions, an algorithm named multi-areas Genetic Algorithm (mGA) was proposed, where multiple areas of candidate solutions were constructed according to the fitness and distances among the chromosomes. Results Simulations and experiments on a real life HPLC-DAD data set were used to demonstrate our method and its effectiveness. Through simulations, it can be seen that our method can separate 3D chromatogram to chromatogram peaks and spectra successfully even when they severely overlapped. It is also shown by the experiments that our method is effective to solve real HPLC-DAD data set. Conclusions Our method can separate 3D chromatogram successfully without knowing the compounds' number in advance, which is fast and effective. PMID:25474487

  13. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  14. Microstructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid and open-cellular copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Diana Alejandra

    The fabrication of Cu components were first built by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates leading to a novel example of precipitate-dislocation architecture. These microstructures exhibit cell-like arrays (1-3microm) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular to the build direction with columnar-like arrays extending from ~12 to >60 microm in length and corresponding spatial dimensions of 1-3 microm. These observations were observed by the use of optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness measurements were taken both on the atomized powder and the Cu components. The hardness for these architectures ranged from ~HV 83 to 88, in contrast to the original Cu powder microindentation hardness of HV 72 and the commercial Cu base plate hardness of HV 57. These observations were utilized for the fabrication of open-cellular copper structures by additive manufacturing using EBM and illustrated the ability to fabricate some form of controlled microstructural architecture by EBM parameter alteration or optimizing. The fabrication of these structures ranged in densities from 0.73g/cm3 to 6.67g/cm3. These structures correspond to four different articulated mesh arrays. While these components contained some porosity as a consequence of some unmelted regions, the Cu2O precipitates also contributed to a reduced density. Using X-ray Diffraction showed the approximate volume fraction estimated to be ~2%. The addition of precipitates created in the EBM melt scan formed microstructural arrays which contributed to hardening contributing to the strength of mesh struts and foam ligaments. The measurements of relative stiffness versus relative density plots for Cu compared very closely with Ti-6Al-4V open cellular structures - both mesh and foams. The Cu reticulated mesh structures exhibit a slope of n = 2 in contrast to a slope of n = 2

  15. A Single Deoxynucleoside Kinase Variant from Drosophila melanogaster Synthesizes Monophosphates of Nucleosides That Are Components of an Expanded Genetic System.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Mariko F; Winiger, Christian B; Shaw, Ryan W; Kim, Myong-Jung; Kim, Myong-Sang; Daugherty, Ashley B; Chen, Fei; Moussatche, Patricia; Moses, Jennifer D; Lutz, Stefan; Benner, Steven A

    2017-03-17

    Deoxynucleoside kinase from D. melanogaster (DmdNK) has broad specificity; although it catalyzes the phosphorylation of natural pyrimidine more efficiently than natural purine nucleosides, it accepts all four 2'-deoxynucleosides and many analogues, using ATP as a phosphate donor to give the corresponding deoxynucleoside monophosphates. Here, we show that replacing a single amino acid (glutamine 81 by glutamate) in DmdNK creates a variant that also catalyzes the phosphorylation of nucleosides that form part of an artificially expanded genetic information system (AEGIS). By shuffling hydrogen bonding groups on the nucleobases, AEGIS adds potentially as many as four additional nucleobase pairs to the genetic "alphabet". Specifically, we show that DmdNK Q81E creates the monophosphates from the AEGIS nucleosides dP, dZ, dX, and dK (respectively 2-amino-8-(1'-β-d-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one, dP; 6-amino-3-(1'-β-d-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-5-nitro-1H-pyridin-2-one, dZ; 8-(1'β-d-2'-deoxy-ribofuranosyl)imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazine-2(8H)-4(3H)-dione, dX; and 2,4-diamino-5-(1'-β-d-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-pyrimidine, dK). Using a coupled enzyme assay, in vitro kinetic parameters were obtained for three of these nucleosides (dP, dX, and dK; the UV absorbance of dZ made it impossible to get its precise kinetic parameters). Thus, DmdNK Q81E appears to be a suitable enzyme to catalyze the first step in the biosynthesis of AEGIS 2'-deoxynucleoside triphosphates in vitro and, perhaps, in vivo, in a cell able to manage plasmids containing AEGIS DNA.

  16. Effect of Partition of Photo-Initiator Components and Addition of Iodonium Salt on the Photopolymerization of Phase-Separated Dental Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, Farhana; Ye, Qiang; Song, Linyong; Ge, Xueping; Camarda, Kyle; Spencer, Paulette

    2016-04-01

    The polymerization kinetics of physically separated hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases of a model dental adhesive have been investigated. The two phases were prepared from neat resin containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) in the ratio of 45:55 (wt./wt.). Neat resins containing various combinations of popular photo-initiating compounds, e.g., camphoquinone (CQ), ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDMAB), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (DPIHP), were prepared. To obtain the two phases, 33 wt.% of deuterium oxide (D2O) was added to the neat resins. This amount of D2O exceeded the miscibility limit for the resins. The concentration of each component of the photo-initiating system in the two phases was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). When combined with CQ, DMAEMA is less efficient as a co-initiator compared to EDMAB. The addition of DPIHP as the third component into either CQ/EDMAB or CQ/DMAEMA photo-initiating systems led to comparable performance in both the hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases. The addition of the iodonium salt significantly improved the photopolymerization of the hydrophilic-rich phase; the latter exhibited extremely poor polymerization when the iodonium salt was not included in the formulation. The partition concentration of EDMAB in the hydrophilic-rich phase was significantly lower than that of DMAEMA or DPIHP. This study indicates the need for a combination of hydrophobic/hydrophilic photosensitizer and addition of iodonium salt to improve polymerization within the hydrophilic-rich phase of the dental adhesive.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: pseudoxanthoma elasticum

    MedlinePlus

    ... elastic fibers. Elastic fibers are a component of connective tissue , which provides strength and flexibility to structures throughout ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Health Topic: Connective Tissue Disorders Health Topic: Vascular Diseases Genetic and Rare ...

  18. Biochemical, genetic and physiological characterization of venom components from two species of scorpions: Centruroides exilicauda Wood and Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing.

    PubMed

    Valdez-Cruz, Norma A; Dávila, Sonia; Licea, Alexei; Corona, Miguel; Zamudio, Fernando Z; García-Valdes, Jesús; Boyer, Leslie; Possani, Lourival D

    2004-06-01

    Current literature concerning the taxonomic names of two possibly distinct species of scorpions from the genus Centruroides (sculpturatus and/or exilicauda) is controversial. This communication reports the results of biochemical, genetic and electrophysiological experiments conducted with C. exilicauda Wood of Baja California (Mexico) and C. sculpturatus Ewing of Arizona (USA). The chromatographic profile fractionation of the soluble venom from both species of scorpions is different. The N-terminal amino acid sequence for nine toxins of C. exilicauda was determined and compared with those from C. sculpturatus. Lethality tests conducted in mice support the idea that C. exilicauda venom should be expected to be medically less important than C. sculpturatus. Thirteen genes from the venomous glands of the scorpion C. exilicauda were obtained and compared with previously published sequences from genes of the species C. sculpturatus. Genes coding for cytochrome oxidase I and II of both species were also sequenced. A phylogenetic tree was generated with this information showing important differences between them. Additionally, the results of electrophysiological assays conducted with the venom from both species on the Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-channels, showed significant differences. These results strongly support the conclusion that C. exilicauda and C. sculpturatus are in fact two distinct species of scorpions.

  19. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  20. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  1. Plants with genetically modified events combined by conventional breeding: an assessment of the need for additional regulatory data.

    PubMed

    Pilacinski, W; Crawford, A; Downey, R; Harvey, B; Huber, S; Hunst, P; Lahman, L K; MacIntosh, S; Pohl, M; Rickard, C; Tagliani, L; Weber, N

    2011-01-01

    Crop varieties with multiple GM events combined by conventional breeding have become important in global agriculture. The regulatory requirements in different countries for such products vary considerably, placing an additional burden on regulatory agencies in countries where the submission of additional data is required and delaying the introduction of innovative products to meet agricultural needs. The process of conventional plant breeding has predictably provided safe food and feed products both historically and in the modern era of plant breeding. Thus, previously approved GM events that have been combined by conventional plant breeding and contain GM traits that are not likely to interact in a manner affecting safety should be considered to be as safe as their conventional counterparts. Such combined GM event crop varieties should require little, if any, additional regulatory data to meet regulatory requirements.

  2. Genetic identification of the central nucleus and other components of the central extended amygdala in chicken during development

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Alba; Abellán, Antonio; Desfilis, Ester; Medina, Loreta

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the central extended amygdala shows a highly complex organization, and is essential for animal survival due to its implication in fear responses. However, many aspects of its evolution are still unknown, and this structure is especially poorly understood in birds. The aim of this study was to define the central extended amygdala in chicken, by means of a battery of region-specific transcription factors (Pax6, Islet1, Nkx2.1) and phenotypic markers that characterize these different subdivisions in mammals. Our results allowed the identification of at least six distinct subdivisions in the lateral part of the avian central extended amygdala: (1) capsular central subdivision; (2) a group of intercalated-like cell patches; (3) oval central nucleus; (4) peri-intrapeduncular (peri-INP) island field; (5) perioval zone; and (6) a rostral part of the subpallial extended amygdala. In addition, we identified three subdivisions of the laterodorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTLd) belonging to the medial region of the chicken central extended amygdala complex. Based on their genetic profile, cellular composition and apparent embryonic origin of the cells, we discuss the similarity of these different subdivisions of chicken with different parts of the mouse central amygdala and surrounding cell masses, including the intercalated amygdalar masses and the sublenticular part of the central extended amygdala. Most of the subdivisions include various subpopulations of cells that apparently originate in the dorsal striatal, ventral striatal, pallidal, and preoptic embryonic domains, reaching their final location by either radial or tangential migrations. Similarly to mammals, the central amygdala and BSTLd of chicken project to the hypothalamus, and include different neurons expressing proenkephalin, corticotropin-releasing factor, somatostatin or tyrosine hydroxylase, which may be involved in the control of different aspects of fear/anxiety-related behavior

  3. A novel ion-pairing chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of both nicarbazin components in feed additives: chemometric tools for improving the optimization and validation.

    PubMed

    De Zan, María M; Teglia, Carla M; Robles, Juan C; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2011-07-15

    The development, optimization and validation of an ion-pairing high performance liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of both nicarbazin (NIC) components: 4,4'-dinitrocarbanilide (DNC) and 2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (HDP) in bulk materials and feed additives are described. An experimental design was used for the optimization of the chromatographic system. Four variables, including mobile phase composition and oven temperature, were analyzed through a central composite design exploring their contribution to analyte separation. Five responses: peak resolutions, HDP capacity factor, HDP tailing and analysis time, were modelled by using the response surface methodology and were optimized simultaneously by implementing the desirability function. The optimum conditions resulted in a mobile phase consisting of 10.0 mmol L(-1) of 1-heptanesulfonate, 20.0 mmol L(-1) of sodium acetate, pH=3.30 buffer and acetonitrile in a gradient system at a flow rate of 1.00 mL min(-1). Column was an INERSTIL ODS-3 (4.6 mm×150 mm, 5 μm particle size) at 40.0°C. Detection was performed at 300 nm by a diode array detector. The validation results of the method indicated a high selectivity and good precision characteristics, with RSD less than 1.0% for both components, both in intra and inter-assay precision studies. Linearity was proved for a range of 32.0-50.0 μg mL(-1) of NIC in sample solution. The recovery, studied at three different fortification levels, varied from 98.0 to 101.4 for HDP and from 99.1 to 100.2 for DNC. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by determining DNC and HDP content in raw materials and commercial formulations used for coccidiosis prevention. Assays results on real samples showed that considerable differences in molecular ratio DNC:HDP exist among them.

  4. Specific Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Genetic Terms Definitions for genetic terms Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  5. Additive genetic variation in resistance traits of an exotic pine species: little evidence for constraints on evolution of resistance against native herbivores.

    PubMed

    Moreira, X; Zas, R; Sampedro, L

    2013-05-01

    The apparent failure of invasions by alien pines in Europe has been explained by the co-occurrence of native pine congeners supporting herbivores that might easily recognize the new plants as hosts. Previous studies have reported that exotic pines show reduced tolerance and capacity to induce resistance to those native herbivores. We hypothesize that limited genetic variation in resistance to native herbivores and the existence of evolutionary trade-offs between growth and resistance could represent additional potential constraints on the evolution of invasiveness of exotic pines outside their natural range. In this paper, we examined genetic variation for constitutive and induced chemical defences (measured as non-volatile resin in the stem and total phenolics in the needles) and resistance to two major native generalist herbivores of pines in cafeteria bioassays (the phloem-feeder Hylobius abietis and the defoliator Thaumetopoea pityocampa) using half-sib families drawn from a sample of the population of Pinus radiata introduced to Spain in the mid-19th century. We found (i) significant genetic variation, with moderate-to-high narrow-sense heritabilities for both the production of constitutive non-volatile resin and induced total phenolics, and for constitutive resistance against T. pityocampa in bioassays, (ii) no evolutionary trade-offs between plant resistance and growth traits or between the production of different quantitative chemical defences and (iii) a positive genetic correlation between constitutive resistance to the two studied herbivores. Overall, results of our study indicate that the exotic pine P. radiata has limited genetic constraints on the evolution of resistance against herbivores in its introduced range, suggesting that, at least in terms of interactions with these enemies, this pine species has potential to become invasive in the future.

  6. Principal component analysis reveals the 1000 Genomes Project does not sufficiently cover the human genetic diversity in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dongsheng; Xu, Shuhua

    2013-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project (1KG) aims to provide a comprehensive resource on human genetic variations. With an effort of sequencing 2,500 individuals, 1KG is expected to cover the majority of the human genetic diversities worldwide. In this study, using analysis of population structure based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) data, we examined and evaluated the coverage of genetic diversity of 1KG samples with the available genome-wide SNP data of 3,831 individuals representing 140 population samples worldwide. We developed a method to quantitatively measure and evaluate the genetic diversity revealed by population structure analysis. Our results showed that the 1KG does not have sufficient coverage of the human genetic diversity in Asia, especially in Southeast Asia. We suggested a good coverage of Southeast Asian populations be considered in 1KG or a regional effort be initialized to provide a more comprehensive characterization of the human genetic diversity in Asia, which is important for both evolutionary and medical studies in the future. PMID:23847652

  7. Principal component analysis reveals the 1000 Genomes Project does not sufficiently cover the human genetic diversity in Asia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dongsheng; Xu, Shuhua

    2013-01-01

    The 1000 Genomes Project (1KG) aims to provide a comprehensive resource on human genetic variations. With an effort of sequencing 2,500 individuals, 1KG is expected to cover the majority of the human genetic diversities worldwide. In this study, using analysis of population structure based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) data, we examined and evaluated the coverage of genetic diversity of 1KG samples with the available genome-wide SNP data of 3,831 individuals representing 140 population samples worldwide. We developed a method to quantitatively measure and evaluate the genetic diversity revealed by population structure analysis. Our results showed that the 1KG does not have sufficient coverage of the human genetic diversity in Asia, especially in Southeast Asia. We suggested a good coverage of Southeast Asian populations be considered in 1KG or a regional effort be initialized to provide a more comprehensive characterization of the human genetic diversity in Asia, which is important for both evolutionary and medical studies in the future.

  8. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2014-01-01

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces. PMID:25281725

  9. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2014-10-03

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces.

  10. Replication of a gene-environment interaction Via Multimodel inference: additive-genetic variance in adolescents' general cognitive ability increases with family-of-origin socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2015-03-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES-an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research.

  11. Replication of a Gene-Environment Interaction via Multimodel Inference: Additive-Genetic Variance in Adolescents’ General Cognitive Ability Increases with Family-of-Origin Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES—an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research. PMID:25539975

  12. Genetic Components of Heterosis for Seedling Traits in an Elite Rice Hybrid Analyzed Using an Immortalized F2 Population.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Zhou, Gang; Xu, Caiguo; Zhang, Qifa

    2016-02-20

    Utilization of heterosis has greatly contributed to rice productivity in China and many Asian countries. Superior hybrids usually show heterosis at two stages: canopy development at vegetative stage and panicle development at reproductive stage resulting in heterosis in yield. Although the genetic basis of heterosis in rice has been extensively investigated, all the previous studies focused on yield traits at maturity stage. In this study, we analyzed the genetic basis of heterosis at seedling stage making use of an "immortalized F2" population composed of 105 hybrids produced by intercrossing recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between Zhenshan 97 and Minghui 63, the parents of Shanyou 63, which is an elite hybrid widely grown in China. Eight seedling traits, seedling height, tiller number, leaf number, root number, maximum root length, root dry weight, shoot dry weight and total dry weight, were investigated using hydroponic culture. We analyzed single-locus and digenic genetic effects at the whole genome level using an ultrahigh-density SNP bin map obtained by population re-sequencing. The analysis revealed large numbers of heterotic effects for seedling traits including dominance, overdominance and digenic dominance (epistasis) in both positive and negative directions. Overdominance effects were prevalent for all the traits, and digenic dominance effects also accounted for a large portion of the genetic effects. The results suggested that cumulative small advantages of the single-locus effects and two-locus interactions, most of which could not be detected statistically, could explain the genetic basis of seedling heterosis of the F1 hybrid.

  13. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., structural components of the dwelling, hot water heating, or heating or cooling systems. (ii) The use of the... or a system from components manufactured by other persons. The application shall provide the... for heating and cooling (see § 450.35 of 10 CFR part 450 (1980)). (7) The impact of increased...

  14. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., structural components of the dwelling, hot water heating, or heating or cooling systems. (ii) The use of the... or a system from components manufactured by other persons. The application shall provide the... for heating and cooling (see § 450.35 of 10 CFR part 450 (1980)). (7) The impact of increased...

  15. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., structural components of the dwelling, hot water heating, or heating or cooling systems. (ii) The use of the... or a system from components manufactured by other persons. The application shall provide the... for heating and cooling (see § 450.35 of 10 CFR part 450 (1980)). (7) The impact of increased...

  16. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., structural components of the dwelling, hot water heating, or heating or cooling systems. (ii) The use of the... or a system from components manufactured by other persons. The application shall provide the... for heating and cooling (see § 450.35 of 10 CFR part 450 (1980)). (7) The impact of increased...

  17. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., structural components of the dwelling, hot water heating, or heating or cooling systems. (ii) The use of the... or a system from components manufactured by other persons. The application shall provide the... for heating and cooling (see § 450.35 of 10 CFR part 450 (1980)). (7) The impact of increased...

  18. Marker-Based Estimates Reveal Significant Non-additive Effects in Clonally Propagated Cassava (Manihot esculenta): Implications for the Prediction of Total Genetic Value and the Selection of Varieties.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Marnin D; Kulakow, Peter; Rabbi, Ismail Y; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-31

    In clonally propagated crops, non-additive genetic effects can be effectively exploited by the identification of superior genetic individuals as varieties. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a clonally propagated staple food crop that feeds hundreds of millions. We quantified the amount and nature of non-additive genetic variation for three key traits in a breeding population of cassava from sub-Saharan Africa using additive and non-additive genome-wide marker-based relationship matrices. We then assessed the accuracy of genomic prediction for total (additive plus non-additive) genetic value. We confirmed previous findings based on diallel populations, that non-additive genetic variation is significant for key cassava traits. Specifically, we found that dominance is particularly important for root yield and epistasis contributes strongly to variation in CMD resistance. Further, we showed that total genetic value predicted observed phenotypes more accurately than additive only models for root yield but not for dry matter content, which is mostly additive or for CMD resistance, which has high narrow-sense heritability. We address the implication of these results for cassava breeding and put our work in the context of previous results in cassava, and other plant and animal species.

  19. [Supervision of foods containing components of genetically modified organisms and the problems of labeling this type of products].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G

    2010-01-01

    Commercial production of genetically modified (GM) crops as food or feed is regarded as a promising social area in the development of modern biotechnology. The Russian Federation has set up a governmental system to regulate the use of biotechnology products, which is based on Russian and foreign experience and the most up-to-date scientific approaches. The system for evaluating the quality and safety of GM foodstuffs envisages the postregistration monitoring of their circulation as an obligatory stage. For these purposes, the world community applies two methods: enzyme immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction. It should be noted that there are various approaches to GM food labeling in the world; this raises the question of whether the labeling of foods that are prepared from genetically modified organisms, but contain no protein or DNA is to be introduced in Russia, as in the European Union.

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity in banana cultivars (Musa cvs.) from the South of Oman using AFLP markers and classification by phylogenetic, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses.

    PubMed

    Opara, Umezuruike Linus; Jacobson, Dan; Al-Saady, Nadiya Abubakar

    2010-05-01

    Banana is an important crop grown in Oman and there is a dearth of information on its genetic diversity to assist in crop breeding and improvement programs. This study employed amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to investigate the genetic variation in local banana cultivars from the southern region of Oman. Using 12 primer combinations, a total of 1094 bands were scored, of which 1012 were polymorphic. Eighty-two unique markers were identified, which revealed the distinct separation of the seven cultivars. The results obtained show that AFLP can be used to differentiate the banana cultivars. Further classification by phylogenetic, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses showed significant differences between the clusters found with molecular markers and those clusters created by previous studies using morphological analysis. Based on the analytical results, a consensus dendrogram of the banana cultivars is presented.

  1. Identification of quantitative genetic components of fitness variation in farmed, hybrid and native salmon in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Besnier, F; Glover, K A; Lien, S; Kent, M; Hansen, M M; Shen, X; Skaala, Ø

    2015-01-01

    Feral animals represent an important problem in many ecosystems due to interbreeding with wild conspecifics. Hybrid offspring from wild and domestic parents are often less adapted to local environment and ultimately, can reduce the fitness of the native population. This problem is an important concern in Norway, where each year, hundreds of thousands of farm Atlantic salmon escape from fish farms. Feral fish outnumber wild populations, leading to a possible loss of local adaptive genetic variation and erosion of genetic structure in wild populations. Studying the genetic factors underlying relative performance between wild and domesticated conspecific can help to better understand how domestication modifies the genetic background of populations, and how it may alter their ability to adapt to the natural environment. Here, based upon a large-scale release of wild, farm and wild x farm salmon crosses into a natural river system, a genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) scan was performed on the offspring of 50 full-sib families, for traits related to fitness (length, weight, condition factor and survival). Six QTLs were detected as significant contributors to the phenotypic variation of the first three traits, explaining collectively between 9.8 and 14.8% of the phenotypic variation. The seventh QTL had a significant contribution to the variation in survival, and is regarded as a key factor to understand the fitness variability observed among salmon in the river. Interestingly, strong allelic correlation within one of the QTL regions in farmed salmon might reflect a recent selective sweep due to artificial selection. PMID:26059968

  2. (Co)variance components and genetic parameters for growth traits in Arabi sheep using different animal models.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, B; Baneh, H

    2012-02-08

    The objective of the present study was to estimate genetic parameters for body weight at different ages in Arabi sheep using data collected from 1999 to 2009. Investigated traits consisted of birth weight (N = 2776), weaning weight (N = 2002) and weight at six months of age (N = 1885). The data were analyzed using restricted maximum likelihood analysis, by fitting univariate and multivariate animal models. All three weight traits were significantly influenced by birth year, sex and birth type. Age of dam only significantly affected birth weight. Log-likelihood ratio tests were conducted to determine the most suitable model for each growth trait in univariate analyses. Direct and total heritability estimates for birth weight, weaning weight and weight at six months of age (based on the best model) were 0.42 and 0.16 (model 4), 0.38 and 0.13 (model 4) and 0.14 and 0.14 (model 1), respectively. Estimation of maternal heritability for birth weight and weaning weight was 0.22 and 0.18, respectively. Genetic and phenotypic correlations among these traits were positive. Phenotypic correlations among traits were low to moderate. Genetic correlations among traits were positive and higher than the corresponding phenotypic correlations. Weaning weight had a strong and significant correlation with weight at six months of age (0.99). We conclude that selection can be made in animals based on weaning weight instead of the present practice of selection based on weight at six months.

  3. Association of serum lipid components and obesity with genetic ancestry in an admixed population of elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Tulio C.; Pires, Alause S.; Paula, Roberta S.; Moraes, Clayton F.; Vieira, Rodrigo G.; Vianna, Lucy G.; Nobrega, Otávio T.; Pereira, Rinaldo W.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic disorders varies among ethnic populations and these disorders represent a critical health care issue for elderly women. This study investigated the correlation between genetic ancestry and body composition, metabolic traits and clinical status in a sample of elderly women. Clinical, nutritional and anthropometric data were collected from 176 volunteers. Genetic ancestry was estimated using 23 ancestry-informative markers. Pearsons correlation test was used to examine the relationship between continuous variables and an independent samples t-test was used to compare the means of continuous traits within categorical variables. Overall ancestry was a combination of European (57.49%), Native American (25.78%) and African (16.73%). Significant correlations were found for European ancestry with body mass index (r = 0.165; p = 0.037) and obesity (mean difference (MD) = 5.3%; p = 0.042). African ancestry showed a significant correlation with LDL (r = 0.159, p = 0.035), VLDL (r = −0.185; p = 0.014), hypertriglyceridemia (MD = 6.4%; p = 0.003) and hyperlipidemia (MD = 4.8%; p = 0.026). Amerindian ancestry showed a significant correlation with triglyceride levels (r = 0.150; p = 0.047) and hypertriglyceridemia (MD = 4.5%; p = 0.039). These findings suggest that genetic admixture may influence the etiology of lipid metabolism-related diseases and obesity in elderly women. PMID:23055794

  4. Female mate choice predicts paternity success in the absence of additive genetic variance for other female paternity bias mechanisms in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Collet, J M; Blows, M W

    2014-11-01

    After choosing a first mate, polyandrous females have access to a range of opportunities to bias paternity, such as repeating matings with the preferred male, facilitating fertilization from the best sperm or differentially investing in offspring according to their sire. Female ability to bias paternity after a first mating has been demonstrated in a few species, but unambiguous evidence remains limited by the access to complex behaviours, sperm storage organs and fertilization processes within females. Even when found at the phenotypic level, the potential evolution of any mechanism allowing females to bias paternity other than mate choice remains little explored. Using a large population of pedigreed females, we developed a simple test to determine whether there is additive genetic variation in female ability to bias paternity after a first, chosen, mating. We applied this method in the highly polyandrous Drosophila serrata, giving females the opportunity to successively mate with two males ad libitum. We found that despite high levels of polyandry (females mated more than once per day), the first mate choice was a significant predictor of male total reproductive success. Importantly, there was no detectable genetic variance in female ability to bias paternity beyond mate choice. Therefore, whether or not females can bias paternity before or after copulation, their role on the evolution of sexual male traits is likely to be limited to their first mate choice in D. serrata.

  5. Introgressing Subgenome Components from Brassica rapa and B. carinata to B. juncea for Broadening Its Genetic Base and Exploring Intersubgenomic Heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zili; Wang, Meng; Chang, Shihao; Wu, Chao; Liu, Peifa; Meng, Jinling; Zou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Brassica juncea (AjAjBjBj), is an allotetraploid that arose from two diploid species, B. rapa (ArAr) and B. nigra (BnBn). It is an old oilseed crop with unique favorable traits, but the genetic improvement on this species is limited. We developed an approach to broaden its genetic base within several generations by intensive selection. The Ar subgenome from the Asian oil crop B. rapa (ArAr) and the Bc subgenome from the African oil crop B. carinata (BcBcCcCc) were combined in a synthesized allohexaploid (ArArBcBcCcCc), which was crossed with traditional B. juncea to generate pentaploid F1 hybrids (ArAjBcBjCc), with subsequent self-pollination to obtain newly synthesized B. juncea (Ar/jAr/jBc/jBc/j). After intensive cytological screening and phenotypic selection of fertility and agronomic traits, a population of new-type B. juncea was obtained and was found to be genetically stable at the F6 generation. The new-type B. juncea possesses good fertility and rich genetic diversity and is distinctly divergent but not isolated from traditional B. juncea, as revealed by population genetic analysis with molecular markers. More than half of its genome was modified, showing exotic introgression and novel variation. In addition to the improvement in some traits of the new-type B. juncea lines, a considerable potential for heterosis was observed in inter-subgenomic hybrids between new-type B. juncea lines and traditional B. juncea accessions. The new-type B. juncea exhibited a stable chromosome number and a novel genome composition through multiple generations, providing insight into how to significantly broaden the genetic base of crops with subgenome introgression from their related species and the potential of exploring inter-subgenomic heterosis for hybrid breeding. PMID:27909440

  6. Evaluation of genetic components in traits related to superovulation, in vitro fertilization, and embryo transfer in Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to estimate variance components and identify regions of the genome associated with traits related to embryo transfer in Holsteins. Reproductive technologies are used in the dairy industry to increase the reproductive rate of superior females. A drawback of these met...

  7. Estimates of (co)variance components and genetic parameters for body weights and first greasy fleece weight in Bharat Merino sheep.

    PubMed

    Gowane, G R; Chopra, A; Prince, L L L; Paswan, C; Arora, A L

    2010-03-01

    (Co)variance components and genetic parameters of weight at birth (BWT), weaning (3WT), 6, 9 and 12 months of age (6WT, 9WT and 12WT, respectively) and first greasy fleece weight (GFW) of Bharat Merino sheep, maintained at Central Sheep and Wool Research Institute, Avikanagar, Rajasthan, India, were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood, fitting six animal models with various combinations of direct and maternal effects. Data were collected over a period of 10 years (1998 to 2007). A log-likelihood ratio test was used to select the most appropriate univariate model for each trait, which was subsequently used in bivariate analysis. Heritability estimates for BWT, 3WT, 6WT, 9WT and 12WT and first GFW were 0.05 ± 0.03, 0.04 ± 0.02, 0.00, 0.03 ± 0.03, 0.09 ± 0.05 and 0.05 ± 0.03, respectively. There was no evidence for the maternal genetic effect on the traits under study. Maternal permanent environmental effect contributed 19% for BWT and 6% to 11% from 3WT to 9WT and 11% for first GFW. Maternal permanent environmental effect on the post-3WT was a carryover effect of maternal influences during pre-weaning age. A low rate of genetic progress seems possible in the flock through selection. Direct genetic correlations between body weight traits were positive and ranged from 0.36 between BWT and 6WT to 0.94 between 3WT and 6WT and between 6WT and 12WT. Genetic correlations of 3WT with 6WT, 9WT and 12WT were high and positive (0.94, 0.93 and 0.93, respectively), suggesting that genetic gain in post-3WT will be maintained if selection age is reduced to 3 months. The genetic correlations of GFW with live weights were 0.01, 0.16, 0.18, 0.40 and 0.32 for BWT, 3WT, 6WT, 9WT and 12WT, respectively. Correlations of permanent environmental effects of the dam across different traits were high and positive for all the traits (0.45 to 0.98).

  8. High-density linkage maps fail to detect any genetic component to sex determination in a Rana temporaria family.

    PubMed

    Brelsford, A; Rodrigues, N; Perrin, N

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosome differentiation in Rana temporaria varies strikingly among populations or families: whereas some males display well-differentiated Y haplotypes at microsatellite markers on linkage group 2 (LG2), others are genetically undistinguishable from females. We analysed with RADseq markers one family from a Swiss lowland population with no differentiated sex chromosomes, and where sibship analyses had failed to detect any association between the phenotypic sex of progeny and parental haplotypes. Offspring were reared in a common tank in outdoor conditions and sexed at the froglet stage. We could map a total of 2177 SNPs (1123 in the mother, 1054 in the father), recovering in both adults 13 linkage groups (= chromosome pairs) that were strongly syntenic to Xenopus tropicalis despite > 200 My divergence. Sexes differed strikingly in the localization of crossovers, which were uniformly distributed in the female but limited to chromosome ends in the male. None of the 2177 markers showed significant association with offspring sex. Considering the very high power of our analysis, we conclude that sex determination was not genetic in this family; which factors determined sex remain to be investigated.

  9. Monitoring Impact of a Pesticide Treatment on Bacterial Soil Communities by Metabolic and Genetic Fingerprinting in Addition to Conventional Testing Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Bert; Meinken, Kristin; von Wintzingerode, Friedrich; Heuer, Holger; Malkomes, Hans-Peter; Backhaus, Horst

    1998-01-01

    Herbogil (dinoterb), a reference herbicide, the mineral oil Oleo (paraffin oil used as an additive to herbicides), and Goltix (metamitron) were taken as model compounds for the study of impacts on microbial soil communities. After the treatment of soil samples, effects on metabolic sum parameters were determined by monitoring substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and dehydrogenase activity, as well as carbon and nitrogen mineralization. These conventional ecotoxicological testing procedures are used in pesticide registration. Inhibition of biomass-related activities and stimulation of nitrogen mineralization were the most significant effects caused by the application of Herbogil. Even though Goltix and Oleo were used at a higher dosage (10 times higher), the application of Goltix resulted in smaller effects and the additive Oleo was the least-active compound, with minor stimulation of test parameters at later observation times. The results served as a background for investigation of the power of “fingerprinting” methods in microbial ecology. Changes in catabolic activities induced by treatments were analyzed by using the 95 carbon sources provided by the BIOLOG system. Variations in the complex metabolic fingerprints demonstrated inhibition of many catabolic pathways after the application of Herbogil. Again, the effects of the other compounds were expressed at much lower levels and comprised stimulations as well as inhibitions. Testing for significance by a multivariate t test indicated that the sensitivity of this method was similar to the sensitivities of the conventional testing procedures. The variation of sensitive carbon sources, as determined by factor weights at different observation times, indicated the dynamics of the community shift induced by the Herbogil treatment in more detail. DNA extractions from soil resulted in a collection of molecules representing the genetic composition of total bacterial communities. Distinct and highly reproducible

  10. Genetics and antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jay

    2003-01-01

    This commentary article reviews a recent meta-analysis of genetic influences on antisocial behavior by Rhee and Waldman (2002). The authors combined the results of 51 twin and adoption studies and concluded that antisocial behavior has an important genetic component. However, twin and adoption studies contain several methodological flaws and are subject to the confounding influence of environmental factors. Therefore, Rhee and Waldman's conclusions in favor of genetic influences are not supported by the evidence. Two additional topics are Rhee and Waldman's incorrect description of the heritability concept and their failure to discuss several German criminal twin studies published during the Nazi era.

  11. Effects of milk components and food additives on survival of three bifidobacteria strains in fermented milk under simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ziarno, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Background In the dairy industry, probiotic strains of Bifidobacterium are introduced into the composition of traditional starter cultures intended for the production of fermented foods, or sometimes are the sole microflora responsible for the fermentation process. In order to be able to reach the intestines alive and fulfil their beneficial role, probiotic strains must be able to withstand the acidity of the gastric juices and bile present in the duodenum. Objective The paper reports effects of selected fermented milk components on the viability of three strains of bifidobacteria in fermented milk during subsequent incubation under conditions representing model digestive juices. Design The viability of the bifidobacterial cells was examined after a 3-h incubation of fermented milk under simulated gastric juice conditions and then after 5-h incubation under simulated duodenum juice conditions. The Bifidobacterium strains tested differed in their sensitivity to the simulated conditions of the gastrointestinal juices. Results Bifidobacterial cell viability in simulated intestinal juices was dependent on the strain used in our experiments, and product components acted protectively towards bifidobacterial cells and its dose. Conclusions Bifidobacterial cells introduced into the human gastrointestinal tract as food ingredients have a good chance of survival during intestinal transit and to reach the large intestine thanks to the protective properties of the food components and depending on the strain and composition of the food. PMID:26546945

  12. Rate of evolutionary change in cranial morphology of the marsupial genus Monodelphis is constrained by the availability of additive genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Porto, A; Sebastião, H; Pavan, S E; VandeBerg, J L; Marroig, G; Cheverud, J M

    2015-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the rate of marsupial cranial evolution is dependent on the distribution of genetic variation in multivariate space. To do so, we carried out a genetic analysis of cranial morphological variation in laboratory strains of Monodelphis domestica and used estimates of genetic covariation to analyse the morphological diversification of the Monodelphis brevicaudata species group. We found that within-species genetic variation is concentrated in only a few axes of the morphospace and that this strong genetic covariation influenced the rate of morphological diversification of the brevicaudata group, with between-species divergence occurring fastest when occurring along the genetic line of least resistance. Accounting for the geometric distribution of genetic variation also increased our ability to detect the selective regimen underlying species diversification, with several instances of selection only being detected when genetic covariances were taken into account. Therefore, this work directly links patterns of genetic covariation among traits to macroevolutionary patterns of morphological divergence. Our findings also suggest that the limited distribution of Monodelphis species in morphospace is the result of a complex interplay between the limited dimensionality of available genetic variation and strong stabilizing selection along two major axes of genetic variation.

  13. Msxb is a core component of the genetic circuitry specifying the dorsal and ventral neurogenic midlines in the ascidian embryo.

    PubMed

    Roure, Agnès; Darras, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The tail ascidian larval peripheral nervous system is made up of epidermal sensory neurons distributed more or less regularly in ventral and dorsal midlines. Their formation occurs in two-steps: the ventral and dorsal midlines are induced as neurogenic territories by Fgf9/16/20 and Admp respectively. The Delta2/Notch interaction then controls the number of neurons that form. The genetic machinery acting between the inductive processes taking place before gastrulation and neuron specification at tailbud stages are largely unknown. The analysis of seven transcription factors expressed in the forming midlines revealed an unexpected complexity and dynamic of gene expression. Their systematic overexpression confirmed that these genes do not interact following a linear cascade of activation. However, the integration of our data revealed the distinct key roles of the two upstream factors Msxb and Nkx-C that are the earliest expressed genes and the only ones able to induce neurogenic midline and ESN formation. Our data suggest that Msxb would be the primary midline gene integrating inputs from the ventral and dorsal inducers and launching a pan-midline transcriptional program. Nkx-C would be involved in tail tip specification, in maintenance of the pan-midline network and in a posterior to anterior wave controlling differentiation.

  14. Strong genetic evidence for a selective influence of GABAA receptors on a component of the bipolar disorder phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Nick; Jones, Lisa; Jones, Ian R; Kirov, George; Green, Elaine K; Grozeva, Detelina; Moskvina, Valentina; Nikolov, Ivan; Hamshere, Marian L; Vukcevic, Damjan; Caesar, Sian; Gordon-Smith, Katharine; Fraser, Christine; Russell, Ellie; Norton, Nadine; Breen, Gerome; Clair, David St; Collier, David A; Young, Allan H; Ferrier, I Nicol; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A; Donnelly, Peter; Owen, Michael J; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Despite compelling evidence for a major genetic contribution to risk of bipolar mood disorder, conclusive evidence implicating specific genes or pathophysiological systems has proved elusive. In part this is likely to be related to the unknown validity of current phenotype definitions and consequent aetiological heterogeneity of samples. In the recent Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) genome-wide association analysis of bipolar disorder (1868 cases, 2938 controls) one of the most strongly associated polymorphisms lay within the gene encoding the GABAA receptor β1 subunit, GABRB1. Aiming to increase biological homogeneity, we sought the diagnostic subset that showed the strongest signal at this polymorphism and used this to test for independent evidence of association with other members of the GABAA receptor gene family. The index signal was significantly enriched in the 279 cases meeting Research Diagnostic Criteria for schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type (p=3.8×10−6). Independently, these cases showed strong evidence that variation in GABAA receptor genes influences risk for this phenotype (independent system-wide p=6.6×10−5) with association signals also at GABRA4, GABRB3, GABRA5 and GABRR1. Our findings have the potential to inform understanding of presentation, pathogenesis and nosology of bipolar disorders. Our method of phenotype refinement may be useful in studies of other complex psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. PMID:19078961

  15. Performance comparison of three types of high-speed counter-current chromatographs for the separation of components of hydrophilic and hydrophobic color additives.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Adrian; Ito, Yoichiro

    2011-09-09

    The performance of three types of high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) instruments was assessed for their use in separating components in hydrophilic and hydrophobic dye mixtures. The HSCCC instruments compared were: (i) a J-type coil planet centrifuge (CPC) system with a conventional multilayer-coil column, (ii) a J-type CPC system with a spiral-tube assembly-coil column, and (iii) a cross-axis CPC system with a multilayer-coil column. The hydrophilic dye mixture consisted of a sample of FD&C Blue No. 2 that contained mainly two isomeric components, 5,5'- and 5,7'-disulfonated indigo, in the ratio of ∼7:1. The hydrophobic dye mixture consisted of a sample of D&C Red No. 17 (mainly Sudan III) and Sudan II in the ratio of ∼4:1. The two-phase solvent systems used for these separations were 1-butanol/1.3M HCl and hexane/acetonitrile. Each of the three instruments was used in two experiments for the hydrophilic dye mixture and two for the hydrophobic dye mixture, for a total of 12 experiments. In one set of experiments, the lower phase was used as the mobile phase, and in the second set of experiments, the upper phase was used as the mobile phase. The results suggest that: (a) use of a J-type instrument with either a multilayer-coil column or a spiral-tube assembly column, applying the lower phase as the mobile phase, is preferable for separating the hydrophilic components of FD&C Blue No. 2; and (b) use of a J-type instrument with multilayer-coil column, while applying either the upper phase or the lower phase as the mobile phase, is preferable for separating the hydrophobic dye mixture of D&C Red No. 17 and Sudan II.

  16. Genetic and molecular analysis of the autosomal component of the primary sex determination signal of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Barbash, D.A.; Cline, T.W.

    1995-12-01

    Drosophila sex is determined by the action of the X:A chromosome balance on transcription of Sex-lethal (Sxl), a feminizing switch gene. We obtained loss-of-function mutations in denominator elements of the X:A signal by selecting for dominant suppressors of a female-specific lethal mutation in the numerator element, sisterlessA (sisA). Ten suppressors were recovered in this extensive genome-wide selection. All were mutations in deadpan (dpn), a pleiotropic locus previously discovered to be a denominator element. Detailed genetic and molecular characterization is presented of this diverse set of new dpn alleles including their effects on Sxl. Although selected only for impairment of sex-specific functions, all were also impaired in nonsex-specific functions. Male-lethal effects were anticipated for mutations in a major denominator element, but we found that viability of males lacking dpn function was reduced no more than 50% relative to their dpn{sup -} sisters. Moreover, loss of dpn activity in males caused only a modest depression of the Sxl {open_quotes}establishment{close_quotes} promoter (Sxl{sub Pe}), the X:A target. By itself, dpn cannot account for the masculinizing effect of increased autosomal ploidy, the effect that gave rise to the concept of the X:A ratio; nevertheless, if there are other denominator elements, our results suggest that their individual contributions to the sex-determination signal are even less than that of dpn. The time course of expression of dpn and Sxl in dpn mutant backgrounds suggests that dpn is required for sex determination only during the later stages of X:A signaling in males to prevent inappropriate expression of Sxl{sub Pe} in the face of increasing sis gene product levels. 77 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Genetic and molecular analysis of the autosomal component of the primary sex determination signal of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Barbash, D A; Cline, T W

    1995-12-01

    Drosophila sex is determined by the action of the X:A chromosome balance on transcription of Sex-lethal (Sxl), a feminizing switch gene. We obtained loss-of-function mutations in denominator elements of the X:A signal by selecting for dominant suppressors of a female-specific lethal mutation in the numerator element, sisterlessA (sisA). Ten suppressors were recovered in this extensive genome-wide selection. All were mutations in deadpan (dpn), a pleiotropic locus previously discovered to be a denominator element. Detailed genetic and molecular characterization is presented of this diverse set of new dpn alleles including their effects on Sxl. Although selected only for impairment of sex-specific functions, all were also impaired in nonsex-specific functions. Male-lethal effects were anticipated for mutations in a major denominator element, but we found that viability of males lacking dpn function was reduced no more than 50% relative to their dpn- sisters. Moreover, loss of dpn activity in males caused only a modest derepression of the Sxl "establishment" promoter (Sxlpe), the X:A target. By itself, dpn cannot account for the masculinizing effect of increased autosomal ploidy, the effect that gave rise to the concept of the X:A ratio; nevertheless, if there are other denominator elements, our results suggest that their individual contributions to the sex-determination signal are even less than that of dpn. The time course of expression of dpn and of Sxl in dpn mutant backgrounds suggests that dpn is required for sex determination only during the later stages of X:A signaling in males to prevent inappropriate expression of Sxlpe in the face of increasing sis gene product levels.

  18. The giant granodiorite block from Heuberg, Austria: Geoelectric measurements of a submarine debris flow component and its genetic interpretation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, B.; Gebhardt, H.; Krenmayr, H.-G.; Coric, S.

    2009-04-01

    During geological mappings a single huge grey granodiorite block was encountered east of Siegersdorf (near Tulln, Lower Austria), on the northwestern slope of the Heuberg within the sub-alpine Molasse. The block is rich in biotite and was deposited together with smaller (dm to m scale) granitic and sandstone boulders in the informal lithostratigraphic unit „Blockschichten vom Heuberg". Similar granitic debris was also found farther west. These macroscopically very similar rocks (Krenmayr, 2003a) were identified by Humer & Finger (2004) as variscic biotite granite and granodiorite. They are similar to those of the Mauthausen/Freistadt - Group or equivalent rocks, which where encountered in drillings farther east in the Tullner Feld area. Due to the expected high electrical resistivity contrast (silt / marl and granite) the multi electrode geoelectric method was used to study the granite body. The geoelectrical measurements of the granite block with a total of four profiles revealed dimensions of approx. 21 x 29 x 8 m (width x length x depth). With its volume of about 2900 m3, it is probably the largest known single component in Lower Austria Molasse deposits. The age of the surrounding marls, sands and sandstones was determined by foraminifers und nannoplankton associations as Eggenburgium (Lower Miocene). Primarily submarine debris flow come into consideration as transportation and deposition mechanism due to accompaning sediment structures (massive fabric, lack of gradation and sorting, solitary sizable matrix supported components in fine sand matrix). Imbrications on the basis of the sequence point to a transportation of the material from the north (Bohemian Mass) towards the south. It is well known that the southernmost area of the Bohemian Mass was affected by fracture tectonics in the era of the lower Miocene - this is documented by widespreaded crystalline megabreccia of the Mauer-Formation in the Dunkelstein-Forest (Krenmayr 2003b). Therefore the giant

  19. Direct and maternal (co)variance components, genetic parameters and annual trends for growth traits of Dorper sheep in semi-arid Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, C M; Ilatsia, Evans D; Kosgey, Isaac S; Kahi, Alexander K

    2010-03-01

    Genetic and phenotypic parameters were estimated for lamb growth traits for the Dorper sheep in semi-arid Kenya using an animal model. Data on lamb growth performance were extracted from available performance records at the Sheep and Goats Station in Naivasha, Kenya. Growth traits considered were body weights at birth (BW0, kg), at 1 month (BW1, kg), at 2 months (BW2, kg), at weaning (WW, kg), at 6 months (BW6, kg), at 9 months (BW9, kg) and at yearling (YW, kg), average daily gain from birth to 6 months (ADG(0-6), gm) and from 6 months to 1 year (ADG(6-12), gm). Direct heritability estimates were, correspondingly, 0.18, 0.36, 0.32, 0.28, 0.21, 0.14, 0.29, 0.12 and 0.30 for BW0, BW1, BW2, WW, BW6, BW9, YW, ADG(0-6) and ADG(6-12). The corresponding maternal genetic heritability estimates for body weights up to 9 months were 0.16, 0.10, 0.10, 0.19, 0.21 and 0.18. Direct-maternal genetic correlations were negative and high ranging between -0.47 to -0.94. Negative genetic correlations were observed for ADG(0-6)-ADG(6-12), BW2-ADG(6-12), WW-ADG(6-12) and BW6-ADG(6-12). Phenotypic correlations ranged from 0.15 to 0.96. Maternal effects are important in the growth performance of the Dorper sheep though a negative correlation exists between direct and maternal genetic effects. The current study has provided important information on the extent of additive genetic variation in the existing flocks that could now be used in determining the merit of breeding rams and ewes for sale to the commercial flocks. The estimates provided would form the basis of designing breeding schemes for the Dorper sheep in Kenya. Implications of the study to future Dorper sheep breeding programmes are also discussed.

  20. Genetic Deficiency of Complement Component 3 Does Not Alter Disease Progression in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Paul B; Muchowski, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Several genes and proteins of the complement cascade are present at elevated levels in brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD). The complement cascade is well characterized as an effector arm of the immune system, and in the brain it is important for developmental synapse elimination. We hypothesized that increased levels of complement in HD brains contributes to disease progression, perhaps by contributing to synapse elimination or inflammatory signaling. We tested this hypothesis in the R6/2 mouse model of HD by crossing mice deficient in complement component 3 (C3), a crucial complement protein found at increased levels in HD brains, to R6/2 mice and monitoring behavioral and neuropathological disease progression. We found no alterations in multiple behavioral assays, weight or survival in R6/2 mice lacking C3. We also quantified the expression of several complement cascade genes in R6/2 brains and found that the large scale upregulation of complement genes observed in HD brains is not mirrored in R6/2 brains. These data show that C3 deficiency does not alter disease progression in the R6/2 mouse model of HD.

  1. Genetic Analysis of the Functions and Interactions of Components of the LevQRST Signal Transduction Complex of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin; Das, Satarupa; Burne, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of the genes for a fructan hydrolase (fruA) and a fructose/mannose sugar:phosphotransferase permease (levDEFG) in Streptococcus mutans is activated by a four-component regulatory system consisting of a histidine kinase (LevS), a response regulator (LevR) and two carbohydrate-binding proteins (LevQT). The expression of the fruA and levD operons was at baseline in a levQ mutant and substantially decreased in a levT null mutant, with lower expression with the cognate inducers fructose or mannose, but slightly higher expression in glucose or galactose. A strain expressing levQ with two point mutations (E170A/F292S) did not require inducers to activate gene expression and displayed altered levD expression when growing on various carbohydrates, including cellobiose. Linker-scanning (LS) mutagenesis was used to generate three libraries of mutants of levQ, levS and levT that displayed various levels of altered substrate specificity and of fruA/levD gene expression. The data support that LevQ and LevT are intimately involved in the sensing of carbohydrate signals, and that LevQ appears to be required for the integrity of the signal transduction complex, apparently by interacting with the sensor kinase LevS. PMID:21364902

  2. Genetic Interactions between Hop1, Red1 and Mek1 Suggest That Mek1 Regulates Assembly of Axial Element Components during Meiosis in the Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, N. M.; Ponte, L.

    1997-01-01

    During meiosis, axial elements are generated by the condensation of sister chromatids along a protein core as precursors to the formation of the synaptonemal complex (SC). Functional axial elements are essential for wild-type levels of recombination and proper reductional segregation at meiosis I. Genetic and cytological data suggest that three meiosis-specific genes, HOP1, RED1 and MEK1, are involved in axial element formation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. HOP1 and RED1 encode structural components of axial elements while MEK1 encodes a putative protein kinase. Using a partially functional allele of MEK1, new genetic interactions have been found between HOP1, RED1 and MEK1. Overexpression of HOP1 partially suppresses the spore inviability and recombination defects of mek1-974; in contrast, overexpression of RED1 exacerbates the mek1-974 spore inviability. Co-overexpression of HOP1 and RED1 in mek1-974 diploids alleviates the negative effect of overexpressing RED1 alone. Red1p/Red1p as well as Hop1p/Red1p interactions have been reconstituted in two hybrid experiments. Our results suggest a model whereby Mek1 kinase activity controls axial element assembly by regulating the affinity with which Hop1p and Red1p interact with each other. PMID:9286666

  3. Paravertebral Well-Differentiated Liposarcoma with Low-Grade Osteosarcomatous Component: Case Report with 11-Year Follow-Up, Radiological, Pathological, and Genetic Data, and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Stéphane; Maues de Paula, André; Salas, Sébastien; Mattéi, Jean-Camille; Dupuis, Charlotte; Appay, Romain; Aurias, Alain; Dufour, Henry; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Bouvier, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Despite being one of the most frequent soft-tissue sarcomas, well-differentiated liposarcoma has never been reported near the spine. The authors present the case of a 67-year-old man with progressive history of back pain. Physical examination revealed a mass located within the right paravertebral muscles. MR and CT imaging showed a heavily ossified central mass surrounded by a peripheral fatty component. No connection with the underlying bone was detected on imagery and during surgery. After surgical resection, histopathological examination revealed a tumor harboring combined features of well-differentiated liposarcoma and low-grade osteosarcoma. Tumor cells displayed overexpression of MDM2, CDK4, and P16 by immunohistochemistry and CGH revealed amplification of 12q13-15 as the only genetic imbalance. MDM2 FISH analysis was performed but was inconclusive. The pathological, immunohistochemical, and genetic features, the differential diagnoses, and the therapeutic management of this unusual tumor are discussed. No complementary treatment was performed initially. Following first treatment, two recurrences occurred 6 and 9 years later, both displaying histological features similar to the first occurrence. Radiotherapy was started after the second recurrence. Follow-up shows no evidence of disease 11 years after initial diagnosis. This case was unusual due to the paravertebral location of the tumor and its divergent differentiation. PMID:28377828

  4. A conserved genetic module that encodes the major virion components in both the coliphage T4 and the marine cyanophage S-PM2

    PubMed Central

    Hambly, Emma; Tétart, Francoise; Desplats, Carine; Wilson, William H.; Krisch, Henry M.; Mann, Nicholas H.

    2001-01-01

    Sequence analysis of a 10-kb region of the genome of the marine cyanomyovirus S-PM2 reveals a homology to coliphage T4 that extends as a contiguous block from gene (g)18 to g23. The order of the S-PM2 genes in this region is similar to that of T4, but there are insertions and deletions of small ORFs of unknown function. In T4, g18 codes for the tail sheath, g19, the tail tube, g20, the head portal protein, g21, the prohead core protein, g22, a scaffolding protein, and g23, the major capsid protein. Thus, the entire module that determines the structural components of the phage head and contractile tail is conserved between T4 and this cyanophage. The significant differences in the morphology of these phages must reflect the considerable divergence of the amino acid sequence of their homologous virion proteins, which uniformly exceeds 50%. We suggest that their enormous diversity in the sea could be a result of genetic shuffling between disparate phages mediated by such commonly shared modules. These conserved sequences could facilitate genetic exchange by providing partially homologous substrates for recombination between otherwise divergent phage genomes. Such a mechanism would thus expand the pool of phage genes accessible by recombination to all those phages that share common modules. PMID:11553768

  5. Reinvestigation of the Unimolecular Reactions of CHF2CHF2: Identification of the 1,1-HF Elimination Component from Addition of :CFCHF2 to trans-2-Butene.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caleb A; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2016-12-01

    The recombination of ·CHF2 radicals in a room-temperature bath gas was used to generate CHF2CHF2* (where * indicates vibrational excitation) molecules with 96 kcal mol(-1) of vibrational energy. The CHF2CHF2* molecules decompose by four-centered 1,2-HF elimination and by three-centered 1,1-HF elimination reactions to give HF and either CHF═CF2 or :CFCHF2, respectively. The 1,1-HF component was identified by trapping the :CFCHF2 carbene with trans-2-butene that forms 1-fluoro-1-difluoromethyl-2,3-dimethylcyclopropane. The total rate constant for the decomposition of CHF2CHF2* was 6.0 × 10(5) s(-1), and the rate constant for the 1,1-HF pathway forming the carbene, as measured by the 1-fluoro-1-difluoromethyl-2,3-dimethylcyclopropane yield, was 1.4 × 10(5) s(-1). On the basis of matching the experimental rate constants to calculated statistical rate constants, the threshold energies for the four-centered and three-centered reactions are 78 and ≤85 kcal mol(-1), respectively.

  6. Construction of a genetic linkage map and QTL analysis of erucic acid content and glucosinolate components in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is an important condiment crop for the spice trade in the world. It has lagged behind oilseed Brassica species in molecular marker development and application. Intron length polymorphism (ILP) markers are highly polymorphic, co-dominant and cost-effective. The cross-species applicability of ILP markers from Brassica species and Arabidopsis makes them possible to be used for genetic linkage mapping and further QTL analysis of agronomic traits in yellow mustard. Results A total of 250 ILP and 14 SSR markers were mapped on 12 linkage groups and designated as Sal01-12 in yellow mustard. The constructed map covered a total genetic length of 890.4 cM with an average marker interval of 3.3 cM. The QTL for erucic content co-localized with the fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1) gene on Sal03. The self-(in)compatibility gene was assigned to Sal08. The 4-hydroxybenzyl, 3-indolylmethyl and 4-hydroxy-3-indolylmethyl glucosinolate contents were each controlled by one major QTL, all of which were located on Sal02. Two QTLs, accounting for the respective 20.4% and 19.2% of the total variation of 2-hydroxy-3-butenyl glucosinolate content, were identified and mapped to Sal02 and Sal11. Comparative synteny analysis revealed that yellow mustard was phylogenetically related to Arabidopsis thaliana and had undergone extensive chromosomal rearrangements during speciation. Conclusion The linkage map based on ILP and SSR markers was constructed and used for QTL analysis of seed quality traits in yellow mustard. The markers tightly linked with the genes for different glucosinolate components will be used for marker-assisted selection and map-based cloning. The ILP markers and linkage map provide useful molecular tools for yellow mustard breeding. PMID:24066707

  7. Additive effects of LPL, APOA5 and APOE variant combinations on triglyceride levels and hypertriglyceridemia: results of the ICARIA genetic sub-study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well-established independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the influence of several genetic variants in genes related with triglyceride (TG) metabolism has been described, including LPL, APOA5 and APOE. The combined analysis of these polymorphisms could produce clinically meaningful complementary information. Methods A subgroup of the ICARIA study comprising 1825 Spanish subjects (80% men, mean age 36 years) was genotyped for the LPL-HindIII (rs320), S447X (rs328), D9N (rs1801177) and N291S (rs268) polymorphisms, the APOA5-S19W (rs3135506) and -1131T/C (rs662799) variants, and the APOE polymorphism (rs429358; rs7412) using PCR and restriction analysis and TaqMan assays. We used regression analyses to examine their combined effects on TG levels (with the log-transformed variable) and the association of variant combinations with TG levels and hypertriglyceridemia (TG ≥ 1.69 mmol/L), including the covariates: gender, age, waist circumference, blood glucose, blood pressure, smoking and alcohol consumption. Results We found a significant lowering effect of the LPL-HindIII and S447X polymorphisms (p < 0.0001). In addition, the D9N, N291S, S19W and -1131T/C variants and the APOE-ε4 allele were significantly associated with an independent additive TG-raising effect (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Grouping individuals according to the presence of TG-lowering or TG-raising polymorphisms showed significant differences in TG levels (p < 0.0001), with the lowest levels exhibited by carriers of two lowering variants (10.2% reduction in TG geometric mean with respect to individuals who were homozygous for the frequent alleles of all the variants), and the highest levels in carriers of raising combinations (25.1% mean TG increase). Thus, carrying two lowering variants was protective against HTG (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.98; p = 0.042) and having one single raising polymorphism (OR

  8. Variance Components and Genetic Parameters Estimated for Fat and Protein Content in Individual Months of Lactation: The Case of Tsigai Sheep.

    PubMed

    Oravcová, Marta

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess variance components and genetic parameters for fat and protein content in Tsigai sheep using multivariate animal models in which fat and protein content in individual months of lactation were treated as different traits, and univariate models in which fat and protein content were treated as repeated measures of the same traits. Test day measurements were taken between the second and the seventh month of lactation. The fixed effects were lactation number, litter size and days in milk. The random effects were animal genetic effect and permanent environmental effect of ewe. The effect of flock-year-month of test day measurement was fitted either as a fixed (FYM) or random (fym) effect. Heritabilities for fat content were estimated between 0.06 and 0.17 (FYM fitted) and between 0.06 and 0.11 (fym fitted). Heritabilities for protein content were estimated between 0.15 and 0.23 (FYM fitted) and between 0.10 and 0.18 (fym fitted). For fat content, variance ratios of permanent environmental effect of ewe were estimated between 0.04 and 0.11 (FYM fitted) and between 0.02 and 0.06 (fym fitted). For protein content, variance ratios of permanent environmental effect of ewe were estimated between 0.13 and 0.20 (FYM fitted) and between 0.08 and 0.12 (fym fitted). The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by fym effect ranged from 0.39 to 0.43 for fat content and from 0.25 to 0.36 for protein content. Genetic correlations between individual months of lactation ranged from 0.74 to 0.99 (fat content) and from 0.64 to 0.99 (protein content). Fat content heritabilities estimated with univariate animal models roughly corresponded with heritability estimates from multivariate models: 0.13 (FYM fitted) and 0.07 (fym fitted). Protein content heritabilities estimated with univariate animal models also corresponded with heritability estimates from multivariate models: 0.18 (FYM fitted) and 0.13 (fym fitted).

  9. Principal component analysis- adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling and genetic algorithm optimization of adsorption of methylene blue by activated carbon derived from Pistacia khinjuk.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Ghaedi, A M; Abdi, F; Roosta, M; Vafaei, A; Asghari, A

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, activated carbon (AC) simply derived from Pistacia khinjuk and characterized using different techniques such as SEM and BET analysis. This new adsorbent was used for methylene blue (MB) adsorption. Fitting the experimental equilibrium data to various isotherm models shows the suitability and applicability of the Langmuir model. The adsorption mechanism and rate of processes was investigated by analyzing time dependency data to conventional kinetic models and it was found that adsorption follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Principle component analysis (PCA) has been used for preprocessing of input data and genetic algorithm optimization have been used for prediction of adsorption of methylene blue using activated carbon derived from P. khinjuk. In our laboratory various activated carbon as sole adsorbent or loaded with various nanoparticles was used for removal of many pollutants (Ghaedi et al., 2012). These results indicate that the small amount of proposed adsorbent (1.0g) is applicable for successful removal of MB (RE>98%) in short time (45min) with high adsorption capacity (48-185mgg(-1)).

  10. Addition of four-hundred fifty-five microsatellite marker loci to the high density Gossypium hirsutum TM-1 x G. barbadense 3-79 genetic map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high density genetic linkage map plays important roles in understanding genome structure of tetraploid cotton, dissecting economically important traits, identifying molecular markers associated with a trait, and cloning a gene of interest through map-based cloning strategy. Four hundred fifty f...

  11. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  12. Identification of potential genetic components involved in the deviant quorum-sensing signaling pathways of Burkholderia glumae through a functional genomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruoxi; Barphagha, Inderjit K.; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the chief causal agent for bacterial panicle blight of rice. The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum-sensing (QS) system dependent on a pair of luxI and luxR homologs, tofI and tofR, is the primary cell-to-cell signaling mechanism determining the virulence of this bacterium. Production of toxoflavin, a major virulence factor of B. glumae, is known to be dependent on the tofI/tofR QS system. In our previous study, however, it was observed that B. glumae mutants defective in tofI or tofR produced toxoflavin if they grew on the surface of a solid medium, suggesting that alternative signaling pathways independent of tofI or tofR are activated in that growth condition for the production of toxoflavin. In this study, potential genetic components involved in the tofI- and tofR-independent signaling pathways for toxoflavin production were sought through screening random mini-Tn5 mutants of B. glumae to better understand the intercellular signaling pathways of this pathogen. Fifteen and three genes were initially identified as the potential genetic elements of the tofI- and tofR-independent pathways, respectively. Especially, the ORF (bglu_2g06320) divergently transcribed from toxJ, which encodes an orphan LuxR protein and controls toxoflavin biosynthesis, was newly identified in this study as a gene required for the tofR-independent toxoflavin production and named as toxK. Among those genes, flhD, dgcB, and wzyB were further studied to validate their functions in the tofI-independent toxoflavin production, and similar studies were also conducted with qsmR and toxK for their functions in the tofR-independent toxoflavin production. This work provides a foundation for future comprehensive studies of the intercellular signaling systems of B. glumae and other related pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25806356

  13. Effect of active component addition and support modification on catalytic activity of Ag/Al2O3 for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by hydrocarbon - A review.

    PubMed

    More, Pavan M

    2017-03-01

    The effect of active component addition and support modification of Ag/Al2O3 has been reviewed to examine their contribution to HC-SCR of NOx. This review has depicted the possible mechanisms of reduction of NO by hydrocarbon using metal/metal oxide doped Ag/Al2O3. The addition of second metal results in the maximum formation of well dispersed Agn(δ+) clusters. Specifically, addition of Au improves the low-temperature activity of the catalyst. However, the role of second metal also depends on the pretreatment to the catalyst and nature of the reductants. The support modification of Ag/Al2O3 by the addition of different metal oxides has also been reviewed. Modification by MgO showed improvement in activity besides sulfur tolerance. In situ DRIFT study demonstrates that the modification by MgO leads to the inhibition of sulfate formation of Ag and Al2O3. Enhancement in activity after second metal addition and support modification attributed to the synergistic effect and improved surface properties of Ag/Al2O3 catalyst.

  14. Characterization of TRPC2, an essential genetic component of VNS chemoreception, provides insights into the evolution of pheromonal olfaction in secondary-adapted marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Jin, Wei; Wang, Jia-xin; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Meng-meng; Zhu, Zhou-hai; Lee, Hang; Lee, Muyeong; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2010-07-01

    Pheromones are chemical cues released and sensed by individuals of the same species, which are of major importance in regulating reproductive and social behaviors of mammals. Generally, they are detected by the vomeronasal system (VNS). Here, we first investigated and compared an essential genetic component of vomeronasal chemoreception, that is, TRPC2 gene, of four marine mammals varying the degree of aquatic specialization and related terrestrial species in order to provide insights into the evolution of pheromonal olfaction in the mammalian transition from land to water. Our results based on sequence characterizations and evolutionary analyses, for the first time, show the evidence for the ancestral impairment of vomeronasal pheromone signal transduction pathway in fully aquatic cetaceans, supporting a reduced or absent dependence on olfaction as a result of the complete adaptation to the marine habitat, whereas the amphibious California sea lion was found to have a putatively functional TRPC2 gene, which is still under strong selective pressures, reflecting the reliance of terrestrial environment on chemical recognition among the semiadapted marine mammals. Interestingly, our study found that, unlike that of the California sea lion, TRPC2 genes of the harbor seal and the river otter, both of which are also semiaquatic, are pseudogenes. Our data suggest that other unknown selective pressures or sensory modalities might have promoted the independent absence of a functional VNS in these two species. In this respect, the evolution of pheromonal olfaction in marine mammals appears to be more complex and confusing than has been previously thought. Our study makes a useful contribution to the current understanding of the evolution of pheromone perception of mammals in response to selective pressures from an aquatic environment.

  15. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course.

    PubMed

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Hayes, Richard B; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M; Crout, Richard J; Marazita, Mary L; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D; Fox, Caroline S; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demerath, Ellen W; Dyer, Thomas D; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Zillikens, M Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I

    2013-09-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10⁻⁸) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10⁻²³), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10⁻¹⁷), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10⁻¹⁷), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10⁻¹¹), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10⁻⁹), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10⁻⁸) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10⁻⁸) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10⁻⁵ after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18-90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M.; Crout, Richard J.; Marazita, Mary L.; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P.; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10−8) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10−23), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10−17), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10−17), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10−11), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10−9), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10−8) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10−8) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10−5 after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18–90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages. PMID:23669352

  17. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short-Hard Gamma-ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-law Component from 10 keV TO GeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E peak = 3.9 ± 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 ± 0.03 that dominates the emission below ≈20 keV and above ≈100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by ~0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5+5.8 -2.6 GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, Γgsim 1200, using simple γγ opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the ≈100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply Γ >~ 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  18. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    PubMed

    Safra, Noa; Bassuk, Alexander G; Ferguson, Polly J; Aguilar, Miriam; Coulson, Rochelle L; Thomas, Nicholas; Hitchens, Peta L; Dickinson, Peter J; Vernau, Karen M; Wolf, Zena T; Bannasch, Danika L

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5)), after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525) were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036). This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  19. The genetic architecture of fitness in a seed beetle: assessing the potential for indirect genetic benefits of female choice

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Quantifying the amount of standing genetic variation in fitness represents an empirical challenge. Unfortunately, the shortage of detailed studies of the genetic architecture of fitness has hampered progress in several domains of evolutionary biology. One such area is the study of sexual selection. In particular, the evolution of adaptive female choice by indirect genetic benefits relies on the presence of genetic variation for fitness. Female choice by genetic benefits fall broadly into good genes (additive) models and compatibility (non-additive) models where the strength of selection is dictated by the genetic architecture of fitness. To characterize the genetic architecture of fitness, we employed a quantitative genetic design (the diallel cross) in a population of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, which is known to exhibit post-copulatory female choice. From reciprocal crosses of inbred lines, we assayed egg production, egg-to-adult survival, and lifetime offspring production of the outbred F1 daughters (F1 productivity). Results We used the bio model to estimate six components of genetic and environmental variance in fitness. We found sizeable additive and non-additive genetic variance in F1 productivity, but lower genetic variance in egg-to-adult survival, which was strongly influenced by maternal and paternal effects. Conclusion Our results show that, in order to gain a relevant understanding of the genetic architecture of fitness, measures of offspring fitness should be inclusive and should include quantifications of offspring reproductive success. We note that our estimate of additive genetic variance in F1 productivity (CVA = 14%) is sufficient to generate indirect selection on female choice. However, our results also show that the major determinant of offspring fitness is the genetic interaction between parental genomes, as indicated by large amounts of non-additive genetic variance (dominance and/or epistasis) for F1 productivity. We

  20. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  1. Implications of recurrent disturbance for genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ian D; Cary, Geoffrey J; Landguth, Erin L; Lindenmayer, David B; Banks, Sam C

    2016-02-01

    Exploring interactions between ecological disturbance, species' abundances and community composition provides critical insights for ecological dynamics. While disturbance is also potentially an important driver of landscape genetic patterns, the mechanisms by which these patterns may arise by selective and neutral processes are not well-understood. We used simulation to evaluate the relative importance of disturbance regime components, and their interaction with demographic and dispersal processes, on the distribution of genetic diversity across landscapes. We investigated genetic impacts of variation in key components of disturbance regimes and spatial patterns that are likely to respond to climate change and land management, including disturbance size, frequency, and severity. The influence of disturbance was mediated by dispersal distance and, to a limited extent, by birth rate. Nevertheless, all three disturbance regime components strongly influenced spatial and temporal patterns of genetic diversity within subpopulations, and were associated with changes in genetic structure. Furthermore, disturbance-induced changes in temporal population dynamics and the spatial distribution of populations across the landscape resulted in disrupted isolation by distance patterns among populations. Our results show that forecast changes in disturbance regimes have the potential to cause major changes to the distribution of genetic diversity within and among populations. We highlight likely scenarios under which future changes to disturbance size, severity, or frequency will have the strongest impacts on population genetic patterns. In addition, our results have implications for the inference of biological processes from genetic data, because the effects of dispersal on genetic patterns were strongly mediated by disturbance regimes.

  2. Effects of segregation and impact of specific feeding behaviour and additional fruit on voluntary nutrient and energy intake in yellow-shouldered amazons (Amazona barbadensis) when fed a multi-component seed diet ad libitum.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, I D; Veys, A C; Geeroms, B; Reinschmidt, M; Waugh, D; Werquin, G; Janssens, G P J

    2010-12-01

    Parrots are commonly fed multi-component seed diets; however, both segregation and feeding behaviour might alter ingredient and nutrient composition of the offered diet. First, the nutritional impact of segregation was assessed as it occurs when multi-component diets are temporarily stored in food containers that are replenished before completely emptied and birds being fed from the upper layer. The most detrimental effect hereof was a vast decrease in mineral supplements, leading to a decrease in Ca:P ratio in the offered food in relation to the formulated diet. Next, caloric distribution shifted towards more EE energy at the expense of NFE energy, as proportion of oilseeds increased and NFE-rich seeds decreased. Next, a feeding trial was performed on six yellow-shouldered amazons (Amazona Barbadensis) in which nutritional impact of parrot-specific feeding behaviour was assessed as well as the influence of additional provision of fruit next to the seed mixture. Profound selective feeding behaviour and dehusking of seeds resulted in a vast increase in energetic density by up to 64% in the ingested fraction in relation to the offered mixture in toto. Furthermore, the already suboptimal Ca:P ratio further deteriorated and caloric distribution shifted by over twofold towards EE energy accompanied with a vast decline in NFE energy, CP energy remaining similar. Finally, provision of fruit next to the seed diet significantly lowered voluntary energy intake from 936 ± 71 to 809 ± 109 kJ ME/kg(0.75)/day, without compromising adequate protein intake. In conclusion, notwithstanding efforts of nutritionists to formulate diets to approximate estimated, species-specific requirements, nutritional composition of the actually consumed fraction of multi-component seed diets can be vastly deteriorated by both animal and management factors. Furthermore, offering of fruit next to a seed-based diet effectively reduces voluntary energy intake and can hence be applied to abate obesity.

  3. Antioxidant value addition in human diets: genetic transformation of Brassica juncea with gamma-TMT gene for increased alpha-tocopherol content.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2007-02-01

    Alpha-tocopherol, the most biologically active form of vitamin E, is implicated in decreasing the risk of several types of cancers, coronary heart disease and a number of degenerative human conditions, when taken in excess of the recommended daily allowance. Natural alpha-tocopherol has twice the bioavailability of the synthetic isomer. This study describes a successful attempt at fortifying human diets with natural alpha-tocopherol by taking recourse to genetic engineering of an important oilseed crop, Brassica juncea. Gamma-tocopherol methyl transferase cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana, coding for the enzyme catalysing the conversion of the large gamma-tocopherol pool to alpha-tocopherol, was overexpressed in B. juncea plants. The successful integration of the transgene was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis, while the enhanced transcript level was evident in the northern blot analysis. HPLC analysis of the seeds of the T1 transgenic lines showed a shift in tocopherol profile with the highest over-expressors having alpha-tocopherol levels as high as sixfold over the non-transgenic controls. This study discusses the production of a transgenic oilseed crop with high alpha-tocopherol levels, which can provide a feasible, innocuous, and inexpensive way of taking the beneficial effects of high alpha-tocopherol intake to the masses.

  4. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Essential Role of Nitrogen Phosphotransferase System Components in Sinorhizobium fredii CCBAU 45436 Symbioses with Soybean and Pigeonpea Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue Zhen; Wang, Dan; Feng, Xue Ying; Jiao, Jian; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-01-01

    The nitrogen phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) consists of EINtr, NPr, and EIIANtr. The active phosphate moiety derived from phosphoenolpyruvate is transferred through EINtr and NPr to EIIANtr. Sinorhizobium fredii can establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the legume crops soybean (as determinate nodules) and pigeonpea (as indeterminate nodules). In this study, S. fredii strains with mutations in ptsP and ptsO (encoding EINtr and NPr, respectively) formed ineffective nodules on soybeans, while a strain with a ptsN mutation (encoding EIIANtr) was not defective in symbiosis with soybeans. Notable reductions in the numbers of bacteroids within each symbiosome and of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules in bacteroids were observed in nodules infected by the ptsP or ptsO mutant strains but not in those infected with the ptsN mutant strain. However, these defects of the ptsP and ptsO mutant strains were recovered in ptsP ptsN and ptsO ptsN double-mutant strains, implying a negative role of unphosphorylated EIIANtr in symbiosis. Moreover, the symbiotic defect of the ptsP mutant was also recovered by expressing EINtr with or without the GAF domain, indicating that the putative glutamine-sensing domain GAF is dispensable in symbiotic interactions. The critical role of PTSNtr in symbiosis was also observed when related PTSNtr mutant strains of S. fredii were inoculated on pigeonpea plants. Furthermore, nodule occupancy and carbon utilization tests suggested that multiple outputs could be derived from components of PTSNtr in addition to the negative role of unphosphorylated EIIANtr. PMID:26682851

  5. Genetic of uveitis.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Carrai, Paola; Srivastava, Sunil K; Lowder, Careen Y; Nucci, Paolo; Neri, Piergiorgio

    2016-06-01

    Immune-mediated uveitis may be associated with a systemic disease or may be localized to the eye. T-cell-dependent immunological events are increasingly being regarded as extremely important in the pathogenesis of uveitis. Several studies have also shown that macrophages are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis. Uveitis phenotypes can differ substantially, and most uveitis diseases are considered polygenic with complex inheritance patterns. This review attempts to present the current state of knowledge from in vitro and in vivo research on the role of genetics in the development and clinical course of uveitis. A review of the literature in the PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane databases was conducted to identify clinical trials, comparative studies, case series, and case reports describing host genetic factors as well as immune imbalance which contribute to the development of uveitis. The search was limited to primary reports published in English with human subjects from 1990 to the present, yielding 3590 manuscripts. In addition, referenced articles from the initial searches were hand searched to identify additional relevant reports. After title and abstract selection, duplicate elimination, and manual search, 55 papers were selected for analysis and reviewed by the authors for inclusion in this review. Studies have demonstrated associations between various genetic factors and the development and clinical course of intraocular inflammatory conditions. Genes involved included genes expressing interleukins, chemokines, chemokine receptors, and tumor necrosis factor and genes involved in complement system. When considering the genetics of uveitis, common threads can be identified. Genome-wide scans and other genetic methods are becoming increasingly successful in identifying genetic loci and candidate genes in many inflammatory disorders that have a uveitic component. It will be important to test these findings as uveitis-specific genetic factors. Therefore, the

  6. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  7. Construction and use of saturated genetic map for identification of QTLs associated with disease resistance, oil quality, morphological descriptors, and yield components in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut production and consumer acceptability are adversely affected by several biotic/abiotic stresses and poor oil quality. In order to deal with these concerns, the developed genetic map from one peanut population derived from SunOleic 97R × NC94022 by Qin et al. (2012) using 190 subset with 172 m...

  8. A complete genetic linkage map and QTL analyses for bast fibre quality traits, yield and yield components in jute (Corchorus olitorius L.).

    PubMed

    Topdar, N; Kundu, A; Sinha, M K; Sarkar, D; Das, M; Banerjee, S; Kar, C S; Satya, P; Balyan, H S; Mahapatra, B S; Gupta, P K

    2013-01-01

    We report the first complete microsatellite genetic map of jute (Corchorus olitorius L.; 2n = 2x = 14) using an F6 recombinant inbred population. Of the 403 microsatellite markers screened, 82 were mapped on the seven linkage groups (LGs) that covered a total genetic distance of 799.9 cM, with an average marker interval of 10.7 cM. LG5 had the longest and LG7 the shortest genetic lengths, whereas LG1 had the maximum and LG7 the minimum number of markers. Segregation distortion of microsatellite loci was high (61%), with the majority of them (76%) skewed towards the female parent. Genomewide non-parametric single-marker analysis in combination with multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL)-models (MQM) mapping detected 26 definitive QTLs for bast fibre quality, yield and yield-related traits. These were unevenly distributed on six LGs, as colocalized clusters, at genomic sectors marked by 15 microsatellite loci. LG1 was the QTL-richest map sector, with the densest colocalized clusters of QTLs governing fibre yield, yield-related traits and tensile strength. Expectedly, favorable QTLs were derived from the desirable parents, except for nearly all of those of fibre fineness, which might be due to the creation of new gene combinations. Our results will be a good starting point for further genome analyses in jute.

  9. Genetics of wellbeing and its components satisfaction with life, happiness, and quality of life: a review and meta-analysis of heritability studies.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Meike

    2015-03-01

    Wellbeing is a major topic of research across several disciplines, reflecting the increasing recognition of its strong value across major domains in life. Previous twin-family studies have revealed that individual differences in wellbeing are accounted for by both genetic as well as environmental factors. A systematic literature search identified 30 twin-family studies on wellbeing or a related measure such as satisfaction with life or happiness. Review of these studies showed considerable variation in heritability estimates (ranging from 0 to 64 %), which makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding the genetic influences on wellbeing. For overall wellbeing twelve heritability estimates, from 10 independent studies, were meta-analyzed by computing a sample size weighted average heritability. Ten heritability estimates, derived from 9 independent samples, were used for the meta-analysis of satisfaction with life. The weighted average heritability of wellbeing, based on a sample size of 55,974 individuals, was 36 % (34-38), while the weighted average heritability for satisfaction with life was 32 % (29-35) (n = 47,750). With this result a more robust estimate of the relative influence of genetic effects on wellbeing is provided.

  10. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  11. X-rays sensing properties of MEH-PPV, Alq₃ and additive components: a new organic dosimeter as a candidate for minimizing the risk of accidents of patients undergoing radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Schimitberger, T; Ferreira, G R; Akcelrud, L C; Saraiva, M F; Bianchi, R F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report our experimental design in searching a smart and easy-to-read dosimeter used to detect 6 MV X-rays for improving patient safety in radiation oncology. The device was based on an organic emissive solutions of poly(2-methoxy-5(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV), aluminum-tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq₃) and additive components which were characterized by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence and CIE color coordinate diagram. The optical properties of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions have been examined as function of radiation dose over the range of 0-100 Gy. It has shown that MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions are specifically sensitive to X-rays, since the effect of radiation on this organic system is strongly correlated with the efficient spectral overlap between Alq₃ emission and the absorption of degraded MEH-PPV, which alters the color and photoemission of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ mixtures from red to yellow, and then to green. The rate of this change is more sensitive when MEH-PPV/Alq₃ is irradiated in the presence of benzoyl peroxide than when in the presence of hindered phenolic stabilizers, respectively, an accelerator and an inhibitor to activate or inhibit free radical formation. This gives rise to optimize the response curve of the dosimeter. It is clear from the experimental results that organic emissive semiconductors have potential to be used as dedicated and low-cost dosimeters to provide an independent check of beam output of a linear accelerator and therefore to give patients the opportunity to have information on the dose prescription or equipment-related problems a few minutes before being exposed to radiation.

  12. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  13. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  14. Genetics and violence.

    PubMed

    Alsobrook, J P; Pauls, D L

    2000-10-01

    As is evident from this brief review, the genetic study of violence is maturing at an ever-increasing rate; much more work is needed to examine specific molecular genetic markers and their associated phenotypes, particularly in subjects with juvenile onset. It is also becoming clear that more work is needed to help delineate the specific phenotypes that are being transmitted within families. It is unlikely that we will find a gene or genes that are both necessary and sufficient for the manifestation of aggression and violence. It is more likely that specific genes will be associated with discrete factors that either increase the risk for the expression of violence or that are components of the violent phenotype. Thus, in addition to continuing research that examines the role of specific genetic factors in the manifestation of violence, more work is needed that will help further develop the nosology of violence and related behaviors. As noted previously, an understanding of the inherited phenotype is critical in the study of any disorder. It is especially important in the study of complex behaviors such as violence in which there may be several behavioral components that comprise the complete diagnostic category.

  15. Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches to analysis of genetic and environmental components of human developmental change and G x E interaction.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Lindon; Erkanli, Alaattin

    2003-05-01

    The linear structural model has provided the statistical backbone of the analysis of twin and family data for 25 years. A new generation of questions cannot easily be forced into the framework of current approaches to modeling and data analysis because they involve nonlinear processes. Maximizing the likelihood with respect to parameters of such nonlinear models is often cumbersome and does not yield easily to current numerical methods. The application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to modeling the nonlinear effects of genes and environment in MZ and DZ twins is outlined. Nonlinear developmental change and genotype x environment interaction in the presence of genotype-environment correlation are explored in simulated twin data. The MCMC method recovers the simulated parameters and provides estimates of error and latent (missing) trait values. Possible limitations of MCMC methods are discussed. Further studies are necessary explore the value of an approach that could extend the horizons of research in developmental genetic epidemiology.

  16. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Scribner, Kim T.; Libants, Scot V.; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M.; Langenberg, Julia A.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case–control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n = 68) and CWD-negative (n = 91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p < 0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  17. Genetics of Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Mallipatna, Ashwin; Marino, Meghan; Singh, Arun D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a malignant retinal tumor that affects young children. Mutations in the RB1 gene cause retinoblastoma. Mutations in both RB1 alleles within the precursor retinal cell are essential, with one mutation that may be germline or somatic and the second one that is always somatic. Identification of the RB1 germline status of a patient allows differentiation between sporadic and heritable retinoblastoma variants. Application of this knowledge is crucial for assessing short-term (risk of additional tumors in the same eye and other eye) and long-term (risk of nonocular malignant tumors) prognosis and offering cost-effective surveillance strategies. Genetic testing and genetic counseling are therefore essential components of care for all children diagnosed with retinoblastoma. The American Joint Committee on Cancer has acknowledged the importance of detecting this heritable trait and has introduced the letter "H" to denote a heritable trait of all cancers, starting with retinoblastoma (in publication). In this article, we discuss the clinically relevant aspects of genetic testing and genetic counseling for a child with retinoblastoma.

  18. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  19. Genetic Analyses of Integrin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Sara A.; Radovanac, Korana; Fässler, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms, as well as maintenance of organ architecture and function, requires robust regulation of cell fates. This is in part achieved by conserved signaling pathways through which cells process extracellular information and translate this information into changes in proliferation, differentiation, migration, and cell shape. Gene deletion studies in higher eukaryotes have assigned critical roles for components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and their cellular receptors in a vast number of developmental processes, indicating that a large proportion of this signaling is regulated by cell-ECM interactions. In addition, genetic alterations in components of this signaling axis play causative roles in several human diseases. This review will discuss what genetic analyses in mice and lower organisms have taught us about adhesion signaling in development and disease. PMID:21421914

  20. Armet/Manf and Creld2 are components of a specialized ER stress response provoked by inappropriate formation of disulphide bonds: implications for genetic skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Claire L.; Edwards, Sarah; Mullan, Lorna; Bell, Peter A.; Fresquet, Maryline; Boot-Handford, Raymond P.; Briggs, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Mutant matrilin-3 (V194D) forms non-native disulphide bonded aggregates in the rER of chondrocytes from cell and mouse models of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Intracellular retention of mutant matrilin-3 causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induces an unfolded protein response (UPR) including the upregulation of two genes recently implicated in ER stress: Armet and Creld2. Nothing is known about the role of Armet and Creld2 in human genetic diseases. In this study, we used a variety of cell and mouse models of chondrodysplasia to determine the genotype-specific expression profiles of Armet and Creld2. We also studied their interactions with various mutant proteins and investigated their potential roles as protein disulphide isomerases (PDIs). Armet and Creld2 were up-regulated in cell and/or mouse models of chondrodysplasias caused by mutations in Matn3 and Col10a1, but not Comp. Intriguingly, both Armet and Creld2 were also secreted into the ECM of these disease models following ER stress. Armet and Creld2 interacted with mutant matrilin-3, but not with COMP, thereby validating the genotype-specific expression. Substrate-trapping experiments confirmed Creld2 processed PDI-like activity, thus identifying a putative functional role. Finally, alanine substitution of the two terminal cysteine residues from the A-domain of V194D matrilin-3 prevented aggregation, promoted mutant protein secretion and reduced the levels of Armet and Creld2 in a cell culture model. We demonstrate that Armet and Creld2 are genotype-specific ER stress response proteins with substrate specificities, and that aggregation of mutant matrilin-3 is a key disease trigger in MED that could be exploited as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23956175

  1. Genetic interactions of pokkuri with seven in absentia, tramtrack and downstream components of the sevenless pathway in R7 photoreceptor induction in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Nihonmatsu, Itsuko; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Kondo, Shunzo; Hirata, Kanako; Ikegami, Yuko

    1996-02-01

    The sevenless (sev) cascade plays an inductive role in formation of the R7 photoreceptor, whilst the pokkuri (pok) and tramtrack (ttk) gene products are known to repress R7 induction in developing ommatidia of Drosophila melanogaster. To elucidate how these positive and negative signalling mechanisms co-operate in the normal fate determination of R7, genetic interactions of mutations in the pok locus with ttk and downstream elements of sev including Gap1, raf1, rolled (r1) and seven in absentia (sina) were examined. The eye phenotype of a weak hypomorph, pok (15), was enhanced dominantly by Gap1-(mip), a recessive mutation in a gene encoding a down-regulator of Ras1, producing multiple R7 in ommatidia. Ras1 has been reported to activate r1-encoded mitrogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase via Raf1 that is associated physically with Rasl. Ommatidia of raf1 (c110) and rl (2)/rl(EMS64) typically lacked R7 and a few outer photoreceptors. The pok (1) mutation suppressed dominantly the rafl (c110) rl(2)/rl(EMS64) eye phenotypes, allowing single R7 cells to develop in ommatidia. The rafl (c110) mutation improved adult viability of pok (1) homozygotes. An in vitro experiment demonstrated that MAP kinase phosphorylates Pok protein. Ttk is a transcriptional repressor which binds to the regulatory sequence upstream of the fushi-tarazu (ftz), even skipped (eve) and engrailed (en) coding region. A reduced activity in ttk resulted in enhancement of the pok phenotype. ttk mutations produced extra R7 cells even in sina homozygotes whilst the pok mutation did not. This result indicates that Ttk represses R7 induction downstream of the sites where Pok and Sina function.

  2. A genetic screen for neurite outgrowth mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans reveals a new function for the F-box ubiquitin ligase component LIN-23.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nehal; Loria, Paula M; Hobert, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    Axon pathfinding and target recognition are highly dynamic and tightly regulated cellular processes. One of the mechanisms involved in regulating protein activity levels during axonal and synaptic development is protein ubiquitination. We describe here the isolation of several Caenorhabditis elegans mutants, termed eno (ectopic/erratic neurite outgrowth) mutants, that display defects in axon outgrowth of specific neuron classes. One retrieved mutant is characterized by abnormal termination of axon outgrowth in a subset of several distinct neuron classes, including ventral nerve cord motor neurons, head motor neurons, and mechanosensory neurons. This mutant is allelic to lin-23, which codes for an F-box-containing component of an SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that was previously shown to negatively regulate postembryonic cell divisions. We demonstrate that LIN-23 is a broadly expressed cytoplasmically localized protein that is required autonomously in neurons to affect axon outgrowth. Our newly isolated allele of lin-23, a point mutation in the C-terminal tail of the protein, displays axonal outgrowth defects similar to those observed in null alleles of this gene, but does not display defects in cell cycle regulation. We have thus defined separable activities of LIN-23 in two distinct processes, cell cycle control and axon patterning. We propose that LIN-23 targets distinct substrates for ubiquitination within each process. PMID:15082545

  3. Amplification of the telomerase RNA component gene as a new genetic marker for disease progression and prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-D; Ma, J; Wang, F-Y; Peng, L-B; Wang, X; Shi, S-S; Ma, H-H; Lu, Z-F; Lu, G-M; Zhou, X-J

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the human telomerase RNA component (TERC) gene was found in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, its roles in the progression and prognosis of ESCC have not been well understood. The amplification of TERC in normal mucosa, low-grade and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and invasive ESCC samples were evaluated using a fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. The amplification of TERC invariably occurred in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive ESCC, partially occurred in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia specimens, and seldom occurred in normal mucosa. The average signal ratio of TERC to chromosome 3 centromere-specific probe (TERC/CSP3) was 1.00 ± 0.01 (average ± standard deviation) in normal mucosas, 1.01 ± 0.08 in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasias, 1.39 ± 0.26 in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasias, and 1.56 ± 0.41 in invasive ESCC. High TERC/CSP3 ratio was positively associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.005) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.045). Patients with high amplification of TERC had poor survival (P = 0.01). The amplification of TERC could be used as a new genomic marker for disease progression and prognosis of ESCC. The amplified TERC gene may be a potential therapeutic target for ESCC.

  4. C. elegans fmi-1/flamingo and Wnt pathway components interact genetically to control the anteroposterior neurite growth of the VD GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ackley, Brian D

    2013-07-01

    During development, multiple environmental cues, e.g., growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, etc., interact to influence the pattern of outgrowth of axons and dendrites in a cell-specific fashion. As a result, individual neurons may receive similar signals, but make unique choices, leading to distinct wiring within the nervous system. C. elegans has been useful in identifying molecular cues that influence neuronal development, as well as the downstream mechanisms that allow individual neurons to make cell-specific responses. Recently, we described a role for the conserved cadherin domain-containing protein, FMI-1/flamingo, in multiple stages of neural development in C. elegans. During the initial phase of neurite outgrowth, FMI-1 seems to have a relatively cell-specific effect on the VD neurons to promote the initial neurite formed to grow toward the anterior. In this capacity, FMI-1 appears to work coordinately with at least two Wnt ligands, EGL-20 and LIN-44, and multiple downstream Wnt signaling components (including LIN-17/Frizzled, DSH-1/Disheveled, and BAR-1/β-catenin). Here I will discuss some of the ideas we considered about how FMI-1 could affect neurons as they acquire their morphology during development.

  5. Varietal differences in the flavonol content of mulberry (Morus spp.) leaves and genetic analysis of quercetin 3-(6-malonylglucoside) for component breeding.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Mari; Katsube, Takuya; Koyama, Akio; Itamura, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-25

    The varietal differences in the flavonol glycosides rutin, isoquercitrin, kaempferol 3-(6-rhamnosylglucoside), quercetin 3-(6-malonylglucoside), astragalin, quercetin 3-(6-acetylglucoside), and kaempferol 3-(6-malonylglucoside) contained in mulberry leaves were elucidated. This information was used for breeding mulberry cultivars with a high concentration of functional components. The flavonol content, composition, and proportion in leaves varied widely. 'Kobuchizawa 1' had the highest level of total flavonols (1819 mg/100 g of dry weight), 5 times higher than that of 'Mikurasima 15' (393 mg/100 g of dry weight). Quercetin 3-(6-malonylglucoside) was the most abundant flavonol, although it was not found in all cultivars. Quercetin 3-(6-acetylglucoside) was only found in 'Keguwa'. From the quercetin 3-(6-malonylglucoside) content in crossbred offspring, malonyltransferase, an enzyme involved in quercetin 3-(6-malonylglucoside) synthesis, was acquired according to Mendelian inheritance. An offspring with a higher quercetin 3-(6-malonylglucoside) level than both parents was obtained from the crossing. This suggested that crossbreeding was effective for acquiring cultivars with a higher content of quercetin 3-(6-malonylglucoside).

  6. A genetic approach for finding small RNAs regulators of genes of interest identifies RybC as regulating the DpiA/DpiB two-component system.

    PubMed

    Mandin, Pierre; Gottesman, Susan

    2009-05-01

    In Escherichia coli, the largest class of small regulatory RNAs binds to the RNA chaperone Hfq and regulates the stability and/or translation of specific mRNAs. While recent studies have shown that some mRNAs could be subject to post-transcriptional regulation by sRNAs (e.g. mRNAs found by co-immunoprecipitation with Hfq), no method has yet been described to identify small RNAs that regulate them. We developed a method to easily make translational fusions of genes of interest to the lacZ reporter gene, under the control of a P(BAD)-inducible promoter. A multicopy plasmid library of the E. coli genome can then be used to screen for small RNAs that affect the activity of the fusion. This screening method was first applied to the dpiB gene from the dpiBA operon, which encodes a two-component signal transduction system involved in the SOS response to beta-lactams. One small RNA, RybC, was found to negatively regulate the expression of dpiB. Using mutants in the dpiB-lacZ fusion and compensatory mutations in the RybC sRNA, we demonstrate that RybC directly base pairs with the dpiBA mRNA.

  7. Reassessment of the Listeria monocytogenes pan-genome reveals dynamic integration hotspots and mobile genetic elements as major components of the accessory genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen and model organism for host-pathogen interaction, thus representing an invaluable target considering research on the forces governing the evolution of such microbes. The diversity of this species has not been exhaustively explored yet, as previous efforts have focused on analyses of serotypes primarily implicated in human listeriosis. We conducted complete genome sequencing of 11 strains employing 454 GS FLX technology, thereby achieving full coverage of all serotypes including the first complete strains of serotypes 1/2b, 3c, 3b, 4c, 4d, and 4e. These were comparatively analyzed in conjunction with publicly available data and assessed for pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella insect model. Results The species pan-genome of L. monocytogenes is highly stable but open, suggesting an ability to adapt to new niches by generating or including new genetic information. The majority of gene-scale differences represented by the accessory genome resulted from nine hyper variable hotspots, a similar number of different prophages, three transposons (Tn916, Tn554, IS3-like), and two mobilizable islands. Only a subset of strains showed CRISPR/Cas bacteriophage resistance systems of different subtypes, suggesting a supplementary function in maintenance of chromosomal stability. Multiple phylogenetic branches of the genus Listeria imply long common histories of strains of each lineage as revealed by a SNP-based core genome tree highlighting the impact of small mutations for the evolution of species L. monocytogenes. Frequent loss or truncation of genes described to be vital for virulence or pathogenicity was confirmed as a recurring pattern, especially for strains belonging to lineages III and II. New candidate genes implicated in virulence function were predicted based on functional domains and phylogenetic distribution. A comparative analysis of small regulatory RNA candidates supports observations of a

  8. Genetic covariance structure of incisor crown size in twins.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, P J; Townsend, G C; Martin, N G; Neale, M C

    1995-07-01

    Previous studies of tooth size in twins and their families have suggested a high degree of genetic control, although there have been difficulties separating the various genetic and environmental effects. A genetic analysis of variation in crown size of the permanent incisors of South Australian twins was carried out, with structural equation modeling used to determine the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors. Maximum mesiodistal crown dimensions of maxillary and mandibular permanent incisors were recorded from dental models of 298 pairs of twins, including 149 monozygous (MZ) and 149 dizygous (DZ) pairs. The analysis revealed that: (i) an adequate fit required additive genetic and unique environmental components; (ii) augmenting the model with non-additive genetic variation did not lead to a significant improvement in fit; (iii) there was evidence of shared environmental influences in the upper central incisors of males; (iv) the additive genetic component constituted a general factor loading on all eight teeth, with group factors loading on antimeric pairs of teeth; (v) unique environmental effects were mostly variable-specific; (vi) most factor loadings on antimeric tooth pairs could be constrained to be equal, indicating a symmetry of genetic and environmental influences between left and right sides; and (vii) estimated heritability of the incisor mesiodistal dimensions varied from 0.81 to 0.91.

  9. A genetic genomics-expression approach reveals components of the molecular mechanisms beyond the cell wall that underlie peach fruit woolliness due to cold storage.

    PubMed

    Pons, Clara; Martí, Cristina; Forment, Javier; Crisosto, Carlos H; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Granell, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Peach fruits subjected to prolonged cold storage (CS) to delay decay and over-ripening often develop a form of chilling injury (CI) called mealiness/woolliness (WLT), a flesh textural disorder characterized by lack of juiciness. Transcript profiles were analyzed after different lengths of CS and subsequent shelf life ripening (SLR) in pools of fruits from siblings of the Pop-DG population with contrasting sensitivity to develop WLT. This was followed by quantitative PCR on pools and individual lines of the Pop-DG population to validate and extend the microarray results. Relative tolerance to WLT development during SLR was related to the fruit's ability to recover from cold and the reactivation of normal ripening, processes that are probably regulated by transcription factors involved in stress protection, stress recovery and induction of ripening. Furthermore, our results showed that altered ripening in WLT fruits during shelf life is probably due, in part, to cold-induced desynchronization of the ripening program involving ethylene and auxin hormonal regulation of metabolism and cell wall. In addition, we found strong correlation between expression of RNA translation and protein assembly genes and the visual injury symptoms.

  10. A genetic screen for novel components of the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway that interact with the yan gene of Drosophila identifies split ends, a new RNA recognition motif-containing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rebay, I; Chen, F; Hsiao, F; Kolodziej, P A; Kuang, B H; Laverty, T; Suh, C; Voas, M; Williams, A; Rubin, G M

    2000-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathway is used reiteratively during the development of all multicellular organisms. While the core RTK/Ras/MAPK signaling cassette has been studied extensively, little is known about the nature of the downstream targets of the pathway or how these effectors regulate the specificity of cellular responses. Drosophila yan is one of a few downstream components identified to date, functioning as an antagonist of the RTK/Ras/MAPK pathway. Previously, we have shown that ectopic expression of a constitutively active protein (yan(ACT)) inhibits the differentiation of multiple cell types. In an effort to identify new genes functioning downstream in the Ras/MAPK/yan pathway, we have performed a genetic screen to isolate dominant modifiers of the rough eye phenotype associated with eye-specific expression of yan(ACT). Approximately 190,000 mutagenized flies were screened, and 260 enhancers and 90 suppressors were obtained. Among the previously known genes we recovered are four RTK pathway components, rolled (MAPK), son-of-sevenless, Star, and pointed, and two genes, eyes absent and string, that have not been implicated previously in RTK signaling events. We also isolated mutations in five previously uncharacterized genes, one of which, split ends, we have characterized molecularly and have shown to encode a member of the RRM family of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:10655223

  11. C. elegans fmi-1/flamingo and Wnt pathway components interact genetically to control the anteroposterior neurite growth of the VD GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Huarcaya Najarro, Elvis; Ackley, Brian D

    2013-05-01

    Directed axonal growth is essential to establish neuronal networks. During the early development of the VD neurons, an anterior neurite that will become the VD axon extends along the anteroposterior (A/P) axis in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) in Caenorhabditis elegans. Little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are important for correct neurite growth in the VNC. In fmi-1/flamingo mutant animals, we observed that some postembryonically born VD neurons had a posterior neurite instead of a normal anterior neurite, which caused aberrant VD commissure patterning along the A/P axis. In addition, VD anterior neurites had underextension defects in the VNC in fmi-1 animals, whereas VD commissure growth along the dorsoventral (D/V) axis occurred normally in these animals, suggesting that fmi-1 is important for neurite growth along the A/P axis but not the D/V axis. We also uncovered unknown details of the early development of the VD neurons, indicating that the neurite defects arose during their early development. Interestingly, though fmi-1 is present at this time in the VNC, we did not observe FMI-1 in the VD neurons themselves, suggesting that fmi-1 might be working in a cell non-autonomous fashion. Furthermore, fmi-1 appears to be working in a novel pathway, independently from the planar cell polarity pathway and in parallel to lin-17/frizzled and dsh-1/dishevelled, to determine the direction of neurite growth. Our findings indicate that redundant developmental pathways regulate neurite growth in the VNC in C. elegans.

  12. Genetics of human body size and shape: pleiotropic and independent genetic determinants of adiposity.

    PubMed

    Livshits, G; Yakovenko, K; Ginsburg, E; Kobyliansky, E

    1998-01-01

    The present study utilized pedigree data from three ethnically different populations of Kirghizstan, Turkmenia and Chuvasha. Principal component analysis was performed on a matrix of genetic correlations between 22 measures of adiposity, including skinfolds, circumferences and indices. Findings are summarized as follows: (1) All three genetic matrices were not positive definite and the first four factors retained even after exclusion RG > or = 1.0, explained from 88% to 97% of the total additive genetic variation in the 22 trials studied. This clearly emphasizes the massive involvement of pleiotropic gene effects in the variability of adiposity traits. (2) Despite the quite natural differences in pairwise correlations between the adiposity traits in the three ethnically different samples under study, factor analysis revealed a common basic pattern of covariability for the adiposity traits. In each of the three samples, four genetic factors were retained, namely, the amount of subcutaneous fat, the total body obesity, the pattern of distribution of subcutaneous fat and the central adiposity distribution. (3) Genetic correlations between the retained four factors were virtually non-existent, suggesting that several independent genetic sources may be governing the variation of adiposity traits. (4) Variance decomposition analysis on the obtained genetic factors leaves no doubt regarding the substantial familial and (most probably genetic) effects on variation of each factor in each studied population. The similarity of results in the three different samples indicates that the findings may be deemed valid and reliable descriptions of the genetic variation and covariation pattern of adiposity traits in the human species.

  13. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human ...

  14. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Before or between pregnancies > Genetic counseling Genetic counseling E-mail to a friend Please fill ... a genetic counselor in your area. What is genetic counseling? Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes , ...

  15. Ruthenium(II)/chiral Brønsted acid co-catalyzed enantioselective four-component reaction/cascade aza-Michael addition for efficient construction of 1,3,4-tetrasubstituted tetrahydroisoquinolines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Ma, Xiaochu; Ji, Changge; Guo, Zhenqiu; Shi, Taoda; Liu, Shunying; Hu, Wenhao

    2014-02-03

    An elegant synergistic catalytic system comprising a ruthenium complex with a chiral Brønsted acid was developed for a four-component Mannich/cascade aza-Michael reaction. The ruthenium-associated ammonium ylides successfully trapped with in situ generated imines indicates a stepwise process of proton transfer in the ruthenium-catalyzed carbenoid N-H insertion reaction. The different decomposition abilities of various ruthenium complexes towards diazo compounds were well explained by the calculated thermodynamic data. The transformation features a mild, rapid, and efficient method for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure 1,3,4-tetrasubstituted tetrahydroquinolines bearing a quaternary stereogenic carbon center from simple starting precursors in moderate yields with high diastereo- and enantioselectivity.

  16. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic and Genomic Science

    MedlinePlus

    ... used on this page Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic and Genomic Science What are genetics and genomics? ... genetic and genomic technologies? Additional Resources What are genetics and genomics? Genetics is a term that refers ...

  17. The genetic contribution to canine personality.

    PubMed

    Saetre, P; Strandberg, E; Sundgren, P-E; Pettersson, U; Jazin, E; Bergström, T F

    2006-04-01

    The domestic dog may be exceptionally well suited for behavioral genetic studies owing to its population history and the striking behavior differences among breeds. To explore to what extent and how behavioral traits are transmitted between generations, heritabilities and genetic correlations for behavioral traits were estimated in a cohort containing over 10,000 behaviorally tested German shepherd and Rottweiler dogs. In both breeds, the pattern of co-inheritance was found to be similar for the 16 examined behavioral traits. Furthermore, over 50% of the additive genetic variation of the behavioral traits could be explained by one underlying principal component, indicating a shared genetic component behind most of the examined behavioral traits. Only aggression appears to be inherited independently of the other traits. The results support a genetic basis for a broad personality trait previously named shyness-boldness dimension, and heritability was estimated to be 0.25 in the two breeds. Therefore, breeds of dogs appear to constitute a valuable resource for behavioral genetic research on the normal behavioral differences in broad personality traits.

  18. Genetic Heterogeneity in Algerian Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Deba, Tahria; Calafell, Francesc; Benhamamouch, Soraya; Comas, David

    2015-01-01

    The demographic history of human populations in North Africa has been characterized by complex processes of admixture and isolation that have modeled its current gene pool. Diverse genetic ancestral components with different origins (autochthonous, European, Middle Eastern, and sub-Saharan) and genetic heterogeneity in the region have been described. In this complex genetic landscape, Algeria, the largest country in Africa, has been poorly covered, with most of the studies using a single Algerian sample. In order to evaluate the genetic heterogeneity of Algeria, Y-chromosome, mtDNA and autosomal genome-wide makers have been analyzed in several Berber- and Arab-speaking groups. Our results show that the genetic heterogeneity found in Algeria is not correlated with geography or linguistics, challenging the idea of Berber groups being genetically isolated and Arab groups open to gene flow. In addition, we have found that external sources of gene flow into North Africa have been carried more often by females than males, while the North African autochthonous component is more frequent in paternally transmitted genome regions. Our results highlight the different demographic history revealed by different markers and urge to be cautious when deriving general conclusions from partial genomic information or from single samples as representatives of the total population of a region. PMID:26402429

  19. In vitro analysis of the cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of antioxidant compounds used as additives in ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene in total joint replacement components.

    PubMed

    Bladen, C L; Tzu-Yin, L; Fisher, J; Tipper, J L

    2013-04-01

    Ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the most commonly used material in modern joint replacement prostheses. However, UHMWPE wear particles, formed as the bearing articulates, are one of the main factors leading to joint replacement failure via the induction of osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening. Previous studies have shown that the addition of antioxidants such as vitamin E to UHMWPE can improve wear resistance of the polymer and reduce oxidative fatigue. However, little is known regarding the biological consequences of such antioxidant chemicals. This study investigated the cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of a variety of antioxidant compounds currently being tested experimentally for use in hip and knee prostheses, including nitroxides, hindered phenols, and lanthanides on U937 human histocyte cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) in vitro. After addition of the compounds, cell viability was determined by dose response cytotoxicity studies. Anti-inflammatory effects were determined by quantitation of TNF-α release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells. This study has shown that many of these compounds were cytotoxic to U937 cells and PBMNCs, at relatively low concentrations (micromolar), specifically the hindered phenol 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate (HPAO1), and the nitroxide 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO). Lanthanides were only cytotoxic at very high concentrations and were well tolerated by the cells at lower concentrations. Cytotoxic compounds also showed reduced anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in PBMNCs. Careful consideration should therefore be given to the use of any of these compounds as potential additives to UHMWPE.

  20. Estimation of genetic parameters and genetic changes for growth characteristics of Santa Ines sheep.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, E L; Mattos, E C; Eler, J P; Barreto Neto, A D; Ferraz, J B

    2016-08-19

    Studying genetic parameters and genetic changes in Santa Ines sheep is important, because it is the commonest breed in Brazil. This study obtained genetic data from 37,735 pedigree records of lambs over 12 years (2003-2014) from 33 flocks in 10 Brazilian States; 11,851 records of performance were available. (Co)variance components, genetic parameters and breeding values estimates were obtained by derivative-free restricted maximum likelihood in a univariate analysis that included maternal additive genetic and maternal permanent environmental effects. Birth weight, weaning weight, weight at 180 days of age, weight at 270 days of age, average daily weight gain in the following states: from birth to weaning, from weaning to 6 months, from 6 months to 9 months, and from weaning to 9 months; presence of hair in fur and leg muscularity were assessed. (Co)variance component values increased in the weight traits with age. A significant maternal effect was found in the pre-weaned stage that decreased in the post-weaned stage. High values were estimated for the maternal permanent environmental effect, possibly because of the extensive grassland that was available. High total heritability values were estimated for all of the traits evaluated. Significant, positive correlations were found between direct and maternal additive genetic traits with a gradual decrease as the lambs gained independence from their mothers. The genetic trends observed were irregular and incremental. Significant genetic variance suggests that direct selection for pre-weaning traits results in indirect selection of maternal abilities, and individual selection of any post-weaning trait results in rapid genetic improvement.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Jönsson G, Sjöholm AG, Truedsson L, Bengtsson AA, Braconier JH, Sturfelt G. Rheumatological manifestations, organ damage ... 31. Review. Citation on PubMed Truedsson L, Bengtsson AA, Sturfelt G. Complement deficiencies and systemic lupus erythematosus. ...

  2. Epigenetic and genetic components of height regulation

    PubMed Central

    Benonisdottir, Stefania; Oddsson, Asmundur; Helgason, Agnar; Kristjansson, Ragnar P.; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Oskarsdottir, Arna; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Davidsson, Olafur B.; Arnadottir, Gudny A.; Sulem, Gerald; Jensson, Brynjar O.; Holm, Hilma; Alexandersson, Kristjan F.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Walters, G. Bragi; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Ward, Lucas D.; Sigurdsson, Jon K.; Iordache, Paul D.; Frigge, Michael L.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Helgason, Hannes; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Adult height is a highly heritable trait. Here we identified 31.6 million sequence variants by whole-genome sequencing of 8,453 Icelanders and tested them for association with adult height by imputing them into 88,835 Icelanders. Here we discovered 13 novel height associations by testing four different models including parent-of-origin (|β|=0.4–10.6 cm). The minor alleles of three parent-of-origin signals associate with less height only when inherited from the father and are located within imprinted regions (IGF2-H19 and DLK1-MEG3). We also examined the association of these sequence variants in a set of 12,645 Icelanders with birth length measurements. Two of the novel variants, (IGF2-H19 and TET1), show significant association with both adult height and birth length, indicating a role in early growth regulation. Among the parent-of-origin signals, we observed opposing parental effects raising questions about underlying mechanisms. These findings demonstrate that common variations affect human growth by parental imprinting. PMID:27848971

  3. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  4. Additive composition, for gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Vataru, M.

    1989-01-10

    An admixture is described that comprises Diesel fuel and an additive composition added thereto which is between about 0.05 to about 2.0 percent by weight of the fuel, the composition comprising: (a) between about 0.05 and 25% relative weight parts of an organic peroxide, and (b) between about 0.1 and 25% relative weight parts of detergent selected from the component group that consists of: (i) fatty amines; (ii) ethoxylated and propoxylated derivatives of fatty amines; (iii) fatty diamines; (iv) fatty imidazlines; (v) polymeric amines and derivatives thereof; (vi) combination of one or more of the (i) through (v) components with carboxylic acid or acids having from three to forth carbon atoms, (c) from about 99.0 to about 50% by weight of a hydrocarbon solvent.

  5. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist.

  6. Evolutionary genetics of maternal effects

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jason B.; Wade, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal genetic effects (MGEs), where genes expressed by mothers affect the phenotype of their offspring, are important sources of phenotypic diversity in a myriad of organisms. We use a single‐locus model to examine how MGEs contribute patterns of heritable and nonheritable variation and influence evolutionary dynamics in randomly mating and inbreeding populations. We elucidate the influence of MGEs by examining the offspring genotype‐phenotype relationship, which determines how MGEs affect evolutionary dynamics in response to selection on offspring phenotypes. This approach reveals important results that are not apparent from classic quantitative genetic treatments of MGEs. We show that additive and dominance MGEs make different contributions to evolutionary dynamics and patterns of variation, which are differentially affected by inbreeding. Dominance MGEs make the offspring genotype‐phenotype relationship frequency dependent, resulting in the appearance of negative frequency‐dependent selection, while additive MGEs contribute a component of parent‐of‐origin dependent variation. Inbreeding amplifies the contribution of MGEs to the additive genetic variance and, therefore enhances their evolutionary response. Considering evolutionary dynamics of allele frequency change on an adaptive landscape, we show that this landscape differs from the mean fitness surface, and therefore, under some condition, fitness peaks can exist but not be “available” to the evolving population. PMID:26969266

  7. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  8. New Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  9. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Genetic Disorders Home For Patients Search FAQs Genetic Disorders ... Spanish Genetic Disorders FAQ094, April 2014 PDF Format Genetic Disorders Pregnancy What are genes? What are chromosomes? ...

  10. Battery component

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, F.; Batson, D.C.; Miserendino, A.J.; Boyle, G.

    1988-03-15

    A mechanical component for reserve type electrochemical batteries having cylindrical porous members is described comprising a disc having: (i) circular grooves in one flat side for accepting the porous members; and (ii) at least one radial channel in the opposite flat side in fluid communication with the grooves.

  11. Genetic Prediction in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Andreas; Bohossian, Nora; Diego, Vincent P.; Yao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing data can be used to predict phenotypes from genotypes, and this corresponds to establishing a prognostic model. In extended pedigrees the relatedness of subjects provides additional information so that genetic values, fixed or random genetic components, and heritability can be estimated. At the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 the working group on genetic prediction dealt with both establishing a prognostic model and, in one contribution, comparing standard logistic regression with robust logistic regression in a sample of unrelated affected or unaffected individuals. Results of both logistic regression approaches were similar. All other contributions to this group used extended family data, in general using the quantitative trait blood pressure. The individual contributions varied in several important aspects, such as the estimation of the kinship matrix and the estimation method. Contributors chose various approaches for model validation, including different versions of cross-validation or within-family validation. Within-family validation included model building in the upper generations and validation in later generations. The choice of the statistical model and the computational algorithm had substantial effects on computation time. If decorrelation approaches were applied, the computational burden was substantially reduced. Some software packages estimated negative eigenvalues, although eigenvalues of correlation matrices should be nonnegative. Most statistical models and software packages have been developed for experimental crosses and planned breeding programs. With their specialized pedigree structures, they are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate the variability of human pedigrees in general, and improved implementations are required. PMID:25112190

  12. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  13. Genetic control of inflorescence in common bean.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S R; Ramalho, M A P; de F B Abreu, A; Pereira, L A

    2014-12-04

    The number of pods per common bean plant is a primary component of grain yield, which depends on the number of flowers produced and on the flower set. Thus, a larger number of flowers per plant would increase yield. Lines with inflorescences that had a large number of flowers compared to common bean plants now under cultivation were identified. We analyzed the genetic control of this trait and its association with grain yield. The cultivar BRSMG Talismã was crossed with 2 lines, L.59583 and L.59692, which have a large number of flowers. The F1, F2, and F3 generations were obtained. These generations were assessed together with the parents in a randomized block experimental design with 2 replications. The traits assessed included length of inflorescence, number of pods per inflorescence, number of pods per plant, number of grains per plant, 100-grain weight, and grain yield per plant. Mean genetic components and variance were estimated. The traits length of inflorescence and number of pods per inflorescence exhibited genetic control with predominance that showed an additive effect. In the 2 crosses, genetic control of grain yield and of its primary components showed that the allelic interaction of dominance was high. The wide variability in the traits assessed may be used to increase yield of the common bean plant by increasing the number of flowers on the plant.

  14. On the Additive and Dominant Variance and Covariance of Individuals Within the Genomic Selection Scope

    PubMed Central

    Vitezica, Zulma G.; Varona, Luis; Legarra, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Genomic evaluation models can fit additive and dominant SNP effects. Under quantitative genetics theory, additive or “breeding” values of individuals are generated by substitution effects, which involve both “biological” additive and dominant effects of the markers. Dominance deviations include only a portion of the biological dominant effects of the markers. Additive variance includes variation due to the additive and dominant effects of the markers. We describe a matrix of dominant genomic relationships across individuals, D, which is similar to the G matrix used in genomic best linear unbiased prediction. This matrix can be used in a mixed-model context for genomic evaluations or to estimate dominant and additive variances in the population. From the “genotypic” value of individuals, an alternative parameterization defines additive and dominance as the parts attributable to the additive and dominant effect of the markers. This approach underestimates the additive genetic variance and overestimates the dominance variance. Transforming the variances from one model into the other is trivial if the distribution of allelic frequencies is known. We illustrate these results with mouse data (four traits, 1884 mice, and 10,946 markers) and simulated data (2100 individuals and 10,000 markers). Variance components were estimated correctly in the model, considering breeding values and dominance deviations. For the model considering genotypic values, the inclusion of dominant effects biased the estimate of additive variance. Genomic models were more accurate for the estimation of variance components than their pedigree-based counterparts. PMID:24121775

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Meckel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... MKS Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (3 links) Health Topic: Brain Malformations Health Topic: Kidney Cysts Health Topic: Neural Tube Defects Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  16. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  17. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... separate stage of filtration if both filtration stages treat entire plant flow taken from a surface water or GWUDI source and no disinfectant residual is present in the influent water to the slow...

  18. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... separate stage of filtration if both filtration stages treat entire plant flow taken from a surface water or GWUDI source and no disinfectant residual is present in the influent water to the slow...

  19. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... separate stage of filtration if both filtration stages treat entire plant flow taken from a surface water or GWUDI source and no disinfectant residual is present in the influent water to the slow...

  20. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... separate stage of filtration if both filtration stages treat entire plant flow taken from a surface water or GWUDI source and no disinfectant residual is present in the influent water to the slow...

  1. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... separate stage of filtration if both filtration stages treat entire plant flow taken from a surface water or GWUDI source and no disinfectant residual is present in the influent water to the slow...

  2. Genetic interest assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughney, Erin

    Genetics is becoming increasingly integrated into peoples' lives. Different measures have been taken to try and better genetics education. This thesis examined undergraduate students at the University of North Texas not majoring in the life sciences interest in genetic concepts through the means of a Likert style survey. ANOVA analysis showed there was variation amongst the interest level in different genetic concepts. In addition age and lecture were also analyzed as contributing factors to students' interest. Both age and lecture were evaluated to see if they contributed to the interest of students in genetic concepts and neither showed statistical significance. The Genetic Interest Assessment (GIA) serves to help mediate the gap between genetic curriculum and students' interest.

  3. Genetic influences in caries and periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Hassell, T M; Harris, E L

    1995-01-01

    Deciphering the relative roles of heredity and environmental factors ("nature vs. nurture") in the pathogenesis of dental caries and diseases of the periodontium has occupied clinical and basic researchers for decades. Success in the endeavor has come more easily in the case of caries; the complex interactions that occur between host-response mechanisms and putative microbiologic pathogens in periodontal disease have made elucidation of genetic factors in disease susceptibility more difficult. In addition, during the 30-year period between 1958 and 1987, only meager resources were targeted toward the "nature" side of the nature/nurture dipole in periodontology. In this article, we present a brief history of the development of genetic epistemology, then describe the three main research mechanisms by which questions about the hereditary component of diseases in humans can be addressed. A critical discussion of the evidence for a hereditary component in caries susceptibility is next presented, also from a historical perspective. The evolution of knowledge concerning possible genetic ("endogenous", "idiotypic") factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal disease is initiated with an analysis of some foreign-language (primarily German) literature that is likely to be unfamiliar to the reader. We identify a turning point at about 1960, when the periodontal research community turned away from genetics in favor of microbiology research. During the past five years, investigators have re-initiated the search for the hereditary component in susceptibility to common adult periodontal disease; this small but growing body of literature is reviewed. Recent applications of in vitro methods for genetic analyses in periodontal research are presented, with an eye toward a future in which persons who are at risk--genetically predisposed--to periodontal disease may be identified and targeted for interventive strategies. Critical is the realization that genes and environment

  4. A novel holistic framework for genetic-based captive-breeding and reintroduction programs.

    PubMed

    Attard, C R M; Möller, L M; Sasaki, M; Hammer, M P; Bice, C M; Brauer, C J; Carvalho, D C; Harris, J O; Beheregaray, L B

    2016-10-01

    Research in reintroduction biology has provided a greater understanding of the often limited success of species reintroductions and highlighted the need for scientifically rigorous approaches in reintroduction programs. We examined the recent genetic-based captive-breeding and reintroduction literature to showcase the underuse of the genetic data gathered. We devised a framework that takes full advantage of the genetic data through assessment of the genetic makeup of populations before (past component of the framework), during (present component), and after (future component) captive-breeding and reintroduction events to understand their conservation potential and maximize their success. We empirically applied our framework to two small fishes: Yarra pygmy perch (Nannoperca obscura) and southern pygmy perch (Nannoperca australis). Each of these species has a locally adapted and geographically isolated lineage that is endemic to the highly threatened lower Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. These two populations were rescued during Australia's recent decade-long Millennium Drought, when their persistence became entirely dependent on captive-breeding and subsequent reintroduction efforts. Using historical demographic analyses, we found differences and similarities between the species in the genetic impacts of past natural and anthropogenic events that occurred in situ, such as European settlement (past component). Subsequently, successful maintenance of genetic diversity in captivity-despite skewed brooder contribution to offspring-was achieved through carefully managed genetic-based breeding (present component). Finally, genetic monitoring revealed the survival and recruitment of released captive-bred offspring in the wild (future component). Our holistic framework often requires no additional data collection to that typically gathered in genetic-based breeding programs, is applicable to a wide range of species, advances the genetic considerations of reintroduction

  5. Mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). In addition, this review makes use of a growing number of publically available databases including MITOMAP, a human mitochondrial genome database (www.mitomap.org), the Human DNA polymerase Gamma Mutation Database (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/polg/) and PhyloTree.org (www.phylotree.org), a repository of global mtDNA variation. Areas of agreement The disruption in cellular energy, resulting from defects in mtDNA or defects in the nuclear-encoded genes responsible for mitochondrial maintenance, manifests in a growing number of human diseases. Areas of controversy The exact mechanisms which govern the inheritance of mtDNA are hotly debated. Growing points Although still in the early stages, the development of in vitro genetic manipulation could see an end to the inheritance of the most severe mtDNA disease. PMID:23704099

  6. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  7. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  8. Genetic Counseling as an Educational Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, James M.; St. Pierre, Richard

    Historically genetic counseling programs have not included strong educational components or sound educational foundations. This paper deals with some of the drawbacks of current genetic counseling programs and the implications for education in the genetic counseling process. The author adopts a broad definition of genetic counseling which…

  9. Genetics and Genetic Biomarkers in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carethers, John M.; Jung, Barbara H.

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is a somatic genetic disease in which pathogenesis is influenced by the local colonic environment and the patient’s genetic background. Consolidating the knowledge of genetic and epigenetic events that occur with initiation, progression, and metastasis of sporadic CRC has identified some biomarkers that might be utilized to predict behavior and prognosis beyond staging, and inform treatment approaches. Modern next generation sequencing of sporadic CRCs has confirmed prior identified genetic alterations, and has classified new alterations. Each patient’s CRC is genetically unique, propelled by 2 to 8 driver gene alterations that have accumulated within the CRC since initiation. Commonly observed alterations across sporadic CRCs have allowed classification into a: (1) hypermutated group that includes defective DNA mismatch repair with microsatellite instability (MSI) and POLE mutations in ~15%, containing multiple frameshifted genes and BRAFV600E; (2) non-hypermutated group with multiple somatic copy number alterations and aneuploidy in ~85%, containing oncogenic activation of KRAS and PIK3CA and mutation and loss of heterozygosity of tumor suppressor genes such as APC and TP53; (3) CpG Island Methylator Phenotype CRCs in ~20% that overlap greatly with MSI CRCs and some non-hypermutated CRCs; and (4) elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) in ~60% that associates with metastatic behavior in both hypermutated and non-hypermutated groups. Components from these classifications are now used as diagnostic, prognostic and treatment biomarkers. Additional common biomarkers may come from genome-wide association studies and microRNAs among other sources, as well as from the unique alteration profile of an individual CRC to apply a precision medicine approach to care. PMID:26216840

  10. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  11. Genetics Home Reference: histidinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition characterized by elevated blood levels of the amino acid histidine, a building block of most proteins. Histidinemia ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: hyperlysinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition characterized by elevated blood levels of the amino acid lysine, a building block of most proteins. Hyperlysinemia ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: phenylketonuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information & Resources MedlinePlus (4 links) Encyclopedia: Phenylketonuria Encyclopedia: Serum Phenylalanine Screening Health Topic: Newborn Screening Health Topic: Phenylketonuria Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Phenylketonuria Additional NIH Resources ( ...

  14. The quantitative genetics of indirect genetic effects: a selective review of modelling issues.

    PubMed

    Bijma, P

    2014-01-01

    Indirect genetic effects (IGE) occur when the genotype of an individual affects the phenotypic trait value of another conspecific individual. IGEs can have profound effects on both the magnitude and the direction of response to selection. Models of inheritance and response to selection in traits subject to IGEs have been developed within two frameworks; a trait-based framework in which IGEs are specified as a direct consequence of individual trait values, and a variance-component framework in which phenotypic variance is decomposed into a direct and an indirect additive genetic component. This work is a selective review of the quantitative genetics of traits affected by IGEs, with a focus on modelling, estimation and interpretation issues. It includes a discussion on variance-component vs trait-based models of IGEs, a review of issues related to the estimation of IGEs from field data, including the estimation of the interaction coefficient Ψ (psi), and a discussion on the relevance of IGEs for response to selection in cases where the strength of interaction varies among pairs of individuals. An investigation of the trait-based model shows that the interaction coefficient Ψ may deviate considerably from the corresponding regression coefficient when feedback occurs. The increasing research effort devoted to IGEs suggests that they are a widespread phenomenon, probably particularly in natural populations and plants. Further work in this field should considerably broaden our understanding of the quantitative genetics of inheritance and response to selection in relation to the social organisation of populations.

  15. Genetics, society, and decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kowles, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides a conceptual understanding of the biology of genes and also gives current events and controversies in the field. Basic transmission genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics are covered, with additional discussions relating to such topics as agriculture, aging, forensic science, genetic counseling, gene splicing, and recombinant DNA. Low level radiation and its effects, drugs and heredity, IQ, heredity and racial variation, and creationism versus evolution are also described. ''Billboard'' style diagrams visually explain important concepts. Boldfaced key terms are defined within the text and in a comprehensive glossary. Selected readings, discussion questions and problems, and excellent chapter summaries further aid study.

  16. The Genetics of Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Dorota M.; Gajecka, Marzena

    2011-01-01

    Keratoconus (KTCN) is non-inflammatory thinning and anterior protrusion of the cornea that results in steepening and distortion of the cornea, altered refractive error, and decreased vision. Keratoconus is a complex condition of multifactorial etiology. Both genetic and environmental factors are associated with KTCN. Evidence of genetic etiology includes familial inheritance, discordance between dizygotic twins, and association with other known genetic disorders. Several loci responsible for a familial form of KTCN have been mapped; however, no mutations in any genes have been identified for any of these loci. This article focuses on the genetic aspects. In addition, bioinformatics methods applied in KTCN gene identification process are discussed. PMID:21572727

  17. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  18. Glomerular diseases: genetic causes and future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Kang; Inagi, Reiko

    2010-09-01

    The glomerulus consists of capillary tufts, a mesangial cell component and the Bowman capsule. The glomerular filtration barrier is composed of glomerular endothelial cells, a basement membrane, and podocytes. Particular components of the slit diaphragm and the glomerular basement membrane strictly orchestrate the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier. The basement membrane is made of a highly crosslinked macromolecular meshwork of type IV collagen, proteoglycans, and laminin. Genetic forms of glomerular disease are predominantly caused by genetic defects in these molecular structures or in factors that regulate the glomerular filtration barrier. In addition, abnormal IgA1 glycosylation can increase susceptibility to IgA nephropathy. Dysregulation of the complement system or of platelet activation can lead to the development of endocapillary lesions, which manifest as thrombotic microangiopathy. Glomerular dysfunction is also encountered in several genetic metabolic and mitochondrial disorders. Discoveries of mutations in a range of genes have provided new insights into the mechanisms of glomerular disease. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the genetics and therapeutics of a number of glomerular diseases.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... H, Wollnik B. Mutations in different components of FGF signaling in LADD syndrome. Nat Genet. 2006 Apr; ... H, Wollnik B. Mutations in different components of FGF signaling in LADD syndrome. Nat Genet. 2006 Apr; ...

  20. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  1. Genetic, Epigenetic and Pharmacogenetic Aspects of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-11-01

    There is a strong familial component to psoriatic disease as well as a complex array of genetic, immunologic, and environmental factors. The dominant genetic effect is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex region, accounting for one-third of genetic contribution. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified additional genes, including skin barrier function, innate immune response, and adaptive immune response genes. To better understand disease susceptibility and progression requires replication in larger cohorts, fine-mapping efforts, new technologies, and functional studies of genetic variants, gene-gene interactions and gene-environmental interactions. New technologies available include next-generation sequencing, copy number variation analysis, and epigenetics.

  2. Individual Differences in Scotopic Visual Acuity and Contrast Sensitivity: Genetic and Non-Genetic Influences

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Alex J.; Lad, Eleonora M.; Cao, Dingcai; Bach, Michael; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large amount of variation found in the night (scotopic) vision capabilities of healthy volunteers, little effort has been made to characterize this variation and factors, genetic and non-genetic, that influence it. In the largest population of healthy observers measured for scotopic visual acuity (VA) and contrast sensitivity (CS) to date, we quantified the effect of a range of variables on visual performance. We found that young volunteers with excellent photopic vision exhibit great variation in their scotopic VA and CS, and this variation is reliable from one testing session to the next. We additionally identified that factors such as Circadian preference, iris color, astigmatism, depression, sex and education have no significant impact on scotopic visual function. We confirmed previous work showing that the amount of time spent on the vision test influences performance and that laser eye surgery results in worse scotopic vision. We also showed a significant effect of intelligence and photopic visual performance on scotopic VA and CS, but all of these variables collectively explain <30% of the variation in scotopic vision. The wide variation seen in young healthy volunteers with excellent photopic vision, the high test-retest agreement, and the vast majority of the variation in scotopic vision remaining unexplained by obvious non-genetic factors suggests a strong genetic component. Our preliminary genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 106 participants ruled out any common genetic variants of very large effect and paves the way for future, larger genetic studies of scotopic vision. PMID:26886100

  3. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  4. Monitoring cytosolic and ER Zn2+ in stimulated breast cancer cells using genetically encoded FRET sensors† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5mt00257e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Hessels, Anne M.; Taylor, Kathryn M.

    2016-01-01

    The Zn2+-specific ion channel ZIP7 has been implicated to play an important role in releasing Zn2+ from the ER. External stimulation of breast cancer cells has been proposed to induce phosphorylation of ZIP7 by CK2α, resulting in ZIP7-mediated Zn2+ release from the ER into the cytosol. Here, we examined whether changes in cytosolic and ER Zn2+ concentrations can be detected upon such external stimuli. Two previously developed FRET sensors for Zn2+, eZinCh-2 (K d = 1 nM at pH 7.1) and eCALWY-4 (K d = 0.63 nM at pH 7.1), were expressed in both the cytosol and the ER of wild-type MCF-7 and TamR cells. Treatment of MCF-7 and TamR cells with external Zn2+ and pyrithione, one of the previously used triggers, resulted in an immediate increase in free Zn2+ in both cytosol and ER, suggesting that Zn2+ was directly transferred across the cellular membranes by pyrithione. Cells treated with a second trigger, EGF/ionomycin, showed no changes in intracellular Zn2+ levels, neither in multicolor imaging experiments that allowed simultaneous imaging of cytosolic and ER Zn2+, nor in experiments in which cytosolic and ER Zn2+ were monitored separately. In contrast to previous work using small-molecule fluorescent dyes, these results indicate that EGF–ionomycin treatment does not result in significant changes in cytosolic Zn2+ levels as a result from Zn2+ release from the ER. These results underline the importance of using genetically encoded fluorescent sensors to complement and verify intracellular imaging experiments with synthetic fluorescent Zn2+ dyes. PMID:26739447

  5. Logistics for Working Together to Facilitate Genomic/Quantitative Genetic Prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incorporation of DNA tests into the national cattle evaluation system will require estimation of variances of and covariances among the additive genetic components of the DNA tests and the phenotypic traits they are intended to predict. Populations with both DNA test results and phenotypes will ...

  6. A genetic algorithm for solving supply chain network design model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firoozi, Z.; Ismail, N.; Ariafar, S. H.; Tang, S. H.; Ariffin, M. K. M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Network design is by nature costly and optimization models play significant role in reducing the unnecessary cost components of a distribution network. This study proposes a genetic algorithm to solve a distribution network design model. The structure of the chromosome in the proposed algorithm is defined in a novel way that in addition to producing feasible solutions, it also reduces the computational complexity of the algorithm. Computational results are presented to show the algorithm performance.

  7. Effect of genotype and environment on five bioactive components of cultivated licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis FISCH.) populations in northern China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fulai; Wang, Qiuling; Wei, Shengli; Wang, Dan; Fang, Yuqiang; Liu, Fengbo; Zhao, Zhigang; Hou, Junling; Wang, Wenquan

    2014-10-30

    Methods to improve the bioactive component content of cultivated licorice have become the bottleneck of industrial licorice extraction for pharmaceutical use. To evaluate the effects of genotype, environment and their interaction on major bioactive components, we analyzed the five bioactive components: liquiritin (LQ), liquiritigenin (LQG), glycyrrhizin (GL), isoliquiritin (ILQ) and isoliquiritigenin (ILQG) of four diverse licorice varieties grown in four distinct environments in northern China during 2010-11. Analysis of variance showed that environmental and genotypic effects were significant (P<0.01) for all five bioactive components. Additionally, their interaction was significant (P<0.05) for GL in the 2-year study period. LQ and ILQ were mainly affected by genetic factors and have great potential for genetic improvement, whereas LQG and ILQG were mainly affected by environmental factors. GL was similarly affected by environmental and genetic factors. Biplot of the principal component analysis showed that for quality breeding, G2 (WNT-1) and G3 (JX-1) are two relatively preferable genotypes, and E2 (Chifeng) location is suitable for accumulation of the bioactive components of these two genotypes. Stepwise regression analysis showed that sunshine and rainfall are the dominant environmental factors for licorice bioactive component accumulation; increased duration of sunshine is advantageous to GL accumulation whereas declining rainfall is conducive to LQG and ILQG accumulation. These results provide a theoretical basis for initiating licorice breeding programs with increased bioactive components and improved quality.

  8. Effect of genotype and environment on five bioactive components of cultivated licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis) populations in northern China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fulai; Wang, Qiuling; Wei, Shengli; Wang, Dan; Fang, Yuqiang; Liu, Fengbo; Zhao, Zhigang; Hou, Junling; Wang, Wenquan

    2015-01-01

    Methods to improve the bioactive component content of cultivated licorice have become the bottleneck of industrial licorice extraction for pharmaceutical use. To evaluate the effects of genotype, environment and their interaction on major bioactive components, we analyzed the five bioactive components: liquiritin (LQ), liquiritigenin (LQG), glycyrrhizin (GL), isoliquiritin (ILQ) and isoliquiritigenin (ILQG) of four diverse licorice varieties grown in four distinct environments in northern China during 2010-11. Analysis of variance showed that environmental and genotypic effects were significant (p<0.01) for all five bioactive components. Additionally, their interaction was significant (p<0.05) for GL in the 2-year study period. LQ and ILQ were mainly affected by genetic factors and have great potential for genetic improvement, whereas LQG and ILQG were mainly affected by environmental factors. GL was similarly affected by environmental and genetic factors. Biplot of the principal component analysis showed that for quality breeding, G2 (WNT-1) and G3 (JX-1) are two relatively preferable genotypes, and E2 (Chifeng) location is suitable for accumulation of the bioactive components of these two genotypes. Stepwise regression analysis showed that sunshine and rainfall are the dominant environmental factors for licorice bioactive component accumulation; increased duration of sunshine is advantageous to GL accumulation whereas declining rainfall is conducive to LQG and ILQG accumulation. These results provide a theoretical basis for initiating licorice breeding programs with increased bioactive components and improved quality.

  9. Heredity--venturing beyond genetics.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Kanellopoulos-Langevin, Colette

    2008-07-01

    Our knowledge of heredity has recently undergone major upheaval. Heredity transmits considerably more than just genetic elements. First, the oocyte is full of maternal cytoplasmic components that subsequently are present in each new cell. Second, maternal cells can pass to the progeny, where they remain active into adult life (microchimerism). Here, we examine the notion that the transmission of characters involves at least two processes in addition to that of mendelian heredity, long considered to be the only hereditary mechanism. These processes all involve epigenetic processes, including the transmission of macromolecules, subcellular organelles, and living cells solely from the mother to her offspring, whether female or male, during pregnancy and lactation. We postulate that cytoplasmic heredity and maternal transmission of cells leading to a long-term state of microchimerism in progeny are two good examples of matrilineal, nonmendelian heredity. A mother's important contribution to the development and health of her progeny seems to possess many uncharted depths.

  10. Study on the optimal algorithm prediction of corn leaf component information based on hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jihua; Wang, Cheng; Xu, Tongyu

    2016-09-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) has a significant effect in the band optimization selection of Partial Least Squares (PLS) correction model. Application of genetic algorithm in selection of characteristic bands can achieve the optimal solution more rapidly, effectively improve measurement accuracy and reduce variables used for modeling. In this study, genetic algorithm as a module conducted band selection for the application of hyperspectral imaging in nondestructive testing of corn seedling leaves, and GA-PLS model was established. In addition, PLS quantitative model of full spectrum and experienced-spectrum region were established in order to suggest the feasibility of genetic algorithm optimizing wave bands, and model robustness was evaluated. There were 12 characteristic bands selected by genetic algorithm. With reflectance values of corn seedling component information at spectral characteristic wavelengths corresponding to 12 characteristic bands as variables, a model about SPAD values of corn leaves acquired was established by PLS, and modeling results showed r = 0.7825. The model results were better than those of PLS model established in full spectrum and experience-based selected bands. The results suggested that genetic algorithm can be used for data optimization and screening before establishing the corn seedling component information model by PLS method and effectively increase measurement accuracy and greatly reduce variables used for modeling.

  11. Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Perry G.; Ebbert, Mark T. W.; Kauwe, John S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that lacks disease-altering treatments. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of Alzheimer's disease, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease are largely understood with variants in three different genes leading to disease. In contrast, while several common alleles associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, including APOE, have been identified using association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23984328

  12. Nanoengineered Additives for Active Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    commercial ad bial activ component from the coating, leading to eventual depletion of the film. Small TPU samples were evaluated using a Kirby - Bauer ...7 Table 5. Summary of 24-hr ASTM E 2180 tests with 1 weight-percent additive in PUr (solvent dispersible) based on 6-log loading of...Noveon X-1150). The ASTM E 2180 test is run in triplicate (Note that alternative ro 1° amines) was suspended in dry tetrahydrofuran (THF) (150 mL) in

  13. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000510.htm Genetic counseling To use the sharing features on this ... cystic fibrosis or Down syndrome. Who May Want Genetic Counseling? It is up to you whether or ...

  14. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  15. Genetics of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Groop, L

    2000-03-01

    The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors such as abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance in the same persons has been called the metabolic or insulin-resistance syndrome. In 1998 WHO proposed a unifying definition for the syndrome and chose to call it the metabolic syndrome rather than the insulin-resistance syndrome. Although insulin resistance has been considered as a common denominator for the different components of the syndrome, there is still debate as to whether it is pathogenically involved in all of the different components of the syndrome. Clustering of the syndrome in families suggests a genetic component. It is plausible that so-called thrifty genes, which have ensured optimal storage of energy during periods of fasting, could contribute to the phenotype of the metabolic syndrome. Common variants in a number of candidate genes influencing fat and glucose metabolism can probably, together with environmental triggers, increase susceptibility to the syndrome. Among these, the genes for beta 3-adrenergic receptor, hormone-sensitive lipase, lipoprotein lipase, IRS-1, PC-1, skeletal muscle glycogen synthase, etc. appear to increase the risk of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, novel genes may be identified by genome-wide searches.

  16. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  17. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  18. Genetic pleiotropy between asthma and obesity in a community-based sample of twins

    PubMed Central

    Hallstrand, Teal S.; Fischer, Mary E.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Afari, Niloofar; Buchwald, Dedra; Goldberg, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Background Asthma and obesity are common conditions that are strongly associated. This association might be due to shared genetic or environmental causes. Objective We sought to determine whether a shared genetic cause is responsible for the association between asthma and obesity and to estimate the magnitude of shared genetic cause. Methods The analyses were performed with 1001 monozygotic and 383 dizygotic same-sex twin pairs within the University of Washington Twin Registry. The presence of asthma was determined by self-report of a physician diagnosis of asthma, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated by using self-reported height and weight. Obesity was defined as a BMI of 30 or greater. The association between asthma and BMI was assessed by means of mixed-effects ordinal regression. Twin correlations examined the association of asthma and obesity. Univariate and bivariate structural equation models estimated the components of variance attributable to genetic and environmental effects. Results A strong association between asthma and BMI was identified in the sample population (P < .001). Substantial heritability was detected for asthma (53%) and obesity (77%), which is indicative of additive genetic influences on each disorder. The best-fitting model of shared components of variance indicated that 8% of the genetic component of obesity is shared with asthma. Conclusion The covariation between obesity and asthma is predominantly caused by shared genetic risk factors for both conditions. PMID:16337451

  19. Selection and genetic (co)variance in bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Coltman, David W; O'Donoghue, Paul; Hogg, John T; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2005-06-01

    Genetic theory predicts that directional selection should deplete additive genetic variance for traits closely related to fitness, and may favor the maintenance of alleles with antagonistically pleiotropic effects on fitness-related traits. Trait heritability is therefore expected to decline with the degree of association with fitness, and some genetic correlations between selected traits are expected to be negative. Here we demonstrate a negative relationship between trait heritability and association with lifetime reproductive success in a wild population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) at Ram Mountain, Alberta, Canada. Lower heritability for fitness-related traits, however, was not wholly a consequence of declining genetic variance, because those traits showed high levels of residual variance. Genetic correlations estimated between pairs of traits with significant heritability were positive. Principal component analyses suggest that positive relationships between morphometric traits constitute the main axis of genetic variation. Trade-offs in the form of negative genetic or phenotypic correlations among the traits we have measured do not appear to constrain the potential for evolution in this population.

  20. The genetic structure of a relict population of wood frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scherer, Rick; Muths, Erin; Noon, Barry; Oyler-McCance, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and the associated reduction in connectivity between habitat patches are commonly cited causes of genetic differentiation and reduced genetic variation in animal populations. We used eight microsatellite markers to investigate genetic structure and levels of genetic diversity in a relict population of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvatica) in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, where recent disturbances have altered hydrologic processes and fragmented amphibian habitat. We also estimated migration rates among subpopulations, tested for a pattern of isolation-by-distance, and looked for evidence of a recent population bottleneck. The results from the clustering algorithm in Program STRUCTURE indicated the population is partitioned into two genetic clusters (subpopulations), and this result was further supported by factorial component analysis. In addition, an estimate of FST (FST = 0.0675, P value \\0.0001) supported the genetic differentiation of the two clusters. Estimates of migration rates among the two subpopulations were low, as were estimates of genetic variability. Conservation of the population of wood frogs may be improved by increasing the spatial distribution of the population and improving gene flow between the subpopulations. Construction or restoration of wetlands in the landscape between the clusters has the potential to address each of these objectives.

  1. Genetic control of leaf curl in maize.

    PubMed

    Entringer, G C; Guedes, F L; Oliveira, A A; Nascimento, J P; Souza, J C

    2014-03-17

    Among the many implications of climatic change on agriculture, drought is expected to continue to have a major impact on agribusinesses. Leaf curling is an anatomical characteristic that might be potentially used to enhance plant tolerance to water deficit. Hence, we aimed to study the genetic control of leaf curl in maize. From 2 contrasting inbred lines for the trait, generations F1, F2, and the backcrosses were obtained. All of these generations were evaluated in a randomized block design with 2 replicates. Leaf curl samples were collected from 3 leaves above the first ear at the tasseling stage, and quantified by dividing the width of the leaf blade with natural curling against its extended width. The mean and variance components were estimated by the weighted least square method. It was found that the trait studied has predominance of the additive effects, with genetic control being attributed to few genes that favor selection and exhibit minimal influence from the environment.

  2. Genetic background of Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis.

    PubMed

    Saari, M; Vuorre, I; Tiilikainen, A; Algvere, P

    1978-10-01

    We studied the genetic background of 24 patients with Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis (FHC). Each was given a careful eye examination which included family history and serological determination of HLA antigens. Two families each had 2 cases of FHC in the same family; in addition an ancestor in the second family possibly had FHC; in both families one healthy member had simple heterochromia. One patient with FHC had congenital uveal coloboma, one pigmentary retinal dystrophy, and four had cysts of the ciliary body. The frequencies of all HLA antigens in patients with FHC compared well with the frequencies in the controls. In a family in which HLA haplotypes could be derived, the patients with FHC showed different HLA haplotypes. We conclude that FHC has a hereditary basis but its immunological component is not genetically associated with the HLA system.

  3. Advances in genetic engineering of marine algae.

    PubMed

    Qin, Song; Lin, Hanzhi; Jiang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Algae are a component of bait sources for animal aquaculture, and they produce abundant valuable compounds for the chemical industry and human health. With today's fast growing demand for algae biofuels and the profitable market for cosmetics and pharmaceuticals made from algal natural products, the genetic engineering of marine algae has been attracting increasing attention as a crucial systemic technology to address the challenge of the biomass feedstock supply for sustainable industrial applications and to modify the metabolic pathway for the more efficient production of high-value products. Nevertheless, to date, only a few marine algae species can be genetically manipulated. In this article, an updated account of the research progress in marine algal genomics is presented along with methods for transformation. In addition, vector construction and gene selection strategies are reviewed. Meanwhile, a review on the progress of bioreactor technologies for marine algae culture is also revisited.

  4. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  5. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  6. Genetics of Intraspecies Variation in Avoidance Behavior Induced by a Thermal Stimulus in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Bloom, Joshua S.; Mohammadi, Aylia; Schumer, Molly E.; Andolfatto, Peter; Ryu, William; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Individuals within a species vary in their responses to a wide range of stimuli, partly as a result of differences in their genetic makeup. Relatively little is known about the genetic and neuronal mechanisms contributing to diversity of behavior in natural populations. By studying intraspecies variation in innate avoidance behavior to thermal stimuli in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we uncovered genetic principles of how different components of a behavioral response can be altered in nature to generate behavioral diversity. Using a thermal pulse assay, we uncovered heritable variation in responses to a transient temperature increase. Quantitative trait locus mapping revealed that separate components of this response were controlled by distinct genomic loci. The loci we identified contributed to variation in components of thermal pulse avoidance behavior in an additive fashion. Our results show that the escape behavior induced by thermal stimuli is composed of simpler behavioral components that are influenced by at least six distinct genetic loci. The loci that decouple components of the escape behavior reveal a genetic system that allows independent modification of behavioral parameters. Our work sets the foundation for future studies of evolution of innate behaviors at the molecular and neuronal level. PMID:26092720

  7. Genetics of Intraspecies Variation in Avoidance Behavior Induced by a Thermal Stimulus in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Bloom, Joshua S; Mohammadi, Aylia; Schumer, Molly E; Andolfatto, Peter; Ryu, William; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2015-08-01

    Individuals within a species vary in their responses to a wide range of stimuli, partly as a result of differences in their genetic makeup. Relatively little is known about the genetic and neuronal mechanisms contributing to diversity of behavior in natural populations. By studying intraspecies variation in innate avoidance behavior to thermal stimuli in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we uncovered genetic principles of how different components of a behavioral response can be altered in nature to generate behavioral diversity. Using a thermal pulse assay, we uncovered heritable variation in responses to a transient temperature increase. Quantitative trait locus mapping revealed that separate components of this response were controlled by distinct genomic loci. The loci we identified contributed to variation in components of thermal pulse avoidance behavior in an additive fashion. Our results show that the escape behavior induced by thermal stimuli is composed of simpler behavioral components that are influenced by at least six distinct genetic loci. The loci that decouple components of the escape behavior reveal a genetic system that allows independent modification of behavioral parameters. Our work sets the foundation for future studies of evolution of innate behaviors at the molecular and neuronal level.

  8. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T Ashton; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-02-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T Ashton; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  11. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-12-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  12. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-10-27

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  13. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-02-28

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  14. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  15. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-11-17

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. Detecting Genomic Signatures of Natural Selection with Principal Component Analysis: Application to the 1000 Genomes Data.

    PubMed

    Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Luu, Keurcien; Laval, Guillaume; Bazin, Eric; Blum, Michael G B

    2016-04-01

    To characterize natural selection, various analytical methods for detecting candidate genomic regions have been developed. We propose to perform genome-wide scans of natural selection using principal component analysis (PCA). We show that the common FST index of genetic differentiation between populations can be viewed as the proportion of variance explained by the principal components. Considering the correlations between genetic variants and each principal component provides a conceptual framework to detect genetic variants involved in local adaptation without any prior definition of populations. To validate the PCA-based approach, we consider the 1000 Genomes data (phase 1) considering 850 individuals coming from Africa, Asia, and Europe. The number of genetic variants is of the order of 36 millions obtained with a low-coverage sequencing depth (3×). The correlations between genetic variation and each principal component provide well-known targets for positive selection (EDAR, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, DARC), and also new candidate genes (APPBPP2, TP1A1, RTTN, KCNMA, MYO5C) and noncoding RNAs. In addition to identifying genes involved in biological adaptation, we identify two biological pathways involved in polygenic adaptation that are related to the innate immune system (beta defensins) and to lipid metabolism (fatty acid omega oxidation). An additional analysis of European data shows that a genome scan based on PCA retrieves classical examples of local adaptation even when there are no well-defined populations. PCA-based statistics, implemented in the PCAdapt R package and the PCAdapt fast open-source software, retrieve well-known signals of human adaptation, which is encouraging for future whole-genome sequencing project, especially when defining populations is difficult.

  18. Different types of secondary information in the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Maraia, Richard J; Iben, James R

    2014-07-01

    Whole-genome and functional analyses suggest a wealth of secondary or auxiliary genetic information (AGI) within the redundancy component of the genetic code. Although there are multiple aspects of biased codon use, we focus on two types of auxiliary information: codon-specific translational pauses that can be used by particular proteins toward their unique folding and biased codon patterns shared by groups of functionally related mRNAs with coordinate regulation. AGI is important to genetics in general and to human disease; here, we consider influences of its three major components, biased codon use itself, variations in the tRNAome, and anticodon modifications that distinguish synonymous decoding. AGI is plastic and can be used by different species to different extents, with tissue-specificity and in stress responses. Because AGI is species-specific, it is important to consider codon-sensitive experiments when using heterologous systems; for this we focus on the tRNA anticodon loop modification enzyme, CDKAL1, and its link to type 2 diabetes. Newly uncovered tRNAome variability among humans suggests roles in penetrance and as a genetic modifier and disease modifier. Development of experimental and bioinformatics methods are needed to uncover additional means of auxiliary genetic information.

  19. Genetic transformation of fruit trees: current status and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Giorgio; Gribaudo, Ivana

    2012-12-01

    Genetic transformation has emerged as a powerful tool for genetic improvement of fruit trees hindered by their reproductive biology and their high levels of heterozygosity. For years, genetic engineering of fruit trees has focussed principally on enhancing disease resistance (against viruses, fungi, and bacteria), although there are few examples of field cultivation and commercial application of these transgenic plants. In addition, over the years much work has been performed to enhance abiotic stress tolerance, to induce modifications of plant growth and habit, to produce marker-free transgenic plants and to improve fruit quality by modification of genes that are crucially important in the production of specific plant components. Recently, with the release of several genome sequences, studies of functional genomics are becoming increasingly important: by modification (overexpression or silencing) of genes involved in the production of specific plant components is possible to uncover regulatory mechanisms associated with the biosynthesis and catabolism of metabolites in plants. This review focuses on the main advances, in recent years, in genetic transformation of the most important species of fruit trees, devoting particular attention to functional genomics approaches and possible future challenges of genetic engineering for these species in the post-genomic era.

  20. Expression of COPI components during development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Grieder, Nicole C; Kloter, Urs; Gehring, Walter J

    2005-12-01

    In a P{lArB} enhancer detector collection, a line was found that showed upregulated expression within centrally to posteriorly located germarial cysts. It was inserted in the gammaCOP locus on chromosome 3R. GammaCOP is a component of the COPI coatomer involved in membrane traffic. Most of the other known components of the COPI coatomer also showed higher expression in the posterior half of the germarium. Not only meiotic germline cysts but also migrating follicle cells upregulate the COPI subunits. During embryonic and larval development, the COPI subunits are expressed ubiquitously as expected for genes required for cell viability. In addition, they are strongly expressed in the salivary glands and the proventriculus. Whether tissue-specific transcriptional upregulation of COPI subunits is required for the reorganization of membranous compartments that are needed for the developmental processes that confer cyst polarity and follicle maturation will have to be addressed in a genetic study.

  1. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  2. Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ulrike; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors. A small proportion (3–5%) of cases arises from hereditary syndromes predisposing to early onset CRC as a result of mutations in over a dozen well-defined genes. In contrast, CRC is predominantly a late-onset “sporadic” disease, developing in individuals with no obvious hereditary syndrome. In recent years genome-wide association studies have discovered over 40 genetic regions to be associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC and it has been estimated that increasingly large genome-wide scans will identify many additional novel genetic regions. Subsequent experimental validations have identified the causally related variant(s) in a limited number of these genetic regions. Further biological insight could be obtained through ethnically diverse study populations, larger genetic sequencing studies, and development of higher-throughput functional experiments. Along with inherited variation, integration of the tumour genome may shed light on the carcinogenic processes in CRC. In addition to summarizing the genetic architecture of CRC, this review discusses genetic factors that modify environmental predictors of CRC, as well as examples of how genetic insight has improved clinical surveillance, prevention, and treatment strategies. In summary, substantial progress has been made in uncovering the genetic architecture of CRC and continued research efforts are expected to identify additional genetic risk factors that further our biological understanding of this disease. PMID:26187503

  3. Optimized Kernel Entropy Components.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Verdiguier, Emma; Laparra, Valero; Jenssen, Robert; Gomez-Chova, Luis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-02-25

    This brief addresses two main issues of the standard kernel entropy component analysis (KECA) algorithm: the optimization of the kernel decomposition and the optimization of the Gaussian kernel parameter. KECA roughly reduces to a sorting of the importance of kernel eigenvectors by entropy instead of variance, as in the kernel principal components analysis. In this brief, we propose an extension of the KECA method, named optimized KECA (OKECA), that directly extracts the optimal features retaining most of the data entropy by means of compacting the information in very few features (often in just one or two). The proposed method produces features which have higher expressive power. In particular, it is based on the independent component analysis framework, and introduces an extra rotation to the eigen decomposition, which is optimized via gradient-ascent search. This maximum entropy preservation suggests that OKECA features are more efficient than KECA features for density estimation. In addition, a critical issue in both the methods is the selection of the kernel parameter, since it critically affects the resulting performance. Here, we analyze the most common kernel length-scale selection criteria. The results of both the methods are illustrated in different synthetic and real problems. Results show that OKECA returns projections with more expressive power than KECA, the most successful rule for estimating the kernel parameter is based on maximum likelihood, and OKECA is more robust to the selection of the length-scale parameter in kernel density estimation.

  4. Estimation of genetic parameters and environmental factors on early growth traits for Lori breed sheep using single trait animal model.

    PubMed

    Lavvaf, A; Noshary, A

    2008-01-01

    The effects of different environmental factors and estimation of genetic parameters on early growth traits for Lori breed sheep including birth weight, weaning weight and body weight at 6 months of age using 19960 records from 35 herds of Lorestan Jahad Agriculture Organization were studied in the cities of Aleshtar, Khorramabad and Poldokhtar from 1995 to 2003. The effect of herd, sex of lambs, dam age and birth year on all traits and birth type had significant effect only on weaning weight. Different single trait animal models estimated the components of direct additive genetic variance, maternal genetic variance and maternal permanent environment variance through restricted maximum likelihood using environmental factors as a fixe effect and different random effects. The results showed that direct additive genetic effect had additionally significant effect on all traits moreover maternal additive genetic and maternal permanent environment effects. Results also revealed that the maternal permanent environment variance for all traits is higher than maternal genetic variance. Also the direct heritability for all traits was higher than maternal heritability. Estimation of the direct heritability from the birth to 6 months of age showed a reducing trend that could arise from high dependence of birth and weaning weight on maternal environment conditions as compared with the age conditions afterward. The genetic assessment of growth traits in Lori breed sheep without inclusion of maternal effect in animal model causes decreased selection accuracy and incorrect genetic assessment of the lambs.

  5. Genetic counseling for women with an intermediate family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Burke, W; Culver, J O; Bowen, D; Lowry, D; Durfy, S; McTiernan, A; Andersen, M R

    2000-02-28

    Women with a family history of breast cancer often over-estimate their personal risk for cancer and may view themselves as candidates for genetic testing even when the likelihood of an informative test result is low. We report here on genetic counseling of women with an intermediate family history of breast cancer, defined as women who have one or more biological relatives with breast cancer but whose pedigree suggests a low likelihood of autosomal dominant transmission. A genetic counseling protocol based on traditional genetic counseling strategies was developed with additional components added to address the needs of women with moderately increased breast cancer risk. These additional components included information about non-genetic risk factors, comparisons of high and moderate risk pedigrees, and evaluation of personal risk based on both genetic and nongenetic risk factors. Most participants liked the genetic counseling and found it useful. At baseline, participants over-estimated both their personal risk of breast cancer and that of the average woman. After counseling, estimates of personal and average risk of breast cancer were lower, although both remained higher than actual risk. Most participants reported that they felt less worried about breast cancer after receiving their personal-risk estimate. At baseline, most women judged themselves to be candidates for genetic testing and expressed interest in testing. The number who considered themselves candidates for testing was reduced after counseling (60% versus 82%) but still constituted a majority. Similarly, interest in testing was partially reduced by counseling (60% versus 91%). We conclude that genetic counseling can help women with an intermediate family history of breast cancer to develop more accurate views of their risk, reduce their breast cancer worry, and aid some of them in developing a more realistic view of genetic testing.

  6. Early Alzheimer's disease genetics.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2006-01-01

    The genetics community working on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias has made remarkable progress in the past 20 years. The cumulative efforts by multiple groups have lead to the identification of three autosomal dominant genes for early onset AD. These are the amyloid-beta protein precursor gene (APP), and the genes encoding presenilin1 and 2. The knowledge derived from this work has firmly established Abeta as a critical disease molecule and lead to candidate drugs currently in treatment trials. Work on a related disease, frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism - chromosome 17 type has also added to our understanding of pathogenesis by revealing that tau, the protein component of neurofibrillary tangles, is also a critical molecule in neurodegeneration. Lessons learned that still influence work on human genetics include the need to recognize and deal with genetic heterogeneity, a feature common to many genetic disorders. Genetic heterogeneity, if recognized, can be source of information. Another critical lesson is that clinical, molecular, and statistical scientists need to work closely on disease projects to succeed in solving the complex problems of common genetic disorders.

  7. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  8. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  9. Genetic secrets: Protecting privacy and confidentiality in the genetic era

    SciTech Connect

    Rothstein, M.A.

    1998-07-01

    Few developments are likely to affect human beings more profoundly in the long run than the discoveries resulting from advances in modern genetics. Although the developments in genetic technology promise to provide many additional benefits, their application to genetic screening poses ethical, social, and legal questions, many of which are rooted in issues of privacy and confidentiality. The ethical, practical, and legal ramifications of these and related questions are explored in depth. The broad range of topics includes: the privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; the challenges to privacy and confidentiality that may be projected to result from the emerging genetic technologies; the role of informed consent in protecting the confidentiality of genetic information in the clinical setting; the potential uses of genetic information by third parties; the implications of changes in the health care delivery system for privacy and confidentiality; relevant national and international developments in public policies, professional standards, and laws; recommendations; and the identification of research needs.

  10. Referring patients for a medical genetics consultation and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Reid

    2011-01-01

    Clinical geneticists and genetic counselors provide diagnosis and counseling for genetic disorders affecting every organ system and every age group. Genetic counselors are more focused on informing patients and families about the inheritance of a genetic disorder and providing recurrence risk counseling, support and information about a diagnosis and reproductive options. Medical geneticists may also share some of these roles in addition to establishing a diagnosis and providing medical management. Medical Geneticists receive training in ACGME-accredited residency programs and are certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics. Genetic counseling is a masters degree program and certification is granted by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. When a patient/family is referred to a Clinical Geneticist, they may expect a thorough evaluation in an effort to establish a diagnosis that may provide information about etiology, prognosis, therapy and recurrence risk.

  11. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; ...

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  12. Genetic barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  13. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing statistically-based genetics problems. This issue is at the emerging edge of modern college-level genetics instruction, and this study attempts to identify key theoretical components for creating a specialized biological statistics curriculum. The goal of this curriculum will be to prepare biology students with the skills for assimilating quantitatively-based genetic processes, increasingly at the forefront of modern genetics. To fulfill this, two college level classes at two universities were surveyed. One university was located in the northeastern US and the other in the West Indies. There was a sample size of 42 students and a supplementary interview was administered to a select 9 students. Interviews were also administered to professors in the field in order to gain insight into the teaching of statistics in genetics. Key findings indicated that students had very little to no background in statistics (55%). Although students did perform well on exams with 60% of the population receiving an A or B grade, 77% of them did not offer good explanations on a probability question associated with the normal distribution provided in the survey. The scope and presentation of the applicable statistics/mathematics in some of the most used textbooks in genetics teaching, as well as genetics syllabi used by instructors do not help the issue. It was found that the text books, often times, either did not give effective explanations for students, or completely left out certain topics. The omission of certain statistical/mathematical oriented topics was seen to be also true with the genetics syllabi reviewed for this study. Nonetheless

  14. Genetic predisposition for development of complications in multiple trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Frank; Mommsen, Philipp; Frink, Michael; van Griensven, Martijn; Krettek, Christian

    2011-05-01

    The care of multiple trauma patients has been improved through advances made in preclinical treatment, surgical procedures, and intensive care medicine. However, posttraumatic complications such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and sepsis remain a major problem following multiple trauma. Components of the innate immune system and other inflammatory mediators (e.g., procalcitonin) play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic complications. Studies investigating the genetic predisposition for complications after multiple trauma have provided evidence for a genetic heterogeneity in the posttraumatic immune response. The differences in response to multiple trauma associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms may contribute to the development of new genetically tailored diagnostic and therapeutic interventions improving outcome in this patient population. In addition, detrimental adverse effects of adjuvant therapy could be avoided in other patients who, by genotype, are predicted not to benefit.

  15. Review: Genetically modified plants for the promotion of human health.

    PubMed

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Saito, Kazuki

    2006-12-01

    Plants are attractive biological resources because of their ability to produce a huge variety of chemical compounds, and the familiarity of production in even the most rural settings. Genetic engineering gives plants additional characteristics and value for cultivation and post-harvest. Genetically modified (GM) plants of the "first generation" were conferred with traits beneficial to producers, whereas GM plants in subsequent "generations" are intended to provide beneficial traits for consumers. Golden Rice is a promising example of a GM plant in the second generation, and has overcome a number of obstacles for practical use. Furthermore, consumer-acceptable plants with health-promoting properties that are genetically modified using native genes are being developed. The emerging technology of metabolomics will also support the commercial realization of GM plants by providing comprehensive analyzes of plant biochemical components.

  16. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  17. The genetic correlation between height and IQ: shared genes or assortative mating?

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthew C; Garver-Apgar, Christine E; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Corley, Robin P; Stallings, Michael C; Hewitt, John K; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2013-04-01

    Traits that are attractive to the opposite sex are often positively correlated when scaled such that scores increase with attractiveness, and this correlation typically has a genetic component. Such traits can be genetically correlated due to genes that affect both traits ("pleiotropy") and/or because assortative mating causes statistical correlations to develop between selected alleles across the traits ("gametic phase disequilibrium"). In this study, we modeled the covariation between monozygotic and dizygotic twins, their siblings, and their parents (total N = 7,905) to elucidate the nature of the correlation between two potentially sexually selected traits in humans: height and IQ. Unlike previous designs used to investigate the nature of the height-IQ correlation, the present design accounts for the effects of assortative mating and provides much less biased estimates of additive genetic, non-additive genetic, and shared environmental influences. Both traits were highly heritable, although there was greater evidence for non-additive genetic effects in males. After accounting for assortative mating, the correlation between height and IQ was found to be almost entirely genetic in nature. Model fits indicate that both pleiotropy and assortative mating contribute significantly and about equally to this genetic correlation.

  18. Genetic parameters and trends in the Chilean multibreed dairy cattle population.

    PubMed

    Elzo, M A; Jara, A; Barria, N

    2004-05-01

    Estimates of additive and nonadditive multibreed co-variance components, genetic parameters, and predicted genetic values for first lactation 305-d mature equivalent (ME) milk yield, fat yield, and protein yield were computed using data from a sample of 3316 cows from the Chilean Holstein-other breeds multibreed population. Variances and covariances were estimated by 2-trait REML analyses using a Generalized Expectation-Maximization algorithm applied to multibreed populations. Multiple estimates of additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, and environmental variances from 2-trait analyses were averaged to yield a single variance estimate for each trait and effect. Heritabilities were moderate for all traits in Holstein, other, and Holstein x other crossbred groups. Interbreed interactibilities (ratio of nonadditive genetic to phenotypic variances) were all near zero. Multibreed additive, nonadditive, and total genetic trends were estimated using the complete dataset (56,277 cows). Upward trends between 1990 and 2000 existed for all traits, genetic effects, and breed groups, except for 305-d ME protein yield in 1/4 Holstein, indicating that Chilean dairy producers were successful in choosing progressively better semen and sires from imported and local sources over time.

  19. Genetics in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Rego, Ignacio; Carreira-Garcia, Vanessa; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative articular disease with complex pathogeny because diverse factors interact causing a process of deterioration of the cartilage. Despite the multifactorial nature of this pathology, from the 50’s it´s known that certain forms of osteoarthritis are related to a strong genetic component. The genetic bases of this disease do not follow the typical patterns of mendelian inheritance and probably they are related to alterations in multiple genes. The identification of a high number of candidate genes to confer susceptibility to the development of the osteoarthritis shows the complex nature of this disease. At the moment, the genetic mechanisms of this disease are not known, however, which seems clear is that expression levels of several genes are altered, and that the inheritance will become a substantial factor in future considerations of diagnosis and treatment of the osteoarthritis. PMID:19516961

  20. Genetics of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Michael A; Zavala, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar disorder especially the most severe type (type I), has a strong genetic component. Family studies suggest that a small number of genes of modest effect are involved in this disorder. Family-based studies have identified a number of chromosomal regions linked to bipolar disorder, and progress is currently being made in identifying positional candidate genes within those regions. A number of candidate genes have also shown evidence of association with bipolar disorder, and genome-wide association studies are now under way, using dense genetic maps. Replication studies in larger or combined datasets are needed to definitively assign a role for specific genes in this disorder. This review covers our current knowledge of the genetics of bipolar disorder, and provides a commentary on current approaches used to identify the genes involved in this complex behavioral disorder.

  1. Genetic factors in exercise adoption, adherence and obesity.

    PubMed

    Herring, M P; Sailors, M H; Bray, M S

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise play critical roles in energy balance. While many interventions targeted at increasing physical activity have demonstrated efficacy in promoting weight loss or maintenance in the short term, long term adherence to such programmes is not frequently observed. Numerous factors have been examined for their ability to predict and/or influence physical activity and exercise adherence. Although physical activity has been demonstrated to have a strong genetic component in both animals and humans, few studies have examined the association between genetic variation and exercise adherence. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the non-genetic and genetic predictors of physical activity and adherence to exercise. In addition, we report the results of analysis of 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms in six candidate genes examined for association to exercise adherence, duration, intensity and total exercise dose in young adults from the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study. Based on both animal and human research, neural signalling and pleasure/reward systems in the brain may drive in large part the propensity to be physically active and to adhere to an exercise programme. Adherence/compliance research in other fields may inform future investigation of the genetics of exercise adherence.

  2. Genetic tools for Sulfolobus spp.: vectors and first applications.

    PubMed

    Berkner, Silvia; Lipps, Georg

    2008-09-01

    Sulfolobus species belong to the best-studied archaeal organisms but have lacked powerful genetic methods. Recently, there has been considerable progress in the field of Sulfolobus genetics. Urgently needed basic genetic tools, such as targeted gene knockout techniques and shuttle vectors are being developed at an increasing pace. For S. solfataricus knockout systems as well as different shuttle vectors are available. For the genetically more stable S. acidocaldarius shuttle vectors have been recently developed. In this review we summarize the currently available genetic tools and methods for the genus Sulfolobus. Different transformation protocols are discussed, as well as all so far developed knockout systems and Sulfolobus-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors are summarized. Special emphasis is put on the important vector components, i.e., selectable markers and Sulfolobus replicons. Additionally, the information gathered on different Sulfolobus strains with respect to their use as recipient strains is reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of the different systems are discussed and aims for further improvement of genetic systems are identified.

  3. Effect of domestication on the genetic diversity and structure of Saccharina japonica populations in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xiuliang; Yao, Jianting; Li, Qiuying; Liu, Fuli; Yotsukura, Norishige; Krupnova, Tatiana N.; Duan, Delin

    2017-01-01

    Saccharina japonica is a commercially and ecologically important seaweed and is an excellent system for understanding the effects of domestication on marine crops. In this study, we used 19 selected simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to investigate the influence of domestication on the genetic diversity and structure of S. japonica populations. Wild kelp populations exhibited higher genetic diversity than cultivated populations based on total NA, HE, HO, NP and AR. Discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC), a neighbour-joining (NJ) tree and STRUCTURE analyses indicated that S. japonica populations could be divided into two groups (a cultivated/introduced group and a wild indigenous group) with significant genetic differentiation (P < 0.0001). Divergent selection, continuous inbreeding and inter-specific hybridization have caused the divergence of these two genetically separate gene pools. The significant genetic differentiation between northern and southern cultivated populations appears to be due to inter-specific hybridization and wild germplasm introduction during the domestication process. In addition, the cultivation of S. japonica has not resulted in any serious genetic disturbance of wild introduced S. japonica populations. An understanding of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of domesticated S. japonica will be necessary for further genetic improvement and effective use of germplasm. PMID:28176848

  4. Effect of domestication on the genetic diversity and structure of Saccharina japonica populations in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xiuliang; Yao, Jianting; Li, Qiuying; Liu, Fuli; Yotsukura, Norishige; Krupnova, Tatiana N; Duan, Delin

    2017-02-08

    Saccharina japonica is a commercially and ecologically important seaweed and is an excellent system for understanding the effects of domestication on marine crops. In this study, we used 19 selected simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to investigate the influence of domestication on the genetic diversity and structure of S. japonica populations. Wild kelp populations exhibited higher genetic diversity than cultivated populations based on total NA, HE, HO, NP and AR. Discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC), a neighbour-joining (NJ) tree and STRUCTURE analyses indicated that S. japonica populations could be divided into two groups (a cultivated/introduced group and a wild indigenous group) with significant genetic differentiation (P < 0.0001). Divergent selection, continuous inbreeding and inter-specific hybridization have caused the divergence of these two genetically separate gene pools. The significant genetic differentiation between northern and southern cultivated populations appears to be due to inter-specific hybridization and wild germplasm introduction during the domestication process. In addition, the cultivation of S. japonica has not resulted in any serious genetic disturbance of wild introduced S. japonica populations. An understanding of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of domesticated S. japonica will be necessary for further genetic improvement and effective use of germplasm.

  5. Distinct evolutionary histories of the DNA-A and DNA-B components of bipartite begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Viruses of the genus Begomovirus (family Geminiviridae) have genomes consisting of either one or two genomic components. The component of bipartite begomoviruses known as DNA-A is homologous to the genomes of all geminiviruses and encodes proteins required for replication, control of gene expression, overcoming host defenses, encapsidation and insect transmission. The second component, referred to as DNA-B, encodes two proteins with functions in intra- and intercellular movement in host plants. The origin of the DNA-B component remains unclear. The study described here was initiated to investigate the relationship between the DNA-A and DNA-B components of bipartite begomoviruses with a view to unraveling their evolutionary histories and providing information on the possible origin of the DNA-B component. Results Comparative phylogenetic and exhaustive pairwise sequence comparison of all DNA-A and DNA-B components of begomoviruses demonstrates that the two molecules have very distinct molecular evolutionary histories and likely are under very different evolutionary pressures. The analysis highlights that component exchange has played a far greater role in diversification of begomoviruses than previously suspected, although there are distinct differences in the apparent ability of different groups of viruses to utilize this "sexual" mechanism of genetic exchange. Additionally we explore the hypothesis that DNA-B originated as a satellite that was captured by the monopartite progenitor of all extant bipartite begomoviruses and subsequently evolved to become the integral (essential) genome component that we recognize today. The situation with present-day satellites associated with begomoviruses provides some clues to the processes and selection pressures that may have led to the "domestication" of a wild progenitor of the DNA-B component. Conclusions The analysis has highlighted the greater genetic variation of DNA-B components, in comparison to the DNA

  6. Age-dependent genetic variance in a life-history trait in the mute swan.

    PubMed

    Charmantier, Anne; Perrins, Christopher; McCleery, Robin H; Sheldon, Ben C

    2006-01-22

    Genetic variance in characters under natural selection in natural populations determines the way those populations respond to that selection. Whether populations show temporal and/or spatial constancy in patterns of genetic variance and covariance is regularly considered, as this will determine whether selection responses are constant over space and time. Much less often considered is whether characters show differing amounts of genetic variance over the life-history of individuals. Such age-specific variation, if present, has important potential consequences for the force of natural selection and for understanding the causes of variation in quantitative characters. Using data from a long-term study of the mute swan Cygnus olor, we report the partitioning of phenotypic variance in timing of breeding (subject to strong natural selection) into component parts over 12 different age classes. We show that the additive genetic variance and heritability of this trait are strongly age-dependent, with higher additive genetic variance present in young and, particularly, old birds, but little evidence of any genetic variance for birds of intermediate ages. These results demonstrate that age can have a very important influence on the components of variation of characters in natural populations, and consequently that separate age classes cannot be assumed to be equivalent, either with respect to their evolutionary potential or response.

  7. Multifunctional gasoline additives

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, M.E.

    1983-10-18

    The reaction products of epoxides, containing from about 6 to about 20 carbon atoms, with unsubstituted alkylenediamines, N-alkyl alkylenediamines, N-alkoxyalkyl alkylenediamines and poly (ethyleneamines) are effective carburetor detergents and reduce deposits on various components of internal combustion engines. Internal epoxides containing at least one branched alkyl group afford reaction products with particularly desirable properties.

  8. Genetic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  9. Genetics of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stančáková, Alena; Laakso, Markku

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic traits associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to play key roles in the pathogenesis of the MetS. The MetS has a significant genetic component, and therefore linkage analysis, candidate gene approach, and genome-wide association (GWA) studies have been applied in the search of gene variants for the MetS. A few variants have been identified, located mostly in or near genes regulating lipid metabolism. GWA studies for the individual components of the MetS have reported several loci having pleiotropic effects on multiple MetS-related traits. Genetic studies have provided so far only limited evidence for a common genetic background of the MetS. Epigenetic factors (DNA methylation and histone modification) are likely to play important roles in the pathogenesis of the MetS, and they might mediate the effects of environmental exposures on the risk of the MetS. Further research is needed to clarify the role of genetic variation and epigenetic mechanisms in the development of the MetS.

  10. An introductory review of parallel independent component analysis (p-ICA) and a guide to applying p-ICA to genetic data and imaging phenotypes to identify disease-associated biological pathways and systems in common complex disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Liu, Jingyu; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Complex inherited phenotypes, including those for many common medical and psychiatric diseases, are most likely underpinned by multiple genes contributing to interlocking molecular biological processes, along with environmental factors (Owen et al., 2010). Despite this, genotyping strategies for complex, inherited, disease-related phenotypes mostly employ univariate analyses, e.g., genome wide association. Such procedures most often identify isolated risk-related SNPs or loci, not the underlying biological pathways necessary to help guide the development of novel treatment approaches. This article focuses on the multivariate analysis strategy of parallel (i.e., simultaneous combination of SNP and neuroimage information) independent component analysis (p-ICA), which typically yields large clusters of functionally related SNPs statistically correlated with phenotype components, whose overall molecular biologic relevance is inferred subsequently using annotation software suites. Because this is a novel approach, whose details are relatively new to the field we summarize its underlying principles and address conceptual questions regarding interpretation of resulting data and provide practical illustrations of the method. PMID:26442095

  11. Quantitative trait loci mapping in Brassica rapa revealed the structural and functional conservation of genetic loci governing morphological and yield component traits in the A, B, and C subgenomes of Brassica species.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaonan; Ramchiary, Nirala; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Choi, Su Ryun; Hur, Yoonkang; Nou, Ill-Sup; Yoon, Moo Kyoung; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2013-02-01

    Brassica rapa is an important crop species that produces vegetables, oilseed, and fodder. Although many studies reported quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping, the genes governing most of its economically important traits are still unknown. In this study, we report QTL mapping for morphological and yield component traits in B. rapa and comparative map alignment between B. rapa, B. napus, B. juncea, and Arabidopsis thaliana to identify candidate genes and conserved QTL blocks between them. A total of 95 QTL were identified in different crucifer blocks of the B. rapa genome. Through synteny analysis with A. thaliana, B. rapa candidate genes and intronic and exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms in the parental lines were detected from whole genome resequenced data, a few of which were validated by mapping them to the QTL regions. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed differences in the expression levels of a few genes in parental lines. Comparative mapping identified five key major evolutionarily conserved crucifer blocks (R, J, F, E, and W) harbouring QTL for morphological and yield components traits between the A, B, and C subgenomes of B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. napus. The information of the identified candidate genes could be used for breeding B. rapa and other related Brassica species.

  12. An Effective Method to Identify Heritable Components from Multivariate Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangwen; Kranzler, Henry R.; Bi, Jinbo

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate phenotypes may be characterized collectively by a variety of low level traits, such as in the diagnosis of a disease that relies on multiple disease indicators. Such multivariate phenotypes are often used in genetic association studies. If highly heritable components of a multivariate phenotype can be identified, it can maximize the likelihood of finding genetic associations. Existing methods for phenotype refinement perform unsupervised cluster analysis on low-level traits and hence do not assess heritability. Existing heritable component analytics either cannot utilize general pedigrees or have to estimate the entire covariance matrix of low-level traits from limited samples, which leads to inaccurate estimates and is often computationally prohibitive. It is also difficult for these methods to exclude fixed effects from other covariates such as age, sex and race, in order to identify truly heritable components. We propose to search for a combination of low-level traits and directly maximize the heritability of this combined trait. A quadratic optimization problem is thus derived where the objective function is formulated by decomposing the traditional maximum likelihood method for estimating the heritability of a quantitative trait. The proposed approach can generate linearly-combined traits of high heritability that has been corrected for the fixed effects of covariates. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated in simulations and by a case study of cocaine dependence. Our approach was computationally efficient and derived traits of higher heritability than those by other methods. Additional association analysis with the derived cocaine-use trait identified genetic markers that were replicated in an independent sample, further confirming the utility and advantage of the proposed approach. PMID:26658140

  13. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  14. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  15. Basic Genetics: A Human Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Colorado Springs, CO. Center for Education in Human and Medical Genetics.

    This document (which has the form of a magazine) provides a variety of articles, stories, editorials, letters, interviews, and other types of magazine features (such as book reviews) which focus on human genetics. In addition to providing information about the principles of genetics, nearly all of the sections in the "magazine" address moral,…

  16. Evidence for nonadditive genetic effects on Eysenck Personality Scales in South Korean twins.

    PubMed

    Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2007-04-01

    While evidence supporting for nonadditive genetic influences on personality traits in Caucasian populations has been growing in recent years, twin studies that explored the existence of genetic nonadditivity in personality variation in Asian populations are still lacking. Seven hundred and sixty-five pairs of adolescent and young adult twins registered with the South Korean Twin Registry completed the 7 scales of the Eysenck Personality Scales through a mail survey. Maximum likelihood twin correlations were computed and model-fitting analyses were conducted. Monozygotic twin correlations were consistently higher than twice the dizygotic twin correlations for all 7 scales, suggesting pervasive influences of nonadditive genetic effects on personality traits in the South Korean population. Model-fitting analyses indicated that genetic nonadditivity is particularly important for the variation of Impulsivity, Venturesomeness, Empathy, Lie, and Psychoticism. According to the best fitting models, nonadditive genetic effects ranged from 34 to 49% for these scales. For Neuroticism and Extraversion, models that included an additive genetic component fit better than those including a nonadditive genetic variance component.

  17. Principal component analysis (PCA) of volatile terpene compounds dataset emitted by genetically modified sweet orange fruits and juices in which a D-limonene synthase was either up- or down-regulated vs. empty vector controls.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ana; Peris, Josep E; Redondo, Ana; Shimada, Takehiko; Peña, Leandro

    2016-12-01

    We have categorized the dataset from content and emission of terpene volatiles of peel and juice in both Navelina and Pineapple sweet orange cultivars in which D-limonene was either up- (S), down-regulated (AS) or non-altered (EV; control) ("Impact of D-limonene synthase up- or down-regulation on sweet orange fruit and juice odor perception"(A. Rodríguez, J.E. Peris, A. Redondo, T. Shimada, E. Costell, I. Carbonell, C. Rojas, L. Peña, (2016)) [1]). Data from volatile identification and quantification by HS-SPME and GC-MS were classified by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) individually or as chemical groups. AS juice was characterized by the higher influence of the oxygen fraction, and S juice by the major influence of ethyl esters. S juices emitted less linalool compared to AS and EV juices.

  18. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  19. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  20. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  1. One-component nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao; Koo, Jin Mo; Cui, Honggang

    2015-12-10

    One-component nanomedicine (OCN) represents an emerging class of therapeutic nanostructures that contain only one type of chemical substance. This one-component feature allows for fine-tuning and optimization of the drug loading and physicochemical properties of nanomedicine in a precise manner through molecular engineering of the underlying building blocks. Using a precipitation procedure or effective molecular assembly strategies, molecularly crafted therapeutic agents (e.g. polymer-drug conjugates, small molecule