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Sample records for additive hard-sphere mixtures

  1. Density functional for ternary non-additive hard sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Matthias

    2011-10-19

    Based on fundamental measure theory, a Helmholtz free energy density functional for three-component mixtures of hard spheres with general, non-additive interaction distances is constructed. The functional constitutes a generalization of the previously given theory for binary non-additive mixtures. The diagrammatic structure of the spatial integrals in both functionals is of star-like (or tree-like) topology. The ternary diagrams possess a higher degree of complexity than the binary diagrams. Results for partial pair correlation functions, obtained via the Ornstein-Zernike route from the second functional derivatives of the excess free energy functional, agree well with Monte Carlo simulation data. PMID:21946780

  2. Communication: Virial coefficients and demixing in highly asymmetric binary additive hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    López de Haro, Mariano; Tejero, Carlos F; Santos, Andrés

    2013-04-28

    The problem of demixing in a binary fluid mixture of highly asymmetric additive hard spheres is revisited. A comparison is presented between the results derived previously using truncated virial expansions for three finite size ratios with those that one obtains with the same approach in the extreme case in which one of the components consists of point particles. Since this latter system is known not to exhibit fluid-fluid segregation, the similarity observed for the behavior of the critical constants arising in the truncated series in all instances, while not being conclusive, may cast serious doubts as to the actual existence of a demixing fluid-fluid transition in disparate-sized binary additive hard-sphere mixtures. PMID:23635104

  3. Demixing in binary mixtures of apolar and dipolar hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarza, N. G.; Lomba, E.; Martín, C.; Gallardo, A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the demixing transition of mixtures of equal size hard spheres and dipolar hard spheres using computer simulation and integral equation theories. Calculations are carried out at constant pressure, and it is found that there is a strong correlation between the total density and the composition. The critical temperature and the critical total density are found to increase with pressure. The critical mole fraction of the dipolar component on the contrary decreases as pressure is augmented. These qualitative trends are reproduced by the theoretical approaches that on the other hand overestimate by far the value of the critical temperature. Interestingly, the critical parameters for the liquid-vapor equilibrium extrapolated from the mixture results in the limit of vanishing neutral hard sphere concentration agree rather well with recent estimates based on the extrapolation of charged hard dumbbell phase equilibria when dumbbell elongation shrinks to zero [G. Ganzenmüller and P. J. Camp, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 191104 (2007)].

  4. Transport properties of highly asymmetric hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, Marcus N; Lue, Leo

    2009-04-28

    The static and dynamic properties of binary mixtures of hard spheres with a diameter ratio of sigma(B)/sigma(A)=0.1 and a mass ratio of m(B)/m(A)=0.001 are investigated using event driven molecular dynamics. The contact values of the pair correlation functions are found to compare favorably with recently proposed theoretical expressions. The transport coefficients of the mixture, determined from simulation, are compared to the predictions of the revised Enskog theory using both a third-order Sonine expansion and direct simulation Monte Carlo. Overall, the Enskog theory provides a fairly good description of the simulation data, with the exception of systems at the smallest mole fraction of larger spheres (x(A)=0.01) examined. A "fines effect" was observed at higher packing fractions, where adding smaller spheres to a system of large spheres decreases the viscosity of the mixture; this effect is not captured by the Enskog theory. PMID:19405594

  5. Transport properties of highly asymmetric hard-sphere mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannerman, Marcus N.; Lue, Leo

    2009-04-01

    The static and dynamic properties of binary mixtures of hard spheres with a diameter ratio of σB/σA=0.1 and a mass ratio of mB/mA=0.001 are investigated using event driven molecular dynamics. The contact values of the pair correlation functions are found to compare favorably with recently proposed theoretical expressions. The transport coefficients of the mixture, determined from simulation, are compared to the predictions of the revised Enskog theory using both a third-order Sonine expansion and direct simulation Monte Carlo. Overall, the Enskog theory provides a fairly good description of the simulation data, with the exception of systems at the smallest mole fraction of larger spheres (xA=0.01) examined. A "fines effect" was observed at higher packing fractions, where adding smaller spheres to a system of large spheres decreases the viscosity of the mixture; this effect is not captured by the Enskog theory.

  6. Hard-sphere kinetic models for inert and reactive mixtures.

    PubMed

    Polewczak, Jacek

    2016-10-19

    I consider stochastic variants of a simple reacting sphere (SRS) kinetic model (Xystris and Dahler 1978 J. Chem. Phys. 68 387-401, Qin and Dahler 1995 J. Chem. Phys. 103 725-50, Dahler and Qin 2003 J. Chem. Phys. 118 8396-404) for dense reacting mixtures. In contrast to the line-of-center models of chemical reactive models, in the SRS kinetic model, the microscopic reversibility (detailed balance) can be easily shown to be satisfied, and thus all mathematical aspects of the model can be fully justified. In the SRS model, the molecules behave as if they were single mass points with two internal states. Collisions may alter the internal states of the molecules, and this occurs when the kinetic energy associated with the reactive motion exceeds the activation energy. Reactive and non-reactive collision events are considered to be hard sphere-like. I consider a four component mixture A, B, A (*), B (*), in which the chemical reactions are of the type [Formula: see text], with A (*) and B (*) being distinct species from A and B. This work extends the joined works with George Stell to the kinetic models of dense inert and reactive mixtures. The idea of introducing smearing-type effect in the collisional process results in a new class of stochastic kinetic models for both inert and reactive mixtures. In this paper the important new mathematical properties of such systems of kinetic equations are proven. The new results for stochastic revised Enskog system for inert mixtures are also provided. PMID:27545341

  7. Two-fluid theory and thermodynamic properties of liquid mixtures. Application to hard-sphere mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Brandani, V.; Prausnitz, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is the second of three describing a two-fluid theory of binary liquid mixtures. The general theory presented in the preceding paper is used to derive a model for calculating thermodynamic properties of hard-sphere mixtures. Calculations indicate that desirable boundary conditions are satisfied. PMID:16593220

  8. Thermodynamic Functions of Solvation of Hydrocarbons, Noble Gases, and Hard Spheres in Tetrahydrofuran-Water Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sedov, I A; Magsumov, T I

    2015-07-16

    Thermodynamic solvation properties of mixtures of water with tetrahydrofuran at 298 K are studied. The Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of solvation of n-octane and toluene are determined experimentally. For molecular dynamics simulations of the binary solvent, we have modified a TraPPE-UA model for tetrahydrofuran and combined it with the SPC/E potential for water. The excess thermodynamic functions of neon, xenon, and hard spheres with two different radii are calculated using the particle insertion method. Simulated and real systems share the same characteristic trends for the thermodynamic functions. A maximum is present on dependencies of the enthalpy of solvation from the composition of solvent at 70-90 mol % water, making it higher than in both of the cosolvents. It is caused by a high enthalpy of cavity formation in the mixtures rich with water due to solvent reorganization around the cavity, which is shown by calculation of the enthalpy of solvation of hard spheres. Addition of relatively small amounts of tetrahydrofuran to water effectively suppresses the hydrophobic effect, leading to a quick increase of both the entropy and enthalpy of cavity formation and solvation of low polar molecules. PMID:26115405

  9. Perturbation theory for multicomponent fluids based on structural properties of hard-sphere chain mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hlushak, Stepan

    2015-09-28

    An analytical expression for the Laplace transform of the radial distribution function of a mixture of hard-sphere chains of arbitrary segment size and chain length is used to rigorously formulate the first-order Barker-Henderson perturbation theory for the contribution of the segment-segment dispersive interactions into thermodynamics of the Lennard-Jones chain mixtures. Based on this approximation, a simple variant of the statistical associating fluid theory is proposed and used to predict properties of several mixtures of chains of different lengths and segment sizes. The theory treats the dispersive interactions more rigorously than the conventional theories and provides means for more accurate description of dispersive interactions in the mixtures of highly asymmetric components.

  10. Phase behavior of binary hard-sphere mixtures from perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Velasco, E; Navascués, G; Mederos, L

    1999-09-01

    Using a first-order perturbation theory, we have studied the phase diagram of a binary mixture of hard spheres for different values of the size ratio. Recent models for the two-body depletion potential between large spheres are used to take into account the role of the small spheres. The theory predicts a complex phase diagram including a fluid-solid transition at high packing fraction of small spheres, metastability of fluid-fluid demixing, an isostructural solid-solid transition at high packing fraction of the large spheres for sufficiently small values of the size ratio q of the spheres, and the tendency to sticky-sphere behavior in the limit q-->0. The agreement with recent simulation results is quite good. We also show that this phenomenology was already implicit in the pioneering work of Asakura and Oosawa. PMID:11970123

  11. Orientational ordering and phase behaviour of binary mixtures of hard spheres and hard spherocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang; Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A.; Avendaño, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    We study the structure and fluid-phase behaviour of binary mixtures of hard spheres (HSs) and hard spherocylinders (HSCs) in isotropic and nematic states using the NPnAT ensemble Monte Carlo (MC) approach in which the normal component of the pressure tensor is fixed in a system confined between two hard walls. The method allows one to estimate the location of the isotropic-nematic phase transition and to observe the asymmetry in the composition between the coexisting phases, with the expected enhancement of the HSC concentration in the nematic phase. This is in stark contrast with the previously reported MC simulations where a conventional isotropic NPT ensemble was used. We further compare the simulation results with the theoretical predictions of two analytic theories that extend the original Parsons-Lee theory using the one-fluid and the many-fluid approximations [Malijevský et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 144504 (2008)]. In the one-fluid version of the theory, the properties of the mixture are related to an effective one-component HS system, while in the many-fluid theory, the components of the mixtures are represented as separate effective HS particles. The comparison reveals that both the one- and the many-fluid approaches provide a reasonably accurate quantitative description of the mixture including the predictions of the isotropic-nematic phase boundary and degree of orientational order of the HSC-HS mixture.

  12. Depletion effects in smectic phases of hard-rod-hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Y; Cinacchi, G; Velasco, E; Mederos, L

    2006-10-01

    It is known that when hard spheres are added to a pure system of hard rods the stability of the smectic phase may be greatly enhanced, and that this effect can be rationalised in terms of depletion forces. In the present paper we first study the effect of orientational order on depletion forces in this particular binary system, comparing our results with those obtained adopting the usual approximation of considering the rods parallel and their orientations frozen. We consider mixtures with rods of different aspect ratios and spheres of different diameters, and we treat them within Onsager theory. Our results indicate that depletion effects, and consequently smectic stability, decrease significantly as a result of orientational disorder in the smectic phase when compared with corresponding data based on the frozen-orientation approximation. These results are discussed in terms of the tau parameter, which has been proposed as a convenient measure of depletion strength. We present closed expressions for tau, and show that it is intimately connected with the depletion potential. We then analyse the effect of particle geometry by comparing results pertaining to systems of parallel rods of different shapes (spherocylinders, cylinders and parallelepipeds). We finally provide results based on the Zwanzig approximation of a fundamental-measure density-functional theory applied to mixtures of parallelepipeds and cubes of different sizes. In this case, we show that the tau parameter exhibits a linear asymptotic behaviour in the limit of large values of the hard-rod aspect ratio, in conformity with Onsager theory, as well as in the limit of large values of the ratio of rod breadth to cube side length, d, in contrast to Onsager approximation, which predicts tau approximately d (3). Based on both this result and the Percus-Yevick approximation for the direct correlation function for a hard-sphere binary mixture in the same limit of infinite asymmetry, we speculate that, for

  13. How to predict polydisperse hard-sphere mixture behavior using maximally equivalent tridisperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogarko, Vitaliy; Luding, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Polydisperse hard sphere mixtures have equilibrium properties which essentially depend on the number density and a reduced number K of moments of the size distribution function. Such systems are equivalent to other systems with different size distributions if the K moments are matched. In particular, a small number s of components, such that 2 s - 1 = K is sufficient to mimic systems with continuous size distributions. For most of the fluid phase K = 3 moments (s = 2 components) are enough to define an equivalent system, while in the glassy states one needs K = 5 moments (s = 3 components) to achieve good agreement between the polydisperse and its maximally-equivalent tridisperse system. With K = 5 matched moments they are also close in number- and volume-fractions of rattlers. Finally, also the jamming density of maximally-equivalent jammed packings is very close, where the tiny differences can be explained by the distribution of rattlers. This research is supported by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is the applied science division of NWO, and the Technology Programme of the Ministry of Economic Affairs, project Nr. STW-MUST 10120.

  14. Equilibrium equation of state of a hard sphere binary mixture at very large densities using replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo; Berthier, Ludovic

    2011-02-01

    We use replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations to measure the equilibrium equation of state of the disordered fluid state for a binary hard sphere mixture up to very large densities where standard Monte Carlo simulations do not easily reach thermal equilibrium. For the moderate system sizes we use (up to N = 100), we find no sign of a pressure discontinuity near the location of dynamic glass singularities extrapolated using either algebraic or simple exponential divergences, suggesting they do not correspond to genuine thermodynamic glass transitions. Several scenarios are proposed for the fate of the fluid state in the thermodynamic limit. PMID:21303135

  15. Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM): A simplified model for oxide and silicate melts at mantle pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Aaron S.; Asimow, Paul D.; Stevenson, David J.

    2015-08-01

    We develop a new model to understand and predict the behavior of oxide and silicate melts at extreme temperatures and pressures, including deep mantle conditions like those in the early Earth magma ocean. The Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM) is based on an extension of the hard sphere mixture model, accounting for the range of coordination states available to each cation in the liquid. By utilizing approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, this method is capable of predicting complex liquid structure and thermodynamics while remaining computationally efficient, requiring only minutes of calculation time on standard desktop computers. This modeling framework is applied to the MgO system, where model parameters are trained on a collection of crystal polymorphs, producing realistic predictions of coordination evolution and the equation of state of MgO melt over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. We find that the typical coordination number of the Mg cation evolves continuously upward from 5.25 at 0 GPa to 8.5 at 250 GPa. The results produced by CHaSM are evaluated by comparison with predictions from published first-principles molecular dynamics calculations, indicating that CHaSM is accurately capturing the dominant physics controlling the behavior of oxide melts at high pressure. Finally, we present a simple quantitative model to explain the universality of the increasing Grüneisen parameter trend for liquids, which directly reflects their progressive evolution toward more compact solid-like structures upon compression. This general behavior is opposite that of solid materials, and produces steep adiabatic thermal profiles for silicate melts, thus playing a crucial role in magma ocean evolution.

  16. Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM): A fast approximate model for oxide and silicate melts at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A. S.; Asimow, P. D.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent first-principles calculations (e.g. Stixrude, 2009; de Koker, 2013), shock-wave experiments (Mosenfelder, 2009), and diamond-anvil cell investigations (Sanloup, 2013) indicate that silicate melts undergo complex structural evolution at high pressure. The observed increase in cation-coordination (e.g. Karki, 2006; 2007) induces higher compressibilities and lower adiabatic thermal gradients in melts as compared with their solid counterparts. These properties are crucial for understanding the evolution of impact-generated magma oceans, which are dominated by the poorly understood behavior of silicates at mantle pressures and temperatures (e.g. Stixrude et al. 2009). Probing these conditions is difficult for both theory and experiment, especially given the large compositional space (MgO-SiO2-FeO-Al2O3-etc). We develop a new model to understand and predict the behavior of oxide and silicate melts at extreme P-T conditions (Wolf et al., 2015). The Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM) extends the Hard Sphere mixture model, accounting for the range of coordination states for each cation in the liquid. Using approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, this fast statistical method compliments classical and first-principles methods, providing accurate thermodynamic and structural property predictions for melts. This framework is applied to the MgO system, where model parameters are trained on a collection of crystal polymorphs, producing realistic predictions of coordination evolution and the equation of state of MgO melt over a wide P-T range. Typical Mg-coordination numbers are predicted to evolve continuously from 5.25 (0 GPa) to 8.5 (250 GPa), comparing favorably with first-principles Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. We begin extending the model to a simplified mantle chemistry using empirical potentials (generally accurate over moderate pressure ranges, <~30 GPa), yielding predictions rooted in statistical representations of melt structure

  17. Demixing and nematic behaviour of oblate hard spherocylinders and hard spheres mixtures: Monte Carlo simulation and Parsons-Lee theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gámez, Francisco; Acemel, Rafael D.; Cuetos, Alejandro

    2013-10-01

    Parsons-Lee approach is formulated for the isotropic-nematic transition in a binary mixture of oblate hard spherocylinders and hard spheres. Results for the phase coexistence and for the equation of state in both phases for fluids with different relative size and composition ranges are presented. The predicted behaviour is in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in a qualitative fashion. The study serves to provide a rational view of how to control key aspects of the behaviour of these binary nematogenic colloidal systems. This behaviour can be tuned with an appropriate choice of the relative size and molar fractions of the depleting particles. In general, the mixture of discotic and spherical particles is stable against demixing up to very high packing fractions. We explore in detail the narrow geometrical range where demixing is predicted to be possible in the isotropic phase. The influence of molecular crowding effects on the stability of the mixture when spherical molecules are added to a system of discotic colloids is also studied.

  18. Tracer diffusion of hard-sphere binary mixtures under nano-confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Malgaretti, Paolo; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    The physics of diffusion phenomena in nano- and microchannels has attracted a lot of attention in recent years, due to its close connection with many technological, medical, and industrial applications. In the present paper, we employ a kinetic approach to investigate how the confinement in nanostructured geometries affects the diffusive properties of fluid mixtures and leads to the appearance of properties different from those of bulk systems. In particular, we derive an expression for the friction tensor in the case of a bulk fluid mixture confined to a narrow slit having undulated walls. The boundary roughness leads to a new mechanism for transverse diffusion and can even lead to an effective diffusion along the channel larger than the one corresponding to a planar channel of equivalent section. Finally, we discuss a reduction of the previous equation to a one dimensional effective diffusion equation in which an entropic term encapsulates the geometrical information on the channel shape.

  19. Direct observation in 3d of structural crossover in binary hard sphere mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statt, Antonia; Pinchaipat, Rattachai; Turci, Francesco; Evans, Robert; Royall, C. Patrick

    2016-04-01

    For binary fluid mixtures of spherical particles in which the two species are sufficiently different in size, the dominant wavelength of oscillations of the pair correlation functions is predicted to change from roughly the diameter of the large species to that of the small species along a sharp crossover line in the phase diagram [C. Grodon et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 7869 (2004)]. Using particle-resolved colloid experiments in 3d we demonstrate that crossover exists and that its location in the phase diagram is in quantitative agreement with the results of both theory and our Monte-Carlo simulations. In contrast with previous work [J. Baumgartl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 198303 (2007)], where a correspondence was drawn between crossover and percolation of both species, in our 3d study we find that structural crossover is unrelated to percolation.

  20. The isotropic-nematic and nematic-nematic phase transition of binary mixtures of tangent hard-sphere chain fluids: An analytical equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Gross, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    An analytical equation of state (EoS) is derived to describe the isotropic (I) and nematic (N) phase of linear- and partially flexible tangent hard-sphere chain fluids and their mixtures. The EoS is based on an extension of Onsager's second virial theory that was developed in our previous work [T. van Westen, B. Oyarzún, T. J. H. Vlugt, and J. Gross, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 034505 (2013)]. Higher virial coefficients are calculated using a Vega-Lago rescaling procedure, which is hereby generalized to mixtures. The EoS is used to study (1) the effect of length bidispersity on the I-N and N-N phase behavior of binary linear tangent hard-sphere chain fluid mixtures, (2) the effect of partial molecular flexibility on the binary phase diagram, and (3) the solubility of hard-sphere solutes in I- and N tangent hard-sphere chain fluids. By changing the length bidispersity, two types of phase diagrams were found. The first type is characterized by an I-N region at low pressure and a N-N demixed region at higher pressure that starts from an I-N-N triphase equilibrium. The second type does not show the I-N-N equilibrium. Instead, the N-N region starts from a lower critical point at a pressure above the I-N region. The results for the I-N region are in excellent agreement with the results from molecular simulations. It is shown that the N-N demixing is driven both by orientational and configurational/excluded volume entropy. By making the chains partially flexible, it is shown that the driving force resulting from the configurational entropy is reduced (due to a less anisotropic pair-excluded volume), resulting in a shift of the N-N demixed region to higher pressure. Compared to linear chains, no topological differences in the phase diagram were found. We show that the solubility of hard-sphere solutes decreases across the I-N phase transition. Furthermore, it is shown that by using a liquid crystal mixture as the solvent, the solubility difference can by maximized by tuning the

  1. The theory of semipermeable vesicles and membranes: An integral-equation approach. I. General formalism and application to a hard-sphere mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yaoqi; Stell, George

    1988-12-01

    An exact integral-equation formalism for a system of a binary hard-sphere mixture interacting with a spherical semipermeable vesicle (SPV) and plane semipermeable membrane (SPM) is derived by using the Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) equation with appropriate closures. The Percus-Yevick (PY) closure or the hypernetted chain (HNC) closure, in which the bulk correlation is obtained by the PY approximation, are considered as examples. We refer to these as the PY/PY and HNC/PY approximations, respectively. The mixture contains solvent particles, which are permeable to the membrane, and solute particles (``protein'' or ``polymer'' particles), which can not pass through the membrane. We develop an exact general formalism for this problem and as an illustration of its use give quantative results for solvent and solute particles modeled as hard spheres of different diameters. An analytical expression for the density ratio in the PY/PY and HNC/PY approximations between two sides of a plane SPM is obtained. Results obtained from these expressions agree very well with results obtained by equating chemical potentials in the region of interest. It turns out that the protein-membrane direct correlation function can be given by a simple analytic expression for the limit of a point solvent in the PY/PY approximation. The osmotic pressure and density profiles for the system containing an ideal spherical SPV or plane SPM in the PY/PY approximation are evaluated. Extension to the nonlocal density-functional closures previously introduced by Blum and Stell is discussed. Finally, we note that certain impenetrable-wall problems previously considered elsewhere can be regarded as semipermeable membrane problems treated via McMillan-Mayer formalism in the continuum-solvent approximation.

  2. Prediction of binary hard-sphere crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2009-04-01

    We present a method based on a combination of a genetic algorithm and Monte Carlo simulations to predict close-packed crystal structures in hard-core systems. We employ this method to predict the binary crystal structures in a mixture of large and small hard spheres with various stoichiometries and diameter ratios between 0.4 and 0.84. In addition to known binary hard-sphere crystal structures similar to NaCl and AlB2, we predict additional crystal structures with the symmetry of CrB, gammaCuTi, alphaIrV, HgBr2, AuTe2, Ag2Se, and various structures for which an atomic analog was not found. In order to determine the crystal structures at infinite pressures, we calculate the maximum packing density as a function of size ratio for the crystal structures predicted by our GA using a simulated annealing approach. PMID:19518387

  3. Liquid-Vapor Coexistence in the Screened Coulomb (Yukawa) Hard Sphere Binary Mixture in Disordered Porous Media: The Mean Spherical Approximation.

    PubMed

    Trokhymchuk; Orozco; Pizio; Vlachy

    1998-11-15

    The thermodynamics of a two-component fluid with a hard core interaction and screened Coulomb (Yukawa) interaction between particles, similar to the primitive model of an electrolyte solution, adsorbed in a disordered matrix of hard spheres, is studied by using replica Ornstein-Zernike integral equations and the mean spherical approximation (MSA). The gas-liquid transition is localized. The coexistence curve is investigated dependent on the range of interaction between fluid species, on matrix density, and on fluid-matrix attraction. We have observed shrinking of the coexistence envelope with increasing matrix density. The critical temperature of adsorbed mixture decreases with increasing matrix density. The critical density is less affected; however, it also decreases slightly. The critical temperature is sensitive to the fluid species-matrix attraction and depends nonmonotonously on their strength. For a given matrix microporosity, it increases slightly and then decreases with augmenting strength of fluid-matrix attraction. The critical density is less affected by this attraction. However, it decreases for the model with a sufficiently long-range tail of fluid-matrix attraction. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9792783

  4. Clustering and gelation of hard spheres induced by the Pickering effect.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    A mixture of hard-sphere particles and model emulsion droplets is studied with a Brownian dynamics simulation. We find that the addition of nonwetting emulsion droplets to a suspension of pure hard spheres can lead to both gas-liquid and fluid-solid phase separations. Furthermore, we find a stable fluid of hard-sphere clusters. The stability is due to the saturation of the attraction that occurs when the surface of the droplets is completely covered with colloidal particles. At larger emulsion droplet densities a percolation transition is observed. The resulting networks of colloidal particles show dynamical and mechanical properties typical of a colloidal gel. The results of the model are in good qualitative agreement with recent experimental findings [E. Koos and N. Willenbacher, Science 331, 897 (2011)] in a mixture of colloidal particles and two immiscible fluids. PMID:22680411

  5. Segregation of Fluidized Binary Hard-Sphere Systems Under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul

    We have derived an analytic expression for the contact value of the local density of binary hard-sphere systems under gravity. We have obtained the crossover conditions for the Brazil-nut type segregation of binary hard-sphere mixtures and binary hard-sphere chain mixtures from the segregation criterion, where the segregation occurs when the density (or the pressure) of the small spheres at the bottom is higher than that of the large spheres, or vice versa. For the binary hard-sphere chain mixtures, the crossover condition for the segregation depends on the number of monomers composed of hard-sphere chains as well as the mass and the diameter of each species. The fundamental-measure theories (FMTs) and local density approximation (LDA) are employed to examine the crossover condition for the segregation of the gravity-induced hard-sphere mixtures. The calculated results show that the LDA does not explain the density oscillation near the bottom, whereas the modified fundamental-measure theory (MFMT) compares with molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Hard sphere packings within cylinders.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Steinhardt, William; Zhao, Hao; Socolar, Joshua E S; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2016-02-23

    Arrangements of identical hard spheres confined to a cylinder with hard walls have been used to model experimental systems, such as fullerenes in nanotubes and colloidal wire assembly. Finding the densest configurations, called close packings, of hard spheres of diameter σ in a cylinder of diameter D is a purely geometric problem that grows increasingly complex as D/σ increases, and little is thus known about the regime for D > 2.873σ. In this work, we extend the identification of close packings up to D = 4.00σ by adapting Torquato-Jiao's adaptive-shrinking-cell formulation and sequential-linear-programming (SLP) technique. We identify 17 new structures, almost all of them chiral. Beyond D ≈ 2.85σ, most of the structures consist of an outer shell and an inner core that compete for being close packed. In some cases, the shell adopts its own maximum density configuration, and the stacking of core spheres within it is quasiperiodic. In other cases, an interplay between the two components is observed, which may result in simple periodic structures. In yet other cases, the very distinction between the core and shell vanishes, resulting in more exotic packing geometries, including some that are three-dimensional extensions of structures obtained from packing hard disks in a circle. PMID:26843132

  7. Geometrical characterization of hard-sphere systems.

    PubMed

    Richard, P; Oger, L; Troadec, J P; Gervois, A

    1999-10-01

    By using molecular dynamics simulations on a large number of hard spheres and the Voronoï tessellation we characterize hard-sphere systems geometrically at any packing fraction eta along the different branches of the phase diagram. Crystallization of disordered packings occurs only for a small range of packing fraction. For the other packing fractions the system behaves as either a fluid (stable or metastable) or a glass. We have studied the evolution of the statistics of the Voronoï tessellation during crystallization and characterized the apparition of order by an order parameter (Q(6)) built from spherical harmonics. PMID:11970312

  8. Stabilizing the hexagonal close packed structure of hard spheres with polymers: Phase diagram, structure, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Edison, John R; Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-01

    We study the phase behaviour of a binary mixture of colloidal hard spheres and freely jointed chains of beads using Monte Carlo simulations. Recently Panagiotopoulos and co-workers predicted [Nat. Commun. 5, 4472 (2014)] that the hexagonal close packed (HCP) structure of hard spheres can be stabilized in such a mixture due to the interplay between polymer and the void structure in the crystal phase. Their predictions were based on estimates of the free-energy penalty for adding a single hard polymer chain in the HCP and the competing face centered cubic (FCC) phase. Here we calculate the phase diagram using free-energy calculations of the full binary mixture and find a broad fluid-solid coexistence region and a metastable gas-liquid coexistence region. For the colloid-monomer size ratio considered in this work, we find that the HCP phase is only stable in a small window at relatively high polymer reservoir packing fractions, where the coexisting HCP phase is nearly close packed. Additionally we investigate the structure and dynamic behaviour of these mixtures. PMID:27497577

  9. Stabilizing the hexagonal close packed structure of hard spheres with polymers: Phase diagram, structure, and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edison, John R.; Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-01

    We study the phase behaviour of a binary mixture of colloidal hard spheres and freely jointed chains of beads using Monte Carlo simulations. Recently Panagiotopoulos and co-workers predicted [Nat. Commun. 5, 4472 (2014)] that the hexagonal close packed (HCP) structure of hard spheres can be stabilized in such a mixture due to the interplay between polymer and the void structure in the crystal phase. Their predictions were based on estimates of the free-energy penalty for adding a single hard polymer chain in the HCP and the competing face centered cubic (FCC) phase. Here we calculate the phase diagram using free-energy calculations of the full binary mixture and find a broad fluid-solid coexistence region and a metastable gas-liquid coexistence region. For the colloid-monomer size ratio considered in this work, we find that the HCP phase is only stable in a small window at relatively high polymer reservoir packing fractions, where the coexisting HCP phase is nearly close packed. Additionally we investigate the structure and dynamic behaviour of these mixtures.

  10. Beyond packing of hard spheres: The effects of core softness, non-additivity, intermediate-range repulsion, and many-body interactions on the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Fan, Meng; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D.; O’Hern, Corey S.

    2015-11-14

    When a liquid is cooled well below its melting temperature at a rate that exceeds the critical cooling rate R{sub c}, the crystalline state is bypassed and a metastable, amorphous glassy state forms instead. R{sub c} (or the corresponding critical casting thickness d{sub c}) characterizes the glass-forming ability (GFA) of each material. While silica is an excellent glass-former with small R{sub c} < 10{sup −2} K/s, pure metals and most alloys are typically poor glass-formers with large R{sub c} > 10{sup 10} K/s. Only in the past thirty years have bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) been identified with R{sub c} approaching that for silica. Recent simulations have shown that simple, hard-sphere models are able to identify the atomic size ratio and number fraction regime where BMGs exist with critical cooling rates more than 13 orders of magnitude smaller than those for pure metals. However, there are a number of other features of interatomic potentials beyond hard-core interactions. How do these other features affect the glass-forming ability of BMGs? In this manuscript, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine how variations in the softness and non-additivity of the repulsive core and form of the interatomic pair potential at intermediate distances affect the GFA of binary alloys. These variations in the interatomic pair potential allow us to introduce geometric frustration and change the crystal phases that compete with glass formation. We also investigate the effect of tuning the strength of the many-body interactions from zero to the full embedded atom model on the GFA for pure metals. We then employ the full embedded atom model for binary BMGs and show that hard-core interactions play the dominant role in setting the GFA of alloys, while other features of the interatomic potential only change the GFA by one to two orders of magnitude. Despite their perturbative effect, understanding the detailed form of the intermetallic potential is important for

  11. Beyond packing of hard spheres: The effects of core softness, non-additivity, intermediate-range repulsion, and many-body interactions on the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Fan, Meng; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2015-11-01

    When a liquid is cooled well below its melting temperature at a rate that exceeds the critical cooling rate Rc, the crystalline state is bypassed and a metastable, amorphous glassy state forms instead. Rc (or the corresponding critical casting thickness dc) characterizes the glass-forming ability (GFA) of each material. While silica is an excellent glass-former with small Rc < 10-2 K/s, pure metals and most alloys are typically poor glass-formers with large Rc > 1010 K/s. Only in the past thirty years have bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) been identified with Rc approaching that for silica. Recent simulations have shown that simple, hard-sphere models are able to identify the atomic size ratio and number fraction regime where BMGs exist with critical cooling rates more than 13 orders of magnitude smaller than those for pure metals. However, there are a number of other features of interatomic potentials beyond hard-core interactions. How do these other features affect the glass-forming ability of BMGs? In this manuscript, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine how variations in the softness and non-additivity of the repulsive core and form of the interatomic pair potential at intermediate distances affect the GFA of binary alloys. These variations in the interatomic pair potential allow us to introduce geometric frustration and change the crystal phases that compete with glass formation. We also investigate the effect of tuning the strength of the many-body interactions from zero to the full embedded atom model on the GFA for pure metals. We then employ the full embedded atom model for binary BMGs and show that hard-core interactions play the dominant role in setting the GFA of alloys, while other features of the interatomic potential only change the GFA by one to two orders of magnitude. Despite their perturbative effect, understanding the detailed form of the intermetallic potential is important for designing BMGs with cm or greater casting thickness.

  12. Beyond packing of hard spheres: The effects of core softness, non-additivity, intermediate-range repulsion, and many-body interactions on the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Fan, Meng; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D; O'Hern, Corey S

    2015-11-14

    When a liquid is cooled well below its melting temperature at a rate that exceeds the critical cooling rate Rc, the crystalline state is bypassed and a metastable, amorphous glassy state forms instead. Rc (or the corresponding critical casting thickness dc) characterizes the glass-forming ability (GFA) of each material. While silica is an excellent glass-former with small Rc < 10(-2) K/s, pure metals and most alloys are typically poor glass-formers with large Rc > 10(10) K/s. Only in the past thirty years have bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) been identified with Rc approaching that for silica. Recent simulations have shown that simple, hard-sphere models are able to identify the atomic size ratio and number fraction regime where BMGs exist with critical cooling rates more than 13 orders of magnitude smaller than those for pure metals. However, there are a number of other features of interatomic potentials beyond hard-core interactions. How do these other features affect the glass-forming ability of BMGs? In this manuscript, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine how variations in the softness and non-additivity of the repulsive core and form of the interatomic pair potential at intermediate distances affect the GFA of binary alloys. These variations in the interatomic pair potential allow us to introduce geometric frustration and change the crystal phases that compete with glass formation. We also investigate the effect of tuning the strength of the many-body interactions from zero to the full embedded atom model on the GFA for pure metals. We then employ the full embedded atom model for binary BMGs and show that hard-core interactions play the dominant role in setting the GFA of alloys, while other features of the interatomic potential only change the GFA by one to two orders of magnitude. Despite their perturbative effect, understanding the detailed form of the intermetallic potential is important for designing BMGs with cm or greater casting

  13. Equilibrium distribution of hard-sphere systems and revised Enskog theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijeren, H.

    1983-10-01

    A revised Enskog theory (RET) is shown to lead to a correct equilibrium distribution in hard-sphere systems in a stationary external potential, while the standard Enskog theory (SET) does not. Attention is given to the s-component hard-sphere mixture with constant external potential acting on particles of a particular species. The different definition of the pair correlation function at a contact point of two different species used in RET is demonstrated to be consistent with equilibrium statistical mechanics, whereas the definition chosen for the contact point in SET is not.

  14. Aging dynamics of colloidal hard sphere glasses.

    PubMed

    Martinez, V A; Bryant, G; van Megen, W

    2010-09-21

    We report the results of dynamic light scattering measurements of the coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) of glasses of colloidal hard spheres for several volume fractions and a range of scattering vectors around the primary peak of the static structure factor. The ISF shows a clear crossover from an initial fast decay to a slower nonstationary decay. Aging is quantified in several different ways. However, regardless of the method chosen, the perfect "aged" glass is approached in a power law fashion. In particular the coupling between the fast and slow decays, as measured by the degree of stretching of the ISF at the crossover, also decreases algebraically with waiting time. The nonstationarity of this coupling implies that even the fastest detectable processes are themselves nonstationary. PMID:20866156

  15. Replica exchange Monte Carlo applied to hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo

    2009-10-14

    In this work a replica exchange Monte Carlo scheme which considers an extended isobaric-isothermal ensemble with respect to pressure is applied to study hard spheres (HSs). The idea behind the proposal is expanding volume instead of increasing temperature to let crowded systems characterized by dominant repulsive interactions to unblock, and so, to produce sampling from disjoint configurations. The method produces, in a single parallel run, the complete HS equation of state. Thus, the first order fluid-solid transition is captured. The obtained results well agree with previous calculations. This approach seems particularly useful to treat purely entropy-driven systems such as hard body and nonadditive hard mixtures, where temperature plays a trivial role. PMID:19831433

  16. The phase behavior of linear and partially flexible hard-sphere chain fluids and the solubility of hard spheres in hard-sphere chain fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzún, Bernardo; van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.

    2013-05-01

    The liquid crystal phase behavior of linear and partially flexible hard-sphere chain fluids and the solubility of hard spheres in hard-sphere chain fluids are studied by constant pressure Monte Carlo simulations. An extensive study on the phase behavior of linear fluids with a length of 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 20 beads is carried out. The phase behavior of partially flexible fluids with a total length of 8, 10, 14, and 15 beads and with different lengths for the linear part is also determined. A precise description of the reduced pressure and of the packing fraction change at the isotropic-nematic coexistence was achieved by performing long simulation runs. For linear fluids, a maximum in the isotropic to nematic packing fraction change is observed for a chain length of 15 beads. The infinite dilution solubility of hard spheres in linear and partially flexible hard-sphere chain fluids is calculated by the Widom test-particle insertion method. To identify the effect of chain connectivity and molecular anisotropy on free volume, solubility is expressed relative to that of hard spheres in a hard sphere fluid at same packing fraction as relative Henry's law constants. A linear relationship between relative Henry's law constants and packing fraction is observed for all linear fluids. Furthermore, this linearity is independent of liquid crystal ordering and seems to be independent of chain length for linear chains of 10 beads and longer. The same linear relationship was observed for the solubility of hard spheres in nematic forming partially flexible fluids for packing fractions up to a value slightly higher than the nematic packing fraction at the isotropic-nematic coexistence. At higher packing fractions, the small flexibility of these fluids seems to improve solubility in comparison with the linear fluids.

  17. Dynamics of hard sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective is to perform on homogeneous, fully equilibrated dispersions the full set of experiments characterizing the transition from fluid to solid and the properties of the crystalline and glassy solid. These include measurements quantifying the nucleation and growth of crystallites, the structure of the initial fluid and the fully crystalline solid, and Brownian motion of particles within the crystal, and the elasticity of the crystal and the glass. Experiments are being built and tested for ideal microgravity environment. Here we describe the ground based effort, which exploits a fluidized bed to create a homogeneous, steady dispersion for the studies. The differences between the microgravity environment and the fluidized bed is gauged by the Peclet number Pe, which measures the rate of convection/sedimentation relative to Brownian motion. We have designed our experiment to accomplish three types of measurements on hard sphere suspensions in a fluidized bed: the static scattering intensity as a function of angle to determine the structure factor, the temporal autocorrelation function at all scattering angles to probe the dynamics, and the amplitude of the response to an oscillatory forcing to deduce the low frequency viscoelasticity. Thus the scattering instrument and the colloidal dispersion were chosen such as that the important features of each physical property lie within the detectable range for each measurement.

  18. Molecular-scale hydrophobic interactions between hard-sphere reference solutes are attractive and endothermic

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Holleran, Sinead A.; Ashbaugh, Henry S.; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2013-01-01

    The osmotic second virial coefficients, B2, for atomic-sized hard spheres in water are attractive (B2 < 0) and become more attractive with increasing temperature (ΔB2/ΔT < 0) in the temperature range 300 K ≤ T ≤ 360 K. Thus, these hydrophobic interactions are attractive and endothermic at moderate temperatures. Hydrophobic interactions between atomic-sized hard spheres in water are more attractive than predicted by the available statistical mechanical theory. These results constitute an initial step toward detailed molecular theory of additional intermolecular interaction features, specifically, attractive interactions associated with hydrophobic solutes. PMID:24297918

  19. Non-hard sphere thermodynamic perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-08-01

    A non-hard sphere (HS) perturbation scheme, recently advanced by the present author, is elaborated for several technical matters, which are key mathematical details for implementation of the non-HS perturbation scheme in a coupling parameter expansion (CPE) thermodynamic perturbation framework. NVT-Monte Carlo simulation is carried out for a generalized Lennard-Jones (LJ) 2n-n potential to obtain routine thermodynamic quantities such as excess internal energy, pressure, excess chemical potential, excess Helmholtz free energy, and excess constant volume heat capacity. Then, these new simulation data, and available simulation data in literatures about a hard core attractive Yukawa fluid and a Sutherland fluid, are used to test the non-HS CPE 3rd-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and give a comparison between the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT and other theoretical approaches. It is indicated that the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT is superior to other traditional TPT such as van der Waals/HS (vdW/HS), perturbation theory 2 (PT2)/HS, and vdW/Yukawa (vdW/Y) theory or analytical equation of state such as mean spherical approximation (MSA)-equation of state and is at least comparable to several currently the most accurate Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theories. It is discovered that three technical issues, i.e., opening up new bridge function approximation for the reference potential, choosing proper reference potential, and/or using proper thermodynamic route for calculation of fex - ref, chiefly decide the quality of the non-HS CPE TPT. Considering that the non-HS perturbation scheme applies for a wide variety of model fluids, and its implementation in the CPE thermodynamic perturbation framework is amenable to high-order truncation, the non-HS CPE 3rd-order or higher order TPT will be more promising once the above-mentioned three technological advances are established.

  20. Dendritic Growth of Hard-Sphere Crystals. Experiment 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Meyer, W. V.; Rogers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations of the disorder-order transition for colloidal hard spheres under microgravity revealed dendritic crystallites roughly 1-2 mm in size for samples in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Order-of-magnitude estimates rationalize the absence of large or dendritic crystals under normal gravity and their stability to annealing in microgravity. A linear stability analysis of the Ackerson and Schaetzel model for crystallization of hard spheres establishes the domain of instability for diffusion-limited growth at small supersaturations. The relationship between hard-sphere and molecular crystal growth is established and exploited to relate the predicted linear instability to the well-developed dendrites observed.

  1. Uniform shear flow in dissipative gases: computer simulations of inelastic hard spheres and frictional elastic hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Astillero, Antonio; Santos, Andrés

    2005-09-01

    In the preceding paper, we have conjectured that the main transport properties of a dilute gas of inelastic hard spheres (IHSs) can be satisfactorily captured by an equivalent gas of elastic hard spheres (EHSs), provided that the latter are under the action of an effective drag force and their collision rate is reduced by a factor (1+alpha)/2 (where alpha is the constant coefficient of normal restitution). In this paper we test the above expectation in a paradigmatic nonequilibrium state, namely, the simple or uniform shear flow, by performing Monte Carlo computer simulations of the Boltzmann equation for both classes of dissipative gases with a dissipation range 0.5 < or = alpha < or = 0.95 and two values of the imposed shear rate a. It is observed that the evolution toward the steady state proceeds in two stages: a short kinetic stage (strongly dependent on the initial preparation of the system) followed by a slower hydrodynamic regime that becomes increasingly less dependent on the initial state. Once conveniently scaled, the intrinsic quantities in the hydrodynamic regime depend on time, at a given value of alpha, only through the reduced shear rate a*(t) is proportional to a/square root(T(t)), until a steady state, independent of the imposed shear rate and of the initial preparation, is reached. The distortion of the steady-state velocity distribution from the local equilibrium state is measured by the shear stress, the normal stress differences, the cooling rate, the fourth and sixth cumulants, and the shape of the distribution itself. In particular, the simulation results seem to be consistent with an exponential overpopulation of the high-velocity tail. These properties are common to both the IHS and EHS systems. In addition, the EHS results are in general hardly distinguishable from the IHS ones if alpha approximately > 0.7, so that the distinct signature of the IHS gas (higher anisotropy and overpopulation) only manifests itself at relatively high

  2. Simple effective rule to estimate the jamming packing fraction of polydisperse hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrés; Yuste, Santos B; López de Haro, Mariano; Odriozola, Gerardo; Ogarko, Vitaliy

    2014-04-01

    A recent proposal in which the equation of state of a polydisperse hard-sphere mixture is mapped onto that of the one-component fluid is extrapolated beyond the freezing point to estimate the jamming packing fraction ϕJ of the polydisperse system as a simple function of M1M3/M22, where Mk is the kth moment of the size distribution. An analysis of experimental and simulation data of ϕJ for a large number of different mixtures shows a remarkable general agreement with the theoretical estimate. To give extra support to the procedure, simulation data for seventeen mixtures in the high-density region are used to infer the equation of state of the pure hard-sphere system in the metastable region. An excellent collapse of the inferred curves up to the glass transition and a significant narrowing of the different out-of-equilibrium glass branches all the way to jamming are observed. Thus, the present approach provides an extremely simple criterion to unify in a common framework and to give coherence to data coming from very different polydisperse hard-sphere mixtures. PMID:24827171

  3. Computational polymer physics: Hard-sphere chain in solvent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Avinash; Gavazzi, Daniel; Taylor, Mark

    2009-10-01

    In this work we present results for chain conformation in two simple chain-in-solvent systems constructed from hard-sphere monomers of diameter D. The first system consists of a flexible chain of fused hard spheres (i.e., bond length L=D) in a monomeric hard-sphere solvent. The second system consists of a flexible tangent hard-sphere chain (L=D) in a dimeric hard-sphere solvent with L=D. These systems are studied using Monte Carlo simulations which employ both single-site crankshaft and multi-site pivot moves to sample the configuration space of the chain. We report chain structure, in terms of site-site probability functions, as a function of solvent density. In all cases, increasing solvent density leads to an overall compression of the chain. At high solvent density the chain conformation is closely coupled to the local solvent structure and we speculate that incommensurate structures may lead to interesting conformational transitions.

  4. Scaled Particle Theory for Multicomponent Hard Sphere Fluids Confined in Random Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Zhao, S L; Holovko, M; Chen, X S; Dong, W

    2016-06-23

    The formulation of scaled particle theory (SPT) is presented for a quite general model of fluids confined in a random porous media, i.e., a multicomponent hard sphere (HS) fluid in a multicomponent hard sphere or a multicomponent overlapping hard sphere (OHS) matrix. The analytical expressions for pressure, Helmholtz free energy, and chemical potential are derived. The thermodynamic consistency of the proposed theory is established. Moreover, we show that there is an isomorphism between the SPT for a multicomponent system and that for a one-component system. Results from grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations are also presented for a binary HS mixture in a one-component HS or a one-component OHS matrix. The accuracy of various variants derived from the basic SPT formulation is appraised against the simulation results. Scaled particle theory, initially formulated for a bulk HS fluid, has not only provided an analytical tool for calculating thermodynamic properties of HS fluid but also helped to gain very useful insight for elaborating other theoretical approaches such as the fundamental measure theory (FMT). We expect that the general SPT for multicomponent systems developed in this work can contribute to the study of confined fluids in a similar way. PMID:27294670

  5. Using compressibility factor as a predictor of confined hard-sphere fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Jeetain

    2009-10-22

    We study the correlations between the diffusivity (or viscosity) and the compressibility factor of bulk hard-sphere fluid as predicted by the ultralocal limit of the barrier hopping theory. Our specific aim is to determine if these correlations observed in the bulk equilibrium hard-sphere fluid can be used to predict the self-diffusivity of fluid confined between a slit-pore or a rectangular channel. In this work, we consider a single-component and a binary mixture of hard spheres. To represent confining walls, we use purely reflecting hard walls and interacting square-well walls. Our results clearly show that the correspondence between the diffusivity and the compressibility factor can be used along with the knowledge of the confined fluid's compressibility factor to predict its diffusivity with quantitative accuracy. Our analysis also suggests that a simple measure, the average fluid density, can be an accurate predictor of confined fluid diffusivity for very tight confinements ( approximately 2-3 particle diameters wide) at low to intermediate density conditions. Together, these results provide further support for the idea that one can use robust connections between thermodynamic and dynamic quantities to predict dynamics of confined fluids from their thermodynamics. PMID:19702285

  6. Using compressibility factor as a predictor of confined hard-sphere fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Jeetain

    2009-01-01

    We study the correlations between the diffusivity (or viscosity) and the compressibility factor of bulk hard-sphere fluid as predicted by the ultralocal limit of the barrier hopping theory. Our specific aim is to determine if these correlations observed in the bulk equilibrium hard-sphere fluid can be used to predict the self-diffusivity of fluid confined between a slit-pore or a rectangular channel. In this work, we consider a single-component and a binary mixture of hard spheres. To represent confining walls, we use purely reflecting hard walls and interacting square-well walls. Our results clearly show that the correspondence between the diffusivity and the compressibility factor can be used along with the knowledge of the confined fluid's compressibility factor to predict its diffusivity with quantitative accuracy. Our analysis also suggests that a simple measure, the average fluid density, can be an accurate predictor of confined fluid diffusivity for very tight confinements (≈ 2-3 particle diameters wide) at low to intermediate density conditions. Together, these results provide further support for the idea that one can use robust connections between thermodynamic and dynamic quantities to predict dynamics of confined fluids from their thermodynamics. PMID:19702285

  7. Singular Value Decomposition of the Radial Distribution Function for Hard Sphere and Square Well Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Travis

    2013-01-01

    We compute the singular value decomposition of the radial distribution function for hard sphere, and square well solutions. We find that decomposes into a small set of basis vectors allowing for an extremely accurate representation at all interpolated densities and potential strengths. In addition, we find that the coefficient vectors describing the magnitude of each basis vector are well described by a low-order polynomial. We provide a program to calculate in this compact representation for the investigated parameter range. PMID:24143174

  8. Rowlinson’s concept of an effective hard sphere diameter

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Attention is drawn to John Rowlinson’s idea that the repulsive portion of the intermolecular interaction may be replaced by a temperature-dependent hard sphere diameter. It is this approximation that made the development of perturbation theory possible for realistic fluids whose intermolecular interactions have a steep, but finite, repulsion at short separations. PMID:20953320

  9. The structural origin of the hard-sphere glass transition in granular packing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yujie

    2015-09-28

    Glass transition is accompanied by a rapid growth of the structural relaxation time and a concomitant decrease of configurational entropy. It remains unclear whether the transition has a thermodynamic origin, and whether the dynamic arrest is associated with the growth of a certain static order. Using granular packing as a model hard-sphere glass, we show the glass transition as a thermodynamic phase transition with a ‘hidden’ polytetrahedral order. This polytetrahedral order is spatially correlated with the slow dynamics. It is geometrically frustrated and has a peculiar fractal dimension. Additionally, as the packing fraction increases, its growth follows an entropy-driven nucleationmore » process, similar to that of the random first-order transition theory. In conclusion, our study essentially identifies a long-sought-after structural glass order in hard-sphere glasses.« less

  10. The structural origin of the hard-sphere glass transition in granular packing

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yujie

    2015-09-28

    Glass transition is accompanied by a rapid growth of the structural relaxation time and a concomitant decrease of configurational entropy. It remains unclear whether the transition has a thermodynamic origin, and whether the dynamic arrest is associated with the growth of a certain static order. Using granular packing as a model hard-sphere glass, we show the glass transition as a thermodynamic phase transition with a ‘hidden’ polytetrahedral order. This polytetrahedral order is spatially correlated with the slow dynamics. It is geometrically frustrated and has a peculiar fractal dimension. Additionally, as the packing fraction increases, its growth follows an entropy-driven nucleation process, similar to that of the random first-order transition theory. In conclusion, our study essentially identifies a long-sought-after structural glass order in hard-sphere glasses.

  11. The structural origin of the hard-sphere glass transition in granular packing

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Glass transition is accompanied by a rapid growth of the structural relaxation time and a concomitant decrease of configurational entropy. It remains unclear whether the transition has a thermodynamic origin, and whether the dynamic arrest is associated with the growth of a certain static order. Using granular packing as a model hard-sphere glass, we show the glass transition as a thermodynamic phase transition with a ‘hidden' polytetrahedral order. This polytetrahedral order is spatially correlated with the slow dynamics. It is geometrically frustrated and has a peculiar fractal dimension. Additionally, as the packing fraction increases, its growth follows an entropy-driven nucleation process, similar to that of the random first-order transition theory. Our study essentially identifies a long-sought-after structural glass order in hard-sphere glasses. PMID:26412008

  12. The structural origin of the hard-sphere glass transition in granular packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yujie

    2015-09-01

    Glass transition is accompanied by a rapid growth of the structural relaxation time and a concomitant decrease of configurational entropy. It remains unclear whether the transition has a thermodynamic origin, and whether the dynamic arrest is associated with the growth of a certain static order. Using granular packing as a model hard-sphere glass, we show the glass transition as a thermodynamic phase transition with a `hidden' polytetrahedral order. This polytetrahedral order is spatially correlated with the slow dynamics. It is geometrically frustrated and has a peculiar fractal dimension. Additionally, as the packing fraction increases, its growth follows an entropy-driven nucleation process, similar to that of the random first-order transition theory. Our study essentially identifies a long-sought-after structural glass order in hard-sphere glasses.

  13. The structural origin of the hard-sphere glass transition in granular packing.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Glass transition is accompanied by a rapid growth of the structural relaxation time and a concomitant decrease of configurational entropy. It remains unclear whether the transition has a thermodynamic origin, and whether the dynamic arrest is associated with the growth of a certain static order. Using granular packing as a model hard-sphere glass, we show the glass transition as a thermodynamic phase transition with a 'hidden' polytetrahedral order. This polytetrahedral order is spatially correlated with the slow dynamics. It is geometrically frustrated and has a peculiar fractal dimension. Additionally, as the packing fraction increases, its growth follows an entropy-driven nucleation process, similar to that of the random first-order transition theory. Our study essentially identifies a long-sought-after structural glass order in hard-sphere glasses. PMID:26412008

  14. Extension of the BMCSL equation of state for hard spheres to the metastable disordered region: Application to the SAFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Paricaud, P.

    2015-07-28

    A simple modification of the Boublík-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland equation of state is proposed for an application to the metastable disordered region. The new model has a positive pole at the jamming limit and can accurately describe the molecular simulation data of pure hard in the stable fluid region and along the metastable branch. The new model has also been applied to binary mixtures hard spheres, and an excellent description of the fluid and metastable branches can be obtained by adjusting the jamming packing fraction. The new model for hard sphere mixtures can be used as the repulsive term of equations of state for real fluids. In this case, the modified equations of state give very similar predictions of thermodynamic properties as the original models, and one can remove the multiple liquid density roots observed for some versions of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT) at low temperature without any modification of the dispersion term.

  15. Simple liquids’ quasiuniversality and the hard-sphere paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-08-01

    This topical review discusses the quasiuniversality of simple liquids’ structure and dynamics and two possible justifications of it. The traditional one is based on the van der Waals picture of liquids in which the hard-sphere system reflects the basic physics. An alternative explanation argues that all quasiuniversal liquids to a good approximation conform to the same equation of motion, referring to the exponentially repulsive pair-potential system as the basic reference system. The paper, which is aimed at non-experts, ends by listing a number of open problems in the field.

  16. Simple liquids' quasiuniversality and the hard-sphere paradigm.

    PubMed

    Dyre, Jeppe C

    2016-08-17

    This topical review discusses the quasiuniversality of simple liquids' structure and dynamics and two possible justifications of it. The traditional one is based on the van der Waals picture of liquids in which the hard-sphere system reflects the basic physics. An alternative explanation argues that all quasiuniversal liquids to a good approximation conform to the same equation of motion, referring to the exponentially repulsive pair-potential system as the basic reference system. The paper, which is aimed at non-experts, ends by listing a number of open problems in the field. PMID:27345623

  17. Multicomponent adhesive hard sphere models and short-ranged attractive interactions in colloidal or micellar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzillo, Domenico; Giacometti, Achille; Fantoni, Riccardo; Sollich, Peter

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the dependence of the stickiness parameters tij=1/(12τij) —where the τij are the conventional Baxter parameters—on the solute diameters σi and σj in multicomponent sticky hard sphere (SHS) models for fluid mixtures of mesoscopic neutral particles. A variety of simple but realistic interaction potentials, utilized in the literature to model short-ranged attractions present in real solutions of colloids or reverse micelles, is reviewed. We consider: (i) van der Waals attractions, (ii) hard-sphere-depletion forces, (iii) polymer-coated colloids, and (iv) solvation effects (in particular hydrophobic bonding and attractions between reverse micelles of water-in-oil microemulsions). We map each of these potentials onto an equivalent SHS model by requiring the equality of the second virial coefficients. The main finding is that, for most of the potentials considered, the size-dependence of tij(T,σi,σj) can be approximated by essentially the same expression, i.e., a simple polynomial in the variable σiσj/σij2 , with coefficients depending on the temperature T , or—for depletion interactions—on the packing fraction η0 of the depletant particles.

  18. Scaled particle theory for hard sphere pairs. I. Mathematical structure.

    PubMed

    Stillinger, Frank H; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Chatterjee, Swaroop

    2006-11-28

    We develop an extension of the original Reiss-Frisch-Lebowitz scaled particle theory that can serve as a predictive method for the hard sphere pair correlation function g(r). The reversible cavity creation work is analyzed both for a single spherical cavity of arbitrary size, as well as for a pair of identical such spherical cavities with variable center-to-center separation. These quantities lead directly to a prediction of g(r). Smooth connection conditions have been identified between the small-cavity situation where the work can be exactly and completely expressed in terms of g(r), and the large-cavity regime where macroscopic properties become relevant. Closure conditions emerge which produce a nonlinear integral equation that must be satisfied by the pair correlation function. This integral equation has a structure which straightforwardly generates a solution that is a power series in density. The results of this series replicate the exact second and third virial coefficients for the hard sphere system via the contact value of the pair correlation function. The predicted fourth virial coefficient is approximately 0.6% lower than the known exact value. Detailed numerical analysis of the nonlinear integral equation has been deferred to the subsequent paper. PMID:17144712

  19. Scaled particle theory for hard sphere pairs. I. Mathematical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillinger, Frank H.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Chatterjee, Swaroop

    2006-11-01

    We develop an extension of the original Reiss-Frisch-Lebowitz scaled particle theory that can serve as a predictive method for the hard sphere pair correlation function g(r ). The reversible cavity creation work is analyzed both for a single spherical cavity of arbitrary size, as well as for a pair of identical such spherical cavities with variable center-to-center separation. These quantities lead directly to a prediction of g(r ). Smooth connection conditions have been identified between the small-cavity situation where the work can be exactly and completely expressed in terms of g(r ), and the large-cavity regime where macroscopic properties become relevant. Closure conditions emerge which produce a nonlinear integral equation that must be satisfied by the pair correlation function. This integral equation has a structure which straightforwardly generates a solution that is a power series in density. The results of this series replicate the exact second and third virial coefficients for the hard sphere system via the contact value of the pair correlation function. The predicted fourth virial coefficient is approximately 0.6% lower than the known exact value. Detailed numerical analysis of the nonlinear integral equation has been deferred to the subsequent paper.

  20. Solubilities of Solutes in Ionic Liquids from a SimplePerturbed-Hard-Sphere Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yuan; Prausnitz, John M.

    2005-09-20

    In recent years, several publications have provided solubilities of ordinary gases and liquids in ionic liquids. This work reports an initial attempt to correlate the experimental data using a perturbed-hard-sphere theory; the perturbation is based on well-known molecular physics when the solution is considered as a dielectric continuum. For this correlation, the most important input parameters are hard-sphere diameters of the solute and of the cation and anion that constitute the ionic liquid. In addition, the correlation uses the solvent density and the solute's polarizability and dipole and quadrupole moments, if any. Dispersion-energy parameters are obtained from global correlation of solubility data. Results are given for twenty solutes in several ionic liquids at normal temperatures; in addition, some results are given for gases in two molten salts at very high temperatures. Because the theory used here is much simplified, and because experimental uncertainties (especially for gaseous solutes) are often large, the accuracy of the correlation presented here is not high; in general, predicted solubilities (Henry's constants) agree with experiment to within roughly {+-} 70%. As more reliable experimental data become available, modifications in the characterizing parameters are likely to improve accuracy. Nevertheless, even in its present form, the correlation may be useful for solvent screening in engineering design.

  1. Compact Collision Kernels for Hard Sphere and Coulomb Cross Sections; Fokker-Planck Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yongbin; Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2008-12-31

    A compact collision kernel is derived for both hard sphere and Coulomb cross sections. The difference between hard sphere interaction and Coulomb interaction is characterized by a parameter {eta}. With this compact collision kernel, the calculation of Fokker-Planck coefficients can be done for both the Coulomb and hard sphere interactions. The results for arbitrary order Fokker-Planck coefficients are greatly simplified. An alternate form for the Coulomb logarithm is derived with concern to the temperature relaxation in a binary plasma.

  2. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  3. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Hyltegren, Kristin; Chodankar, Shirish; Perret, Edith; Buitenhuis, Johan; van der Veen, J. Friso; Kjellander, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  4. Detecting Phase Boundaries in Hard-Sphere Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Rogers, Richard B.; Gray, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    A special image-data-processing technique has been developed for use in experiments that involve observation, via optical microscopes equipped with electronic cameras, of moving boundaries between the colloidal-solid and colloidal-liquid phases of colloidal suspensions of monodisperse hard spheres. During an experiment, it is necessary to adjust the position of a microscope to keep the phase boundary within view. A boundary typically moves at a speed of the order of microns per hour. Because an experiment can last days or even weeks, it is impractical to require human intervention to keep the phase boundary in view. The present image-data-processing technique yields results within a computation time short enough to enable generation of automated-microscope-positioning commands to track the moving phase boundary

  5. Dynamics of heterogeneous hard spheres in a file

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flomenbom, Ophir

    2010-09-01

    Normal dynamics in a quasi-one-dimensional channel of length L (→∞) of N hard spheres are analyzed. The spheres are heterogeneous: each has a diffusion coefficient D that is drawn from a probability density function (PDF), W˜D-γ for small D , where 0≤γ<1 . The initial spheres’ density ρ is nonuniform and scales with the distance (from the origin) l as ρ˜l-α , 0≤α≤1 . An approximation for the N -particle PDF for this problem is derived. From this solution, scaling law analysis and numerical simulations, we show here that the mean square displacement for a particle in such a system obeys ⟨r2⟩˜t(1-γ)/(2c-γ) , where c=1/(1+α) . The PDF of the tagged particle is Gaussian in position. Generalizations of these results are considered.

  6. Inhomogeneous quasistationary state of dense fluids of inelastic hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak

    2014-05-01

    We study closed dense collections of freely cooling hard spheres that collide inelastically with constant coefficient of normal restitution. We find inhomogeneous states (ISs) where the density profile is spatially nonuniform but constant in time. The states are exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations that describe the coupled distributions of density and temperature valid when inelastic losses of energy per collision are small. The derivation is performed without modeling the equations' coefficients that are unknown in the dense limit (such as the equation of state) using only their scaling form specific for hard spheres. Thus the IS is the exact state of this dense many-body system. It captures a fundamental property of inelastic collections of particles: the possibility of preserving nonuniform temperature via the interplay of inelastic cooling and heat conduction that generalizes previous results. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate that arbitrary initial state evolves to the IS in the limit of long times where the container has the geometry of the channel. The evolution is like a gas-liquid transition. The liquid condenses in a vanishing part of the total volume but takes most of the mass of the system. However, the gaseous phase, which mass grows only logarithmically with the system size, is relevant because its fast particles carry most of the energy of the system. Remarkably, the system self-organizes to dissipate no energy: The inelastic decay of energy is a power law [1+t/t(c)](-2), where t(c) diverges in the thermodynamic limit. This is reinforced by observing that for supercritical systems the IS coincide in most of the space with the steady states of granular systems heated at one of the walls. We discuss the relation of our results to the recently proposed finite-time singularity in other container's geometries. PMID:25353790

  7. Communication: Dynamical density functional theory for dense suspensions of colloidal hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopper, Daniel; Roth, Roland; Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2015-11-01

    We study structural relaxation of colloidal hard spheres undergoing Brownian motion using dynamical density functional theory. Contrary to the partial linearization route [D. Stopper et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 022151 (2015)] which amounts to using different free energy functionals for the self and distinct part of the van Hove function G(r, t), we put forward a unified description employing a single functional for both components. To this end, interactions within the self part are removed via the zero-dimensional limit of the functional with a quenched self component. In addition, we make use of a theoretical result for the long-time mobility in hard-sphere suspensions, which we adapt to the inhomogeneous fluid. Our results for G(r, t) are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations even in the dense liquid phase. In particular, our theory accurately yields the crossover from free diffusion at short times to the slower long-time diffusion in a crowded environment.

  8. Free Energy Calculations of Crystalline Hard Sphere Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-12-22

    Recently developed fundamental measure density functional theory (FMT) is used to study binary hard sphere (HS) complexes in crystalline phases. By comparing the excess free energy, pressure and phase diagram, we show that the fundamental measure functional yields good agreements to the available simulation results of AB, AB2 and AB13 crystals. Additionally, we use this functional to study the HS models of five binary crystals, Cu5Zr(C15b), Cu51Zr14(β), Cu10Zr7(φ), CuZr(B2) and CuZr2 (C11b), which are observed in the Cu-Zr system. The FMT functional gives well behaved minimum for most of the hard sphere crystal complexes in the two dimensional Gaussian space, namely a crystalline phase. However, the current version of FMT functional (white Bear) fails to give a stable minimum for the structure Cu10Zr7(φ). We argue that the observed solid phases for the HS models of the Cu-Zr system are true thermodynamic stable phases and can be used as a reference system in perturbation calculations.

  9. Free Energy Calculations of Crystalline Hard Sphere Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-12-22

    Recently developed fundamental measure density functional theory (FMT) is used to study binary hard sphere (HS) complexes in crystalline phases. By comparing the excess free energy, pressure and phase diagram, we show that the fundamental measure functional yields good agreements to the available simulation results of AB, AB2 and AB13 crystals. Additionally, we use this functional to study the HS models of five binary crystals, Cu5Zr(C15b), Cu51Zr14(β), Cu10Zr7(φ), CuZr(B2) and CuZr2 (C11b), which are observed in the Cu-Zr system. The FMT functional gives well behaved minimum for most of the hard sphere crystal complexes in the two dimensional Gaussian space,more » namely a crystalline phase. However, the current version of FMT functional (white Bear) fails to give a stable minimum for the structure Cu10Zr7(φ). We argue that the observed solid phases for the HS models of the Cu-Zr system are true thermodynamic stable phases and can be used as a reference system in perturbation calculations.« less

  10. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PhaSE) or "Making Jello in Space"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Doherty, Michael P.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE) is a highly successful experiment that flew aboard two shuttle missions to study the transitions involved in the formation of jellolike colloidal crystals in a microgravity environment. A colloidal suspension, or colloid, consists of fine particles, often having complex interactions, suspended in a liquid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. In low Earth orbit, the effective force of gravity is thousands of times less than at the Earth's surface. This provides researchers a way to conduct experiments that cannot be adequately performed in an Earth-gravity environment. In microgravity, colloidal particles freely interact without the complications of settling that occur in normal gravity on Earth. If the particle interactions within these colloidal suspensions could be predicted and accurately modeled, they could provide the key to understanding fundamental problems in condensed matter physics and could help make possible the development of wonderful new "designer" materials. Industries that make semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. Atomic interactions determine the physical properties (e.g., weight, color, and hardness) of ordinary matter. PHaSE uses colloidal suspensions of microscopic solid plastic spheres to model the behavior of atomic interactions. When uniformly sized hard spheres suspended in a fluid reach a certain concentration (volume fraction), the particle-fluid mixture changes from a disordered fluid state, in which the spheres are randomly organized, to an ordered "crystalline" state, in which they are structured periodically. The thermal energy of the spheres causes them to form ordered arrays, analogous to crystals. Seven of the eight PHaSE samples ranged in volume fraction from 0.483 to 0.624 to cover the range of interest, while one sample, having a concentration of 0.019, was included for

  11. Velocity and energy distributions in microcanonical ensembles of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Scalas, Enrico; Gabriel, Adrian T; Martin, Edgar; Germano, Guido

    2015-08-01

    In a microcanonical ensemble (constant NVE, hard reflecting walls) and in a molecular dynamics ensemble (constant NVEPG, periodic boundary conditions) with a number N of smooth elastic hard spheres in a d-dimensional volume V having a total energy E, a total momentum P, and an overall center of mass position G, the individual velocity components, velocity moduli, and energies have transformed beta distributions with different arguments and shape parameters depending on d, N, E, the boundary conditions, and possible symmetries in the initial conditions. This can be shown marginalizing the joint distribution of individual energies, which is a symmetric Dirichlet distribution. In the thermodynamic limit the beta distributions converge to gamma distributions with different arguments and shape or scale parameters, corresponding respectively to the Gaussian, i.e., Maxwell-Boltzmann, Maxwell, and Boltzmann or Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. These analytical results agree with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations with different numbers of hard disks or spheres and hard reflecting walls or periodic boundary conditions. The agreement is perfect with our Monte Carlo algorithm, which acts only on velocities independently of positions with the collision versor sampled uniformly on a unit half sphere in d dimensions, while slight deviations appear with our molecular dynamics simulations for the smallest values of N. PMID:26382376

  12. Local order variations in confined hard-sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2013-10-01

    Pair distributions of fluids confined between two surfaces at close distance are of fundamental importance for a variety of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena, such as interactions between macromolecules in solution, surface forces, and diffusion in narrow pores. However, in contrast to bulk fluids, properties of inhomogeneous fluids are seldom studied at the pair-distribution level. Motivated by recent experimental advances in determining anisotropic structure factors of confined fluids, we analyze theoretically the underlying anisotropic pair distributions of the archetypical hard-sphere fluid confined between two parallel hard surfaces using first-principles statistical mechanics of inhomogeneous fluids. For this purpose, we introduce an experimentally accessible ensemble-averaged local density correlation function and study its behavior as a function of confining slit width. Upon increasing the distance between the confining surfaces, we observe an alternating sequence of strongly anisotropic versus more isotropic local order. The latter is due to packing frustration of the spherical particles. This observation highlights the importance of studying inhomogeneous fluids at the pair-distribution level.

  13. Velocity and energy distributions in microcanonical ensembles of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalas, Enrico; Gabriel, Adrian T.; Martin, Edgar; Germano, Guido

    2015-08-01

    In a microcanonical ensemble (constant N V E , hard reflecting walls) and in a molecular dynamics ensemble (constant N V E PG , periodic boundary conditions) with a number N of smooth elastic hard spheres in a d -dimensional volume V having a total energy E , a total momentum P , and an overall center of mass position G , the individual velocity components, velocity moduli, and energies have transformed beta distributions with different arguments and shape parameters depending on d , N , E , the boundary conditions, and possible symmetries in the initial conditions. This can be shown marginalizing the joint distribution of individual energies, which is a symmetric Dirichlet distribution. In the thermodynamic limit the beta distributions converge to gamma distributions with different arguments and shape or scale parameters, corresponding respectively to the Gaussian, i.e., Maxwell-Boltzmann, Maxwell, and Boltzmann or Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. These analytical results agree with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations with different numbers of hard disks or spheres and hard reflecting walls or periodic boundary conditions. The agreement is perfect with our Monte Carlo algorithm, which acts only on velocities independently of positions with the collision versor sampled uniformly on a unit half sphere in d dimensions, while slight deviations appear with our molecular dynamics simulations for the smallest values of N .

  14. Jamming transition and inherent structures of hard spheres and disks.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Misaki; Kuroiwa, Takeshi; Ikeda, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Kunimasa

    2012-11-16

    Recent studies show that volume fractions φ(J) at the jamming transition of frictionless hard spheres and disks are not uniquely determined but exist over a continuous range. Motivated by this observation, we numerically investigate the dependence of φ(J) on the initial configurations of the parent fluid equilibrated at a volume fraction φ(eq), before compressing to generate a jammed packing. We find that φ(J) remains constant when φ(eq) is small but sharply increases as φ(eq) exceeds the dynamic transition point which the mode-coupling theory predicts. We carefully analyze configurational properties of both jammed packings and parent fluids and find that, while all jammed packings remain isostatic, the increase of φ(J) is accompanied with subtle but distinct changes of local orders, a static length scale, and an exponent of the finite-size scaling. These results are consistent with the scenario of the random first-order transition theory of the glass transition. PMID:23215507

  15. Topological lifetimes of polydisperse colloidal hard spheres at a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullens, Roel P. A.; Kegel, Willem K.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study the behavior of dense suspensions of model colloidal hard spheres at a single wall. Due to the slight polydispersity, our system shows a reentrant melting transition at high densities involving a hexatic structure [R. P. A. Dullens and W. K. Kegel, Phys. Rev. Lett 92, 195702 (2004)]. The reentrant melting transition is accompanied by an increase in the mean-squared displacement. The correlation between structure and dynamics was quantitatively analyzed on a single-particle level. In particular, the topological lifetime, being the average time that a particle spends having the same coordination number, is determined for all coordination numbers and as a function of volume fraction. The defective (non-sixfold-coordinated) particles exhibit shorter lifetimes than sixfold-coordinated particles, indicating that the mobility of the system is larger at or close to defective particles. The lifetime itself is a strong function of volume fraction. In particular, the global behavior of the mean-squared displacement is proportional to the hopping frequency (the inverse of the lifetime), showing that particles changing their coordination number contribute most to the local mobility.

  16. Apparent wall slip in non-Brownian hard-sphere suspensions.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Marko; Mohtaschemi, Mikael; Puisto, Antti; Illa, Xavier; Alava, Mikko J

    2015-05-01

    We analyze apparent wall slip, the reduction of particle concentration near the wall, in hard-sphere suspensions at concentrations well below the jamming limit utilizing a continuum level diffusion model. The approach extends a constitutive equation proposed earlier with two additional potentials describing the effects of gravitation and wall-particle repulsion. We find that although both mechanisms are shear independent by nature, due to the shear-rate-dependent counter-balancing particle migration fluxes, the resulting net effect is non-linearly shear dependent, causing larger slip at small shear rates. In effect, this shows up in the classically measured flow curves as a mild shear thickening regime at the transition from small to intermediate shear rates. PMID:25998170

  17. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment: Significant and Quantitative Findings Made

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    Direct examination of atomic interactions is difficult. One powerful approach to visualizing atomic interactions is to study near-index-matched colloidal dispersions of microscopic plastic spheres, which can be probed by visible light. Such spheres interact through hydrodynamic and Brownian forces, but they feel no direct force before an infinite repulsion at contact. Through the microgravity flight of the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), researchers have sought a more complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard-sphere colloidal dispersions. The experiment was conceived by Professors Paul M. Chaikin and William B. Russel of Princeton University. Microgravity was required because, on Earth, index-matched colloidal dispersions often cannot be density matched, resulting in significant settling over the crystallization period. This settling makes them a poor model of the equilibrium atomic system, where the effect of gravity is truly negligible. For this purpose, a customized light-scattering instrument was designed, built, and flown by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field on the space shuttle (shuttle missions STS 83 and STS 94). This instrument performed both static and dynamic light scattering, with sample oscillation for determining rheological properties. Scattered light from a 532- nm laser was recorded either by a 10-bit charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera from a concentric screen covering angles of 0 to 60 or by sensitive avalanche photodiode detectors, which convert the photons into binary data from which two correlators compute autocorrelation functions. The sample cell was driven by a direct-current servomotor to allow sinusoidal oscillation for the measurement of rheological properties. Significant microgravity research findings include the observation of beautiful dendritic crystals, the crystallization of a "glassy phase" sample in microgravity that did not crystallize for over 1 year in 1g

  18. Monte Carlo methods: Application to hydrogen gas and hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewing, Mark Douglas

    2001-08-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are among the most accurate for computing ground state properties of quantum systems. The two major types of QMC we use are Variational Monte Carlo (VMC), which evaluates integrals arising from the variational principle, and Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC), which stochastically projects to the ground state from a trial wave function. These methods are applied to a system of boson hard spheres to get exact, infinite system size results for the ground state at several densities. The kinds of problems that can be simulated with Monte Carlo methods are expanded through the development of new algorithms for combining a QMC simulation with a classical Monte Carlo simulation, which we call Coupled Electronic-Ionic Monte Carlo (CEIMC). The new CEIMC method is applied to a system of molecular hydrogen at temperatures ranging from 2800K to 4500K and densities from 0.25 to 0.46 g/cm3. VMC requires optimizing a parameterized wave function to find the minimum energy. We examine several techniques for optimizing VMC wave functions, focusing on the ability to optimize parameters appearing in the Slater determinant. Classical Monte Carlo simulations use an empirical interatomic potential to compute equilibrium properties of various states of matter. The CEIMC method replaces the empirical potential with a QMC calculation of the electronic energy. This is similar in spirit to the Car-Parrinello technique, which uses Density Functional Theory for the electrons and molecular dynamics for the nuclei. The challenges in constructing an efficient CEIMC simulation center mostly around the noisy results generated from the QMC computations of the electronic energy. We introduce two complementary techniques, one for tolerating the noise and the other for reducing it. The penalty method modifies the Metropolis acceptance ratio to tolerate noise without introducing a bias in the simulation of the nuclei. For reducing the noise, we introduce the two-sided energy

  19. Relaxation rates in the Maxwellian collision model and its variable hard sphere surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The variable hard sphere and related models have proven to be accurate and computationally convenient replacements for the inverse power law model of classical kinetic theory in direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. We attempt to provide theoretical support for this remarkable success by comparing the relaxation rates in the linearized Boltzmann equation for the Maxwellian collision model with those of its variable hard sphere surrogate. The comparison demonstrates that the linearized collision operator with variable hard sphere interactions can accurately approximate the linearized collision operator with Maxwellian inverse power law interactions under well-defined and broadly applicable conditions. Extensions of the analysis to the general inverse power law model and to more realistic intermolecular potentials are briefly discussed.

  20. Nonclassical Nucleation in a Solid-Solid Transition of Confined Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Weikai; Peng, Yi; Han, Yilong; Bowles, Richard K.; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2015-10-01

    A solid-solid phase transition of colloidal hard spheres confined between two planar hard walls is studied using a combination of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation. The transition from a solid consisting of five crystalline layers with square symmetry (5 □ ) to a solid consisting of four layers with triangular symmetry (4 △ ) is shown to occur through a nonclassical nucleation mechanism that involves the initial formation of a precritical liquid cluster, within which the cluster of the stable 4 △ phase grows. Free-energy calculations show that the transition occurs in one step, crossing a single free-energy barrier, and that the critical nucleus consists of a small 4 △ solid cluster wetted by a metastable liquid. In addition, the liquid cluster and the solid cluster are shown to grow at the planar hard walls. We also find that the critical nucleus size increases with supersaturation, which is at odds with classical nucleation theory. The △-solid-like cluster is shown to contain both face-centered-cubic and hexagonal-close-packed ordered particles.

  1. Stochastic Hard-Sphere Dynamics for Hydrodynamics of Non-Ideal Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A; Alder, B J; Garcia, A L

    2008-02-26

    A novel stochastic fluid model is proposed with a nonideal structure factor consistent with compressibility, and adjustable transport coefficients. This stochastic hard-sphere dynamics (SHSD) algorithm is a modification of the direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm and has several computational advantages over event-driven hard-sphere molecular dynamics. Surprisingly, SHSD results in an equation of state and a pair correlation function identical to that of a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with linear core pair potentials. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified for the Brownian motion of a nanoparticle suspended in a compressible solvent.

  2. Freezing, melting and the glass transition in a suspension of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Megen, W.

    2002-08-01

    When a suspension of hard spheres traverses the freezing volume fraction we find discontinuous changes in the character of the tagged particle density. In particular, the velocity auto-correlation function develops a negative algebraic decay and the fluctuations become subject to interruption. From these, and the exponent of the algebraic growth of the non-Gaussian parameter, the difference in mode of relaxation of the density fluctuations between the stable and metastable colloidal fluids can be quantified. A diagrammatic scheme is proposed that reconciles the dynamics of phase transitions observed in hard-sphere colloids.

  3. Crystal nucleation of hard spheres using molecular dynamics, umbrella sampling, and forward flux sampling: A comparison of simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filion, L.; Hermes, M.; Ni, R.; Dijkstra, M.

    2010-12-01

    Over the last number of years several simulation methods have been introduced to study rare events such as nucleation. In this paper we examine the crystal nucleation rate of hard spheres using three such numerical techniques: molecular dynamics, forward flux sampling, and a Bennett-Chandler-type theory where the nucleation barrier is determined using umbrella sampling simulations. The resulting nucleation rates are compared with the experimental rates of Harland and van Megen [Phys. Rev. E 55, 3054 (1997)], Sinn et al. [Prog. Colloid Polym. Sci. 118, 266 (2001)], Schätzel and Ackerson [Phys. Rev. E 48, 3766 (1993)], and the predicted rates for monodisperse and 5% polydisperse hard spheres of Auer and Frenkel [Nature 409, 1020 (2001)]. When the rates are examined in units of the long-time diffusion coefficient, we find agreement between all the theoretically predicted nucleation rates, however, the experimental results display a markedly different behavior for low supersaturation. Additionally, we examined the precritical nuclei arising in the molecular dynamics, forward flux sampling, and umbrella sampling simulations. The structure of the nuclei appears independent of the simulation method, and in all cases, the nuclei contains on average significantly more face-centered-cubic ordered particles than hexagonal-close-packed ordered particles.

  4. Sum Rules for the Pair-Correlation Functions of Inhomogeneous Fluids: Results for the Hard-Sphere-Hard-Wall System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D.; Plischke, M.

    1987-04-01

    Starting from well-known relations for the derivatives of the radial distribution functions of a mixture of fluids, and allowing the diameter of one particle to become exceedingly large, three sum rules for a fluid with density inhomogeneities are obtained. None of these sum rules are new. However, the relation between the Lovett-Mou-Buff-Wertheim and the Born-Green hierarchy of equations seems not well known. The accuracy of a recent parametrization of the pair correlation of hard spheres near a hard wall and of the solutions of the Percus-Yevick and hypernetted-chain equation for this same function are examined by determination of how well these functions satisfy these sum rules and the accuracy of their surface tension, calculated from the sum rule of Triezenberg and Zwanzig. Generally speaking, the Percus-Yevick theory gives the best results and the hypernetted-chain approximation gives the worst results with the parametrization being intermediate.

  5. Equations of state of freely jointed hard-sphere chain fluids: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stell, G.; Lin, C.; Kalyuzhnyi, Y.V.

    1999-03-01

    Using the analytical solution of a multidensity integral equation solved in our previous papers [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 108}, 6513, 6525 (1998)], we derive two compressibility and two virial equations of state (EOS) for freely jointed hard-sphere chain fluids on the basis of the approximations defined by the polymer Percus{endash}Yevick (PPY) closure and of the PPY ideal-chain closure for the integral equations. We also extend a version of first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory to polymers, using a dimer fluid as the reference system, to treat mixtures of heteronuclear chain fluids and polymer solutions; the structural information of the dimer fluid is obtained from the PPY ideal-chain approximation in the complete-association limit. The attractive forces between monomers of chain molecules are treated using simple perturbation theory. We find that the compressibility EOS derived on the basis of the PPY approximation subject to the chain-connectivity condition reduces to the compressibility EOS based upon the PPY ideal-chain approximation in the complete-association limit, which is also equivalent to the EOS derived by Chiew [Mol. Phys. {bold 70}, 129 (1990)] and to the EOS derived by Kalyuzhnyi and Cummings [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 105}, 2011 (1996)]. On the other hand, the virial EOS derived on the basis of the PPY ideal-chain approximation coincides with Attard{close_quote}s virial EOS [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 102}, 5411 (1995)] only in the zero-density limit. The advantages in numerical implementation of the EOS presented in this work are also discussed, but a full quantitative assessment of our results and a detailed numerical comparison among them are made in a companion paper, as is comparison with available simulation results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Density Functional Approximation for Non-Hard Sphere Fluids Subjected to External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    A theoretical way is proposed, by which any hard sphere density functional approximation (DFA) can be applied to non-hard sphere fluids for the calculation of density profile in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Used as examples, the present formalism is combined respectively with two recently proposed hard sphere DFAs to predict the density profile of Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid, hard core square well (SW) fluid and penetrable potenial fluid subjected to diverse external fields. Extensive comparison between theoretical predictions and corresponding simulation results shows that the present theoretical way, when combined with an accurate hard sphere DFA, can perform well for calculating the density profile of the non-uniform fluids of the above mentioned potentials. Concretely speaking, for LJ and hard core SW fluid, even a less accurate FEDFA is sufficient, while for extreme potential such as the penetrable potenial, a more accurate adjustable parameter free version of LTDFA is needed to combine with the present theoretical way to predict density profile satisfactorily. The advantage of the proposed theoretical way is that the resultant DFA is applicable to both subcritical and supercritical temperature cases, thereby overcoming the disadvantages of previous two categories of DFT approach.

  7. Note: equation of state and the freezing point in the hard-sphere model.

    PubMed

    Robles, Miguel; López de Haro, Mariano; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    The merits of different analytical equations of state for the hard-sphere system with respect to the recently computed high-accuracy value of the freezing-point packing fraction are assessed. It is found that the Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa and the branch-point approximant equations of state yield the best performance. PMID:24712819

  8. Stochastic interactions of two Brownian hard spheres in the presence of depletants

    SciTech Connect

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Tuinier, Remco; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2014-06-07

    A quantitative analysis is presented for the stochastic interactions of a pair of Brownian hard spheres in non-adsorbing polymer solutions. The hard spheres are hypothetically trapped by optical tweezers and allowed for random motion near the trapped positions. The investigation focuses on the long-time correlated Brownian motion. The mobility tensor altered by the polymer depletion effect is computed by the boundary integral method, and the corresponding random displacement is determined by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. From our computations it follows that the presence of depletion layers around the hard spheres has a significant effect on the hydrodynamic interactions and particle dynamics as compared to pure solvent and uniform polymer solution cases. The probability distribution functions of random walks of the two interacting hard spheres that are trapped clearly shift due to the polymer depletion effect. The results show that the reduction of the viscosity in the depletion layers around the spheres and the entropic force due to the overlapping of depletion zones have a significant influence on the correlated Brownian interactions.

  9. Self-consistent phonon theory of the crystallization and elasticity of attractive hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Shin, Homin; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2013-02-28

    We propose an Einstein-solid, self-consistent phonon theory for the crystal phase of hard spheres that interact via short-range attractions. The approach is first tested against the known behavior of hard spheres, and then applied to homogeneous particles that interact via short-range square well attractions and the Baxter adhesive hard sphere model. Given the crystal symmetry, packing fraction, and strength and range of attractive interactions, an effective harmonic potential experienced by a particle confined to its Wigner-Seitz cell and corresponding mean square vibrational amplitude are self-consistently calculated. The crystal free energy is then computed and, using separate information about the fluid phase free energy, phase diagrams constructed, including a first-order solid-solid phase transition and its associated critical point. The simple theory qualitatively captures all the many distinctive features of the phase diagram (critical and triple point, crystal-fluid re-entrancy, low-density coexistence curve) as a function of attraction range, and overall is in good semi-quantitative agreement with simulation. Knowledge of the particle localization length allows the crystal shear modulus to be estimated based on elementary ideas. Excellent predictions are obtained for the hard sphere crystal. Expanded and condensed face-centered cubic crystals are found to have qualitatively different elastic responses to varying attraction strength or temperature. As temperature increases, the expanded entropic solid stiffens, while the energy-controlled, fully-bonded dense solid softens. PMID:23464163

  10. Hard sphere-like glass transition in eye lens α-crystallin solutions

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Gabriela; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Thurston, George M.; Stradner, Anna; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We study the equilibrium liquid structure and dynamics of dilute and concentrated bovine eye lens α-crystallin solutions, using small-angle X-ray scattering, static and dynamic light scattering, viscometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and mode-coupling theory. We find that a polydisperse Percus–Yevick hard-sphere liquid-structure model accurately reproduces both static light scattering data and small-angle X-ray scattering liquid structure data from α-crystallin solutions over an extended range of protein concentrations up to 290 mg/mL or 49% vol fraction and up to ca. 330 mg/mL for static light scattering. The measured dynamic light scattering and viscosity properties are also consistent with those of hard-sphere colloids and show power laws characteristic of an approach toward a glass transition at α-crystallin volume fractions near 58%. Dynamic light scattering at a volume fraction beyond the glass transition indicates formation of an arrested state. We further perform event-driven molecular dynamics simulations of polydisperse hard-sphere systems and use mode-coupling theory to compare the measured dynamic power laws with those of hard-sphere models. The static and dynamic data, simulations, and analysis show that aqueous eye lens α-crystallin solutions exhibit a glass transition at high concentrations that is similar to those found in hard-sphere colloidal systems. The α-crystallin glass transition could have implications for the molecular basis of presbyopia and the kinetics of molecular change during cataractogenesis. PMID:25385638

  11. Thermodynamic stability in elastic systems: Hard spheres embedded in a finite spherical elastic solid.

    PubMed

    Solano-Altamirano, J M; Goldman, Saul

    2015-12-01

    We determined the total system elastic Helmholtz free energy, under the constraints of constant temperature and volume, for systems comprised of one or more perfectly bonded hard spherical inclusions (i.e. "hard spheres") embedded in a finite spherical elastic solid. Dirichlet boundary conditions were applied both at the surface(s) of the hard spheres, and at the outer surface of the elastic solid. The boundary conditions at the surface of the spheres were used to describe the rigid displacements of the spheres, relative to their initial location(s) in the unstressed initial state. These displacements, together with the initial positions, provided the final shape of the strained elastic solid. The boundary conditions at the outer surface of the elastic medium were used to ensure constancy of the system volume. We determined the strain and stress tensors numerically, using a method that combines the Neuber-Papkovich spherical harmonic decomposition, the Schwartz alternating method, and Least-squares for determining the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients. The total system elastic Helmholtz free energy was determined by numerically integrating the elastic Helmholtz free energy density over the volume of the elastic solid, either by a quadrature, or a Monte Carlo method, or both. Depending on the initial position of the hard sphere(s) (or equivalently, the shape of the un-deformed stress-free elastic solid), and the displacements, either stationary or non-stationary Helmholtz free energy minima were found. The non-stationary minima, which involved the hard spheres nearly in contact with one another, corresponded to lower Helmholtz free energies, than did the stationary minima, for which the hard spheres were further away from one another. PMID:26701708

  12. Clusters in sedimentation equilibrium for an experimental hard-sphere-plus-dipolar Brownian colloidal system.

    PubMed

    Newman, Hugh D; Yethiraj, Anand

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we use structure and dynamics in sedimentation equilibrium, in the presence of gravity, to examine, via confocal microscopy, a Brownian colloidal system in the presence of an external electric field. The zero field equation of state (EOS) is hard sphere without any re-scaling of particle size, and the hydrodynamic corrections to the long-time self-diffusion coefficient are quantitatively consistent with the expected value for hard spheres. Care is taken to ensure that both the dimensionless gravitational energy, which is equivalent to a Peclet number Peg, and dipolar strength Λ are of order unity. In the presence of an external electric field, anisotropic chain-chain clusters form; this cluster formation manifests itself with the appearance of a plateau in the diffusion coefficient when the dimensionless dipolar strength Λ ~ 1. The structure and dynamics of this chain-chain cluster state is examined for a monodisperse system for two particle sizes. PMID:26323363

  13. The Dynamics of Disorder-Order Transition in Hard Sphere Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.; Zhu, Jixiang; Cheng, Zhengdong; Phan, See-Eng; Russel, William B.; Lant, Christian T.; Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, William V.; Rogers, Richard; Cannell, D. S.; Ottewill, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE) seeks a complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard sphere colloidal dispersions. The light scattering instrument designed for flight collects Bragg and low angle light scattering in the forward direction via a CCD camera and performs conventional static and dynamic light scattering at 10-160 deg. through fiber optic cables. Here we report on the kinetics of nucleation and growth extracted from time-resolved Bragg images and measurements of the elastic modulus of crystalline phases obtained by monitoring resonant responses to sinusoidal forcing through dynamic light scattering. Preliminary analysis of the former indicates a significant difference from measurements on the ground, while the latter confirms nicely laboratory experiments with the same instrument and predictions from computer simulations.

  14. Regularized 13 moment equations for hard sphere molecules: Linear bulk equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struchtrup, Henning; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2013-05-01

    The regularized 13 moment equations of rarefied gas dynamics are derived for a monatomic hard sphere gas in the linear regime. The equations are based on an extended Grad-type moment system, which is systematically reduced by means of the Order of Magnitude Method [H. Struchtrup, "Stable transport equations for rarefied gases at high orders in the Knudsen number," Phys. Fluids 16(11), 3921-3934 (2004)], 10.1063/1.1782751. Chapman-Enskog expansion of the final equations yields the linear Burnett and super-Burnett equations. While the Burnett coefficients agree with literature values, this seems to be the first time that super-Burnett coefficients are computed for a hard sphere gas. As a first test of the equations the dispersion and damping of sound waves is considered.

  15. Clusters in sedimentation equilibrium for an experimental hard-sphere-plus-dipolar Brownian colloidal system

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Hugh D.; Yethiraj, Anand

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we use structure and dynamics in sedimentation equilibrium, in the presence of gravity, to examine, via confocal microscopy, a Brownian colloidal system in the presence of an external electric field. The zero field equation of state (EOS) is hard sphere without any re-scaling of particle size, and the hydrodynamic corrections to the long-time self-diffusion coefficient are quantitatively consistent with the expected value for hard spheres. Care is taken to ensure that both the dimensionless gravitational energy, which is equivalent to a Peclet number Peg, and dipolar strength Λ are of order unity. In the presence of an external electric field, anisotropic chain-chain clusters form; this cluster formation manifests itself with the appearance of a plateau in the diffusion coefficient when the dimensionless dipolar strength Λ ~ 1. The structure and dynamics of this chain-chain cluster state is examined for a monodisperse system for two particle sizes. PMID:26323363

  16. New closed virial equation of state for hard-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianxiang; Gui, Yuanxing; Mulero, Angel

    2010-10-28

    A new closed virial equation of state of hard-sphere fluids is proposed which reproduces the calculated or estimated values of the first 16 virial coefficients and at the same time gives very good accuracy when compared with computer simulation data for the compressibility factor over the entire fluid range, as well as having a pole at the correct closest packing density. PMID:20883000

  17. Thermodynamics of dipolar hard spheres with low-to-intermediate coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A; Ivanov, Alexey O; Camp, Philip J

    2012-08-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the dipolar hard-sphere fluid are studied using theory and simulation. A new theory is derived using a convenient mathematical approximation for the Helmholtz free energy relative to that for the hard-sphere fluid. The approximation is designed to give the correct low-density virial expansion. New theoretical and numerical results for the fourth virial coefficient are given. Predictions of thermodynamic functions for dipolar coupling constants λ=1 and 2 show excellent agreement with simulation results, even at the highest value of the particle volume fraction φ. For higher values of λ, there are deviations at high volume fractions, but the correct low-density behavior is retained. The theory is compared critically against the established thermodynamic perturbation theory; it gives significant improvements at low densities and is more convenient in terms of the required numerics. Dipolar hard spheres provide a basic model for ferrofluids, and the theory is accurate for typical experimental parameters λ

  18. A Local Approximation of Fundamental Measure Theory Incorporated into Three Dimensional Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations to Account for Hard Sphere Repulsion Among Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yu; Liu, Xuejiao; Chen, Minxin; Lu, Benzhuo

    2016-04-01

    The hard sphere repulsion among ions can be considered in the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations by combining the fundamental measure theory (FMT). To reduce the nonlocal computational complexity in 3D simulation of biological systems, a local approximation of FMT is derived, which forms a local hard sphere PNP (LHSPNP) model. In the derivation, the excess chemical potential from hard sphere repulsion is obtained with the FMT and has six integration components. For the integrands and weighted densities in each component, Taylor expansions are performed and the lowest order approximations are taken, which result in the final local hard sphere (LHS) excess chemical potential with four components. By plugging the LHS excess chemical potential into the ionic flux expression in the Nernst-Planck equation, the three dimensional LHSPNP is obtained. It is interestingly found that the essential part of free energy term of the previous size modified model (Borukhov et al. in Phys Rev Lett 79:435-438, 1997; Kilic et al. in Phys Rev E 75:021502, 2007; Lu and Zhou in Biophys J 100:2475-2485, 2011; Liu and Eisenberg in J Chem Phys 141:22D532, 2014) has a very similar form to one term of the LHS model, but LHSPNP has more additional terms accounting for size effects. Equation of state for one component homogeneous fluid is studied for the local hard sphere approximation of FMT and is proved to be exact for the first two virial coefficients, while the previous size modified model only presents the first virial coefficient accurately. To investigate the effects of LHS model and the competitions among different counterion species, numerical experiments are performed for the traditional PNP model, the LHSPNP model, the previous size modified PNP (SMPNP) model and the Monte Carlo simulation. It's observed that in steady state the LHSPNP results are quite different from the PNP results, but are close to the SMPNP results under a wide range of boundary conditions. Besides, in both

  19. Primitive models of chemical association. IV. Polymer Percus{endash}Yevick ideal-chain approximation for heteronuclear hard-sphere chain fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyuzhnyi, Y.V. |; Lin, C.; Stell, G.

    1998-04-01

    We continue here our series of studies in which integral-equation theory is developed and used for the monomer-monomer correlation functions in a fluid of multicomponent freely jointed hard-sphere polymers. In this study our approach is based on Wertheim{close_quote}s polymer Percus{endash}Yevick (PPY) theory supplemented by the ideal-chain approximation; it can be regarded as a simplified version of Wertheim{close_quote}s four-density PPY approximation for associating fluids considered in the complete-association limit. The numerical procedure of this simplified theory is much easier than that of the original Wertheim{close_quote}s four-density PPY approximation, but the degree of accuracy is reduced. The theory can also be regarded as an extension of the PPY theory for the homonuclear polymer system proposed by Chang and Sandler [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 102}, 437 (1995)]. Their work is based upon a description of a system of hard-sphere monomers that associate into a polydisperse system of chains of prescribed mean length. Our theory instead directly describes a multicomponent system of associating monomers that form monodisperse chains of prescribed length upon complete association. An analytical solution of the PPY ideal-chain approximation for the general case of a multicomponent mixture of heteronuclear hard-sphere linear chain molecules is given. Its use is illustrated by numerical results for two models of copolymer fluids, a symmetrical diblock copolymer system, and an alternating copolymer system. The comparison with Monte Carlo simulations is given to gauge the accuracy of the theory. We find for the molecules we study here that predictions of our theory for heteronuclear chain systems have the same degree of accuracy as Chang and Sandler{close_quote}s theory for homonuclear chain systems. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Chemical Mixture Risk Assessment Additivity-Based Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powerpoint presentation includes additivity-based chemical mixture risk assessment methods. Basic concepts, theory and example calculations are included. Several slides discuss the use of "common adverse outcomes" in analyzing phthalate mixtures.

  1. The van Hove distribution function for Brownian hard spheres: Dynamical test particle theory and computer simulations for bulk dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Paul; Fortini, Andrea; Archer, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    We describe a test particle approach based on dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) for studying the correlated time evolution of the particles that constitute a fluid. Our theory provides a means of calculating the van Hove distribution function by treating its self and distinct parts as the two components of a binary fluid mixture, with the "self " component having only one particle, the "distinct" component consisting of all the other particles, and using DDFT to calculate the time evolution of the density profiles for the two components. We apply this approach to a bulk fluid of Brownian hard spheres and compare to results for the van Hove function and the intermediate scattering function from Brownian dynamics computer simulations. We find good agreement at low and intermediate densities using the very simple Ramakrishnan-Yussouff [Phys. Rev. B 19, 2775 (1979)] approximation for the excess free energy functional. Since the DDFT is based on the equilibrium Helmholtz free energy functional, we can probe a free energy landscape that underlies the dynamics. Within the mean-field approximation we find that as the particle density increases, this landscape develops a minimum, while an exact treatment of a model confined situation shows that for an ergodic fluid this landscape should be monotonic. We discuss possible implications for slow, glassy, and arrested dynamics at high densities.

  2. The van Hove distribution function for brownian hard spheres: dynamical test particle theory and computer simulations for bulk dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Paul; Fortini, Andrea; Archer, Andrew J; Schmidt, Matthias

    2010-12-14

    We describe a test particle approach based on dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) for studying the correlated time evolution of the particles that constitute a fluid. Our theory provides a means of calculating the van Hove distribution function by treating its self and distinct parts as the two components of a binary fluid mixture, with the "self " component having only one particle, the "distinct" component consisting of all the other particles, and using DDFT to calculate the time evolution of the density profiles for the two components. We apply this approach to a bulk fluid of Brownian hard spheres and compare to results for the van Hove function and the intermediate scattering function from Brownian dynamics computer simulations. We find good agreement at low and intermediate densities using the very simple Ramakrishnan-Yussouff [Phys. Rev. B 19, 2775 (1979)] approximation for the excess free energy functional. Since the DDFT is based on the equilibrium Helmholtz free energy functional, we can probe a free energy landscape that underlies the dynamics. Within the mean-field approximation we find that as the particle density increases, this landscape develops a minimum, while an exact treatment of a model confined situation shows that for an ergodic fluid this landscape should be monotonic. We discuss possible implications for slow, glassy, and arrested dynamics at high densities. PMID:21171689

  3. Equilibrium Sampling of Hard Spheres up to the Jamming Density and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, Ludovic; Coslovich, Daniele; Ninarello, Andrea; Ozawa, Misaki

    2016-06-01

    We implement and optimize a particle-swap Monte Carlo algorithm that allows us to thermalize a polydisperse system of hard spheres up to unprecedentedly large volume fractions, where previous algorithms and experiments fail to equilibrate. We show that no glass singularity intervenes before the jamming density, which we independently determine through two distinct nonequilibrium protocols. We demonstrate that equilibrium fluid and nonequilibrium jammed states can have the same density, showing that the jamming transition cannot be the end point of the fluid branch.

  4. Simple and accurate theory for strong shock waves in a dense hard-sphere fluid.

    PubMed

    Montanero, J M; López de Haro, M; Santos, A; Garzó, V

    1999-12-01

    Following an earlier work by Holian et al. [Phys. Rev. E 47, R24 (1993)] for a dilute gas, we present a theory for strong shock waves in a hard-sphere fluid described by the Enskog equation. The idea is to use the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic equations but taking the temperature in the direction of shock propagation rather than the actual temperature in the computation of the transport coefficients. In general, for finite densities, this theory agrees much better with Monte Carlo simulations than the Navier-Stokes and (linear) Burnett theories, in contrast to the well-known superiority of the Burnett theory for dilute gases. PMID:11970718

  5. Radial distribution function for hard spheres in fractal dimensions: A heuristic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andrés; de Haro, Mariano López

    2016-06-01

    Analytic approximations for the radial distribution function, the structure factor, and the equation of state of hard-core fluids in fractal dimension d (1 ≤d ≤3 ) are developed as heuristic interpolations from the knowledge of the exact and Percus-Yevick results for the hard-rod and hard-sphere fluids, respectively. In order to assess their value, such approximate results are compared with those of recent Monte Carlo simulations and numerical solutions of the Percus-Yevick equation for a fractal dimension [M. Heinen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 097801 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.097801], a good agreement being observed.

  6. Equilibrium Sampling of Hard Spheres up to the Jamming Density and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Ludovic; Coslovich, Daniele; Ninarello, Andrea; Ozawa, Misaki

    2016-06-10

    We implement and optimize a particle-swap Monte Carlo algorithm that allows us to thermalize a polydisperse system of hard spheres up to unprecedentedly large volume fractions, where previous algorithms and experiments fail to equilibrate. We show that no glass singularity intervenes before the jamming density, which we independently determine through two distinct nonequilibrium protocols. We demonstrate that equilibrium fluid and nonequilibrium jammed states can have the same density, showing that the jamming transition cannot be the end point of the fluid branch. PMID:27341260

  7. Glass-transition properties of Yukawa potentials: from charged point particles to hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Ivlev, Alexei; Khrapak, Sergey; Thomas, Hubertus; Morfill, Gregor E; Löwen, Hartmut; Wysocki, Adam; Sperl, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    The glass transition is investigated in three dimensions for single and double Yukawa potentials for the full range of control parameters. For vanishing screening parameter, the limit of the one-component plasma is obtained; for large screening parameters and high coupling strengths, the glass-transition properties cross over to the hard-sphere system. Between the two limits, the entire transition diagram can be described by analytical functions. Unlike other potentials, the glass-transition and melting lines for Yukawa potentials are found to follow shifted but otherwise identical curves in control-parameter space. PMID:25019902

  8. Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment: Scattering, Rheology and Microscopy Study of Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Z.-D.; Zhu, J.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Meyer, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment has two incarnations: the first as a scattering and rheology experiment on STS-83 and STS-94 and the second as a microscopy experiment to be performed in the future on LMM on the space station. Here we describe some of the quantitative and qualitative results from previous flights on the dynamics of crystallization in microgravity and especially the observed interaction of growing crystallites in the coexistance regime. To clarify rheological measurements we also present ground based experiments on the low shear rate viscosity and diffusion coefficient of several hard sphere experiments at high volume fraction. We also show how these experiments will be performed with confocal microscopy and laser tweezers in our lab and as preparation for the phAse II experiments on LMM. One of the main aims of the microscopy study will be the control of colloidal samples using an array of applied fields with an eye toward colloidal architectures. Temperature gradients, electric field gradients, laser tweezers and a variety of switchable imposed surface patterns are used toward this control.

  9. The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment on MSL-1: Required Measurements and Instrument Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Lant, Christian T.; Ling, Jerri S.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of HArd Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), one of NASA Lewis Research Center's first major light scattering experiments for microgravity research on complex fluids, flew on board the Space Shuttle's Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) in 1997. Using colloidal systems of various concentrations of micron-sized plastic spheres in a refractive index-matching fluid as test samples, illuminated by laser light during and after crystallization, investigations were conducted to measure the nucleation and growth rate of colloidal crystals as well as the structure, rheology, and dynamics of the equilibrium crystal. Together, these measurements support an enhanced understanding of the nature of the liquid-to-solid transition. Achievement of the science objectives required an accurate experimental determination of eight fundamental properties for the hard sphere colloidal samples. The instrument design met almost all of the original measurement requirements, but with compromise on the number of samples on which data were taken. The instrument performs 2-D Bragg and low angle scattering from 0.4 deg. to 60 deg., dynamic and single-channel static scattering from 10 deg. to 170 deg., rheology using fiber optics, and white light imaging of the sample. As a result, PHaSE provided a timely microgravity demonstration of critical light scattering measurement techniques and hardware concepts, while generating data already showing promise of interesting new scientific findings in the field of condensed matter physics.

  10. Structural and mechanical features of the order-disorder transition in experimental hard-sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifpour, M.; Francois, N.; Robins, V.; Kingston, A.; Vaez Allaei, S. M.; Saadatfar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Here we present an experimental and numerical investigation on the grain-scale geometrical and mechanical properties of partially crystallized structures made of macroscopic frictional grains. Crystallization is inevitable in arrangements of monosized hard spheres with packing densities exceeding Bernal's limiting density ϕBernal≈0.64 . We study packings of monosized hard spheres whose density spans over a wide range (0.59 <ϕ <0.72 ) . These experiments harness x-ray computed tomography, three-dimensional image analysis, and numerical simulations to access precisely the geometry and the 3D structure of internal forces within the sphere packings. We show that clear geometrical transitions coincide with modifications of the mechanical backbone of the packing both at the grain and global scale. Notably, two transitions are identified at ϕBernal≈0.64 and ϕc≈0.68 . These results provide insights on how geometrical and mechanical features at the grain scale conspire to yield partially crystallized structures that are mechanically stable.

  11. Simulation of nucleation in almost hard-sphere colloids: The discrepancy between experiment and simulation persists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filion, L.; Ni, R.; Frenkel, D.; Dijkstra, M.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we examine the phase behavior of the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) potential with βɛ = 40. Crystal nucleation in this model system was recently studied by Kawasaki and Tanaka [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14036 (2010)], 10.1021/pr100656u, who argued that the computed nucleation rates agree well with experiment, a finding that contradicted earlier simulation results. Here we report an extensive numerical study of crystallization in the WCA model, using three totally different techniques (Brownian dynamics, umbrella sampling, and forward flux sampling). We find that all simulations yield essentially the same nucleation rates. However, these rates differ significantly from the values reported by Kawasaki and Tanaka and hence we argue that the huge discrepancy in nucleation rates between simulation and experiment persists. When we map the WCA model onto a hard-sphere system, we find good agreement between the present simulation results and those that had been obtained for hard spheres [L. Filion, M. Hermes, R. Ni, and M. Dijkstra, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 244115 (2010), 10.1063/1.3506838; S. Auer and D. Frenkel, Nature 409, 1020 (2001), 10.1038/35059035].

  12. Structural and mechanical features of the order-disorder transition in experimental hard-sphere packings.

    PubMed

    Hanifpour, M; Francois, N; Robins, V; Kingston, A; Allaei, S M Vaez; Saadatfar, M

    2015-06-01

    Here we present an experimental and numerical investigation on the grain-scale geometrical and mechanical properties of partially crystallized structures made of macroscopic frictional grains. Crystallization is inevitable in arrangements of monosized hard spheres with packing densities exceeding Bernal's limiting density ϕ(Bernal)≈0.64. We study packings of monosized hard spheres whose density spans over a wide range (0.59<ϕ<0.72). These experiments harness x-ray computed tomography, three-dimensional image analysis, and numerical simulations to access precisely the geometry and the 3D structure of internal forces within the sphere packings. We show that clear geometrical transitions coincide with modifications of the mechanical backbone of the packing both at the grain and global scale. Notably, two transitions are identified at ϕ(Bernal)≈0.64 and ϕ(c)≈0.68. These results provide insights on how geometrical and mechanical features at the grain scale conspire to yield partially crystallized structures that are mechanically stable. PMID:26172700

  13. One- and multi-component theories of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ree, F.H.

    1993-07-01

    We describe one-component statistical mechanical theories and van der Waal`s effective one-component mixture model. We then show how to apply them to mixtures (containing CO{sub 2}) to extract reliable unlike-pair potential involving CO{sub 2} molecules as well as their dissociation products. A more fundamental approach will require the development of a perturbation or variational theory of mixtures based on a non-additive hard-sphere mixture reference system. Recent progresses made in this direction by means of an integral equation and computer simulations is described.

  14. Antiandrogenic activity of phthalate mixtures: Validity of concentration addition

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Oberli-Schrämmli, Aurelia; Fent, Karl

    2012-03-01

    Phthalates and bisphenol A have very widespread use leading to significant exposure of humans. They are suspected to interfere with the endocrine system, including the androgen, estrogen and the thyroid hormone system. Here we analyzed the antiandrogenic activity of six binary, and one ternary mixture of phthalates exhibiting complete antiandrogenic dose–response curves, and binary mixtures of phthalates and bisphenol A at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 10}, EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50} in MDA-kb2 cells. Mixture activity followed the concentration addition (CA) model with a tendency to synergism at high and antagonism at low concentrations. Isoboles and the toxic unit approach (TUA) confirmed the additive to synergistic activity of the binary mixtures BBP + DBP, DBP + DEP and DEP + BPA at high concentrations. Both methods indicate a tendency to antagonism for the EC{sub 10} mixtures BBP + DBP, BBP + DEP and DBP + DEP, and the EC{sub 25} mixture of DBP + BPA. A ternary mixture revealed synergism at the EC{sub 50}, and weak antagonistic activity at the EC{sub 25} level by the TUA. A mixture of five phthalates representing a human urine composition and reflecting exposure to corresponding parent compounds showed no antiandrogenic activity. Our study demonstrates that CA is an appropriate concept to account for mixture effects of antiandrogenic phthalates and bisphenol A. The interaction indicates a departure from additivity to antagonism at low concentrations, probably due to interaction with the androgen receptor and/or cofactors. This study emphasizes that a risk assessment of phthalates should account for mixture effects by applying the CA concept. -- Highlights: ► Antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of 2 and 3 phthalates are assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. ► Mixture activities followed the concentration addition model. ► A tendency to synergism at high and antagonism at low levels occurred.

  15. How to Extend the Bridge Density Functional Approximation to the Confined Non-hard Sphere Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shi-qi

    2006-08-01

    A theoretical method was proposed to extend a bridge density functional approximation (BDFA) for the non-uniform hard sphere fluid to the non-uniform Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid. The DFT approach for LJ fluid is simple, quantitatively accurate in a wide range of coexistence phase and external field parameters. Especially, the DFT approach only needs a second order direct correlation function (DCF) of the coexistence bulk fluid as input, and is therefore applicable to the subcritical temperature region. The present theoretical method can be regarded as a non-uniform counterpart of the thermodynamic perturbation theory, in which it is not at the level of the free energy but at the level of the second order DCF.

  16. Correlation between dynamical and structural heterogeneities in colloidal hard-sphere suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golde, Sebastian; Palberg, Thomas; Schöpe, Hans Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Dynamical and structural heterogeneities have long been thought to play a key role in a unified picture of solidification in view of the two competitive processes of crystallization and vitrification. Here, we study these heterogeneities by means of a combination of dynamic and static light-scattering techniques applied to the simplest model system exhibiting crystallization and vitrification: the colloidal hard-sphere system. Our method enables us to quantify and correlate the temporal evolution of the amount of ordered clusters (precursors) and the amount of slow particles. Our analysis shows that their temporal evolutions are closely related and that there is an intimate link between structural and dynamic heterogeneities, crystal nucleation and the non-crystallization transition.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of non-conformal soft-sphere fluids with effective hard-sphere diameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Tonalli; del Río, Fernando

    2012-01-28

    In this work we study a set of soft-sphere systems characterised by a well-defined variation of their softness. These systems represent an extension of the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential widely used in statistical mechanics of fluids. This type of soft spheres is of interest because they represent quite accurately the effective intermolecular repulsion in fluid substances and also because they exhibit interesting properties. The thermodynamics of the soft-sphere fluids is obtained via an effective hard-sphere diameter approach that leads to a compact and accurate equation of state. The virial coefficients of soft spheres are shown to follow quite simple relationships that are incorporated into the equation of state. The approach followed exhibits the rescaling of the density that produces a unique equation for all systems and temperatures. The scaling is carried through to the level of the structure of the fluids. PMID:22158949

  18. Radial distribution function for hard spheres in fractal dimensions: A heuristic approximation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrés; de Haro, Mariano López

    2016-06-01

    Analytic approximations for the radial distribution function, the structure factor, and the equation of state of hard-core fluids in fractal dimension d (1≤d≤3) are developed as heuristic interpolations from the knowledge of the exact and Percus-Yevick results for the hard-rod and hard-sphere fluids, respectively. In order to assess their value, such approximate results are compared with those of recent Monte Carlo simulations and numerical solutions of the Percus-Yevick equation for a fractal dimension [M. Heinen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 097801 (2015)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.097801], a good agreement being observed. PMID:27415227

  19. Creep and aging of hard-sphere glasses under constant stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesta, P.; Petekidis, G.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the aging behavior of glassy suspensions of nearly hard-sphere colloids submitted to a constant shear stress. For low stresses, below the yield stress, the system is subject to creep motion. As the sample ages, the shear rate exhibits a power-law decrease with time with exponents that depend on the sample age. We use a combination of rheological experiments with time-resolved photon correlation spectroscopy to investigate the time evolution of the sample dynamics under shear on various time and length scales. Long-time light-scattering experiments reveal the occurrence of microscopic rearrangement events that are linked with the macroscopic strain deformation of the sample. Dynamic time sweep experiments indicate that while the internal microscopic dynamics slow down continuously with waiting time, the storage and loss moduli are almost constant after a fast, weak decrease, resembling the behavior of quenched systems with partially frozen-in stresses.

  20. The rheology of hard sphere suspensions at arbitrary volume fractions: An improved differential viscosity model.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Carlos I; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-28

    We propose a simple and general model accounting for the dependence of the viscosity of a hard sphere suspension at arbitrary volume fractions. The model constitutes a continuum-medium description based on a recursive-differential method where correlations between the spheres are introduced through an effective volume fraction. In contrast to other differential methods, the introduction of the effective volume fraction as the integration variable implicitly considers interactions between the spheres of the same recursive stage. The final expression for the viscosity scales with this effective volume fraction, which allows constructing a master curve that contains all the experimental situations considered. The agreement of our expression for the viscosity with experiments at low- and high-shear rates and in the high-frequency limit is remarkable for all volume fractions. PMID:19191410

  1. Thermodynamic perturbation theory for fused hard-sphere and hard-disk chain fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.; Hall, C.K.; Stell, G.

    1995-08-15

    We find that first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1) which incorporates the reference monomer fluid used in the generalized Flory--{ital AB} (GF--{ital AB}) theory yields an equation of state for fused hard-sphere (FHS) chain fluids that has accuracy comparable to the GF--{ital AB} and GF--dimer--{ital AC} theories. The new TPT1 equation of state is significantly more accurate than other extensions of the TPT1 theory to FHS chain fluids. The TPT1 is also extended to two-dimensional fused hard-disk chain fluids. For the fused hard-disk dimer fluid, the extended TPT1 equation of state is found to be more accurate than the Boublik hard-disk dimer equation of state. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Equation of state of sticky-hard-sphere fluids in the chemical-potential route.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, René D; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    The coupling-parameter method, whereby an extra particle is progressively coupled to the rest of the particles, is applied to the sticky-hard-sphere fluid to obtain its equation of state in the so-called chemical-potential route (μ route). As a consistency test, the results for one-dimensional sticky particles are shown to be exact. Results corresponding to the three-dimensional case (Baxter's model) are derived within the Percus-Yevick approximation by using different prescriptions for the dependence of the interaction potential of the extra particle on the coupling parameter. The critical point and the coexistence curve of the gas-liquid phase transition are obtained in the μ route and compared with predictions from other thermodynamics routes and from computer simulations. The results show that the μ route yields a general better description than the virial, energy, compressibility, and zero-separation routes. PMID:24827207

  3. An Automatic Phase-Change Detection Technique for Colloidal Hard Sphere Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth; Rogers, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of monodisperse spheres are used as physical models of thermodynamic phase transitions and as precursors to photonic band gap materials. However, current image analysis techniques are not able to distinguish between densely packed phases within conventional microscope images, which are mainly characterized by degrees of randomness or order with similar grayscale value properties. Current techniques for identifying the phase boundaries involve manually identifying the phase transitions, which is very tedious and time consuming. We have developed an intelligent machine vision technique that automatically identifies colloidal phase boundaries. The algorithm utilizes intelligent image processing techniques that accurately identify and track phase changes vertically or horizontally for a sequence of colloidal hard sphere suspension images. This technique is readily adaptable to any imaging application where regions of interest are distinguished from the background by differing patterns of motion over time.

  4. Communication: radial distribution functions in a two-dimensional binary colloidal hard sphere system.

    PubMed

    Thorneywork, Alice L; Roth, Roland; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Dullens, Roel P A

    2014-04-28

    Two-dimensional hard disks are a fundamentally important many-body model system in classical statistical mechanics. Despite their significance, a comprehensive experimental data set for two-dimensional single component and binary hard disks is lacking. Here, we present a direct comparison between the full set of radial distribution functions and the contact values of a two-dimensional binary colloidal hard sphere model system and those calculated using fundamental measure theory. We find excellent quantitative agreement between our experimental data and theoretical predictions for both single component and binary hard disk systems. Our results provide a unique and fully quantitative mapping between experiments and theory, which is crucial in establishing the fundamental link between structure and dynamics in simple liquids and glass forming systems. PMID:24784245

  5. Density-functional theory of elastic moduli: Hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarić, Marko V.; Mohanty, Udayan

    1988-03-01

    We propose a density-functional method for calculating elastic moduli of crystalline solids. The method is based on the second-order Ramakrishnan-Yussouff (RY) expansion of the variational grand-canonical potential around a uniform liquid state. The densities of the strained and unstrained crystal are represented as sums of narrow Gaussians. We express the crystal moduli in terms of the liquid structure factor its first and second derivatives evaluated at the reciprocal-lattice points of the crystal. We evaluate the elastic moduli for fcc hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones crystals using the Percus-Yevick and computer-simulation liquid structure factors, respectively. An indirect comparison with available experimental and theoretical values shows that although our calculated moduli are accurate to an order of magnitude, higher-order terms in the RY expansion might be significant. We find important contributions from density equilibration within the strained unit cell.

  6. Parallelized event chain algorithm for dense hard sphere and polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kampmann, Tobias A. Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-01-15

    We combine parallelization and cluster Monte Carlo for hard sphere systems and present a parallelized event chain algorithm for the hard disk system in two dimensions. For parallelization we use a spatial partitioning approach into simulation cells. We find that it is crucial for correctness to ensure detailed balance on the level of Monte Carlo sweeps by drawing the starting sphere of event chains within each simulation cell with replacement. We analyze the performance gains for the parallelized event chain and find a criterion for an optimal degree of parallelization. Because of the cluster nature of event chain moves massive parallelization will not be optimal. Finally, we discuss first applications of the event chain algorithm to dense polymer systems, i.e., bundle-forming solutions of attractive semiflexible polymers.

  7. Direct measurement of the free energy of aging hard sphere colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Zargar, Rojman; Nienhuis, Bernard; Schall, Peter; Bonn, Daniel

    2013-06-21

    The nature of the glass transition is one of the most important unsolved problems in condensed matter physics. The difference between glasses and liquids is believed to be caused by very large free energy barriers for particle rearrangements; however, so far it has not been possible to confirm this experimentally. We provide the first quantitative determination of the free energy for an aging hard sphere colloidal glass. The determination of the free energy allows for a number of new insights in the glass transition, notably the quantification of the strong spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the free energy. A study of the local minima of the free energy reveals that the observed variations are directly related to the rearrangements of the particles. Our main finding is that the probability of particle rearrangements shows a power law dependence on the free energy changes associated with the rearrangements similar to the Gutenberg-Richter law in seismology. PMID:23829762

  8. Family of tunable spherically symmetric potentials that span the range from hard spheres to waterlike behavior.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenyu; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Stanley, H Eugene

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the equation of state, diffusion coefficient, and structural order of a family of spherically symmetric potentials consisting of a hard core and a linear repulsive ramp. This generic potential has two characteristic length scales: the hard and soft core diameters. The family of potentials is generated by varying their ratio, lambda. We find negative thermal expansion (thermodynamic anomaly) and an increase of the diffusion coefficient upon isothermal compression (dynamic anomaly) for 0< or =lambda<6/7. As in water, the regions where these anomalies occur are nested domes in the (T, p) or (T, P) planes , with the thermodynamic anomaly dome contained entirely within the dynamic anomaly dome. We calculate translational and orientational order parameters (t and Q6), and project equilibrium state points onto the (t, Q6) plane, or order map. The order map evolves from waterlike behavior to hard-sphere-like behavior upon varying lambda between 4/7 and 6/7. Thus, we traverse the range of liquid behavior encompassed by hard spheres (lanbda=1) and waterlike (lambda approximately 4/7) with a family of tunable spherically symmetric potentials by simply varying the ratio of hard to soft-core diameters. Although dynamic and thermodynamic anomalies occur almost across the entire range 0< or=lambda< or=1, waterlike structural anomalies (i.e., decrease in both t and Q6 upon compression and strictly correlated T and Q6 in the anomalous region) occur only around lambda=4/7. Waterlike anomalies in structure, dynamics and thermodynamics arise solely due to the existence of two length scales, with their ratio lambda being the single control parameter, orientation-dependent interactions being absent by design. PMID:16802925

  9. The role of bond tangency and bond gap in hard sphere crystallization of chains.

    PubMed

    Karayiannis, Nikos Ch; Foteinopoulou, Katerina; Laso, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    We report results from Monte Carlo simulations on dense packings of linear, freely-jointed chains of hard spheres of uniform size. In contrast to our past studies where bonded spheres along the chain backbone were tangent, in the present work a finite tolerance in the bond is allowed. Bond lengths are allowed to fluctuate in the interval [σ, σ + dl], where σ is the sphere diameter. We find that bond tolerance affects the phase behaviour of hard-sphere chains, especially in the close vicinity of the melting transition. First, a critical dl(crit) exists marking the threshold for crystallization, whose value decreases with increasing volume fraction. Second, bond gaps enhance the onset of phase transition by accelerating crystal nucleation and growth. Finally, bond tolerance has an effect on crystal morphologies: in the tangent limit the majority of structures correspond to stack-faulted random hexagonal close packing (rhcp). However, as bond tolerance increases a wealth of diverse structures can be observed: from single fcc (or hcp) crystallites to random hcp/fcc stackings with multiple directions. By extending the simulations over trillions of MC steps (10(12)) we are able to observe crystal-crystal transitions and perfection even for entangled polymer chains in accordance to the Ostwald's rule of stages in crystal polymorphism. Through simple geometric arguments we explain how the presence of rigid or flexible constraints affects crystallization in general atomic and particulate systems. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that proper tuning of bond gaps and of the connectivity network can be a controlling factor for the phase behaviour of model, polymer-based colloidal and granular systems. PMID:25594158

  10. A Novel Approach for Evaluating Carbamate Mixtures for Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two mathematical approaches were used to test the hypothesis ofdose-addition for a binary and a seven-chemical mixture ofN-methyl carbamates, toxicologically similar chemicals that inhibit cholinesterase (ChE). In the more novel approach, mixture data were not included in the ana...

  11. Computational modeling of the side chain dihedral angle distributions of methionine using hard-sphere repulsive and short-range attractive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virrueta, Alejandro; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    Methionine (Met) is a versatile amino acid found frequently both in protein cores and at protein-protein interfaces. Thus, a complete description of the structure of Met is tantamount to a fundamental understanding of protein structure and design. In previous work, we showed that our hard-sphere dipeptide model is able to recapitulate the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in high-resolution protein crystal structures for the 8 amino acids we have studied to date: Val, Thr, Ser, Leu, Ile, Cys, Tyr, and Phe. Using the same approach, we can predict the observed Met side chain dihedral angle distributions P (χ1) and P (χ2) , but not P (χ3) . In this manuscript, we investigate the possible origins of the discrepancy and identify the minimal additions to the hard-sphere dipeptide model necessary to quantitatively predict P (χ3) of Met. We find that applying a Lennard-Jones potential with weak attraction between hydrogen atoms is sufficient to achieve predictions that match the observed χ3 side chain dihedral angle probability distributions for Met, Nle, and Mse without negatively affecting our results for the 8 previously studied amino acids. A. V. is supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and a Ford Foundation Fellowship.

  12. Hard-sphere fluid adsorbed in an annular wedge: The depletion force of hard-body colloidal physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, A. R.; Henderson, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    and molecular sized mixtures, respectively. This proposal implies that nanocolloidal systems lie in between the two limits, so that the depletion force no longer scales linearly with the colloid radius. That is, by decreasing the size ratio from mesoscopic to molecular sized solutes, one moves smoothly between the Derjaguin and the DFT predictions for the depletion force scaled by the colloid radius. We describe the results of a simulation study designed specifically as a test of compatibility with this complex scenario. Grand canonical simulation procedures applied to hard-sphere fluid adsorbed in a series of annular wedges, representing the depletion regime of hard-body colloidal physics, confirm that neither the Derjaguin approximation, nor advanced formulations of DFT, apply at moderate to high solvent density when the geometry is appropriate to nanosized colloids. Our simulations also allow us to report structural characteristics of hard-body solvent adsorbed in hard annular wedges. Both these aspects are key ingredients in the proposal that unifies the disparate predictions, via the introduction of new physics. Our data are consistent with this proposed physics, although as yet limited to a single colloidal size asymmetry.

  13. A Monte Carlo study of the influence of molecular flexibility on the phase diagram of a fused hard sphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Carl; Vega, Carlos

    2002-12-01

    A study of a rigid fully flexible fused hard sphere model [C. McBride, C. Vega, and L. G. MacDowell, Phys. Rev. E 64, 011703 (2001)] is extended to the smectic and solid branches of the phase diagram. Computer simulations have been performed for a completely rigid model composed of 15 fused hard spheres (15+0), a model of 15 fused hard spheres of which 2 monomers at one end of the model form a flexible tail (13+2), and a model consisting of 15 fused hard spheres with 5 monomers forming a flexible tail (10+5). For the 15+0 model the phase sequence isotropic-nematic-smectic A-columnar is found on compression, and the sequence solid-smectic A-nematic-isotropic on expansion. For the 13+2 model the phase sequence isotropic-nematic-smectic C is found on compression, and the sequence solid-smectic A-nematic-isotropic on expansion. For the 10+5 model the phase sequence isotropic-glass is found on compression. The expansion runs displayed the phase sequence solid-smectic A-isotropic. The introduction of flexibility was seen to stabilize the smectic A phase at the expense of the nematic phase.

  14. Jamming II: Edwards’ statistical mechanics of random packings of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Song, Chaoming; Jin, Yuliang; Makse, Hernán A.

    2011-02-01

    The problem of finding the most efficient way to pack spheres has an illustrious history, dating back to the crystalline arrays conjectured by Kepler and the random geometries explored by Bernal in the 1960s. This problem finds applications spanning from the mathematician’s pencil, the processing of granular materials, the jamming and glass transitions, all the way to fruit packing in every grocery. There are presently numerous experiments showing that the loosest way to pack spheres gives a density of ∼55% (named random loose packing, RLP) while filling all the loose voids results in a maximum density of ∼63%-64% (named random close packing, RCP). While those values seem robustly true, to this date there is no well-accepted physical explanation or theoretical prediction for them. Here we develop a common framework for understanding the random packings of monodisperse hard spheres whose limits can be interpreted as the experimentally observed RLP and RCP. The reason for these limits arises from a statistical picture of jammed states in which the RCP can be interpreted as the ground state of the ensemble of jammed matter with zero compactivity, while the RLP arises in the infinite compactivity limit. We combine an extended statistical mechanics approach ‘a la Edwards’ (where the role traditionally played by the energy and temperature in thermal systems is substituted by the volume and compactivity) with a constraint on mechanical stability imposed by the isostatic condition. We show how such approaches can bring results that can be compared to experiments and allow for an exploitation of the statistical mechanics framework. The key result is the use of a relation between the local Voronoi volumes of the constituent grains (denoted the volume function) and the number of neighbors in contact that permits us to simply combine the two approaches to develop a theory of volume fluctuations in jammed matter. Ultimately, our results lead to a phase diagram that

  15. Rovibrationally Inelastic Atom-Molecule Collision Cross Sections from a Hard Sphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashner, Jacob; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Hard-shell models have long been used to elucidate the principal features of molecular energy transfer and exchange reaction in the A + BC system. Nevertheless, no three-dimensional hard-shell calculation of inelastic collision cross sections has been reported. This work aims to fill that void. A particular motivation comes from our experimental results, which show the importance of equatorial impacts in the vibrational excitation process. Working with the simple hard-sphere model, we incorporated secondary impacts, defined as those in which A strikes C after striking B. Such collisions are important in systems such as Li2 - X, in which vibrational energy transfer occurs principally through side impacts. We discuss the complexity this adds to the model and present fully three-dimensional cross sections for rovibrational excitation of an initially stationary molecule in the homonuclear A + B2 system, examining the cross section as a function of the masses and radii of the atoms. We show how the features in the cross section evolve as these parameters are varied and calculate the contribution of secondary (near-equatorial) impacts to the dynamics. We compare with recent measurements in our laboratory and with the results of quasiclassical trajectories.

  16. Upper bound on the Edwards entropy in frictional monodisperse hard-sphere packings.

    PubMed

    Baranau, Vasili; Zhao, Song-Chuan; Scheel, Mario; Tallarek, Ulrich; Schröter, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    We extend the Widom particle insertion method [B. Widom, J. Chem. Phys., 1963, 39, 2808-2812] to determine an upper bound sub on the Edwards entropy in frictional hard-sphere packings. sub corresponds to the logarithm of the number of mechanically stable configurations for a given volume fraction and boundary conditions. To accomplish this, we extend the method for estimating the particle insertion probability through the pore-size distribution in frictionless packings [V. Baranau, et al., Soft Matter, 2013, 9, 3361-3372] to the case of frictional particles. We use computer-generated and experimentally obtained three-dimensional sphere packings with volume fractions φ in the range 0.551-0.65. We find that sub has a maximum in the vicinity of the Random Loose Packing Limit φRLP = 0.55 and decreases then monotonically with increasing φ to reach a minimum at φ = 0.65. Further on, sub does not distinguish between real mechanical stability and packings in close proximity to mechanical stable configurations. The probability to find a given number of contacts for a particle inserted in a large enough pore does not depend on φ, but it decreases strongly with the contact number. PMID:27020114

  17. Predicting side-chain conformations of methionine using a hard-sphere model with stereochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virrueta, A.; Gaines, J.; O'Hern, C. S.; Regan, L.

    2015-03-01

    Current research in the O'Hern and Regan laboratories focuses on the development of hard-sphere models with stereochemical constraints for protein structure prediction as an alternative to molecular dynamics methods that utilize knowledge-based corrections in their force-fields. Beginning with simple hydrophobic dipeptides like valine, leucine, and isoleucine, we have shown that our model is able to reproduce the side-chain dihedral angle distributions derived from sets of high-resolution protein crystal structures. However, methionine remains an exception - our model yields a chi-3 side-chain dihedral angle distribution that is relatively uniform from 60 to 300 degrees, while the observed distribution displays peaks at 60, 180, and 300 degrees. Our goal is to resolve this discrepancy by considering clashes with neighboring residues, and averaging the reduced distribution of allowable methionine structures taken from a set of crystallized proteins. We will also re-evaluate the electron density maps from which these protein structures are derived to ensure that the methionines and their local environments are correctly modeled. This work will ultimately serve as a tool for computing side-chain entropy and protein stability. A. V. is supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and a Ford Foundation Fellowship. J. G. is supported by NIH training Grant NIH-5T15LM007056-28.

  18. Effect of Hydrodynamic Interactions on Self-Diffusion of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Colloidal Hard Spheres.

    PubMed

    Thorneywork, Alice L; Rozas, Roberto E; Dullens, Roel P A; Horbach, Jürgen

    2015-12-31

    We compare experimental results from a quasi-two-dimensional colloidal hard sphere fluid to a Monte Carlo simulation of hard disks with small particle displacements. The experimental short-time self-diffusion coefficient D(S) scaled by the diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution, D(0), strongly depends on the area fraction, pointing to significant hydrodynamic interactions at short times in the experiment, which are absent in the simulation. In contrast, the area fraction dependence of the experimental long-time self-diffusion coefficient D(L)/D(0) is in quantitative agreement with D(L)/D(0) obtained from the simulation. This indicates that the reduction in the particle mobility at short times due to hydrodynamic interactions does not lead to a proportional reduction in the long-time self-diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, the quantitative agreement between experiment and simulation at long times indicates that hydrodynamic interactions effectively do not affect the dependence of D(L)/D(0) on the area fraction. In light of this, we discuss the link between structure and long-time self-diffusion in terms of a configurational excess entropy and do not find a simple exponential relation between these quantities for all fluid area fractions. PMID:26765032

  19. Shells of charge: a density functional theory for charged hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    A functional for the electrostatic excess free-energy for charged, hard sphere fluids is proposed. The functional is derived from two complementary, but equivalent, interpretations of the mean spherical approximation (MSA). The first combines fundamental measure theory (FMT) from hard-core interactions with the idea that MSA can be interpreted in terms of the interaction spherical shells of charge. This formulation gives the free-energy density as a function of weighted densities. When all the ions have the same size, the functional adopts an FMT-like form. The second in effect ‘functionalizes’ the derivation of MSA; that is, it generalizes the MSA as a functional-based version of MSA (fMSA). This formulation defines the free-energy density as a function of a position-dependent MSA screening parameter and the weighted densities of the FMT approach. This FMT/fMSA functional is shown to give accurate density profiles, as compared to Monte Carlo simulations, under a wide range of ion concentrations, size asymmetries, and valences.

  20. A Continuous Time Random Walk Description of Monodisperse, Hard-Sphere Colloids below the Ordering Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechman, Jeremy; Pierce, Flint

    2012-02-01

    Diffusive transport is a ubiquitous process that is typically understood in terms of a classical random walk of non-interacting particles. Here we present the results for a model of hard-sphere colloids in a Newtonian incompressible solvent at various volume fractions below the ordering transition (˜50%). We numerically simulate the colloidal systems via Fast Lubrication Dynamics -- a Brownian Dynamics approach with corrected mean-field hydrodynamic interactions. Colloid-colloid interactions are also included so that we effectively solve a system of interacting Langevin equations. The results of the simulations are analyzed in terms of the diffusion coefficient as a function of time with the early and late time diffusion coefficients comparing well with experimental results. An interpretation of the full time dependent behavior of the diffusion coefficient and mean-squared displacement is given in terms of a continuous time random walk. Therefore, the deterministic, continuum diffusion equation which arises from the discrete, interacting random walkers is presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Low-shear Viscosity and Diffusion of Hard-sphere Dispersion at High Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengdong; Chaikin, P. M.; Phan, See-Eng; Zhu, Jixiang; Russel, W. B.

    1997-03-01

    We are interested in the rheology of hard-sphere dispersion at high concentration, especially the asymptotic behavior near the glass transition, which is the ideal place to test various theories.(J.F. Brady, J. Chem. phys. 99(1993)567) (M. Tokuyama and I. Oppenheim, Phys. Rev. E. 50(1994)R16) The dispersion studied is silica in Ethylene glycol/Glycerol/NaCl. Low-shear viscosity is measured by a Zimm viscometer. The data are consistent with recent PMMA measurement at low concentration(P.N. Segreet. al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 75(1995)958; 76(1996)585 (See-eng Phan et. al.), Phys. rev. E., to be published., and at high concentration (metastable state) are better described by the Doolittle equation as in earlier experiments (L. Marshall, C.F. Zukoski IV, J. Phys. Chem. 94(1990)1164) (L.V. Woodcock, C.A. Angell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 47(1981)1129)). No theory yet gives a complete interpretion of the data. Dynamic light scattering (ensemble averaged) is used to measure self diffusion.

  2. Disappearance of a Stacking Fault in Hard-Sphere Crystals under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Matsuo, S.

    In the first part of this paper, a review is given on the mechanismfor the disappearance of an intrinsic stacking fault in a hard-sphere (HS) crystal under gravity, which we recently discovered by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations [A. Mori et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124 (2006), 17450; Mol. Phys. 105 (2007), 1377]. We have observed, in the case of fcc (001) stacking, that the intrinsic stacking fault running along an oblique direction shrunk through the gliding of a Shockley partial dislocation at the lower end of the stacking fault. In order to address the shortcomings and approximations of previous simulations, such as the use of periodic ] boundary condition (PBC) and the fact that the fcc (001) stacking had been realized by the stress from the small PBC box, we present an elastic strain energy calculation for an infinite system and a MC simulation result for HSs in a pyramidal pit under gravity. In particular, the geometry of the latter has already been tested experi mentally [S. Matsuo et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003), 4283]. The advantage of using a pyramidal pit as a template as well as the feasibility of the mechanism we describe is demonstrated.

  3. Effect of Hydrodynamic Interactions on Self-Diffusion of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Colloidal Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorneywork, Alice L.; Rozas, Roberto E.; Dullens, Roel P. A.; Horbach, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We compare experimental results from a quasi-two-dimensional colloidal hard sphere fluid to a Monte Carlo simulation of hard disks with small particle displacements. The experimental short-time self-diffusion coefficient DS scaled by the diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution, D0, strongly depends on the area fraction, pointing to significant hydrodynamic interactions at short times in the experiment, which are absent in the simulation. In contrast, the area fraction dependence of the experimental long-time self-diffusion coefficient DL/D0 is in quantitative agreement with DL/D0 obtained from the simulation. This indicates that the reduction in the particle mobility at short times due to hydrodynamic interactions does not lead to a proportional reduction in the long-time self-diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, the quantitative agreement between experiment and simulation at long times indicates that hydrodynamic interactions effectively do not affect the dependence of DL/D0 on the area fraction. In light of this, we discuss the link between structure and long-time self-diffusion in terms of a configurational excess entropy and do not find a simple exponential relation between these quantities for all fluid area fractions.

  4. Transport coefficients of a granular gas of inelastic rough hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; Santos, Andrés; Garzó, Vicente

    2014-08-01

    The Boltzmann equation for inelastic and rough hard spheres is considered as a model of a dilute granular gas. In this model, the collisions are characterized by constant coefficients of normal and tangential restitution, and hence the translational and rotational degrees of freedom are coupled. A normal solution to the Boltzmann equation is obtained by means of the Chapman-Enskog method for states near the homogeneous cooling state. The analysis is carried out to first order in the spatial gradients of the number density, the flow velocity, and the granular temperature. The constitutive equations for the momentum and heat fluxes and for the cooling rate are derived, and the associated transport coefficients are expressed in terms of the solutions of linear integral equations. For practical purposes, a first Sonine approximation is used to obtain explicit expressions of the transport coefficients as nonlinear functions of both coefficients of restitution and the moment of inertia. Known results for purely smooth inelastic spheres and perfectly elastic and rough spheres are recovered in the appropriate limits.

  5. Shells of charge: a density functional theory for charged hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk

    2016-06-22

    A functional for the electrostatic excess free-energy for charged, hard sphere fluids is proposed. The functional is derived from two complementary, but equivalent, interpretations of the mean spherical approximation (MSA). The first combines fundamental measure theory (FMT) from hard-core interactions with the idea that MSA can be interpreted in terms of the interaction spherical shells of charge. This formulation gives the free-energy density as a function of weighted densities. When all the ions have the same size, the functional adopts an FMT-like form. The second in effect 'functionalizes' the derivation of MSA; that is, it generalizes the MSA as a functional-based version of MSA (fMSA). This formulation defines the free-energy density as a function of a position-dependent MSA screening parameter and the weighted densities of the FMT approach. This FMT/fMSA functional is shown to give accurate density profiles, as compared to Monte Carlo simulations, under a wide range of ion concentrations, size asymmetries, and valences. PMID:27116385

  6. Variational Monte Carlo study of soliton excitations in hard-sphere Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, R.; Giorgini, S.

    2015-10-01

    By using a full many-body approach, we calculate the excitation energy, the effective mass, and the density profile of soliton states in a three-dimensional Bose gas of hard spheres at zero temperature. The many-body wave function used to describe the soliton contains a one-body term, derived from the solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, and a two-body Jastrow term, which accounts for the repulsive correlations between atoms. We optimize the parameters in the many-body wave function via a variational Monte Carlo procedure, calculating the grand-canonical energy and the canonical momentum of the system in a moving reference frame where the soliton is stationary. As the density of the gas is increased, significant deviations from the mean-field predictions are found for the excitation energy and the density profile of both dark and gray solitons. In particular, the soliton effective mass m* and the mass m Δ N of missing particles in the region of the density depression are smaller than the result from the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, their ratio, however, being well reproduced by this theory up to large values of the gas parameter. We also calculate the profile of the condensate density around the soliton notch, finding good agreement with the prediction of the local-density approximation.

  7. A Thermodynamically-Consistent Non-Ideal Stochastic Hard-Sphere Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A; Alder, B J; Garcia, A L

    2009-08-03

    A grid-free variant of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is proposed, named the Isotropic DSMC (I-DSMC) method, that is suitable for simulating collision-dominated dense fluid flows. The I-DSMC algorithm eliminates all grid artifacts from the traditional DSMC algorithm and is Galilean invariant and microscopically isotropic. The stochastic collision rules in I-DSMC are modified to introduce a non-ideal structure factor that gives consistent compressibility, as first proposed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101:075902 (2008)]. The resulting Stochastic Hard Sphere Dynamics (SHSD) fluid is empirically shown to be thermodynamically identical to a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with a linear core pair potential, well-described by the hypernetted chain (HNC) approximation. We develop a kinetic theory for the SHSD fluid to obtain estimates for the transport coefficients that are in excellent agreement with particle simulations over a wide range of densities and collision rates. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified by comparing its dynamic structure factor against theory based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes equations. We also study the Brownian motion of a nano-particle suspended in an SHSD fluid and find a long-time power-law tail in its velocity autocorrelation function consistent with hydrodynamic theory and molecular dynamics calculations.

  8. Cavity averages for hard spheres in the presence of polydispersity and incomplete data.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Michael; Maggs, A C

    2015-09-01

    We develop a cavity-based method which allows to extract thermodynamic properties from position information in hard-sphere/disk systems. So far, there are available-volume and free-volume methods. We add a third one, which we call available volume after take-out, and which is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the others. In applications, where data sets are finite, all three methods show limitations, and they do this in different parameter ranges. We illustrate the principal equivalence and the limitations on data from molecular dynamics: In particular, we test robustness against missing data. We have in mind experimental limitations where there is a small polydispersity, say 4% in the particle radii, but individual radii cannot be determined. We observe that, depending on the used method, the errors in such a situation are easily 100% for the pressure and 10kT for the chemical potentials. Our work is meant as guideline to the experimentalists for choosing the right one of the three methods, in order to keep the outcome of experimental data analysis meaningful. PMID:26359237

  9. Crystal nucleation in the hard-sphere system revisited: a critical test of theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2009-04-16

    The hard-sphere system is the best known fluid that crystallizes: the solid-liquid interfacial free energy, the equations of state, and the height of the nucleation barrier are known accurately, offering a unique possibility for a quantitative validation of nucleation theories. A recent significant downward revision of the interfacial free energy from approximately 0.61kT/sigma(2) to (0.56 +/- 0.02)kT/sigma(2) [Davidchack, R.; Morris, J. R.; Laird, B. B. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 125, 094710] necessitates a re-evaluation of theoretical approaches to crystal nucleation. This has been carried out for the droplet model of the classical nucleation theory (CNT), the self-consistent classical theory (SCCT), a phenomenological diffuse interface theory (DIT), and single- and two-field variants of the phase field theory that rely on either the usual double-well and interpolation functions (PFT/S1 and PFT/S2, respectively) or on a Ginzburg-Landau expanded free energy that reflects the crystal symmetries (PFT/GL1 and PFT/GL2). We find that the PFT/GL1, PFT/GL2, and DIT models predict fairly accurately the height of the nucleation barrier known from Monte Carlo simulations in the volume fraction range of 0.52 < varphi < 0.54, whereas the CNT, SCCT, PFT/S1, and PFT/S2 models underestimate it significantly. PMID:19320450

  10. Topological and metrical property characterization of radical subunits for ternary hard sphere crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; An, Xizhong; Wang, Defeng; Qian, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative characterization on the topological and metrical properties of radical subunits (polyhedra) for two new ternary hard sphere crystals was studied. These two ideal crystalline structures are numerically constructed by filling small and medium spheres into interstices (corresponding to regular tetrahedral and octahedral pores) of perfect face centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystals formed by the packing of large spheres. Topological properties such as face number, edge number, vertex number of each radical polyhedron (RP), edge number of each RP face and metrical properties such as volume, surface area, total perimeter and pore volume of each RP, area and perimeter of each RP face were analyzed and compared. The results show that even though the overall packing densities for FCC and HCP ternary crystals are the same, different characteristics of radical polyhedra for corresponding spheres in these two crystals can be identified. That is, in the former structure RPs are more symmetric than those in the latter; the orientations of corresponding RP in the latter are twice as many as that in the former. Moreover, RP topological and metrical properties in the HCP ternary crystal are much more complicated than those in the FCC ternary crystal. These differences imply the structure and property differences of these two ternary crystals. Analyses of RPs provide intensive understanding of pores in the structure.

  11. Modeling diffusion in colloidal suspensions by dynamical density functional theory using fundamental measure theory of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopper, Daniel; Marolt, Kevin; Roth, Roland; Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of colloidal suspensions of hard spheres that are subject to Brownian motion in the overdamped limit. We obtain the time evolution of the self- and distinct parts of the van Hove function by means of dynamical density functional theory. The free-energy model for the hard-sphere fluid that we use is the very accurate White Bear II version of Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory. However, in order to remove interactions within the self-part of the van Hove function, a nontrivial modification has to be applied to the free-energy functional. We compare our theoretical results with data that we obtain from dynamical Monte Carlo simulations, and we find that the latter are well described by our approach even for colloid packing fractions as large as 40%.

  12. Modeling diffusion in colloidal suspensions by dynamical density functional theory using fundamental measure theory of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Stopper, Daniel; Marolt, Kevin; Roth, Roland; Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of colloidal suspensions of hard spheres that are subject to Brownian motion in the overdamped limit. We obtain the time evolution of the self- and distinct parts of the van Hove function by means of dynamical density functional theory. The free-energy model for the hard-sphere fluid that we use is the very accurate White Bear II version of Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory. However, in order to remove interactions within the self-part of the van Hove function, a nontrivial modification has to be applied to the free-energy functional. We compare our theoretical results with data that we obtain from dynamical Monte Carlo simulations, and we find that the latter are well described by our approach even for colloid packing fractions as large as 40%. PMID:26382387

  13. Additive for otto cycle engines and fuel mixture so obtained

    SciTech Connect

    Scifoni, M.

    1985-02-12

    The additive for Otto cycle engines according to the present invention consists of a mixture of water, ethanol, methanol and butanol to which is added a determined quantity of a liquid obtained by pressing prickly pear leaves. Added in a small percentage to the fuel, gasoline, LP or methane, this additive prevents the oxidation associated with the use of water and/or alcohols in Otto cycle engines, lowers fuel consumption and allows the use of low octane fuel.

  14. Connection between the packing efficiency of binary hard spheres and the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Smith, W Wendell; Wang, Minglei; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D; O'Hern, Corey S

    2014-09-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to compress binary hard spheres into jammed packings as a function of the compression rate R, size ratio α, and number fraction x(S) of small particles to determine the connection between the glass-forming ability (GFA) and packing efficiency in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). We define the GFA by measuring the critical compression rate R(c), below which jammed hard-sphere packings begin to form "random crystal" structures with defects. We find that for systems with α≳0.8 that do not demix, R(c) decreases strongly with Δϕ(J), as R(c)∼exp(-1/Δϕ(J)(2)), where Δϕ(J) is the difference between the average packing fraction of the amorphous packings and random crystal structures at R(c). Systems with α≲0.8 partially demix, which promotes crystallization, but we still find a strong correlation between R(c) and Δϕ(J). We show that known metal-metal BMGs occur in the regions of the α and x(S) parameter space with the lowest values of R(c) for binary hard spheres. Our results emphasize that maximizing GFA in binary systems involves two competing effects: minimizing α to increase packing efficiency, while maximizing α to prevent demixing. PMID:25314450

  15. Fused hard-sphere chain molecules: Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation for the bulk pressure and generalized Flory theories

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, L.A.; Zhou, Y.; Hall, C.K.; Carra, S.

    1995-04-15

    We report Monte Carlo simulation results for the bulk pressure of fused-hard-sphere (FHS) chain fluids with bond-length-to-bead-diameter ratios {approx} 0.4 at chain lengths {ital n}=4, 8 and 16. We also report density profiles for FHS chain fluids at a hard wall. The results for the compressibility factor are compared to results from extensions of the Generalized Flory (GF) and Generalized Flory Dimer (GFD) theories proposed by Yethiraj {ital et} {ital al}. and by us. Our new GF theory, GF-AB, significantly improves the prediction of the bulk pressure of fused-hard-sphere chains over the GFD theories proposed by Yethiraj {ital et} {ital al}. and by us although the GFD theories give slightly better low-density results. The GFD-A theory, the GFD-B theory and the new theories (GF-AB, GFD-AB, and GFD-AC) satisfy the exact zero-bonding-length limit. All theories considered recover the GF or GFD theories at the tangent hard-sphere chain limit.

  16. Description of concentration fluctuations in liquid binary mixtures with nonadditive potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, S.M.; Singh, R.N. )

    1995-01-01

    The segregation or phase separation in a binary mixture is investigated within a quasilattice model and the hard-sphere-like model. The hard-sphere results are improved by incorporating a nonadditive attractive tail interaction. An analytic expression for the concentration fluctuation [ital S][sub [ital c][ital c

  17. Dry building mixture with complex dispersed mineral additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, Liliia; Mukhina, Irina; Teplov, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of the complex dispersed mineral additive consisting of diopside and limestone was provided by the following factors. Diopside, due to the high hardness, reinforces formed hardened cement paste and prevents the spread of micro-cracks in it under the action of loads. Furthermore, diopside due to the greater elastic modulus than cement paste causes redistribution of stress between the additive particles and the cement. Limestone, since it has chemical affinity with the clinker minerals and products of their hydration hardening, effects on the hydration process and the formation of the contact area between the additive particles and the cement. The optimum quantity of complex dispersed mineral additive is 7%. At the same time the strength of the solution, made of dry building mixture "rough leveler for floor", increased by 22.1%, and the strength of the solution, made of dry mortar "masonry mixture" increased by 32.7%. With the mineral additive introduction the offset of the endoeffect temperatures to higher temperatures on derivatograms is fixed. If there is a mineral additive in the hardened cement paste, which may act as substrate for the tumors crystallization, the hardened cement paste structure strengthening while the complex thermal analysis is seen.

  18. Sedimentation and Crystallization of Hard-Sphere Colloidal Suspensions: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kevin Eugene

    Sedimentation and ultrafiltration are important processes for removing solids from suspensions. The Kynch theory describes the transient settling of non-colloidal particles forming an incompressible sediment by providing a solution to the convective conservation equation. This solution predicts the evolution of several different regions. Subsequent treatments have accounted for compressibility within the sediment. These modifications, nevertheless, rely entirely on Kynch theory for analytical description, differing only by the assumed boundary condition imposed by the sediment. We present a model of sedimentation for colloidal systems by including a diffusion term in the governing equation. In the regions above the sediment, this term acts as a small perturbation to the Kynch theory. Within the sediment, owing to the high volume fraction, diffusion is comparable to convection. Slow compression to the maximum volume fraction contrasts the incompressibility of the Kynch theory. Application of the method of matched asymptotic expansions to the conservation equation enables us to complete a description of the settling process, in particular, the volume fraction evolution within the sediment. This method is also applied to the related ultrafiltration process. Colloidal dispersions exhibit thermodynamic properties similar to molecular systems, including a hard-sphere disorder -to-order transition, i.e. freezing or crystallization, at particle volume fractions above 0.50. Throughout concentrated suspensions investigators have observed nucleation and growth of small ordered regions. Our dilute suspensions of organophilic silica in cyclohexane depend on settling to concentrate particles. In contrast to the above we observe ordered sediments produced by one-dimensional crystal growth. The slow sedimentation of small particles permits rearrangement into the iridescent ordered structure at the phase boundary. Suspensions with particle sizes of up to 0.34mum easily form fully

  19. Addition Table of Colours: Additive and Subtractive Mixtures Described Using a Single Reasoning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, A. R.; Lopes dos Santos, J. M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Students' misconceptions concerning colour phenomena and the apparent complexity of the underlying concepts--due to the different domains of knowledge involved--make its teaching very difficult. We have developed and tested a teaching device, the addition table of colours (ATC), that encompasses additive and subtractive mixtures in a single…

  20. An analytical approximation for the orientation-dependent excluded volume of tangent hard sphere chains of arbitrary chain length and flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Gross, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    Onsager-like theories are commonly used to describe the phase behavior of nematic (only orientationally ordered) liquid crystals. A key ingredient in such theories is the orientation-dependent excluded volume of two molecules. Although for hard convex molecular models this is generally known in analytical form, for more realistic molecular models that incorporate intramolecular flexibility, one has to rely on approximations or on computationally expensive Monte Carlo techniques. In this work, we provide a general correlation for the excluded volume of tangent hard-sphere chains of arbitrary chain length and flexibility. The flexibility is introduced by means of the rod-coil model. The resulting correlation is of simple analytical form and accurately covers a wide range of pure component excluded volume data obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of two-chain molecules. The extension to mixtures follows naturally by applying simple combining rules for the parameters involved. The results for mixtures are also in good agreement with data from Monte Carlo simulations. We have expressed the excluded volume as a second order power series in sin (γ), where γ is the angle between the molecular axes. Such a representation is appealing since the solution of the Onsager Helmholtz energy functional usually involves an expansion of the excluded volume in Legendre coefficients. Both for pure components and mixtures, the correlation reduces to an exact expression in the limit of completely linear chains. The expression for mixtures, as derived in this work, is thereby an exact extension of the pure component result of Williamson and Jackson [Mol. Phys. 86, 819-836 (1995)], 10.1080/00268979500102391.

  1. Hard-sphere dispersions: Small-wave-vector structure-factor measurements in a linear shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerson, Bruce J.; van der Werff, Jos; de Kruif, C. G.

    1988-06-01

    Small-scattering-wave-vector structure-factor measurements have been made for model hard-sphere suspensions undergoing a steady linear shear flow. The samples are comprised of sterically stabilized silica particles in cyclohexane and have been well characterized previously by rheological, light scattering, and neutron scattering measurements. These combined measurements provide a strict test of recent theories of microscopic order in suspensions undergoing shear and suggest a picture which unifies several intuitive notions about suspensions undergoing shear flow: distortion of the pair correlation function, clustering, layering, and nonequilibrium phase transitions.

  2. Approximation of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator for hard-sphere and inverse-power-law models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenning; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2015-08-01

    A sequence of approximate linear collision models for hard-sphere and inverse-power-law gases is introduced. These models are obtained by expanding the linearized Boltzmann collision operator into series, and a practical algorithm is proposed for evaluating the coefficients in the series. The sequence is proven to be convergent to the linearized Boltzmann operator, and it established a connection between the Shakhov model and the linearized collision model. The convergence is demonstrated by solving the spatially homogeneous Boltzmann equation. By observing the magnitudes of the coefficients, simpler models are developed through removing small entries in the coefficient matrices.

  3. Local shear viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous dense fluids: from the hard-sphere to the Lennard-Jones fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Hai; Galliero, Guillaume

    2013-12-01

    This work aims at providing a tractable approach to model the local shear viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous dense fluids composed of spherical molecules, in which the density variations occur on molecular distance. The proposed scheme, which relies on the local density average model, has been applied to the quasi-hard-sphere, the Week-Chandler-Andersen and the Lennard-Jones fluids. A weight function has been developed to deal with the hard-sphere fluid given the specificities of momentum exchange. To extend the approach to the smoothly repulsive potential, we have taken into account that the non-local contributions to the viscosity due to the interactions of particles separated by a given distance are temperature dependent. Then, using a simple perturbation scheme, the approach is extended to the Lennard-Jones fluids. It is shown that the viscosity profiles of inhomogeneous dense fluids deduced from this approach are consistent with those directly computed by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Apparent viscosity and particle pressure of a concentrated suspension of non-Brownian hard spheres near the jamming transition.

    PubMed

    Mills, P; Snabre, P

    2009-11-01

    We consider the steady shear flow of a homogeneous and dense assembly of hard spheres suspended in a Newtonian viscous fluid. In a first part, a mean-field approach based on geometric arguments is used to determine the viscous dissipation in a dense isotropic suspension of smooth hard spheres and the hydrodynamic contribution to the suspension viscosity. In a second part, we consider the coexistence of transient solid clusters coupled to regions with free flowing particles near the jamming transition. The fraction of particles in transient clusters is derived through the Landau-Ginzburg concepts for first-order phase transition with an order parameter corresponding to the proportion of "solid" contacts. A state equation for the fraction of particle-accessible volume is introduced to derive the average normal stresses and a constitutive law that relates the total shear stress to the shear rate. The analytical expression of the average normal stresses well accounts for numerical or experimental evaluation of the particle pressure and non-equilibrium osmotic pressure in a dense sheared suspension. Both the friction level between particles and the suspension dilatancy are shown to determine the singularity of the apparent shear viscosity and the flow stability near the jamming transition. The model further predicts a Newtonian behavior for a concentrated suspension of neutrally buoyant particles and no shear thinning behavior in relation with the shear liquefaction of transient solid clusters. PMID:19856003

  5. Long-range weight functions in fundamental measure theory of the non-uniform hard-sphere fluid.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-06-22

    We introduce long-range weight functions to the framework of fundamental measure theory (FMT) of the non-uniform, single-component hard-sphere fluid. While the range of the usual weight functions is equal to the hard-sphere radius R, the modified weight functions have range 3R. Based on the augmented FMT, we calculate the radial distribution function g(r) up to second order in the density within Percus' test particle theory. Consistency of the compressibility and virial routes on this level allows us to determine the free parameter γ of the theory. As a side result, we obtain a value for the fourth virial coefficient B 4 which deviates by only 0.01% from the exact result. The augmented FMT is tested for the dense fluid by comparing results for g(r) calculated via the test particle route to existing results from molecular dynamics simulations. The agreement at large distances (r  >  6R) is significantly improved when the FMT with long-range weight functions is used. In order to improve agreement close to contact (r  =  2R) we construct a free energy which is based on the accurate Carnahan-Starling equation of state, rather than the Percus-Yevick compressibility equation underlying standard FMT. PMID:27115721

  6. Monte Carlo simulation and equation of state for flexible charged hard-sphere chain fluids: Polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Adidharma, Hertanto

    2014-11-07

    The thermodynamic modeling of flexible charged hard-sphere chains representing polyampholyte or polyelectrolyte molecules in solution is considered. The excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyampholyte and the osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyelectrolytes are determined by performing canonical and isobaric-isothermal Monte Carlo simulations. A new equation of state based on the thermodynamic perturbation theory is also proposed for flexible charged hard-sphere chains. For the modeling of such chains, the use of solely the structure information of monomer fluid for calculating the chain contribution is found to be insufficient and more detailed structure information must therefore be considered. Two approaches, i.e., the dimer and dimer-monomer approaches, are explored to obtain the contribution of the chain formation to the Helmholtz energy. By comparing with the simulation results, the equation of state with either the dimer or dimer-monomer approach accurately predicts the excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions except at very low density. It also well captures the effect of temperature on the thermodynamic properties of these solutions.

  7. Bending rigidity and higher-order curvature terms for the hard-sphere fluid near a curved wall.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    In this work I derive analytic expressions for the curvature-dependent fluid-substrate surface tension of a hard-sphere fluid on a hard curved wall. In the first step, the curvature thermodynamic properties are found as truncated power series in the activity in terms of the exactly known second- and third-order cluster integrals of the hard-sphere fluid near spherical and cylindrical walls. These results are then expressed as packing fraction power series and transformed to different reference regions, which is equivalent to considering different positions of the dividing surface. Based on the truncated series it is shown that the bending rigidity of the system is non-null and that higher-order terms in the curvature also exist. In the second step, approximate analytic expressions for the surface tension, the Tolman length, the bending rigidity, and the Gaussian rigidity as functions of the packing fraction are found by considering the known terms of the series expansion complemented with a simple fitting approach. It is found that the obtained formulas accurately describe the curvature thermodynamic properties of the system; further, they are more accurate than any previously published expressions. PMID:24730805

  8. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-01

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  9. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  10. Elastically Cooperative Activated Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Liquids. I. General Formulation and Application to Hard Sphere Fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time.

  11. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges. PMID:25554179

  12. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. I. General formulation and application to hard sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-05-01

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time.

  13. Long-range weight functions in fundamental measure theory of the non-uniform hard-sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    We introduce long-range weight functions to the framework of fundamental measure theory (FMT) of the non-uniform, single-component hard-sphere fluid. While the range of the usual weight functions is equal to the hard-sphere radius R, the modified weight functions have range 3R. Based on the augmented FMT, we calculate the radial distribution function g(r) up to second order in the density within Percus’ test particle theory. Consistency of the compressibility and virial routes on this level allows us to determine the free parameter γ of the theory. As a side result, we obtain a value for the fourth virial coefficient B 4 which deviates by only 0.01% from the exact result. The augmented FMT is tested for the dense fluid by comparing results for g(r) calculated via the test particle route to existing results from molecular dynamics simulations. The agreement at large distances (r  >  6R) is significantly improved when the FMT with long-range weight functions is used. In order to improve agreement close to contact (r  =  2R) we construct a free energy which is based on the accurate Carnahan–Starling equation of state, rather than the Percus–Yevick compressibility equation underlying standard FMT.

  14. Computer simulations and theoretical aspects of the depletion interaction in protein-oligomer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bončina, M.; Reščič, J.; Kalyuzhnyi, Yu. V.; Vlachy, V.

    2007-07-01

    The depletion interaction between proteins caused by addition of either uncharged or partially charged oligomers was studied using the canonical Monte Carlo simulation technique and the integral equation theory. A protein molecule was modeled in two different ways: either as (i) a hard sphere of diameter 30.0Å with net charge 0, or +5, or (ii) as a hard sphere with discrete charges (depending on the pH of solution) of diameter 45.4Å. The oligomers were pictured as tangentially jointed, uncharged, or partially charged, hard spheres. The ions of a simple electrolyte present in solution were represented by charged hard spheres distributed in the dielectric continuum. In this study we were particularly interested in changes of the protein-protein pair-distribution function, caused by addition of the oligomer component. In agreement with previous studies we found that addition of a nonadsorbing oligomer reduces the phase stability of solution, which is reflected in the shape of the protein-protein pair-distribution function. The value of this function in protein-protein contact increases with increasing oligomer concentration, and is larger for charged oligomers. The range of the depletion interaction and its strength also depend on the length (number of monomer units) of the oligomer chain. The integral equation theory, based on the Wertheim Ornstein-Zernike approach applied in this study, was found to be in fair agreement with Monte Carlo results only for very short oligomers. The computer simulations for a model mimicking the lysozyme molecule (ii) are in qualitative agreement with small-angle neutron experiments for lysozyme-dextran mixtures.

  15. Chemical potential and entropy in monodisperse and polydisperse hard-sphere fluids using Widom's particle insertion method and a pore size distribution-based insertion probability.

    PubMed

    Baranau, Vasili; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the excess chemical potential Δμ and excess entropy per particle Δs of computer-generated, monodisperse and polydisperse, frictionless hard-sphere fluids. For this purpose, we utilize the Widom particle insertion method, which for hard-sphere systems relates Δμ to the probability to successfully (without intersections) insert a particle into a system. This insertion probability is evaluated directly for each configuration of hard spheres by extrapolating to infinity the pore radii (nearest-surface) distribution and integrating its tail. The estimates of Δμ and Δs are compared to (and comply well with) predictions from the Boublík-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland equation of state. For polydisperse spheres, we employ log-normal particle radii distributions with polydispersities δ = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3. PMID:27276959

  16. 21 CFR 80.35 - Color additive mixtures; certification and exemption from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Color additive mixtures; certification and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVE CERTIFICATION Certification Procedures § 80.35 Color additive mixtures; certification and exemption from certification. (a) Color additive mixtures to...

  17. 21 CFR 80.35 - Color additive mixtures; certification and exemption from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Color additive mixtures; certification and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVE CERTIFICATION Certification Procedures § 80.35 Color additive mixtures; certification and exemption from certification. (a) Color additive mixtures to...

  18. Accurate prediction of hard-sphere virial coefficients B6 to B12 from a compressibility-based equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    We derive an analytical equation of state for the hard-sphere fluid that is within 0.01% of computer simulations for the whole range of the stable fluid phase. In contrast, the commonly used Carnahan-Starling equation of state deviates by up to 0.3% from simulations. The derivation uses the functional form of the isothermal compressibility from the Percus-Yevick closure of the Ornstein-Zernike relation as a starting point. Two additional degrees of freedom are introduced, which are constrained by requiring the equation of state to (i) recover the exact fourth virial coefficient B4 and (ii) involve only integer coefficients on the level of the ideal gas, while providing best possible agreement with the numerical result for B5. Virial coefficients B6 to B10 obtained from the equation of state are within 0.5% of numerical computations, and coefficients B11 and B12 are within the error of numerical results. We conjecture that even higher virial coefficients are reliably predicted.

  19. Accurate prediction of hard-sphere virial coefficients B6 to B12 from a compressibility-based equation of state.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-04-28

    We derive an analytical equation of state for the hard-sphere fluid that is within 0.01% of computer simulations for the whole range of the stable fluid phase. In contrast, the commonly used Carnahan-Starling equation of state deviates by up to 0.3% from simulations. The derivation uses the functional form of the isothermal compressibility from the Percus-Yevick closure of the Ornstein-Zernike relation as a starting point. Two additional degrees of freedom are introduced, which are constrained by requiring the equation of state to (i) recover the exact fourth virial coefficient B4 and (ii) involve only integer coefficients on the level of the ideal gas, while providing best possible agreement with the numerical result for B5. Virial coefficients B6 to B10 obtained from the equation of state are within 0.5% of numerical computations, and coefficients B11 and B12 are within the error of numerical results. We conjecture that even higher virial coefficients are reliably predicted. PMID:27131556

  20. Hard-sphere behavior in the dynamics of all mono-atomic liquids at the de Gennes minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montfrooij, Wouter

    2016-08-01

    We show that the position of the de Gennes minimum in scattering spectra, where the dynamics of liquids shows down, is given by a hard-sphere expression for a range of mono-atomic liquids that crystallize in a close packed structure. This expression relates the position of the minimum to the number density of the liquid, without any adjustable or unknown parameters. We argue that this implies that a liquid can be viewed as a close packed structure of the cages that represent the confinement of atoms by their neighbors. We further show that some metals deviate from this expression, namely those metals that crystallize in a structure that is not close packed. Our expression should prove very useful in identifying what liquids to study in inelastic scattering experiments given that deviations from normal fluid behavior can already be predicted based on the peak position of the static structure factor.

  1. Finite-size effects in the microscopic structure of a hard-sphere fluid in a narrow cylindrical pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, F. L.; White, J. A.; González, A.; Velasco, S.

    2006-04-01

    We examine the microscopic structure of a hard-sphere fluid confined to a small cylindrical pore by means of Monte Carlo simulation. In order to analyze finite-size effects, the simulations are carried out in the framework of different statistical mechanics ensembles. We find that the size effects are specially relevant in the canonical ensemble where noticeable differences are found with the results in the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) and the isothermal isobaric ensemble (IIE) which, in most situations, remain very close to the infinite system results. A customary series expansion in terms of fluctuations of either the number of particles (GCE) or the inverse volume (IIE) allows us to connect with the results of the canonical ensemble.

  2. Statistical Thermodynamics of an "Open" Hard Sphere System on the Equilibrium Fluid Isotherm: Study of Properties of the Freezing Transition Without Direct Involvement of the Equilibrium Solid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard; Manzanares, José A.

    2016-09-01

    Using several theoretical toolsldots (i) the nucleation theorem, (ii) an equivalent cavity, (iii) the reversible work of adding a cavity to an open hard sphere system, and (iv) the theory of "stability"... the authors estimated the density at which the hard sphere freezing transition occurs. No direct involvement of the equilibrium solid phase is involved. The reduced density \\uppi a^3ρ _f/6 (where a is the hard sphere diameter and ρ _f is the actual density at which freezing occurs) is found to be 0.4937 while the value obtained by computer simulation is 0.494. The agreement is good, but the new method still contains some approximation. However, the approximation is based on the idea that at a density just below ρ _f the fluid adopts a distorted structure resembling the solid, but different enough so that long-range order vanishes. Initial loss of stability may not be involved in every fluid-solid transition, but it may be an early step in the hard sphere and related systems.

  3. 75 FR 53867 - Additions to Listing of Exempt Chemical Mixtures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ...Under this Direct Final Rule, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is updating the Table of Exempt Chemical Mixtures. This action is in response to DEA's review of new applications for exemption. Having reviewed applications and relevant information, DEA finds that these 21 preparations meet the applicable exemption criteria. Therefore, these products are exempted from the application of......

  4. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  5. Dynamics of Disorder-Order Transitions in Hard Sphere Colloidal Dispersions in micro-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Li, M.; Phan, S. E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Rogers, Rick; Meyers, W.

    1996-01-01

    We performed a series of experiments on 0.518 millimeter PMMA spheres suspended in an index matching mixture of decalin and tetralin the microgravity environment provided by the Shuttle Columbia on mission STS-73. The samples ranged in concentration from 0.49 to 0.62. volume fraction (phi) of spheres, which covers the range in which liquid, coexistence, solid and glass phases are expected from Earth bound experiments. Light scattering was used to probe the static structure, and the particle dynamics. Digital and 35 mm photos provided information on the morphology of the crystals. In general, the crystallites grew considerably larger (roughly an order of magnitude larger) than the same samples with identical treatment in 1 g. The dynamic light scattering shows the typical short time diffusion and long time caging effects found in 1 g. The surprises that were encountered in microgravity include the preponderance of random hexagonal close packed (RHCP) structures and the complete absence of the expected face centered cubic (FCC) structure, existence of large dendritic crystals floating in the coexistence samples (where liquid and solid phases coexist) and the rapid crystallization of samples which exist only in glass phase under the influence of one g. These results suggest that colloidal crystal growth is profoundly effected by gravity in yet unrecognized ways. We suspect that the RCHP structure is related to the nonequilibrium growth that is evident from the presence of dendrites. An analysis of the dendritic growth instabilities is presented within the framework of the Ackerson-Schatzel equation.

  6. The power of hard-sphere models for proteins: Understanding side-chain conformations and predicting thermodynamic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Alice; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    2013-03-01

    We seek to dramatically improve computational protein design using minimal models that include only the dominant physical interactions. By modeling proteins with hard-sphere interactions and stereochemical constraints, we are able to explain the side-chain dihedral angle distributions for Leu, Ile, and other hydrophobic residues that are observed in protein crystal structures. We also consider inter-residue interactions on the distribution of side-chain dihedral angles for residues in the hydrophobic core of T4 lysozyme. We calculate the energetic and entropic contributions to the free energy differences between wildtype T4 lysozyme and several mutants involving Leu to Ala substitutions. We find a strong correlation between the entropy difference and the decrease in the melting temperature of the mutatants. These results emphasize that considering both entropy and enthalpy is crucial for obtaining a quantitative understanding of protein stability. NSF DMR-1006537 and PHY-1019147, the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical and Engineering Sciences, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Research Fellowship

  7. Anisotropic diffusion of concentrated hard-sphere colloids near a hard wall studied by evanescent wave dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailidou, V. N.; Swan, J. W.; Brady, J. F.; Petekidis, G.

    2013-10-01

    Evanescent wave dynamic light scattering and Stokesian dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics of hard-sphere colloidal particles near a hard wall in concentrated suspensions. The evanescent wave averaged short-time diffusion coefficients were determined from experimental correlation functions over a range of scattering wave vectors and penetration depths. Stokesian dynamics simulations performed for similar conditions allow a direct comparison of both the short-time self- and collective diffusivity. As seen earlier [V. N. Michailidou, G. Petekidis, J. W. Swan, and J. F. Brady, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 068302 (2009)] while the near wall dynamics in the dilute regime slow down compared to the free bulk diffusion, the reduction is negligible at higher volume fractions due to an interplay between the particle-wall and particle-particle hydrodynamic interactions. Here, we provide a comprehensive comparison between experiments and simulations and discuss the interplay of particle-wall and particle-particle hydrodynamics in the self- and cooperative dynamics determined at different scattering wave vectors and penetration depths.

  8. Free energy of dipolar hard spheres: The virial expansion under the presence of an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A.; Karavaeva, Tatyana E.; Ivanov, Alexey O.

    2014-12-01

    A method for calculation of the free energy of dipolar hard spheres under the presence of an applied magnetic field is presented. The method is based on the virial expansion in terms of density as well as the dipolar coupling constant λ, and it uses diagram technique. The formulas and the diagrams, needed to calculate the second B2 and third B3 virial coefficients, are derived up to the order of ˜λ3, and compared to the zero-field case. The formula for B2 is the same as in the zero-field case; the formula for B3, however, is different in an applied field, and a derivation is presented. This is a surprising result which is not emphasized in standard texts, but which has been noticed before in the virial expansion for flexible molecules (Caracciolo et al., 2006; Caracciolo et al., 2008). To verify the correctness of the obtained formulas, B2 and B3 were calculated within the accuracy of λ2, which were applied to initial magnetic susceptibility. The obtained expression fully coincides with the well-known theories (Morozov and Lebedev, 1990; Huke and Lücke, 2000; Ivanov and Kuznetsova, 2001), which used different methods to calculate the initial magnetic susceptibility.

  9. Near-wall dynamics of concentrated hard-sphere suspensions: comparison of evanescent wave DLS experiments, virial approximation and simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Bławzdziewicz, Jerzy; Cichocki, Bogdan; Dhont, Jan K G; Lisicki, Maciej; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Young, Y-N; Lang, Peter R

    2015-10-01

    In this article we report on a study of the near-wall dynamics of suspended colloidal hard spheres over a broad range of volume fractions. We present a thorough comparison of experimental data with predictions based on a virial approximation and simulation results. We find that the virial approach describes the experimental data reasonably well up to a volume fraction of ϕ≈ 0.25 which provides us with a fast and non-costly tool for the analysis and prediction of evanescent wave DLS data. Based on this we propose a new method to assess the near-wall self-diffusion at elevated density. Here, we qualitatively confirm earlier results [Michailidou, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2009, 102, 068302], which indicate that many-particle hydrodynamic interactions are diminished by the presence of the wall at increasing volume fractions as compared to bulk dynamics. Beyond this finding we show that this diminishment is different for the particle motion normal and parallel to the wall. PMID:26264420

  10. A Four Step Approach to Evaluate Mixtures for Consistency with Dose Addition

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a four step approach for evaluating chemical mixture data for consistency with dose addition for use in environmental health risk assessment. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture risk guidance (EPA 2000a,b), toxicological interaction for a defined mixture (...

  11. Entropy and enthalpy convergence of hydrophobic solvation beyond the hard-sphere limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Horinek, Dominik; Netz, Roland R.

    2011-02-01

    The experimentally well-known convergence of solvation entropies and enthalpies of different small hydrophobic solutes at universal temperatures seems to indicate that hydrophobic solvation is dominated by universal water features and not so much by solute specifics. The reported convergence of the denaturing entropy of a group of different proteins at roughly the same temperature as hydrophobic solutes was consequently argued to indicate that the denaturing entropy of proteins is dominated by the hydrophobic effect and used to estimate the hydrophobic contribution to protein stability. However, this appealing picture was subsequently questioned since the initially claimed universal convergence of denaturing entropies holds only for a small subset of proteins; for a larger data collection no convergence is seen. We report extensive simulation results for the solvation of small spherical solutes in explicit water with varying solute-water potentials. We show that convergence of solvation properties for solutes of different radii exists but that the convergence temperatures depend sensitively on solute-water potential features such as stiffness of the repulsive part and attraction strength, not so much on the attraction range. Accordingly, convergence of solvation properties is only expected for solutes of a homologous series that differ in the number of one species of subunits (which attests to the additivity of solvation properties) or solutes that are characterized by similar solute-water interaction potentials. In contrast, for peptides that arguably consist of multiple groups with widely disperse interactions with water, it means that thermodynamic convergence at a universal temperature cannot be expected, in general, in agreement with experimental results.

  12. A Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like Model Kinetic Equation for a Granular Gas of Inelastic Rough Hard Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Andres

    2011-05-20

    The Boltzmann collision operator for a dilute granular gas of inelastic rough hard spheres is much more intricate than its counterpart for inelastic smooth spheres. Now the one-body distribution function depends not only on the translational velocity v of the center of mass but also on the angular velocity {omega} of the particle. Moreover, the collision rules couple v and {omega}, involving not only the coefficient of normal restitution {alpha} but also the coefficient of tangential restitution {beta}. The aim of this paper is to propose an extension to inelastic rough particles of a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like kinetic model previously proposed for inelastic smooth particles. The Boltzmann collision operator is replaced by the sum of three terms representing: (i) the relaxation to a two-temperature local equilibrium distribution, (ii) the action of a nonconservative drag force F proportional to v-u(u being the flow velocity), and (iii) the action of a nonconservative torque M equal to a linear combination of {omega} and {Omega}({Omega} being the mean angular velocity). The three coefficients in F and M are fixed to reproduce the Boltzmann collisional rates of change of {Omega} and of the two granular temperatures (translational and rotational). A simpler version of the model is also constructed in the form of two coupled kinetic equations for the translational and rotational velocity distributions. The kinetic model is applied to the simple shear flow steady state and the combined influence of {alpha} and {beta} on the shear and normal stresses and on the translational velocity distribution function is analyzed.

  13. Crystallization of Hard Sphere Colloids in Microgravity: Results of the Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition, CDOT on USML-2. Experiment 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Chaikin, P. M.; Li, Min; Russel, W. B.; Ottewill, R. H.; Rogers, R.; Meyer, W. V.

    1998-01-01

    Classical hard spheres have long served as a paradigm for our understanding of the structure of liquids, crystals, and glasses and the transitions between these phases. Ground-based experiments have demonstrated that suspensions of uniform polymer colloids are near-ideal physical realizations of hard spheres. However, gravity appears to play a significant and unexpected role in the formation and structure of these colloidal crystals. In the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle, crystals grow purely via random stacking of hexagonal close-packed planes, lacking any of the face-centered cubic (FCC) component evident in crystals grown in 1 g beyond melting and allowed some time to settle. Gravity also masks 33-539 the natural growth instabilities of the hard sphere crystals which exhibit striking dendritic arms when grown in microgravity. Finally, high volume fraction "glass" samples which fail to crystallize after more than a year in 1 g begin nucleation after several days and fully crystallize in less than 2 weeks on the Space Shuttle.

  14. Lars Onsager Prize: The mean field solution for Hard Sphere Jamming and a new scenario for the low temperature landscape of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Giorgio

    In a hard spheres systems particles cannot overlap. Increasing the density we reach a point where most of the particles are blocked and the density cannot be increased any more: this is the jamming point. The jamming point separates the phase, where all the constraint can be satisfied, from an unsatifiable phase, where spheres do have to overlap. A scaling theory of the behavior around the jamming critical point has been formulated and a few critical exponents have been introduced. The exponents are apparently super-universal, as far as they do seem to be independent from the space dimensions. The mean field version of the model (i.e. the infinite dimensions limit) has been solved analytically using broken replica symmetry techniques and the computed critical exponents have been found in a remarkable agreement with three-dimensional and two-dimensional numerical results and experiments. The theory predicts in hard spheres (in glasses) a new transition (the Gardener transition) from the replica symmetric phase to the replica broken phase at high density (at low temperature), in agreement with simulations on hard sphere systems. I will briefly discuss the possible consequences of this new picture on the very low temperature behavior of glasses in the quantum regime.

  15. Evaluation of Warm Mix Asphalt Additives for Use in Modified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamoun, Zahi

    The objective of this research effort is to evaluate the use of warm-mix additives with polymer modified and terminal blend tire rubber asphalt mixtures from Nevada and California. The research completed over two stages: first stage evaluated two different WMA technologies; Sasobit and Advera, and second stage evaluated one additional WMA technology; Evotherm. The experimental program covered the evaluation of resistance of the mixtures to moisture damage, the performance characteristics of the mixtures, and mechanistic analysis of mixtures in simulated pavements. In the both stages, the mixture resistance to moisture damage was evaluated using the indirect tensile test and the dynamic modulus at multiple freeze-thaw cycles, and the resistance of the various asphalt mixtures to permanent deformation using the Asphalt Mixture Performance Tester (AMPT). Resistance of the untreated mixes to fatigue cracking using the flexural beam fatigue was only completed for the first stage. One source of aggregates was sampled in, two different batches, three warm mix asphalt technologies (Advera, Sasobit and Evotherm) and three asphalt binder types (neat, polymer-modified, and terminal blend tire rubber modified asphalt binders) typically used in Nevada and California were evaluated in this study. This thesis presents the resistance of the first stage mixtures to permanent deformation and fatigue cracking using two warm-mix additives; Advera and Sasobit, and the resistance to moisture damage and permanent deformation of the second stage mixtures with only one warm-mix additive; Evotherm.

  16. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl

    2014-09-15

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50}. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of

  17. Liquid theory with high accuracy and broad applicability: Coupling parameter series expansion and non hard sphere perturbation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-12-01

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of liquids are of fundamental interest in physics, chemistry, and biology, and perturbation approach has been fundamental to liquid theoretical approaches since the dawn of modern statistical mechanics and remains so to this day. Although thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) is widely used in the chemical physics community, one of the most popular versions of the TPT, i.e. Zwanzig (Zwanzig, R. W. J. Chem. Phys. 1954, 22, 1420-1426) 1st-order high temperature series expansion (HTSE) TPT and its 2nd-order counterpart under a macroscopic compressibility approximation of Barker-Henderson (Barker, J. A.; Henderson, D. J. Chem. Phys. 1967, 47, 2856-2861), have some serious shortcomings: (i) the nth-order term of the HTSE is involved with reference fluid distribution functions of order up to 2n, and the higher-order terms hence progressively become more complicated and numerically inaccessible; (ii) the performance of the HTSE rapidly deteriorates and the calculated results become even qualitatively incorrect as the temperature of interest decreases. This account deals with the developments that we have made over the last five years or so to advance a coupling parameter series expansion (CPSE) and a non hard sphere (HS) perturbation strategy that has scored some of its greatest successes in overcoming the above-mentioned difficulties. In this account (i) we expatiate on implementation details of our schemes: how input information indispensable to high-order truncation of the CPSE in both the HS and non HS perturbation schemes is calculated by an Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theory; how high-order thermodynamic quantities, such as critical parameters and excess constant volume heat capacity, are extracted from the resulting excess Helmholtz free energy with irregular and inevitable numerical errors; how to select reference potential in the non HS perturbation scheme. (ii) We give a quantitative analysis on why convergence

  18. A four-step approach to evaluate mixtures for consistency with dose addition.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, Richard C; Pan, Yi; Li, Ruosha; Haber, Lynne T; Lyles, Robert H; Herr, David W; Moser, Virginia C; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2013-11-16

    Mixture risk assessment is often hampered by the lack of dose-response information on the mixture being assessed, forcing reliance on component formulas such as dose addition. We present a four-step approach for evaluating chemical mixture data for consistency with dose addition for use in supporting a component based mixture risk assessment. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture risk guidance (U.S. EPA, 2000a,b), toxicological interaction for a defined mixture (all components known) is departure from a clearly articulated definition of component additivity. For the common approach of dose additivity, the EPA guidance identifies three desirable characteristics, foremost of which is that the component chemicals are toxicologically similar. The other two characteristics are empirical: the mixture components have toxic potencies that are fixed proportions of each other (throughout the dose range of interest), and the mixture dose term in the dose additive prediction formula, which we call the combined prediction model (CPM), can be represented by a linear combination of the component doses. A consequent property of the proportional toxic potencies is that the component chemicals must share a common dose-response model, where only the dose coefficients depend on the chemical components. A further consequence is that the mixture data must be described by the same mathematical function ("mixture model") as the components, but with a distinct coefficient for the total mixture dose. The mixture response is predicted from the component dose-response curves by using the dose additive CPM and the prediction is then compared with the observed mixture results. The four steps are to evaluate: (1) toxic proportionality by determining how well the CPM matches the single chemical models regarding mean and variance; (2) fit of the mixture model to the mixture data; (3) agreement between the mixture data and the CPM prediction; and (4) consistency between the CPM and the

  19. MIXTURES OF THYROID DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: TESTING ADDITIVITY OF HEPATIC INDUCERS AND THYROID PEROXIDASE INHIBITORS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to chemical mixtures via diet, occupation, and the environment. Previous data demonstrated that low doses of polycyclic halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) acting through similar mechanisms result in an additive reduction of thyroxine (T4). If xenobioti...

  20. Water based on a molecular model behaves like a hard-sphere solvent for a nonpolar solute when the reference interaction site model and related theories are employed.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Oshima, Hiraku; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    For neutral hard-sphere solutes, we compare the reduced density profile of water around a solute g(r), solvation free energy μ, energy U, and entropy S under the isochoric condition predicted by the two theories: dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) and angle-dependent integral equation (ADIE) theories. A molecular model for water pertinent to each theory is adopted. The hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure is employed in the ADIE theory, and the HNC and Kovalenko-Hirata (K-H) closures are tested in the DRISM theory. We also calculate g(r), U, S, and μ of the same solute in a hard-sphere solvent whose molecular diameter and number density are set at those of water, in which case the radial-symmetric integral equation (RSIE) theory is employed. The dependences of μ, U, and S on the excluded volume and solvent-accessible surface area are analyzed using the morphometric approach (MA). The results from the ADIE theory are in by far better agreement with those from computer simulations available for g(r), U, and μ. For the DRISM theory, g(r) in the vicinity of the solute is quite high and becomes progressively higher as the solute diameter d U increases. By contrast, for the ADIE theory, it is much lower and becomes further lower as d U increases. Due to unphysically positive U and significantly larger |S|, μ from the DRISM theory becomes too high. It is interesting that μ, U, and S from the K-H closure are worse than those from the HNC closure. Overall, the results from the DRISM theory with a molecular model for water are quite similar to those from the RSIE theory with the hard-sphere solvent. Based on the results of the MA analysis, we comparatively discuss the different theoretical methods for cases where they are applied to studies on the solvation of a protein. PMID:27366886

  1. Water based on a molecular model behaves like a hard-sphere solvent for a nonpolar solute when the reference interaction site model and related theories are employed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Oshima, Hiraku; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    For neutral hard-sphere solutes, we compare the reduced density profile of water around a solute g(r), solvation free energy μ, energy U, and entropy S under the isochoric condition predicted by the two theories: dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) and angle-dependent integral equation (ADIE) theories. A molecular model for water pertinent to each theory is adopted. The hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure is employed in the ADIE theory, and the HNC and Kovalenko–Hirata (K–H) closures are tested in the DRISM theory. We also calculate g(r), U, S, and μ of the same solute in a hard-sphere solvent whose molecular diameter and number density are set at those of water, in which case the radial-symmetric integral equation (RSIE) theory is employed. The dependences of μ, U, and S on the excluded volume and solvent-accessible surface area are analyzed using the morphometric approach (MA). The results from the ADIE theory are in by far better agreement with those from computer simulations available for g(r), U, and μ. For the DRISM theory, g(r) in the vicinity of the solute is quite high and becomes progressively higher as the solute diameter d U increases. By contrast, for the ADIE theory, it is much lower and becomes further lower as d U increases. Due to unphysically positive U and significantly larger |S|, μ from the DRISM theory becomes too high. It is interesting that μ, U, and S from the K–H closure are worse than those from the HNC closure. Overall, the results from the DRISM theory with a molecular model for water are quite similar to those from the RSIE theory with the hard-sphere solvent. Based on the results of the MA analysis, we comparatively discuss the different theoretical methods for cases where they are applied to studies on the solvation of a protein.

  2. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  3. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-14

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  4. Testing for Additivity at Select Mixture Groups of Interest Based on Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, LeAnna M.; Gennings, Chris; Carchman, Richard; Carter, Jr., Walter H.; Pounds, Joel G.; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2006-12-01

    Several assumptions, defined and undefined, are used in the toxicity assessment of chemical mixtures. In scientific practice mixture components in the low-dose region, particularly subthreshold doses, are often assumed to behave additively (i.e., zero interaction) based on heuristic arguments. This assumption has important implications in the practice of risk assessment, but has not been experimentally tested. We have developed methodology to test for additivity in the sense of Berenbaum (Advances in Cancer Research, 1981), based on the statistical equivalence testing literature where the null hypothesis of interaction is rejected for the alternative hypothesis of additivity when data support the claim. The implication of this approach is that conclusions of additivity are made with a false positive rate controlled by the experimenter. The claim of additivity is based on prespecified additivity margins, which are chosen using expert biological judgment such that small deviations from additivity, which are not considered to be biologically important, are not statistically significant. This approach is in contrast to the usual hypothesis-testing framework that assumes additivity in the null hypothesis and rejects when there is significant evidence of interaction. In this scenario, failure to reject may be due to lack of statistical power making the claim of additivity problematic. The proposed method is illustrated in a mixture of five organophosphorus pesticides that were experimentally evaluated alone and at relevant mixing ratios. Motor activity was assessed in adult male rats following acute exposure. Four low-dose mixture groups were evaluated. Evidence of additivity is found in three of the four low-dose mixture groups.The proposed method tests for additivity of the whole mixture and does not take into account subset interactions (e.g., synergistic, antagonistic) that may have occurred and cancelled each other out.

  5. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Betancor, K.; Ritz, C.; Fernández-Piñas, F.; Leganés, F.; Rodea-Palomares, I.

    2015-11-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks

  6. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors.

    PubMed

    Martin-Betancor, K; Ritz, C; Fernández-Piñas, F; Leganés, F; Rodea-Palomares, I

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks. PMID:26606975

  7. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Betancor, K.; Ritz, C.; Fernández-Piñas, F.; Leganés, F.; Rodea-Palomares, I.

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks PMID:26606975

  8. 40 CFR 716.105 - Additions of substances and mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additions of substances and mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.105 Section 716.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.105 Additions of substances...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1001 - Diluents in color additive mixtures for drug use exempt from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Restrictions Alcohol, specially denatured As set forth in 26 CFR, pt. 212 As set forth in 26 CFR, pt. 211... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diluents in color additive mixtures for drug use..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1001 - Diluents in color additive mixtures for drug use exempt from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Restrictions Alcohol, specially denatured As set forth in 26 CFR, pt. 212 As set forth in 26 CFR, pt. 211... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diluents in color additive mixtures for drug use..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION...

  11. A variable hard sphere-based phenomenological inelastic collision model for rarefied gas flow simulations by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, P. S.; Kakkassery, Jose K.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2012-04-01

    A modified phenomenological model is constructed for the simulation of rarefied flows of polyatomic non-polar gas molecules by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. This variable hard sphere-based model employs a constant rotational collision number, but all its collisions are inelastic in nature and at the same time the correct macroscopic relaxation rate is maintained. In equilibrium conditions, there is equi-partition of energy between the rotational and translational modes and it satisfies the principle of reciprocity or detailed balancing. The present model is applicable for moderate temperatures at which the molecules are in their vibrational ground state. For verification, the model is applied to the DSMC simulations of the translational and rotational energy distributions in nitrogen gas at equilibrium and the results are compared with their corresponding Maxwellian distributions. Next, the Couette flow, the temperature jump and the Rayleigh flow are simulated; the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of nitrogen are numerically estimated and compared with experimentally measured values. The model is further applied to the simulation of the rotational relaxation of nitrogen through low- and high-Mach-number normal shock waves in a novel way. In all cases, the results are found to be in good agreement with theoretically expected and experimentally observed values. It is concluded that the inelastic collision of polyatomic molecules can be predicted well by employing the constructed variable hard sphere (VHS)-based collision model.

  12. Thermoregulatory response to an organophosphate and carbamate insecticide mixture: testing the assumption of dose-additivity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Herr, David W; Gennings, Chris; Graff, Jaimie E; McMurray, Matthew; Stork, LeAnna; Coffey, Todd; Hamm, Adam; Mack, Cina M

    2006-01-01

    Most toxicity data are based on studies using single compounds. This study assessed if there is an interaction between mixtures of the anticholinesterase insecticides chlorpyrifos (CHP) and carbaryl (CAR) using hypothermia and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition as toxicological endpoints. Core temperature (T(c)) was continuously monitored by radiotelemetry in adult Long-Evans rats administered CHP at doses ranging from 0 to 50mg/kg and CAR doses of 0-150 mg/kg. The temperature index (TI), an integration of the change in T(c) over a 12h period, was quantified. Effects of mixtures of CHP and CAR in 2:1 and 1:1 ratios on the TI were examined and the data analyzed using a statistical model designed to assess significant departures from additivity for chemical mixtures. CHP and CAR elicited a marked hypothermia and dose-related decrease in the TI. The TI response to a 2:1 ratio of CHP:CAR was significantly less than that predicted by additivity. The TI response to a 1:1 ratio of CHP and CAR was not significantly different from the predicted additivity. Plasma and brain ChE activity were measured 4h after dosing with CHP, CAR, and mixtures in separate groups of rats. There was a dose-additive interaction for the inhibition of brain ChE for the 2:1 ratio, but an antagonistic effect for the 1:1 ratio. The 2:1 and 1:1 mixtures had an antagonistic interaction on plasma ChE. Overall, the departures from additivity for the physiological (i.e., temperature) and biochemical (i.e., ChE inhibition) endpoints for the 2:1 and 1:1 mixtures studies did not coincide as expected. An interaction between CHP and CAR appears to depend on the ratio of compounds in the mixture as well as the biological endpoint. PMID:16182429

  13. Interaction of phenolic uncouplers in binary mixtures: concentration-additive and synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Escher, B I; Hunziker, R W; Schwarzenbach, R P

    2001-10-01

    The uncoupling activities of 14 binary mixtures of substituted phenols and of 4 binary mixtures of phenols and anisols were investigated at different pH values. Experiments were performed with time-resolved spectroscopy on membrane vesicles (chromatophores) of the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Phenols are known to destroy the electrochemical proton gradient in energy-transducing membranes by a protonophoric mechanism. Anisols do not have protonophoric activity but disturb membrane structure and functioning as a nonspecific baseline toxicant. It was postulated in the literature that, for certain substituted phenols, the formation of a dimer between the phenoxide and the neutral phenol may contribute significantly to the overall protonophoric activity. In 13 of 14 mixtures of substituted phenols but in none of the mixtures of phenols with anisols, such a dimer appears to be formed between two different mixture partners. An extended shuttle mechanism of uncoupling, which includes a term for the contribution of such a mixed dimer, provided a good description of all experimental data. Opposite speciation favors interaction and ortho substituents abate interaction, which adds evidence for the dimerformation via a hydrogen bond between the phenol-OH and the phenoxide. These findings are significant not only regarding the mechanism of protonophoric action but also for the risk assessment process of chemical mixtures in the environment. When assessing the effect of mixtures, concentration addition is regarded as a reference X concept to estimate effects of similarly acting compounds. The substituted phenols in this work act according to the same action mechanism of uncoupling. Nevertheless, the overall effect of four of the investigated mixtures, which exhibit stronger dimer formation as compared to the single compounds or for which the resulting dimer is intrinsically more active, exceeded the effect calculated according to concentration addition

  14. Theoretical study of miscibility and glass-forming trends in mixtures of polystyrene spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical study of glass-forming trends and miscibility in mixtures of polystyrene spheres (polyballs) of different diameters, suspended in an aqueous solution, is presented. The polyballs are assumed to be charged and to interact via a Debye-Hueckel screened Coulomb potential. The Helmholtz free energy is calculated from a variational principle based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality, in which a mixture of hard spheres of different diameters is chosen as the reference system. It is found that when the charges of the two types of polyballs are sufficiently different, the variationally determined ratio of hard-sphere diameters differs substantially, leading to packing difficulties characteristic of glass formation. The experimentally observed range of glass formation corresponds to a ratio of hard-sphere diameters of 0.8 or less. Calculations of the free energy as a function of concentration indicate that the liquid polyball mixture is stable against the phase separation, even for widely different polyball charges.

  15. Testing for departures from additivity in mixtures of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is a follow-up to a paper by Carr, et al. that determined a design structure to optimally test for departures from additivity in a fixed ratio mixture of four perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) using an in vitro transiently-transfected COS- 1 PPARa reporter model with an NHA...

  16. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to mixtures of environmental compounds. A regulatory assumption is that the mixtures of chemicals act in an additive manner. However, this assumption requires experimental validation. Traditional experimental designs (full factorial) require a large number of e...

  17. Evaluating mixtures of 14 hygroscopic additives to improve antibody microarray performance.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Sébastien; Laforte, Veronique; Lo, Pik-Shan; Li, Huiyan; Juncker, David

    2015-11-01

    Microarrays allow the miniaturization and multiplexing of biological assays while only requiring minute amounts of samples. As a consequence of the small volumes used for spotting and the assays, evaporation often deteriorates the quality, reproducibility of spots, and the overall assay performance. Glycerol is commonly added to antibody microarray printing buffers to decrease evaporation; however, it often decreases the binding of antibodies to the surface, thereby negatively affecting assay sensitivity. Here, combinations of 14 hygroscopic chemicals were used as additives to printing buffers for contact-printed antibody microarrays on four different surface chemistries. The ability of the additives to suppress evaporation was quantified by measuring the residual buffer volume in open quill pins over time. The seven best additives were then printed either individually or as a 1:1 mixture of two additives, and the homogeneity, intensity, and reproducibility of both the spotted protein and of a fluorescently labeled analyte in an assay were quantified. Among the 28 combinations on the four slides, many were found to outperform glycerol, and the best additive mixtures were further evaluated by changing the ratio of the two additives. We observed that the optimal additive mixture was dependent on the slide chemistry, and that it was possible to increase the binding of antibodies to the surface threefold compared to 50 % glycerol, while decreasing whole-slide coefficient of variation to 5.9 %. For the two best slides, improvements were made for both the limit of detection (1.6× and 5.9×, respectively) and the quantification range (1.2× and 2.1×, respectively). The additive mixtures identified here thus help improve assay reproducibility and performance, and might be beneficial to all types of microarrays that suffer from evaporation of the printing buffers. PMID:26345442

  18. Evidence for dose-additive effects of a type II pyrethroid mixture. In vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Ares, I; Ramos, E; Castellano, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Larrañaga, M R; Anadón, A; Martínez, M A

    2015-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of pyrethroid insecticides that led to common exposure in the population, few studies have been conducted to quantitatively assess dose-additive effects of pyrethroids using a funcional measure involved in the common toxic mode of action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potency and efficacy of 6 Type II pyretroids (α-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, cyphenothrin and esfenvalerate) to evoke induction of both nitric oxide and lipid peroxides levels measured as malondialdehyde in three in vitro models (SH-SY5Y, HepG2 and Caco-2 human cells) as well as to test the hypothesis of dose additivity for mixtures of these same 6 pyrethroids. Concentration-responses for 6 pyrethroids were determined as well as the response to mixtures of all 6 pyrethroids. Additivity was tested assuming a dose-additive model. The human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line was the most sensitive in vitro model. The rank order of potency for cell SH-SY5Y viability MTT assay was deltamethrin>cyphenothrin>λ-cyhalothrin>cyfluthrin>esfenvalerate>α-cypermethrin. When 6 pyrethroids were present in the mixture at an equitoxic mixing ratio, the action on nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxides measured as malondialdehyde (MDA) production was consistent with a dose-additive model. The results of the present study are consistent with previous reports of additivity of pyrethroids in vivo e in vitro. PMID:25688004

  19. Research on the Technology Applying Anti-Rutting Additive to Asphalt Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Huang, Liming; Li, Chun

    High-temperature problems like rutting, displacement and upheaval are the most serious ones for bituminous pavement of urban roads. Especially, such problems at crossroads and fixed places where buses stop, for instance, BRT, affect service ability and life of roads largely. Application of anti-rutting asphalt mixture mainly aims at reducing strain and deformation generated by bituminous concrete under effect of vehicle load, decreasing remainders that cannot be recovered in deformation, improving the ability of bituminous pavement to resist deformation under high temperature and delaying generation of rutting. Anti-rutting asphalt mixture in this thesis refers to the asphalt mixture where anti-rutting additive is added by dry method and high-temperature stability is improved.

  20. Computational study of the melting-freezing transition in the quantum hard-sphere system for intermediate densities. II. Structural features.

    PubMed

    Sesé, Luis M; Bailey, Lorna E

    2007-04-28

    The structural features of the quantum hard-sphere system in the region of the fluid-face-centered-cubic-solid transition, for reduced number densities 0.45hard spheres has been performed, and some interesting differences between the classical and quantum melting-freezing transition are observed. PMID:17477616

  1. THE COMBINED CARCINOGENIC RISK FOR EXPOSURE TO MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS MAY BE LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Combined Carcinogenic Risk for Exposure to Mixtures of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products May be Less Than Additive

    Risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume...

  2. Influence of propane additives on the detonation characteristics of H2-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanbing; Bauer, Pascal; Zitoun, Ratiba

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen is more and more considered as a potential fuel for propulsion applications. However, due to its low ignition energy and wide flammability limits, H2-air mixtures raise a concern in terms of safety. This aspect can be partly solved by adding an alkane to these mixtures, which plays the role of an inhibitor. The present paper provides data on such binary fuel-air mixtures where various amounts of propane are added to hydrogen. The behavior of the corresponding mixtures, in terms of detonation characteristics and other fundamental properties, such as the cell size of the detonation front and induction delay, are presented and discussed for a series of equivalence ratios and propane addition. The experimental detonation velocity is in good agreement with calculated theoretical Chapman-Jouguet values. Based on soot tracks records, the cell size λ is measured, whereas the induction length L i is derived from data using a GRI-Mech kinetic mechanism. These data allow providing a value of the coefficient K = λ/L i .

  3. Statistically significant deviations from additivity: What do they mean in assessing toxicity of mixtures?

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Vijver, Martina G; Qiu, Hao; Baas, Jan; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-12-01

    There is increasing attention from scientists and policy makers to the joint effects of multiple metals on organisms when present in a mixture. Using root elongation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) as a toxicity endpoint, the combined effects of binary mixtures of Cu, Cd, and Ni were studied. The statistical MixTox model was used to search deviations from the reference models i.e. concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). The deviations were subsequently interpreted as 'interactions'. A comprehensive experiment was designed to test the reproducibility of the 'interactions'. The results showed that the toxicity of binary metal mixtures was equally well predicted by both reference models. We found statistically significant 'interactions' in four of the five total datasets. However, the patterns of 'interactions' were found to be inconsistent or even contradictory across the different independent experiments. It is recommended that a statistically significant 'interaction', must be treated with care and is not necessarily biologically relevant. Searching a statistically significant interaction can be the starting point for further measurements and modeling to advance the understanding of underlying mechanisms and non-additive interactions occurring inside the organisms. PMID:26188643

  4. Using special additions to preparation of the moulding mixture for casting steel parts of drive wheel type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josan, A.; Pinca Bretotean, C.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the possibility of using special additions to the execution of moulding mixtures for steel castings, drive wheel type. Critical analysis of moulding technology leads to the idea that most defects appear due to using improper moulding mixture. Using a improper moulding mixture leads to penetration of steel in moulding mixture, resulting in the formation of adherences, due to inadequate refractarity of the mould and core mixtures. Using only the unique mixture to the moulding leads to increasing consumption of new sand, respectively to the increase of price of piece. Acording to the dates registered in the industrial practice is necessary to use the special additions to obtain the moulding mixtures, carbonaceous materials respectively.

  5. THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) WAS LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) W AS LESS THAN ADDITIVE.

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological res...

  6. A Four-Step and Four-Criteria Approach for Evaluating Evidence of Dose Addition in Chemical Mixture Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose addition is the most frequently-used component-based approach for predicting dose response for a mixture of toxicologically-similar chemicals and for statistical evaluation of whether the mixture response is consistent with dose additivity and therefore predictable from the ...

  7. Additive toxicity of herbicide mixtures and comparative sensitivity of tropical benthic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Marie; Heimann, Kirsten; Quayle, Pamela; Negri, Andrew P

    2010-11-01

    Natural waters often contain complex mixtures of unknown contaminants potentially posing a threat to marine communities through chemical interactions. Here, acute effects of the photosystem II-inhibiting herbicides diuron, tebuthiuron, atrazine, simazine, and hexazinone, herbicide breakdown products (desethyl-atrazine (DEA) and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA)) and binary mixtures, were investigated using three tropical benthic microalgae; Navicula sp. and Cylindrotheca closterium (Ochrophyta) and Nephroselmis pyriformis (Chlorophyta), and one standard test species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Ochrophyta), in a high-throughput Maxi-Imaging-PAM bioassay (Maxi-IPAM). The order of toxicity was; diuron > hexazinone > tebuthiuron > atrazine > simazine > DEA > 3,4-DCA for all species. The tropical green alga N. pyriformis was up to 10-fold more sensitive than the diatoms tested here and reported for coral symbionts, and is recommended as a standard tropical test species for future research. All binary mixtures exhibited additive toxicity, and the use of herbicide equivalents (HEq) is therefore recommended in order to incorporate total-maximum-load measures for environmental regulatory purposes. PMID:20800855

  8. On the asymptotic improvement of supervised learning by utilizing additional unlabeled samples - Normal mixture density case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahshahani, Behzad M.; Landgrebe, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of additional unlabeled samples in improving the supervised learning process is studied in this paper. Three learning processes. supervised, unsupervised, and combined supervised-unsupervised, are compared by studying the asymptotic behavior of the estimates obtained under each process. Upper and lower bounds on the asymptotic covariance matrices are derived. It is shown that under a normal mixture density assumption for the probability density function of the feature space, the combined supervised-unsupervised learning is always superior to the supervised learning in achieving better estimates. Experimental results are provided to verify the theoretical concepts.

  9. Computational stability ranking of mutated hydrophobic cores in staphylococcal nuclease and T4 lysozyme using hard-sphere and stereochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virrueta, Alejandro; Zhou, Alice; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics methods have significantly advanced the understanding of protein folding and stability. However, current force-fields cannot accurately calculate and rank the stability of modified or de novo proteins. One possible reason is that current force-fields use knowledge-based corrections that improve dihedral angle sampling, but do not satisfy the stereochemical constraints for amino acids. I propose the use of simple hard-sphere models for amino acids with stereochemical constraints taken from high-resolution protein crystal structures. This model can enable a correct consideration of the entropy of side-chain rotations, and may be sufficient to predict the effects of single residue mutations in the hydrophobic cores of staphylococcal nuclease and T4 lysozyme on stability changes. I will computationally count the total number of allowed side-chain conformations Ω and calculate the associated entropy, S = kBln(Ω) , before and after each mutation. I will then rank the stability of the mutated cores based on my computed entropy changes, and compare my results with structural and thermodynamic data published by the Stites and Matthews groups. If successful, this project will provide a novel framework for the evaluation of entropic protein stabilities, and serve as a possible tool for computational protein design.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of a piston driven shock wave in a hard sphere gas. Final Contractor ReportPh.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Myeung-Jouh; Greber, Isaac

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the piston driven shock wave at Mach 1.5, 3, and 10. A shock tube, whose shape is a circular cylinder, is filled with hard sphere molecules having a Maxwellian thermal velocity distribution and zero mean velocity. The piston moves and a shock wave is generated. All collisions are specular, including those between the molecules and the computational boundaries, so that the shock development is entirely causal, with no imposed statistics. The structure of the generated shock is examined in detail, and the wave speed; profiles of density, velocity, and temperature; and shock thickness are determined. The results are compared with published results of other methods, especially the direct simulation Monte-Carlo method. Property profiles are similar to those generated by direct simulation Monte-Carlo method. The shock wave thicknesses are smaller than the direct simulation Monte-Carlo results, but larger than those of the other methods. Simulation of a shock wave, which is one-dimensional, is a severe test of the molecular dynamics method, which is always three-dimensional. A major challenge of the thesis is to examine the capability of the molecular dynamics methods by choosing a difficult task.

  11. DETERMINING A ROBUST D-OPTIMAL DESIGN FOR TESTING FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A MIXTURE OF FOUR PFAAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine an optimal experimental design for a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) that is robust to the assumption of additivity. Of particular focus to this research project is whether an environmentally relevant mixture of four PFAAs with long half-liv...

  12. Synthesis and Properties of a Clean and Sustainable Deicing Additive for Asphalt Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chao; Yu, Jianying; Zhao, Zhijie; Dai, Jing; Fu, Jingyi; Zhao, Meiling; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A clean and sustainable deicing additive was prepared via the adsorption of acetate anions (Ac-) by magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) calcined layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-CLDH). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrums proved that Ac- had intercalated into LDH structure. X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the intercalation spacing and platelet thickness of Mg and Al layered double hydroxide containing Ac- anions (Mg/Al-Ac- LDH) had been enlarged due to substitution of divalent CO32- anions by a larger quantity of monovalent Ac– anions. Differential scanning calorimetry tests testified that the insoluble Mg2/Al-Ac- LDH evidently decreased the freeze point (FP) of water to -10.68°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the Ac- were strongly confined by the metal layers of LDHs. FP test of asphalt mixtures confirmed that Mg/Al-Ac- LDHs reduced FP to -5.5°C. Immersion test results indicated that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH had a good deicing durability and Ac- did not released from asphalt mixture. Snow melting observation was conducted further testified that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH melted snow or ice sustainably. PMID:25625279

  13. Synthesis and properties of a clean and sustainable deicing additive for asphalt mixture.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Yu, Jianying; Zhao, Zhijie; Dai, Jing; Fu, Jingyi; Zhao, Meiling; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A clean and sustainable deicing additive was prepared via the adsorption of acetate anions (Ac-) by magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) calcined layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-CLDH). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrums proved that Ac- had intercalated into LDH structure. X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the intercalation spacing and platelet thickness of Mg and Al layered double hydroxide containing Ac- anions (Mg/Al-Ac- LDH) had been enlarged due to substitution of divalent CO32- anions by a larger quantity of monovalent Ac- anions. Differential scanning calorimetry tests testified that the insoluble Mg2/Al-Ac- LDH evidently decreased the freeze point (FP) of water to -10.68°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the Ac- were strongly confined by the metal layers of LDHs. FP test of asphalt mixtures confirmed that Mg/Al-Ac- LDHs reduced FP to -5.5°C. Immersion test results indicated that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH had a good deicing durability and Ac- did not released from asphalt mixture. Snow melting observation was conducted further testified that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH melted snow or ice sustainably. PMID:25625279

  14. Augmenting a Waste Glass Mixture Experiment Study with Additional Glass Components and Experimental Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F. ); Cooley, Scott K. ); Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D. ); Edwards, Tommy B.

    2002-01-01

    A glass composition variation study (CVS) for high-level waste (HLW) stored in Idaho is being statistically designed and performed in phases over several years. The purpose of the CVS is to investigate and model how HLW-glass properties depend on glass composition. The resulting glass property-composition models will be used to develop desirable glass formulations and for other purposes. Phases 1 and 2 of the CVS have been completed and are briefly described. This paper focuses on the CVS Phase 3 experimental design, which was chosen to augment the Phase 1 and 2 data with additional data points, as well as to account for additional glass components not studied in Phases 1 and/or 2. In total, 16 glass components were varied in the Phase 3 experimental design. The paper describes how these Phase 3 experimental design augmentation challenges were addressed using the previous data, preliminary property-composition models, and statistical mixture experiment and optimal experimental design methods and software.

  15. D-optimal experimental designs to test for departure from additivity in a fixed-ratio mixture ray.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Todd; Gennings, Chris; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Herr, David W

    2005-12-01

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture may be prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. Using a mixture of chemicals with a fixed ratio (mixture ray) results in an economical design that allows estimation of additivity or nonadditive interaction for a mixture of interest. This methodology is extended easily to a mixture with a large number of chemicals. Optimal experimental conditions can be chosen that result in increased power to detect departures from additivity. Although these designs are used widely for linear models, optimal designs for nonlinear threshold models are less well known. In the present work, the use of D-optimal designs is demonstrated for nonlinear threshold models applied to a fixed-ratio mixture ray. For a fixed sample size, this design criterion selects the experimental doses and number of subjects per dose level that result in minimum variance of the model parameters and thus increased power to detect departures from additivity. An optimal design is illustrated for a 2:1 ratio (chlorpyrifos:carbaryl) mixture experiment. For this example, and in general, the optimal designs for the nonlinear threshold model depend on prior specification of the slope and dose threshold parameters. Use of a D-optimal criterion produces experimental designs with increased power, whereas standard nonoptimal designs with equally spaced dose groups may result in low power if the active range or threshold is missed. PMID:16162847

  16. Characteristics of concentration-inhibition curves of individual chemicals and applicability of the concentration addition model for mixture toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Wang, Xiaochang C; Ma, Xiaoyan

    2015-03-01

    The concentration addition (CA) model has been widely applied to predict mixture toxicity. However, its applicability is difficult to evaluate due to the complexity of interactions among substances. Considering that the concentration-response curve (CRC) of each component of the mixture is closely related to the prediction of mixture toxicity, mathematical treatments were used to derive a characteristic index kECx (k was the slope of the tangent line of a CRC at concentration ECx). The implication is that the CA model would be applicable for predicting the mixture toxicity only when chemical components have similar kECx in the whole or part of the concentration range. For five selected chemicals whose toxicity was detected using luminescent bacteria, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) showed much higher kECx values than the others and its existence in the binary mixtures brought about overestimation of the mixture toxicity with the CA model. The higher the mass ratio of SDBS in a multi-mixture was, the more the toxicity prediction deviated from measurements. By applying the method proposed in this study to analyze some published data, it is confirmed that some components having significantly different kECx values from the other components could explain the large deviation of the mixture toxicity predicted by the CA model. PMID:25499050

  17. Sensory Property Improvement of Jokbal (Korean Pettitoes) Made from Frozen Pig Feet by Addition of Herbal Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Woon

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to improve sensory quality of Jokbal (Korean Pettitoes) made from frozen pig feet by addition of herbal mixture (glasswort, raspberry and Sansa powders). After adding herbal mixture, lipid oxidation (2-thiobarbituric acid values, TBARS), sensory property, and textural property were determined. Herbs were individually added into cooking soup at concentration of 6% (low concentration treatment, LCT) or 12% (high concentration treatment, HCT) of raw pig feet. Refrigerated pig feet were used as control. Thawed feet without any herbal mixture were used as freezing treatment (FT). TBARS in LCT or HCT were lower than that in FT, and showed the similar to that in Control. Addition of the herbal mixture was effective in improving the flavor and textural property of thawed feet by inhibiting lipid oxidation and protein denaturation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27499659

  18. Sensory Property Improvement of Jokbal (Korean Pettitoes) Made from Frozen Pig Feet by Addition of Herbal Mixture.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young-Jung; Hwang, Seol-A; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to improve sensory quality of Jokbal (Korean Pettitoes) made from frozen pig feet by addition of herbal mixture (glasswort, raspberry and Sansa powders). After adding herbal mixture, lipid oxidation (2-thiobarbituric acid values, TBARS), sensory property, and textural property were determined. Herbs were individually added into cooking soup at concentration of 6% (low concentration treatment, LCT) or 12% (high concentration treatment, HCT) of raw pig feet. Refrigerated pig feet were used as control. Thawed feet without any herbal mixture were used as freezing treatment (FT). TBARS in LCT or HCT were lower than that in FT, and showed the similar to that in Control. Addition of the herbal mixture was effective in improving the flavor and textural property of thawed feet by inhibiting lipid oxidation and protein denaturation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27499659

  19. Leaf Litter Mixtures Alter Microbial Community Development: Mechanisms for Non-Additive Effects in Litter Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Samantha K.; Newman, Gregory S.; Hart, Stephen C.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Koch, George W.

    2013-01-01

    To what extent microbial community composition can explain variability in ecosystem processes remains an open question in ecology. Microbial decomposer communities can change during litter decomposition due to biotic interactions and shifting substrate availability. Though relative abundance of decomposers may change due to mixing leaf litter, linking these shifts to the non-additive patterns often recorded in mixed species litter decomposition rates has been elusive, and links community composition to ecosystem function. We extracted phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) from single species and mixed species leaf litterbags after 10 and 27 months of decomposition in a mixed conifer forest. Total PLFA concentrations were 70% higher on litter mixtures than single litter types after 10 months, but were only 20% higher after 27 months. Similarly, fungal-to-bacterial ratios differed between mixed and single litter types after 10 months of decomposition, but equalized over time. Microbial community composition, as indicated by principal components analyses, differed due to both litter mixing and stage of litter decomposition. PLFA biomarkers a15∶0 and cy17∶0, which indicate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria respectively, in particular drove these shifts. Total PLFA correlated significantly with single litter mass loss early in decomposition but not at later stages. We conclude that litter mixing alters microbial community development, which can contribute to synergisms in litter decomposition. These findings advance our understanding of how changing forest biodiversity can alter microbial communities and the ecosystem processes they mediate. PMID:23658639

  20. In situ vitrification and the effects of soil additives; A mixture experiment case study

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G.F.; Shade, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a case study involving in situ vitrification (ISV), a process for immobilizing chemical or nuclear wastes in soil by melting-dissolving the contaminated soil into a glass block. One goal of the study was to investigate how viscosity and electrical conductivity were affected by mixing CaO and Na{sub 2}O with soil. A three-component constrained-region mixture experiment design was generated and the viscosity and electrical conductivity data collected. Several second-order mixture models were considered, and the Box-Cox transformation technique was applied to select property transformations. The fitted models were used to produce contour and component effects plots.

  1. Determining a Robust D-Optimal Design for Testing for Departure from Additivity in a Mixture of Four Perfluoroalkyl Acids.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective is to determine an optimal experimental design for a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) that is robust to the assumption of additivity. PFAAs are widely used in consumer products and industrial applications. The presence and persistence of PFAAs, especially in ...

  2. Testing for Additivity in Chemical Mixtures Using a Fixed-Ratio Ray Design and Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fixed-ratio ray designs have been used for detecting and characterizing interactions of large numbers of chemicals in combination. Single chemical dose-response data are used to predict an “additivity curve” along an environmentally relevant ray. A “mixture curve” is estimated fr...

  3. A MIXTURE OF SEVEN ANTIANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS ELICITS ADDITIVE EFFECTS ON THE MALE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT THAT CORRESPOND TO MODELED PREDICTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objectives of this study were to: (1) determine whether dissimilar antiandrogenic compounds display additive effects when present in combination and (2) to assess the ability of modelling approaches to accurately predict these mixture effects based on data from single ch...

  4. NON-ADDITIVE INTERACTIONS OF AN ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE MIXTURE IN ADULT AND PREWEANLING RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Critical features of risk assessment include the evaluation of risk following exposure to pesticide mixtures as well as the potential for increased sensitivity of the young. The US EPA is required to regulate pesticides acting via a common mechanism of action as a group, e.g.,...

  5. Fuel and lubricant additives from acid treated mixtures of vegetable oil derived amides and esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, B.R.; Devault, A.N.

    1981-05-26

    Vegetable oils such as corn oil, peanut oil, and soy oil are reacted with polyamines to form a mixture containing amides, imides, half esters, and glycerol with subsequent treatment with a strong acid such as sulfonic acid to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels and lubricants.

  6. THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE OF TSC2 MUTANT LONG EVANS (EKER) RATS TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS WAS LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may not represent the actual biological response. A rodent model of hereditary ...

  7. Effect of residual attractive interactions in size asymmetric colloidal mixtures: Theoretical analysis and predictions.

    PubMed

    Germain, Ph

    2010-07-28

    We analyze the influence of residual attractions on the static and some dynamic properties of size asymmetric mixtures of "hard-sphere-like" colloids. These attractions, usually neglected in the theoretical analysis, are characterized by a very short range and a moderate strength reflecting the underlying microscopic structure of the colloidal particles. Their effect on the potentials of mean force is analyzed from analytical expressions obtained from low density expansions. The effective potential of the big particle fluid is next considered. An analytical expression is proposed for estimating the deviation with respect to the hard sphere depletion potential. This case is compared to that of mixtures with noninteracting depletants. The important consequences on the binodals and the glass transition lines of the effective fluid are discussed in both cases. This study is next extended to other properties-the specific heat and the low shear viscosity-which incorporate contributions from the two components of the binary mixture. PMID:20687684

  8. Effect of residual attractive interactions in size asymmetric colloidal mixtures: Theoretical analysis and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germain, Ph.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the influence of residual attractions on the static and some dynamic properties of size asymmetric mixtures of "hard-sphere-like" colloids. These attractions, usually neglected in the theoretical analysis, are characterized by a very short range and a moderate strength reflecting the underlying microscopic structure of the colloidal particles. Their effect on the potentials of mean force is analyzed from analytical expressions obtained from low density expansions. The effective potential of the big particle fluid is next considered. An analytical expression is proposed for estimating the deviation with respect to the hard sphere depletion potential. This case is compared to that of mixtures with noninteracting depletants. The important consequences on the binodals and the glass transition lines of the effective fluid are discussed in both cases. This study is next extended to other properties—the specific heat and the low shear viscosity—which incorporate contributions from the two components of the binary mixture.

  9. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R.; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the (”bifurcation” or fixed-point”) equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  10. Precipitation in aqueous mixtures with addition of a strongly hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2010-11-01

    We examine phase separation in aqueous mixtures due to preferential solvation with a low-density solute (hydrophilic ions or hydrophobic particles). For hydrophilic ions, preferential solvation can stabilize water domains enriched with ions. This precipitation occurs above a critical solute density n(p) in wide ranges of the temperature and the average composition, where the mixture solvent would be in a one-phase state without solute. The volume fraction of precipitated domains tends to zero as the average solute density n is decreased to np or as the interaction parameter χ is decreased to a critical value χ(p). If we start with one-phase states with n>n(p) or χ>χ(p), precipitation proceeds via homogeneous nucleation or via heterogeneous nucleation, for example, around suspended colloids. In the latter case, colloid particles are wrapped by thick wetting layers. We also predict a first-order prewetting transition for n or χ slightly below np or χ(p) for neutral colloids. PMID:21230480

  11. A numerical study of the influence of ammonia addition on the auto-ignition limits of methane/air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Van den Schoor, F; Norman, F; Vandebroek, L; Verplaetsen, F; Berghmans, J

    2009-05-30

    In this study the auto-ignition limit of ammonia/methane/air mixtures is calculated based upon a perfectly stirred reactor model with convective heat transfer. The results of four different reaction mechanisms are compared with existing experimental data at an initial temperature of 723 K with ammonia concentrations of 0-20 mol.% and methane concentrations of 2.5-10 mol.%. It is found that the calculation of the auto-ignition limit pressure at constant temperature leads to larger relative deviations between calculated and experimental results than the calculation of the auto-ignition temperature at constant pressure. In addition to the calculations, a reaction path analysis is performed to explain the observed lowering of the auto-ignition limit of methane/air mixtures by ammonia addition. It is found that this decrease is caused by the formation of NO and NO(2), which enhance the oxidation of methane at low temperatures. PMID:18926632

  12. The influence of additives on coal-water mixtures prepared with beneficiated coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ekmann, J.M.; Wildman, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Use of coal-water mixtures (CWM) as fuels for utility and industrial applications is currently constrained by a number of factors, including the cost of compliance with environmental quality regulations. From a utilization standpoint, limiting ash and sulfur contents to levels comparable to those for residual fuel oil produces an attractive alternate fuel provided the unit cost is equal to that for the fuel oil. Reduction in the mineral matter content of the coal has been identified as a target for continued development of CWM. Changes in coal type or in the characteristics of a single coal have been shown to affect CWM properties. It appears worthwhile to examine the impact that beneficiation might have on CWM properties.

  13. Additional development of large diameter carbon monofilament. [from boron, hydrogen, and methane gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, B. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The chemical vapor process for preparing a large diameter carbon-base monofilament from a BCl3, Ch4 and H2 gas mixture with a carbon substrate fiber was studied. The effect of reactor geometry, total gas flows and deposition temperature on the tensile strength of the monofilament were investigated. It was noted that consistent results could only be obtained when the carbon substrate fiber was cleaned. The strength of the monofilament was found to depend on the highest temperature and the temperature profile of the monofilament in the reactor. The strength of monofilament produced in the dc and RF reactors were found to be similar and similar alloy compositions in the monofilament were attained when the same gas ratios were used. The tensile strength of the monofilament at 500 C was found to be 60 to 70% of the room temperature tensile strength. No degradation was noted after exposure to molten aluminum.

  14. Depletion, melting and reentrant solidification in mixtures of soft and hard colloids.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Daniela; Capone, Barbara; Marakis, John; Merola, Maria Consiglia; Truzzolillo, Domenico; Cipelletti, Luca; Moingeon, Firmin; Gauthier, Mario; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris; Likos, Christos N; Camargo, Manuel

    2015-11-14

    We present extensive experimental and theoretical investigations on the structure, phase behavior, dynamics and rheology of model soft-hard colloidal mixtures realized with large, multiarm star polymers as the soft component and smaller, compact stars as the hard one. The number and length of the arms in star polymers control their softness, whereas the size ratio, the overall density and the composition are additional parameters varied for the mixtures. A coarse-grained theoretical strategy is employed to predict the structure of the systems as well as their ergodicity properties on the basis of mode coupling theory, for comparison with rheological measurements on the samples. We discovered that dynamically arrested star-polymer solutions recover their ergodicity upon addition of colloidal additives. At the same time the system displays demixing instability, and the binodal of the latter meets the glass line in a way that leads, upon addition of a sufficient amount of colloidal particles, to an arrested phase separation and reentrant solidification. We present evidence for a subsequent solid-to-solid transition well within the region of arrested phase separation, attributed to a hard-sphere-mixture type of glass, due to osmotic shrinkage of the stars at high colloidal particle concentrations. We systematically investigated the interplay of star functionality and size ratio with glass melting and demixing, and rationalized our findings by the depletion of the big stars due to the smaller colloids. This new depletion potential in which, contrary to the classic colloid-polymer case, the hard component depletes the soft one, has unique and novel characteristics and allows the calculation of phase diagrams for such mixtures. This work covers a broad range of soft-hard colloidal mixture compositions in which the soft component exceeds the hard one in size and provides general guidelines for controlling the properties of such complex mixtures. PMID:26356800

  15. A thermodynamic self-consistent theory of asymmetric hard-core Yukawa mixtures.

    PubMed

    Pellicane, Giuseppe; Caccamo, Carlo

    2016-10-19

    We perform structural and thermodynamic calculations in the framework of the modified hypernetted chain (MHNC) integral equation closure to the Ornstein-Zernike equation for binary mixtures of size-different particles interacting with hard-core Yukawa pair potentials. We use the Percus-Yevick (PY) bridge functions of a binary mixture of hard-sphere (HSM) particles. The hard-sphere diameters of the PY bridge functions of the HSM system are adjusted so to achieve thermodynamic consistency between the virial and compressibility equations of state. We show the benefit of thermodynamic consistency by comparing the MHNC results with the available computer simulation data reported in the literature, and we demonstrate that the self-consistent thermodynamic theory provides a better reproduction of the simulation data over other microscopic theories. PMID:27545096

  16. A Simple and Inexpensive Device for Slow, Controlled Addition of a Solution to a Reaction Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osvath, Peter

    1995-07-01

    A number of reactions require the slow and controlled addition of a solution containing one reagent to another. Attempting to control the flow rate over a number of hours using a conventional constant pressure addition funnel is a frustrating exercise; commercially available constant volume addition funnels are expensive and must be adjusted by trial and error each time a reaction is carried out. The use of an (expensive) peristaltic pump or syringe pump overcomes these problems but can introduce other complications. We have recently had occasion to carry out the synthesis of thioether macrocycles and cages requiring the slow and controlled addition of DMF solutions of (offensively odoriferous) thiols or (air-sensitive) thiolates to a reactant solution under nitrogen(1), Although the use of a syringe pump was called for, there are obvious difficulties associated with purging the solution and assembling such an apparatus under nitrogen, and we report a simple and inexpensive solution. A Male Luer Lock tip (recovered from a broken syringe) was sweated onto the flattened tip of a pressure-equalizing addition funnel and a syringe needle was attached. Judicious selection of needle length, bore size, and reactant volume can be used to control the addition time simply and reproducibly. With a 250-mL funnel, the flow rate changes by <25% from the beginning to the end of the addition. (In fact, a reduction in the rate of addition may even be advantageous as the reaction proceeds, the reagent in the receiving flask is consumed, its concentration drops, and the rate of reaction will decrease). A piece of fine Teflon tubing of appropriate length attached to the needle can be used to reduce the flow rate even further, but this is only necessary for very slow rates of addition. For example, the time of addition of 200 mL, of an ethanolic solution could be varied from approximately 5 minutes (150mm/17 gauge) to approximately 5 h (200mm/22 gauge), and once the addition time for a

  17. Enhanced heavy metal immobilization in soil by grinding with addition of nanometallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Sakita, Shogo; Kakeda, Mitsunori

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a nanometallic Ca and CaO dispersion mixture for the immobilization of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr and Pb) in contaminated soil. Simple grinding achieved 85-90% heavy metal immobilization, but it can be enhanced further to 98-100% by addition of a nanometallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture produced by grinding. Observations using SEM-EDS elemental maps and semi-quantitative analysis showed that the amounts of As, Cd, Cr, and Pb measurable on the soil particle surface decrease after nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment. The leachable heavy metal concentrations were reduced after nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment to concentrations lower than the Japan soil elution standard regulatory threshold: <0.01 mg L(-1) for As, Cd, and Pb; and 0.05 mg L(-1) for Cr. Effects of soil moisture and pH on heavy metal immobilization were not strongly influenced. The most probable mechanisms for the enhancement of heavy metal immobilization capacity with nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment might be due to adsorption and entrapment of heavy metals into newly formed aggregates, thereby prompting aggregation of soil particles and enclosure/binding with Ca/CaO-associated immobile salts. Results suggest that the nanometallic Ca/CaO mixture is suitable for use in immobilization of heavy-metal-contaminated soil under normal moisture conditions. PMID:22818089

  18. Engineering and environmental properties of thermally treated mixtures containing MSWI fly ash and low-cost additives.

    PubMed

    Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Trinci, L; Muntoni, A; Lo Mastro, S

    2004-09-01

    An experimental work was carried out to investigate the feasibility of application of a sintering process to mixtures composed of Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator (MSWI) fly ash and low-cost additives (waste from feldspar production and cullet). The proportions of the three constituents were varied to adjust the mixture compositions to within the optimal range for sintering. The material was compacted in cylindrical specimens and treated at 1100 and 1150 degrees C for 30 and 60 min. Engineering and environmental characteristics including weight loss, dimensional changes, density, open porosity, mechanical strength, chemical stability and leaching behavior were determined for the treated material, allowing the relationship between the degree of sintering and both mixture composition and treatment conditions to be singled out. Mineralogical analyses detected the presence of neo-formation minerals from the pyroxene group. Estimation of the extent of metal loss from the samples indicated that the potential for volatilization of species of Pb, Cd and Zn is still a matter of major concern when dealing with thermal treatment of incinerator ash. PMID:15268956

  19. Explanation of non-additive effects in mixtures of similar mode of action chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masashi; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Many models have been developed to predict the combined effect of drugs and chemicals. Most models are classified into two additive models: independent action (IA) and concentration addition (CA). It is generally considered if the modes of action of chemicals are similar then the combined effect obeys CA; however, many empirical studies report nonlinear effects deviating from the predictions by CA. Such deviations are termed synergism and antagonism. Synergism, which leads to a stronger toxicity, requires more careful management, and hence it is important to understand how and which combinations of chemicals lead to synergism. In this paper, three types of chemical reactions are mathematically modeled and the cause of the nonlinear effects among chemicals with similar modes of action was investigated. Our results show that combined effects obey CA only when the modes of action are exactly the same. Contrary to existing knowledge, combined effects are generally nonlinear even if the modes of action of the chemicals are similar. Our results further show that the nonlinear effects vanish out when the chemical concentrations are low, suggesting that the current management procedure of assuming CA is rarely inappropriate because environmental concentrations of chemicals are generally low. PMID:26134580

  20. Non-Additive Voltametric Currents From a Mixture of Two, Three and Four Redox-Active Compounds and Electroanalytical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dass, Amala; Oh, Woon Su; Gao, Xue-Rong; Rawashdeh, Abdel M.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    We have published recently the effect of dissimilar diffusion coefficients on the size of the voltammetric waves from a mixture of two redox-active compounds. Similarly, at the potential range where three redox-active species, decamethylferrocene (dMeFc), ferrocene (Fc) and N-methylphenothiazine (MePTZ), are oxidized simultaneously with rates controlled by linear diffusion, electrogenerated radicals diffusing outwards from the electrode react with the original species diffusing towards the electrode from the bulk; thus, Fc(+) reacts with dMeFc producing Fc and dMeFc(+), while MePTZ(+) reacts both with dMeFc producing MePTZ and dMeFc(+), and with Fc producing MePTZ and Fc(+). These reactions replace dMeFc with Fc at the second plateau, and both dMeFc and Fc with MePTZ at the third plateau. Since the diffusion coefficients of the three species are not equal, the mass-transfer limited currents of the second and the third oxidation wave plateaus change by approx. 10%. Numerical simulations of the experimental voltamograms support this mechanism. Similar results were also obtained for a mixture of four redoxactive compounds. The implications of this non-additive nature of currents on: (a) the use of internal voltammetric standards for quantitative analysis of a mixture of redox-active compounds; and, (b) the half wave potentials (E1/2) of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th waves for qualitative analysis, will be discussed.

  1. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO RAY MIXTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessors are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of assessing interactions between chemicals in a mixture. Most traditional designs for evaluating interactions are prohibitive when the number of chemicals in the mixture is large. However, evaluation of interacti...

  2. Decomposition of Phragmites australis litter retarded by invasive Solidago canadensis in mixtures: an antagonistic non-additive effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Yaojun; Zou, Jianwen; Siemann, Evan

    2014-06-01

    Solidago canadensis is an aggressive invader in China. Solidago invasion success is partially attributed to allelopathic compounds release and more benefits from AM fungi, which potentially makes the properties of Solidago litter different from co-occurring natives. These properties may comprehensively affect litter decomposition of co-occurring natives. We conducted a field experiment to examine litter mixing effects in a Phragmites australis dominated community invaded by Solidago in southeast China. Solidago had more rapid mass and N loss rate than Phragmites when they decomposed separately. Litter mixing decreased N loss rate in Phragmites litter and increased that of Solidago. Large decreases in Phragmites mass loss and smaller increases in Solidago mass loss caused negative non-additive effect. Solidago litter extracts reduced soil C decomposition and N processes, suggested an inhibitory effect of Solidago secondary compounds. These results are consistent with the idea that nutrient transfer and secondary compounds both affected litter mixtures decomposition.

  3. Decomposition of Phragmites australis litter retarded by invasive Solidago canadensis in mixtures: an antagonistic non-additive effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Yaojun; Zou, Jianwen; Siemann, Evan

    2014-01-01

    Solidago canadensis is an aggressive invader in China. Solidago invasion success is partially attributed to allelopathic compounds release and more benefits from AM fungi, which potentially makes the properties of Solidago litter different from co-occurring natives. These properties may comprehensively affect litter decomposition of co-occurring natives. We conducted a field experiment to examine litter mixing effects in a Phragmites australis dominated community invaded by Solidago in southeast China. Solidago had more rapid mass and N loss rate than Phragmites when they decomposed separately. Litter mixing decreased N loss rate in Phragmites litter and increased that of Solidago. Large decreases in Phragmites mass loss and smaller increases in Solidago mass loss caused negative non-additive effect. Solidago litter extracts reduced soil C decomposition and N processes, suggested an inhibitory effect of Solidago secondary compounds. These results are consistent with the idea that nutrient transfer and secondary compounds both affected litter mixtures decomposition. PMID:24976274

  4. The potential application of red mud and soil mixture as additive to the surface layer of a landfill cover system.

    PubMed

    Ujaczki, Éva; Feigl, Viktória; Molnár, Mónika; Vaszita, Emese; Uzinger, Nikolett; Erdélyi, Attila; Gruiz, Katalin

    2016-06-01

    Red mud, the by-product of aluminum production, has been regarded as a problematic residue all over the world. Its storage involves risks as evidenced by the Ajka red mud spill, an accident in Hungary where the slurry broke free, flooding the surrounding areas. As an immediate remediation measure more than 5cm thick red mud layer was removed from the flooded soil surface. The removed red mud and soil mixture (RMSM) was transferred into the reservoirs for storage. In this paper the application of RMSM is evaluated in a field study aiming at re-utilizing waste, decreasing cost of waste disposal and providing a value-added product. The purpose was to investigate the applicability of RMSM as surface layer component of landfill cover systems. The field study was carried out in two steps: in lysimeters and in field plots. The RMSM was mixed at ratios ranging between 0 and 50% w/w with low quality subsoil (LQS) originally used as surface layer of an interim landfill cover. The characteristics of the LQS+RMSM mixtures compared to the subsoil (LQS) and the RMSM were determined by physical-chemical, biological and ecotoxicological methods. The addition of RMSM to the subsoil (LQS) at up to 20% did not result any ecotoxic effect, but it increased the water holding capacity. In addition, the microbial substrate utilization became about triple of subsoil (LQS) after 10months. According to our results the RMSM mixed into subsoil (LQS) at 20% w/w dose may be applied as surface layer of landfill cover systems. PMID:27266315

  5. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  6. Extending the Applicability of the Dose Addition Model to the Assessment of Chemical Mixtures of Partial Agonists by Using a Novel Toxic Unit Extrapolation Method

    PubMed Central

    Scholze, Martin; Silva, Elisabete; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Dose addition, a commonly used concept in toxicology for the prediction of chemical mixture effects, cannot readily be applied to mixtures of partial agonists with differing maximal effects. Due to its mathematical features, effect levels that exceed the maximal effect of the least efficacious compound present in the mixture, cannot be calculated. This poses problems when dealing with mixtures likely to be encountered in realistic assessment situations where chemicals often show differing maximal effects. To overcome this limitation, we developed a pragmatic solution that extrapolates the toxic units of partial agonists to effect levels beyond their maximal efficacy. We extrapolated different additivity expectations that reflect theoretically possible extremes and validated this approach with a mixture of 21 estrogenic chemicals in the E-Screen. This assay measures the proliferation of human epithelial breast cancers. We found that the dose-response curves of the estrogenic agents exhibited widely varying shapes, slopes and maximal effects, which made it necessary to extrapolate mixture responses above 14% proliferation. Our toxic unit extrapolation approach predicted all mixture responses accurately. It extends the applicability of dose addition to combinations of agents with differing saturating effects and removes an important bottleneck that has severely hampered the use of dose addition in the past. PMID:24533151

  7. CHARACTERIZE AGGREGATE AND CUMULATIVE RISK TO MANAGE RISK TO HUMANS EXPOSED TO MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS: DOSE ADDITIVITY FOR PESTICIDE MIXTURES: BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUMMARY: The Agency’s default assumption for the cumulative assessment of the risk of mixtures is additivity based on either single-chemical potency (dose addition) or single-chemical effects (effect addition). NTD is developing models to accurately predict effects of complex mix...

  8. Considerations about the theoretically expected crushing strength of tablets from binary powder mixtures: double layer tablets versus arithmetic additivity rule.

    PubMed

    Belda, Petra M; Mielck, Jobst B

    2006-11-01

    The theoretically expected breaking strength of tablets from powder mixtures is often calculated by the weighted arithmetic mean from the breaking strength of the single components, which corresponds to a linear interpolation. The validity of this additivity of fracture strength shall be evaluated by the underlying model of parallel couplings. It assumes the components linked in parallel with respect to the direction of loading during diametrical strength testing. Parallel couplings were experimentally realised by the preparation of double layer tablets from crystalline and spray-dried lactose on the one hand and from maltitol and metamizol-sodium on the other. Constant total true volumes of the single substances and of layered powders in varying ratios of true volume were compressed on an eccentric tabletting machine to constant geometric mean punch force. Simulated crushing profiles of parallel couplings were derived from force-displacement profiles measured during diametrical compression of the one-component tablets. At given finely graded deformation levels, the forces exerted by the components during loading were added in the proportion of the true volume fractions of the components in the coupling. The results from the experiments and from the simulations are in good accordance. They demonstrate that a linear change of the crushing strength in dependence on the true volume fraction of the components can only be assumed if the single components deform to the same extent up to the point of fracture. This behaviour was approximately found with the parallel lactose system. In all other cases it must be expected that the crushing strength of parallel systems will be lowered beneath the weighted arithmetic mean values or even below the crushing strength of the single components. The latter was observed with the maltitol-metamizol combinations. Thus, if tablets from binary powder mixtures exhibit a crushing strength depression, this is not necessarily an indication

  9. Addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture effect on quality of subarachnoid block and postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Marilyn; Ghoshal, Pabitra; Namshikar, Viraj; Gaude, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Context: This study was undertaken in 100 patients scheduled for lower limb orthopaedic surgeries. Aim: The objective of this study was to study the effect of addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture on the quality of subarachnoid block and compare it with intrathecal bupivacaine clonidine mixture without fentanyl. Settings and Design: In this prospective and double blind randomized controlled study, one hundred patients, between 20-40 years of age, of either sex, weighing between 40-65 Kg, measuring more than 150 cm in height, of ASA Grade I and II who were undergoing orthopaedic lower limb surgeries were selected in order to study the quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia produced by a combination of bupivacaine clonidine and fentanyl in comparison with bupivacaine clonidine. Materials and Methods: The patients were randomly divided in two groups of 50 each: Group BC: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml of 0.9% NaCl. Group BCF: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml (20 μg) of fentanyl. The total volume of solution in both the groups was 3.0 ml. The quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: The data thus obtained was statistically analysed using the following tests: Unpaired student's t-test. Average % change in data over baseline values to detect trends. A ‘P’ value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in duration of sensory and motor blockade in group BCF compared to BC. The duration of analgesia as assessed by, either VAS score of >5 or demand of additional analgesia was > 524.6 ± 32.21 mins in group BC and > 774.4 ± 59.59 mins in group BCF. This prolongation of duration of analgesia in group BCF compared to group BC has statistical significance. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were not

  10. The structure and properties of a simple model mixture of amphiphilic molecules and ions at a solid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pizio, O.; Sokołowski, S.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate microscopic structure, adsorption, and electric properties of a mixture that consists of amphiphilic molecules and charged hard spheres in contact with uncharged or charged solid surfaces. The amphiphilic molecules are modeled as spheres composed of attractive and repulsive parts. The electrolyte component of the mixture is considered in the framework of the restricted primitive model (RPM). The system is studied using a density functional theory that combines fundamental measure theory for hard sphere mixtures, weighted density approach for inhomogeneous charged hard spheres, and a mean-field approximation to describe anisotropic interactions. Our principal focus is in exploring the effects brought by the presence of ions on the distribution of amphiphilic particles at the wall, as well as the effects of amphiphilic molecules on the electric double layer formed at solid surface. In particular, we have found that under certain thermodynamic conditions a long-range translational and orientational order can develop. The presence of amphiphiles produces changes of the shape of the differential capacitance from symmetric or non-symmetric bell-like to camel-like. Moreover, for some systems the value of the potential of the zero charge is non-zero, in contrast to the RPM at a charged surface.

  11. On the Solution of a Boltzmann System for Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirov, Alexander; Yu, Shih-Hsien

    2010-02-01

    We study the Boltzmann equation for a mixture of two gases in one space dimension with initial condition of one gas near vacuum and the other near a Maxwellian equilibrium state. A qualitative-quantitative mathematical analysis is developed to study this mass diffusion problem based on the Green’s function of the Boltzmann equation for the single species hard sphere collision model in Liu andYu (Commun Pure Appl Math 57:1543-1608, 2004). The cross-species resonance of the mass diffusion and the diffusion-sound wave is investigated. An exponentially sharp global solution is obtained.

  12. A Concentration Addition Model to Assess Activation of the Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) by Pesticide Mixtures Found in the French Diet

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Georges; Nawaz, Ahmad; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Rahmani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    French consumers are exposed to mixtures of pesticide residues in part through food consumption. As a xenosensor, the pregnane X receptor (hPXR) is activated by numerous pesticides, the combined effect of which is currently unknown. We examined the activation of hPXR by seven pesticide mixtures most likely found in the French diet and their individual components. The mixture's effect was estimated using the concentration addition (CA) model. PXR transactivation was measured by monitoring luciferase activity in hPXR/HepG2 cells and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. The three mixtures with the highest potency were evaluated using the CA model, at equimolar concentrations and at their relative proportion in the diet. The seven mixtures significantly activated hPXR and induced the expression of CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes. Of the 14 pesticides which constitute the three most active mixtures, four were found to be strong hPXR agonists, four medium, and six weak. Depending on the mixture and pesticide proportions, additive, greater than additive or less than additive effects between compounds were demonstrated. Predictions of the combined effects were obtained with both real-life and equimolar proportions at low concentrations. Pesticides act mostly additively to activate hPXR, when present in a mixture. Modulation of hPXR activation and its target genes induction may represent a risk factor contributing to exacerbate the physiological response of the hPXR signaling pathways and to explain some adverse effects in humans. PMID:25028461

  13. A concentration addition model to assess activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) by pesticide mixtures found in the French diet.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Georges; Nawaz, Ahmad; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Rahmani, Roger

    2014-09-01

    French consumers are exposed to mixtures of pesticide residues in part through food consumption. As a xenosensor, the pregnane X receptor (hPXR) is activated by numerous pesticides, the combined effect of which is currently unknown. We examined the activation of hPXR by seven pesticide mixtures most likely found in the French diet and their individual components. The mixture's effect was estimated using the concentration addition (CA) model. PXR transactivation was measured by monitoring luciferase activity in hPXR/HepG2 cells and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. The three mixtures with the highest potency were evaluated using the CA model, at equimolar concentrations and at their relative proportion in the diet. The seven mixtures significantly activated hPXR and induced the expression of CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes. Of the 14 pesticides which constitute the three most active mixtures, four were found to be strong hPXR agonists, four medium, and six weak. Depending on the mixture and pesticide proportions, additive, greater than additive or less than additive effects between compounds were demonstrated. Predictions of the combined effects were obtained with both real-life and equimolar proportions at low concentrations. Pesticides act mostly additively to activate hPXR, when present in a mixture. Modulation of hPXR activation and its target genes induction may represent a risk factor contributing to exacerbate the physiological response of the hPXR signaling pathways and to explain some adverse effects in humans. PMID:25028461

  14. Additive Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Chemicals in Human Cell-Based Assays Can Be Influenced by Inclusion of Chemicals with Differing Effect Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Richard Mark; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the in vitro effects of mixtures of estrogenic chemicals can be well predicted from the estrogenicity of their components by the concentration addition (CA) concept. However, some studies have observed small deviations from CA. Factors affecting the presence or observation of deviations could include: the type of chemical tested; number of mixture components; mixture design; and assay choice. We designed mixture experiments that address these factors, using mixtures with high numbers of components, chemicals from diverse chemical groups, assays with different in vitro endpoints and different mixture designs and ratios. Firstly, the effects of mixtures composed of up to 17 estrogenic chemicals were examined using estrogenicity assays with reporter-gene (ERLUX) and cell proliferation (ESCREEN) endpoints. Two mixture designs were used: 1) a ‘balanced’ design with components present in proportion to a common effect concentration (e.g. an EC10) and 2) a ‘non-balanced’ design with components in proportion to potential human tissue concentrations. Secondly, the individual and simultaneous ability of 16 potential modulator chemicals (each with minimal estrogenicity) to influence the assay outcome produced by a reference mixture of estrogenic chemicals was examined. Test chemicals included plasticizers, phthalates, metals, PCBs, phytoestrogens, PAHs, heterocyclic amines, antioxidants, UV filters, musks, PBDEs and parabens. In all the scenarios tested, the CA concept provided a good prediction of mixture effects. Modulation studies revealed that chemicals possessing minimal estrogenicity themselves could reduce (negatively modulate) the effect of a mixture of estrogenic chemicals. Whether the type of modulation we observed occurs in practice most likely depends on the chemical concentrations involved, and better information is required on likely human tissue concentrations of estrogens and of potential modulators

  15. Excess compressibility in binary liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, F; Gapiński, J; Pochylski, M; Ponterio, R C; Saija, F; Salvato, G

    2007-06-14

    Brillouin scattering experiments have been carried out on some mixtures of molecular liquids. From the measurement of the hypersonic velocities we have evaluated the adiabatic compressibility as a function of the volume fraction. We show how the quadratic form of the excess compressibility dependence on the solute volume fraction can be derived by simple statistical effects and does not imply any interaction among the components of the system other than excluded volume effects. This idea is supported by the comparison of the experimental results with a well-established prototype model, consisting of a binary mixture of hard spheres with a nonadditive interaction potential. This naive model turns out to be able to produce a very wide spectrum of structural and thermodynamic features depending on values of its parameters. An attempt has made to understand what kind of structural information can be gained through the analysis of the volume fraction dependence of the compressibility. PMID:17581064

  16. Synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects of fruit mixtures on total antioxidant capacities and bioactive compounds in tropical fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana Carolina da Silva; Wurlitzer, Nedio Jair; Dionisio, Ana Paula; Lacerda Soares, Marcia Valéria; Rocha Bastos, Maria do Socorro; Elesbão Alves, Ricardo; Montenegro Brasil, Isabella

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work was investigate the synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects of fruit mixtures on total antioxidant capacities and bioactive compounds in tropical fruit juices, and optimize its formulation by the response surface methodology based on the responses: total polyphenols (TP), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), ascorbic acid content and sensorial acceptance. Camu-camu, acerola and acai were the major factors that influenced the antioxidant potential of the juice; and the yellow mombin showed a positive effect on the acceptance of the tropical juice. It was observed an/antagonistic effect between acerola and camu-camu for the TAC response. The optimum formulation obtained was 20% acerola, 10% camu-camu, 10% yellow mombin, 10% cashew apple and 10% acai, which was responsible for a response of 155.46 mg.100 g(-1) of ascorbic acid, 103.01 mg of GAE.100 g-1 of TP, 10.27 µM Trolox g(-1) of TAC and approximately 6.1 of acceptance. PMID:26817384

  17. Internal structure of shock waves in disparate mass mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Jeng, Duen-Ren; Penko, Paul F.

    1992-01-01

    The detailed flow structure of a normal shock wave for a gas mixture is investigated using the direct-simulation Monte Carlo method. A variable diameter hard-sphere (VDHS) model is employed to investigate the effect of different viscosity temperature exponents (VTE) for each species in a gas mixture. Special attention is paid to the irregular behavior in the density profiles which was previously observed in a helium-xenon experiment. It is shown that the VTE can have substantial effects in the prediction of the structure of shock waves. The variable hard-sphere model of Bird shows good agreement, but with some limitations, with the experimental data if a common VTE is chosen properly for each case. The VDHS model shows better agreement with the experimental data without adjusting the VTE. The irregular behavior of the light-gas component in shock waves of disparate mass mixtures is observed not only in the density profile, but also in the parallel temperature profile. The strength of the shock wave, the type of molecular interactions, and the mole fraction of heavy species have substantial effects on the existence and structure of the irregularities.

  18. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture are prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. However, recent advances in statistically-based experimental design have made it easier to evaluate interactions involving many chemicals...

  19. Free Volume of the Hard Spheres Gas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shutler, P. M. E.; Martinez, J. C.; Springham, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    The Enskog factor [chi] plays a central role in the theory of dense gases, quantifying how the finite size of molecules causes many physical quantities, such as the equation of state, the mean free path, and the diffusion coefficient, to deviate from those of an ideal gas. We suggest an intuitive but rigorous derivation of this fact by showing how…

  20. Hard quasispherical particle models for the viscosity of solutions of protein mixtures.

    PubMed

    Minton, Allen P

    2012-08-01

    Recently reported measurements of the viscosity of three monoclonal antibodies, their binary mixtures, and a binary mixture of an antibody and albumin over a broad range of compositions (Galush et al., J. Pharm. Sci. 2011,101, 1012) were quantitatively accounted for to within experimental uncertainty by an extension of the hard quasispherical particle model suggested by Ross and Minton (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1977, 76, 971) and by a generalization of the hard sphere equation of Krieger and Dougherty (Trans. Soc. Rheol. 1959, 3, 137) . Further generalization of these equations to treat the concentration-dependent viscosity of self-associating proteins is suggested. PMID:22780089

  1. Many-fluid Onsager density functional theories for orientational ordering in mixtures of anisotropic hard-body fluids.

    PubMed

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George; Varga, Szabolcs

    2008-10-14

    The extension of Onsager's second-virial theory [L. Onsager, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 51, 627 (1949)] for the orientational ordering of hard rods to mixtures of nonspherical hard bodies with finite length-to-breadth ratios is examined using the decoupling approximations of Parsons [Phys. Rev. A 19, 1225 (1979)] and Lee [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 6567 (1987); 89, 7036 (1988)]. Invariably the extension of the Parsons-Lee (PL) theory to mixtures has in the past involved a van der Waals one-fluid treatment in which the properties of the mixture are approximated by those of a reference one-component hard-sphere fluid with an effective diameter which depends on the composition of the mixture and the molecular parameters of the various components; commonly this is achieved by equating the molecular volumes of the effective hard sphere and of the components in the mixture and is referred to as the PL theory of mixtures. It is well known that a one-fluid treatment is not the most appropriate for the description of the thermodynamic properties of isotropic fluids, and inadequacies are often rectified with a many-fluid (MF) theory. Here, we examine MF theories which are developed from the virial theorem and the virial expansion of the Helmholtz free energy of anisotropic fluid mixtures. The use of the decoupling approximation of the pair distribution function at the level of a multicomponent hard-sphere reference system leads to our MF Parsons (MFP) theory of anisotropic mixtures. Alternatively the mapping of the virial coefficients of the hard-body mixtures onto those of equivalent hard-sphere systems leads to our MF Lee (MFL) theory. The description of the isotropic-nematic phase behavior of binary mixtures of hard Gaussian overlap particles is used to assess the adequacy of the four different theories, namely, the original second-virial theory of Onsager, the usual PL one-fluid theory, and the MF theories based on the Lee (MFL) and Parsons (MFP) approaches. A comparison with the

  2. AN ADDITIVE EFFECT OF A MIXTURE OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE AND SODIUM CHLORATE ON PITUTARY-THYROID AXIS IN MALE F-344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Additive Effect of a Mixture of Ammonium Perchlorate
    and Sodium Chlorate on Pitutary-Thyroid Axis in Male F-344 Rats

    Moazzam A. Khan 1,2,, 3Suzanne E. Fenton. 2Adam E. Swank, ZGeremy W. Knapp, 2Susan D.
    Hester, and 2Douglas C. Wolf. 1NRC, 2Environmental Carcinog...

  3. Environmentally Realistic Mixtures of the Five Regulated Haloacetic Acids Exhibit Concentration-Dependent Departures from Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of water decreases waterborne disease. Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of oxidizing disinfectants with inorganic and organic materials in the source water. The U.S. EPA regulates five haloacetic acid (HAA) DBPs as a mixture. The objective ...

  4. Cumulative reproductive effects of in utero administration of mixtures of antiandrogens in male SD rats: synergy or additivity?

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1996 the USEPA was charged under the FQPA to consider the cumulative effects of chemicals in their risk assessments. Our studies were conducted to provide a framework for assessing the cumulative effects of antiandrogens. Toxicants were administered individually or as mixtures...

  5. Mixtures of charged colloid and neutral polymer: influence of electrostatic interactions on demixing and interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Denton, Alan R; Schmidt, Matthias

    2005-06-22

    The equilibrium phase behavior of a binary mixture of charged colloids and neutral, nonadsorbing polymers is studied within free-volume theory. A model mixture of charged hard-sphere macroions and ideal, coarse-grained, effective-sphere polymers is mapped first onto a binary hard-sphere mixture with nonadditive diameters and then onto an effective Asakura-Oosawa model [S. Asakura and F. Oosawa, J. Chem. Phys. 22, 1255 (1954)]. The effective model is defined by a single dimensionless parameter-the ratio of the polymer diameter to the effective colloid diameter. For high salt-to-counterion concentration ratios, a free-volume approximation for the free energy is used to compute the fluid phase diagram, which describes demixing into colloid-rich (liquid) and colloid-poor (vapor) phases. Increasing the range of electrostatic interactions shifts the demixing binodal toward higher polymer concentration, stabilizing the mixture. The enhanced stability is attributed to a weakening of polymer depletion-induced attraction between electrostatically repelling macroions. Comparison with predictions of density-functional theory reveals a corresponding increase in the liquid-vapor interfacial tension. The predicted trends in phase stability are consistent with observed behavior of protein-polysaccharide mixtures in food colloids. PMID:16035820

  6. Large attractive depletion interactions in soft repulsive-sphere binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Mederos, Luis; Navascués, Guillermo; Tani, Alessandro; Velasco, Enrique

    2007-12-01

    We consider binary mixtures of soft repulsive spherical particles and calculate the depletion interaction between two big spheres mediated by the fluid of small spheres, using different theoretical and simulation methods. The validity of the theoretical approach, a virial expansion in terms of the density of the small spheres, is checked against simulation results. Attention is given to the approach toward the hard-sphere limit and to the effect of density and temperature on the strength of the depletion potential. Our results indicate, surprisingly, that even a modest degree of softness in the pair potential governing the direct interactions between the particles may lead to a significantly more attractive total effective potential for the big spheres than in the hard-sphere case. This might lead to significant differences in phase behavior, structure, and dynamics of a binary mixture of soft repulsive spheres. In particular, a perturbative scheme is applied to predict the phase diagram of an effective system of big spheres interacting via depletion forces for a size ratio of small and big spheres of 0.2; this diagram includes the usual fluid-solid transition but, in the soft-sphere case, the metastable fluid-fluid transition, which is probably absent in hard-sphere mixtures, is close to being stable with respect to direct fluid-solid coexistence. From these results, the interesting possibility arises that, for sufficiently soft repulsive particles, this phase transition could become stable. Possible implications for the phase behavior of real colloidal dispersions are discussed. PMID:18067358

  7. Importance of Rhodococcus strains in a bacterial consortium degrading a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives revealed by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Marc D; Yergeau, Etienne; Labbé, Diane; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial consortium (Mix3) composed of microorganisms originating from different environments (soils and wastewater) was obtained after enrichment in the presence of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives. After addition of the mixture, the development of the microbial composition of Mix3 was monitored at three different times (35, 113, and 222 days) using fingerprinting method and dominant bacterial species were identified. In parallel, 14 bacteria were isolated after 113 days and identified. Degradation capacities for Mix3 and the isolated bacterial strains were characterized and compared. At day 113, we induced the expression of catabolic genes in Mix3 by adding the substrate mixture to resting cells and the metatranscriptome was analyzed. After addition of the substrate mixture, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased at day 222 while a shift between Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium was observed after 113 days. Mix3 was able to degrade 13 compounds completely, with partial degradation of isooctane and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, but tert-butyl alcohol was not degraded. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016 isolated from Mix3 showed almost the same degradation capacities as Mix3: these results were not observed with the other isolated strains. Transcriptomic results revealed that Actinobacteria and in particular, Rhodococcus species, were major contributors in terms of total and catabolic gene transcripts while other species were involved in cyclohexane degradation. Not all the microorganisms identified at day 113 were active except R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 that appeared to be a major player in the degradation activity observed in Mix3. PMID:25343979

  8. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heneweer, Marjoke . E-mail: M.Heneweer@iras.uu.nl; Muusse, Martine; Berg, Martin van den; Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 {mu}M). Therefore, instead of using EC{sub 50} values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC{sub 50} value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 {mu}M, 0.5 {mu}M, 1.9 {mu}M, and 1.0 {mu}M for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol

  9. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heneweer, Marjoke; Muusse, Martine; van den Berg, Martin; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 microM). Therefore, instead of using EC50 values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC50 value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 microM, 0.5 microM, 1.9 microM, and 1.0 microM for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol (E2

  10. Additive inhibition of human α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors by mixtures of commonly used drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Hondebrink, Laura; Tan, Sijie; Hermans, Elise; van Kleef, Regina G D M; Meulenbelt, Jan; Westerink, Remco H S

    2013-03-01

    Yearly, exposure to drugs of abuse results in ∼1 million emergency department visits in the US. In ∼50% of the visits, stimulant drugs like cocaine and amphetamine-like substances (e.g. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, the main active ingredient of ecstasy)) are involved, whereas in ∼60% multiple drugs are involved. These drugs induce higher dopamine and serotonin levels resulting in drug-induced toxicity. Since GABA receptors (GABA-R) provide the main inhibitory input on dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons, drug-induced inhibition of GABA-R could contribute to higher neurotransmitter levels and thus toxicity. We therefore investigated the effects of combinations of commonly abused stimulant drugs (cocaine, MDMA, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP)) on the function of the human α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor (hGABAA-R), expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. These drugs concentration-dependently inhibited the GABA-evoked current (mCPP>cocaine>MDMA>MDA). Most drug combinations decreased the GABA-evoked current stronger than the single drug. Additivity was observed during combined exposure to low concentrations of cocaine and mCPP as well as during combined exposure to MDA with cocaine or mCPP. However, combinations containing MDMA mainly resulted in sub-additivity or no additivity. At drug concentrations relevant for clinical toxicology, co-exposure to ≥2 drugs can decrease the GABA-evoked current in an additive manner. Thus, in patients exposed to multiple drugs, inhibitory GABA-ergic input is reduced more prominently, likely resulting in higher brain dopamine levels. As this will increase the risk for drug-induced toxicity, treatment of drug-intoxicated patients with drugs that enhance GABA-ergic input should be further optimized. PMID:23266428

  11. Transitional liquid crystalline phases between the hexagonal and lamellar phases in ternary cesium N-tetradecanoate-water-additive mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.C.; Kilpatrick, P.K. )

    1993-04-01

    The effects of added salt (CsOH, CsCl), long-chain carboxylic acid, and long-chain alcohol on the lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behavior in the cesium n-tetradecanoate (CsTD)-water system is reported. The transitional region between the hexagonal (H) and lamellar (L) phases was the compositional range of focus. Three transitional phases were observed: (i) the ribbon (R) phase, a biaxial phase consisting of cylinders of ellipsoidal cross section; (ii) the viscous isotropic (VI) phase, an isotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on an Ia3d lattice; and (iii) the intermediate (Int) phase, a uniaxial anisotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on a planar lattice. The effect of the additives was to decrease the interfacial curvature of the surfactant head group layer by varying head group repulsion and by varying the surfactant tail volume relative to the surfactant head group area. These changes resulted in formation of transitional phases seeming to possess curvature between that of the cylindrical H phase and the planar L phase. The ionic repulsion between carboxylate head groups was reduced by the addition of CsOH or CsCl, and resulted in destabilization of the VI phase and the formation of the anisotropic Int phase. With the addition of cosurfactants, n-tetradecanoic acid (TDA) and 1-tetradecanol (TDOH), no Int phase was observed. With 7 wt% added TDA the R phase was stabilized up to temperatures of 336 K, above the 330 K temperature limit in the binary CsTD-D[sub 2]O system. In all four systems, sufficient additive (5-10 wt%) resulted in a transition to the L phase, which was stable over a large portion of the compositional range. In order of apparently decreasing mean curvature, the phase sequence is: hexagonal, ribbon, viscous isotropic, intermediate, and lamellar.

  12. Reflected-Shock Ignition of H2-O2-Ar Mixtures with Addition of H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, O.; Deguillaume, F.; Petersen, E. L.

    It is well known that some impurities, even in very low concentration, can induce strong changes in the combustion properties of a fuel. Amongst these impurities, H2S is a common one that can be found in syngas produced from biomass or coal and in natural gases, in addition to being a by-product of the oil industry. Unfortunately, due to both the limited available literature data and the large number of sensitive reactions with significant rate uncertainty [1], the high-temperature chemistry of sulfur species remains poorly understood.

  13. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure and Ultra-High Vacuum Tribological Properties of Ionic Liquids (2) Mixtures and Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Koch, Victor R.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Richard, Ryan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ionic liquids are salts, many of which are typically viscous fluids at room temperature. The fluids are characterized by negligible vapor pressures under ambient conditions. These properties have led us to study the effectiveness of ionic liquids containing both organic cations and anions for use as space lubricants. In the previous paper we have measured the vapor pressure and some tribological properties of two distinct ionic liquids under simulated space conditions. In this paper we will present vapor pressure measurements for two new ionic liquids and friction coefficient data for boundary lubrication conditions in a spiral orbit tribometer using stainless steel tribocouples. In addition we present the first tribological data on mixed ionic liquids and an ionic liquid additive. Post mortem infrared and Raman analysis of the balls and races indicates the major degradation pathway for these two organic ionic liquids is similar to those of other carbon based lubricants, i.e. deterioration of the organic structure into amorphous graphitic carbon. The coefficients of friction and lifetimes of these lubricants are comparable to or exceed these properties for several commonly used space oils.

  14. Reinforcement of acrylic resins for provisional fixed restorations. Part III: effects of addition of titania and zirconia mixtures on some mechanical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Panyayong, W; Oshida, Y; Andres, C J; Barco, T M; Brown, D T; Hovijitra, S

    2002-01-01

    Acrylic resins have been used in many different applications in dentistry, especially in the fabrication of provisional fixed partial dentures. Ideally, a provisional crown and bridge material should be easy to handle and should protect teeth against physical, chemical, and thermal injuries. Some of the problems associated with this use are related to the material's poor mechanical properties. It has been demonstrated that acrylic resin can be strengthened through the addition of structural component of different size distributed in the acrylic matrix, thus forming a composite structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the addition effects of mixtures of titania (titanium dioxide, TiO(2)) powder and zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO(2)) powder being incorporated with pre-polymerized beads mixed in monomer liquid, on some mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin. The pre-polymerized powder poly(methyl methacrylate) resin was admixed with titania and zirconia powder. A mixing ratio was controlled by volume % of 0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 (samples with 0 v/o served as control groups). For using mixture of titania and zirconia, total amount of the mixture was controlled by volume % of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0, in which titania and zirconia were mixed at the ratio 1 :1, 1 :2 and 2 :1. Prior to mechanical tests, all rectangular-shaped samples (25 mm x 2 mm x 5 mm) were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days after polishing all six sides of samples. Samples were then subjected to the three-point bending flexion test to evaluate the bending strength as well as the modulus of elasticity. Weight gain and exothermic reaction survey were investigated as well. All data were collected and analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Sidak method (p=0.05). It was found that the addition of particles generally decreased the water absorbed by the composite system. Only 1 percent by volume concentration of 1 :1 ratio and 2 percent by volume concentration

  15. Crowding in polymer-nanoparticle mixtures.

    PubMed

    Denton, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly crowded environment, filled with a multicomponent, polydisperse mixture of biopolymers and nuclear bodies dispersed in a viscous solvent. With volume fractions approaching 20%, excluded-volume interactions play a key role in determining the structure, dynamics, and function of macromolecules in vivo. Under such constraints, the ensembles of macromolecular conformations can differ substantially from those prevailing in dilute solutions. Crowding thus can affect protein and RNA folding, conformational stability, and reaction kinetics, as well as phase stability of macromolecular mixtures. From the perspective of soft matter physics, this chapter reviews recent studies on crowding in polymer-nanoparticle mixtures, seeking to demonstrate the utility of simple physical models for addressing challenging issues in cell biology. The focus is on applications of free-volume theory and Monte Carlo simulation, based on geometrical models of polymers as fluctuating spheres or ellipsoids. Ideal polymer coils respond to hard-sphere crowding agents by compactifying, reducing their radius of gyration, and becoming more spherical. At sufficiently high concentrations, polymers and crowders phase-separate. The goal of this review is to identify universal principles governing macromolecular crowding and to establish a general framework for future explorations of more realistic models that may include nonsteric (e.g., electrostatic) interactions. PMID:24380592

  16. The Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Addition of Rosemary Extract, Sodium Acetate and Calcium Lactate Mixture on the Quality of Pre-cooked Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Muhlisin; Kang, Sun Moon; Choi, Won Hee; Lee, Keun Taik; Cheong, Sung Hee; Lee, Sung Ki

    2013-01-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 30% CO2+70% N2 or 100% N2) and an additive mixture (500 ppm rosemary extract, 3,000 ppm sodium acetate and 1,500 ppm calcium lactate) on the quality of pre-cooked hamburger patties during storage at 5°C for 14 d was evaluated. The addition of the additive mixture reduced aerobic and anaerobic bacteria counts in both 30% CO2-MAP (30% CO2+70% N2) and 100% N2-MAP (p<0.05). The 30% CO2-MAP was more effective to suppress the microbial growth than 100% N2-MAP, moreover the 30% CO2-MAP combined with additive mixture resulted in the lowest bacterial counts. The hamburger patties with additive mixture showed lower CIE L* and CIE a*, and higher CIE b* than those with no additive mixture. The 30% CO2-MAP tended to decrease the TBARS during storage regardless of the addition of additives. The use of 30% CO2-MAP in combination with additives mixture was effective for maintaining the quality and extending the shelf-life of pre-cooked hamburger patties. PMID:25049716

  17. New approach in direct-simulation of gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Jeng, Duen-Ren

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of a new direct-simulation Monte Carlo method by which energy transfer and chemical reactions are calculated. The new method, which reduces to the variable cross-section hard sphere model as a special case, allows different viscosity-temperature exponents for each species in a gas mixture when combined with a modified Larsen-Borgnakke phenomenological model. This removes the most serious limitation of the usefulness of the model for engineering simulations. The necessary kinetic theory for the application of the new method to mixtures of monatomic or polyatomic gases is presented, including gas mixtures involving chemical reactions. Calculations are made for the relaxation of a diatomic gas mixture, a plane shock wave in a gas mixture, and a chemically reacting gas flow along the stagnation streamline in front of a hypersonic vehicle. Calculated results show that the introduction of different molecular interactions for each species in a gas mixture produces significant differences in comparison with a common molecular interaction for all species in the mixture. This effect should not be neglected for accurate DSMC simulations in an engineering context.

  18. Effect of α-Si3N4 Addition on Sintering of α-Sialon Powder via Carbonthermal Reduction Nitridation of Boron-rich Slag-based Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junbin; Jiang, Tao; Xue, Xiangxin

    2011-10-01

    With boron-rich slag, silica fume, bauxite chalmette, carbon black and α-Si3N4 as starting materials, α-Sialon powders were prepared by carbothermal reduction-nitridation(CRN). Different contents of α-Si3N4 addition were added to investigate the α-Sialon formation as a function of α-Si3N4 addition from boron rich slag based mixture fired at 1480 °C for 8 h under N2 flowing of 0.4 L/min. Phase assembly, microstructure of reaction products were determined by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope. The results showed that the main phases of the samples were a-Sialon, h-BN, AlN and small quantity of SiC. With the increasing amount of the α-Si3N4 addition, the h-BN content remained in a constant and AlN content was running down steadily, while the α-Sialon content increased gradually. The aspect ratio and the amount of elongated α-Sialon grains could be tailored by using different amounts of the α-Si3N4 addition.

  19. Mixtures of l-Amino Acids as Reaction Medium for Formation of Iron Nanoparticles: The Order of Addition into a Ferrous Salt Solution Matters

    PubMed Central

    Šišková, Karolína M.; Machala, Libor; Tuček, Jiři; Kašlík, Josef; Mojzeš, Peter; Zbořil, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Owing to Mössbauer spectroscopy, an advanced characterization technique for iron-containing materials, the present study reveals previously unknown possibilities using l-amino acids for the generation of magnetic particles. Based on our results, a simple choice of the order of l-amino acids addition into a reaction mixture containing ferrous ions leads to either superparamagnetic ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide particles, or magnetically strong Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles after chemical reduction. Conversely, when ferric salts are employed with the addition of selected l-amino acids, only Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles are observed, regardless of the addition order. We explain this phenomenon by a specific transient/intermediate complex formation between Fe2+ and l-glutamic acid. This type of complexation prevents ferrous ions from spontaneous oxidation in solutions with full air access. Moreover, due to surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy we show that the functional groups of l-amino acids are not destroyed during the borohydride-induced reduction. These functionalities can be further exploited for (i) attachment of l-amino acids to the as-prepared magnetic particles, and (ii) for targeted bio- and/or environmental applications where the surface chemistry needs to be tailored and directed toward biocompatible species. PMID:24071943

  20. A computational investigation of the thermodynamics and structure in colloid and polymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahynski, Nathan Alexander

    In this dissertation I use computational tools to study the structure and thermodynamics of colloid-polymer mixtures. I show that fluid-fluid phase separation in mixtures of colloids and linear polymers cannot be universally reduced using polymer-based scaling principles since these assume the binodals exist in a single scaling regime, whereas accurate simulations clearly demonstrate otherwise. I show that rethinking these solutions in terms of multiple length scales is necessary to properly explain the thermodynamic stability and structure of these fluid phases, and produce phase diagrams in nearly quantitative agreement with experimental results. I then extend this work to encompass more geometrically complex "star" polymers revealing how the phase behavior for many of these binary mixtures may be mapped onto that of mixtures containing only linear polymers. I further consider the depletion-driven crystallization of athermal colloidal hard spheres induced by polymers. I demonstrate how the partitioning of a finite amount of polymer into the colloidal crystal phase implies that the polymer's architecture can be tailored to interact with the internal void structure of different crystal polymorphs uniquely, thus providing a direct route to thermodynamically stabilizing one arbitrarily chosen structure over another, e.g., the hexagonal close-packed crystal over the face-centered cubic. I then begin to generalize this result by considering the consequences of thermal interactions and complex polymer architectures. These principles lay the groundwork for intelligently engineering co-solute additives in crystallizing colloidal suspensions that can be used to thermodynamically isolate single crystal morphologies. Finally, I examine the competition between self-assembly and phase separation in polymer-grafted nanoparticle systems by comparing and contrasting the validity of two different models for grafted nanoparticles: "nanoparticle amphiphiles" versus "patchy particles

  1. Thermodynamic properties of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-02-20

    We report on the thermodynamic properties of binary compound mixtures of model groups II–VI semiconductors. We use the recently introduced Stillinger–Weber Hamiltonian to model binary mixtures of CdTe and CdSe. We use molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the volume and enthalpy of mixing as a function of mole fraction. The lattice parameter of the mixture closely follows Vegard's law: a linear relation. This implies that the excess volume is a cubic function of mole fraction. A connection is made with hard sphere models of mixed fcc and zincblende structures. We found that the potential energy exhibits a positive deviation from ideal soluton behaviour; the excess enthalpy is nearly independent of temperatures studied (300 and 533 K) and is well described by a simple cubic function of the mole fraction. Using a regular solution approach (combining non-ideal behaviour for the enthalpy with ideal solution behaviour for the entropy of mixing), we arrive at the Gibbs free energy of the mixture. The Gibbs free energy results indicate that the CdTe and CdSe mixtures exhibit phase separation. The upper consolute temperature is found to be 335 K. Finally, we provide the surface energy as a function of composition. Moreover, it roughly follows ideal solution theory, but with a negative deviation (negative excess surface energy). This indicates that alloying increases the stability, even for nano-particles.

  2. Thermodynamic properties of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-02-20

    We report on the thermodynamic properties of binary compound mixtures of model groups II–VI semiconductors. We use the recently introduced Stillinger–Weber Hamiltonian to model binary mixtures of CdTe and CdSe. We use molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the volume and enthalpy of mixing as a function of mole fraction. The lattice parameter of the mixture closely follows Vegard's law: a linear relation. This implies that the excess volume is a cubic function of mole fraction. A connection is made with hard sphere models of mixed fcc and zincblende structures. We found that the potential energy exhibits a positive deviation frommore » ideal soluton behaviour; the excess enthalpy is nearly independent of temperatures studied (300 and 533 K) and is well described by a simple cubic function of the mole fraction. Using a regular solution approach (combining non-ideal behaviour for the enthalpy with ideal solution behaviour for the entropy of mixing), we arrive at the Gibbs free energy of the mixture. The Gibbs free energy results indicate that the CdTe and CdSe mixtures exhibit phase separation. The upper consolute temperature is found to be 335 K. Finally, we provide the surface energy as a function of composition. Moreover, it roughly follows ideal solution theory, but with a negative deviation (negative excess surface energy). This indicates that alloying increases the stability, even for nano-particles.« less

  3. Wall-fluid and liquid-gas interfaces of model colloid-polymer mixtures by simulation and theory.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Andrea; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Schmidt, Matthias; Wessels, Paul P F

    2005-05-01

    We perform a study of the interfacial properties of a model suspension of hard sphere colloids with diameter sigma(c) and nonadsorbing ideal polymer coils with diameter sigma(p) . For the mixture in contact with a planar hard wall, we obtain from simulations the wall-fluid interfacial free energy, gamma(wf) , for size ratios q =sigma(p)/sigma(c) =0.6 and 1, using thermodynamic integration, and study the (excess) adsorption of colloids, Gamma(c) , and of polymers, Gamma(p) , at the hard wall. The interfacial tension of the free liquid-gas interface, gamma(lg) , is obtained following three different routes in simulations: (i) from studying the system size dependence of the interfacial width according to the predictions of capillary wave theory, (ii) from the probability distribution of the colloid density at coexistence in the grand canonical ensemble, and (iii) for state points where the colloidal liquid wets the wall completely, from Young's equation relating gamma(lg) to the difference of wall-liquid and wall-gas interfacial tensions, gamma(wl)-gamma(wg) . In addition, we calculate gamma(wf) ,Gamma(c) , and Gamma(p) using density functional theory and a scaled particle theory based on free volume theory. Good agreement is found between the simulation results and those from density functional theory, while the results from scaled particle theory quantitatively deviate but reproduce some essential features. Simulation results for gamma(lg) obtained from the three different routes are all in good agreement. Density functional theory predicts gamma(lg) with good accuracy for high polymer reservoir packing fractions, but yields deviations from the simulation results close to the critical point. PMID:16089531

  4. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.; Swol, Frank van

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083–4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer’s enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  5. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives.

    PubMed

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A; van Swol, Frank; Truskett, Thomas M

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083-4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer's enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics. PMID:25833590

  6. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  7. TESTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM ADDITIVITY FOR A 2:1 MIXTURE OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND CARBARYL ON CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN BRAIN, PLASMA, AND RED BLOOD CELLS OF LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detecting and characterizing interactions among chemicals is an important environmental issue. This study was conducted to test for the existence of a significant departure from additivity for a mixture of two cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting pesticides: chlorpyrifos (CPF), an org...

  8. Fuel additives from SO/sub 2/ treated mixtures of amides and esters derived from vegetable oil, tall oil acid, or aralkyl acid

    SciTech Connect

    Efner, H. F.; Schiff, S.

    1985-03-12

    Vegetable oils, particularly soybean oil, tall oil acid, or aralkyl acids, particularly phenylstearic acid, are reacted with multiamines, particularly tetraethylenepentamine, to form a product mixture for subsequent reaction with SO/sub 2/ to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels.

  9. Dose addition models based on biologically-relevant reductions in fetal testosterone accurately predict postnatal reproductive tract alterations by a phthalate mixture in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Challenges in cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic phthalate mixtures include a lack of data on all the individual phthalates and difficulty determining the biological relevance of reduction in fetal testosterone (T) on postnatal development. The objectives of the curren...

  10. Evaluation of additivity of binary mixtures of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARa) activation in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are found globally in the environment and in animal tissues, and are present as mixtures of PFAA congeners. Mechanistic studies have found that in vivo effects of PFAAs are mediated by PPARL. Our previous studies showed that individual PFAAs activate ...

  11. Structure and thermodynamics of a mixture of patchy and spherical colloids: A multi-body association theory with complete reference fluid information.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Artee; Asthagiri, D; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2016-08-21

    A mixture of solvent particles with short-range, directional interactions and solute particles with short-range, isotropic interactions that can bond multiple times is of fundamental interest in understanding liquids and colloidal mixtures. Because of multi-body correlations, predicting the structure and thermodynamics of such systems remains a challenge. Earlier Marshall and Chapman [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104904 (2013)] developed a theory wherein association effects due to interactions multiply the partition function for clustering of particles in a reference hard-sphere system. The multi-body effects are incorporated in the clustering process, which in their work was obtained in the absence of the bulk medium. The bulk solvent effects were then modeled approximately within a second order perturbation approach. However, their approach is inadequate at high densities and for large association strengths. Based on the idea that the clustering of solvent in a defined coordination volume around the solute is related to occupancy statistics in that defined coordination volume, we develop an approach to incorporate the complete information about hard-sphere clustering in a bulk solvent at the density of interest. The occupancy probabilities are obtained from enhanced sampling simulations but we also develop a concise parametric form to model these probabilities using the quasichemical theory of solutions. We show that incorporating the complete reference information results in an approach that can predict the bonding state and thermodynamics of the colloidal solute for a wide range of system conditions. PMID:27544123

  12. Colloidal rod-sphere mixtures: fluid-fluid interfaces and the Onsager limit.

    PubMed

    Brader, Joseph M; Esztermann, Ansgar; Schmidt, Matthias

    2002-09-01

    Using a geometry-based density functional theory we investigate the free interface between demixed bulk fluid phases of a colloidal mixture of hard spheres and vanishingly thin needles. Results are presented for the spatial and orientational density distributions of the particles, as well as for the interface tension. Density profiles display oscillations on the sphere-rich side of the interface provided the sphere liquid phase is on the oscillatory side of the Fisher-Widom line in the bulk phase diagram. Needles tend to align parallel (perpendicular) to the interface on the needle-rich (sphere-rich) side displaying biaxial (uniaxial) order. Furthermore, we generalize the theory to the Onsager limit for interacting rods, and give explicit expressions for the functional in simple geometries. PMID:12366111

  13. Capillary length in a fluid-fluid demixed colloid-polymer mixture.

    PubMed

    Aarts, D G A L

    2005-04-21

    We report measurements of the interfacial profile close to a vertical wall in a fluid-fluid demixed colloid-polymer mixture. The profile is measured by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy. It is accurately described by the interplay between the Laplace and hydrostatic pressure and from this description the capillary length is obtained. For different statepoints approaching the critical point the capillary length varies from 50 to 5 microm. These results are compared to theory. The mass density difference Deltarho is calculated from the bulk phase behavior, which is described within free volume theory with polymers modeled as penetrable hard spheres. The interfacial tension gamma is calculated within a squared gradient approximation. The capillary length is then given through with g equal to the Earth's acceleration. Predictions from theory are in overall qualitative agreement with experiment without the use of any adjustable parameter. PMID:16851848

  14. Recovering Navier–Stokes Equations from Asymptotic Limits of the Boltzmann Gas Mixture Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Bianca; Christian, Dogbe

    2016-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the derivation of macroscopic fluid dynamics from the Boltzmann mesoscopic dynamics of a binary mixture of hard-sphere gas particles. Specifically the hydrodynamics limit is performed by employing different time and space scalings. The paper shows that, depending on the magnitude of the parameters which define the scaling, the macroscopic quantities (number density, mean velocity and local temperature) are solutions of the acoustic equation, the linear incompressible Euler equation and the incompressible Navier–Stokes equation. The derivation is formally tackled by the recent moment method proposed by [C. Bardos, et al., J. Stat. Phys. 63 (1991) 323] and the results generalize the analysis performed in [C. Bianca, et al., Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simulat. 29 (2015) 240].

  15. Mixtures of ions and amphiphilic molecules in slit-like pores: A density functional approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pizio, O.; Rżysko, W. Sokołowski, S.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2015-04-28

    We investigate microscopic structure and thermodynamic properties of a mixture that contains amphiphilic molecules and charged hard spheres confined in slit-like pores with uncharged hard walls. The model and the density functional approach are the same as described in details in our previous work [Pizio et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 174706 (2014)]. Our principal focus is in exploring the effects brought by the presence of ions on the structure of confined amphiphilic particles. We have found that for some cases of anisotropic interactions, the change of the structure of confined fluids occurs via the first-order transitions. Moreover, if anions and cations are attracted by different hemispheres of amphiphiles, a charge at the walls appears at the zero value of the wall electrostatic potential. For a given thermodynamic state, this charge is an oscillating function of the pore width.

  16. Mixture of cholesterol end-capped polyethylene glycol with DSPC liposomal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Soheil

    2015-07-01

    The dynamic of network of self-assembled liposome by end-capped polymer was investigated using dynamic light scattering. The liposome network, physically cross-linked by mixed liposome solutions with three different length scale of cholesterol end-capped polyethylene glycol. The network of liposome is dependent on both the polymer concentration and length scale. In the pure liposome, one motion at low time scale is observed by DLS. In the higher concentration of polymer in liposome, several motion is observed that the fast motion is alpha relaxation and other two slow motion are beta and gamma relaxations. The distance between diffusion coefficient of fast and slow relaxation is increased with increase of length scale of endcapped polymers. The SAXS data is fitted with a Percus-Yevick hard sphere model and it shows that the size of liposome increasing with increase of polymer length scale in the mixture system.

  17. Treatment of a mixture of food color additives (E122, E124 and E129) in different water matrices by UVA and solar photoelectro-Fenton.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdoulaye; Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric

    2015-09-15

    The degradation of 130 mL of mixtures of food azo dyes E122, E124 and E129 has been studied by electro-Fenton (EF) and UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) using a stirred tank reactor with either a boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Pt anode and an air-diffusion cathode. The main oxidant was hydroxyl radical formed at the anode from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between added Fe(2+) and H2O2 generated at the cathode. In sulfate medium, fast decolorization was found for all systems, but the almost total mineralization was more rapidly achieved by PEF with BDD. The performance with a real water matrix was slightly worse, although the removal of total organic load was still as high as 95%. The solar PEF (i.e., SPEF) treatment of dye mixtures using a 2.5 L flow plant with a BDD/air-diffusion cell coupled to a planar solar photoreactor is also reported. Fast decolorization and almost total mineralization was found in the presence of either sulfate, perchlorate, nitrate or a mixture of sulfate + chloride ions. In chloride medium, however, the formation of recalcitrant chloroderivatives decelerated the degradation process. Greater current efficiency and lower specific energy consumption were attained in sulfate medium at lower current density and higher azo dye content. A plausible reaction sequence based on 18 aromatic intermediates identified by GC-MS and 6 short-linear carboxylic acids detected by ion-exclusion HPLC has been proposed. The SPEF process promoted the photodegradation of Fe(III)-oxalate complexes and other undetected products. Sulfate and nitrate ions were always released to the medium. PMID:26057717

  18. A test of the additivity of acute toxicity of binary-metal mixtures of ni with Cd, Cu, and Zn to Daphnia magna, using the inflection point of the concentration-response curves.

    PubMed

    Traudt, Elizabeth M; Ranville, James F; Smith, Samantha A; Meyer, Joseph S

    2016-07-01

    Mixtures of metals are often present in surface waters, leading to toxicity that is difficult to predict. To provide data for development of multimetal toxicity models, Daphnia magna neonates were exposed to individual metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn) and to binary combinations of those metals in standard 48-h lethality tests conducted in US Environmental Protection Agency moderately hard reconstituted water with 3 mg dissolved organic carbon (DOC)/L added as Suwannee River fulvic acid. Toxicity tests were performed with mixtures of Ni and 1) Cd, which is considerably more toxic than Ni; 2) Cu, which is less toxic than Cd but more toxic than Ni; and 3) Zn, which has a toxicity threshold similar to Ni. For each combination of metals in the binary mixtures, the concentration of 1 metal was held constant while the second metal was varied through a series that ranged from nonlethal to lethal concentrations; then the roles of the metals were reversed. Inflection points of the concentration-response curves were compared to test for additivity of toxicity. Sublethal concentrations of Ni caused less-than-additive toxicity with Cd, slightly less-than-additive toxicity with Zn, and greater-than-additive toxicity with Cu. One explanation of these results might be competition among the metals for binding to biological ligands and/or dissolved organic matter. Therefore, models might have to incorporate sometimes competing chemical interactions to accurately predict metal-mixture toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1843-1851. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26681657

  19. Sticky-sphere model for phase separation of mixtures of the eye lens proteins gamma-B and alpha crystallin: non-monotonic dependence on mutual attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, George; Bautista, Maurino; Ross, David; Lindberg, Vern; Shahmohamad, Hossein

    2008-03-01

    We apply a multi-component extension of the Baxter sticky-sphere model to aqueous solutions of the eye lens proteins gamma-B crystallin and alpha crystallin. These mixtures show liquid-liquid phase separation influenced by gamma-B/gamma-B attraction, gamma-B/alpha size disparity and gamma-B/alpha attraction. We examine the dependence of the upper-consolute spinodal temperature surface on gamma-B/alpha attraction, previously found to influence stability. Gamma-B crystallin is modeled with a temperature-dependent stickiness parameter that reproduces both static light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering near its critical point. Alpha crystallin is modeled as a hard sphere. We find that the Barboy-Tenne model shows a non-monotonic dependence of the spinodal temperature surface on gamma-B/alpha attraction that is qualitatively consistent with recent molecular dynamics simulation results. Hard-sphere or very attractive gamma-B/alpha interactions lead to instability, and the spinodal surface shows a minimum in an intermediate range of gamma-B/alpha attraction strength. We examine the nature of the two types of instability.

  20. Molecular thermodynamics of some highly asymmetric liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianzhong

    1998-11-01

    To advance understanding of the thermodynamic properties of complex liquid mixtures, molecular-thermodynamic attention is given to several types of asymmetric mixtures: asphaltene-containing crude oils, water- hydrocarbon mixtures with or without salt, and aqueous saline solutions of proteins and colloids. The phase behavior of these liquid mixtures is important for optimum design of industrial processes including production of petroleum and natural gas, separation of protein mixtures, and synthesis of new materials. The objective is to provide molecular-thermodynamic models for describing thermodynamic properties of these industry-oriented liquid mixtures. Our model for an asphaltene-containing crude oil represents asphaltenes by attractive hard spheres, resins by attractive hard-sphere chains, and all other components by a continuous medium that affects interactions between asphaltene-asphaltene, asphaltene- resin, and resin-resin pairs. We consider explicitly associations between asphaltene and asphaltene, and between asphaltene and resin. Thermodynamic properties are described in the McMillan-Mayer framework using the statistical-associated-fluid theory (SAFT). Our model can semi-quantitatively explain essentially all experimental observations concerning asphaltene precipitation from crude oils. This model has been applied to identify approximately the operating conditions at the onset of asphaltene precipitation, and the amount of precipitation under various petroleum-reservoir conditions. For the prevention of asphaltene precipitation, we recommend the use of amphiphiles that like both asphaltenes and the oil medium, but not the resins. For water-hydrocarbon mixtures with or without salt, we have developed theoretically-based extensions of the Peng-Robinson equation of state by including associations and electrostatic interactions. Illustrative examples show that these extensions are successful for correlating vapor-liquid equilibria for hydrocarbon

  1. Monte Carlo cluster algorithm for fluid phase transitions in highly size-asymmetrical binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Douglas J.; Liu, Jiwen; Luijten, Erik; Wilding, Nigel B.

    2010-11-01

    Highly size-asymmetrical fluid mixtures arise in a variety of physical contexts, notably in suspensions of colloidal particles to which much smaller particles have been added in the form of polymers or nanoparticles. Conventional schemes for simulating models of such systems are hamstrung by the difficulty of relaxing the large species in the presence of the small one. Here we describe how the rejection-free geometrical cluster algorithm of Liu and Luijten [J. Liu and E. Luijten, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 035504 (2004)] can be embedded within a restricted Gibbs ensemble to facilitate efficient and accurate studies of fluid phase behavior of highly size-asymmetrical mixtures. After providing a detailed description of the algorithm, we summarize the bespoke analysis techniques of [Ashton et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074111 (2010)] that permit accurate estimates of coexisting densities and critical-point parameters. We apply our methods to study the liquid-vapor phase diagram of a particular mixture of Lennard-Jones particles having a 10:1 size ratio. As the reservoir volume fraction of small particles is increased in the range of 0%-5%, the critical temperature decreases by approximately 50%, while the critical density drops by some 30%. These trends imply that in our system, adding small particles decreases the net attraction between large particles, a situation that contrasts with hard-sphere mixtures where an attractive depletion force occurs.

  2. Suppression of hydrogenated carbon film deposition and hydrogen isotope retention by nitrogen addition into cold remote H/D and CH4 mixture plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, K.; Notani, M.; Uesugi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2015-08-01

    Control of tritium retention and its removal from the first wall of future fusion devices are one of the most crucial issues for safety and effective use for fuel. Nitrogen addition into remote edge plasmas has been considered and tested as an effective method for suppression of carbon film deposition and reduction of hydrogen isotope absorption in the deposited films. In this paper we have investigated the scavenger effects of nitrogen injected into low temperature D2/CH4 plasmas on hydrogenated carbon film growth using a small helical device. The result of the deposition shows that the key reactive particles with CN and ND(H) bonds to suppression of hydrogenated carbon film growth and hydrogen isotope absorption are much slowly generated compared with hydrocarbon particles such as CD(H)x and C2D(H)x. This may be due to the slow atomic nitrogen diffusion into hydrogenated carbon layer and the chemical equilibrium between nitrogen absorption.

  3. Effect of monomeric and oligomeric sugar osmolytes on DeltaGD, the Gibbs energy of stabilization of the protein at different pH values: is the sum effect of monosaccharide individually additive in a mixture?

    PubMed

    Poddar, Nitesh Kumar; Ansari, Z A; Singh, R K Brojen; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ahmad, Faizan

    2008-12-01

    Thermal denaturation curves of ribonuclease-A were measured by monitoring changes in the far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra in the presence of different concentrations of six sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, raffinose and stachyose) and mixture of monosaccharide constituents of each oligosaccharide at various pH values in the range of 6.0-2.0. These measurements gave values of T(m) (midpoint of denaturation), DeltaH(m) (enthalpy change at T(m)), DeltaC(p) (constant-pressure heat capacity change) under a given solvent condition. Using these values of DeltaH(m), T(m) and DeltaC(p) in appropriate thermodynamic relations, thermodynamic parameters at 25 degrees C, namely, DeltaG(D)(o) (Gibbs energy change), DeltaH(D)(o) (enthalpy change), and DeltaS(D)(o) (entropy change) were determined at a given pH and concentration of each sugar (including its mixture of monosaccharide constituents). Our main conclusions are: (i) each sugar stabilizes the protein in terms of T(m) and DeltaG(D)(o), and this stabilization is under enthalpic control, (ii) the protein stabilization by the oligosaccharide is significantly less than that by the equimolar concentration of the constituent monosaccharides, and (iii) the stabilization by monosaccharides in a mixture is fully additive. Furthermore, measurements of the far- and near-UV CD spectra suggested that secondary and tertiary structures of protein in their native and denatured states are not perturbed on the addition of sugars. PMID:18835508

  4. Kinetic spectrophotometric H-point standard addition method for the simultaneous determination of diloxanide furoate and metronidazole in binary mixtures and biological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Mahmoud Mohamed; Nejem, R.'afat Mahmoud; Shanab, Alaa Mohamed Abu; Shaat, Nahed Talab

    2013-10-01

    Simple, reliable, and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of diloxanide furoate and metronidazole using H-point standard addition method (HPSAM). The method is based on the oxidation rate difference of diloxanide and metronidazole by potassium permanganate in basic medium. A green color has been developed and measured at 610 nm. Different experimental parameters were carefully optimized. The limiting logarithmic and the initial-rate methods were adopted for the construction of the calibration curve of each individual reaction with potassium permanganate. Under the optimum conditions, Beer's law was obeyed in the range of 1.0-20.0 and 5.0-25.0 μg ml-1 for diloxanide furoate and metronidazole, respectively. The detection limits were 0.22 μg ml-1 for diloxanide furoate and 0.83 μg ml-1 for metronidazole. Correlation coefficients of the regression equations were greater than 0.9970 in all cases. The precision of the method was satisfactory; the maximum value of relative standard deviation did not exceed 1.06% (n = 5). The accuracy, expressed as recovery was between 99.4% and 101.4% with relative error of 0.12 and 0.14 for diloxanide furoate and metronidazole, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of both drugs in pharmaceutical dosage forms and human urine samples and compared with alternative HPLC method.

  5. AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-12-08

    The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

  6. Non-equilibrium dynamics of glass-forming liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Díaz, Luis Enrique; Lázaro-Lázaro, Edilio; Olais-Govea, José Manuel; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2014-06-01

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible processes in glass-forming liquids [P. Ramírez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010)] is extended here to multi-component systems. The resulting theory describes the statistical properties of the instantaneous local particle concentration profiles nα(r, t) of species α in terms of the coupled time-evolution equations for the mean value overline{n}_α ({r},t) and for the covariance σ _{α β }({r},{r}^' };t)equiv overline{δ n_α ({r},t)δ n_β ({r}^' },t)} of the fluctuations δ n_α ({r},t) = n_α ({r},t)- overline{n}_α ({r},t). As in the monocomponent case, these two coarse-grained equations involve a local mobility function bα(r, t) for each species, written in terms of the memory function of the two-time correlation function C_{α β }({r},{r}^' };t,t^' }) equiv overline{δ n_α ({r},t)δ n_β ({r}^' },t^' })}. If the system is constrained to remain spatially uniform and subjected to a non-equilibrium preparation protocol described by a given temperature and composition change program T(t) and overline{n}_α (t), these equations predict the irreversible structural relaxation of the partial static structure factors Sαβ(k; t) and of the (collective and self) intermediate scattering functions Fαβ(k, τ; t) and F^S_{α β }(k,τ ;t). We illustrate the applicability of the resulting theory with two examples involving simple model mixtures subjected to an instantaneous temperature quench: an electroneutral binary mixture of equally sized and oppositely charged hard-spheres, and a binary mixture of soft-spheres of moderate size-asymmetry.

  7. The supra-additive hyperactivity caused by an amphetamine-chlordiazepoxide mixture exhibits an inverted-U dose response: negative implications for the use of a model in screening for mood stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michele P; Logue, Sheree F; Dwyer, Jason M; Beyer, Chad E; Majchrowski, Heather; Cai, Zhang; Liu, Zhi; Adedoyin, Adedayo; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon; Comery, Thomas A

    2009-06-01

    One of the few preclinical models used to identify mood stabilizers is an assay in which amphetamine-induced hyperactivity (AMPH) is potentiated by the benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide (CDP), an effect purportedly blocked by mood stabilizers. Our data here challenge this standard interpretation of the AMPH-CDP model. We show that the potentiating effects of AMPH-CDP are not explained by a pharmacokinetic interaction as both drugs have similar brain and plasma exposures whether administered alone or in combination. Of concern, however, we find that combining CDP (1-12 mg/kg) with AMPH (3 mg/kg) results in an inverted-U dose response in outbred CD-1 as well as inbred C57Bl/6N and 129S6 mice (peak hyperactivity at 3 mg/kg CDP+3 mg/kg AMPH). Such an inverted-U dose response complicates interpreting whether a reduction in hyperactivity produced by a mood stabilizer reflects a "blockade" or a "potentiation" of the mixture. In fact, we show that the prototypical mood stabilizer valproic acid augments the effects of CDP on hypolocomotion and anxiolytic-like behavior (increases punished crossings by Swiss-Webster mice in the four-plate test). We argue that these data, in addition to other practical and theoretical concerns surrounding the model, limit the utility of the AMPH-CDP mixture model in drug discovery. PMID:19303035

  8. Tracking three-phase coexistences in binary mixtures of hard plates and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, Roohollah; Moradi, Mahmood; Varga, Szabolcs

    2016-02-01

    The stability of demixing phase transition in binary mixtures of hard plates (with thickness L and diameter D) and hard spheres (with diameter σ) is studied by means of Parsons-Lee theory. The isotropic-isotropic demixing, which is found in mixtures of large spheres and small plates, is very likely to be pre-empted by crystallization. In contrast, the nematic-nematic demixing, which is obtained in mixtures of large plates and small spheres, can be stabilized at low diameter ratios (σ/D) and aspect ratios (L/D). At intermediate values of σ/D, where the sizes of the components are similar, neither the isotropic-isotropic nor the nematic-nematic demixing can be stabilized, but a very strong fractionation takes place between a plate rich nematic and a sphere rich isotropic phases. Our results show that the excluded volume interactions are capable alone to explain the experimental observation of the nematic-nematic demixing, but they fail in the description of isotropic-isotropic one [M. Chen et al., Soft Matter 11, 5775 (2015)].

  9. Shear viscosity for a heated granular binary mixture at low density.

    PubMed

    Montanero, José María; Garzó, Vicente

    2003-02-01

    The shear viscosity for a heated granular binary mixture of smooth hard spheres at low density is analyzed. The mixture is heated by the action of an external driving force (Gaussian thermostat) that exactly compensates for cooling effects associated with the dissipation of collisions. The study is made from the Boltzmann kinetic theory, which is solved by using two complementary approaches. First, a normal solution of the Boltzmann equation via the Chapman-Enskog method is obtained up to first order in the spatial gradients. The mass, heat, and momentum fluxes are determined and the corresponding transport coefficients identified. As in the free cooling case [V. Garzó and J. W. Dufty, Phys. Fluids 14, 1476 (2002)], practical evaluation requires a Sonine polynomial approximation, and here it is mainly illustrated in the case of the shear viscosity. Second, to check the accuracy of the Chapman-Enskog results, the Boltzmann equation is numerically solved by means of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The simulation is performed for a system under uniform shear flow, using the Gaussian thermostat to control inelastic cooling. The comparison shows an excellent agreement between theory and simulation over a wide range of values of the restitution coefficients and the parameters of the mixture (masses, concentrations, and sizes). PMID:12636672

  10. CO2-helium and CO2-neon mixtures at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Mallick, B; Ninet, S; Le Marchand, G; Munsch, P; Datchi, F

    2013-01-28

    The properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide with helium or neon have been investigated as a function of CO(2) concentration and pressure up to 30 GPa at room temperature. The binary phase diagrams of these mixtures are determined over the full range of CO(2) concentrations using visual observations and Raman scattering measurements. Both diagrams are of eutectic type, with a fluid-fluid miscibility gap for CO(2) concentrations in the range [5, 75] mol. % for He and [8, 55] mol. % for Ne, and a complete separation between the two components in the solid phase. The absence of alloys or stoichiometric compounds for these two binary systems is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules of hard sphere mixtures. The Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns of solid CO(2) embedded in He or Ne for various initial concentrations have been measured up to 30 GPa and 12 GPa, respectively. The frequencies of the Raman modes and the volume of solid phase I are identical, within error bars, to those reported for 100% CO(2) samples, thus confirming the total immiscibility of CO(2) with He and Ne in the solid phase. These results demonstrate the possibility to perform high-pressure experiments on solid CO(2) under (quasi-)hydrostatic conditions using He or Ne as pressure transmitting medium. PMID:23387603

  11. Solid-liquid phase equilibrium for binary Lennard-Jones mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, Monica R.; Hall, Carol K.

    1999-06-01

    Solid-liquid phase diagrams are calculated for binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones spheres using Monte Carlo simulation and the Gibbs-Duhem integration technique of Kofke. We calculate solid-liquid phase diagrams for the model Lennard-Jones mixtures: argon-methane, krypton-methane, and argon-krypton, and compare our simulation results with experimental data and with Cottin and Monson's recent cell theory predictions. The Lennard-Jones model simulation results and the cell theory predictions show qualitative agreement with the experimental phase diagrams. One of the mixtures, argon-krypton, has a different phase diagram than its hard-sphere counterpart, suggesting that attractive interactions are an important consideration in determining solid-liquid phase behavior. We then systematically explore Lennard-Jones parameter space to investigate how solid-liquid phase diagrams change as a function of the Lennard-Jones diameter ratio, σ11/σ22, and well-depth ratio, ɛ11/ɛ22. This culminates in an estimate of the boundaries separating the regions of solid solution, azeotrope, and eutectic solid-liquid phase behavior in the space spanned by σ11/σ22 and ɛ11/ɛ22 for the case σ11/σ22<0.85.

  12. Segregation of a binary mixture of granular particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kook-Young

    Kinetic theory for a binary mixture of slightly inelastic particles, based on Maxwellian velocity distribution with corrections due to high density, is used to predict segregation of a binary mixture with species differing in sizes and material densities. The relative mean species velocities indicates segregation for a mixture uniformly agitated under gravity. Molecular dynamics simulations of elastic hard spheres and physical experiments with inelastic spheres in a cylindrical container vibrated at high normalized acceleration support this prediction. An analysis for a non-uniformly agitated mixture under gravity provides a general criterion for segregation. We establish the validity of equipartition assumption in this problem. Then, we introduce kinetic theory for mono-disperse disks with a friction model differentiating sticking and sliding collisions and derive a simple way of incorporating friction into theory with effective normal restitution coefficient. We linearize Revised Enskog Theory for a binary mixture of disks with small differences in sizes and masses. By solving a boundary value problem of the mixture sheared between two bumpy circular cells, we provide experimenters a concrete way of testing the theory. We then compare dense Maxwellian theory, from the first problem, with Revised Enskog Theory to see differences and their consequences on the prediction of segregation. In the absence of temperature gradient, with gravity present, they yield similar predictions. However, in the presence of temperature gradient, with gravity absent, they only agree at high volume fractions. Then, we describe a steady fully-developed flow on a bumpy incline, with a kinetic theory for mono-disperse spheres. We test the theory by attempting to reproduce three features of inclined flows from physical experiments and numerical simulations. On failing this, we describe modifications that may salvage the core of the theory with a few assumptions. A chain theory is

  13. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied. PMID:26651684

  14. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions fr(0 ) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a , the coefficients of restitution αr s, and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions fr(0 ) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and αr s. The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied.

  15. Deviation from additivity in mixture toxicity: relevance of nonlinear dose-response relationships and cell line differences in genotoxicity assays with combinations of chemical mutagens and gamma-radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Werner K; Vamvakas, Spyros; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Schlatter, Josef; Stopper, Helga

    2002-01-01

    not be generalized. Regarding the testing of mixtures for deviation from additive toxicity, the suggested experimental protocol is easily followed by toxicologists. PMID:12634119

  16. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  17. Thermodynamics and phase separation of dense fully-ionized hydrogen-helium fluid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    The free energy of a hydrogen-helium fluid mixture is evaluated for the temperatures and densities appropriate to the deep interior of a giant planet such as Jupiter. The electrons are assumed to be fully pressure-ionized and degenerate. In this regime, an appropriate first approximation to the ionic distribution functions can be found by assuming hard sphere interactions. Corrections to this approximation are incorporated by means of the perturbation theory of Anderson and Chandler. Approximations for the three-body interactions and the nonlinear response of the electron gas to the ions are included. It is predicted that a hydrogen-helium mixture, containing 10% by number of helium ions, separates into hydrogen-rich and helium-rich phases below about 8000 K, at the pressures relevant to Jupiter (4-40 Megabars). It is also predicted that the alloy occupies less volume per ion than the separated phases. The equations of state and other thermodynamic derivatives are tabulated. Implications of these results are discussed.

  18. Polymer-Induced Depletion Interaction and Its Effect on Colloidal Sedimentation in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Penger

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the polymer-induced depletion attraction and its effect on colloidal sedimentation in colloid-polymer mixtures. We first report a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the depletion effect in a mixture of hard-sphere-like colloid and non-adsorbing polymer. Then we present results of our recent sedimentation measurements in the same colloid-polymer mixture. A key parameter in controlling the sedimentation of heavy colloidal particles is the interparticle potential U(tau), which is the work required to bring two colloidal particles from infinity to a distance tau under a give solvent condition. This potential is known to affect the average settling velocity of the particles and experimentally one needs to have a way to continuously vary U(tau) in order to test the theory. The interaction potential U(tau) can be altered by adding polymer molecules into the colloidal suspension. In a mixture of colloid and non-adsorbing polymer, the potential U(tau) can develop an attractive well because of the depletion effect, in that the polymer chains are expelled from the region between two colloidal particles when their surface separation becomes smaller than the size of the polymer chains. The exclusion of polymer molecules from the space between the colloidal particles leads to an unbalanced osmotic pressure difference pushing the colloidal particles together, which results in an effective attraction between the two colloidal particles. The polymer-induced depletion attraction controls the phase stability of many colloid-polymer mixtures, which are directly of interest to industry.

  19. On a modified Monte-Carlo method and variable soft sphere model for rarefied binary gas mixture flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourazar, S. S.; Jahangiri, P.; Aboutalebi, A.; Ganjaei, A. A.; Nourazar, M.; Khadem, J.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of new terms in the improved algorithm, the modified direct simulation Monte-Carlo (MDSMC) method, is investigated by simulating a rarefied binary gas mixture flow inside a rotating cylinder. Dalton law for the partial pressures contributed by each species of the binary gas mixture is incorporated into our simulation using the MDSMC method and the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method. Moreover, the effect of the exponent of the cosine of deflection angle (α) in the inter-molecular collision models, the variable soft sphere (VSS) and the variable hard sphere (VHS), is investigated in our simulation. The improvement of the results of simulation is pronounced using the MDSMC method when compared with the results of the DSMC method. The results of simulation using the VSS model show some improvements on the result of simulation for the mixture temperature at radial distances close to the cylinder wall where the temperature reaches the maximum value when compared with the results using the VHS model.

  20. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Feron, V J; Groten, J P

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures have gradually substituted trial-and-error approaches, improving the insight into the testability of joint action and interaction of constituents of mixtures. The acquired knowledge has successfully been used to evaluate the safety of combined exposures and complex mixtures such as, for example, the atmosphere at hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavouring complexes, and the combined intake of food additives. To consolidate the scientific foundation of mixture toxicology, studies are in progress to revisit the biological concepts and mathematics underlying formulas for low-dose extrapolation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Conspicuous developments include the production of new computer programs applicable to mixture research (CombiTool, BioMol, Reaction Network Modelling), the application of functional genomics and proteomics to mixture studies, the use of nano-optochemical sensors for in vivo imaging of physiological processes in cells, and the application of optical sensor micro- and nano-arrays for complex sample analysis. Clearly, the input of theoretical biologists, biomathematicians and bioengineers in mixture toxicology is essential for the development of this challenging branch of toxicology into a scientific subdiscipline of full value. PMID:11983277

  1. Mixture design and multivariate analysis in mixture research.

    PubMed Central

    Eide, I; Johnsen, H G

    1998-01-01

    Mixture design has been used to identify possible interactions between mutagens in a mixture. In this paper the use of mixture design in multidimensional isobolographic studies is introduced. Mutagenicity of individual nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated is an organic extract of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). After replacing DCM with dimethyl sulfoxide, the extract was spiked with three individual nitro-PAH: 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. The nitro-PAH were added separately and in various combinations to the extract to determine the effects of each variable and to identify possible interactions between the individual nitro-PAH and between the nitro-PAH and the extract. The composition of the mixtures was determined by mixture design (linear axial normal) with four variables (the DEP extract and the three nitro-PAH, giving 8 different mixtures plus a triplicate centerpoint, i.e., a total of 11. The design supports a model with linear and interaction (product) terms. Two different approaches were used: traditional mixture design within a well-defined range on the linear part of the dose-response curves and an isobolographic mixture design with equipotent doses of each variable. The mixtures were tested for mutagenicity in the Ames assay using the TA98 strain of Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed with projections to latent structures (PLS). The three individual nitro-PAH and the DEP extract acted additively in the Ames test. The use of mixture design either within a well-defined range of the linear part on the dose-response curve or with equipotent doses saves experiments and reduces the possibility of false interaction terms in situations with dose additivity or response additivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9860895

  2. Mixture design and multivariate analysis in mixture research.

    PubMed

    Eide, I; Johnsen, H G

    1998-12-01

    Mixture design has been used to identify possible interactions between mutagens in a mixture. In this paper the use of mixture design in multidimensional isobolographic studies is introduced. Mutagenicity of individual nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated is an organic extract of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). After replacing DCM with dimethyl sulfoxide, the extract was spiked with three individual nitro-PAH: 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. The nitro-PAH were added separately and in various combinations to the extract to determine the effects of each variable and to identify possible interactions between the individual nitro-PAH and between the nitro-PAH and the extract. The composition of the mixtures was determined by mixture design (linear axial normal) with four variables (the DEP extract and the three nitro-PAH, giving 8 different mixtures plus a triplicate centerpoint, i.e., a total of 11. The design supports a model with linear and interaction (product) terms. Two different approaches were used: traditional mixture design within a well-defined range on the linear part of the dose-response curves and an isobolographic mixture design with equipotent doses of each variable. The mixtures were tested for mutagenicity in the Ames assay using the TA98 strain of Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed with projections to latent structures (PLS). The three individual nitro-PAH and the DEP extract acted additively in the Ames test. The use of mixture design either within a well-defined range of the linear part on the dose-response curve or with equipotent doses saves experiments and reduces the possibility of false interaction terms in situations with dose additivity or response additivity. PMID:9860895

  3. Influence of a random field on particle fractionation and solidification in liquid-crystal colloid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa-Nita, V.; van der Schoot, P.; Kralj, S.

    2006-11-01

    The influence of a random-anisotropy (RA) type disorder on the phase separation of nematogen-colloid mixtures is studied theoretically by combining the phenomenological Landau-de Gennes, Carnahan-Starling, and hard-sphere crystal theories. We assume that the colloids enforce the RA disorder on the surrounding thermotropic liquid-crystal (LC) molecules. We adopt the Imry-Ma argument according to which the lower-temperature phase exhibits a domain-type pattern. The colloids impose a finite degree of orientational ordering even in the isotropic (paranematic) phase. In the ordered phase they give rise to a domain-type structure, resulting in the distorted nematic (speronematic) phase. The RA field opposes the phase separation tendency. With increasing disorder the difference between the paranematic and speronematic ordering decreases. Consequently there is a critical disorder, above which both phases become identical from the orientation point of view, but have different concentrations of colloids. We have also estimated another characteristic value of disorder above which the isotropic phase can exist only in a liquid state, the crystal phase being suppressed completely.

  4. Non-equilibrium dynamics of glass-forming liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Díaz, Luis Enrique; Lázaro-Lázaro, Edilio; Olais-Govea, José Manuel; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2014-06-21

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible processes in glass-forming liquids [P. Ramírez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010)] is extended here to multi-component systems. The resulting theory describes the statistical properties of the instantaneous local particle concentration profiles n{sub α}(r, t) of species α in terms of the coupled time-evolution equations for the mean value n{sup ¯}{sub α}(r,t) and for the covariance σ{sub αβ}(r,r{sup ′};t)≡δn{sub α}(r,t)δn{sub β}(r{sup ′},t){sup ¯} of the fluctuations δn{sub α}(r,t)=n{sub α}(r,t)−n{sup ¯}{sub α}(r,t). As in the monocomponent case, these two coarse-grained equations involve a local mobility function b{sub α}(r, t) for each species, written in terms of the memory function of the two-time correlation function C{sub αβ}(r,r{sup ′};t,t{sup ′})≡δn{sub α}(r,t)δn{sub β}(r{sup ′},t{sup ′}){sup ¯}. If the system is constrained to remain spatially uniform and subjected to a non-equilibrium preparation protocol described by a given temperature and composition change program T(t) and n{sup ¯}{sub α}(t), these equations predict the irreversible structural relaxation of the partial static structure factors S{sub αβ}(k; t) and of the (collective and self) intermediate scattering functions F{sub αβ}(k, τ; t) and F{sub αβ}{sup S}(k,τ;t). We illustrate the applicability of the resulting theory with two examples involving simple model mixtures subjected to an instantaneous temperature quench: an electroneutral binary mixture of equally sized and oppositely charged hard-spheres, and a binary mixture of soft-spheres of moderate size-asymmetry.

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  6. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  7. Phase behavior of colloidal dimers and hydrodynamic instabilities in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinkovic, K.

    2013-05-01

    We use computer simulations to study colloidal suspensions comprised of either bidisperse spherical particles or monodisperse dimer particles. The two main simulation techniques employed are a hybrid between molecular dynamics and stochastic rotation dynamics (MD-SRD), and a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm. MD-SRD allows us to take Brownian motion and hydrodynamic interactions into account, while we use MC simulations to study equilibrium phase behavior. The first part of this thesis is dedicated to studying the Rayleigh-Taylor-like hydrodynamic instabilities which form in binary colloidal mixtures. Configurations with initially inhomogeneous distributions of colloidal species let to sediment in confinement will undergo the instability, and here we have studied the formation, evolution and the structural organization of the colloids within the instability as a function of the properties of the binary mixture. We found that the distribution of the colloids within the instability does not depend significantly on the composition of the mixtures, but does depend greatly on the relative magnitudes of the particle Peclet numbers. To follow the time evolution of the instability formation we calculated the spatial colloid velocity correlation functions, observing alternating regions in which the particle sedimentation velocities are correlated and anticorrelated. These observations are consistent with the network-like structures which are characteristic for Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We also calculated the growth rates of the unstable modes both from our simulation data and theoretically, finding good agreement between the obtained results. The second part of this thesis focuses on the phase behavior of monodisperse dimer systems. We first studied the phase behavior of hard snowman-shaped particles which consist of tangential hard spheres with different diameters. We used Monte Carlo simulations and free energy calculations to obtain the phase diagram as a function of the

  8. The Boltzmann Equation for a Multi-species Mixture Close to Global Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briant, Marc; Daus, Esther S.

    2016-07-01

    We study the Cauchy theory for a multi-species mixture, where the different species can have different masses, in a perturbative setting on the three dimensional torus. The ultimate aim of this work is to obtain the existence, uniqueness and exponential trend to equilibrium of solutions to the multi-species Boltzmann equation in {L^1_vL^∞_x(m)} , where {m˜ (1+ |v|^k)} is a polynomial weight. We prove the existence of a spectral gap for the linear multi-species Boltzmann operator allowing different masses, and then we establish a semigroup property thanks to a new explicit coercive estimate for the Boltzmann operator. Then we develop an {L^2-L^E&infty}; theory à la Guo for the linear perturbed equation. Finally, we combine the latter results with a decomposition of the multi-species Boltzmann equation in order to deal with the full equation. We emphasize that dealing with different masses induces a loss of symmetry in the Boltzmann operator which prevents the direct adaptation of standard mono-species methods (for example Carleman representation, Povzner inequality). Of important note is the fact that all methods used and developed in this work are constructive. Moreover, they do not require any Sobolev regularity and the {L^1_vL^∞_x} framework is dealt with for any {k > k_0} , recovering the optimal physical threshold of finite energy {k_0=2} in the particular case of a multi-species hard spheres mixture with the same masses.

  9. Phase behavior and structure of model colloid-polymer mixtures confined between two parallel planar walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2006-05-01

    Using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory we investigate the fluid-fluid demixing transition in inhomogeneous colloid-polymer mixtures confined between two parallel plates with separation distances between one and ten colloid diameters covering the complete range from quasi-two-dimensional to bulklike behavior. We use the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij model in which colloid-colloid and colloid-polymer interactions are hard-sphere like, while the pair potential between polymers vanishes. Two different types of confinement induced by a pair of parallel walls are considered—namely, either through two hard walls or through two semipermeable walls that repel colloids but allow polymers to freely penetrate. For hard (semipermeable) walls we find that the capillary binodal is shifted towards higher (lower) polymer fugacities and lower (higher) colloid fugacities as compared to the bulk binodal; this implies capillary condensation (evaporation) of the colloidal liquid phase in the slit. A macroscopic treatment is provided by a symmetric Kelvin equation for general binary mixtures based on the proximity in chemical potentials of statepoints at capillary coexistence and the reference bulk coexistence. Results for capillary binodals compare well with those obtained from the classic version of the Kelvin equation due to [Evans and Marini Bettolo Marconi, J. Chem. Phys. 86, 7138 (1987)] and are quantitatively accurate away from the fluid-fluid critical point, even at small wall separations. However, the significant shift of the critical polymer fugacity towards higher values upon increasing confinement, as found in simulations, is not reproduced. For hard walls the density profiles of polymers and colloids inside the slit display oscillations due to packing effects for all statepoints. For semipermeable walls either similar structuring or flat profiles are found, depending on the statepoint considered.

  10. Deciding which chemical mixtures risk assessment methods work best for what mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Teuschler, Linda K.

    2007-09-01

    The most commonly used chemical mixtures risk assessment methods involve simple notions of additivity and toxicological similarity. Newer methods are emerging in response to the complexities of chemical mixture exposures and effects. Factors based on both science and policy drive decisions regarding whether to conduct a chemical mixtures risk assessment and, if so, which methods to employ. Scientific considerations are based on positive evidence of joint toxic action, elevated human exposure conditions or the potential for significant impacts on human health. Policy issues include legislative drivers that may mandate action even though adequate toxicity data on a specific mixture may not be available and risk assessment goals that impact the choice of risk assessment method to obtain the amount of health protection desired. This paper discusses three important concepts used to choose among available approaches for conducting a chemical mixtures risk assessment: (1) additive joint toxic action of mixture components; (2) toxicological interactions of mixture components; and (3) chemical composition of complex mixtures. It is proposed that scientific support for basic assumptions used in chemical mixtures risk assessment should be developed by expert panels, risk assessment methods experts, and laboratory toxicologists. This is imperative to further develop and refine quantitative methods and provide guidance on their appropriate applications. Risk assessors need scientific support for chemical mixtures risk assessment methods in the form of toxicological data on joint toxic action for high priority mixtures, statistical methods for analyzing dose-response for mixtures, and toxicological and statistical criteria for determining sufficient similarity of complex mixtures.

  11. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  12. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  13. Mixture distributions in human genetics research.

    PubMed

    Schork, N J; Allison, D B; Thiel, B

    1996-06-01

    The use of mixture distributions in genetics research dates back to at least the late 1800s when Karl Pearson applied them in an analysis of crab morphometry. Pearson's use of normal mixture distributions to model the mixing of different species of crab (or 'families' of crab as he referred to them) within a defined geographic area motivated further use of mixture distributions in genetics research settings, and ultimately led to their development and recognition as intuitive modelling devices for the effects of underlying genes on quantitative phenotypic (i.e. trait) expression. In addition, mixture distributions are now used routinely to model or accommodate the genetic heterogeneity thought to underlie many human diseases. Specific applications of mixture distribution models in contemporary human genetics research are, in fact, too numerous to count. Despite this long, consistent and arguably illustrious history of use, little mention of mixture distributions in genetics research is made in many recent reviews on mixture models. This review attempts to rectify this by providing insight into the role that mixture distributions play in contemporary human genetics research. Tables providing examples from the literature that describe applications of mixture models in human genetics research are offered as a way of acquainting the interested reader with relevant studies. In addition, some of the more problematic aspects of the use of mixture models in genetics research are outlined and addressed. PMID:8817796

  14. RENAL CANCER STUDIES OF DRINKING WATER MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological response. A rodent model of hereditary renal cancer (Eker rat) was used to evaluate the carcinogenicity of a mixture of DBPs...

  15. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  16. Periodic and Aperiodic Close Packing: A Spontaneous Hard-Sphere Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Waal, B. W.

    1985-01-01

    Shows how to make close-packed models from balloons and table tennis balls to illustrate structural features of clusters and organometallic cluster-compounds (which are of great interest in the study of chemical reactions). These models provide a very inexpensive and tactile illustration of the organization of matter for concrete operational…

  17. Hypersonic acoustic excitations in binary colloidal crystals: big versus small hard sphere control.

    PubMed

    Tommaseo, G; Petekidis, G; Steffen, W; Fytas, G; Schofield, A B; Stefanou, N

    2007-01-01

    The phononic band structure of two binary colloidal crystals, at hypersonic frequencies, is studied by means of Brillouin light scattering and analyzed in conjunction with corresponding dispersion diagrams of the single colloidal crystals of the constituent particles. Besides the acoustic band of the average medium, the authors' results show the existence of narrow bands originating from resonant multipole modes of the individual particles as well as Bragg-type modes due to the (short-range) periodicity. Strong interaction, leading to the occurrence of hybridization gaps, is observed between the acoustic band and the band of quadrupole modes of the particles that occupy the largest fractional volume of the mixed crystal; the effective radius is either that of the large (in the symmetric NaCl-type crystalline phase) or the small (in the asymmetric NaZn(13)-type crystalline phase) particles. The possibility to reveal a universal behavior of the phononic band structure for different single and binary colloidal crystalline suspensions, by representing in the dispersion diagrams reduced quantities using an appropriate length scale, is discussed. PMID:17212511

  18. Equations of state of freely jointed hard-sphere chain fluids: Numerical results

    SciTech Connect

    Stell, G.; Lin, C.; Kalyuzhnyi, Y.V.

    1999-03-01

    We continue our series of studies in which the equations of state (EOS) are derived based on the product-reactant Ornstein{endash}Zernike approach (PROZA) and first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1). These include two compressibility EOS, two virial EOS, and one TPT1 EOS (TPT1-D) that uses the structural information of the dimer fluid as input. In this study, we carry out the numerical implementation for these five EOS and compare their numerical results as well as those obtained from Attard{close_quote}s EOS and GF-D (generalized Flory-dimer) EOS with computer simulation results for the corresponding chain models over a wide range of densities and chain length. The comparison shows that our compressibility EOS, GF-D, and TPT1-D are in quantitative agreement with simulation results, and TPT1-D is the best among various EOS according to its average absolute deviation (AAD). On the basis of a comparison of limited data, our virial EOS appears to be superior to the predictions of Attard{close_quote}s approximate virial EOS and the approximate virial EOS derived by Schweizer and Curro in the context of the PRISM approach; all of them are only qualitatively accurate. The degree of accuracy predicted by our compressibility EOS is comparable to that of GF-D EOS, and both of them overestimate the compressibility factor at low densities and underestimate it at high densities. The compressibility factor of a polydisperse homonuclear chain system is also investigated in this work via our compressibility EOS; the numerical results are identical to those of a monodisperse system with the same chain length. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Relaxation rates for inverse power law particle interactions and their variable hard sphere surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that collision models based on an assumed intermolecular potential (IPL, LJ, ...) can be successfully replaced by simplified surrogates (VHS, VSS, VS, ...) in DSMC calculations. But these surrogates only reproduce certain gross properties of the molecular model, for example, the temperature dependence of the viscosity; they do not approximate, and even mis-state, the details of the particle interactions. The success of the simplified models in problems at finite Knudsen number, where the Navier-Stokes approximation is not valid, may therefore seem surprising. To understand this success in a very special case, we showed that the first seven relaxation rates of the linearized Boltzmann equation for Maxwellian molecules are well approximated by the corresponding relaxation rates of its VHS surrogate. We will show that this analysis can be extended in somewhat less generality to IPL interactions, and to some extent to more realistic models including LJ. We believe that this analysis can help address the more general problem of identifying the properties of the collision model that dominate the predictions of the Boltzmann equation.

  20. Diffuse interface analysis of crystal nucleation in hard-sphere liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gránásy, László; Pusztai, Tamás

    2002-12-01

    We show that the increase of the interface free energy with deviation from equilibrium seen in recent Monte Carlo simulations [S. Auer and D. Frenkel, Nature (London) 413, 711 (2001)] can be recovered if the molecular scale diffuseness of the crystal-liquid interface is considered. We compare two models, Gránásy's phenomenological diffuse interface theory, and a density functional theory that relies on the type of Ginzburg-Landau expansion for fcc nucleation, that Shih et al. introduced for bcc crystal. It is shown that, in the range of Monte Carlo simulations, the nucleation rate of the stable fcc phase is by several orders of magnitude higher than for the metastable bcc phase, seen to nucleate first in other fcc systems. The nucleation barrier that the diffuse interface theories predict for small deviations from equilibrium is in far better agreement with the simulations than the classical droplet model. The behavior expected at high densities is model dependent. Gránásy's phenomenological diffuse interface theory indicates a spinodal point close to glass transition, while a nonsingular behavior is predicted by the density functional theory with constant Ginzburg-Landau coefficients. Remarkably, a minimum of the nucleation barrier, similar to the one seen in polydisperse systems, occurs if the known density dependence of the Ginzburg-Landau coefficients is considered.

  1. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  2. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  3. Near azeotropic mixture substitute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture consisting of a first mole fraction of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124), CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b) and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a).

  4. Time-dependence in mixture toxicity prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Douglas A.; Allen, Erin M.G.; Allen, Joshua L.; Baumann, Hannah J.; Bensinger, Heather M.; Genco, Nicole; Guinn, Daphne; Hull, Michael W.; Il'Giovine, Zachary J.; Kaminski, Chelsea M.; Peyton, Jennifer R.; Schultz, T. Wayne; Pöch, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    The value of time-dependent toxicity (TDT) data in predicting mixture toxicity was examined. Single chemical (A and B) and mixture (A + B) toxicity tests using Microtox® were conducted with inhibition of bioluminescence (Vibrio fischeri) being quantified after 15, 30 and 45-min of exposure. Single chemical and mixture tests for 25 sham (A1:A2) and 125 true (A:B) combinations had a minimum of seven duplicated concentrations with a duplicated control treatment for each test. Concentration/response (x/y) data were fitted to sigmoid curves using the five-parameter logistic minus one parameter (5PL-1P) function, from which slope, EC25, EC50, EC75, asymmetry, maximum effect, and r2 values were obtained for each chemical and mixture at each exposure duration. Toxicity data were used to calculate percentage-based TDT values for each individual chemical and mixture of each combination. Predicted TDT values for each mixture were calculated by averaging the TDT values of the individual components and regressed against the observed TDT values obtained in testing, resulting in strong correlations for both sham (r2 = 0.989, n = 25) and true mixtures (r2 = 0.944, n = 125). Additionally, regression analyses confirmed that observed mixture TDT values calculated for the 50% effect level were somewhat better correlated with predicted mixture TDT values than at the 25 and 75% effect levels. Single chemical and mixture TDT values were classified into five levels in order to discern trends. The results suggested that the ability to predict mixture TDT by averaging the TDT of the single agents was modestly reduced when one agent of the combination had a positive TDT value and the other had a minimal or negative TDT value. PMID:25446331

  5. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  6. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  7. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  8. Kinematic separation of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldshtik, M.; Husain, H.S.; Hussain, F. )

    1992-06-15

    A phenomenon of spontaneous separation of components in an initially uniform fluid mixture is found experimentally. A qualitative explanation of the effect is proposed in terms of nonparallel streamlines in the medium.

  9. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  10. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  11. Fluid-fluid coexistence in an athermal colloid-polymer mixture: thermodynamic perturbation theory and continuum molecular-dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jover, Julio; Galindo, Amparo; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A.; Haslam, Andrew J.

    2015-09-01

    Using both theory and continuum simulation, we examine a system comprising a mixture of polymer chains formed from 100 hard-sphere (HS) segments and HS colloids with a diameter which is 20 times that of the polymer segments. According to Wertheim's first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1) this athermal system is expected to phase separate into a colloid-rich and a polymer-rich phase. Using a previously developed continuous pseudo-HS potential [J. F. Jover, A. J. Haslam, A. Galindo, G. Jackson, and E. A. Muller, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 144505 (2012)], we simulate the system at a phase point indicated by the theory to be well within the two-phase binodal region. Molecular-dynamics simulations are performed from starting configurations corresponding to completely phase-separated and completely pre-mixed colloids and polymers. Clear evidence is seen of the stabilisation of two coexisting fluid phases in both cases. An analysis of the interfacial tension of the phase-separated regions is made; ultra-low tensions are observed in line with previous values determined with square-gradient theory and experiment for colloid-polymer systems. Further simulations are carried out to examine the nature of these coexisting phases, taking as input the densities and compositions calculated using TPT1 (and corresponding to the peaks in the probability distribution of the density profiles obtained in the simulations). The polymer chains are seen to be fully penetrable by other polymers. By contrast, from the point of view of the colloids, the polymers behave (on average) as almost-impenetrable spheres. It is demonstrated that, while the average interaction between the polymer molecules in the polymer-rich phase is (as expected) soft-repulsive in nature, the corresponding interaction in the colloid-rich phase is of an entirely different form, characterised by a region of effective intermolecular attraction.

  12. Accurate coarse-grained models for mixtures of colloids and linear polymers under good-solvent conditions

    SciTech Connect

    D’Adamo, Giuseppe; Pelissetto, Andrea; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2014-12-28

    A coarse-graining strategy, previously developed for polymer solutions, is extended here to mixtures of linear polymers and hard-sphere colloids. In this approach, groups of monomers are mapped onto a single pseudoatom (a blob) and the effective blob-blob interactions are obtained by requiring the model to reproduce some large-scale structural properties in the zero-density limit. We show that an accurate parametrization of the polymer-colloid interactions is obtained by simply introducing pair potentials between blobs and colloids. For the coarse-grained (CG) model in which polymers are modelled as four-blob chains (tetramers), the pair potentials are determined by means of the iterative Boltzmann inversion scheme, taking full-monomer (FM) pair correlation functions at zero-density as targets. For a larger number n of blobs, pair potentials are determined by using a simple transferability assumption based on the polymer self-similarity. We validate the model by comparing its predictions with full-monomer results for the interfacial properties of polymer solutions in the presence of a single colloid and for thermodynamic and structural properties in the homogeneous phase at finite polymer and colloid density. The tetramer model is quite accurate for q ≲ 1 (q=R{sup ^}{sub g}/R{sub c}, where R{sup ^}{sub g} is the zero-density polymer radius of gyration and R{sub c} is the colloid radius) and reasonably good also for q = 2. For q = 2, an accurate coarse-grained description is obtained by using the n = 10 blob model. We also compare our results with those obtained by using single-blob models with state-dependent potentials.

  13. Mixture risk assessment: a case study of Monsanto experiences.

    PubMed

    Nair, R S; Dudek, B R; Grothe, D R; Johannsen, F R; Lamb, I C; Martens, M A; Sherman, J H; Stevens, M W

    1996-01-01

    Monsanto employs several pragmatic approaches for evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. These approaches are similar to those recommended by many national and international agencies. When conducting hazard and risk assessments, priority is always given to using data collected directly on the mixture of concern. To provide an example of the first tier of evaluation, actual data on acute respiratory irritation studies on mixtures were evaluated to determine whether the principle of additivity was applicable to the mixture evaluated. If actual data on the mixture are unavailable, extrapolation across similar mixtures is considered. Because many formulations are quite similar in composition, the toxicity data from one mixture can be extended to a closely related mixture in a scientifically justifiable manner. An example of a family of products where such extrapolations have been made is presented to exemplify this second approach. Lastly, if data on similar mixtures are unavailable, data on component fractions are used to predict the toxicity of the mixture. In this third approach, process knowledge and scientific judgement are used to determine how the known toxicological properties of the individual fractions affect toxicity of the mixture. Three examples of plant effluents where toxicological data on fractions were used to predict the toxicity of the mixture are discussed. The results of the analysis are used to discuss the predictive value of each of the above mentioned toxicological approaches for evaluating chemical mixtures. PMID:9119327

  14. Size segregation in dense, dry, inclined flows of binary granular mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larcher, Michele; Jenkins, James T.

    2013-04-01

    the simulation are not so small, we expect qualitative, rather than quantitative, agreement. A more complicated segregation theory is expected to provide improved results, but at the cost of the loss of transparency the present theory provides. References: 1. J. M. N. T. Gray & C. Ancey, "Multi-component particle-size segregation in shallow granular avalanches," J. Fluid Mech. 678, 535-588 (2011). 2. V. Garzo & J. W. Dufty, "Dense fluid transport for inelastic hard spheres," Phys. Rev. E 59, 5895-5911 (1999). 3. J. T. Jenkins & D. Berzi, "Dense inclined flows of inelastic spheres: Tests of an extension of kinetic theory," Gran. Mat. 12, 151-158 (2010). 4. J. T. Jenkins, J. T. & C. Zhang, "Kinetic theory for identical, frictional, nearly elastic spheres", Phys. Fluids 14, 12281235 (2002). 5. B. Ö. Arnarson & J. T. Jenkins, "Binary mixtures of inelastic spheres: simplified constitutive theory," Phys. Fluids 16, 4543-4550 (2004). 6. A.Tripathi & D. V. Khakhar, "Rheology of binary mixtures in the dense flow regime," Phys. Fluids 23, 113302 (2011).

  15. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Petra Y; Fent, Karl

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hERalpha agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 beta estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hERalpha agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hERalpha agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products. PMID:17027055

  16. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Petra Y. . E-mail: petra.kunz@fhnw.ch; Fent, Karl . E-mail: karl.fent@bluewin.ch

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hER{alpha} agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER{alpha}). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 {beta} estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (Canada) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hER{alpha} agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hER{alpha} agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products.

  17. Structure of multi-component/multi-Yukawa mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L.; Arias, M.

    2006-09-01

    \\begin{equation} \\fl 2 \\pi \\tilde{g}_{ij}(s)=-\\frac{\\rme^{-s \\sigma_{ij}}}{D_{\\tau}(s)} \\left\\{{1\\over s^2}+{1\\over s}Q^{\\prime}_{ij}(\\sigma_{ij})+\\sum_{m=1}^{M}{{ z_m \\tilde{\\cal{X}}}_i^{(m)}{f}_j^{(m)}\\over{s+z_m}}\\right\\}. \\label{eq2} \\end{equation} This function is also easily transformed into S(k) by replacing s\\Rightarrow \\rmi k . For low density situations (dilute colloids) D_{\\tau } (s)\\sim 1+{\\cal {O}(\\rho)} and S(k) is a sum of M Lorentzians. For hard sphere PY mixtures we get the simple (compare Lebowitz 1964 Phys. Rev. 133 A895 and Blum and Stell 1979 J. Chem. Phys. 71 42) \\[ 2 \\pi \\tilde{g}_{ij}(s)=-\\frac{\\rme^{-s \\sigma_{ij}}}{s^2 D_{\\tau}(s)} \\left\\{1+s\\left[(Q^{HS})^{\\prime}_{ij}(\\sigma_{ij})\\right]\\right\\} \\] where Dτ(s) is a scalar function. For polydisperse electrolytes in the MSA a simpler expression is also obtained (compare Blum and Hoye 1977 J. Phys. Chem. 81 1311). An explicit continued fraction solution of the one component multi-Yukawa case is also given.

  18. Synergy and other ineffective mixture risk definitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, R.; MacDonell, M.; Environmental Assessment

    2002-04-08

    A substantial effort has been spent over the past few decades to label toxicologic interaction outcomes as synergistic, antagonistic, or additive. Although useful in influencing the emotions of the public and the press, these labels have contributed fairly little to our understanding of joint toxic action. Part of the difficulty is that their underlying toxicological concepts are only defined for two chemical mixtures, while most environmental and occupational exposures are to mixtures of many more chemicals. Furthermore, the mathematical characterizations of synergism and antagonism are inextricably linked to the prevailing definition of 'no interaction,' instead of some intrinsic toxicological property. For example, the US EPA has selected dose addition as the no-interaction definition for mixture risk assessment, so that synergism would represent toxic effects that exceed those predicted from dose addition. For now, labels such as synergism are useful to regulatory agencies, both for qualitative indications of public health risk as well as numerical decision tools for mixture risk characterization. Efforts to quantify interaction designations for use in risk assessment formulas, however, are highly simplified and carry large uncertainties. Several research directions, such as pharmacokinetic measurements and models, and toxicogenomics, should promote significant improvements by providing multi-component data that will allow biologically based mathematical models of joint toxicity to replace these pairwise interaction labels in mixture risk assessment procedures.

  19. Predicting skin permeability from complex chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Riviere, Jim E. . E-mail: Jim_Riviere@ncsu.edu; Brooks, James D.

    2005-10-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to topical chemicals is usually in the form of complex chemical mixtures, yet risk assessment is based on experimentally derived data from individual chemical exposures from a single, usually aqueous vehicle, or from computed physiochemical properties. We present an approach using hybrid quantitative structure permeation relationships (QSPeR) models where absorption through porcine skin flow-through diffusion cells is well predicted using a QSPeR model describing the individual penetrants, coupled with a mixture factor (MF) that accounts for physicochemical properties of the vehicle/mixture components. The baseline equation is log k {sub p} = c + mMF + a{sigma}{alpha} {sub 2} {sup H} + b{sigma}{beta} {sub 2} {sup H} + s{pi} {sub 2} {sup H} + rR {sub 2} + vV {sub x} where {sigma}{alpha} {sub 2} {sup H} is the hydrogen-bond donor acidity, {sigma}{beta} {sub 2} {sup H} is the hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity, {pi} {sub 2} {sup H} is the dipolarity/polarizability, R {sub 2} represents the excess molar refractivity, and V {sub x} is the McGowan volume of the penetrants of interest; c, m, a, b, s, r, and v are strength coefficients coupling these descriptors to skin permeability (k {sub p}) of 12 penetrants (atrazine, chlorpyrifos, ethylparathion, fenthion, methylparathion, nonylphenol, {rho}-nitrophenol, pentachlorophenol, phenol, propazine, simazine, and triazine) in 24 mixtures. Mixtures consisted of full factorial combinations of vehicles (water, ethanol, propylene glycol) and additives (sodium lauryl sulfate, methyl nicotinate). An additional set of 4 penetrants (DEET, SDS, permethrin, ricinoleic acid) in different mixtures were included to assess applicability of this approach. This resulted in a dataset of 16 compounds administered in 344 treatment combinations. Across all exposures with no MF, R{sup 2} for absorption was 0.62. With the MF, correlations increased up to 0.78. Parameters correlated to the MF include refractive

  20. MIXTURES FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have been conducted to address questions concerning the toxicity of "real world" mixtures of DBPs. These studies, which used either concentrates of drinking water or humic acid preparations treated with various disinfectants, were largely negative and had a nu...

  1. MixtureTree annotator: a program for automatic colorization and visual annotation of MixtureTree.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Ogata, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The MixtureTree Annotator, written in JAVA, allows the user to automatically color any phylogenetic tree in Newick format generated from any phylogeny reconstruction program and output the Nexus file. By providing the ability to automatically color the tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator provides a unique advantage over any other programs which perform a similar function. In addition, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only package that can efficiently annotate the output produced by MixtureTree with mutation information and coalescent time information. In order to visualize the resulting output file, a modified version of FigTree is used. Certain popular methods, which lack good built-in visualization tools, for example, MEGA, Mesquite, PHY-FI, TreeView, treeGraph and Geneious, may give results with human errors due to either manually adding colors to each node or with other limitations, for example only using color based on a number, such as branch length, or by taxonomy. In addition to allowing the user to automatically color any given Newick tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only method that allows the user to automatically annotate the resulting tree created by the MixtureTree program. The MixtureTree Annotator is fast and easy-to-use, while still allowing the user full control over the coloring and annotating process. PMID:25826378

  2. A Four-step Approach for Evaluation of Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    A four step approach was developed for evaluating toxicity data on a chemical mixture for consistency with dose addition. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture guidance (EPA 2000), toxicologic interaction for a defined mixture (all components known) is departure from a c...

  3. Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Bruce C.; Lamppa, Diana L.; Voigt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

  4. Combined photobacterium toxicity of herbicide mixtures containing one insecticide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Song, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhang, Jing

    2009-04-01

    To test whether the dose-addition (DA) model can predict the combined toxicity of the mixtures of herbicides that coexisted with insecticide(s), we selected five herbicides (simetryn, prometon, bromacil, velpar, and diquat) and one organophosphorus insecticide (dichlorvos) as the test components. The inhibition toxicities of the six pesticides as well as those of their mixtures to Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 were determined by using the microplate toxicity test procedure. The dose-response curves (DRCs) between the observed inhibition toxicities and the doses of the pesticides or the mixtures were modeled by using the nonlinear least square fitting. It was shown that all dose-response relationships were effectively described by the Weibull function. To fully explore the combined toxicities of mixtures including various concentration compositions, we designed three equivalent-effect concentration ratio (EECR) mixtures and six uniform design concentration ratio (UDCR) mixtures. The combined toxicity of a mixture is identified by inspecting whether the DRC predicted by the dose addition (DA) or independent action (IA) locates in the 95% confidence interval of the DRC of the mixture. Furthermore, the possible reason for the three mixtures to depart from the DA action was the very high concentration ratio of diquat in the mixtures. PMID:19215957

  5. Combustion of Gaseous Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duchene, R

    1932-01-01

    This report not only presents matters of practical importance in the classification of engine fuels, for which other means have proved inadequate, but also makes a few suggestions. It confirms the results of Withrow and Boyd which localize the explosive wave in the last portions of the mixture burned. This being the case, it may be assumed that the greater the normal combustion, the less the energy developed in the explosive form. In order to combat the detonation, it is therefore necessary to try to render the normal combustion swift and complete, as produced in carbureted mixtures containing benzene (benzol), in which the flame propagation, beginning at the spark, yields a progressive and pronounced darkening on the photographic film.

  6. Hydrodynamic gas mixture separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarov, A.A.

    1982-02-10

    The separation of gas mixtures is the basis of many chemical, petrochemical, and gas processes. Classical separation methods (absorption, adsorption, condensation, and freezing) require cumbersome and complex equipment. No adequate solution is provided by the cheapening and simplification of gas-processing apparatus and separation methods by hydration and diffusion. For example, an apparatus for extracting helium from natural gas by diffusion has a throughput of gas containing 0.45% helium of 117,000 m/sup 3//h and in the first stage has teflon membranes working at a pressure difference of 63.3x10/sup 5/ Pa of area 79,000 m/sup 2/, and the specific cost of the apparatus was 8500 dollars per m/sup 3//h of helium. Therefore, vigorous studies are being conducted on new ways of efficient separation of gas mixtures that are cheaper and simpler. Here we consider a novel method of physically essentially reversible separation of gas mixtures, which involves some features of single-phase supersonic flows.

  7. DEVELOPMENTAL MALFORMATION OF FROG EMBRYOS: AN ANALYSIS OF TERATOGENICITY OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical compounds known to be teratogenic to frog embryos were tested singly and in binary mixtures and Weibull functions were used to model their concentration response relationships. eparate Weibull function with an additive concentration variable modeled the mixtures using on...

  8. A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Reis, Martina; Wang, Yongqi; Bono Maurizio Sacchi Bassi, Adalberto

    2013-11-01

    A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures is formulated. The intermolecular interactions among the constituents of the mixture are accounted for through additional freedom degrees to each constituent of the mixture. Balance equations for polar reacting continuum mixtures are accordingly formulated and a proper set of constitutive equations is derived with basis in the Müller-Liu formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. Moreover, the non-equilibrium and equilibrium responses of the reacting mixture are investigated in detail by emphasizing the inner and reactive structures of the medium. From the balance laws and constitutive relations, the effects of molecular structure of constituents upon the fluid flow are studied. It is also demonstrated that the local thermodynamic equilibrium state can be reached without imposing that the set of independent constitutive variables is time independent, neither spatially homogeneous nor null. The resulting constitutive relations presented throughout this work are of relevance to many practical applications, such as swelling of clays, developing of bio and polymeric membranes, and use of electrorheological fluids in industrial processes. The first author acknowledges financial support from National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq) and German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

  9. Mixture models for distance sampling detection functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, David L; Thomas, Len

    2015-01-01

    We present a new class of models for the detection function in distance sampling surveys of wildlife populations, based on finite mixtures of simple parametric key functions such as the half-normal. The models share many of the features of the widely-used "key function plus series adjustment" (K+A) formulation: they are flexible, produce plausible shapes with a small number of parameters, allow incorporation of covariates in addition to distance and can be fitted using maximum likelihood. One important advantage over the K+A approach is that the mixtures are automatically monotonic non-increasing and non-negative, so constrained optimization is not required to ensure distance sampling assumptions are honoured. We compare the mixture formulation to the K+A approach using simulations to evaluate its applicability in a wide set of challenging situations. We also re-analyze four previously problematic real-world case studies. We find mixtures outperform K+A methods in many cases, particularly spiked line transect data (i.e., where detectability drops rapidly at small distances) and larger sample sizes. We recommend that current standard model selection methods for distance sampling detection functions are extended to include mixture models in the candidate set. PMID:25793744

  10. Detecting Mixtures from Structural Model Differences Using Latent Variable Mixture Modeling: A Comparison of Relative Model Fit Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, James M.; Reise, Steven P.; Kim, Kevin H.

    2007-01-01

    The accuracy of structural model parameter estimates in latent variable mixture modeling was explored with a 3 (sample size) [times] 3 (exogenous latent mean difference) [times] 3 (endogenous latent mean difference) [times] 3 (correlation between factors) [times] 3 (mixture proportions) factorial design. In addition, the efficacy of several…

  11. [Construction of Three-Dimensional Isobologram for Ternary Pollutant Mixtures].

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China) Isobolographic analysis was widely used in the interaction assessment of binary mixtures. However, how to construct a three-dimensional (3D) isobologram for the assessment of toxicity interaction within ternary mixtures is still not reported up to date. The main purpose of this paper is to develop a 3D isobologram where the relative concentrations of three components are acted as three coordinate axes in 3D space to examine the toxicity interaction within ternary mixtures. Taking six commonly used pesticides in China, including three herbicides (2, 4-D, desmetryne and simetryn) and three insecticides ( dimethoate, imidacloprid and propoxur) as the mixture components, the uniform design ray procedure (UD-Ray) was used to rationally design the concentration composition of various components in the ternary mixtures so that effectively and comprehensively reflected the variety of actual environmental concentrations. The luminescent inhibition toxicities of single pesticides and their ternary mixtures to Vibrio fischeri at various concentration levels were determined by the microplate toxicity analysis. Selecting concentration addition (CA) as the addition reference, 3D isobolograms were constructed to study the toxicity interactions of various ternary mixtures. The results showed that the 3D isobologram could clearly and directly exhibit the toxicity interactions of ternary mixtures, and extend the use of isobolographic analysis into the ternary mixtures. PMID:27011996

  12. Maximum likelihood estimation of finite mixture model for economic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-06-01

    Finite mixture model is a mixture model with finite-dimension. This models are provides a natural representation of heterogeneity in a finite number of latent classes. In addition, finite mixture models also known as latent class models or unsupervised learning models. Recently, maximum likelihood estimation fitted finite mixture models has greatly drawn statistician's attention. The main reason is because maximum likelihood estimation is a powerful statistical method which provides consistent findings as the sample sizes increases to infinity. Thus, the application of maximum likelihood estimation is used to fit finite mixture model in the present paper in order to explore the relationship between nonlinear economic data. In this paper, a two-component normal mixture model is fitted by maximum likelihood estimation in order to investigate the relationship among stock market price and rubber price for sampled countries. Results described that there is a negative effect among rubber price and stock market price for Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia.

  13. Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and method of making thereof

    DOEpatents

    Mariani, Robert Dominick; Porter, Douglas Lloyd

    2016-04-05

    Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and methods of making nuclear fuel mixtures are provided. Pseudo-binary actinide-M fuel mixtures form alloys and exhibit: body-centered cubic solid phases at low temperatures; high solidus temperatures; and/or minimal or no reaction or inter-diffusion with steel and other cladding materials. Methods described herein through metallurgical and thermodynamics advancements guide the selection of amounts of fuel mixture components by use of phase diagrams. Weight percentages for components of a metallic additive to an actinide fuel are selected in a solid phase region of an isothermal phase diagram taken at a temperature below an upper temperature limit for the resulting fuel mixture in reactor use. Fuel mixtures include uranium-molybdenum-tungsten, uranium-molybdenum-tantalum, molybdenum-titanium-zirconium, and uranium-molybdenum-titanium systems.

  14. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  15. Identification and evaluation of pyrethroid insecticide mixtures in urban sediments.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Andrew J; Weston, Donald P; Belden, Jason B; Lydy, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    Organochlorine, organophosphorous, and pyrethroid insecticides frequently have been detected together as mixtures in stream sediments. To simplify mixture analyses, additive toxic responses usually are assumed but rarely are confirmed, especially for compounds with similar modes of action. The first objective of the present study was to screen a database of 24 different pesticides and 94 urban-stream sediment samples collected throughout central and northern California (USA) to identify compounds and partial mixtures that dominated sample toxicity to Hyalella azteca. Pyrethroids and chlorpyrifos were the most toxicologically relevant compounds in terms of detection frequency, contribution to overall sample toxicity, and co-occurrence in the most common mixture patterns. Organochlorine insecticides were the least toxicologically relevant compounds, with only a small percentage of samples exceeding predefined screening values. The second objective was to confirm that mixtures of type I and type II pyrethroids display additive responses. Ten-day sediment toxicity tests of binary pesticide mixtures were conducted using H. azteca as the test organism. Observed dose-response curves were compared to those predicted from concentration-addition and independent-action models. Model deviation ratios (MDRs) were calculated at the median effect level to quantify the magnitudes of deviation between observed and predicted curves. Whereas the concentration-addition model adequately predicted toxicity for all the pyrethroid mixtures (MDRs within a factor of two), dose-response values deviated from additivity enough to warrant further investigation. PMID:19245272

  16. Characteristics of asphalt mixes with FT additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefunková, S.

    2012-03-01

    This article is focused on low-temperature asphalt mixture technologies using FT additive and RAP. The modern production and use of asphalt mixture technologies with reduced temperatures has many advantages. These advantages mainly help to save energy and the environment. Lower temperatures enable a reduction in energy consumption, a more acceptable working environment for workers, a reduction in negative environmental effects, such as greenhouse gas emissions, and an improvement in the workability of mixtures and a prolongation of their duration. This technology is currently becoming popular in many countries.

  17. A mixture of seven antiandrogens induces reproductive malformations in rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, regulatory agencies have not considered conducting cumulative risk assessments for mixtures of chemicals with diverse mechanisms of toxicity because it is assumed that the chemicals will act independently and the individual chemical doses are not additive. However, this ...

  18. Realistic environmental mixtures of micropollutants in surface, drinking, and recycled water: herbicides dominate the mixture toxicity toward algae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2014-06-01

    Mixture toxicity studies with herbicides have focused on a few priority components that are most likely to cause environmental impacts, and experimental mixtures were often designed as equipotent mixtures; however, real-world mixtures are made up of chemicals with different modes of toxic action at arbitrary concentration ratios. The toxicological significance of environmentally realistic mixtures has only been scarcely studied. Few studies have simultaneously compared the mixture effect of water samples with designed reference mixtures comprised of the ratios of analytically detected concentrations in toxicity tests. In the present study, the authors address the effect of herbicides and other chemicals on inhibition of photosynthesis and algal growth rate. The authors tested water samples including secondary treated wastewater effluent, recycled water, drinking water, and storm water in the combined algae assay. The detected chemicals were mixed in the concentration ratios detected, and the biological effects of the water samples were compared with the designed mixtures of individual detected chemicals to quantify the fraction of effect caused by unknown chemicals. The results showed that herbicides dominated the algal toxicity in these environmentally realistic mixtures, and the contribution by the non-herbicides was negligible. A 2-stage model, which used concentration addition within the groups of herbicides and non-herbicides followed by the model of independent action to predict the mixture effect of the two groups, could predict the experimental mixture toxicity effectively, but the concentration addition model for herbicides was robust and sufficient for complex mixtures. Therefore, the authors used the bioanalytical equivalency concept to derive effect-based trigger values for algal toxicity for monitoring water quality in recycled and surface water. All water samples tested would be compliant with the proposed trigger values associated with the

  19. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  20. Stabilizer for fuel mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Moriyama, N.; Yamamura, M.

    1981-02-24

    A stabilizer for fuel mixtures of finely divided coal and fuel oil is composed of an active ingredient, a non-ionic surface active agent consisting of a block copolymer represented by the following general formula (I): R/sub 1/O-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)l-(C/sub 3/H/sup 6/O)m-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)n-R/sub 2/ (I) wherein r/sub 1/ and r/sub 2/ stand for a hydrogen atom or an alklyl group having 1 to 6 carbon atoms, the mole number (L+n) of added ethylene oxide is in the range of from 30 to 300, the mole number (M) of added propylene oxide is in the range of from 15 to 80, and the content of ethylene oxide in the whole molecule is 40 to 85% by weight.

  1. Mixtures with relatives and linked markers.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Guro; Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Egeland, Thore

    2016-05-01

    Mixture DNA profiles commonly appear in forensic genetics, and a large number of statistical methods and software are available for such cases. However, most of the literature concerns mixtures where the contributors are assumed unrelated and the genetic markers are unlinked. In this paper, we consider mixtures of linked markers and related contributors. If no relationships are involved, linkage can be ignored. While unlinked markers can be treated independently, linkage introduces dependencies. The use of linked markers presents statistical and computational challenges, but may also lead to a considerable increase in power since the number of markers available is much larger if we do not require the markers to be unlinked. In addition, some cases that cannot be solved with an unlimited number of unlinked autosomal markers can be solved with linked markers. We focus on two special cases of linked markers: pairs of linked autosomal markers and X-chromosomal markers. A framework is presented for calculation of likelihood ratios for mixtures with general relationships and with linkage between any number of markers. Finally, we explore the effect of linkage disequilibrium, also called allelic association, on the likelihood ratio. PMID:26614310

  2. Continuous Crystallization of Urea-Water Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokamura, Taku; Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Seki, Mitsuo; Murakoshi, Hiromichi

    Ice slurries have been used as environmentally-friendly secondary refrigerants. In addition to such ice slurries, aqueous solutions in slurry-state have also been put to practical use at temperatures below 0 oC. Urea-water mixture is a multi-component substance that has a eutectic point. If we can form a two-phase fluid substance by the liquid-solid phases at the eutectic point, it can be used as a fluid latent heat storage material, which will maintain the secondary refrigerant in a heat exchanger at constant temperature. In the present study, we propose a urea-water mixture as a novel functional thermal fluid that can be used as a fluid latent heat material. To demonstrate its feasibility, we first measured the latent heat and density of a urea-water mixture, and then used a counter-flow double tube heat exchanger to produce a liquid-solid two-phase flow of the urea-water mixture. This work demonstrates that it is possible to make a fluid latent heat storage material continuously from an aqueous solution at the eutectic point by flowing it through a double tube heat exchanger equipped with a stirrer.

  3. Prediction for the mixture toxicity of six organophosphorus pesticides to the luminescent bacterium Q67.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Hui; Liu, Shu-Shen; Song, Xiao-Qing; Ge, Hui-Lin

    2008-11-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are ubiquitous in the surface water as mixtures. To examine the mixture toxicity in the multi-component space, the uniform design (UD) which can explore the concentration changes with few experimental efforts was employed to design the mixtures. On the other hand, the fixed concentration ratio ray was applied into six UD mixtures and two equivalent-effect concentration mixtures to build the whole concentration-response curves to overcome the demerit of the classical "point-to-point" method. The experimental toxicities of six pesticides and their mixtures to the luminescent bacterium Q67 were determined. The mixture toxicities were predicted by two models, concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). The results showed that all the mixture toxicities observed had no significant differences from the ones predicted by CA. However, the mixture toxicities were also well predicted by IA especially at the low-concentration section. PMID:18308393

  4. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  5. Thermobaric investigation of coal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinskii, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    An examination of the dynamics of gas emission during the heating in vacuo of different grades of Donbass coal included a study of binary and ternary mixtures of these coals. Discrete gas emission was established at temperatures depending principally on the ratio of coals within the mixtures. The data obtained could be used as a basis for commercial processes.

  6. Encoding of mixtures in a simple olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kai; Tootoonian, Sina; Laurent, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Natural odors are usually mixtures; yet humans and animals can experience them as unitary percepts. Olfaction also enables stimulus categorization and generalization. We addressed how these computations are performed with the responses of 168 locust antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) to varying mixtures of two monomolecular odors, and 174 PNs and 209 mushroom body Kenyon cells (KCs) to mixtures of up to 8 monomolecular odors. Single PN responses showed strong hypo-additivity, and population trajectories clustered by odor concentration and mixture similarity. KC responses were much sparser on average than with PNs and often signaled the presence of single components in mixtures. Linear classifiers could read out the responses of both populations in single time bins to perform odor identification, categorization, and generalization. Our results suggest that odor representations in the mushroom body may result from competing optimization constraints to facilitate memorization (sparseness) while enabling identification, classification and generalization. PMID:24210905

  7. Latent classiness and other mixtures.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves' role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  8. Latent Classiness and Other Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves’ role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  9. Complex mixtures, complex responses: Assessing pharmaceutical mixtures using field and laboratory approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Scott, Tia-Marie; Kolpin, Dana W.; Cetkovic-Cvrlje, Marina; Lesteberg, Kelsey E.; Rearick, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are present in low concentrations (<100 ng/L) in most municipal wastewater effluents but may be elevated locally because of factors such as input from pharmaceutical formulation facilities. Using existing concentration data, the authors assessed pharmaceuticals in laboratory exposures of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and added environmental complexity through effluent exposures. In the laboratory, larval and mature minnows were exposed to a simple opioid mixture (hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone), an opioid agonist (tramadol), a muscle relaxant (methocarbamol), a simple antidepressant mixture (fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine), a sleep aid (temazepam), or a complex mixture of all compounds. Larval minnow response to effluent exposure was not consistent. The 2010 exposures resulted in shorter exposed minnow larvae, whereas the larvae exposed in 2012 exhibited altered escape behavior. Mature minnows exhibited altered hepatosomatic indices, with the strongest effects in females and in mixture exposures. In addition, laboratory-exposed, mature male minnows exposed to all pharmaceuticals (except the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor mixture) defended nest sites less rigorously than fish in the control group. Tramadol or antidepressant mixture exposure resulted in increased splenic T lymphocytes. Only male minnows exposed to whole effluent responded with increased plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Female minnows exposed to pharmaceuticals (except the opioid mixture) had larger livers, likely as a compensatory result of greater prominence of vacuoles in liver hepatocytes. The observed alteration of apical endpoints central to sustaining fish populations confirms that effluents containing waste streams from pharmaceutical formulation facilities can adversely impact fish populations but that the effects may not be temporally consistent. The present study highlights the importance of including diverse biological endpoints spanning

  10. Complex mixtures, complex responses: Assessing pharmaceutical mixtures using field and laboratory approaches.

    PubMed

    Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Furlong, Edward T; Phillips, Pat J; Scott, Tia-Marie; Kolpin, Dana W; Cetkovic-Cvrlje, Marina; Lesteberg, Kelsey E; Rearick, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals are present in low concentrations (<100 ng/L) in most municipal wastewater effluents but may be elevated locally because of factors such as input from pharmaceutical formulation facilities. Using existing concentration data, the authors assessed pharmaceuticals in laboratory exposures of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and added environmental complexity through effluent exposures. In the laboratory, larval and mature minnows were exposed to a simple opioid mixture (hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone), an opioid agonist (tramadol), a muscle relaxant (methocarbamol), a simple antidepressant mixture (fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine), a sleep aid (temazepam), or a complex mixture of all compounds. Larval minnow response to effluent exposure was not consistent. The 2010 exposures resulted in shorter exposed minnow larvae, whereas the larvae exposed in 2012 exhibited altered escape behavior. Mature minnows exhibited altered hepatosomatic indices, with the strongest effects in females and in mixture exposures. In addition, laboratory-exposed, mature male minnows exposed to all pharmaceuticals (except the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor mixture) defended nest sites less rigorously than fish in the control group. Tramadol or antidepressant mixture exposure resulted in increased splenic T lymphocytes. Only male minnows exposed to whole effluent responded with increased plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Female minnows exposed to pharmaceuticals (except the opioid mixture) had larger livers, likely as a compensatory result of greater prominence of vacuoles in liver hepatocytes. The observed alteration of apical endpoints central to sustaining fish populations confirms that effluents containing waste streams from pharmaceutical formulation facilities can adversely impact fish populations but that the effects may not be temporally consistent. The present study highlights the importance of including diverse biological endpoints spanning

  11. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  12. Acute toxicity to goldfish of mixtures of chloramines, copper, and linear alkylate sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.F.; McKee, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity to goldfish (Carassius auratus) of mixtures of chloramines, copper, and linear alkylate sulfonate (LAS) was studied by continuous-flow toxicity tests during an exposure period of 96 hours. The individual toxicities of these three chemicals are either additive or synergistic in mixtures, depending on the rate of toxic action of the individual chemical, the toxicity ratio of the chemicals in the mixtures, and the concentration of the mixtures.

  13. Hierarchical similarity transformations between Gaussian mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rigas, George; Nikou, Christophoros; Goletsis, Yorgos; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to estimate the density of a data space represented by a geometric transformation of an initial Gaussian mixture model. The geometric transformation is hierarchical, and it is decomposed into two steps. At first, the initial model is assumed to undergo a global similarity transformation modeled by translation, rotation, and scaling of the model components. Then, to increase the degrees of freedom of the model and allow it to capture fine data structures, each individual mixture component may be transformed by another, local similarity transformation, whose parameters are distinct for each component of the mixture. In addition, to constrain the order of magnitude of the local transformation (LT) with respect to the global transformation (GT), zero-mean Gaussian priors are imposed onto the local parameters. The estimation of both GT and LT parameters is obtained through the expectation maximization framework. Experiments on artificial data are conducted to evaluate the proposed model, with varying data dimensionality, number of model components, and transformation parameters. In addition, the method is evaluated using real data from a speech recognition task. The obtained results show a high model accuracy and demonstrate the potential application of the proposed method to similar classification problems. PMID:24808615

  14. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  15. Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liddle, S M; Narayanan, T; Poon, W C K

    2011-05-18

    We study phase separation and transient gelation experimentally in a mixture consisting of polydisperse colloids (polydispersity: ≈ 6%) and non-adsorbing polymers, where the ratio of the average size of the polymer to that of the colloid is ≈ 0.062. Unlike what has been reported previously for mixtures with somewhat lower colloid polydispersity (≈ 5%), the addition of polymers does not expand the fluid-solid coexistence region. Instead, we find a region of fluid-solid coexistence which has an approximately constant width but an unexpected re-entrant shape. We detect the presence of a metastable gas-liquid binodal, which gives rise to two-stepped crystallization kinetics that can be rationalized as the effect of fractionation. Finally, we find that the separation into multiple coexisting solid phases at high colloid volume fractions predicted by equilibrium statistical mechanics is kinetically suppressed before the system reaches dynamical arrest. PMID:21525554

  16. Nonergodic correction to a binary mixture phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, L.

    2016-05-01

    For a binary mixture with limited miscibility of the components, the correction to the equation of state that arises from the finite diffusion velocity is discussed. It is shown that this correction corresponds to a nonergodic microheterogeneity of the mixture. We suggest that the above microheterogeneity may be accounted as corresponding fluctuations of the chemical potential. The mean square of these fluctuations C is an additional thermodynamic variable, and the nonergodic microheterogeneity is an equilibrium property of every binary mixture with limited miscibility. The experimental status of this statement is discussed for eutectic and monotectic systems.

  17. Supersonic combustion of a silane/methane mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.; Mclain, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the ignition and combustion characteristics of a 20 volume percent silane/methane mixture using a model scramjet combustor with Mach 2 combustor entrance conditions. The test gas total temperature was varied from 1200 to 3900 R. The mixture autoignited at a total temperature of 1650 R. This autoignition temperature can be contrasted with 2330 R for hydrogen and 1350 R for a 20 percent silane/hydrogen mixture in similar hardware. Methane without the silane additive did not autoignite in this configuration at temperatures as high as 3900 R.

  18. Viscosity of Mixtures of α-Tocopherol Acetate + Mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwajczaka, Elżbieta; Stagraczyński, Ryszard; Herba, Henryk; Świergielb, Jolanta; Jadżyn, Jan

    2009-08-01

    The paper presents results of the share viscosity measurements performed as a function of temperature and concentration for mixtures of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamine E acetate) and mesitylene, two liquids of essentially different viscosity (four order of magnitude difference at 280 K). The viscosity/ temperature dependence for pure α-tocopherol acetate as well as for the mixtures studied can be well described with the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation. The viscosities of the mixtures exhibit a strong negative deviation from the rule of additive dependence on concentration and for increasing temperature the maximum value of the deviation shows an exponential decreasing.

  19. Endocrine activity of mycotoxins and mycotoxin mixtures.

    PubMed

    Demaegdt, Heidi; Daminet, Britt; Evrard, Annick; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Muller, Marc; Pussemier, Luc; Callebaut, Alfons; Vandermeiren, Karine

    2016-10-01

    Reporter gene assays incorporating nuclear receptors (estrogen, androgen, thyroid β and PPARγ2) have been implemented to assess the endocrine activity of 13 mycotoxins and their mixtures. As expected, zearalenone and its metabolites α-zearalenol and β- zearalenol turned out to have the strongest estrogenic potency (EC50 8,7 10-10 ± 0,8; 3,1 10-11 ± 0,5 and 1,3 10-8 ± 0,3 M respectively). The metabolite of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol also had estrogenic activity (EC50 3,8 10-7 ± 1,1 M). Furthermore, most of the mycotoxins (and their mixtures) showed anti-androgenic effects (15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol and α-zearalenol with potencies within one order of magnitude of that of the reference compound flutamide). In particular, deoxynivalenol and 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol acted as antagonists for the PPARy2 receptor. When testing mixtures of mycotoxins on the same cell systems, we showed that most of the mixtures reacted as predicted by the concentration addition (CA) theory. Generally, the CA was within the 95% confidence interval of the observed ones, only minor deviations were detected. Although these reporter gene tests cannot be directly extrapolated in vivo, they can be the basis for further research. Especially the additive effects of ZEN and its metabolites are of importance and could have repercussions in vivo. PMID:27481073

  20. EXPLORING THE LIMITS OF ADDITIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA has published several documents describing methods to perform health risk assessment of chemical mixtures (U.S. EPA, 1986; 2000) in which three approaches (i.e, actual mixture, similar mixture or component-based) to quantifying health risk for a chemical mixture are recom...

  1. Evolution of weak disturbances in inert binary mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of weak disturbances in inert binary mixtures is determined for the one-dimensional piston problem. The interaction of the dissipative and nonlinear mechanisms is described by Burgers' equation. The binary mixture diffusion mechanisms enter as an additive term in an effective diffusivity. Results for the impulsive motion of a piston moving into an ambient medium and the sinusoidally oscillating piston are used to illustrate the results and elucidate the incorrect behavior pertaining to the associated linear theory.

  2. Thermobaric investigations of coal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinskii, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamics of the evolution of gas when coals of various types from the Donbass and binary and ternary mixtures of them are heated have been studied. The discrete nature of the evolution of gas has been established, the temperature intervals of which depend primarily on the ratio of the coals in the mixtures. The possibility of using the results obtained in determining rational schemes for the industrial processing of coals is suggested.

  3. Screening level mixture risk assessment of pharmaceuticals in STP effluents.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Thomas; Karlsson, Maja

    2014-02-01

    We modeled the ecotoxicological risks of the pharmaceutical mixtures emitted from STP effluents into the environment. The classic mixture toxicity concept of Concentration Addition was used to calculate the total expected risk of the analytically determined mixtures, compare the expected impact of seven effluent streams and pinpoint the most sensitive group of species. The risk quotient of a single, randomly selected pharmaceutical is often more than a factor of 1000 lower than the mixture risk, clearly indicating the need to systematically analyse the overall risk of all pharmaceuticals present. The MCR, which is the ratio between the most risky compound and the total mixture risk, varies between 1.2 and 4.2, depending on the actual scenario and species group under consideration. The mixture risk quotients, based on acute data and an assessment factor of 1000, regularly exceed 1, indicating a potential risk for the environment, depending on the dilution in the recipient stream. The top 10 mixture components explain more than 95% of the mixture risk in all cases. A mixture toxicity assessment cannot go beyond the underlying single substance data. The lack of data on the chronic toxicity of most pharmaceuticals as well as the very few data available for in vivo fish toxicity has to be regarded as a major knowledge gap in this context. On the other hand, ignoring Independent Action or even using the sum of individual risk quotients as a rough approximation of Concentration Addition does not have a major impact on the final risk estimate. PMID:24321250

  4. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  5. Generalized Mixture Models for Molecular Phylogenetic Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jason; Sullivan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing availability of multigene sequence data during the past decade has enabled phylogeny estimation at phylogenomic scales. However, dealing with evolutionary process heterogeneity across the genome becomes increasingly challenging. Here we develop a mixture model approach that uses reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation to permit as many distinct models as the data require. Each additional model considered may be a fully parametrized general time-reversible model or any of its special cases. Furthermore, we expand the usual proposal mechanisms for topology changes to permit hard polytomies (i.e., zero-length internal branches). This new approach is implemented in the Crux software toolkit. We demonstrate the feasibility of using reversible jump MCMC on mixture models by reexamining a well-known 44-taxon mammalian data set comprising 22 concatenated genes. We are able to reproduce the results of the original analysis (with respect to bipartition support) when we make identical assumptions, but when we allow for polytomies and/or use data-driven mixture model estimation, we infer much lower bipartition support values for several key bipartitions. PMID:21873377

  6. Anthracene + Pyrene Solid Mixtures: Eutectic and Azeotropic Character

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James W.; Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize the thermodynamic behavior of a binary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixture, thermochemical and vapor pressure experiments were used to examine the phase behavior of the anthracene (1) + pyrene (2) system. A solid-liquid phase diagram was mapped for the mixture. A eutectic point occurs at 404 K at x1 = 0.22. A model based on eutectic formation can be used to predict the enthalpy of fusion associated with the mixture. For mixtures that contain x1 < 0.90, the enthalpy of fusion is near that of pure pyrene. This and X-ray diffraction results indicate that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene have pyrene-like crystal structures and energetics until the composition nears that of pure anthracene. Solid-vapor equilibrium studies show that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene form solid azeotropes at x1 of 0.03 and 0.14. Additionally, mixtures at x1 = 0.99 sublime at the vapor pressure of pure anthracene, suggesting that anthracene behavior is not significantly influenced by x2 = 0.01 in the crystal structure. PMID:21116474

  7. Thermal behavior of crumb-rubber modified asphalt concrete mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Amy Louise

    Thermal cracking is one of the primary forms of distress in asphalt concrete pavements, resulting from either a single drop in temperature to an extreme low or from multiple temperature cycles above the fracture temperature of the asphalt-aggregate mixture. The first mode described is low temperature cracking; the second is thermal fatigue. The addition of crumb-rubber, manufactured from scrap tires, to the binder in asphalt concrete pavements has been suggested to minimize both types of thermal cracking. Four experiments were designed and completed to evaluate the thermal behavior of crumb-rubber modified (CRM) asphalt-aggregate mixtures. Modified and unmodified mixture response to thermal stresses was measured in four laboratory tests. The Thermal Stress Restrained Specimen Test (TSRST) and the Indirect Tensile Test (IDT) were used to compare mixture resistance to low temperature cracking. Modified mixtures showed improved performance, and cooling rate did not affect mixture resistance according to the statistical analysis. Therefore results from tests with faster rates can predict performance under slower field rates. In comparison, predicted fracture temperatures and stresses (IDT) were generally higher than measured values (TSRST). In addition, predicted fracture temperatures from binder test results demonstrated that binder testing alone is not sufficient to evaluate CRM mixtures. Thermal fatigue was explored in the third experiment using conventional load-induced fatigue tests with conditions selected to simulate daily temperature fluctuations. Test results indicated that thermal fatigue may contribute to transverse cracking in asphalt pavements. Both unmodified and modified mixtures had a finite capacity to withstand daily temperature fluctuations coupled with cold temperatures. Modified mixtures again exhibited improved performance. The fourth experiment examined fracture properties of modified and unmodified mixtures using a common fracture toughness test

  8. Combined toxicity of heavy metal mixtures in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xialu; Gu, Yuanliang; Zhou, Qi; Mao, Guochuan; Zou, Baobo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2016-09-01

    With rapid industrialization, China is now facing great challenges in heavy metal contamination in the environment. Human exposure to heavy metals through air, water and food commonly involves a mixture consisting of multiple heavy metals. In this study, eight common heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni) that cause environmental contamination were selected to investigate the combined toxicity of different heavy metal mixtures in HL7702 cells. Toxicity (24 h LC50 ) of each individual metal on the cells ranked Hg > Cr = Cd > Cu > Zn > Ni > Mn > Pb; toxicity of the different mixtures ranked: M5 > M3PbHgCd > M5+Mn > M5+Cu > M2CdNi > M4A > M8-Mn > M8 > M5+Zn > M4B > M8-Cr > M8-Zn > M8-Cu > M8-Pb > M8-Cd > M8-Hg > M8-Ni > M3PbHgNi > M3CuZnMn. The cytotoxicity data of individual metals were successfully used to build the additive models of two- to eight-component metal mixtures. The comparison between additive model and combination model or partly additive model was useful to evaluate the combined effects in mixture. Synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects of the toxicity were observed in different mixtures. These results suggest that the combined effects should be considered in the risk assessment of heavy metal co-exposure, and more comprehensive investigations on the combined effects of different heavy metal mixtures are needed in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26865462

  9. Explosive compaction of WC+Co mixture by axisymmetric scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzyurkin, A. E.; Kraus, E. I.; Lukyanov, Ya L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of development and optimization of schemes for explosive compaction of mixtures of solid powder materials with metal bond. For this purpose, experiments were conducted on explosive compaction of mixtures of tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt (Co) using a simple cylindrical compaction system. In addition, a numerical simulation of shock waves propagation in two-phase porous medium WC+Co was carried out. Based on experimental and numerical studies of shock wave propagation, the optimal modes of explosive compaction of two-phase powder media, representing mixtures of solid powder materials with metal bond, were found. It is shown that the most preferable compaction mode for obtaining a uniform durable compact of a mixture of powders WC+Co with ratio 9:1 by volume in axially symmetric scheme with central mandrel corresponds to the detonation velocity of 4.6 km/s followed by sintering.

  10. A Variational Statistical-Field Theory for Polar Liquid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    Using a variational field-theoretic approach, we derive a molecularly-based theory for polar liquid mixtures. The resulting theory consists of simple algebraic expressions for the free energy of mixing and the dielectric constant as functions of mixture composition. Using only the dielectric constants and the molar volumes of the pure liquid constituents, the theory evaluates the mixture dielectric constants in good agreement with the experimental values for a wide range of liquid mixtures, without using adjustable parameters. In addition, the theory predicts that liquids with similar dielectric constants and molar volumes dissolve well in each other, while sufficient disparity in these parameters result in phase separation. The calculated miscibility map on the dielectric constant-molar volume axes agrees well with known experimental observations for a large number of liquid pairs. Thus the theory provides a quantification for the well-known empirical ``like-dissolves-like'' rule. Bz acknowledges the A-STAR fellowship for the financial support.

  11. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  12. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  13. Understanding the human health effects of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David O; Arcaro, Kathleen; Spink, David C

    2002-01-01

    Most research on the effects of chemicals on biologic systems is conducted on one chemical at a time. However, in the real world people are exposed to mixtures, not single chemicals. Although various substances may have totally independent actions, in many cases two substances may act at the same site in ways that can be either additive or nonadditive. Many even more complex interactions may occur if two chemicals act at different but related targets. In the extreme case there may be synergistic effects, in which case the effects of two substances together are greater than the sum of either effect alone. In reality, most persons are exposed to many chemicals, not just one or two, and therefore the effects of a chemical mixture are extremely complex and may differ for each mixture depending on the chemical composition. This complexity is a major reason why mixtures have not been well studied. In this review we attempt to illustrate some of the principles and approaches that can be used to study effects of mixtures. By the nature of the state of the science, this discussion is more a presentation of what we do not know than of what we do know about mixtures. We approach the study of mixtures at three levels, using specific examples. First, we discuss several human diseases in relation to a variety of environmental agents believed to influence the development and progression of the disease. We present results of selected cellular and animal studies in which simple mixtures have been investigated. Finally, we discuss some of the effects of mixtures at a molecular level. PMID:11834461

  14. Approximate Thermodynamics State Relations in Partially Ionized Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2003-12-30

    In practical applications, the thermodynamic state relations of partially ionized gas mixtures are usually approximated in terms of the state relations of the pure partially ionized constituent gases or materials in isolation. Such approximations are ordinarily based on an artificial partitioning or separation of the mixture into its constituent materials, with material k regarded as being confined by itself within a compartment or subvolume with volume fraction {alpha}k and possessing a fraction {beta}k of the total internal energy of the mixture. In a mixture of N materials, the quantities {alpha}k and {beta}k constitute an additional 2N--2 independent variables. The most common procedure for determining these variables, and hence the state relations for the mixture, is to require that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and pressure. This intuitively reasonable procedure is easily shown to reproduce the correct thermal and caloric state equations for a mixture of neutral (non-ionized) ideal gases. Here we wish to point out that (a) this procedure leads to incorrect state equations for a mixture of partially ionized ideal gases, whereas (b) the alternative procedure of requiring that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and free electron density reproduces the correct thermal and caloric state equations for such a mixture. These results readily generalize to the case of partially degenerate and/or relativistic electrons, to a common approximation used to represent pressure ionization effects, and to two-temperature plasmas. This suggests that equating the subvolume electron number densities or chemical potentials instead of pressures is likely to provide a more accurate approximation even in nonideal plasma mixtures.

  15. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts

    PubMed Central

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  16. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  17. Analytic properties of the OCP and ionic mixtures in the strongly coupled fluid state

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E.

    1993-12-02

    Exact results for the Madelung constants and first order anharmonic energies are given for the inverse power potentials with the Coulomb potential as the softest example. Similar exact results are obtained using the analysis of Rosenfeld on the {Gamma} {yields} {infinity} limit for the OCP internal energy, direct correlation function, screening function, and bridge functions. Knowing these exact limits for the fluid phase of the OCP allows one to determine the nature of the thermal corrections to the strongly coupled results. Solutions of the HNC equation modified with the hard sphere bridge function give an example.

  18. Unrestricted Mixture Models for Class Identification in Growth Mixture Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Growth mixture modeling has gained much attention in applied and methodological social science research recently, but the selection of the number of latent classes for such models remains a challenging issue, especially when the assumption of proper model specification is violated. The current simulation study compared the performance of a linear…

  19. Deuterium separation by infrared-induced addition reaction

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by the infrared-induced addition reaction of a deuterium halide with an unsaturated aliphatic compound. A gaseous mixture of a hydrogen halide feedstock and an unsaturated aliphatic compound, particularly an olefin, is irradiated to selectively vibrationally excite the deuterium halide contained therein. The excited deuterium halide preferentially reacts with the unsaturated aliphatic compound to produce a deuterated addition product which is removed from the reaction mixture.

  20. Landfilling ash/sludge mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.; Eighmy, T.T.; Crannell, B.S.

    1999-10-01

    The geotechnical properties of a mixture of municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge was investigated for a proposed ash/sludge secure landfill. The components as well as mixtures ranging from 10:1 to 5:1 (ash:sludge, by volume) were evaluated, where appropriate, for a number of geotechnical index and mechanical properties including particle size, water content, specific gravity, density-moisture relationships, shear strength, and compressibility. The results from a compactibility study and stability analysis of the proposed landfill were used to help approve a landfill codisposal concept; a full-scale facility was constructed and is currently operating successfully.

  1. Estimating proportions of materials using mixture models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydorn, R. P.; Basu, R.

    1983-01-01

    An approach to proportion estimation based on the notion of a mixture model, appropriate parametric forms for a mixture model that appears to fit observed remotely sensed data, methods for estimating the parameters in these models, methods for labelling proportion determination from the mixture model, and methods which use the mixture model estimates as auxiliary variable values in some proportion estimation schemes are addressed.

  2. Toxicology of chemical mixtures: a challenging quest along empirical sciences.

    PubMed

    Groten, John P; Heijne, Wilbert H M; Stierum, Rob H; Freidig, Andreas P; Feron, Victor J

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the "quest" of our institute trying to assess the toxicology of chemical mixtures. In this overview, we will discuss some critical developments in hazard identification and risk assessment of chemical mixtures during these past 15 years. We will stand still at empirical and mechanistic modeling. "Empirical" means that only information on doses or concentrations and effects is available in addition to an often empirically selected quantitative dose-response relationship. Empirical models have played a dominant role in the last decade to identify health and safety characteristics of chemical mixtures. Many of these models are based on the work of pioneers in mixture toxicology who defined three basic types of action for combinations of chemicals: simple similar action, simple dissimilar action and interaction. Nowadays, empirical models are mainly based on response-surface analysis and make use of advanced statistical designs. However, possible interactions between components in a mixture can also be given in terms of mechanistic models. In terms of "mechanistic" (or biological) understanding, interactions between compounds may occur in the kinetic phase (processes of uptake, distribution, metabolism and excretion) or in the dynamic phase (effects of chemicals on the receptor, cellular target or organ). A biological phenomenon such as competitive agonism as described for mixtures of drugs (biotransformation enzymes) or sensory irritants (nerve receptors) can accurately predict the effect of any of these mixtures. Thus, far mechanistic and empirical analyses of interactions are usually unrelated. It is one of the future challenges for mixtures research to combine information from both approaches. Also, our current biology-based models have their limitations, since they cannot integrate every relevant biological mechanism. In this respect, mechanistic modeling of mixtures may benefit from the developments coming from the arena of molecular biology

  3. Rabbit Neonates and Human Adults Perceive a Blending 6-Component Odor Mixture in a Comparable Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sinding, Charlotte; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Chambault, Adeline; Béno, Noelle; Dosne, Thibaut; Chabanet, Claire; Schaal, Benoist; Coureaud, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Young and adult mammals are constantly exposed to chemically complex stimuli. The olfactory system allows for a dual processing of relevant information from the environment either as single odorants in mixtures (elemental perception) or as mixtures of odorants as a whole (configural perception). However, it seems that human adults have certain limits in elemental perception of odor mixtures, as suggested by their inability to identify each odorant in mixtures of more than 4 components. Here, we explored some of these limits by evaluating the perception of three 6-odorant mixtures in human adults and newborn rabbits. Using free-sorting tasks in humans, we investigated the configural or elemental perception of these mixtures, or of 5-component sub-mixtures, or of the 6-odorant mixtures with modified odorants' proportion. In rabbit pups, the perception of the same mixtures was evaluated by measuring the orocephalic sucking response to the mixtures or their components after conditioning to one of these stimuli. The results revealed that one mixture, previously shown to carry the specific odor of red cordial in humans, was indeed configurally processed in humans and in rabbits while the two other 6-component mixtures were not. Moreover, in both species, such configural perception was specific not only to the 6 odorants included in the mixture but also to their respective proportion. Interestingly, rabbit neonates also responded to each odorant after conditioning to the red cordial mixture, which demonstrates their ability to perceive elements in addition to configuration in this complex mixture. Taken together, the results provide new insights related to the processing of relatively complex odor mixtures in mammals and the inter-species conservation of certain perceptual mechanisms; the results also revealed some differences in the expression of these capacities between species putatively linked to developmental and ecological constraints. PMID:23341948

  4. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations. PMID:25761383

  5. Detonation cell widths in hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Stamps, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper I report on the influence of steam and carbon dioxide on the detonability of hydrogen-air mixtures. Data were obtained on the detonation cell width in a heated detonation tube that is 0.43 m in diameter and 13.1 m long. The detonation cell widths were correlated using a characteristic length calculated from a chemical kinetic model. The addition of either diluent to a hydrogen-air mixture increased the cell width for all equivalence ratios. For equal diluent concentrations, however, carbon dioxide not only yielded larger increases in the cell width than steam, but its efficacy relative to steam was predicted to increase with increasing concentration. The range of detonable hydrogen concentrations in a hydrogen-air mixture initially at 1 atm pressure was found to be between 11.6 percent and 74.9 percent for mixtures at 20{degree}C and 9.4 percent and 76.9 percent for mixtures at 100{degree}C. The detonation limit was between 38.8 percent and 40.5 percent steam for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixture initially at 100{degree}C and 1 atm. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Modeling phase equilibria in mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride and halocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lencka, M. ); Anderko, A. Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa )

    1993-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on the production of environmentally acceptable refrigerants, which not only offer desirable physico-chemical properties, but do not deplete the ozone layer and do not cause the greenhouse effect. The production of such refrigerants involves the separation of multicomponent mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and various chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons. Therefore, it is indispensable to know the phase behavior of these mixtures. While the phase behavior of refrigerant mixtures can be adequately modeled in the absence of HF using standard thermodynamic techniques, drastically increases the complexity of the mixture because of its unusually strong association. The association of HF manifests itself in its significantly reduced gas-phase compressibility factor and the strong nonideality of mixtures containing HF and hydrocarbons or halocarbons. In this work, the authors develop an accurate, yet simple, association model for HF and compare it with simulation data. The model is combined with a simple equation of state to yield a closed-form expression that is applicable to both pure fluids and mixtures. In addition to representing the pure-component data for HF, the theory accurately predicts phase equilibria in HF + halocarbon systems.

  7. Joint toxic action of binary metal mixtures of copper, manganese and nickel to Paronychiurus kimi (Collembola).

    PubMed

    Son, Jino; Lee, Yun-Sik; Kim, Yongeun; Shin, Key-Il; Hyun, Seunghun; Cho, Kijong

    2016-10-01

    The joint toxic effects of binary metal mixtures of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn) and nickel (Ni) on reproduction of Paronhchiurus kimi (Lee) was evaluated using a toxic unit (TU) approach by judging additivity across a range of effect levels (10-90%). For all metal mixtures, the joint toxic effects of metal mixtures on reproduction of P. kimi decreased in a TU-dependent manner. The joint toxic effects of metal mixtures also changed from less than additive to more than additive at an effect level lower than or equal to 50%, while a more than additive toxic effects were apparent at higher effect levels. These results indicate that the joint toxicity of metal mixtures is substantially different from that of individual metals based on additivity. Moreover, the close relationship of toxicity to effect level suggests that it is necessary to encompass a whole range of effect levels rather than a specific effect level when judging mixture toxicity. In conclusion, the less than additive toxicity at low effect levels suggests that the additivity assumption is sufficiently conservative to warrant predicting joint toxicity of metal mixtures, which may give an additional margin of safety when setting soil quality standards for ecological risk assessment. PMID:27318557

  8. Seeking solutions to chemical mixtures challenges in public health.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, M M; Rosa, C T De; Cibulas, W; Falk, H

    2004-11-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) identifies people near hazardous waste sites who are at potential health risk because of their exposure to environmental chemicals. Nearly, 2000 chemicals have been associated with such sites. Residents of U.S. communities are potentially exposed to hazardous substances through air, soil, drinking water, and food. The agency has determined that more than 73 million people live within a 4-mile radius of waste sites. More than 14 million Americans live within 1 mile of a National Priorities List site, of which 11% are 7 years of age or younger, 12% are 64 years of age or older, 24% are women of childbearing age, and 25% are minorities. The lack of adequate environmental sampling and information on human exposures often restricts ATSDR's evaluation and assessment activities. Assessing human exposure with its attendant health risks and outcomes is complex because many populations have a wide range of reported illnesses, and generally exposures are to mixtures of chemicals. This prompted ATSDR to consider mixtures issues more in depth and to establish a formal mixtures assessment and research program in 1994. In this paper, we present an overview of the agency activities, the genesis, legislative mandates, and pertinence of the mixtures program including applied research and the development of methods for evaluating the impact of multiple-chemical exposure. On the basis of 20-year experience of evaluating and researching environmental chemical mixtures at waste sites, ATSDR convened the International Conference on Chemical Mixtures (ICCM) in 2002. The conference was supported by several federal agencies and scientific organizations and attended by international and national experts. The conference addressed broad topics such as prevalence of exposures to chemical mixtures, importance of interactions at environmentally relevant levels, validity of assuming additivity (dose or response) as default for mixtures

  9. Toxicity and photoactivation of PAH mixtures in marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.; Ferraro, S.; Lamberson, J.; Cole, F.; Ozretich, R.; Boese, B.; Schults, D.; Behrenfeld, M.; Ankley, G.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity and toxicological photoactivation of mixtures of sediment-associated fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and acenaphthene were determined using standard 10 d sediment toxicity tests with the marine amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius. The four PAHs were spiked into sediment in a concentration series of either single compounds or an equitoxic mixture. Spiked sediment was stored at 4 C for 28 d before testing. Toxicity tests were conducted under fluorescent lighting. Survivors after 10 d in PAH-contaminated sediment were exposed for 1 h to UV light in the absence of sediment and then tested for their ability to bury in clean sediment. The 10 d LC50s for single PAHs were 3.3, 2.2, 2.8, and 2.3 mg/g oc for fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and acenaphthene, respectively. These LC50s were used to calculate the sum of toxic units ({Sigma}TU) of the four PAHs in the equitoxic mixture treatments. The {Sigma}TU LC50 was then calculated for the mixture treatments. If the toxicological interaction of the four PAHs in the mixture was additive, the {Sigma}TU LC50 should equal 1.0. The observed {Sigma}TU LC50 in the mixture was 1.55, indicating the interaction was slightly less than additive. UV enhancement of toxic effects of individual PAHs was correctly predicted by photophysical properties, i.e. pyrene and fluoranthene were photoactivated and phenanthrene and acenaphthene were not. UV effects in the mixture of four PAHs can be explained by the photoactivation of pyrene and fluoranthene alone.

  10. Combined toxicity of pesticide mixtures on green algae and photobacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Wang, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Xiang-Wei; Li, Wei-Ying

    2013-09-01

    Different organisms have diverse responses to the same chemicals or mixtures. In this paper, we selected the green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) and photobacteria Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 (V. qinghaiensis) as target organisms and determined the toxicities of six pesticides, including three herbicides (simetryn, bromacil and hexazinone), two fungicides (dodine and metalaxyl) and one insecticide (propoxur), and their mixtures by using the microplate toxicity analysis. The toxicities of three herbicides to C. pyrenoidosa are much higher than those to V. qinghaiensis, and the toxicities of metalaxyl and propoxur to V. qinghaiensis are higher than those to C. pyrenoidosa, while the toxicity of dodine to C. pyrenoidosa is similar to those to V. qinghaiensis. Using the concentration addition as an additive reference model, the binary pesticide mixtures exhibited different toxicity interactions, i.e., displayed antagonism to C. pyrenoidosa but synergism to V. qinghaiensis. However, the toxicities of the multi-component mixtures of more than two components are additive and can be predicted by the concentration addition model. PMID:23816361

  11. Olfactory discrimination of complex mixtures of amino acids by the black bullhead Ameiurus melas.

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Miklavc, P; Kralj, S; Zgonik, V

    2011-07-01

    On the basis of previous findings of behavioural discrimination of amino acids and on the knowledge of electrophysiology of the catfish (genera Ictalurus and Ameiurus) olfactory organs, behavioural experiments that investigated olfactory discrimination of amino acid mixtures were carried out on the black bullhead Ameiurus melas. Repeated presentations of food-rewarded mixtures released increased swimming activity measured by counting the number of turns >90° within 90 s of stimulus addition. Non-rewarded amino acids and their mixtures released little swimming activity, indicating that A. melas discriminated between the conditioned and the non-conditioned stimuli. Two questions of mixture discrimination were addressed: (1) Are A. melas able to detect components within simple and complex amino acid mixtures? (2) What are the smallest differences between two complex mixtures that A. melas can detect? Three and 13 component mixtures tested were composed primarily of equipotent amino acids [determined by equal electroolfactogram (EOG) amplitude] that contained L-Cys at ×100 the equipotent concentration. Ameiurus melas initially perceived the ternary amino acid mixture as its more stimulatory component alone [i.e. cysteine (Cys)], whereas the conditioned 13 component mixture containing the more stimulatory L-Cys was perceived immediately as different from L-Cys alone. The results indicate that components of ternary mixtures are detectable by A. melas but not those of more complex mixtures. To test for the smallest detectable differences in composition between similar multimixtures, all mixture components were equipotent. Initially, A. melas were unable to discriminate the mixtures of six amino acids from the conditioned mixtures of seven amino acids, whereas they discriminated immediately the mixtures of four and five amino acids from the conditioned mixture. Experience with dissimilar mixtures enabled the A. melas to start discriminating the seven

  12. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Polyimide resins having improved thermo-oxidative stability are provided having aromatic vinyl end-caps. The polyimides are prepared by the reaction of a mixture of monomers comprising (1) a diamine, (2) an ester of tetracarboxylic acid and (3) an aromatic vinyl compound in a molar ratio of 1:2:3 of n: (n + 1):2 when the aromatic vinyl compound contains nitrogen and in a ratio of (n + 1):n:2 when the aromatic vinyl compound does not contain nitrogen, wherein n ranges from about 5 to about 20.

  13. Spinodal decomposition in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto; Shinnar, Reuel; Triantafyllou, George

    1996-03-01

    We study the early stage of the phase separation of a binary mixture far from its critical point of demixing. Whenever the mixture of two mutually repulsive species is quenched to a temperature below its critical point of miscibility, the effect of the enthalpic repulsive force prevails upon the entropic tendency to mix, so that the system eventually separates itno two coexisting phases. We have developed a highly nonlinear model, in close analogy with the linear theory of Cahn and Hilliard, where a generalized free energy is defined in terms of two parameters ψ and a, the first describing the equilibrium composition of the two phases, ad the second denoting a characteristic length scale that is inversely proportional to the equilibrium surface tension. The linear stability analysis predicts that any perturbation of the initial mixture composition with wave number k smaller than √2ψ /a will grow exponentially in time, with a maximum growth corresponding to kmax= √ψ /a. A numerical solution of the equation shows that nonlinear effects saturate the exponential growth, and that the concentraiton distribution tends to a steady state, peroidic profile with wavelength λ=2πa/ √ψ corresponding to the fastest growing mode of the linear regime. The main result of our theoretical model is that this steady state does not depend on the form of the initial perturbation to the homogeneous composition profile.

  14. Criteria for deviation from predictions by the concentration addition model.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Jun-Ichi; Seki, Masanori; Kamo, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Loewe's additivity (concentration addition) is a well-known model for predicting the toxic effects of chemical mixtures under the additivity assumption of toxicity. However, from the perspective of chemical risk assessment and/or management, it is important to identify chemicals whose toxicities are additive when present concurrently, that is, it should be established whether there are chemical mixtures to which the concentration addition predictive model can be applied. The objective of the present study was to develop criteria for judging test results that deviated from the predictions by the concentration addition chemical mixture model. These criteria were based on the confidence interval of the concentration addition model's prediction and on estimation of errors of the predicted concentration-effect curves by toxicity tests after exposure to single chemicals. A log-logit model with 2 parameters was assumed for the concentration-effect curve of each individual chemical. These parameters were determined by the maximum-likelihood method, and the criteria were defined using the variances and the covariance of the parameters. In addition, the criteria were applied to a toxicity test of a binary mixture of p-n-nonylphenol and p-n-octylphenol using the Japanese killifish, medaka (Oryzias latipes). Consequently, the concentration addition model using confidence interval was capable of predicting the test results at any level, and no reason for rejecting the concentration addition was found. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1806-1814. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26660330

  15. Detonation cell size measurements in H/sub 2/-air-H/sub 2/O mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Shepherd, J.E.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Conclusions of this study are: (1) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures at 20/sup 0/C and a total pressure of 101 kPa, detonations have been achieved between 13.5% and 70% H/sub 2/ mole fraction. This compositional range is wider than the detonability limits previously reported for smaller tubes. (2) The addition of CO/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/-air mixtures greatly reduces the detonability of the mixture. (3) For a given initial temperature, air density and equivalence ratio, the addition of steam to a H/sub 2/-Air mixture greatly decreases the detonability of the mixture. (4) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, detonation of H/sub 2/-air mixtures with up to 30% steam have been recorded. (5) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures, the detonability increases with increasing initial temperature at constant density. Consequently, the diluent effect of the addition of steam to a fixed volume of an H/sub 2/-air mixture in reducing detonability is partially offset if there is a concomitant temperature increase. (6) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, a 13.0% H/sub 2/-air mixture has been detonated. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Detonability of H/sub 2/-air-diluent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Berman, M.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the Heated Detonation Tube (HDT). Detonation cell width and velocity results are presented for H/sub 2/-air mixtures, undiluted and diluted with CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O for a range of H/sub 2/ concentration, initial temperature and pressure. The results show that the addition of either CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O significantly increases the detonation cell width and hence reduces the detonability of the mixture. The results also show that the detonation cell width is reduced (detonability is increased) for increased initial temperature and/or pressure.

  17. Estimating the mass of mutagens in indeterminate mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D.J.; Kerster, H.W.

    1985-10-01

    A method is shown for estimating the quantity (mass) of genotoxic compounds in complex mixtures without prior identification of components. This method uses fractiles of the probability distribution of responses from the assay of interest and dose-response of the mixture. The method depends upon the assumption of additivity, on average, in the interaction of mutagens and on lognormality of the distribution of mutagen molecular weights. Mass estimates are necessary for hazard characterization, risk estimation, and risk assessment. The method is illustrated using Ames assay results from a coke plant wastewater.

  18. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of {sup 41}K induces a significant loss of coherence in {sup 87}Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices.

  19. Charge Transport and Structural Dynamics in Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, Tyler; Holt, Adam; Terheggen, Logan; Griffin, Philip; Benson, Roberto; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in a series of imidazole and carboxylic acid-based deep eutectic mixtures are investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is found that the extended hydrogen-bonded networks characteristic of imidazoles are broken down upon addition of carboxylic acids, resulting in an increase in dc conductivity of the mixtures. These results are discussed within the framework of recent theories of hydrogen bonding and proton transport.

  20. Structure Property Relationships in Imidazole-based Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terheggen, Logan; Cosby, Tyler; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Deep eutectic mixtures of levulinic acid with a systematic series of imidazoles are measured by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the impact of steric interactions on charge transport and structural dynamics. An enhancement of dc conductivity is found in each of the imidazoles upon the addition of levulinic acid. However, the extent of increase is dependent upon the alkyl substitution on the imidazole ring. These results highlight the importance of molecular structure on hydrogen bonding and charge transport in deep eutectic mixtures.

  1. Mixtures of strongly interacting bosons in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Buonsante, P; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Penna, V; Vezzani, A

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of 41K induces a significant loss of coherence in 87Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices. PMID:18643555

  2. Enhanced shear strength of sodium bentonite using frictional additives

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, K.E.; Bowders, J.J.; Gilbert, R.B.; Daniel, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most important obstacles to using geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) in landfill cover systems is the low shear strength provided by the bentonitic portion of the GCL. In this study, the authors propose that granular, frictional materials might be added to the bentonite to form an admixture that would have greater shear strength than the bentonite alone while still raining low hydraulic conductivity. Bentonite was mixed with two separate granular additives, expanded shale and recycled to form mixtures consisting of 20-70% bentonite by weight. In direct shear tests at normal stresses of 34.5-103.5 kPa, effective friction angles were measured as 45{degrees} for the expanded 36{degrees} for the recycled glass, and 7{degrees} for the hydrated granular bentonite. The strength of the expanded shale mixtures increased nearly linearly as the percentage shale in the mixture increased, to 44{degrees} for a bentonite mixture with 80% shale. The addition of recycled glass showed little effect on the shear strength of the mixtures of glass and bentonite. Hydraulic conductivity measurements for both types of mixtures indicated a linear increase with log(k) as the amount of granular additive increased. For applications involving geosynthetic clay liners for cover systems, a mixture of 40% expanded shale and 60% bentonite is recommended, although further testing must be done. The 40/60 mixture satisfies the hydraulic equivalency requirement, with k = 5.1X10{sup -9} cm/sec, while increasing the shear strength parameters of the bentonitic mixture to {phi}{prime} = 17{degrees} and c{prime} = 0.

  3. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  4. Uncertainty in Mixtures and Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans and environmental species are rarely exposed to single chemicals. These chemicals typically affect multiple tissues through multiple modes of action, which may depend on the dose. Mixtures risk assessment may employ dose response information from the mixture of interest,...

  5. CLUSTERING CRITERIA AND MULTIVARIATE NORMAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New clustering criteria for use when a mixture of multivariate normal distributions is an appropriate model are presented. They are derived from maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches corresponding to different assumptions about the covariance matrices of the mixture componen...

  6. The Square-Shoulder-Asakura-Oosawa model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantoni, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    A new model for a colloidal size-asymmetric binary mixture is proposed: The Square-Shoulder-Asakura-Oosawa. This belongs to the larger class of non-additive hard-spheres models and has the property that its effective pair formulation is exact whenever the solvent particle fits inside the interstitial region of three touching solute particles. Therefore one can study its properties from the equivalent one-component effective problem. Some remarks on the phase diagram of this new model are also addressed.

  7. Optical Properties of Thin Film Molecular Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Shumway, Dean A.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thin films composed of molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric are being considered for use as solar selective coatings for a variety of space power applications. By controlling the degree of molecular mixing, the solar selective coatings can be tailored to have the combined properties of high solar absorptance, alpha, and low infrared emittance, epsilon. On orbit, these combined properties would simultaneously maximize the amount of solar energy captured by the coating and minimize the amount of thermal energy radiated. Mini-satellites equipped with solar collectors coated with these cermet coatings may utilize the captured heat energy to power a heat engine to generate electricity, or to power a thermal bus that directs heat to remote regions of the spacecraft. Early work in this area identified the theoretical boundary conditions needed to operate a Carnot cycle in space, including the need for a solar concentrator, a solar selective coating at the heat inlet of the engine, and a radiator. A solar concentrator that can concentrate sunlight by a factor of 100 is ideal. At lower values, the temperature of the solar absorbing surface becomes too low for efficient heat engine operation, and at higher values, cavity type heat receivers become attractive. In designing the solar selective coating, the wavelength region yielding high solar absorptance must be separated from the wavelength region yielding low infrared emittance by establishing a sharp transition in optical properties. In particular, a sharp transition in reflectance is desired in the infrared to achieve the desired optical performance. For a heat engine operating at 450C, a sharp transition at 1.8 micrometers is desired. The radiator completes the heat flow through the Carnot cycle. Additional work has been done supporting the use of molecular mixtures for terrestrial applications. Sputter deposition provides a means to apply coatings to the tubes that carry a working fluid at the focus of trough

  8. Coarsening in binary solid-liquid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhees, P. W.

    1990-01-01

    A theory of Ostwald ripening has been developed for a solid-liquid mixture cosisting of a low volume fraction array of spherical solid particles in a liquid wherein the coarsening process proceeds via the transport of both heat and mass. It is found that the simultaneous transport of heat and mass during ripening does not alter the exponents of the temporal power laws governing the ripening process from their classical values but does alter the amplitudes of these power laws. The growth rate of the cube of the average particle radius, the rate constant, is found to depend both on the alloy solute concentration and the ratio of the thermal to solutal diffusivities. In most metallic systems, a large decrease in the rate constant can be expected with small additions of solute to a pure metal. Possible extensions of this theory to the analogous problem of ripening in isothermal ternary alloys are also discussed.

  9. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  10. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  11. Recycled rubber, aggregate, and filler in asphalt paving mixtures. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    ;Contents(Partial): Evaluation Systems for Crumb Rubber Modified Binders and Mixtures; Hot Mix Asphalt Rubber Applications in Virginia; Evaluation of Pyrolized Carbon Black from Scrap Tires as Additive in Hot Mix Asphalt; Use of Scrap Tire Chips in Asphaltic Membrane; Effects of Mineral Fillers on Properties of Stone Matrix Asphalt Mixtures; and Quantitative Analysis of Aggregate Based on Hough Transform.

  12. Toxicity of synthetic naphthenic acids and mixtures of these to fish liver cells.

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Petersen, Karina; Rowland, Steven J

    2012-05-01

    Environmental concerns have been raised over the toxicity of crude naphthenic acids (NA) originating from oil exploration activities offshore, oil sands exploitation onshore, and use of refined NA as wood preservatives, tire additives, and in various other applications. The NA exist in highly complex mixtures, so the toxic effects of the individual acids are rarely known. The present study investigated the relationships between the chemical structures of a range of synthetic alicyclic and aromatic acids and their acute toxicities both as single chemicals and as complex mixtures in a primary culture of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. The combined toxicity of multicomponent mixtures of these NA was assessed using the concept of concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) prediction. All of the acids tested were moderately toxic, with EC(50) values in the range 108-405 μM (24-89 mg L(-1)) and 188-656 μM (43-148 mg L(-1)) when assessed by effects on metabolic inhibition or loss of membrane integrity, respectively. Binary and 6-compound mixture of NA caused combined toxicity according to the concept of additivity, although slight deviations from additivity were observed at a few mixture concentrations. Single NA and mixtures of NA with similar structures to those tested herein probably contribute to the toxicity of complex natural mixtures of NA. Toxicity tests on three commercial NA mixtures showed that these exhibited highly variable toxicities themselves probably reflecting their chemical heterogeneity. PMID:22462822

  13. RIM: A Random Item Mixture Model to Detect Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederickx, Sofie; Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul; Magis, David

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology for detecting differential item functioning (DIF). We introduce a DIF model, called the random item mixture (RIM), that is based on a Rasch model with random item difficulties (besides the common random person abilities). In addition, a mixture model is assumed for the item difficulties such that the…

  14. TOXICITY OF COMPLEX WASTE MIXTURES: A COMPARISON OF OBSERVED AND PREDICTED LETHALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to predict the biological effect of complex waste mixtures from chemical characterization data was examined by comparing observed mortality to that predicted by a mathematical additivity model with literature LD50 values for the chemicals identified in the mixtures. a...

  15. A NONADDITITIVE TUMOR RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects, but this may not be consistent with the actual biological response. We used a rodent model of hereditary renal cancer to investigate the carcinogenic response of a mixture of drinkin...

  16. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  17. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-12-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  18. Efficacy of pesticide mixtures against the western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) under laboratory and greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Amy L; Cloyd, Raymond A; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2013-02-01

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande is a commonly encountered and economically important insect pest of greenhouses. Greenhouse producers typically apply pesticides as mixtures to mitigate western flower thrips populations; however, there is limited information available on the compatibility and efficacy of commonly used pesticide mixtures. This study assessed nine binary and three tertiary pesticide mixtures used in greenhouses which included pesticides containing abamectin, acephate, azadirachtin, bifenazate, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, imidacloprid, novaluron, pymetrozine, and spinosad. Compatibility was determined for the binary pesticide mixtures using jar tests. In addition, the binary mixtures were applied to nine horticultural plant species to determine phytotoxicity based on visual appearance assessed 7 d after treatment. Bean-dip bioassays were performed in a laboratory using green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to determine LC50 values for each individual pesticide and the mixtures to establish whether the mixtures were synergistic, antagonistic, or there was no effect. The mortality of western flower thrips was assessed after 24 h, and LC50 values were calculated. Furthermore, semifield bioassays were performed in greenhouses for binary and tertiary mixtures to evaluate the efficacy (based on percent mortality) of the pesticide mixtures against western flower thrips. Results indicated that all binary mixtures were visibly compatible, and not phytotoxic to any of the plant species evaluated. Combination index calculations based on laboratory results indicated most of the binary mixtures were synergistic; however, the mixture containing spinosad + bifenazate appeared to be antagonistic against western flower thrips. The semifield bioassays demonstrated significantly reduced efficacy associated with mixtures containing azadirachtin, however, all binary mixtures provided approximately 80% western flower thrips mortality. PMID:23448038

  19. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a...

  4. Inferential determination of various properties of a gas mixture

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2007-03-27

    Methods for inferentially determining various properties of a gas mixture, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. The method can be applied to natural gas mixtures, where the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for heating value calculations. The method may also be applied to inferentially determine density and molecular weight for gas mixtures other than natural gases.

  5. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  6. Effect of Interstitial Media on Segregation in Vertically Vibrated Granular Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Xian; Li, Liang-Sheng; Wen, Ping-Ping; Shi, Qing-Fan; Zheng, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Vertically vibrated segregation behaviors of binary granular mixtures with different interstitial media are experimentally investigated. To study the role of interstitial media on the segregation, two types of interstitial fluids are adopted and the resulting phase diagrams are compared. The water-immersed granular mixture exhibits two kinds of complete segregation behaviors: Brazil nut effect and sandwich patterns, at least the latter is absent in the same air-immersed mixture. Additionally, the segregation extent is improved remarkably for the water-immersed mixture. The experimental observation further confirms that the effect of interstitial media on the relative motion of grains is one of the predominant mechanisms for granular segregation.

  7. New additive retards coke formation in ethylene furnace tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-09

    Adding relatively small amounts of a new additive to the feed stream of a steam cracker can inhibit coke formation on the metal surfaces of processing equipment and increase furnace run time. The additive comprises a variable mixture of four to six inorganic salts in aqueous solution. The components of the additive mixture can be varied, as needed, for processing heavy feed materials such as heavy naphtha and gas oil. The process was first tested at a Korean petrochemical plant and is now operating successfully at a commercial facility in Russia. The results of the Korean trial are presented here.

  8. Investigations of reversible thermochromic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, Douglas C.

    Three-component organic thermochromic systems have potential applications in reversible, rewritable thermal printing. In principle, such mixtures could maintain a coloured or non-coloured state at ambient temperature depending on their thermal treatment. These systems generally consist of a functional dye (1--3 mol%), a weakly acidic colour developer (5--25 mol%), and a high-melting organic solvent (75--90 mol%). Colour development occurs at the fusion temperature of the mixture, which triggers the interaction of the dye and developer. Slow cooling of the melt results in an equilibrium state with low colour density, whereas rapid cooling of the melt results in a metastable state with high colour density. The metastable state can be decoloured by heating to an intermediate decolourisation temperature at which the coloured state becomes unstable. Barriers to the widespread use of reversible, rewritable thermochromic materials include problems with colour contrast, colour stability, and decolourisation rates. Development is hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the interactions between components in these systems. In this study the developer-dye and developer-solvent interactions were examined for an archetypal dye/developer/solvent thermochromic system. Vibrational spectroscopy, NMR, and thermal analysis were used to examine compounds formed in developer/dye and developer/solvent binary mixtures. Rewritable thermochromic properties such as metastable colour density, equilibrium colour density, and decolourisation rates were examined and discussed in terms of the thermodynamics of the developer/dye and developer/solvent interactions. Observed thermochromic properties are shown to be strongly correlated to a competition between the dye and the solvent for interaction with the developer. Increasing the attractive interaction between the solvent and developer results in enhanced rewritable thermochromic properties.

  9. Mixture Models for Dependent Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric mixture models appropriate for data presented in homogeneous blocks of varying sizes from several unidentified source populations are considered. For most applications, the data elements within each block are dependent. Models are proposed for multivariate normal data incorporating two types of dependence, exchangeability of elements within blocks, and a Markov structure for blocks. The consequences of assuming exchangeability, when in fact the Markov structure holds, are explored. Computational problems for each model are considered, and results of a simple test of the exchangeability hypothesis for LANDSAT data are presented.

  10. Combustion of coal/water mixtures with thermal preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, M.; Roffe, G.; Miller, G.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal preconditioning is a process in which coal/water mixtures are vaporized to produce coal/steam suspensions, and then superheated to allow the coal to devolitalize producing suspensions of char particles in hydrocarbon gases and steam. This final product of the process can be injected without atomization, and burned directly in a gas turbine combustor. This paper reports on the results of an experimental program in which thermally preconditioned coal/water mixture was successfully burned with a stable flame in a gas turbine combustor test rig. Tests were performed at a mixture flowrate of 300 1b/hr and combustor pressure of 8 atmospheres. The coal/water mixture was thermally preconditioned and injected into the combustor over a temperature range from 350/sup 0/F to 600/sup 0/F, and combustion air was supplied at between 600/sup 0/F to 725/sup 0/F. Test durations varied between 10 to 20 minutes. The original mean coal particle size for these tests, prior to preconditioning was 25 microns. Results of additional tests showed that one-third of the sulfur contained in the solids of a coal/water mixture with 3 percent sulfur were evolved in gaseous form (under mild thermolized conditions) mainly as H/sub 2/S with the remainder as light mercaptans.

  11. Feasibility of separations for distillation of nonideal ternary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fidkowski, Z.T.; Doherty, M.F.; Malone, M.F. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The product compositions in single-feed distillation columns can be specified only in certain regions of the composition space, which depend only on the pressure, feed, and vapor-liquid equilibrium for the mixture. In nonideal mixtures, even without azeotropes, the regions may allow unusual product distributions. For example, the distillate in a direct split is composed primarily of the lightest component. Intuition and experience with relatively ideal mixtures suggest that the next most plentiful component is the intermediate boiler. In nonideal mixtures, however, with or without azeotropes, the next most plentiful component may be the highest-boiling species with only trace amounts of the intermediate boiler. For azeotropic mixtures, distillation boundaries may give rise to additional restrictions on the product compositions. The authors describe how simple distillation boundaries deform into continuous distillation boundaries and, in a limited number of cases, how the simple distillation boundaries can be crossed in continuous columns for certain ranges of the design variables. Unfortunately, such designs may be quite sensitive to model uncertainties or to disturbances in the parameters.

  12. Secondary organic aerosol from biogenic volatile organic compound mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, Meagan L.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

    2011-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the ozonolysis of a Siberian fir needle oil (SFNO), a Canadian fir needle oil (CFNO), and several SOA precursor mixtures containing reactive and non-reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated. The use of precursor mixtures more completely describes the atmosphere where many VOCs exist. The addition of non-reactive VOCs such as bornyl acetate, camphene, and borneol had very little to no effect on SOA yields. The oxidation of VOC mixtures with VOC mass percentages similar to the SFNO produced SOA yields that became more similar to the SOA yield from SFNO as the complexity and concentration of VOCs within the mixture became more similar to overall SFNO composition. The SOA yield produced by the oxidation of CFNO was within the error of the SOA yield produced by the oxidation of SFNO at a similar VOC concentration. The SOA yields from SFNO were modeled using the volatility basis set (VBS), which predicts the SOA yields for a given mass concentration of mixtures containing similar VOCs.

  13. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  14. A study of finite mixture model: Bayesian approach on financial time series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-07-01

    Recently, statistician have emphasized on the fitting finite mixture model by using Bayesian method. Finite mixture model is a mixture of distributions in modeling a statistical distribution meanwhile Bayesian method is a statistical method that use to fit the mixture model. Bayesian method is being used widely because it has asymptotic properties which provide remarkable result. In addition, Bayesian method also shows consistency characteristic which means the parameter estimates are close to the predictive distributions. In the present paper, the number of components for mixture model is studied by using Bayesian Information Criterion. Identify the number of component is important because it may lead to an invalid result. Later, the Bayesian method is utilized to fit the k-component mixture model in order to explore the relationship between rubber price and stock market price for Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia. Lastly, the results showed that there is a negative effect among rubber price and stock market price for all selected countries.

  15. Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, D.F.

    1992-07-10

    This report presents completed sealed tube stability test results for the following eight refrigerant/lubricant mixtures: R-22/mineral oil; R-124/alkylbenzene; R-134a/pentaerythritol (PE) ester (mixed acid); R- 134a/PE (branched acid); R-134a/ PE (100 cSt viscosity); R- 142b/alkylbenzene; R-143a/ PE (branched acid); R-152a/alkylbenzene. Partial results are shown for an additional eight refrigerant-lubricant mixtures. Though work is in progress, no data are available at this point in time for the five remaining test mixtures. Reported are: visual observations on aged sealed tubes, gas chromatographic analyses on the vapor phase contents of the tubes, chloride ion contents of HCFC containing mixtures or fluoride ion contents of HFC mixtures, and total acid number values and infrared analysis results for mixtures containing ester lubricants.

  16. Formation of hydrotalcite in mixtures of aluminum hydroxycarbonate and magnesium hydroxide gels.

    PubMed

    Vanderlaan, R K; White, J L; Hem, S L

    1982-07-01

    IR and X-ray analysis demonstrate that hydrotalcite forms during the aging of aluminum hydroxycarbonate gel and magnesium hydroxide gel mixtures. The formation of hydrotalcite produces a change in the pH-stat titrigram and a sharp increase in the pH of the mixture. Hydrotalcite was noted earlier in mixtures having a high molar ratio of magnesium to aluminum, a high total gel concentration, a high initial pH, or in mixtures stored at elevated temperatures. The addition of sorbitol to the mixtures substantially delayed the appearance of hydrotalcite. Nonacid-reactive hydrotalcite formed when mixtures of chloride-containing aluminum hydroxide gel and magnesium hydroxide gel were aged. PMID:7120062

  17. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  18. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  19. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  20. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.