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Sample records for additive mixture consists

  1. A Four Step Approach to Evaluate Mixtures for Consistency with Dose Addition

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a four step approach for evaluating chemical mixture data for consistency with dose addition for use in environmental health risk assessment. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture risk guidance (EPA 2000a,b), toxicological interaction for a defined mixture (...

  2. A four-step approach to evaluate mixtures for consistency with dose addition.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, Richard C; Pan, Yi; Li, Ruosha; Haber, Lynne T; Lyles, Robert H; Herr, David W; Moser, Virginia C; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2013-11-16

    Mixture risk assessment is often hampered by the lack of dose-response information on the mixture being assessed, forcing reliance on component formulas such as dose addition. We present a four-step approach for evaluating chemical mixture data for consistency with dose addition for use in supporting a component based mixture risk assessment. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture risk guidance (U.S. EPA, 2000a,b), toxicological interaction for a defined mixture (all components known) is departure from a clearly articulated definition of component additivity. For the common approach of dose additivity, the EPA guidance identifies three desirable characteristics, foremost of which is that the component chemicals are toxicologically similar. The other two characteristics are empirical: the mixture components have toxic potencies that are fixed proportions of each other (throughout the dose range of interest), and the mixture dose term in the dose additive prediction formula, which we call the combined prediction model (CPM), can be represented by a linear combination of the component doses. A consequent property of the proportional toxic potencies is that the component chemicals must share a common dose-response model, where only the dose coefficients depend on the chemical components. A further consequence is that the mixture data must be described by the same mathematical function ("mixture model") as the components, but with a distinct coefficient for the total mixture dose. The mixture response is predicted from the component dose-response curves by using the dose additive CPM and the prediction is then compared with the observed mixture results. The four steps are to evaluate: (1) toxic proportionality by determining how well the CPM matches the single chemical models regarding mean and variance; (2) fit of the mixture model to the mixture data; (3) agreement between the mixture data and the CPM prediction; and (4) consistency between the CPM and the

  3. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  4. Regolith breccia consisting of H and LL chondrite mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanai, Keizo; Kojima, Hideyasu

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite Yamato-8424 (Y-8424) is a regolith breccia that is homogenized mixture of H and LL chondrite components. The breccia consists mainly of a fine-grained material with mineral fragments of olivine, pyroxene, and Fe-Ni metal with traces of plagioclase.

  5. Additive for otto cycle engines and fuel mixture so obtained

    SciTech Connect

    Scifoni, M.

    1985-02-12

    The additive for Otto cycle engines according to the present invention consists of a mixture of water, ethanol, methanol and butanol to which is added a determined quantity of a liquid obtained by pressing prickly pear leaves. Added in a small percentage to the fuel, gasoline, LP or methane, this additive prevents the oxidation associated with the use of water and/or alcohols in Otto cycle engines, lowers fuel consumption and allows the use of low octane fuel.

  6. Using Self Consistent Field Theory on Polymeric Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Konigslow, Kier; Park, Chul; Thompson, Russell

    The ability to predict the solubility of a particular solvent in a polymer fluid is essential to the production of polymer foams. For the past 40 years, the primary model employed to this end has been an expansion of Flory-Huggins lattice fluid theory developed by Sanchez and Lacombe (S-L theory). S-L theory, while useful in the uniform limit, is limited to homogeneous systems. Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT), which has long been in use in polymer physics, is a mean-field theory capable of modeling the equilibrium behaviour of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems. We are investigating whether SCFT, applied to polymer-solvent mixtures, is in agreement with SL-theory in the homogeneous limit. Should this prove successful, we hope to use SCFT to model more general mixtures, including inhomogeneous nanocellular polymer foam systems.

  7. Chemical Mixture Risk Assessment Additivity-Based Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powerpoint presentation includes additivity-based chemical mixture risk assessment methods. Basic concepts, theory and example calculations are included. Several slides discuss the use of "common adverse outcomes" in analyzing phthalate mixtures.

  8. Dry building mixture with complex dispersed mineral additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, Liliia; Mukhina, Irina; Teplov, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of the complex dispersed mineral additive consisting of diopside and limestone was provided by the following factors. Diopside, due to the high hardness, reinforces formed hardened cement paste and prevents the spread of micro-cracks in it under the action of loads. Furthermore, diopside due to the greater elastic modulus than cement paste causes redistribution of stress between the additive particles and the cement. Limestone, since it has chemical affinity with the clinker minerals and products of their hydration hardening, effects on the hydration process and the formation of the contact area between the additive particles and the cement. The optimum quantity of complex dispersed mineral additive is 7%. At the same time the strength of the solution, made of dry building mixture "rough leveler for floor", increased by 22.1%, and the strength of the solution, made of dry mortar "masonry mixture" increased by 32.7%. With the mineral additive introduction the offset of the endoeffect temperatures to higher temperatures on derivatograms is fixed. If there is a mineral additive in the hardened cement paste, which may act as substrate for the tumors crystallization, the hardened cement paste structure strengthening while the complex thermal analysis is seen.

  9. Antiandrogenic activity of phthalate mixtures: Validity of concentration addition

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Oberli-Schrämmli, Aurelia; Fent, Karl

    2012-03-01

    Phthalates and bisphenol A have very widespread use leading to significant exposure of humans. They are suspected to interfere with the endocrine system, including the androgen, estrogen and the thyroid hormone system. Here we analyzed the antiandrogenic activity of six binary, and one ternary mixture of phthalates exhibiting complete antiandrogenic dose–response curves, and binary mixtures of phthalates and bisphenol A at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 10}, EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50} in MDA-kb2 cells. Mixture activity followed the concentration addition (CA) model with a tendency to synergism at high and antagonism at low concentrations. Isoboles and the toxic unit approach (TUA) confirmed the additive to synergistic activity of the binary mixtures BBP + DBP, DBP + DEP and DEP + BPA at high concentrations. Both methods indicate a tendency to antagonism for the EC{sub 10} mixtures BBP + DBP, BBP + DEP and DBP + DEP, and the EC{sub 25} mixture of DBP + BPA. A ternary mixture revealed synergism at the EC{sub 50}, and weak antagonistic activity at the EC{sub 25} level by the TUA. A mixture of five phthalates representing a human urine composition and reflecting exposure to corresponding parent compounds showed no antiandrogenic activity. Our study demonstrates that CA is an appropriate concept to account for mixture effects of antiandrogenic phthalates and bisphenol A. The interaction indicates a departure from additivity to antagonism at low concentrations, probably due to interaction with the androgen receptor and/or cofactors. This study emphasizes that a risk assessment of phthalates should account for mixture effects by applying the CA concept. -- Highlights: ► Antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of 2 and 3 phthalates are assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. ► Mixture activities followed the concentration addition model. ► A tendency to synergism at high and antagonism at low levels occurred.

  10. Metabolome consistency: additional parazoanthines from the mediterranean zoanthid parazoanthus axinellae.

    PubMed

    Audoin, Coralie; Cocandeau, Vincent; Thomas, Olivier P; Bruschini, Adrien; Holderith, Serge; Genta-Jouve, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis of the organic extract obtained from the Mediterranean zoanthid Parazoanthus axinellae yielded to the identification of five new parazoanthines F-J. The structures were fully determined by comparison of fragmentation patterns with those of previously isolated parazoathines and MS/MS spectra simulation of in silico predicted compounds according to the metabolome consistency. The absolute configuration of the new compounds has been assigned using on-line electronic circular dichroism (UHPLC-ECD). We thus demonstrated the potential of highly sensitive hyphenated techniques to characterize the structures of a whole family of natural products within the metabolome of a marine species. Minor compounds can be characterized using these techniques thus avoiding long isolation processes that may alter the structure of the natural products. These results are also of interest to identify putative bioactive compounds present at low concentration in a complex mixture. PMID:24957034

  11. A Novel Approach for Evaluating Carbamate Mixtures for Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two mathematical approaches were used to test the hypothesis ofdose-addition for a binary and a seven-chemical mixture ofN-methyl carbamates, toxicologically similar chemicals that inhibit cholinesterase (ChE). In the more novel approach, mixture data were not included in the ana...

  12. Thermodynamically consistent microstructure prediction of additively manufactured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing has risen to the top of research interest in advanced manufacturing in recent years due to process flexibility, achievability of geometric complexity, and the ability to locally modify and optimize materials. The present work is focused on providing an approach for incorporating thermodynamically consistent properties and microstructure evolution for non-equilibrium supercooling, as observed in additive manufacturing processes, into finite element analysis. There are two primary benefits of this work: (1) the resulting prediction is based on the material composition and (2) the nonlinear behavior caused by the thermodynamic properties of the material during the non-equilibrium solution is accounted for with extremely high resolution. The predicted temperature response and microstructure evolution for additively manufactured stainless steel 316L using standard handbook-obtained thermodynamic properties are compared with the thermodynamic properties calculated using the CALculation of PHAse Diagrams (CALPHAD) approach. Data transfer from the CALPHAD approach to finite element analysis is discussed.

  13. Density functional for ternary non-additive hard sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Matthias

    2011-10-19

    Based on fundamental measure theory, a Helmholtz free energy density functional for three-component mixtures of hard spheres with general, non-additive interaction distances is constructed. The functional constitutes a generalization of the previously given theory for binary non-additive mixtures. The diagrammatic structure of the spatial integrals in both functionals is of star-like (or tree-like) topology. The ternary diagrams possess a higher degree of complexity than the binary diagrams. Results for partial pair correlation functions, obtained via the Ornstein-Zernike route from the second functional derivatives of the excess free energy functional, agree well with Monte Carlo simulation data. PMID:21946780

  14. Addition Table of Colours: Additive and Subtractive Mixtures Described Using a Single Reasoning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, A. R.; Lopes dos Santos, J. M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Students' misconceptions concerning colour phenomena and the apparent complexity of the underlying concepts--due to the different domains of knowledge involved--make its teaching very difficult. We have developed and tested a teaching device, the addition table of colours (ATC), that encompasses additive and subtractive mixtures in a single…

  15. A Four-Step and Four-Criteria Approach for Evaluating Evidence of Dose Addition in Chemical Mixture Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose addition is the most frequently-used component-based approach for predicting dose response for a mixture of toxicologically-similar chemicals and for statistical evaluation of whether the mixture response is consistent with dose additivity and therefore predictable from the ...

  16. A thermodynamic self-consistent theory of asymmetric hard-core Yukawa mixtures.

    PubMed

    Pellicane, Giuseppe; Caccamo, Carlo

    2016-10-19

    We perform structural and thermodynamic calculations in the framework of the modified hypernetted chain (MHNC) integral equation closure to the Ornstein-Zernike equation for binary mixtures of size-different particles interacting with hard-core Yukawa pair potentials. We use the Percus-Yevick (PY) bridge functions of a binary mixture of hard-sphere (HSM) particles. The hard-sphere diameters of the PY bridge functions of the HSM system are adjusted so to achieve thermodynamic consistency between the virial and compressibility equations of state. We show the benefit of thermodynamic consistency by comparing the MHNC results with the available computer simulation data reported in the literature, and we demonstrate that the self-consistent thermodynamic theory provides a better reproduction of the simulation data over other microscopic theories. PMID:27545096

  17. Evidence for dose-additive effects of a type II pyrethroid mixture. In vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Ares, I; Ramos, E; Castellano, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Larrañaga, M R; Anadón, A; Martínez, M A

    2015-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of pyrethroid insecticides that led to common exposure in the population, few studies have been conducted to quantitatively assess dose-additive effects of pyrethroids using a funcional measure involved in the common toxic mode of action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potency and efficacy of 6 Type II pyretroids (α-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, cyphenothrin and esfenvalerate) to evoke induction of both nitric oxide and lipid peroxides levels measured as malondialdehyde in three in vitro models (SH-SY5Y, HepG2 and Caco-2 human cells) as well as to test the hypothesis of dose additivity for mixtures of these same 6 pyrethroids. Concentration-responses for 6 pyrethroids were determined as well as the response to mixtures of all 6 pyrethroids. Additivity was tested assuming a dose-additive model. The human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line was the most sensitive in vitro model. The rank order of potency for cell SH-SY5Y viability MTT assay was deltamethrin>cyphenothrin>λ-cyhalothrin>cyfluthrin>esfenvalerate>α-cypermethrin. When 6 pyrethroids were present in the mixture at an equitoxic mixing ratio, the action on nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxides measured as malondialdehyde (MDA) production was consistent with a dose-additive model. The results of the present study are consistent with previous reports of additivity of pyrethroids in vivo e in vitro. PMID:25688004

  18. 21 CFR 80.35 - Color additive mixtures; certification and exemption from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Color additive mixtures; certification and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVE CERTIFICATION Certification Procedures § 80.35 Color additive mixtures; certification and exemption from certification. (a) Color additive mixtures to...

  19. 21 CFR 80.35 - Color additive mixtures; certification and exemption from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Color additive mixtures; certification and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVE CERTIFICATION Certification Procedures § 80.35 Color additive mixtures; certification and exemption from certification. (a) Color additive mixtures to...

  20. Communication: Virial coefficients and demixing in highly asymmetric binary additive hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    López de Haro, Mariano; Tejero, Carlos F; Santos, Andrés

    2013-04-28

    The problem of demixing in a binary fluid mixture of highly asymmetric additive hard spheres is revisited. A comparison is presented between the results derived previously using truncated virial expansions for three finite size ratios with those that one obtains with the same approach in the extreme case in which one of the components consists of point particles. Since this latter system is known not to exhibit fluid-fluid segregation, the similarity observed for the behavior of the critical constants arising in the truncated series in all instances, while not being conclusive, may cast serious doubts as to the actual existence of a demixing fluid-fluid transition in disparate-sized binary additive hard-sphere mixtures. PMID:23635104

  1. 75 FR 53867 - Additions to Listing of Exempt Chemical Mixtures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ...Under this Direct Final Rule, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is updating the Table of Exempt Chemical Mixtures. This action is in response to DEA's review of new applications for exemption. Having reviewed applications and relevant information, DEA finds that these 21 preparations meet the applicable exemption criteria. Therefore, these products are exempted from the application of......

  2. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  3. Evaluation of Warm Mix Asphalt Additives for Use in Modified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamoun, Zahi

    The objective of this research effort is to evaluate the use of warm-mix additives with polymer modified and terminal blend tire rubber asphalt mixtures from Nevada and California. The research completed over two stages: first stage evaluated two different WMA technologies; Sasobit and Advera, and second stage evaluated one additional WMA technology; Evotherm. The experimental program covered the evaluation of resistance of the mixtures to moisture damage, the performance characteristics of the mixtures, and mechanistic analysis of mixtures in simulated pavements. In the both stages, the mixture resistance to moisture damage was evaluated using the indirect tensile test and the dynamic modulus at multiple freeze-thaw cycles, and the resistance of the various asphalt mixtures to permanent deformation using the Asphalt Mixture Performance Tester (AMPT). Resistance of the untreated mixes to fatigue cracking using the flexural beam fatigue was only completed for the first stage. One source of aggregates was sampled in, two different batches, three warm mix asphalt technologies (Advera, Sasobit and Evotherm) and three asphalt binder types (neat, polymer-modified, and terminal blend tire rubber modified asphalt binders) typically used in Nevada and California were evaluated in this study. This thesis presents the resistance of the first stage mixtures to permanent deformation and fatigue cracking using two warm-mix additives; Advera and Sasobit, and the resistance to moisture damage and permanent deformation of the second stage mixtures with only one warm-mix additive; Evotherm.

  4. A New Self-Consistent Field Model of Polymer/Nanoparticle Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Li, Hui-shu; Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Jian; Tian, Wen-de

    2016-01-01

    Field-theoretical method is efficient in predicting assembling structures of polymeric systems. However, it’s challenging to generalize this method to study the polymer/nanoparticle mixture due to its multi-scale nature. Here, we develop a new field-based model which unifies the nanoparticle description with the polymer field within the self-consistent field theory. Instead of being “ensemble-averaged” continuous distribution, the particle density in the final morphology can represent individual particles located at preferred positions. The discreteness of particle density allows our model to properly address the polymer-particle interface and the excluded-volume interaction. We use this model to study the simplest system of nanoparticles immersed in the dense homopolymer solution. The flexibility of tuning the interfacial details allows our model to capture the rich phenomena such as bridging aggregation and depletion attraction. Insights are obtained on the enthalpic and/or entropic origin of the structural variation due to the competition between depletion and interfacial interaction. This approach is readily extendable to the study of more complex polymer-based nanocomposites or biology-related systems, such as dendrimer/drug encapsulation and membrane/particle assembly. PMID:26829174

  5. A New Self-Consistent Field Model of Polymer/Nanoparticle Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Li, Hui-Shu; Zhang, Bo-Kai; Li, Jian; Tian, Wen-De

    2016-02-01

    Field-theoretical method is efficient in predicting assembling structures of polymeric systems. However, it’s challenging to generalize this method to study the polymer/nanoparticle mixture due to its multi-scale nature. Here, we develop a new field-based model which unifies the nanoparticle description with the polymer field within the self-consistent field theory. Instead of being “ensemble-averaged” continuous distribution, the particle density in the final morphology can represent individual particles located at preferred positions. The discreteness of particle density allows our model to properly address the polymer-particle interface and the excluded-volume interaction. We use this model to study the simplest system of nanoparticles immersed in the dense homopolymer solution. The flexibility of tuning the interfacial details allows our model to capture the rich phenomena such as bridging aggregation and depletion attraction. Insights are obtained on the enthalpic and/or entropic origin of the structural variation due to the competition between depletion and interfacial interaction. This approach is readily extendable to the study of more complex polymer-based nanocomposites or biology-related systems, such as dendrimer/drug encapsulation and membrane/particle assembly.

  6. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl

    2014-09-15

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50}. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of

  7. MIXTURES OF THYROID DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: TESTING ADDITIVITY OF HEPATIC INDUCERS AND THYROID PEROXIDASE INHIBITORS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to chemical mixtures via diet, occupation, and the environment. Previous data demonstrated that low doses of polycyclic halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) acting through similar mechanisms result in an additive reduction of thyroxine (T4). If xenobioti...

  8. Testing for Additivity at Select Mixture Groups of Interest Based on Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, LeAnna M.; Gennings, Chris; Carchman, Richard; Carter, Jr., Walter H.; Pounds, Joel G.; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2006-12-01

    Several assumptions, defined and undefined, are used in the toxicity assessment of chemical mixtures. In scientific practice mixture components in the low-dose region, particularly subthreshold doses, are often assumed to behave additively (i.e., zero interaction) based on heuristic arguments. This assumption has important implications in the practice of risk assessment, but has not been experimentally tested. We have developed methodology to test for additivity in the sense of Berenbaum (Advances in Cancer Research, 1981), based on the statistical equivalence testing literature where the null hypothesis of interaction is rejected for the alternative hypothesis of additivity when data support the claim. The implication of this approach is that conclusions of additivity are made with a false positive rate controlled by the experimenter. The claim of additivity is based on prespecified additivity margins, which are chosen using expert biological judgment such that small deviations from additivity, which are not considered to be biologically important, are not statistically significant. This approach is in contrast to the usual hypothesis-testing framework that assumes additivity in the null hypothesis and rejects when there is significant evidence of interaction. In this scenario, failure to reject may be due to lack of statistical power making the claim of additivity problematic. The proposed method is illustrated in a mixture of five organophosphorus pesticides that were experimentally evaluated alone and at relevant mixing ratios. Motor activity was assessed in adult male rats following acute exposure. Four low-dose mixture groups were evaluated. Evidence of additivity is found in three of the four low-dose mixture groups.The proposed method tests for additivity of the whole mixture and does not take into account subset interactions (e.g., synergistic, antagonistic) that may have occurred and cancelled each other out.

  9. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Betancor, K.; Ritz, C.; Fernández-Piñas, F.; Leganés, F.; Rodea-Palomares, I.

    2015-11-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks

  10. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors.

    PubMed

    Martin-Betancor, K; Ritz, C; Fernández-Piñas, F; Leganés, F; Rodea-Palomares, I

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks. PMID:26606975

  11. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Betancor, K.; Ritz, C.; Fernández-Piñas, F.; Leganés, F.; Rodea-Palomares, I.

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks PMID:26606975

  12. 40 CFR 716.105 - Additions of substances and mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additions of substances and mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.105 Section 716.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.105 Additions of substances...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1001 - Diluents in color additive mixtures for drug use exempt from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Restrictions Alcohol, specially denatured As set forth in 26 CFR, pt. 212 As set forth in 26 CFR, pt. 211... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diluents in color additive mixtures for drug use..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1001 - Diluents in color additive mixtures for drug use exempt from certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Restrictions Alcohol, specially denatured As set forth in 26 CFR, pt. 212 As set forth in 26 CFR, pt. 211... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diluents in color additive mixtures for drug use..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION...

  15. Thermoregulatory response to an organophosphate and carbamate insecticide mixture: testing the assumption of dose-additivity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Herr, David W; Gennings, Chris; Graff, Jaimie E; McMurray, Matthew; Stork, LeAnna; Coffey, Todd; Hamm, Adam; Mack, Cina M

    2006-01-01

    Most toxicity data are based on studies using single compounds. This study assessed if there is an interaction between mixtures of the anticholinesterase insecticides chlorpyrifos (CHP) and carbaryl (CAR) using hypothermia and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition as toxicological endpoints. Core temperature (T(c)) was continuously monitored by radiotelemetry in adult Long-Evans rats administered CHP at doses ranging from 0 to 50mg/kg and CAR doses of 0-150 mg/kg. The temperature index (TI), an integration of the change in T(c) over a 12h period, was quantified. Effects of mixtures of CHP and CAR in 2:1 and 1:1 ratios on the TI were examined and the data analyzed using a statistical model designed to assess significant departures from additivity for chemical mixtures. CHP and CAR elicited a marked hypothermia and dose-related decrease in the TI. The TI response to a 2:1 ratio of CHP:CAR was significantly less than that predicted by additivity. The TI response to a 1:1 ratio of CHP and CAR was not significantly different from the predicted additivity. Plasma and brain ChE activity were measured 4h after dosing with CHP, CAR, and mixtures in separate groups of rats. There was a dose-additive interaction for the inhibition of brain ChE for the 2:1 ratio, but an antagonistic effect for the 1:1 ratio. The 2:1 and 1:1 mixtures had an antagonistic interaction on plasma ChE. Overall, the departures from additivity for the physiological (i.e., temperature) and biochemical (i.e., ChE inhibition) endpoints for the 2:1 and 1:1 mixtures studies did not coincide as expected. An interaction between CHP and CAR appears to depend on the ratio of compounds in the mixture as well as the biological endpoint. PMID:16182429

  16. Interaction of phenolic uncouplers in binary mixtures: concentration-additive and synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Escher, B I; Hunziker, R W; Schwarzenbach, R P

    2001-10-01

    The uncoupling activities of 14 binary mixtures of substituted phenols and of 4 binary mixtures of phenols and anisols were investigated at different pH values. Experiments were performed with time-resolved spectroscopy on membrane vesicles (chromatophores) of the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Phenols are known to destroy the electrochemical proton gradient in energy-transducing membranes by a protonophoric mechanism. Anisols do not have protonophoric activity but disturb membrane structure and functioning as a nonspecific baseline toxicant. It was postulated in the literature that, for certain substituted phenols, the formation of a dimer between the phenoxide and the neutral phenol may contribute significantly to the overall protonophoric activity. In 13 of 14 mixtures of substituted phenols but in none of the mixtures of phenols with anisols, such a dimer appears to be formed between two different mixture partners. An extended shuttle mechanism of uncoupling, which includes a term for the contribution of such a mixed dimer, provided a good description of all experimental data. Opposite speciation favors interaction and ortho substituents abate interaction, which adds evidence for the dimerformation via a hydrogen bond between the phenol-OH and the phenoxide. These findings are significant not only regarding the mechanism of protonophoric action but also for the risk assessment process of chemical mixtures in the environment. When assessing the effect of mixtures, concentration addition is regarded as a reference X concept to estimate effects of similarly acting compounds. The substituted phenols in this work act according to the same action mechanism of uncoupling. Nevertheless, the overall effect of four of the investigated mixtures, which exhibit stronger dimer formation as compared to the single compounds or for which the resulting dimer is intrinsically more active, exceeded the effect calculated according to concentration addition

  17. Testing for departures from additivity in mixtures of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is a follow-up to a paper by Carr, et al. that determined a design structure to optimally test for departures from additivity in a fixed ratio mixture of four perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) using an in vitro transiently-transfected COS- 1 PPARa reporter model with an NHA...

  18. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to mixtures of environmental compounds. A regulatory assumption is that the mixtures of chemicals act in an additive manner. However, this assumption requires experimental validation. Traditional experimental designs (full factorial) require a large number of e...

  19. Evaluating mixtures of 14 hygroscopic additives to improve antibody microarray performance.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Sébastien; Laforte, Veronique; Lo, Pik-Shan; Li, Huiyan; Juncker, David

    2015-11-01

    Microarrays allow the miniaturization and multiplexing of biological assays while only requiring minute amounts of samples. As a consequence of the small volumes used for spotting and the assays, evaporation often deteriorates the quality, reproducibility of spots, and the overall assay performance. Glycerol is commonly added to antibody microarray printing buffers to decrease evaporation; however, it often decreases the binding of antibodies to the surface, thereby negatively affecting assay sensitivity. Here, combinations of 14 hygroscopic chemicals were used as additives to printing buffers for contact-printed antibody microarrays on four different surface chemistries. The ability of the additives to suppress evaporation was quantified by measuring the residual buffer volume in open quill pins over time. The seven best additives were then printed either individually or as a 1:1 mixture of two additives, and the homogeneity, intensity, and reproducibility of both the spotted protein and of a fluorescently labeled analyte in an assay were quantified. Among the 28 combinations on the four slides, many were found to outperform glycerol, and the best additive mixtures were further evaluated by changing the ratio of the two additives. We observed that the optimal additive mixture was dependent on the slide chemistry, and that it was possible to increase the binding of antibodies to the surface threefold compared to 50 % glycerol, while decreasing whole-slide coefficient of variation to 5.9 %. For the two best slides, improvements were made for both the limit of detection (1.6× and 5.9×, respectively) and the quantification range (1.2× and 2.1×, respectively). The additive mixtures identified here thus help improve assay reproducibility and performance, and might be beneficial to all types of microarrays that suffer from evaporation of the printing buffers. PMID:26345442

  20. Research on the Technology Applying Anti-Rutting Additive to Asphalt Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Huang, Liming; Li, Chun

    High-temperature problems like rutting, displacement and upheaval are the most serious ones for bituminous pavement of urban roads. Especially, such problems at crossroads and fixed places where buses stop, for instance, BRT, affect service ability and life of roads largely. Application of anti-rutting asphalt mixture mainly aims at reducing strain and deformation generated by bituminous concrete under effect of vehicle load, decreasing remainders that cannot be recovered in deformation, improving the ability of bituminous pavement to resist deformation under high temperature and delaying generation of rutting. Anti-rutting asphalt mixture in this thesis refers to the asphalt mixture where anti-rutting additive is added by dry method and high-temperature stability is improved.

  1. THE COMBINED CARCINOGENIC RISK FOR EXPOSURE TO MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS MAY BE LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Combined Carcinogenic Risk for Exposure to Mixtures of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products May be Less Than Additive

    Risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume...

  2. Influence of propane additives on the detonation characteristics of H2-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanbing; Bauer, Pascal; Zitoun, Ratiba

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen is more and more considered as a potential fuel for propulsion applications. However, due to its low ignition energy and wide flammability limits, H2-air mixtures raise a concern in terms of safety. This aspect can be partly solved by adding an alkane to these mixtures, which plays the role of an inhibitor. The present paper provides data on such binary fuel-air mixtures where various amounts of propane are added to hydrogen. The behavior of the corresponding mixtures, in terms of detonation characteristics and other fundamental properties, such as the cell size of the detonation front and induction delay, are presented and discussed for a series of equivalence ratios and propane addition. The experimental detonation velocity is in good agreement with calculated theoretical Chapman-Jouguet values. Based on soot tracks records, the cell size λ is measured, whereas the induction length L i is derived from data using a GRI-Mech kinetic mechanism. These data allow providing a value of the coefficient K = λ/L i .

  3. Statistically significant deviations from additivity: What do they mean in assessing toxicity of mixtures?

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Vijver, Martina G; Qiu, Hao; Baas, Jan; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-12-01

    There is increasing attention from scientists and policy makers to the joint effects of multiple metals on organisms when present in a mixture. Using root elongation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) as a toxicity endpoint, the combined effects of binary mixtures of Cu, Cd, and Ni were studied. The statistical MixTox model was used to search deviations from the reference models i.e. concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). The deviations were subsequently interpreted as 'interactions'. A comprehensive experiment was designed to test the reproducibility of the 'interactions'. The results showed that the toxicity of binary metal mixtures was equally well predicted by both reference models. We found statistically significant 'interactions' in four of the five total datasets. However, the patterns of 'interactions' were found to be inconsistent or even contradictory across the different independent experiments. It is recommended that a statistically significant 'interaction', must be treated with care and is not necessarily biologically relevant. Searching a statistically significant interaction can be the starting point for further measurements and modeling to advance the understanding of underlying mechanisms and non-additive interactions occurring inside the organisms. PMID:26188643

  4. Using special additions to preparation of the moulding mixture for casting steel parts of drive wheel type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josan, A.; Pinca Bretotean, C.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the possibility of using special additions to the execution of moulding mixtures for steel castings, drive wheel type. Critical analysis of moulding technology leads to the idea that most defects appear due to using improper moulding mixture. Using a improper moulding mixture leads to penetration of steel in moulding mixture, resulting in the formation of adherences, due to inadequate refractarity of the mould and core mixtures. Using only the unique mixture to the moulding leads to increasing consumption of new sand, respectively to the increase of price of piece. Acording to the dates registered in the industrial practice is necessary to use the special additions to obtain the moulding mixtures, carbonaceous materials respectively.

  5. THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) WAS LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) W AS LESS THAN ADDITIVE.

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological res...

  6. Additive toxicity of herbicide mixtures and comparative sensitivity of tropical benthic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Marie; Heimann, Kirsten; Quayle, Pamela; Negri, Andrew P

    2010-11-01

    Natural waters often contain complex mixtures of unknown contaminants potentially posing a threat to marine communities through chemical interactions. Here, acute effects of the photosystem II-inhibiting herbicides diuron, tebuthiuron, atrazine, simazine, and hexazinone, herbicide breakdown products (desethyl-atrazine (DEA) and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA)) and binary mixtures, were investigated using three tropical benthic microalgae; Navicula sp. and Cylindrotheca closterium (Ochrophyta) and Nephroselmis pyriformis (Chlorophyta), and one standard test species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Ochrophyta), in a high-throughput Maxi-Imaging-PAM bioassay (Maxi-IPAM). The order of toxicity was; diuron > hexazinone > tebuthiuron > atrazine > simazine > DEA > 3,4-DCA for all species. The tropical green alga N. pyriformis was up to 10-fold more sensitive than the diatoms tested here and reported for coral symbionts, and is recommended as a standard tropical test species for future research. All binary mixtures exhibited additive toxicity, and the use of herbicide equivalents (HEq) is therefore recommended in order to incorporate total-maximum-load measures for environmental regulatory purposes. PMID:20800855

  7. On the asymptotic improvement of supervised learning by utilizing additional unlabeled samples - Normal mixture density case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahshahani, Behzad M.; Landgrebe, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of additional unlabeled samples in improving the supervised learning process is studied in this paper. Three learning processes. supervised, unsupervised, and combined supervised-unsupervised, are compared by studying the asymptotic behavior of the estimates obtained under each process. Upper and lower bounds on the asymptotic covariance matrices are derived. It is shown that under a normal mixture density assumption for the probability density function of the feature space, the combined supervised-unsupervised learning is always superior to the supervised learning in achieving better estimates. Experimental results are provided to verify the theoretical concepts.

  8. Additional development of large diameter carbon monofilament. [from boron, hydrogen, and methane gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, B. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The chemical vapor process for preparing a large diameter carbon-base monofilament from a BCl3, Ch4 and H2 gas mixture with a carbon substrate fiber was studied. The effect of reactor geometry, total gas flows and deposition temperature on the tensile strength of the monofilament were investigated. It was noted that consistent results could only be obtained when the carbon substrate fiber was cleaned. The strength of the monofilament was found to depend on the highest temperature and the temperature profile of the monofilament in the reactor. The strength of monofilament produced in the dc and RF reactors were found to be similar and similar alloy compositions in the monofilament were attained when the same gas ratios were used. The tensile strength of the monofilament at 500 C was found to be 60 to 70% of the room temperature tensile strength. No degradation was noted after exposure to molten aluminum.

  9. DETERMINING A ROBUST D-OPTIMAL DESIGN FOR TESTING FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A MIXTURE OF FOUR PFAAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine an optimal experimental design for a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) that is robust to the assumption of additivity. Of particular focus to this research project is whether an environmentally relevant mixture of four PFAAs with long half-liv...

  10. Synthesis and Properties of a Clean and Sustainable Deicing Additive for Asphalt Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chao; Yu, Jianying; Zhao, Zhijie; Dai, Jing; Fu, Jingyi; Zhao, Meiling; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A clean and sustainable deicing additive was prepared via the adsorption of acetate anions (Ac-) by magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) calcined layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-CLDH). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrums proved that Ac- had intercalated into LDH structure. X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the intercalation spacing and platelet thickness of Mg and Al layered double hydroxide containing Ac- anions (Mg/Al-Ac- LDH) had been enlarged due to substitution of divalent CO32- anions by a larger quantity of monovalent Ac– anions. Differential scanning calorimetry tests testified that the insoluble Mg2/Al-Ac- LDH evidently decreased the freeze point (FP) of water to -10.68°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the Ac- were strongly confined by the metal layers of LDHs. FP test of asphalt mixtures confirmed that Mg/Al-Ac- LDHs reduced FP to -5.5°C. Immersion test results indicated that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH had a good deicing durability and Ac- did not released from asphalt mixture. Snow melting observation was conducted further testified that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH melted snow or ice sustainably. PMID:25625279

  11. Synthesis and properties of a clean and sustainable deicing additive for asphalt mixture.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Yu, Jianying; Zhao, Zhijie; Dai, Jing; Fu, Jingyi; Zhao, Meiling; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A clean and sustainable deicing additive was prepared via the adsorption of acetate anions (Ac-) by magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) calcined layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-CLDH). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrums proved that Ac- had intercalated into LDH structure. X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the intercalation spacing and platelet thickness of Mg and Al layered double hydroxide containing Ac- anions (Mg/Al-Ac- LDH) had been enlarged due to substitution of divalent CO32- anions by a larger quantity of monovalent Ac- anions. Differential scanning calorimetry tests testified that the insoluble Mg2/Al-Ac- LDH evidently decreased the freeze point (FP) of water to -10.68°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the Ac- were strongly confined by the metal layers of LDHs. FP test of asphalt mixtures confirmed that Mg/Al-Ac- LDHs reduced FP to -5.5°C. Immersion test results indicated that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH had a good deicing durability and Ac- did not released from asphalt mixture. Snow melting observation was conducted further testified that Mg/Al-Ac- LDH melted snow or ice sustainably. PMID:25625279

  12. Decomposition of Phragmites australis litter retarded by invasive Solidago canadensis in mixtures: an antagonistic non-additive effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Yaojun; Zou, Jianwen; Siemann, Evan

    2014-06-01

    Solidago canadensis is an aggressive invader in China. Solidago invasion success is partially attributed to allelopathic compounds release and more benefits from AM fungi, which potentially makes the properties of Solidago litter different from co-occurring natives. These properties may comprehensively affect litter decomposition of co-occurring natives. We conducted a field experiment to examine litter mixing effects in a Phragmites australis dominated community invaded by Solidago in southeast China. Solidago had more rapid mass and N loss rate than Phragmites when they decomposed separately. Litter mixing decreased N loss rate in Phragmites litter and increased that of Solidago. Large decreases in Phragmites mass loss and smaller increases in Solidago mass loss caused negative non-additive effect. Solidago litter extracts reduced soil C decomposition and N processes, suggested an inhibitory effect of Solidago secondary compounds. These results are consistent with the idea that nutrient transfer and secondary compounds both affected litter mixtures decomposition.

  13. Decomposition of Phragmites australis litter retarded by invasive Solidago canadensis in mixtures: an antagonistic non-additive effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Yaojun; Zou, Jianwen; Siemann, Evan

    2014-01-01

    Solidago canadensis is an aggressive invader in China. Solidago invasion success is partially attributed to allelopathic compounds release and more benefits from AM fungi, which potentially makes the properties of Solidago litter different from co-occurring natives. These properties may comprehensively affect litter decomposition of co-occurring natives. We conducted a field experiment to examine litter mixing effects in a Phragmites australis dominated community invaded by Solidago in southeast China. Solidago had more rapid mass and N loss rate than Phragmites when they decomposed separately. Litter mixing decreased N loss rate in Phragmites litter and increased that of Solidago. Large decreases in Phragmites mass loss and smaller increases in Solidago mass loss caused negative non-additive effect. Solidago litter extracts reduced soil C decomposition and N processes, suggested an inhibitory effect of Solidago secondary compounds. These results are consistent with the idea that nutrient transfer and secondary compounds both affected litter mixtures decomposition. PMID:24976274

  14. Optimization of preparation method for ketoprofen-loaded microspheres consisting polymeric blends using simplex lattice mixture design.

    PubMed

    Das, Sanjoy Kumar; Khanam, Jasmina; Nanda, Arunabha

    2016-12-01

    In the present investigation, simplex lattice mixture design was applied for formulation development and optimization of a controlled release dosage form of ketoprofen microspheres consisting polymers like ethylcellulose and Eudragit(®)RL 100; when those were formed by oil-in-oil emulsion solvent evaporation method. The investigation was carried out to observe the effects of polymer amount, stirring speed and emulsifier concentration (% w/w) on percentage yield, average particle size, drug entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release in 8h from the microspheres. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to estimate the significance of the models. Based on the desirability function approach numerical optimization was carried out. Optimized formulation (KTF-O) showed close match between actual and predicted responses with desirability factor 0.811. No adverse reaction between drug and polymers were observed on the basis of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to show discreteness of microspheres (149.2±1.25μm) and their surface conditions during pre and post dissolution operations. The drug release pattern from KTF-O was best explained by Korsmeyer-Peppas and Higuchi models. The batch of optimized microspheres were found with maximum entrapment (~90%), minimum loss (~10%) and prolonged drug release for 8h (91.25%) which may be considered as favourable criteria of controlled release dosage form. PMID:27612752

  15. Augmenting a Waste Glass Mixture Experiment Study with Additional Glass Components and Experimental Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F. ); Cooley, Scott K. ); Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D. ); Edwards, Tommy B.

    2002-01-01

    A glass composition variation study (CVS) for high-level waste (HLW) stored in Idaho is being statistically designed and performed in phases over several years. The purpose of the CVS is to investigate and model how HLW-glass properties depend on glass composition. The resulting glass property-composition models will be used to develop desirable glass formulations and for other purposes. Phases 1 and 2 of the CVS have been completed and are briefly described. This paper focuses on the CVS Phase 3 experimental design, which was chosen to augment the Phase 1 and 2 data with additional data points, as well as to account for additional glass components not studied in Phases 1 and/or 2. In total, 16 glass components were varied in the Phase 3 experimental design. The paper describes how these Phase 3 experimental design augmentation challenges were addressed using the previous data, preliminary property-composition models, and statistical mixture experiment and optimal experimental design methods and software.

  16. D-optimal experimental designs to test for departure from additivity in a fixed-ratio mixture ray.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Todd; Gennings, Chris; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Herr, David W

    2005-12-01

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture may be prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. Using a mixture of chemicals with a fixed ratio (mixture ray) results in an economical design that allows estimation of additivity or nonadditive interaction for a mixture of interest. This methodology is extended easily to a mixture with a large number of chemicals. Optimal experimental conditions can be chosen that result in increased power to detect departures from additivity. Although these designs are used widely for linear models, optimal designs for nonlinear threshold models are less well known. In the present work, the use of D-optimal designs is demonstrated for nonlinear threshold models applied to a fixed-ratio mixture ray. For a fixed sample size, this design criterion selects the experimental doses and number of subjects per dose level that result in minimum variance of the model parameters and thus increased power to detect departures from additivity. An optimal design is illustrated for a 2:1 ratio (chlorpyrifos:carbaryl) mixture experiment. For this example, and in general, the optimal designs for the nonlinear threshold model depend on prior specification of the slope and dose threshold parameters. Use of a D-optimal criterion produces experimental designs with increased power, whereas standard nonoptimal designs with equally spaced dose groups may result in low power if the active range or threshold is missed. PMID:16162847

  17. Characteristics of concentration-inhibition curves of individual chemicals and applicability of the concentration addition model for mixture toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Wang, Xiaochang C; Ma, Xiaoyan

    2015-03-01

    The concentration addition (CA) model has been widely applied to predict mixture toxicity. However, its applicability is difficult to evaluate due to the complexity of interactions among substances. Considering that the concentration-response curve (CRC) of each component of the mixture is closely related to the prediction of mixture toxicity, mathematical treatments were used to derive a characteristic index kECx (k was the slope of the tangent line of a CRC at concentration ECx). The implication is that the CA model would be applicable for predicting the mixture toxicity only when chemical components have similar kECx in the whole or part of the concentration range. For five selected chemicals whose toxicity was detected using luminescent bacteria, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) showed much higher kECx values than the others and its existence in the binary mixtures brought about overestimation of the mixture toxicity with the CA model. The higher the mass ratio of SDBS in a multi-mixture was, the more the toxicity prediction deviated from measurements. By applying the method proposed in this study to analyze some published data, it is confirmed that some components having significantly different kECx values from the other components could explain the large deviation of the mixture toxicity predicted by the CA model. PMID:25499050

  18. Sensory Property Improvement of Jokbal (Korean Pettitoes) Made from Frozen Pig Feet by Addition of Herbal Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Woon

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to improve sensory quality of Jokbal (Korean Pettitoes) made from frozen pig feet by addition of herbal mixture (glasswort, raspberry and Sansa powders). After adding herbal mixture, lipid oxidation (2-thiobarbituric acid values, TBARS), sensory property, and textural property were determined. Herbs were individually added into cooking soup at concentration of 6% (low concentration treatment, LCT) or 12% (high concentration treatment, HCT) of raw pig feet. Refrigerated pig feet were used as control. Thawed feet without any herbal mixture were used as freezing treatment (FT). TBARS in LCT or HCT were lower than that in FT, and showed the similar to that in Control. Addition of the herbal mixture was effective in improving the flavor and textural property of thawed feet by inhibiting lipid oxidation and protein denaturation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27499659

  19. Sensory Property Improvement of Jokbal (Korean Pettitoes) Made from Frozen Pig Feet by Addition of Herbal Mixture.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young-Jung; Hwang, Seol-A; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to improve sensory quality of Jokbal (Korean Pettitoes) made from frozen pig feet by addition of herbal mixture (glasswort, raspberry and Sansa powders). After adding herbal mixture, lipid oxidation (2-thiobarbituric acid values, TBARS), sensory property, and textural property were determined. Herbs were individually added into cooking soup at concentration of 6% (low concentration treatment, LCT) or 12% (high concentration treatment, HCT) of raw pig feet. Refrigerated pig feet were used as control. Thawed feet without any herbal mixture were used as freezing treatment (FT). TBARS in LCT or HCT were lower than that in FT, and showed the similar to that in Control. Addition of the herbal mixture was effective in improving the flavor and textural property of thawed feet by inhibiting lipid oxidation and protein denaturation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27499659

  20. Leaf Litter Mixtures Alter Microbial Community Development: Mechanisms for Non-Additive Effects in Litter Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Samantha K.; Newman, Gregory S.; Hart, Stephen C.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Koch, George W.

    2013-01-01

    To what extent microbial community composition can explain variability in ecosystem processes remains an open question in ecology. Microbial decomposer communities can change during litter decomposition due to biotic interactions and shifting substrate availability. Though relative abundance of decomposers may change due to mixing leaf litter, linking these shifts to the non-additive patterns often recorded in mixed species litter decomposition rates has been elusive, and links community composition to ecosystem function. We extracted phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) from single species and mixed species leaf litterbags after 10 and 27 months of decomposition in a mixed conifer forest. Total PLFA concentrations were 70% higher on litter mixtures than single litter types after 10 months, but were only 20% higher after 27 months. Similarly, fungal-to-bacterial ratios differed between mixed and single litter types after 10 months of decomposition, but equalized over time. Microbial community composition, as indicated by principal components analyses, differed due to both litter mixing and stage of litter decomposition. PLFA biomarkers a15∶0 and cy17∶0, which indicate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria respectively, in particular drove these shifts. Total PLFA correlated significantly with single litter mass loss early in decomposition but not at later stages. We conclude that litter mixing alters microbial community development, which can contribute to synergisms in litter decomposition. These findings advance our understanding of how changing forest biodiversity can alter microbial communities and the ecosystem processes they mediate. PMID:23658639

  1. In situ vitrification and the effects of soil additives; A mixture experiment case study

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G.F.; Shade, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a case study involving in situ vitrification (ISV), a process for immobilizing chemical or nuclear wastes in soil by melting-dissolving the contaminated soil into a glass block. One goal of the study was to investigate how viscosity and electrical conductivity were affected by mixing CaO and Na{sub 2}O with soil. A three-component constrained-region mixture experiment design was generated and the viscosity and electrical conductivity data collected. Several second-order mixture models were considered, and the Box-Cox transformation technique was applied to select property transformations. The fitted models were used to produce contour and component effects plots.

  2. Determining a Robust D-Optimal Design for Testing for Departure from Additivity in a Mixture of Four Perfluoroalkyl Acids.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective is to determine an optimal experimental design for a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) that is robust to the assumption of additivity. PFAAs are widely used in consumer products and industrial applications. The presence and persistence of PFAAs, especially in ...

  3. Testing for Additivity in Chemical Mixtures Using a Fixed-Ratio Ray Design and Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fixed-ratio ray designs have been used for detecting and characterizing interactions of large numbers of chemicals in combination. Single chemical dose-response data are used to predict an “additivity curve” along an environmentally relevant ray. A “mixture curve” is estimated fr...

  4. A MIXTURE OF SEVEN ANTIANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS ELICITS ADDITIVE EFFECTS ON THE MALE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT THAT CORRESPOND TO MODELED PREDICTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objectives of this study were to: (1) determine whether dissimilar antiandrogenic compounds display additive effects when present in combination and (2) to assess the ability of modelling approaches to accurately predict these mixture effects based on data from single ch...

  5. NON-ADDITIVE INTERACTIONS OF AN ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE MIXTURE IN ADULT AND PREWEANLING RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Critical features of risk assessment include the evaluation of risk following exposure to pesticide mixtures as well as the potential for increased sensitivity of the young. The US EPA is required to regulate pesticides acting via a common mechanism of action as a group, e.g.,...

  6. Fuel and lubricant additives from acid treated mixtures of vegetable oil derived amides and esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, B.R.; Devault, A.N.

    1981-05-26

    Vegetable oils such as corn oil, peanut oil, and soy oil are reacted with polyamines to form a mixture containing amides, imides, half esters, and glycerol with subsequent treatment with a strong acid such as sulfonic acid to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels and lubricants.

  7. THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE OF TSC2 MUTANT LONG EVANS (EKER) RATS TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS WAS LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may not represent the actual biological response. A rodent model of hereditary ...

  8. Precipitation in aqueous mixtures with addition of a strongly hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2010-11-01

    We examine phase separation in aqueous mixtures due to preferential solvation with a low-density solute (hydrophilic ions or hydrophobic particles). For hydrophilic ions, preferential solvation can stabilize water domains enriched with ions. This precipitation occurs above a critical solute density n(p) in wide ranges of the temperature and the average composition, where the mixture solvent would be in a one-phase state without solute. The volume fraction of precipitated domains tends to zero as the average solute density n is decreased to np or as the interaction parameter χ is decreased to a critical value χ(p). If we start with one-phase states with n>n(p) or χ>χ(p), precipitation proceeds via homogeneous nucleation or via heterogeneous nucleation, for example, around suspended colloids. In the latter case, colloid particles are wrapped by thick wetting layers. We also predict a first-order prewetting transition for n or χ slightly below np or χ(p) for neutral colloids. PMID:21230480

  9. A numerical study of the influence of ammonia addition on the auto-ignition limits of methane/air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Van den Schoor, F; Norman, F; Vandebroek, L; Verplaetsen, F; Berghmans, J

    2009-05-30

    In this study the auto-ignition limit of ammonia/methane/air mixtures is calculated based upon a perfectly stirred reactor model with convective heat transfer. The results of four different reaction mechanisms are compared with existing experimental data at an initial temperature of 723 K with ammonia concentrations of 0-20 mol.% and methane concentrations of 2.5-10 mol.%. It is found that the calculation of the auto-ignition limit pressure at constant temperature leads to larger relative deviations between calculated and experimental results than the calculation of the auto-ignition temperature at constant pressure. In addition to the calculations, a reaction path analysis is performed to explain the observed lowering of the auto-ignition limit of methane/air mixtures by ammonia addition. It is found that this decrease is caused by the formation of NO and NO(2), which enhance the oxidation of methane at low temperatures. PMID:18926632

  10. The influence of additives on coal-water mixtures prepared with beneficiated coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ekmann, J.M.; Wildman, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Use of coal-water mixtures (CWM) as fuels for utility and industrial applications is currently constrained by a number of factors, including the cost of compliance with environmental quality regulations. From a utilization standpoint, limiting ash and sulfur contents to levels comparable to those for residual fuel oil produces an attractive alternate fuel provided the unit cost is equal to that for the fuel oil. Reduction in the mineral matter content of the coal has been identified as a target for continued development of CWM. Changes in coal type or in the characteristics of a single coal have been shown to affect CWM properties. It appears worthwhile to examine the impact that beneficiation might have on CWM properties.

  11. Phase equilibria in four-component system consisting of water, a nonionic surfactant mixture, and oleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matveenko, V.N.; Drovetskii, B.Yu.; Kirasanov, E.A.

    1994-05-01

    The phase diagram of the system consisting of water, Tween 20, Span 80, and oleic acid has been obtained; the coexisting phases have been identified; and the character of the equilibrium of microemulsion, liquid crystal, and molecular solution has been described. In the water-Tween 20-oleic acid system, the ratio of the water volume to the surfactant volume is identical in all of the coexisting phases; this proves the existence of a corresponding field variable in a system with a nonionic surfactant.

  12. A Simple and Inexpensive Device for Slow, Controlled Addition of a Solution to a Reaction Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osvath, Peter

    1995-07-01

    A number of reactions require the slow and controlled addition of a solution containing one reagent to another. Attempting to control the flow rate over a number of hours using a conventional constant pressure addition funnel is a frustrating exercise; commercially available constant volume addition funnels are expensive and must be adjusted by trial and error each time a reaction is carried out. The use of an (expensive) peristaltic pump or syringe pump overcomes these problems but can introduce other complications. We have recently had occasion to carry out the synthesis of thioether macrocycles and cages requiring the slow and controlled addition of DMF solutions of (offensively odoriferous) thiols or (air-sensitive) thiolates to a reactant solution under nitrogen(1), Although the use of a syringe pump was called for, there are obvious difficulties associated with purging the solution and assembling such an apparatus under nitrogen, and we report a simple and inexpensive solution. A Male Luer Lock tip (recovered from a broken syringe) was sweated onto the flattened tip of a pressure-equalizing addition funnel and a syringe needle was attached. Judicious selection of needle length, bore size, and reactant volume can be used to control the addition time simply and reproducibly. With a 250-mL funnel, the flow rate changes by <25% from the beginning to the end of the addition. (In fact, a reduction in the rate of addition may even be advantageous as the reaction proceeds, the reagent in the receiving flask is consumed, its concentration drops, and the rate of reaction will decrease). A piece of fine Teflon tubing of appropriate length attached to the needle can be used to reduce the flow rate even further, but this is only necessary for very slow rates of addition. For example, the time of addition of 200 mL, of an ethanolic solution could be varied from approximately 5 minutes (150mm/17 gauge) to approximately 5 h (200mm/22 gauge), and once the addition time for a

  13. Enhanced heavy metal immobilization in soil by grinding with addition of nanometallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Sakita, Shogo; Kakeda, Mitsunori

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a nanometallic Ca and CaO dispersion mixture for the immobilization of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr and Pb) in contaminated soil. Simple grinding achieved 85-90% heavy metal immobilization, but it can be enhanced further to 98-100% by addition of a nanometallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture produced by grinding. Observations using SEM-EDS elemental maps and semi-quantitative analysis showed that the amounts of As, Cd, Cr, and Pb measurable on the soil particle surface decrease after nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment. The leachable heavy metal concentrations were reduced after nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment to concentrations lower than the Japan soil elution standard regulatory threshold: <0.01 mg L(-1) for As, Cd, and Pb; and 0.05 mg L(-1) for Cr. Effects of soil moisture and pH on heavy metal immobilization were not strongly influenced. The most probable mechanisms for the enhancement of heavy metal immobilization capacity with nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment might be due to adsorption and entrapment of heavy metals into newly formed aggregates, thereby prompting aggregation of soil particles and enclosure/binding with Ca/CaO-associated immobile salts. Results suggest that the nanometallic Ca/CaO mixture is suitable for use in immobilization of heavy-metal-contaminated soil under normal moisture conditions. PMID:22818089

  14. Engineering and environmental properties of thermally treated mixtures containing MSWI fly ash and low-cost additives.

    PubMed

    Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Trinci, L; Muntoni, A; Lo Mastro, S

    2004-09-01

    An experimental work was carried out to investigate the feasibility of application of a sintering process to mixtures composed of Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator (MSWI) fly ash and low-cost additives (waste from feldspar production and cullet). The proportions of the three constituents were varied to adjust the mixture compositions to within the optimal range for sintering. The material was compacted in cylindrical specimens and treated at 1100 and 1150 degrees C for 30 and 60 min. Engineering and environmental characteristics including weight loss, dimensional changes, density, open porosity, mechanical strength, chemical stability and leaching behavior were determined for the treated material, allowing the relationship between the degree of sintering and both mixture composition and treatment conditions to be singled out. Mineralogical analyses detected the presence of neo-formation minerals from the pyroxene group. Estimation of the extent of metal loss from the samples indicated that the potential for volatilization of species of Pb, Cd and Zn is still a matter of major concern when dealing with thermal treatment of incinerator ash. PMID:15268956

  15. Explanation of non-additive effects in mixtures of similar mode of action chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masashi; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Many models have been developed to predict the combined effect of drugs and chemicals. Most models are classified into two additive models: independent action (IA) and concentration addition (CA). It is generally considered if the modes of action of chemicals are similar then the combined effect obeys CA; however, many empirical studies report nonlinear effects deviating from the predictions by CA. Such deviations are termed synergism and antagonism. Synergism, which leads to a stronger toxicity, requires more careful management, and hence it is important to understand how and which combinations of chemicals lead to synergism. In this paper, three types of chemical reactions are mathematically modeled and the cause of the nonlinear effects among chemicals with similar modes of action was investigated. Our results show that combined effects obey CA only when the modes of action are exactly the same. Contrary to existing knowledge, combined effects are generally nonlinear even if the modes of action of the chemicals are similar. Our results further show that the nonlinear effects vanish out when the chemical concentrations are low, suggesting that the current management procedure of assuming CA is rarely inappropriate because environmental concentrations of chemicals are generally low. PMID:26134580

  16. Non-Additive Voltametric Currents From a Mixture of Two, Three and Four Redox-Active Compounds and Electroanalytical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dass, Amala; Oh, Woon Su; Gao, Xue-Rong; Rawashdeh, Abdel M.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    We have published recently the effect of dissimilar diffusion coefficients on the size of the voltammetric waves from a mixture of two redox-active compounds. Similarly, at the potential range where three redox-active species, decamethylferrocene (dMeFc), ferrocene (Fc) and N-methylphenothiazine (MePTZ), are oxidized simultaneously with rates controlled by linear diffusion, electrogenerated radicals diffusing outwards from the electrode react with the original species diffusing towards the electrode from the bulk; thus, Fc(+) reacts with dMeFc producing Fc and dMeFc(+), while MePTZ(+) reacts both with dMeFc producing MePTZ and dMeFc(+), and with Fc producing MePTZ and Fc(+). These reactions replace dMeFc with Fc at the second plateau, and both dMeFc and Fc with MePTZ at the third plateau. Since the diffusion coefficients of the three species are not equal, the mass-transfer limited currents of the second and the third oxidation wave plateaus change by approx. 10%. Numerical simulations of the experimental voltamograms support this mechanism. Similar results were also obtained for a mixture of four redoxactive compounds. The implications of this non-additive nature of currents on: (a) the use of internal voltammetric standards for quantitative analysis of a mixture of redox-active compounds; and, (b) the half wave potentials (E1/2) of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th waves for qualitative analysis, will be discussed.

  17. A mixture-energy-consistent six-equation two-phase numerical model for fluids with interfaces, cavitation and evaporation waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pelanti, Marica; Shyue, Keh-Ming

    2014-02-15

    We model liquid–gas flows with cavitation by a variant of the six-equation single-velocity two-phase model with stiff mechanical relaxation of Saurel–Petitpas–Berry (Saurel et al., 2009) [9]. In our approach we employ phasic total energy equations instead of the phasic internal energy equations of the classical six-equation system. This alternative formulation allows us to easily design a simple numerical method that ensures consistency with mixture total energy conservation at the discrete level and agreement of the relaxed pressure at equilibrium with the correct mixture equation of state. Temperature and Gibbs free energy exchange terms are included in the equations as relaxation terms to model heat and mass transfer and hence liquid–vapor transition. The algorithm uses a high-resolution wave propagation method for the numerical approximation of the homogeneous hyperbolic portion of the model. In two dimensions a fully-discretized scheme based on a hybrid HLLC/Roe Riemann solver is employed. Thermo-chemical terms are handled numerically via a stiff relaxation solver that forces thermodynamic equilibrium at liquid–vapor interfaces under metastable conditions. We present numerical results of sample tests in one and two space dimensions that show the ability of the proposed model to describe cavitation mechanisms and evaporation wave dynamics.

  18. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO RAY MIXTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessors are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of assessing interactions between chemicals in a mixture. Most traditional designs for evaluating interactions are prohibitive when the number of chemicals in the mixture is large. However, evaluation of interacti...

  19. Findings of Addition and Subtraction in Infants Are Robust and Consistent: Reply to Wakeley, Rivera, and Langer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn, Karen

    2000-01-01

    Maintains that findings showing numerical computation abilities in infants are considerably more robust and consistent than Wakeley, Rivera, and Langer suggest. Asserts that all the interim replication attempts have successfully replicated Wynn's original findings. Discusses possible reasons for failure to replicate in Wakeley et al. experiments.…

  20. Consistent effects of canopy vs. understory nitrogen addition on the soil exchangeable cations and microbial community in two contrasting forests.

    PubMed

    Shi, Leilei; Zhang, Hongzhi; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Weixin; Shao, Yuanhu; Ha, Denglong; Li, Yuanqiu; Zhang, Chuangmao; Cai, Xi-an; Rao, Xingquan; Lin, Yongbiao; Zhou, Lixia; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Zou, Xiaoming; Fu, Shenglei

    2016-05-15

    Anthropogenic N deposition has been well documented to cause substantial impacts on the chemical and biological properties of forest soils. In most studies, however, atmospheric N deposition has been simulated by directly adding N to the forest floor. Such studies thus ignored the potentially significant effect of some key processes occurring in forest canopy (i.e., nitrogen retention) and may therefore have incorrectly assessed the effects of N deposition on soils. Here, we conducted an experiment that included both understory addition of N (UAN) and canopy addition of N (CAN) in two contrasting forests (temperate deciduous forest vs. subtropical evergreen forest). The goal was to determine whether the effects on soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass differed between CAN and UAN. We found that N addition reduced pH, BS (base saturation) and exchangeable Ca and increased exchangeable Al significantly only at the temperate JGS site, and reduced the biomass of most soil microbial groups only at the subtropical SMT site. Except for soil exchangeable Mn, however, effects on soil chemical properties and soil microbial community did not significantly differ between CAN and UAN. Although biotic and abiotic soil characteristics differ significantly and the responses of both soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass were different between the two study sites, we found no significant interactive effects between study site and N treatment approach on almost all soil properties involved in this study. In addition, N addition rate (25 vs. 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) did not show different effects on soil properties under both N addition approaches. These findings did not support previous prediction which expected that, by bypassing canopy effects (i.e., canopy retention and foliage fertilization), understory addition of N would overestimate the effects of N deposition on forest soil properties, at least for short time scale. PMID:26930308

  1. The potential application of red mud and soil mixture as additive to the surface layer of a landfill cover system.

    PubMed

    Ujaczki, Éva; Feigl, Viktória; Molnár, Mónika; Vaszita, Emese; Uzinger, Nikolett; Erdélyi, Attila; Gruiz, Katalin

    2016-06-01

    Red mud, the by-product of aluminum production, has been regarded as a problematic residue all over the world. Its storage involves risks as evidenced by the Ajka red mud spill, an accident in Hungary where the slurry broke free, flooding the surrounding areas. As an immediate remediation measure more than 5cm thick red mud layer was removed from the flooded soil surface. The removed red mud and soil mixture (RMSM) was transferred into the reservoirs for storage. In this paper the application of RMSM is evaluated in a field study aiming at re-utilizing waste, decreasing cost of waste disposal and providing a value-added product. The purpose was to investigate the applicability of RMSM as surface layer component of landfill cover systems. The field study was carried out in two steps: in lysimeters and in field plots. The RMSM was mixed at ratios ranging between 0 and 50% w/w with low quality subsoil (LQS) originally used as surface layer of an interim landfill cover. The characteristics of the LQS+RMSM mixtures compared to the subsoil (LQS) and the RMSM were determined by physical-chemical, biological and ecotoxicological methods. The addition of RMSM to the subsoil (LQS) at up to 20% did not result any ecotoxic effect, but it increased the water holding capacity. In addition, the microbial substrate utilization became about triple of subsoil (LQS) after 10months. According to our results the RMSM mixed into subsoil (LQS) at 20% w/w dose may be applied as surface layer of landfill cover systems. PMID:27266315

  2. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  3. Extending the Applicability of the Dose Addition Model to the Assessment of Chemical Mixtures of Partial Agonists by Using a Novel Toxic Unit Extrapolation Method

    PubMed Central

    Scholze, Martin; Silva, Elisabete; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Dose addition, a commonly used concept in toxicology for the prediction of chemical mixture effects, cannot readily be applied to mixtures of partial agonists with differing maximal effects. Due to its mathematical features, effect levels that exceed the maximal effect of the least efficacious compound present in the mixture, cannot be calculated. This poses problems when dealing with mixtures likely to be encountered in realistic assessment situations where chemicals often show differing maximal effects. To overcome this limitation, we developed a pragmatic solution that extrapolates the toxic units of partial agonists to effect levels beyond their maximal efficacy. We extrapolated different additivity expectations that reflect theoretically possible extremes and validated this approach with a mixture of 21 estrogenic chemicals in the E-Screen. This assay measures the proliferation of human epithelial breast cancers. We found that the dose-response curves of the estrogenic agents exhibited widely varying shapes, slopes and maximal effects, which made it necessary to extrapolate mixture responses above 14% proliferation. Our toxic unit extrapolation approach predicted all mixture responses accurately. It extends the applicability of dose addition to combinations of agents with differing saturating effects and removes an important bottleneck that has severely hampered the use of dose addition in the past. PMID:24533151

  4. CHARACTERIZE AGGREGATE AND CUMULATIVE RISK TO MANAGE RISK TO HUMANS EXPOSED TO MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS: DOSE ADDITIVITY FOR PESTICIDE MIXTURES: BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUMMARY: The Agency’s default assumption for the cumulative assessment of the risk of mixtures is additivity based on either single-chemical potency (dose addition) or single-chemical effects (effect addition). NTD is developing models to accurately predict effects of complex mix...

  5. Considerations about the theoretically expected crushing strength of tablets from binary powder mixtures: double layer tablets versus arithmetic additivity rule.

    PubMed

    Belda, Petra M; Mielck, Jobst B

    2006-11-01

    The theoretically expected breaking strength of tablets from powder mixtures is often calculated by the weighted arithmetic mean from the breaking strength of the single components, which corresponds to a linear interpolation. The validity of this additivity of fracture strength shall be evaluated by the underlying model of parallel couplings. It assumes the components linked in parallel with respect to the direction of loading during diametrical strength testing. Parallel couplings were experimentally realised by the preparation of double layer tablets from crystalline and spray-dried lactose on the one hand and from maltitol and metamizol-sodium on the other. Constant total true volumes of the single substances and of layered powders in varying ratios of true volume were compressed on an eccentric tabletting machine to constant geometric mean punch force. Simulated crushing profiles of parallel couplings were derived from force-displacement profiles measured during diametrical compression of the one-component tablets. At given finely graded deformation levels, the forces exerted by the components during loading were added in the proportion of the true volume fractions of the components in the coupling. The results from the experiments and from the simulations are in good accordance. They demonstrate that a linear change of the crushing strength in dependence on the true volume fraction of the components can only be assumed if the single components deform to the same extent up to the point of fracture. This behaviour was approximately found with the parallel lactose system. In all other cases it must be expected that the crushing strength of parallel systems will be lowered beneath the weighted arithmetic mean values or even below the crushing strength of the single components. The latter was observed with the maltitol-metamizol combinations. Thus, if tablets from binary powder mixtures exhibit a crushing strength depression, this is not necessarily an indication

  6. Addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture effect on quality of subarachnoid block and postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Marilyn; Ghoshal, Pabitra; Namshikar, Viraj; Gaude, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Context: This study was undertaken in 100 patients scheduled for lower limb orthopaedic surgeries. Aim: The objective of this study was to study the effect of addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture on the quality of subarachnoid block and compare it with intrathecal bupivacaine clonidine mixture without fentanyl. Settings and Design: In this prospective and double blind randomized controlled study, one hundred patients, between 20-40 years of age, of either sex, weighing between 40-65 Kg, measuring more than 150 cm in height, of ASA Grade I and II who were undergoing orthopaedic lower limb surgeries were selected in order to study the quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia produced by a combination of bupivacaine clonidine and fentanyl in comparison with bupivacaine clonidine. Materials and Methods: The patients were randomly divided in two groups of 50 each: Group BC: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml of 0.9% NaCl. Group BCF: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml (20 μg) of fentanyl. The total volume of solution in both the groups was 3.0 ml. The quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: The data thus obtained was statistically analysed using the following tests: Unpaired student's t-test. Average % change in data over baseline values to detect trends. A ‘P’ value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in duration of sensory and motor blockade in group BCF compared to BC. The duration of analgesia as assessed by, either VAS score of >5 or demand of additional analgesia was > 524.6 ± 32.21 mins in group BC and > 774.4 ± 59.59 mins in group BCF. This prolongation of duration of analgesia in group BCF compared to group BC has statistical significance. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were not

  7. mRNA export through an additional cap-binding complex consisting of NCBP1 and NCBP3

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, Anna; Habjan, Matthias; Benda, Christian; Meiler, Arno; Haas, Darya A.; Hein, Marco Y.; Mann, Angelika; Mann, Matthias; Habermann, Bianca; Pichlmair, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The flow of genetic information from DNA to protein requires polymerase-II-transcribed RNA characterized by the presence of a 5′-cap. The cap-binding complex (CBC), consisting of the nuclear cap-binding protein (NCBP) 2 and its adaptor NCBP1, is believed to bind all capped RNA and to be necessary for its processing and intracellular localization. Here we show that NCBP1, but not NCBP2, is required for cell viability and poly(A) RNA export. We identify C17orf85 (here named NCBP3) as a cap-binding protein that together with NCBP1 forms an alternative CBC in higher eukaryotes. NCBP3 binds mRNA, associates with components of the mRNA processing machinery and contributes to poly(A) RNA export. Loss of NCBP3 can be compensated by NCBP2 under steady-state conditions. However, NCBP3 becomes pivotal under stress conditions, such as virus infection. We propose the existence of an alternative CBC involving NCBP1 and NCBP3 that plays a key role in mRNA biogenesis. PMID:26382858

  8. A Concentration Addition Model to Assess Activation of the Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) by Pesticide Mixtures Found in the French Diet

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Georges; Nawaz, Ahmad; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Rahmani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    French consumers are exposed to mixtures of pesticide residues in part through food consumption. As a xenosensor, the pregnane X receptor (hPXR) is activated by numerous pesticides, the combined effect of which is currently unknown. We examined the activation of hPXR by seven pesticide mixtures most likely found in the French diet and their individual components. The mixture's effect was estimated using the concentration addition (CA) model. PXR transactivation was measured by monitoring luciferase activity in hPXR/HepG2 cells and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. The three mixtures with the highest potency were evaluated using the CA model, at equimolar concentrations and at their relative proportion in the diet. The seven mixtures significantly activated hPXR and induced the expression of CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes. Of the 14 pesticides which constitute the three most active mixtures, four were found to be strong hPXR agonists, four medium, and six weak. Depending on the mixture and pesticide proportions, additive, greater than additive or less than additive effects between compounds were demonstrated. Predictions of the combined effects were obtained with both real-life and equimolar proportions at low concentrations. Pesticides act mostly additively to activate hPXR, when present in a mixture. Modulation of hPXR activation and its target genes induction may represent a risk factor contributing to exacerbate the physiological response of the hPXR signaling pathways and to explain some adverse effects in humans. PMID:25028461

  9. A concentration addition model to assess activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) by pesticide mixtures found in the French diet.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Georges; Nawaz, Ahmad; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Rahmani, Roger

    2014-09-01

    French consumers are exposed to mixtures of pesticide residues in part through food consumption. As a xenosensor, the pregnane X receptor (hPXR) is activated by numerous pesticides, the combined effect of which is currently unknown. We examined the activation of hPXR by seven pesticide mixtures most likely found in the French diet and their individual components. The mixture's effect was estimated using the concentration addition (CA) model. PXR transactivation was measured by monitoring luciferase activity in hPXR/HepG2 cells and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. The three mixtures with the highest potency were evaluated using the CA model, at equimolar concentrations and at their relative proportion in the diet. The seven mixtures significantly activated hPXR and induced the expression of CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes. Of the 14 pesticides which constitute the three most active mixtures, four were found to be strong hPXR agonists, four medium, and six weak. Depending on the mixture and pesticide proportions, additive, greater than additive or less than additive effects between compounds were demonstrated. Predictions of the combined effects were obtained with both real-life and equimolar proportions at low concentrations. Pesticides act mostly additively to activate hPXR, when present in a mixture. Modulation of hPXR activation and its target genes induction may represent a risk factor contributing to exacerbate the physiological response of the hPXR signaling pathways and to explain some adverse effects in humans. PMID:25028461

  10. Additive Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Chemicals in Human Cell-Based Assays Can Be Influenced by Inclusion of Chemicals with Differing Effect Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Richard Mark; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the in vitro effects of mixtures of estrogenic chemicals can be well predicted from the estrogenicity of their components by the concentration addition (CA) concept. However, some studies have observed small deviations from CA. Factors affecting the presence or observation of deviations could include: the type of chemical tested; number of mixture components; mixture design; and assay choice. We designed mixture experiments that address these factors, using mixtures with high numbers of components, chemicals from diverse chemical groups, assays with different in vitro endpoints and different mixture designs and ratios. Firstly, the effects of mixtures composed of up to 17 estrogenic chemicals were examined using estrogenicity assays with reporter-gene (ERLUX) and cell proliferation (ESCREEN) endpoints. Two mixture designs were used: 1) a ‘balanced’ design with components present in proportion to a common effect concentration (e.g. an EC10) and 2) a ‘non-balanced’ design with components in proportion to potential human tissue concentrations. Secondly, the individual and simultaneous ability of 16 potential modulator chemicals (each with minimal estrogenicity) to influence the assay outcome produced by a reference mixture of estrogenic chemicals was examined. Test chemicals included plasticizers, phthalates, metals, PCBs, phytoestrogens, PAHs, heterocyclic amines, antioxidants, UV filters, musks, PBDEs and parabens. In all the scenarios tested, the CA concept provided a good prediction of mixture effects. Modulation studies revealed that chemicals possessing minimal estrogenicity themselves could reduce (negatively modulate) the effect of a mixture of estrogenic chemicals. Whether the type of modulation we observed occurs in practice most likely depends on the chemical concentrations involved, and better information is required on likely human tissue concentrations of estrogens and of potential modulators

  11. Transitional liquid crystalline phases between the hexagonal and lamellar phases in ternary cesium N-tetradecanoate-water-additive mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.C.; Kilpatrick, P.K. )

    1993-04-01

    The effects of added salt (CsOH, CsCl), long-chain carboxylic acid, and long-chain alcohol on the lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behavior in the cesium n-tetradecanoate (CsTD)-water system is reported. The transitional region between the hexagonal (H) and lamellar (L) phases was the compositional range of focus. Three transitional phases were observed: (i) the ribbon (R) phase, a biaxial phase consisting of cylinders of ellipsoidal cross section; (ii) the viscous isotropic (VI) phase, an isotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on an Ia3d lattice; and (iii) the intermediate (Int) phase, a uniaxial anisotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on a planar lattice. The effect of the additives was to decrease the interfacial curvature of the surfactant head group layer by varying head group repulsion and by varying the surfactant tail volume relative to the surfactant head group area. These changes resulted in formation of transitional phases seeming to possess curvature between that of the cylindrical H phase and the planar L phase. The ionic repulsion between carboxylate head groups was reduced by the addition of CsOH or CsCl, and resulted in destabilization of the VI phase and the formation of the anisotropic Int phase. With the addition of cosurfactants, n-tetradecanoic acid (TDA) and 1-tetradecanol (TDOH), no Int phase was observed. With 7 wt% added TDA the R phase was stabilized up to temperatures of 336 K, above the 330 K temperature limit in the binary CsTD-D[sub 2]O system. In all four systems, sufficient additive (5-10 wt%) resulted in a transition to the L phase, which was stable over a large portion of the compositional range. In order of apparently decreasing mean curvature, the phase sequence is: hexagonal, ribbon, viscous isotropic, intermediate, and lamellar.

  12. Synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects of fruit mixtures on total antioxidant capacities and bioactive compounds in tropical fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana Carolina da Silva; Wurlitzer, Nedio Jair; Dionisio, Ana Paula; Lacerda Soares, Marcia Valéria; Rocha Bastos, Maria do Socorro; Elesbão Alves, Ricardo; Montenegro Brasil, Isabella

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work was investigate the synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects of fruit mixtures on total antioxidant capacities and bioactive compounds in tropical fruit juices, and optimize its formulation by the response surface methodology based on the responses: total polyphenols (TP), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), ascorbic acid content and sensorial acceptance. Camu-camu, acerola and acai were the major factors that influenced the antioxidant potential of the juice; and the yellow mombin showed a positive effect on the acceptance of the tropical juice. It was observed an/antagonistic effect between acerola and camu-camu for the TAC response. The optimum formulation obtained was 20% acerola, 10% camu-camu, 10% yellow mombin, 10% cashew apple and 10% acai, which was responsible for a response of 155.46 mg.100 g(-1) of ascorbic acid, 103.01 mg of GAE.100 g-1 of TP, 10.27 µM Trolox g(-1) of TAC and approximately 6.1 of acceptance. PMID:26817384

  13. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture are prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. However, recent advances in statistically-based experimental design have made it easier to evaluate interactions involving many chemicals...

  14. AN ADDITIVE EFFECT OF A MIXTURE OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE AND SODIUM CHLORATE ON PITUTARY-THYROID AXIS IN MALE F-344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Additive Effect of a Mixture of Ammonium Perchlorate
    and Sodium Chlorate on Pitutary-Thyroid Axis in Male F-344 Rats

    Moazzam A. Khan 1,2,, 3Suzanne E. Fenton. 2Adam E. Swank, ZGeremy W. Knapp, 2Susan D.
    Hester, and 2Douglas C. Wolf. 1NRC, 2Environmental Carcinog...

  15. Environmentally Realistic Mixtures of the Five Regulated Haloacetic Acids Exhibit Concentration-Dependent Departures from Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of water decreases waterborne disease. Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of oxidizing disinfectants with inorganic and organic materials in the source water. The U.S. EPA regulates five haloacetic acid (HAA) DBPs as a mixture. The objective ...

  16. Cumulative reproductive effects of in utero administration of mixtures of antiandrogens in male SD rats: synergy or additivity?

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1996 the USEPA was charged under the FQPA to consider the cumulative effects of chemicals in their risk assessments. Our studies were conducted to provide a framework for assessing the cumulative effects of antiandrogens. Toxicants were administered individually or as mixtures...

  17. Interface-engineering additives of poly(oxyethylene tridecyl ether) for low-band gap polymer solar cells consisting of PCDTBT:PCBM₇₀ bulk-heterojunction layers.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yoon Ho; Park, Byoungchoo

    2013-01-14

    We herein report on the improved photovoltaic (PV) effects of using a polymer bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) layer that consists of a low-band gap electron donor polymer of poly(N-9'-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)) (PCDTBT) and an acceptor of [6,6]-phenyl C₇₁ butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM₇₀), doped with an interface-engineering surfactant additive of poly(oxyethylene tridecyl ether) (PTE). The presence of an interface-engineering additive in the PV layer results in excellent performance; the addition of PTE to a PCDTBT:PCBM₇₀ system produces a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.0%, which is much higher than that of a reference device without the additive (4.9%). We attribute this improvement to an increased charge carrier lifetime, which is likely to be the result of the presence of PTE molecules oriented at the interfaces between the BHJ PV layer and the anode and cathode, as well as at the interfaces between the phase-separated BHJ domains. Our results suggest that the incorporation of the PTE interface-engineering additive in the PCDTBT:PCBM₇₀ PV layer results in a functional composite system that shows considerable promise for use in efficient polymer BHJ PV cells. PMID:23389265

  18. Self-consistent particle modeling of radio frequency discharge in Ar/O{sub 2} mixtures: Effects of crossed electric and magnetic fields and partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Benyoucef, Djilali; Yousfi, Mohammed; Belmadani, Bachir

    2011-04-15

    A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model is developed to study and analyze the electrical characteristics of the nonequilibrium plasma created by radio frequency (RF) discharge in Ar/O{sub 2} mixtures in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields. The method of collision treatment is based on an optimized estimation of the free time flight. The needed basic data--more specifically, the ion-neutral cross sections--are determined first. The simulation conditions are 50 mTorr for the total gas pressure and 200 V for the peak of the RF voltage at a frequency of 13.56 MHz. The magnetic field is varied from 0 to 50 G. The effect of the partial pressure ratio of O{sub 2} in the mixture and the effect of the magnitude of the magnetic field are discussed. In particular, the results show an increase of the plasma density that is ten times higher in the presence of a magnetic field.

  19. Importance of Rhodococcus strains in a bacterial consortium degrading a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives revealed by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Marc D; Yergeau, Etienne; Labbé, Diane; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial consortium (Mix3) composed of microorganisms originating from different environments (soils and wastewater) was obtained after enrichment in the presence of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives. After addition of the mixture, the development of the microbial composition of Mix3 was monitored at three different times (35, 113, and 222 days) using fingerprinting method and dominant bacterial species were identified. In parallel, 14 bacteria were isolated after 113 days and identified. Degradation capacities for Mix3 and the isolated bacterial strains were characterized and compared. At day 113, we induced the expression of catabolic genes in Mix3 by adding the substrate mixture to resting cells and the metatranscriptome was analyzed. After addition of the substrate mixture, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased at day 222 while a shift between Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium was observed after 113 days. Mix3 was able to degrade 13 compounds completely, with partial degradation of isooctane and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, but tert-butyl alcohol was not degraded. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016 isolated from Mix3 showed almost the same degradation capacities as Mix3: these results were not observed with the other isolated strains. Transcriptomic results revealed that Actinobacteria and in particular, Rhodococcus species, were major contributors in terms of total and catabolic gene transcripts while other species were involved in cyclohexane degradation. Not all the microorganisms identified at day 113 were active except R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 that appeared to be a major player in the degradation activity observed in Mix3. PMID:25343979

  20. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heneweer, Marjoke . E-mail: M.Heneweer@iras.uu.nl; Muusse, Martine; Berg, Martin van den; Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 {mu}M). Therefore, instead of using EC{sub 50} values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC{sub 50} value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 {mu}M, 0.5 {mu}M, 1.9 {mu}M, and 1.0 {mu}M for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol

  1. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heneweer, Marjoke; Muusse, Martine; van den Berg, Martin; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 microM). Therefore, instead of using EC50 values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC50 value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 microM, 0.5 microM, 1.9 microM, and 1.0 microM for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol (E2

  2. Exploring the Use of Additives to Optimize the Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers via Self-Consistent Field Theory Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Adam; Sunday, Daniel; Kline, R. Joseph

    The directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCPs) is being investigated for the fabrication of next generation memory and integrated circuit technologies. Much progress has been made showing how these materials can be processed to produce a variety of transferable patterned morphologies that meet the requirements for fabricating integrated circuit geometries. One lingering issue in using these materials to produce sub-10 nm structures is finding new BCPs with a high enough χFlory-Huggins interaction parameter to create small resolution features with low interfacial widths that are also easily processable. An alternative approach to synthesizing new materials is to instead blend the BCP with additives that strongly interacts with one of the blocks. Here we present findings on how the addition of a hydrogen bonding homopolymer affects the overall effective χ, the periodicity, and the morphology of the BCP. Self-consistent field theory simulations are used to explore how the relative χ values and degrees of polymerization between the BCP and homopolymer affect these parameters and suggest optimal blending conditions. Results are compared with experimental X-ray and neutron scattering studies of a polystyrene- b-poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(vinyl phenol) blend.

  3. Additive inhibition of human α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors by mixtures of commonly used drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Hondebrink, Laura; Tan, Sijie; Hermans, Elise; van Kleef, Regina G D M; Meulenbelt, Jan; Westerink, Remco H S

    2013-03-01

    Yearly, exposure to drugs of abuse results in ∼1 million emergency department visits in the US. In ∼50% of the visits, stimulant drugs like cocaine and amphetamine-like substances (e.g. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, the main active ingredient of ecstasy)) are involved, whereas in ∼60% multiple drugs are involved. These drugs induce higher dopamine and serotonin levels resulting in drug-induced toxicity. Since GABA receptors (GABA-R) provide the main inhibitory input on dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons, drug-induced inhibition of GABA-R could contribute to higher neurotransmitter levels and thus toxicity. We therefore investigated the effects of combinations of commonly abused stimulant drugs (cocaine, MDMA, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP)) on the function of the human α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor (hGABAA-R), expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. These drugs concentration-dependently inhibited the GABA-evoked current (mCPP>cocaine>MDMA>MDA). Most drug combinations decreased the GABA-evoked current stronger than the single drug. Additivity was observed during combined exposure to low concentrations of cocaine and mCPP as well as during combined exposure to MDA with cocaine or mCPP. However, combinations containing MDMA mainly resulted in sub-additivity or no additivity. At drug concentrations relevant for clinical toxicology, co-exposure to ≥2 drugs can decrease the GABA-evoked current in an additive manner. Thus, in patients exposed to multiple drugs, inhibitory GABA-ergic input is reduced more prominently, likely resulting in higher brain dopamine levels. As this will increase the risk for drug-induced toxicity, treatment of drug-intoxicated patients with drugs that enhance GABA-ergic input should be further optimized. PMID:23266428

  4. Reflected-Shock Ignition of H2-O2-Ar Mixtures with Addition of H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, O.; Deguillaume, F.; Petersen, E. L.

    It is well known that some impurities, even in very low concentration, can induce strong changes in the combustion properties of a fuel. Amongst these impurities, H2S is a common one that can be found in syngas produced from biomass or coal and in natural gases, in addition to being a by-product of the oil industry. Unfortunately, due to both the limited available literature data and the large number of sensitive reactions with significant rate uncertainty [1], the high-temperature chemistry of sulfur species remains poorly understood.

  5. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure and Ultra-High Vacuum Tribological Properties of Ionic Liquids (2) Mixtures and Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Koch, Victor R.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Richard, Ryan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ionic liquids are salts, many of which are typically viscous fluids at room temperature. The fluids are characterized by negligible vapor pressures under ambient conditions. These properties have led us to study the effectiveness of ionic liquids containing both organic cations and anions for use as space lubricants. In the previous paper we have measured the vapor pressure and some tribological properties of two distinct ionic liquids under simulated space conditions. In this paper we will present vapor pressure measurements for two new ionic liquids and friction coefficient data for boundary lubrication conditions in a spiral orbit tribometer using stainless steel tribocouples. In addition we present the first tribological data on mixed ionic liquids and an ionic liquid additive. Post mortem infrared and Raman analysis of the balls and races indicates the major degradation pathway for these two organic ionic liquids is similar to those of other carbon based lubricants, i.e. deterioration of the organic structure into amorphous graphitic carbon. The coefficients of friction and lifetimes of these lubricants are comparable to or exceed these properties for several commonly used space oils.

  6. A NIR spectroscopy-based efficient approach to detect fraudulent additions within mixtures of dried porcini mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Casale, Monica; Bagnasco, Lucia; Zotti, Mirca; Di Piazza, Simone; Sitta, Nicola; Oliveri, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Boletus edulis and allied species (BEAS), known as "porcini mushrooms", represent almost the totality of wild mushrooms placed on the Italian market, both fresh and dehydrated. Furthermore, considerable amounts of these dried fungi are imported from China. The presence of Tylopilus spp. and other extraneous species (i.e., species edible but not belonging to BEAS) within dried porcini mushrooms - mainly from those imported from China and sold in Italy - may represent an evaluable problem from a commercial point of view. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a rapid and effective alternative to classical methods for identifying extraneous species within dried porcini batches and detecting related commercial frauds. To this goal, 80 dried fungi including BEAS, Tylopilus spp., and Boletus violaceofuscus were analysed by NIRS. For each sample, 3 different parts of the pileus (pileipellis, flesh and hymenium) were analysed and a low-level strategy for data fusion, consisting of combining the signals obtained by the different parts before data processing, was applied. Then, NIR spectra were used to develop reliable and efficient class-models using a novel method, partial least squares density modelling (PLS-DM), and the two most commonly used class-modelling techniques, UNEQ and SIMCA. The results showed that NIR spectroscopy coupled with chemometric class-modelling technique can be suggested as an effective analytical strategy to check the authenticity of dried BEAS mushrooms. PMID:27591669

  7. [The effect of a nasal spray consisting of a standardized mixture of citrus limon (succus) and an aqueous extract of Cydonia oblongata (fructus) on nasal mucociliary clearance].

    PubMed

    Degen, J; Seiberling, M; Meyer, I; Thomann, P; Schürholz, T

    2000-01-01

    In a three-way-crossover study in 18 healthy male and female subjects aged from 20 to 49 years the influence of a 1% and 3% solution of a standardized composition of Citrus limon, succus, and extract from Cydonia oblonga, fructus (Gencydo) on the intranasal mucociliar clearance was investigated after multiple administration. The pH of the solution was about pH 2.3-3.2. The dose regimen consisted of 20 puffs (0.13 ml per puff) in each nostril within 24 h, which was by factor 3-10 higher than the usual therapeutic dosage of 2-6 puffs per nostril and 24 h. The mucociliar transport time was measured by a modified saccharin test, where 1 microliter of a 3-molar aqueous sodium saccharinate solution was applicated at the inferior nasal turbinate 1 cm from its anterior end using a glass capillary microliter pipet. This test was performed at screening examination, before each administration period, directly after each 24 h treatment period and 24 h after the end of each treatment. The time of initial taste perception could be defined with high precision by the volunteer since it appeared very spontaneously. Neither after intranasal administration of the 1% and 3% Citrus/Cydonia solution nor after placebo solution a prolongation of the perception time was found. It could be concluded that there is no measurable influence of the test products on the intranasal ciliar function. PMID:10683714

  8. Reinforcement of acrylic resins for provisional fixed restorations. Part III: effects of addition of titania and zirconia mixtures on some mechanical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Panyayong, W; Oshida, Y; Andres, C J; Barco, T M; Brown, D T; Hovijitra, S

    2002-01-01

    Acrylic resins have been used in many different applications in dentistry, especially in the fabrication of provisional fixed partial dentures. Ideally, a provisional crown and bridge material should be easy to handle and should protect teeth against physical, chemical, and thermal injuries. Some of the problems associated with this use are related to the material's poor mechanical properties. It has been demonstrated that acrylic resin can be strengthened through the addition of structural component of different size distributed in the acrylic matrix, thus forming a composite structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the addition effects of mixtures of titania (titanium dioxide, TiO(2)) powder and zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO(2)) powder being incorporated with pre-polymerized beads mixed in monomer liquid, on some mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin. The pre-polymerized powder poly(methyl methacrylate) resin was admixed with titania and zirconia powder. A mixing ratio was controlled by volume % of 0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 (samples with 0 v/o served as control groups). For using mixture of titania and zirconia, total amount of the mixture was controlled by volume % of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0, in which titania and zirconia were mixed at the ratio 1 :1, 1 :2 and 2 :1. Prior to mechanical tests, all rectangular-shaped samples (25 mm x 2 mm x 5 mm) were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days after polishing all six sides of samples. Samples were then subjected to the three-point bending flexion test to evaluate the bending strength as well as the modulus of elasticity. Weight gain and exothermic reaction survey were investigated as well. All data were collected and analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Sidak method (p=0.05). It was found that the addition of particles generally decreased the water absorbed by the composite system. Only 1 percent by volume concentration of 1 :1 ratio and 2 percent by volume concentration

  9. The Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Addition of Rosemary Extract, Sodium Acetate and Calcium Lactate Mixture on the Quality of Pre-cooked Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Muhlisin; Kang, Sun Moon; Choi, Won Hee; Lee, Keun Taik; Cheong, Sung Hee; Lee, Sung Ki

    2013-01-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 30% CO2+70% N2 or 100% N2) and an additive mixture (500 ppm rosemary extract, 3,000 ppm sodium acetate and 1,500 ppm calcium lactate) on the quality of pre-cooked hamburger patties during storage at 5°C for 14 d was evaluated. The addition of the additive mixture reduced aerobic and anaerobic bacteria counts in both 30% CO2-MAP (30% CO2+70% N2) and 100% N2-MAP (p<0.05). The 30% CO2-MAP was more effective to suppress the microbial growth than 100% N2-MAP, moreover the 30% CO2-MAP combined with additive mixture resulted in the lowest bacterial counts. The hamburger patties with additive mixture showed lower CIE L* and CIE a*, and higher CIE b* than those with no additive mixture. The 30% CO2-MAP tended to decrease the TBARS during storage regardless of the addition of additives. The use of 30% CO2-MAP in combination with additives mixture was effective for maintaining the quality and extending the shelf-life of pre-cooked hamburger patties. PMID:25049716

  10. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  11. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  12. Effect of α-Si3N4 Addition on Sintering of α-Sialon Powder via Carbonthermal Reduction Nitridation of Boron-rich Slag-based Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junbin; Jiang, Tao; Xue, Xiangxin

    2011-10-01

    With boron-rich slag, silica fume, bauxite chalmette, carbon black and α-Si3N4 as starting materials, α-Sialon powders were prepared by carbothermal reduction-nitridation(CRN). Different contents of α-Si3N4 addition were added to investigate the α-Sialon formation as a function of α-Si3N4 addition from boron rich slag based mixture fired at 1480 °C for 8 h under N2 flowing of 0.4 L/min. Phase assembly, microstructure of reaction products were determined by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope. The results showed that the main phases of the samples were a-Sialon, h-BN, AlN and small quantity of SiC. With the increasing amount of the α-Si3N4 addition, the h-BN content remained in a constant and AlN content was running down steadily, while the α-Sialon content increased gradually. The aspect ratio and the amount of elongated α-Sialon grains could be tailored by using different amounts of the α-Si3N4 addition.

  13. Mixtures of l-Amino Acids as Reaction Medium for Formation of Iron Nanoparticles: The Order of Addition into a Ferrous Salt Solution Matters

    PubMed Central

    Šišková, Karolína M.; Machala, Libor; Tuček, Jiři; Kašlík, Josef; Mojzeš, Peter; Zbořil, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Owing to Mössbauer spectroscopy, an advanced characterization technique for iron-containing materials, the present study reveals previously unknown possibilities using l-amino acids for the generation of magnetic particles. Based on our results, a simple choice of the order of l-amino acids addition into a reaction mixture containing ferrous ions leads to either superparamagnetic ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide particles, or magnetically strong Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles after chemical reduction. Conversely, when ferric salts are employed with the addition of selected l-amino acids, only Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles are observed, regardless of the addition order. We explain this phenomenon by a specific transient/intermediate complex formation between Fe2+ and l-glutamic acid. This type of complexation prevents ferrous ions from spontaneous oxidation in solutions with full air access. Moreover, due to surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy we show that the functional groups of l-amino acids are not destroyed during the borohydride-induced reduction. These functionalities can be further exploited for (i) attachment of l-amino acids to the as-prepared magnetic particles, and (ii) for targeted bio- and/or environmental applications where the surface chemistry needs to be tailored and directed toward biocompatible species. PMID:24071943

  14. Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis of Surface Modification Consisting of Addition of Alluvium (Feature 23a)

    SciTech Connect

    N. Erb

    1999-06-11

    The objective of this report is to document the analysis that was conducted to evaluate the effect of a potential change to the TSPA-VA base case design that could improve long-term repository performance. The design feature evaluated in this report is a modification of the topographic surface of Yucca Mountain. The modification consists of covering the land surface immediately above the repository foot-print with a thick layer of unconsolidated material utilizing rip-rap and plants to mitigate erosion. This surface modification is designated as Feature 23a or simply abbreviated as F23a. The fundamental aim of F23a is to reduce the net infiltration into the unsaturated zone by enhancing the potential for evapotranspiratiration at the surface; such a change would, in turn, reduce the seepage flux and the rate of radionuclide releases from the repository. Field and modeling studies of water movement in the unsaturated zone have indicated that shallow infiltration at the surface is almost negligible in locations where the bedrock is covered by a sufficiently thick soil layer. In addition to providing storage for meteoric water, a thick soil layer would slow the downward movement of soil moisture to such an extent that evaporation and transpiration could easily transfer most of the soil-water back to the atmosphere. Generic requirements for the effectiveness of this design feature are two-fold. First, the soil layer above the repository foot-print must be thick enough to provide sufficient storage of meteoric water (from episodic precipitation events) and accommodate plant roots. Second, the added soil layer must be engineered so as to mitigate thinning by erosional processes and have sufficient thickness to accommodate the roots of common desert plants. Under these two conditions, it is reasonable to expect that modification would be effective for a significant time period and the net infiltration and deep percolation flux would be reduced by orders of magnitude lower

  15. A Four-step Approach for Evaluation of Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    A four step approach was developed for evaluating toxicity data on a chemical mixture for consistency with dose addition. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture guidance (EPA 2000), toxicologic interaction for a defined mixture (all components known) is departure from a c...

  16. Mixture distributions in human genetics research.

    PubMed

    Schork, N J; Allison, D B; Thiel, B

    1996-06-01

    The use of mixture distributions in genetics research dates back to at least the late 1800s when Karl Pearson applied them in an analysis of crab morphometry. Pearson's use of normal mixture distributions to model the mixing of different species of crab (or 'families' of crab as he referred to them) within a defined geographic area motivated further use of mixture distributions in genetics research settings, and ultimately led to their development and recognition as intuitive modelling devices for the effects of underlying genes on quantitative phenotypic (i.e. trait) expression. In addition, mixture distributions are now used routinely to model or accommodate the genetic heterogeneity thought to underlie many human diseases. Specific applications of mixture distribution models in contemporary human genetics research are, in fact, too numerous to count. Despite this long, consistent and arguably illustrious history of use, little mention of mixture distributions in genetics research is made in many recent reviews on mixture models. This review attempts to rectify this by providing insight into the role that mixture distributions play in contemporary human genetics research. Tables providing examples from the literature that describe applications of mixture models in human genetics research are offered as a way of acquainting the interested reader with relevant studies. In addition, some of the more problematic aspects of the use of mixture models in genetics research are outlined and addressed. PMID:8817796

  17. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  18. TESTING FOR DEPARTURES FROM ADDITIVITY FOR A 2:1 MIXTURE OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND CARBARYL ON CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN BRAIN, PLASMA, AND RED BLOOD CELLS OF LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detecting and characterizing interactions among chemicals is an important environmental issue. This study was conducted to test for the existence of a significant departure from additivity for a mixture of two cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting pesticides: chlorpyrifos (CPF), an org...

  19. Fuel additives from SO/sub 2/ treated mixtures of amides and esters derived from vegetable oil, tall oil acid, or aralkyl acid

    SciTech Connect

    Efner, H. F.; Schiff, S.

    1985-03-12

    Vegetable oils, particularly soybean oil, tall oil acid, or aralkyl acids, particularly phenylstearic acid, are reacted with multiamines, particularly tetraethylenepentamine, to form a product mixture for subsequent reaction with SO/sub 2/ to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels.

  20. Dose addition models based on biologically-relevant reductions in fetal testosterone accurately predict postnatal reproductive tract alterations by a phthalate mixture in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Challenges in cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic phthalate mixtures include a lack of data on all the individual phthalates and difficulty determining the biological relevance of reduction in fetal testosterone (T) on postnatal development. The objectives of the curren...

  1. Evaluation of additivity of binary mixtures of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARa) activation in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are found globally in the environment and in animal tissues, and are present as mixtures of PFAA congeners. Mechanistic studies have found that in vivo effects of PFAAs are mediated by PPARL. Our previous studies showed that individual PFAAs activate ...

  2. Treatment of a mixture of food color additives (E122, E124 and E129) in different water matrices by UVA and solar photoelectro-Fenton.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdoulaye; Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric

    2015-09-15

    The degradation of 130 mL of mixtures of food azo dyes E122, E124 and E129 has been studied by electro-Fenton (EF) and UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) using a stirred tank reactor with either a boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Pt anode and an air-diffusion cathode. The main oxidant was hydroxyl radical formed at the anode from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between added Fe(2+) and H2O2 generated at the cathode. In sulfate medium, fast decolorization was found for all systems, but the almost total mineralization was more rapidly achieved by PEF with BDD. The performance with a real water matrix was slightly worse, although the removal of total organic load was still as high as 95%. The solar PEF (i.e., SPEF) treatment of dye mixtures using a 2.5 L flow plant with a BDD/air-diffusion cell coupled to a planar solar photoreactor is also reported. Fast decolorization and almost total mineralization was found in the presence of either sulfate, perchlorate, nitrate or a mixture of sulfate + chloride ions. In chloride medium, however, the formation of recalcitrant chloroderivatives decelerated the degradation process. Greater current efficiency and lower specific energy consumption were attained in sulfate medium at lower current density and higher azo dye content. A plausible reaction sequence based on 18 aromatic intermediates identified by GC-MS and 6 short-linear carboxylic acids detected by ion-exclusion HPLC has been proposed. The SPEF process promoted the photodegradation of Fe(III)-oxalate complexes and other undetected products. Sulfate and nitrate ions were always released to the medium. PMID:26057717

  3. A test of the additivity of acute toxicity of binary-metal mixtures of ni with Cd, Cu, and Zn to Daphnia magna, using the inflection point of the concentration-response curves.

    PubMed

    Traudt, Elizabeth M; Ranville, James F; Smith, Samantha A; Meyer, Joseph S

    2016-07-01

    Mixtures of metals are often present in surface waters, leading to toxicity that is difficult to predict. To provide data for development of multimetal toxicity models, Daphnia magna neonates were exposed to individual metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn) and to binary combinations of those metals in standard 48-h lethality tests conducted in US Environmental Protection Agency moderately hard reconstituted water with 3 mg dissolved organic carbon (DOC)/L added as Suwannee River fulvic acid. Toxicity tests were performed with mixtures of Ni and 1) Cd, which is considerably more toxic than Ni; 2) Cu, which is less toxic than Cd but more toxic than Ni; and 3) Zn, which has a toxicity threshold similar to Ni. For each combination of metals in the binary mixtures, the concentration of 1 metal was held constant while the second metal was varied through a series that ranged from nonlethal to lethal concentrations; then the roles of the metals were reversed. Inflection points of the concentration-response curves were compared to test for additivity of toxicity. Sublethal concentrations of Ni caused less-than-additive toxicity with Cd, slightly less-than-additive toxicity with Zn, and greater-than-additive toxicity with Cu. One explanation of these results might be competition among the metals for binding to biological ligands and/or dissolved organic matter. Therefore, models might have to incorporate sometimes competing chemical interactions to accurately predict metal-mixture toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1843-1851. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26681657

  4. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  5. Neighborhood inverse consistency preprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Freuder, E.C.; Elfe, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    Constraint satisfaction consistency preprocessing methods are used to reduce search effort. Time and especially space costs limit the amount of preprocessing that will be cost effective. A new form of consistency preprocessing, neighborhood inverse consistency, can achieve more problem pruning than the usual arc consistency preprocessing in a cost effective manner. There are two basic ideas: (1) Common forms of consistency enforcement basically operate by identifying and remembering solutions to subproblems for which a consistent value cannot be found for some additional problem variable. The space required for this memory can quickly become prohibitive. Inverse consistency basically operates by removing values for variables that are not consistent with any solution to some subproblem involving additional variables. The space requirement is at worst linear. (2) Typically consistency preprocessing achieves some level of consistency uniformly throughout the problem. A subproblem solution will be tested against each additional variable that constrains any subproblem variable. Neighborhood consistency focuses attention on the subproblem formed by the variables that are all constrained by the value in question. By targeting highly relevant subproblems we hope to {open_quotes}skim the cream{close_quotes}, obtaining a high payoff for a limited cost.

  6. Near azeotropic mixture substitute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture consisting of a first mole fraction of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124), CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b) and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a).

  7. Maximum likelihood estimation of finite mixture model for economic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-06-01

    Finite mixture model is a mixture model with finite-dimension. This models are provides a natural representation of heterogeneity in a finite number of latent classes. In addition, finite mixture models also known as latent class models or unsupervised learning models. Recently, maximum likelihood estimation fitted finite mixture models has greatly drawn statistician's attention. The main reason is because maximum likelihood estimation is a powerful statistical method which provides consistent findings as the sample sizes increases to infinity. Thus, the application of maximum likelihood estimation is used to fit finite mixture model in the present paper in order to explore the relationship between nonlinear economic data. In this paper, a two-component normal mixture model is fitted by maximum likelihood estimation in order to investigate the relationship among stock market price and rubber price for sampled countries. Results described that there is a negative effect among rubber price and stock market price for Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia.

  8. Suppression of hydrogenated carbon film deposition and hydrogen isotope retention by nitrogen addition into cold remote H/D and CH4 mixture plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, K.; Notani, M.; Uesugi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2015-08-01

    Control of tritium retention and its removal from the first wall of future fusion devices are one of the most crucial issues for safety and effective use for fuel. Nitrogen addition into remote edge plasmas has been considered and tested as an effective method for suppression of carbon film deposition and reduction of hydrogen isotope absorption in the deposited films. In this paper we have investigated the scavenger effects of nitrogen injected into low temperature D2/CH4 plasmas on hydrogenated carbon film growth using a small helical device. The result of the deposition shows that the key reactive particles with CN and ND(H) bonds to suppression of hydrogenated carbon film growth and hydrogen isotope absorption are much slowly generated compared with hydrocarbon particles such as CD(H)x and C2D(H)x. This may be due to the slow atomic nitrogen diffusion into hydrogenated carbon layer and the chemical equilibrium between nitrogen absorption.

  9. Effect of monomeric and oligomeric sugar osmolytes on DeltaGD, the Gibbs energy of stabilization of the protein at different pH values: is the sum effect of monosaccharide individually additive in a mixture?

    PubMed

    Poddar, Nitesh Kumar; Ansari, Z A; Singh, R K Brojen; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ahmad, Faizan

    2008-12-01

    Thermal denaturation curves of ribonuclease-A were measured by monitoring changes in the far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra in the presence of different concentrations of six sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, raffinose and stachyose) and mixture of monosaccharide constituents of each oligosaccharide at various pH values in the range of 6.0-2.0. These measurements gave values of T(m) (midpoint of denaturation), DeltaH(m) (enthalpy change at T(m)), DeltaC(p) (constant-pressure heat capacity change) under a given solvent condition. Using these values of DeltaH(m), T(m) and DeltaC(p) in appropriate thermodynamic relations, thermodynamic parameters at 25 degrees C, namely, DeltaG(D)(o) (Gibbs energy change), DeltaH(D)(o) (enthalpy change), and DeltaS(D)(o) (entropy change) were determined at a given pH and concentration of each sugar (including its mixture of monosaccharide constituents). Our main conclusions are: (i) each sugar stabilizes the protein in terms of T(m) and DeltaG(D)(o), and this stabilization is under enthalpic control, (ii) the protein stabilization by the oligosaccharide is significantly less than that by the equimolar concentration of the constituent monosaccharides, and (iii) the stabilization by monosaccharides in a mixture is fully additive. Furthermore, measurements of the far- and near-UV CD spectra suggested that secondary and tertiary structures of protein in their native and denatured states are not perturbed on the addition of sugars. PMID:18835508

  10. Kinetic spectrophotometric H-point standard addition method for the simultaneous determination of diloxanide furoate and metronidazole in binary mixtures and biological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Mahmoud Mohamed; Nejem, R.'afat Mahmoud; Shanab, Alaa Mohamed Abu; Shaat, Nahed Talab

    2013-10-01

    Simple, reliable, and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of diloxanide furoate and metronidazole using H-point standard addition method (HPSAM). The method is based on the oxidation rate difference of diloxanide and metronidazole by potassium permanganate in basic medium. A green color has been developed and measured at 610 nm. Different experimental parameters were carefully optimized. The limiting logarithmic and the initial-rate methods were adopted for the construction of the calibration curve of each individual reaction with potassium permanganate. Under the optimum conditions, Beer's law was obeyed in the range of 1.0-20.0 and 5.0-25.0 μg ml-1 for diloxanide furoate and metronidazole, respectively. The detection limits were 0.22 μg ml-1 for diloxanide furoate and 0.83 μg ml-1 for metronidazole. Correlation coefficients of the regression equations were greater than 0.9970 in all cases. The precision of the method was satisfactory; the maximum value of relative standard deviation did not exceed 1.06% (n = 5). The accuracy, expressed as recovery was between 99.4% and 101.4% with relative error of 0.12 and 0.14 for diloxanide furoate and metronidazole, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of both drugs in pharmaceutical dosage forms and human urine samples and compared with alternative HPLC method.

  11. AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-12-08

    The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

  12. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  13. The supra-additive hyperactivity caused by an amphetamine-chlordiazepoxide mixture exhibits an inverted-U dose response: negative implications for the use of a model in screening for mood stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michele P; Logue, Sheree F; Dwyer, Jason M; Beyer, Chad E; Majchrowski, Heather; Cai, Zhang; Liu, Zhi; Adedoyin, Adedayo; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon; Comery, Thomas A

    2009-06-01

    One of the few preclinical models used to identify mood stabilizers is an assay in which amphetamine-induced hyperactivity (AMPH) is potentiated by the benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide (CDP), an effect purportedly blocked by mood stabilizers. Our data here challenge this standard interpretation of the AMPH-CDP model. We show that the potentiating effects of AMPH-CDP are not explained by a pharmacokinetic interaction as both drugs have similar brain and plasma exposures whether administered alone or in combination. Of concern, however, we find that combining CDP (1-12 mg/kg) with AMPH (3 mg/kg) results in an inverted-U dose response in outbred CD-1 as well as inbred C57Bl/6N and 129S6 mice (peak hyperactivity at 3 mg/kg CDP+3 mg/kg AMPH). Such an inverted-U dose response complicates interpreting whether a reduction in hyperactivity produced by a mood stabilizer reflects a "blockade" or a "potentiation" of the mixture. In fact, we show that the prototypical mood stabilizer valproic acid augments the effects of CDP on hypolocomotion and anxiolytic-like behavior (increases punished crossings by Swiss-Webster mice in the four-plate test). We argue that these data, in addition to other practical and theoretical concerns surrounding the model, limit the utility of the AMPH-CDP mixture model in drug discovery. PMID:19303035

  14. The effect of different composition of ternary mixtures of emulsifying salts on the consistency of processed cheese spreads manufactured from Swiss-type cheese with different degrees of maturity.

    PubMed

    Salek, R N; Černíková, M; Maděrová, S; Lapčík, L; Buňka, F

    2016-05-01

    The scope of this work was to investigate the dependence of selected textural (texture profile analysis, TPA) and viscoelastic properties of processed cheese on the composition of ternary mixtures of emulsifying salts [disodium hydrogenphosphate, DSP; tetrasodium diphosphate, TSPP; sodium salt of polyphosphate (with mean length n ≈ 20), P20; and trisodium citrate, TSC] during a 60-d storage period (6±2°C). The processed cheese samples [40% wt/wt dry matter (DM) content, 50% wt/wt fat in DM content] were manufactured using Swiss-type cheese (as the main raw material) with 4 different maturity degrees (4, 8, 12, and 16 wk of ripening). Moreover, the pH of the samples was adjusted (the target values within the range of 5.60-5.80), corresponding to the standard pH values of spreadable processed cheese. With respect to the individual application of emulsifying salts (regardless of the maturity degree of the Swiss-type cheese applied), the samples prepared with P20 were the hardest, followed by those prepared with TSPP, TSC, and DSP. Furthermore, a specific ratio of DSP:TSPP (1:1) led to a significant increase in the hardness of the samples. On the whole, the hardness of all processed cheese samples increased with the prolonging storage period, whereas their hardness significantly dropped with the rising ripening stage of the raw material utilized. In all of the cases, the trends of hardness development remained analogous, and only the absolute values differed significantly. Moreover, the findings of TPA were in accordance with those of the rheological analysis. In particular, the specific ratio of DSP:TSPP (1:1) resulted in the highest gel strength and interaction factor values, followed by P20, TSPP, TSC, and DSP (used individually), reporting the same trend which was demonstrated by TPA. The monitored values of the gel strength and interaction factor decreased with the increasing maturity degree of the Swiss-type cheese used. The intensity of the rigidity of the

  15. A NONADDITITIVE TUMOR RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects, but this may not be consistent with the actual biological response. We used a rodent model of hereditary renal cancer to investigate the carcinogenic response of a mixture of drinkin...

  16. Predicting skin permeability from complex chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Riviere, Jim E. . E-mail: Jim_Riviere@ncsu.edu; Brooks, James D.

    2005-10-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to topical chemicals is usually in the form of complex chemical mixtures, yet risk assessment is based on experimentally derived data from individual chemical exposures from a single, usually aqueous vehicle, or from computed physiochemical properties. We present an approach using hybrid quantitative structure permeation relationships (QSPeR) models where absorption through porcine skin flow-through diffusion cells is well predicted using a QSPeR model describing the individual penetrants, coupled with a mixture factor (MF) that accounts for physicochemical properties of the vehicle/mixture components. The baseline equation is log k {sub p} = c + mMF + a{sigma}{alpha} {sub 2} {sup H} + b{sigma}{beta} {sub 2} {sup H} + s{pi} {sub 2} {sup H} + rR {sub 2} + vV {sub x} where {sigma}{alpha} {sub 2} {sup H} is the hydrogen-bond donor acidity, {sigma}{beta} {sub 2} {sup H} is the hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity, {pi} {sub 2} {sup H} is the dipolarity/polarizability, R {sub 2} represents the excess molar refractivity, and V {sub x} is the McGowan volume of the penetrants of interest; c, m, a, b, s, r, and v are strength coefficients coupling these descriptors to skin permeability (k {sub p}) of 12 penetrants (atrazine, chlorpyrifos, ethylparathion, fenthion, methylparathion, nonylphenol, {rho}-nitrophenol, pentachlorophenol, phenol, propazine, simazine, and triazine) in 24 mixtures. Mixtures consisted of full factorial combinations of vehicles (water, ethanol, propylene glycol) and additives (sodium lauryl sulfate, methyl nicotinate). An additional set of 4 penetrants (DEET, SDS, permethrin, ricinoleic acid) in different mixtures were included to assess applicability of this approach. This resulted in a dataset of 16 compounds administered in 344 treatment combinations. Across all exposures with no MF, R{sup 2} for absorption was 0.62. With the MF, correlations increased up to 0.78. Parameters correlated to the MF include refractive

  17. Deviation from additivity in mixture toxicity: relevance of nonlinear dose-response relationships and cell line differences in genotoxicity assays with combinations of chemical mutagens and gamma-radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Werner K; Vamvakas, Spyros; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Schlatter, Josef; Stopper, Helga

    2002-01-01

    not be generalized. Regarding the testing of mixtures for deviation from additive toxicity, the suggested experimental protocol is easily followed by toxicologists. PMID:12634119

  18. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  19. Complex mixtures, complex responses: Assessing pharmaceutical mixtures using field and laboratory approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Scott, Tia-Marie; Kolpin, Dana W.; Cetkovic-Cvrlje, Marina; Lesteberg, Kelsey E.; Rearick, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are present in low concentrations (<100 ng/L) in most municipal wastewater effluents but may be elevated locally because of factors such as input from pharmaceutical formulation facilities. Using existing concentration data, the authors assessed pharmaceuticals in laboratory exposures of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and added environmental complexity through effluent exposures. In the laboratory, larval and mature minnows were exposed to a simple opioid mixture (hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone), an opioid agonist (tramadol), a muscle relaxant (methocarbamol), a simple antidepressant mixture (fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine), a sleep aid (temazepam), or a complex mixture of all compounds. Larval minnow response to effluent exposure was not consistent. The 2010 exposures resulted in shorter exposed minnow larvae, whereas the larvae exposed in 2012 exhibited altered escape behavior. Mature minnows exhibited altered hepatosomatic indices, with the strongest effects in females and in mixture exposures. In addition, laboratory-exposed, mature male minnows exposed to all pharmaceuticals (except the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor mixture) defended nest sites less rigorously than fish in the control group. Tramadol or antidepressant mixture exposure resulted in increased splenic T lymphocytes. Only male minnows exposed to whole effluent responded with increased plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Female minnows exposed to pharmaceuticals (except the opioid mixture) had larger livers, likely as a compensatory result of greater prominence of vacuoles in liver hepatocytes. The observed alteration of apical endpoints central to sustaining fish populations confirms that effluents containing waste streams from pharmaceutical formulation facilities can adversely impact fish populations but that the effects may not be temporally consistent. The present study highlights the importance of including diverse biological endpoints spanning

  20. Complex mixtures, complex responses: Assessing pharmaceutical mixtures using field and laboratory approaches.

    PubMed

    Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Furlong, Edward T; Phillips, Pat J; Scott, Tia-Marie; Kolpin, Dana W; Cetkovic-Cvrlje, Marina; Lesteberg, Kelsey E; Rearick, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals are present in low concentrations (<100 ng/L) in most municipal wastewater effluents but may be elevated locally because of factors such as input from pharmaceutical formulation facilities. Using existing concentration data, the authors assessed pharmaceuticals in laboratory exposures of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and added environmental complexity through effluent exposures. In the laboratory, larval and mature minnows were exposed to a simple opioid mixture (hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone), an opioid agonist (tramadol), a muscle relaxant (methocarbamol), a simple antidepressant mixture (fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine), a sleep aid (temazepam), or a complex mixture of all compounds. Larval minnow response to effluent exposure was not consistent. The 2010 exposures resulted in shorter exposed minnow larvae, whereas the larvae exposed in 2012 exhibited altered escape behavior. Mature minnows exhibited altered hepatosomatic indices, with the strongest effects in females and in mixture exposures. In addition, laboratory-exposed, mature male minnows exposed to all pharmaceuticals (except the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor mixture) defended nest sites less rigorously than fish in the control group. Tramadol or antidepressant mixture exposure resulted in increased splenic T lymphocytes. Only male minnows exposed to whole effluent responded with increased plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Female minnows exposed to pharmaceuticals (except the opioid mixture) had larger livers, likely as a compensatory result of greater prominence of vacuoles in liver hepatocytes. The observed alteration of apical endpoints central to sustaining fish populations confirms that effluents containing waste streams from pharmaceutical formulation facilities can adversely impact fish populations but that the effects may not be temporally consistent. The present study highlights the importance of including diverse biological endpoints spanning

  1. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Feron, V J; Groten, J P

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures have gradually substituted trial-and-error approaches, improving the insight into the testability of joint action and interaction of constituents of mixtures. The acquired knowledge has successfully been used to evaluate the safety of combined exposures and complex mixtures such as, for example, the atmosphere at hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavouring complexes, and the combined intake of food additives. To consolidate the scientific foundation of mixture toxicology, studies are in progress to revisit the biological concepts and mathematics underlying formulas for low-dose extrapolation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Conspicuous developments include the production of new computer programs applicable to mixture research (CombiTool, BioMol, Reaction Network Modelling), the application of functional genomics and proteomics to mixture studies, the use of nano-optochemical sensors for in vivo imaging of physiological processes in cells, and the application of optical sensor micro- and nano-arrays for complex sample analysis. Clearly, the input of theoretical biologists, biomathematicians and bioengineers in mixture toxicology is essential for the development of this challenging branch of toxicology into a scientific subdiscipline of full value. PMID:11983277

  2. A Variational Statistical-Field Theory for Polar Liquid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    Using a variational field-theoretic approach, we derive a molecularly-based theory for polar liquid mixtures. The resulting theory consists of simple algebraic expressions for the free energy of mixing and the dielectric constant as functions of mixture composition. Using only the dielectric constants and the molar volumes of the pure liquid constituents, the theory evaluates the mixture dielectric constants in good agreement with the experimental values for a wide range of liquid mixtures, without using adjustable parameters. In addition, the theory predicts that liquids with similar dielectric constants and molar volumes dissolve well in each other, while sufficient disparity in these parameters result in phase separation. The calculated miscibility map on the dielectric constant-molar volume axes agrees well with known experimental observations for a large number of liquid pairs. Thus the theory provides a quantification for the well-known empirical ``like-dissolves-like'' rule. Bz acknowledges the A-STAR fellowship for the financial support.

  3. Mixture design and multivariate analysis in mixture research.

    PubMed Central

    Eide, I; Johnsen, H G

    1998-01-01

    Mixture design has been used to identify possible interactions between mutagens in a mixture. In this paper the use of mixture design in multidimensional isobolographic studies is introduced. Mutagenicity of individual nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated is an organic extract of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). After replacing DCM with dimethyl sulfoxide, the extract was spiked with three individual nitro-PAH: 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. The nitro-PAH were added separately and in various combinations to the extract to determine the effects of each variable and to identify possible interactions between the individual nitro-PAH and between the nitro-PAH and the extract. The composition of the mixtures was determined by mixture design (linear axial normal) with four variables (the DEP extract and the three nitro-PAH, giving 8 different mixtures plus a triplicate centerpoint, i.e., a total of 11. The design supports a model with linear and interaction (product) terms. Two different approaches were used: traditional mixture design within a well-defined range on the linear part of the dose-response curves and an isobolographic mixture design with equipotent doses of each variable. The mixtures were tested for mutagenicity in the Ames assay using the TA98 strain of Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed with projections to latent structures (PLS). The three individual nitro-PAH and the DEP extract acted additively in the Ames test. The use of mixture design either within a well-defined range of the linear part on the dose-response curve or with equipotent doses saves experiments and reduces the possibility of false interaction terms in situations with dose additivity or response additivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9860895

  4. Mixture design and multivariate analysis in mixture research.

    PubMed

    Eide, I; Johnsen, H G

    1998-12-01

    Mixture design has been used to identify possible interactions between mutagens in a mixture. In this paper the use of mixture design in multidimensional isobolographic studies is introduced. Mutagenicity of individual nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated is an organic extract of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). After replacing DCM with dimethyl sulfoxide, the extract was spiked with three individual nitro-PAH: 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. The nitro-PAH were added separately and in various combinations to the extract to determine the effects of each variable and to identify possible interactions between the individual nitro-PAH and between the nitro-PAH and the extract. The composition of the mixtures was determined by mixture design (linear axial normal) with four variables (the DEP extract and the three nitro-PAH, giving 8 different mixtures plus a triplicate centerpoint, i.e., a total of 11. The design supports a model with linear and interaction (product) terms. Two different approaches were used: traditional mixture design within a well-defined range on the linear part of the dose-response curves and an isobolographic mixture design with equipotent doses of each variable. The mixtures were tested for mutagenicity in the Ames assay using the TA98 strain of Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed with projections to latent structures (PLS). The three individual nitro-PAH and the DEP extract acted additively in the Ames test. The use of mixture design either within a well-defined range of the linear part on the dose-response curve or with equipotent doses saves experiments and reduces the possibility of false interaction terms in situations with dose additivity or response additivity. PMID:9860895

  5. A study of finite mixture model: Bayesian approach on financial time series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-07-01

    Recently, statistician have emphasized on the fitting finite mixture model by using Bayesian method. Finite mixture model is a mixture of distributions in modeling a statistical distribution meanwhile Bayesian method is a statistical method that use to fit the mixture model. Bayesian method is being used widely because it has asymptotic properties which provide remarkable result. In addition, Bayesian method also shows consistency characteristic which means the parameter estimates are close to the predictive distributions. In the present paper, the number of components for mixture model is studied by using Bayesian Information Criterion. Identify the number of component is important because it may lead to an invalid result. Later, the Bayesian method is utilized to fit the k-component mixture model in order to explore the relationship between rubber price and stock market price for Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia. Lastly, the results showed that there is a negative effect among rubber price and stock market price for all selected countries.

  6. Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liddle, S M; Narayanan, T; Poon, W C K

    2011-05-18

    We study phase separation and transient gelation experimentally in a mixture consisting of polydisperse colloids (polydispersity: ≈ 6%) and non-adsorbing polymers, where the ratio of the average size of the polymer to that of the colloid is ≈ 0.062. Unlike what has been reported previously for mixtures with somewhat lower colloid polydispersity (≈ 5%), the addition of polymers does not expand the fluid-solid coexistence region. Instead, we find a region of fluid-solid coexistence which has an approximately constant width but an unexpected re-entrant shape. We detect the presence of a metastable gas-liquid binodal, which gives rise to two-stepped crystallization kinetics that can be rationalized as the effect of fractionation. Finally, we find that the separation into multiple coexisting solid phases at high colloid volume fractions predicted by equilibrium statistical mechanics is kinetically suppressed before the system reaches dynamical arrest. PMID:21525554

  7. Combined toxicity of heavy metal mixtures in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xialu; Gu, Yuanliang; Zhou, Qi; Mao, Guochuan; Zou, Baobo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2016-09-01

    With rapid industrialization, China is now facing great challenges in heavy metal contamination in the environment. Human exposure to heavy metals through air, water and food commonly involves a mixture consisting of multiple heavy metals. In this study, eight common heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni) that cause environmental contamination were selected to investigate the combined toxicity of different heavy metal mixtures in HL7702 cells. Toxicity (24 h LC50 ) of each individual metal on the cells ranked Hg > Cr = Cd > Cu > Zn > Ni > Mn > Pb; toxicity of the different mixtures ranked: M5 > M3PbHgCd > M5+Mn > M5+Cu > M2CdNi > M4A > M8-Mn > M8 > M5+Zn > M4B > M8-Cr > M8-Zn > M8-Cu > M8-Pb > M8-Cd > M8-Hg > M8-Ni > M3PbHgNi > M3CuZnMn. The cytotoxicity data of individual metals were successfully used to build the additive models of two- to eight-component metal mixtures. The comparison between additive model and combination model or partly additive model was useful to evaluate the combined effects in mixture. Synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects of the toxicity were observed in different mixtures. These results suggest that the combined effects should be considered in the risk assessment of heavy metal co-exposure, and more comprehensive investigations on the combined effects of different heavy metal mixtures are needed in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26865462

  8. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  9. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  10. Fuel compositions comprising coal-liquid fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Niimi, H.; Nobe, T.; Wada, T.

    1981-01-20

    The invention provides: a fuel composition comprising 100 parts by weight of a coal-liquid fuel mixture and 0.02 to 1.0 part by weight of at least one additive selected from the group consisting of dibenzylidene sorbitol, ditoluylidene sorbitol, tribenzylidene sorbitol, tritoluylidene sorbitol and hydrogenated castor oil; and a fuel composition comprising 100 parts by weight of a coal-liquid fuel mixture, 0.02 to 1.0 part by weight of at least one additive selected from the group consisting of dibenzylidene sorbitol, ditoluylidene sorbitol, tribenzylidene sorbitol, tritoluylidene sorbitol and hydrogenated castor oil, and 1 to 10 parts by weight of water. The composition shows high stability over a prolonged period of time, preventing the separation into layers of the components.

  11. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    A measure of indexing consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on indexing consistency…

  12. Near azeotropic mixture substitute for dichlorodifluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A refrigerant and a process of formulating thereof that consists of a mixture of a first mole fraction of CH.sub.2 FCF.sub.3 and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3.

  13. Enhanced shear strength of sodium bentonite using frictional additives

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, K.E.; Bowders, J.J.; Gilbert, R.B.; Daniel, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most important obstacles to using geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) in landfill cover systems is the low shear strength provided by the bentonitic portion of the GCL. In this study, the authors propose that granular, frictional materials might be added to the bentonite to form an admixture that would have greater shear strength than the bentonite alone while still raining low hydraulic conductivity. Bentonite was mixed with two separate granular additives, expanded shale and recycled to form mixtures consisting of 20-70% bentonite by weight. In direct shear tests at normal stresses of 34.5-103.5 kPa, effective friction angles were measured as 45{degrees} for the expanded 36{degrees} for the recycled glass, and 7{degrees} for the hydrated granular bentonite. The strength of the expanded shale mixtures increased nearly linearly as the percentage shale in the mixture increased, to 44{degrees} for a bentonite mixture with 80% shale. The addition of recycled glass showed little effect on the shear strength of the mixtures of glass and bentonite. Hydraulic conductivity measurements for both types of mixtures indicated a linear increase with log(k) as the amount of granular additive increased. For applications involving geosynthetic clay liners for cover systems, a mixture of 40% expanded shale and 60% bentonite is recommended, although further testing must be done. The 40/60 mixture satisfies the hydraulic equivalency requirement, with k = 5.1X10{sup -9} cm/sec, while increasing the shear strength parameters of the bentonitic mixture to {phi}{prime} = 17{degrees} and c{prime} = 0.

  14. Consistent interactions and involution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaparulin, D. S.; Lyakhovich, S. L.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the concept of involution of field equations, a universal method is proposed for constructing consistent interactions between the fields. The method equally well applies to the Lagrangian and non-Lagrangian equations and it is explicitly covariant. No auxiliary fields are introduced. The equations may have (or have no) gauge symmetry and/or second class constraints in Hamiltonian formalism, providing the theory admits a Hamiltonian description. In every case the method identifies all the consistent interactions.

  15. Dielectric properties measurement method in the microwave frequencies range for non-polar/polar liquid mixtures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Ienciu, M.; Surducan, V.; Limare, A.; Fourel, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a method based on dielectric properties measurements over a large spectrum of frequencies, in the microwave (MW) domain, in order to characterize a liquid mixture. The liquid mixtures consist of non-polar fluids (silicone oil, diesel fuel) and polar additives, in order to increase the specific MW absorption of the mixture for further MW power processing. We have measured the MW specific absorptions for mixtures of silicone oil with 20% and 30% (w/w) isopropanol. In both cases, the mixtures are sufficiently stable over time to allow further studies of thermal convection dynamics initiated by MW heating. For a mixture of diesel fuel with 10% (w/w) alkyl polyglycoside, the main observation was that its MW specific absorption varies over time after the mechanical mixing process.

  16. Deciding which chemical mixtures risk assessment methods work best for what mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Teuschler, Linda K.

    2007-09-01

    The most commonly used chemical mixtures risk assessment methods involve simple notions of additivity and toxicological similarity. Newer methods are emerging in response to the complexities of chemical mixture exposures and effects. Factors based on both science and policy drive decisions regarding whether to conduct a chemical mixtures risk assessment and, if so, which methods to employ. Scientific considerations are based on positive evidence of joint toxic action, elevated human exposure conditions or the potential for significant impacts on human health. Policy issues include legislative drivers that may mandate action even though adequate toxicity data on a specific mixture may not be available and risk assessment goals that impact the choice of risk assessment method to obtain the amount of health protection desired. This paper discusses three important concepts used to choose among available approaches for conducting a chemical mixtures risk assessment: (1) additive joint toxic action of mixture components; (2) toxicological interactions of mixture components; and (3) chemical composition of complex mixtures. It is proposed that scientific support for basic assumptions used in chemical mixtures risk assessment should be developed by expert panels, risk assessment methods experts, and laboratory toxicologists. This is imperative to further develop and refine quantitative methods and provide guidance on their appropriate applications. Risk assessors need scientific support for chemical mixtures risk assessment methods in the form of toxicological data on joint toxic action for high priority mixtures, statistical methods for analyzing dose-response for mixtures, and toxicological and statistical criteria for determining sufficient similarity of complex mixtures.

  17. Network Consistent Data Association.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Das, Abir; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K

    2016-09-01

    Existing data association techniques mostly focus on matching pairs of data-point sets and then repeating this process along space-time to achieve long term correspondences. However, in many problems such as person re-identification, a set of data-points may be observed at multiple spatio-temporal locations and/or by multiple agents in a network and simply combining the local pairwise association results between sets of data-points often leads to inconsistencies over the global space-time horizons. In this paper, we propose a Novel Network Consistent Data Association (NCDA) framework formulated as an optimization problem that not only maintains consistency in association results across the network, but also improves the pairwise data association accuracies. The proposed NCDA can be solved as a binary integer program leading to a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling the challenging data-association scenario where the number of data-points varies across different sets of instances in the network. We also present an online implementation of NCDA method that can dynamically associate new observations to already observed data-points in an iterative fashion, while maintaining network consistency. We have tested both the batch and the online NCDA in two application areas-person re-identification and spatio-temporal cell tracking and observed consistent and highly accurate data association results in all the cases. PMID:26485472

  18. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  19. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  20. Stabilizer for fuel mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Moriyama, N.; Yamamura, M.

    1981-02-24

    A stabilizer for fuel mixtures of finely divided coal and fuel oil is composed of an active ingredient, a non-ionic surface active agent consisting of a block copolymer represented by the following general formula (I): R/sub 1/O-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)l-(C/sub 3/H/sup 6/O)m-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)n-R/sub 2/ (I) wherein r/sub 1/ and r/sub 2/ stand for a hydrogen atom or an alklyl group having 1 to 6 carbon atoms, the mole number (L+n) of added ethylene oxide is in the range of from 30 to 300, the mole number (M) of added propylene oxide is in the range of from 15 to 80, and the content of ethylene oxide in the whole molecule is 40 to 85% by weight.

  1. When is holography consistent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett; Ong, Yen Chin

    2015-09-01

    Holographic duality relates two radically different kinds of theory: one with gravity, one without. The very existence of such an equivalence imposes strong consistency conditions which are, in the nature of the case, hard to satisfy. Recently a particularly deep condition of this kind, relating the minimum of a probe brane action to a gravitational bulk action (in a Euclidean formulation), has been recognized; and the question arises as to the circumstances under which it, and its Lorentzian counterpart, is satisfied. We discuss the fact that there are physically interesting situations in which one or both versions might, in principle, not be satisfied. These arise in two distinct circumstances: first, when the bulk is not an Einstein manifold and, second, in the presence of angular momentum. Focusing on the application of holography to the quark-gluon plasma (of the various forms arising in the early Universe and in heavy-ion collisions), we find that these potential violations never actually occur. This suggests that the consistency condition is a "law of physics" expressing a particular aspect of holography.

  2. Consistent Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most fundamental yet difficult subjects in physics. Nonrelativistic quantum theory is presented here in a clear and systematic fashion, integrating Born's probabilistic interpretation with Schrödinger dynamics. Basic quantum principles are illustrated with simple examples requiring no mathematics beyond linear algebra and elementary probability theory. The quantum measurement process is consistently analyzed using fundamental quantum principles without referring to measurement. These same principles are used to resolve several of the paradoxes that have long perplexed physicists, including the double slit and Schrödinger's cat. The consistent histories formalism used here was first introduced by the author, and extended by M. Gell-Mann, J. Hartle and R. Omnès. Essential for researchers yet accessible to advanced undergraduate students in physics, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science, this book is supplementary to standard textbooks. It will also be of interest to physicists and philosophers working on the foundations of quantum mechanics. Comprehensive account Written by one of the main figures in the field Paperback edition of successful work on philosophy of quantum mechanics

  3. Induction of mutation spectra by complex mixtures: approaches, problems, and possibilities.

    PubMed Central

    DeMarini, D M

    1994-01-01

    More complex environmental mixtures have been evaluated for mutagenic activity at the hisD3052 allele of Salmonella, primarily in strain TA98, than in any other target or mutation assay. Using colony probe hybridization to detect a common hot spot deletion, followed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, we have generated 10 mutation spectra from three classes of mixtures (i.e., urban air, cigarette smoke condensate, and municipal waste incinerator emissions). The mutation spectra are distinctly different among the three classes of mixtures; however, the spectra for samples within the same class of mixture are similar. In addition to the hot spot mutation, the mixtures induce complex mutations, which consist of a small deletion and a base substitution. These mutations suggest a mechanism involving misinsertion of a base opposite a DNA adduct followed by a slippage and mismatch. A role for DNA secondary structure also may be the basis for the mutational site specificity exhibited by the various mixtures. The results suggest that unique mutation spectra can be generated by different classes of complex mixtures and that such spectra are a consequence of the dominance of a particular chemical class or classes within the mixture. The problems associated with this type of research are discussed along with the potential value of mutation spectra as a tool for exposure and risk assessment. PMID:7821286

  4. Consistent quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2015-11-01

    In response to recent criticisms by Okon and Sudarsky, various aspects of the consistent histories (CH) resolution of the quantum measurement problem(s) are discussed using a simple Stern-Gerlach device, and compared with the alternative approaches to the measurement problem provided by spontaneous localization (GRW), Bohmian mechanics, many worlds, and standard (textbook) quantum mechanics. Among these CH is unique in solving the second measurement problem: inferring from the measurement outcome a property of the measured system at a time before the measurement took place, as is done routinely by experimental physicists. The main respect in which CH differs from other quantum interpretations is in allowing multiple stochastic descriptions of a given measurement situation, from which one (or more) can be selected on the basis of its utility. This requires abandoning a principle (termed unicity), central to classical physics, that at any instant of time there is only a single correct description of the world.

  5. RENAL CANCER STUDIES OF DRINKING WATER MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological response. A rodent model of hereditary renal cancer (Eker rat) was used to evaluate the carcinogenicity of a mixture of DBPs...

  6. Epipolar Consistency in Transmission Imaging.

    PubMed

    Aichert, André; Berger, Martin; Wang, Jian; Maass, Nicole; Doerfler, Arnd; Hornegger, Joachim; Maier, Andreas K

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the derivation of the Epipolar Consistency Conditions (ECC) between two X-ray images from the Beer-Lambert law of X-ray attenuation and the Epipolar Geometry of two pinhole cameras, using Grangeat's theorem. We motivate the use of Oriented Projective Geometry to express redundant line integrals in projection images and define a consistency metric, which can be used, for instance, to estimate patient motion directly from a set of X-ray images. We describe in detail the mathematical tools to implement an algorithm to compute the Epipolar Consistency Metric and investigate its properties with detailed random studies on both artificial and real FD-CT data. A set of six reference projections of the CT scan of a fish were used to evaluate accuracy and precision of compensating for random disturbances of the ground truth projection matrix using an optimization of the consistency metric. In addition, we use three X-ray images of a pumpkin to prove applicability to real data. We conclude, that the metric might have potential in applications related to the estimation of projection geometry. By expression of redundancy between two arbitrary projection views, we in fact support any device or acquisition trajectory which uses a cone-beam geometry. We discuss certain geometric situations, where the ECC provide the ability to correct 3D motion, without the need for 3D reconstruction. PMID:25915956

  7. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Royce K.; Smith, Jacob W.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility.

  8. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Royce K; Smith, Jacob W; Saykally, Richard J

    2016-05-21

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility. PMID:27208929

  9. Segregation in mixtures of granular chains and spherical grains under vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoxian; Zheng, Ning; Shi, Qingfan; Sun, Gang; Li, Liangsheng

    2013-04-01

    We experimentally investigate segregation behaviors of binary granular mixtures consisting of granular chains and spherical grains with different interstitial media under vertical vibrations. A quantitative criterion is proposed to locate the boundaries between different vibrating phases. The water-immersed granular mixture exhibits two interesting types of segregation behaviors: chain-on-top and sandwich patterns. However, the phenomenon of sandwich segregation is absent for the air-immersed mixture. The topological differences of phase diagrams between two different environments indicate that the interstitial fluid plays an important role on the granular demixing. Additionally, the phase behaviors of mixtures for the different chain lengths show a not significant discrepancy. Finally, the vibrating thickness ratio determining the phase boundary characterizes the mixing extent of the granular bed. The estimated ratios for various chain lengths exhibit a monotonically decreasing dependence, when the vibration frequency increases.

  10. Interstellar Dust Models Consistent with Extinction, Emission, and Abundance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubko, Viktor; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    We present new interstellar dust models which have been derived by simultaneously fitting the far ultraviolet to near infrared extinction, the diffuse infrared emission, and, unlike previous models, the elemental abundances in dust for the diffuse interstellar medium. We found that dust models consisting of a mixture of spherical graphite and silicate grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, in addition to porous composite particles containing silicate, organic refractory, and water ice, provide an improved .t to the UV-to-infrared extinction and infrared emission measurements, while consuming the amounts of elements well within the uncertainties of adopted interstellar abundances, including B star abundances. These models are a signi.cant improvement over the recent Li & Draine (2001, ApJ, 554, 778) model which requires an excessive amount of silicon to be locked up in dust: 48 ppm (atoms per million of H atoms), considerably more than the solar abundance of 34 ppm or the B star abundance of 19 ppm.

  11. Additive for electrolyte of lead-acid batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.M.

    1986-10-14

    This patent describes a lead-acid storage battery containing as an electrolyte for each cell, an aqueous sulfuric acid solution containing an activating amount of an additive comprising a mixture of an iron chelate and a magnesium salt or chelate. The chelates for the iron and magnesium are formed from the chelating agents which form 4 to 6 membered rings with the iron and magnesium and which contain a member of the group consisting of amine groups, phenol groups and aldehyde groups.

  12. 21 CFR 1310.13 - Exemption of chemical mixtures; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption of chemical mixtures; application. 1310... REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES § 1310.13 Exemption of chemical mixtures; application. (a... application of all or any part of the Act a chemical mixture consisting of two or more chemical components,...

  13. Toxicology of chemical mixtures: international perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Feron, V J; Cassee, F R; Groten, J P

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews major activities outside the United States on human health issues related to chemical mixtures. In Europe an international study group on combination effects has been formed and has started by defining synergism and antagonism. Successful research programs in Europe include the development and application of statistically designed experiments combined with multivariate data analysis and modeling in vitro and in vivo studies on a wide variety of chemicals such as petroleum hydrocarbons, aldehydes, food contaminants, industrial solvents, and mycotoxins. Other major activities focus on the development of safety evaluation strategies for mixtures such as the use of toxic equivalence factors or alternatives such as the question-and-answer approach, fractionation followed by recombination of the mixture in combination with a mixture design, and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis combined with lumping analysis and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling for studying complex mixtures. A scheme for hazard identification and risk assessment of complex mixtures and a consistent way to generate total volatile organic compound values for indoor air have also been developed. Examples of other activities are carcinogenicity studies on complex mixtures (petroleum middle distillates, foundry fumes, pesticides, heterocyclic amines, diesel exhaust, solid particles), neurotoxicity studies of mixtures of solvents alone or in combination with exposure to physical factors, and toxicity studies of outdoor air pollutants, focusing on particulates. Outside the United States, toxicologists and regulators clearly have a growing interest in the toxicology and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. PMID:9860882

  14. Surface and Interfacial Properties of Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Mixtures Released to the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, Scott; Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charlie; Oostrom, Martinus; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2009-05-01

    Surface and interfacial tensions that arise at the interface between different phases are key parameters affecting Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) movement and redistribution in the vadose zone after spill events. In this study, the impact of major additive components on surface and interfacial tensions for organic mixtures and wastewater was investigated. Organic mixture and wastewater compositions are based upon carbon tetrachloride (CT) mixtures released at the Hanford site, where CT was discharged simultaneously with dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP), tributyl phosphate (TBP), dibutyl phosphate (DBP), and a machining lard oil (LO). A considerable amount of wastewater consisting primarily of nitrates and metal salts was also discharged. The tension values measured in this study revealed that the addition of these additive components caused a significant lowering of the interfacial tension with water or wastewater and the surface tension of the wastewater phase in equilibrium with the organic mixtures, compared to pure CT, but had minimal effect on the surface tension of the NAPL itself. These results lead to large differences in spreading coefficients for several mixtures, where the additives caused both a higher (more spreading) initial spreading coefficient and a lower (less spreading) equilibrium spreading coefficient. This indicates that if these mixtures migrate into uncontaminated areas, they will tend to spread quickly, but form a higher residual NAPL saturation after equilibrium, as compared to pure CT. Over time, CT likely volatilizes more rapidly than other components in the originally disposed mixtures and the lard oil and phosphates would become more concentrated in the remaining NAPL, resulting in a lower interfacial tension for the mixture. Spreading coefficients are expected to increase and perhaps change the equilibrated organic mixtures from nonspreading to spreading in water-wetting porous media. These results show that the behavior of organic

  15. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  16. Exploring the Fate of Nitrogen Heterocycles in Complex Prebiotic Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    A long standing question in the field of prebiotic chemistry is the origin of the genetic macromolecules DNA and RNA. DNA and RNA have very complex structures with repeating subunits of nucleotides, which are composed of nucleobases (nitrogen heterocycles) connected to sugar-phosphate. Due to the instability of some nucleobases (e.g. cytosine), difficulty of synthesis and instability of D-ribose, and the likely scarcity of polyphosphates necessary for the modern nucleotides, alternative nucleotides have been proposed for constructing the first genetic material. Thus, we have begun to investigate the chemistry of nitrogen heterocycles in plausible, complex prebiotic mixtures in an effort to identify robust reactions and potential alternative nucleotides. We have taken a complex prebiotic mixture produced by a spark discharge acting on a gas mixture of N2, CO2, CH4, and H2, and reacted it with four nitrogen heterocycles: uracil, 5-hydroxymethyluracil, guanine, and isoxanthopterin (2-amino-4,7-dihydroxypteridine). The products of the reaction between the spark mixture and each nitrogen heterocycle were characterized by liquid chromatography coupled to UV spectroscopy and Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We found that the reaction between the spark mixtUl'e and isoxanthopterin formed one major product, which was a cyanide adduct. 5-hydroxymethyluracil also reacted with the spark mixture to form a cyanide adduct, uracil-5-acetonitrile, which has been synthesized previously by reacting HCN with S-hydroxymethyluracil. Unlike isoxanthopterin, the chromatogram of the 5-hydroxymethyluracil reaction was much more complex with multiple products including spark-modified dimers. Additionally, we observed that HMU readily self-polymerizes in solution to a variety of oligomers consistent with those suggested by Cleaves. Guanine and uracil, the biological nucleobases, did not react with the spark mixture, even at high temperature (100 C). This suggests that there are alternative

  17. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  18. Relativistic mixtures of charged and uncharged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Mixtures of relativistic gases within the framework of Boltzmann equation are analyzed. Three systems are considered. The first one refers to a mixture of uncharged particles by using Grad's moment method, where the relativistic mixture is characterized by the moments of the distribution functions: particle four-flows, energy-momentum tensors, and third-order moment tensors. In the second Fick's law for a mixture of relativistic gases of non-disparate rest masses in a Schwarzschild metric are derived from an extension of Marle and McCormack model equations applied to a relativistic truncated Grad's distribution function, where it is shown the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the gravitational potential. The third one consists in the derivation of the relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier for a binary mixtures of electrons with protons and electrons with photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields and in presence of gravitational fields by using the Anderson and Witting model of the Boltzmann equation.

  19. IDENTIFICATION AND EXPERIMENTAL DATABASE FOR BINARY AND MULTICOMPONENT MIXTURES WITH POTENTIAL FOR INCREASING OVERALL CYCLE EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen M Bajorek; J. Schnelle

    2002-05-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation designed to identify binary and multicomponent mixture systems that may be for increasing the overall efficiency of a coal fired unit by extracting heat from flue gases. While ammonia-water mixtures have shown promise for increasing cycle efficiencies in a Kalina cycle, the costs and associated range of thermal conditions involved in a heat recovery system may prohibit its use in a relatively low temperature heat recovery system. This investigation considered commercially available non-azeotropic binary mixtures with a boiling range applicable to a flue gas initially at 477.6 K (400 F) and developed an experimental database of boiling heat transfer coefficients for those mixtures. In addition to their potential as working fluids for increasing cycle efficiency, cost, ease of handling, toxicity, and environmental concerns were considered in selection of the mixture systems to be examined experimentally. Based on this review, water-glycol systems were identified as good candidates. However, previous investigations of mixture boiling have focused on aqueous hydrocarbon mixtures, where water is the heaviest component. There have been few studies of water-glycol systems, and those that do exist have investigated boiling on plain surfaces only. In water-glycol systems, water is the light component, which makes these systems unique compared to those that have been previously examined. This report examines several water-glycol systems, and documents a database of experimental heat transfer coefficients for these systems. In addition, this investigation also examines the effect of an enhanced surface on pool boiling in water-glycol mixtures, by comparing boiling on a smooth surface to boiling on a Turbo IIIB. The experimental apparatus, test sections, and the experimental procedures are described. The mixture systems tested included water-propylene glycol, water-ethylene glycol, and water-diethylene glycol. All

  20. Thermodynamics of wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.; Lira-Galeana, C.L.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    A thermodynamic framework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures over a wide temperature range. The framework assumes that the precipitated wax consists of several solid phases; each solid-phase is described as a pure component or pseudocomponent which does not mix with other solid phases. Liquid-phase properties are obtained from an equation of state. Calculated wax precipitation data are in excellent agreement with experimental results for binary and multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures, including petroleum.

  1. Thermodynamics of wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lira-Galeana, C.; Firoozabadi, A.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1996-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures over a wide temperature range. The framework uses the experimentally supported assumption that precipitated wax consists of several solid phases; each solid phase is described as a pure component or pseudocomponent that does not mix with other solid phases. Liquid-phase properties are obtained from an equation of state. Calculated wax-precipitation data are in excellent agreement with experimental results for binary and multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures, including petroleum.

  2. Densities of some molten fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Liquid densities were determined for a number of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications, using a procedure that consisted of measuring the loss of weight of an inert bob in the melt. The density apparatus was calibrated with pure LiF and NaF at different temperatures. Density data for safe binary and ternary fluoride salt eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds are presented. In addition, a comparison was made between the volumetric heat storage capacity of different salt mixtures.

  3. Mixtures of hydrocarbon and fluoro-carbon surfactants in micelles and at phase boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, M.Y.; Frolov, Y.G.; Remizov, Y.V.

    1986-07-01

    A deviation from the additivity of the surface and interphase tension of aqueous solutions of mixtures of sodium lauryl sulfate with the sodium and ammonium salt of perfluoropelargonic acid was found. The antagonism of the surfactants consists of the fact that the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of their mixtures is higher than the CMC of the individual components and in the presence of a critical concentration of demicellization of the surfactants detected in solubilization of the dye. The aqueous films containing the surfactants investigated are stable on the surface of CCl/sub 4/, decrease the rate of its evaporation and promote foaming.

  4. Thermodiffusion in binary and ternary nonpolar hydrocarbon + alcohol mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Saghir, M. Ziad

    2012-12-01

    Thermodiffusion in complex mixtures, such as associating, molten metal, and polymer mixtures is difficult to model usually owing to the occurrence of a sign change in the thermodiffusion coefficient when the mixture concentration and temperature change. A mixture comprised of a nonpolar hydrocarbon and an alcohol is a complex and highly non-ideal mixture. In this paper an existing binary non-equilibrium thermodynamics model (Eslamian and Saghir, Physical Review E 80, 061201, 2009) developed for aqueous mixtures of alcohols is examined against the experimental data of binary nonpolar hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. For ternary mixtures, non-equilibrium thermodynamic expressions developed by the authors for aqueous mixtures of alcohols (Eslamian and Saghir, Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, DOI 10.1002/cjce.20581) is used to predict thermodiffusion coefficients of ternary nonpolar hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. The rationale behind the sign change is elucidated and attributed to an anomalous change in the molecular structure and therefore viscosity of such mixtures. Model predictions of thermodiffusion coefficients of binary mixtures predict a sign change consistent with the experimental data although the model is still too primitive to capture all structural complexities. For instance, in the methanol-benzene mixture where the model predictions are poorest, the viscosity data show that when concentration varies, the mixture's molecular structure experiences a severe change twice, the first major change leading to a maximum in the thermodiffusion coefficient, whereas the second change causes a sign change.

  5. Time-dependence in mixture toxicity prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Douglas A.; Allen, Erin M.G.; Allen, Joshua L.; Baumann, Hannah J.; Bensinger, Heather M.; Genco, Nicole; Guinn, Daphne; Hull, Michael W.; Il'Giovine, Zachary J.; Kaminski, Chelsea M.; Peyton, Jennifer R.; Schultz, T. Wayne; Pöch, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    The value of time-dependent toxicity (TDT) data in predicting mixture toxicity was examined. Single chemical (A and B) and mixture (A + B) toxicity tests using Microtox® were conducted with inhibition of bioluminescence (Vibrio fischeri) being quantified after 15, 30 and 45-min of exposure. Single chemical and mixture tests for 25 sham (A1:A2) and 125 true (A:B) combinations had a minimum of seven duplicated concentrations with a duplicated control treatment for each test. Concentration/response (x/y) data were fitted to sigmoid curves using the five-parameter logistic minus one parameter (5PL-1P) function, from which slope, EC25, EC50, EC75, asymmetry, maximum effect, and r2 values were obtained for each chemical and mixture at each exposure duration. Toxicity data were used to calculate percentage-based TDT values for each individual chemical and mixture of each combination. Predicted TDT values for each mixture were calculated by averaging the TDT values of the individual components and regressed against the observed TDT values obtained in testing, resulting in strong correlations for both sham (r2 = 0.989, n = 25) and true mixtures (r2 = 0.944, n = 125). Additionally, regression analyses confirmed that observed mixture TDT values calculated for the 50% effect level were somewhat better correlated with predicted mixture TDT values than at the 25 and 75% effect levels. Single chemical and mixture TDT values were classified into five levels in order to discern trends. The results suggested that the ability to predict mixture TDT by averaging the TDT of the single agents was modestly reduced when one agent of the combination had a positive TDT value and the other had a minimal or negative TDT value. PMID:25446331

  6. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  7. In vitro - in vivo correlations for endocrine activity of a mixture of currently used pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Taxvig, Camilla; Hadrup, Niels; Boberg, Julie; Axelstad, Marta; Bossi, Rossana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-11-01

    Two pesticide mixtures were investigated for potential endocrine activity. Mix 3 consisted of bitertanol, propiconazole, and cypermethrin, and Mix 5 included malathion and terbuthylazine in addition to the three pesticides in Mix 3. All five single pesticides and the two mixtures were investigated for their ability to affect steroidogenesis in vitro in H295R cells. The pesticides alone and both mixtures affected steroidogenesis with both mixtures causing increase in progesterone and decrease in testosterone. For Mix 5 an increase in estradiol was seen as well, indicating increased aromatase activity. The two mixtures were also investigated in pregnant rats dosed from gestational day 7 to 21, followed by examination of dams and fetuses. Decreased estradiol and reduced placental testosterone were seen in dams exposed to Mix 5. Also a significant increase in aromatase mRNA-levels in female adrenal glands was found for Mix5. However, either of the two mixtures showed any effects on fetal hormone levels in plasma or testis, or on anogenital distance. Overall, potential aromatase induction was found for Mix 5 both in vitro and in vivo, but not for Mix 3, an effect likely owed to terbuthylazine in Mix 5. However, the hormonal responses in vitro were only partly reflected in vivo, probably due to some toxicokinetic issues, as the pesticide levels in the amniotic fluid also were found to be negatively affected by the number of compounds present in the mixtures. Nonetheless, the H295R assay gives hints on conceivable interference with steroidogenesis, thus generating hypotheses on in vivo effects. - Highlights: • The study examines the endocrine disrupting potential of mixtures of pesticides. • All single pesticides and both mixtures affected steroidogenesis in vitro. • Potential aromatase induction was found for Mix 5 both in vitro and in vivo. • The hormonal responses in vitro were only partly reflected in vivo.

  8. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  9. Mixture of a molybdenum carboxylate and a molybdenum dithiophosphate or a molybdenum dithiocarbamate for use in a hydrovisbreaking process

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Kukes, S.G.

    1987-11-10

    A molybdenum is described containing mixture selected from the group consisting of a mixture comprising a molybdenum dithiophosphate and a molybdenum carboxylate and a mixture comprising a molybdenum dithiocarbamate and a molybdenum carboxylate.

  10. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  11. Kinematic separation of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldshtik, M.; Husain, H.S.; Hussain, F. )

    1992-06-15

    A phenomenon of spontaneous separation of components in an initially uniform fluid mixture is found experimentally. A qualitative explanation of the effect is proposed in terms of nonparallel streamlines in the medium.

  12. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  13. Optical Properties of Thin Film Molecular Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Shumway, Dean A.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    -style collectors. Sputtering offers considerable flexibility in coating conditions, including a wide variety of metal and dielectric targets. Coating designs range from simple two or three layer coatings to complex coatings that are purposely graded to be metal-rich at their base and oxide-rich at their surface in order to yield the desired solar selective properties. In these cermet coatings, molecular islands of metal are thought to be embedded in a three dimensional matrix of dielectric. Recent work has identified the use of custom made ion beam sputter deposition targets to produce coatings containing molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric. The targets are cylindrical and the surface consists of a gradually changing composition of metal and dielectric. Rotating the cylinder under the beam during ion beam sputter deposition yields a coating that is a molecular mixture of metal and dielectric, with the composition changing through the thickness of the coating. The optical properties of these coatings are not only dependent on their thickness and chemical composition, but are also dependent on the extent of the through thickness gradient established during deposition. This paper presents a summary of the optical properties of several thin film molecular mixtures designed as solar selective coatings. Optical performance is first identified as a function of wavelength, from the ultraviolet to the visible and infrared. Coating composition, thickness, and gradient from metal to dielectric also play an important role. Additional work for future activities is also identified.

  14. Mixture risk assessment: a case study of Monsanto experiences.

    PubMed

    Nair, R S; Dudek, B R; Grothe, D R; Johannsen, F R; Lamb, I C; Martens, M A; Sherman, J H; Stevens, M W

    1996-01-01

    Monsanto employs several pragmatic approaches for evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. These approaches are similar to those recommended by many national and international agencies. When conducting hazard and risk assessments, priority is always given to using data collected directly on the mixture of concern. To provide an example of the first tier of evaluation, actual data on acute respiratory irritation studies on mixtures were evaluated to determine whether the principle of additivity was applicable to the mixture evaluated. If actual data on the mixture are unavailable, extrapolation across similar mixtures is considered. Because many formulations are quite similar in composition, the toxicity data from one mixture can be extended to a closely related mixture in a scientifically justifiable manner. An example of a family of products where such extrapolations have been made is presented to exemplify this second approach. Lastly, if data on similar mixtures are unavailable, data on component fractions are used to predict the toxicity of the mixture. In this third approach, process knowledge and scientific judgement are used to determine how the known toxicological properties of the individual fractions affect toxicity of the mixture. Three examples of plant effluents where toxicological data on fractions were used to predict the toxicity of the mixture are discussed. The results of the analysis are used to discuss the predictive value of each of the above mentioned toxicological approaches for evaluating chemical mixtures. PMID:9119327

  15. Adsorption and desorption of mixtures of organic vapors on beaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2012-08-01

    In this study, adsorption and desorption of mixtures of organic compounds commonly emitted from automotive painting operations were experimentally studied. A mixture of two alkanes and a mixture of eight organic compounds were adsorbed onto beaded activated carbon (BAC) and then thermally desorbed under nitrogen. Following both adsorption and regeneration, samples of the BAC were chemically extracted. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify the compounds in the adsorption and desorption gas streams and in the BAC extracts. In general, for both adsorbate mixtures, competitive adsorption resulted in displacing low boiling point compounds by high boiling point compounds during adsorption. In addition to boiling point, adsorbate structure and functionality affected adsorption dynamics. High boiling point compounds such as n-decane and 2,2-dimethylpropylbenzene were not completely desorbed after three hours regeneration at 288 °C indicating that these two compounds contributed to heel accumulation on the BAC. Additional compounds not present in the mixtures were detected in the extract of regenerated BAC possibly due to decomposition or other reactions during regeneration. Closure analysis based on breakthrough curves, solvent extraction of BAC and mass balance on the reactor provided consistent results of the amount of adsorbates on the BAC after adsorption and/or regeneration. PMID:22742925

  16. Fuel properties of bituminous coal and pyrolytic oil mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Hazlin; Sharuddin, Munawar Zaman; Daud, Ahmad Rafizan Mohamad; Syed-Hassan, Syed Shatir A.

    2014-10-01

    Investigation on the thermal decomposition kinetics of coal-biooil slurry (CBS) fuel prepared at different ratios (100:0,70:30,60:40,0:100) was conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The materials consisted of Clermont bituminous coal (Australia) and bio-oil (also known as pyrolytic oil) from the source of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) that was thermally converted by means of pyrolysis. Thermal decomposition of CBS fuel was performed in an inert atmosphere (50mL/min nitrogen) under non-isothermal conditions from room temperature to 1000°C at heating rate of 10°C/min. The apparent activation energy (Ea.) and pre-exponential factor (A) were calculated from the experimental results by using an Arrhenius-type kinetic model which first-order decomposition reaction was assumed. All kinetic parameters were tabulated based on the TG data obtained from the experiment. It was found that, the CBS fuel has higher reactivity than Clermont coal fuel during pyrolysis process, as the addition of pyrolytic oil will reduce the Ea values of the fuel. The thermal profiles of the mixtures showed potential trends that followed the characteristics of an ideal slurry fuel where high degradation rate is desirable. Among the mixture, the optimum fuel was found at the ratio of 60:40 of pyrolytic oil/coal mixtures with highest degradation rate. These findings may contribute to the development of a slurry fuel to be used in the vast existing conventional power plants.

  17. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tabbaa, A.; Aravinthan, T.

    1997-12-31

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeability to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material.

  18. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Petra Y; Fent, Karl

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hERalpha agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 beta estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hERalpha agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hERalpha agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products. PMID:17027055

  19. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Petra Y. . E-mail: petra.kunz@fhnw.ch; Fent, Karl . E-mail: karl.fent@bluewin.ch

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hER{alpha} agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER{alpha}). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 {beta} estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (Canada) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hER{alpha} agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hER{alpha} agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products.

  20. Synergy and other ineffective mixture risk definitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, R.; MacDonell, M.; Environmental Assessment

    2002-04-08

    A substantial effort has been spent over the past few decades to label toxicologic interaction outcomes as synergistic, antagonistic, or additive. Although useful in influencing the emotions of the public and the press, these labels have contributed fairly little to our understanding of joint toxic action. Part of the difficulty is that their underlying toxicological concepts are only defined for two chemical mixtures, while most environmental and occupational exposures are to mixtures of many more chemicals. Furthermore, the mathematical characterizations of synergism and antagonism are inextricably linked to the prevailing definition of 'no interaction,' instead of some intrinsic toxicological property. For example, the US EPA has selected dose addition as the no-interaction definition for mixture risk assessment, so that synergism would represent toxic effects that exceed those predicted from dose addition. For now, labels such as synergism are useful to regulatory agencies, both for qualitative indications of public health risk as well as numerical decision tools for mixture risk characterization. Efforts to quantify interaction designations for use in risk assessment formulas, however, are highly simplified and carry large uncertainties. Several research directions, such as pharmacokinetic measurements and models, and toxicogenomics, should promote significant improvements by providing multi-component data that will allow biologically based mathematical models of joint toxicity to replace these pairwise interaction labels in mixture risk assessment procedures.

  1. Interactions of odorants with olfactory receptors and receptor neurons match the perceptual dynamics observed for woody and fruity odorant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chaput, M A; El Mountassir, F; Atanasova, B; Thomas-Danguin, T; Le Bon, A M; Perrut, A; Ferry, B; Duchamp-Viret, P

    2012-02-01

    The present study aimed to create a direct bridge between observations on peripheral and central responses to odorant mixtures and their components. Three experiments were performed using mixtures of fruity (isoamyl acetate; ISO) and woody (whiskey lactone; WL) odorants known to contribute to some of the major notes in Burgundy red wine. These experiments consisted of (i) calcium imaging of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T) transfected with olfactory receptors (ORs); (ii) single-unit electrophysiological recordings from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and analyses of electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses in the rat nose in vivo; and (iii) psychophysical measurements of the perceived intensity of the mixtures as rated by human subjects. The calcium imaging and electrophysiological results revealed that ISO and WL can act simultaneously on single ORs or ORNs and confirm that receptor responses to mixtures are not the result of a simple sum of the effects of the individual mixture compounds. The addition of WL to ISO principally suppressed the ORN activation induced by ISO alone and was found to enhance this activation in a subset of cases. In the human studies, the addition of high concentrations of WL to ISO decreased the perceived intensity of the ISO. In contrast, the addition of low concentrations of WL enhanced the perceived intensity of the fruity note (ISO) in this mixture, as it enhanced EOG responses in ORNs. Thus, both OR and ORN responses to ISO + WL mixtures faithfully reflected perceptual response changes, so the odour mixture information is set up after the peripheral stage of the olfactory system. PMID:22304504

  2. MIXTURES FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have been conducted to address questions concerning the toxicity of "real world" mixtures of DBPs. These studies, which used either concentrates of drinking water or humic acid preparations treated with various disinfectants, were largely negative and had a nu...

  3. MixtureTree annotator: a program for automatic colorization and visual annotation of MixtureTree.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Ogata, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The MixtureTree Annotator, written in JAVA, allows the user to automatically color any phylogenetic tree in Newick format generated from any phylogeny reconstruction program and output the Nexus file. By providing the ability to automatically color the tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator provides a unique advantage over any other programs which perform a similar function. In addition, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only package that can efficiently annotate the output produced by MixtureTree with mutation information and coalescent time information. In order to visualize the resulting output file, a modified version of FigTree is used. Certain popular methods, which lack good built-in visualization tools, for example, MEGA, Mesquite, PHY-FI, TreeView, treeGraph and Geneious, may give results with human errors due to either manually adding colors to each node or with other limitations, for example only using color based on a number, such as branch length, or by taxonomy. In addition to allowing the user to automatically color any given Newick tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only method that allows the user to automatically annotate the resulting tree created by the MixtureTree program. The MixtureTree Annotator is fast and easy-to-use, while still allowing the user full control over the coloring and annotating process. PMID:25826378

  4. Investigations of reversible thermochromic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, Douglas C.

    Three-component organic thermochromic systems have potential applications in reversible, rewritable thermal printing. In principle, such mixtures could maintain a coloured or non-coloured state at ambient temperature depending on their thermal treatment. These systems generally consist of a functional dye (1--3 mol%), a weakly acidic colour developer (5--25 mol%), and a high-melting organic solvent (75--90 mol%). Colour development occurs at the fusion temperature of the mixture, which triggers the interaction of the dye and developer. Slow cooling of the melt results in an equilibrium state with low colour density, whereas rapid cooling of the melt results in a metastable state with high colour density. The metastable state can be decoloured by heating to an intermediate decolourisation temperature at which the coloured state becomes unstable. Barriers to the widespread use of reversible, rewritable thermochromic materials include problems with colour contrast, colour stability, and decolourisation rates. Development is hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the interactions between components in these systems. In this study the developer-dye and developer-solvent interactions were examined for an archetypal dye/developer/solvent thermochromic system. Vibrational spectroscopy, NMR, and thermal analysis were used to examine compounds formed in developer/dye and developer/solvent binary mixtures. Rewritable thermochromic properties such as metastable colour density, equilibrium colour density, and decolourisation rates were examined and discussed in terms of the thermodynamics of the developer/dye and developer/solvent interactions. Observed thermochromic properties are shown to be strongly correlated to a competition between the dye and the solvent for interaction with the developer. Increasing the attractive interaction between the solvent and developer results in enhanced rewritable thermochromic properties.

  5. Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Bruce C.; Lamppa, Diana L.; Voigt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

  6. The Effect of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate, Exposure Time, and Chemical Mixtures on Methanogenic Community Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Patrick J; LaPara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of organic micropollutant mixtures are found in untreated municipal wastewater. Anaerobic digesters receive large loadings of hydrophobic micropollutants that sorb to wastewater biosolids. Despite micropollutants being pervasive as mixtures, little research is available to explain the impact that mixtures of compounds, as well as exposure time, have on microbial communities in anaerobic digesters. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was added to anaerobic enrichment cultures in both short-term (14 days) and long-term (140 days) studies to determine the impact of exposure time. Additionally, triclosan was added during the experiments to investigate the impact of mixtures on community structure and function. PFOS did not alter methane production in short-term studies, but in long-term studies, methane production increased, consistent with our hypothesis that PFOS may act as a metabolic uncoupler. The impact of triclosan on methane production was exacerbated when PFOS was already present in the anaerobic enrichment cultures. Triclosan also had greater impacts on microbial community structures in the bottles that had been exposed to PFOS long-term. These results demonstrate that both chemical mixtures and exposure time are important parameters to address when trying to define the impacts of micropollutants on anaerobic microbial communities. PMID:26462249

  7. Molecular-Based Theory for Electron-Transfer Reorganization Energy in Solvent Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Using statistical-field techniques, we develop a molecular-based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in liquid mixtures under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions, and apply it to compute the solvent reorganization energy of electron-transfer reactions. In addition to the nonequilibrium orientational polarization, the reorganization energy in liquid mixtures is also determined by the out-of-equilibrium solvent composition around the reacting species due to preferential solvation. Using molecular parameters that are readily available, the DSCFT naturally accounts for the dielectric saturation effect and the spatially varying solvent composition in the vicinity of the reacting species. We identify three general categories of binary solvent mixtures, classified by the relative optical and static dielectric permittivities of the solvent components. Each category of mixture is shown to produce a characteristic local solvent composition profile in the vicinity of the reacting species, which gives rise to the distinctive composition dependence of the reorganization energy that cannot be predicted using the dielectric permittivities of the homogeneous solvent mixtures. PMID:27187110

  8. The Effect of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate, Exposure Time, and Chemical Mixtures on Methanogenic Community Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Patrick J; LaPara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of organic micropollutant mixtures are found in untreated municipal wastewater. Anaerobic digesters receive large loadings of hydrophobic micropollutants that sorb to wastewater biosolids. Despite micropollutants being pervasive as mixtures, little research is available to explain the impact that mixtures of compounds, as well as exposure time, have on microbial communities in anaerobic digesters. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was added to anaerobic enrichment cultures in both short-term (14 days) and long-term (140 days) studies to determine the impact of exposure time. Additionally, triclosan was added during the experiments to investigate the impact of mixtures on community structure and function. PFOS did not alter methane production in short-term studies, but in long-term studies, methane production increased, consistent with our hypothesis that PFOS may act as a metabolic uncoupler. The impact of triclosan on methane production was exacerbated when PFOS was already present in the anaerobic enrichment cultures. Triclosan also had greater impacts on microbial community structures in the bottles that had been exposed to PFOS long-term. These results demonstrate that both chemical mixtures and exposure time are important parameters to address when trying to define the impacts of micropollutants on anaerobic microbial communities. PMID:26462249

  9. Consistency, Markedness and Language Change: On the Notion 'Consistent Language.'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, N. V.

    1981-01-01

    Explores markedness of languages and language change in relation to their roles in the consistency of language. Concludes typology provides no explanations in itself, but rather through data which need explanations and form a testing ground for linguistic theories. (Author/BK)

  10. Thermodynamically Consistent Coarse-Graining of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenza, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of macromolecular liquids, melts and mixtures, bridge an extensive range of length- and time-scales. For these systems, the computational limitations of the atomistic description prevent the study of the properties of interest and coarse-grained models remain the only viable approach. In coarse-grained models, structural and thermodynamic consistency across multiple length scales is essential for the predictive role of multi-scale modeling and molecular dynamic simulations that use mesoscale descriptions. This talk presents a coarse-graining approach that conserves structural and thermodynamic quantities independent of the extent of coarse-graining, and describes a model for the reconstruction of the dynamics measured in mesoscale simulations of the coarse-grained system. Some of the general challenges of preserving structural and thermodynamic consistency in coarse-grained models are discussed together with the conditions by which the problem is lessened. This material is based upon work partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CHE-1362500.

  11. Combined photobacterium toxicity of herbicide mixtures containing one insecticide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Song, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhang, Jing

    2009-04-01

    To test whether the dose-addition (DA) model can predict the combined toxicity of the mixtures of herbicides that coexisted with insecticide(s), we selected five herbicides (simetryn, prometon, bromacil, velpar, and diquat) and one organophosphorus insecticide (dichlorvos) as the test components. The inhibition toxicities of the six pesticides as well as those of their mixtures to Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 were determined by using the microplate toxicity test procedure. The dose-response curves (DRCs) between the observed inhibition toxicities and the doses of the pesticides or the mixtures were modeled by using the nonlinear least square fitting. It was shown that all dose-response relationships were effectively described by the Weibull function. To fully explore the combined toxicities of mixtures including various concentration compositions, we designed three equivalent-effect concentration ratio (EECR) mixtures and six uniform design concentration ratio (UDCR) mixtures. The combined toxicity of a mixture is identified by inspecting whether the DRC predicted by the dose addition (DA) or independent action (IA) locates in the 95% confidence interval of the DRC of the mixture. Furthermore, the possible reason for the three mixtures to depart from the DA action was the very high concentration ratio of diquat in the mixtures. PMID:19215957

  12. Combustion of Gaseous Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duchene, R

    1932-01-01

    This report not only presents matters of practical importance in the classification of engine fuels, for which other means have proved inadequate, but also makes a few suggestions. It confirms the results of Withrow and Boyd which localize the explosive wave in the last portions of the mixture burned. This being the case, it may be assumed that the greater the normal combustion, the less the energy developed in the explosive form. In order to combat the detonation, it is therefore necessary to try to render the normal combustion swift and complete, as produced in carbureted mixtures containing benzene (benzol), in which the flame propagation, beginning at the spark, yields a progressive and pronounced darkening on the photographic film.

  13. Modeling human mortality using mixtures of bathtub shaped failure distributions.

    PubMed

    Bebbington, Mark; Lai, Chin-Diew; Zitikis, Ricardas

    2007-04-01

    Aging and mortality is usually modeled by the Gompertz-Makeham distribution, where the mortality rate accelerates with age in adult humans. The resulting parameters are interpreted as the frailty and decrease in vitality with age. This fits well to life data from 'westernized' societies, where the data are accurate, of high resolution, and show the effects of high quality post-natal care. We show, however, that when the data are of lower resolution, and contain considerable structure in the infant mortality, the fit can be poor. Moreover, the Gompertz-Makeham distribution is consistent with neither the force of natural selection, nor the recently identified 'late life mortality deceleration'. Although actuarial models such as the Heligman-Pollard distribution can, in theory, achieve an improved fit, the lack of a closed form for the survival function makes fitting extremely arduous, and the biological interpretation can be lacking. We show, that a mixture, assigning mortality to exogenous or endogenous causes, using the reduced additive and flexible Weibull distributions, models well human mortality over the entire life span. The components of the mixture are asymptotically consistent with the reliability and biological theories of aging. The relative simplicity of the mixture distribution makes feasible a technique where the curvature functions of the corresponding survival and hazard rate functions are used to identify the beginning and the end of various life phases, such as infant mortality, the end of the force of natural selection, and late life mortality deceleration. We illustrate our results with a comparative analysis of Canadian and Indonesian mortality data. PMID:17188716

  14. Hydrodynamic gas mixture separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarov, A.A.

    1982-02-10

    The separation of gas mixtures is the basis of many chemical, petrochemical, and gas processes. Classical separation methods (absorption, adsorption, condensation, and freezing) require cumbersome and complex equipment. No adequate solution is provided by the cheapening and simplification of gas-processing apparatus and separation methods by hydration and diffusion. For example, an apparatus for extracting helium from natural gas by diffusion has a throughput of gas containing 0.45% helium of 117,000 m/sup 3//h and in the first stage has teflon membranes working at a pressure difference of 63.3x10/sup 5/ Pa of area 79,000 m/sup 2/, and the specific cost of the apparatus was 8500 dollars per m/sup 3//h of helium. Therefore, vigorous studies are being conducted on new ways of efficient separation of gas mixtures that are cheaper and simpler. Here we consider a novel method of physically essentially reversible separation of gas mixtures, which involves some features of single-phase supersonic flows.

  15. [Crohn's disease and enteral feeding: comparative nutritional efficacy of elemental and polymeric nutritive mixtures].

    PubMed

    Cosnes, J; Bellanger, J; Gendre, J P; Le Quintrec, Y

    1988-10-01

    The nutritional development with three types of enteral diets during 28 days, was compared in 45 patients with malnutrition presenting an active Crohn's disease. Enteral feeding consisted of a polymeric mixture (Realmentyl) administered in addition to a normal oral diet in 11 patients; the same mixture was administered alone exclusively to 9 patients, and an elemental diet (Vivonex HN) administered exclusively to 25 patients. The total caloric intake reached, in the three groups, the mean values of 60.2, 36.9 and 33.8 kcal/kg of ideal weight/day, respectively. 33 patients also received steroids. At the end of 28 days of enteral diet, the improvement in the weight and the anthropometric measurements (muscle circumference, triceps skinfold) was significantly more marked (gain of 6.5 kg) with the supplemental polymeric mixture than with exclusive enteral diet, polymeric diet (+/- 2.0 kg) or basic (+1.2 kg). Transferrin and albumin plasma levels increased in all 3 groups, but much faster with the exclusive elemental feeding, in spite of a higher urinary urea excretion in these patients. The overall nutritional development was significantly better with supplemental polymeric feeding, and was identical in the two other groups. These results confirm that the supplemental polymeric enteral feeding is more effective, from the nutrition standpoint. With an exclusive enteral feeding, the nutritional result is appreciably the same, whether the mixture consists of polymers or basic elements. PMID:3144938

  16. Genetic Evidence for Recent Population Mixture in India

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Priya; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Patterson, Nick; Lipson, Mark; Loh, Po-Ru; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Singh, Lalji

    2013-01-01

    Most Indian groups descend from a mixture of two genetically divergent populations: Ancestral North Indians (ANI) related to Central Asians, Middle Easterners, Caucasians, and Europeans; and Ancestral South Indians (ASI) not closely related to groups outside the subcontinent. The date of mixture is unknown but has implications for understanding Indian history. We report genome-wide data from 73 groups from the Indian subcontinent and analyze linkage disequilibrium to estimate ANI-ASI mixture dates ranging from about 1,900 to 4,200 years ago. In a subset of groups, 100% of the mixture is consistent with having occurred during this period. These results show that India experienced a demographic transformation several thousand years ago, from a region in which major population mixture was common to one in which mixture even between closely related groups became rare because of a shift to endogamy. PMID:23932107

  17. Relativistic mixtures of charged and uncharged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-14

    Mixtures of relativistic gases within the framework of Boltzmann equation are analyzed. Three systems are considered. The first one refers to a mixture of uncharged particles by using Grad’s moment method, where the relativistic mixture is characterized by the moments of the distribution functions: particle four-flows, energy-momentum tensors, and third-order moment tensors. In the second Fick’s law for a mixture of relativistic gases of non-disparate rest masses in a Schwarzschild metric are derived from an extension of Marle and McCormack model equations applied to a relativistic truncated Grad’s distribution function, where it is shown the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the gravitational potential. The third one consists in the derivation of the relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier for a binary mixtures of electrons with protons and electrons with photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields and in presence of gravitational fields by using the Anderson and Witting model of the Boltzmann equation.

  18. Averaging Internal Consistency Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Leonard S.; Charter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven approaches to averaging reliability coefficients are presented. Each approach starts with a unique definition of the concept of "average," and no approach is more correct than the others. Six of the approaches are applicable to internal consistency coefficients. The seventh approach is specific to alternate-forms coefficients. Although the…

  19. Attitude Consistency Among American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Frank L.; Mott, Susan H.

    Attitudes of youth (ages 14-21) toward fertility expectations and women's roles are examined for consistency (e.g., whether high career expectations are correlated with a desire for fewer children). Approximately 12,000 White, Black, and Hispanic youth rated their attitudes toward statements that a woman's place is in the home, employment of wives…

  20. Photoactivation and toxicity of mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.C.; Ferraro, S.P.; Lamberson, J.O.; Cole, F.A.; Ozretich, R.J.; Boese, B.L.; Schults, D.W.; Behrenfeld, M.; Ankley, G.T.

    1997-10-01

    The direct toxicity and photoinduced toxicity of sediment-associated acenaphthene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene were determined for the marine amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. The four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were spiked into sediment in a concentration series of either single compounds or as approximately equitoxic mixtures of all four compounds. Standard 10-d sediment toxicity tests were conducted under fluorescent lighting. After 10 d, survivors were exposed for 1 h to ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the absence of sediment and then tested for their ability to bury in uncontaminated sediment. The 10-d median lethal concentrations (LC50s) were 2.31 mg acenaphthene/g organic carbon (OC), 2.22 mg phenanthrene/g OC, 3.31 mg fluoranthene/g OC, and 2.81 mg pyrene/g OC. These LC50s were used to calculate the sum of toxic units ({Sigma}TU) of the four PAHs in the approximately equitoxic mixtures. The {Sigma}TU LC50 was then calculated for the mixture treatments. If the toxicologic interaction of a mixture of contaminants is additive, {Sigma}TU LC50 = 1.0. The observed LC50 (1.55 {Sigma}TU) was slightly, but significantly, greater than unity, indicating that the interaction of PAHs in the mixture was less than additive. Exposure to UV radiation enhanced the toxic effects of fluoranthene and pyrene, but did not affect the toxicity of acenaphthene and phenanthrene. Effects of UV radiation on the toxicity of the mixture of four PAHs could be explained by the photoactivation of fluoranthene and pyrene alone. These results are consistent with predictions based on photophysical properties of PAH compounds.

  1. One- and multi-component theories of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ree, F.H.

    1993-07-01

    We describe one-component statistical mechanical theories and van der Waal`s effective one-component mixture model. We then show how to apply them to mixtures (containing CO{sub 2}) to extract reliable unlike-pair potential involving CO{sub 2} molecules as well as their dissociation products. A more fundamental approach will require the development of a perturbation or variational theory of mixtures based on a non-additive hard-sphere mixture reference system. Recent progresses made in this direction by means of an integral equation and computer simulations is described.

  2. Consistent interpretations of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omnès, Roland

    1992-04-01

    Within the last decade, significant progress has been made towards a consistent and complete reformulation of the Copenhagen interpretation (an interpretation consisting in a formulation of the experimental aspects of physics in terms of the basic formalism; it is consistent if free from internal contradiction and complete if it provides precise predictions for all experiments). The main steps involved decoherence (the transition from linear superpositions of macroscopic states to a mixing), Griffiths histories describing the evolution of quantum properties, a convenient logical structure for dealing with histories, and also some progress in semiclassical physics, which was made possible by new methods. The main outcome is a theory of phenomena, viz., the classically meaningful properties of a macroscopic system. It shows in particular how and when determinism is valid. This theory can be used to give a deductive form to measurement theory, which now covers some cases that were initially devised as counterexamples against the Copenhagen interpretation. These theories are described, together with their applications to some key experiments and some of their consequences concerning epistemology.

  3. DEVELOPMENTAL MALFORMATION OF FROG EMBRYOS: AN ANALYSIS OF TERATOGENICITY OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical compounds known to be teratogenic to frog embryos were tested singly and in binary mixtures and Weibull functions were used to model their concentration response relationships. eparate Weibull function with an additive concentration variable modeled the mixtures using on...

  4. Homogeneous water nucleation and droplet growth in methane and carbon dioxide mixtures at 235 K and 10 bar.

    PubMed

    Holten, V; van Dongen, M E H

    2010-05-28

    Homogeneous nucleation rates and droplet growth rates of water in pure methane and mixtures of methane and carbon dioxide were measured in an expansion wave tube at 235 K and 10 bar. The nucleation rate in pure methane is three orders of magnitude higher than literature nucleation rates of water in low-pressure helium or argon. Addition of carbon dioxide to the carrier gas mixture increases the rates even more. Specifically, rates in a mixture of methane and 3% carbon dioxide are a factor of 10 higher than the rates in pure methane. With 25% carbon dioxide, the rates are four orders of magnitude higher than the rates in pure methane. An application of the nucleation theorem shows that the critical cluster consists of 22 water molecules and 5 methane molecules, for nucleation in pure methane. Growth rates of water droplets were measured in methane and in methane-carbon dioxide mixtures at 243 K and 11.5 bar. At equal temperature, pressure and water vapor fraction, the growth rate of the squared droplet radius is about 20% lower in the mixture with 25% carbon dioxide than in pure methane. The lower growth rate is caused by a smaller diffusion coefficient of water in the mixture with carbon dioxide; the difference of the diffusion coefficients is qualitatively reproduced by the empirical Fuller correlation combined with Blanc's law. PMID:20515097

  5. Self-Consistent Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor); Khazanov, G. V.; Newman, T. S.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fok, M. C.; Spiro, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    A self-consistent ring current (RC) model has been developed that couples electron and ion magnetospheric dynamics with the calculation of the electric field. Two new features were taken into account in order to close the self-consistent magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling loop. First, in addition to the RC ions, we have solved an electron kinetic equation in our model. Second, using the relation of Galand and Richmond, we have calculated the height integrated ionospheric conductances as a function of the precipitated high energy magnetospheric electrons and ions that are produced by our model. To validate the results of our model we simulate the magnetic storm of May 2, 1986, a storm that has been comprehensively studied by Fok et al., and have compared our results with different theoretical approaches. The self-consistent inclusion of the hot electrons and their effect on the conductance results in deeper penetration of the magnetospheric electric field. In addition, a slight westward rotation of the potential pattern (compared to previous self-consistent results) is evident in the inner magnetosphere. These effects change the hot plasma distribution, especially by allowing increased access of plasma sheet ions and electrons to low L shells.

  6. A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Reis, Martina; Wang, Yongqi; Bono Maurizio Sacchi Bassi, Adalberto

    2013-11-01

    A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures is formulated. The intermolecular interactions among the constituents of the mixture are accounted for through additional freedom degrees to each constituent of the mixture. Balance equations for polar reacting continuum mixtures are accordingly formulated and a proper set of constitutive equations is derived with basis in the Müller-Liu formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. Moreover, the non-equilibrium and equilibrium responses of the reacting mixture are investigated in detail by emphasizing the inner and reactive structures of the medium. From the balance laws and constitutive relations, the effects of molecular structure of constituents upon the fluid flow are studied. It is also demonstrated that the local thermodynamic equilibrium state can be reached without imposing that the set of independent constitutive variables is time independent, neither spatially homogeneous nor null. The resulting constitutive relations presented throughout this work are of relevance to many practical applications, such as swelling of clays, developing of bio and polymeric membranes, and use of electrorheological fluids in industrial processes. The first author acknowledges financial support from National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq) and German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

  7. Mixture models for distance sampling detection functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, David L; Thomas, Len

    2015-01-01

    We present a new class of models for the detection function in distance sampling surveys of wildlife populations, based on finite mixtures of simple parametric key functions such as the half-normal. The models share many of the features of the widely-used "key function plus series adjustment" (K+A) formulation: they are flexible, produce plausible shapes with a small number of parameters, allow incorporation of covariates in addition to distance and can be fitted using maximum likelihood. One important advantage over the K+A approach is that the mixtures are automatically monotonic non-increasing and non-negative, so constrained optimization is not required to ensure distance sampling assumptions are honoured. We compare the mixture formulation to the K+A approach using simulations to evaluate its applicability in a wide set of challenging situations. We also re-analyze four previously problematic real-world case studies. We find mixtures outperform K+A methods in many cases, particularly spiked line transect data (i.e., where detectability drops rapidly at small distances) and larger sample sizes. We recommend that current standard model selection methods for distance sampling detection functions are extended to include mixture models in the candidate set. PMID:25793744

  8. Detecting Mixtures from Structural Model Differences Using Latent Variable Mixture Modeling: A Comparison of Relative Model Fit Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, James M.; Reise, Steven P.; Kim, Kevin H.

    2007-01-01

    The accuracy of structural model parameter estimates in latent variable mixture modeling was explored with a 3 (sample size) [times] 3 (exogenous latent mean difference) [times] 3 (endogenous latent mean difference) [times] 3 (correlation between factors) [times] 3 (mixture proportions) factorial design. In addition, the efficacy of several…

  9. [Construction of Three-Dimensional Isobologram for Ternary Pollutant Mixtures].

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China) Isobolographic analysis was widely used in the interaction assessment of binary mixtures. However, how to construct a three-dimensional (3D) isobologram for the assessment of toxicity interaction within ternary mixtures is still not reported up to date. The main purpose of this paper is to develop a 3D isobologram where the relative concentrations of three components are acted as three coordinate axes in 3D space to examine the toxicity interaction within ternary mixtures. Taking six commonly used pesticides in China, including three herbicides (2, 4-D, desmetryne and simetryn) and three insecticides ( dimethoate, imidacloprid and propoxur) as the mixture components, the uniform design ray procedure (UD-Ray) was used to rationally design the concentration composition of various components in the ternary mixtures so that effectively and comprehensively reflected the variety of actual environmental concentrations. The luminescent inhibition toxicities of single pesticides and their ternary mixtures to Vibrio fischeri at various concentration levels were determined by the microplate toxicity analysis. Selecting concentration addition (CA) as the addition reference, 3D isobolograms were constructed to study the toxicity interactions of various ternary mixtures. The results showed that the 3D isobologram could clearly and directly exhibit the toxicity interactions of ternary mixtures, and extend the use of isobolographic analysis into the ternary mixtures. PMID:27011996

  10. Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and method of making thereof

    DOEpatents

    Mariani, Robert Dominick; Porter, Douglas Lloyd

    2016-04-05

    Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and methods of making nuclear fuel mixtures are provided. Pseudo-binary actinide-M fuel mixtures form alloys and exhibit: body-centered cubic solid phases at low temperatures; high solidus temperatures; and/or minimal or no reaction or inter-diffusion with steel and other cladding materials. Methods described herein through metallurgical and thermodynamics advancements guide the selection of amounts of fuel mixture components by use of phase diagrams. Weight percentages for components of a metallic additive to an actinide fuel are selected in a solid phase region of an isothermal phase diagram taken at a temperature below an upper temperature limit for the resulting fuel mixture in reactor use. Fuel mixtures include uranium-molybdenum-tungsten, uranium-molybdenum-tantalum, molybdenum-titanium-zirconium, and uranium-molybdenum-titanium systems.

  11. Reproductive toxicity of binary and ternary mixture combinations of nickel, zinc, and lead to Ceriodaphnia dubia is best predicted with the independent action model.

    PubMed

    Nys, Charlotte; Janssen, Colin R; Blust, Ronny; Smolders, Erik; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2016-07-01

    Metals occur as mixtures in the environment. Risk assessment procedures for metals currently lack a framework to incorporate chronic metal mixture toxicity. In the present study, the toxicity of binary and ternary mixture combinations of Ni, Zn, and Pb was investigated in 3 large-scale experiments using the standard chronic (7-d) Ceriodaphnia dubia reproductive toxicity test. These metals were selected because of anticipated differences in mode of action. The toxicity of the metals in most mixtures, expressed as either free metal ion activities or as dissolved metal concentrations, were antagonistic relative to the concentration addition model, whereas no significant (p < 0.05) interactive effects were observed relative to the independent action model. The only exception was the binary Pb-Zn mixture, for which mixture effects were noninteractive based on the dissolved concentrations, but antagonistic based on free ion activities all relative to the independent action model. Overall, the independent action model fitted the observed toxicity better than the concentration addition model, which is consistent with the different modes of action of these metals. The concentration addition model mostly overestimated toxicity. Finally, the present study warns against extrapolation of the type of interactive effects between species, even when they are closely related. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1796-1805. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26648335

  12. Toxicity assessment of the maize herbicides S-metolachlor, benoxacor, mesotrione and nicosulfuron, and their corresponding commercial formulations, alone and in mixtures, using the Microtox(®) test.

    PubMed

    Joly, Pierre; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Charvy, Jean-Christophe; Bohatier, Jacques; Mallet, Clarisse

    2013-11-01

    The Microtox(®) test, using the prokaryote Vibrio fischeri, was employed to assess the toxicity of the maize herbicides S-metolachlor, benoxacor, mesotrione and nicosulfuron, and their formulated compounds: Dual Gold Safeneur(®), Callisto(®) and Milagro(®); alone and in mixtures. For each compound we obtained original IC50 values, with consistent higher toxicities for formulated compounds compared to active ingredients alone. Mixtures of the four herbicides, prepared according to application doses encountered in agriculture, were found to be toxic at a lower concentration than single molecules. Mesotrione and nicosulfuron mixture appeared to be highly toxic to V. fischeri, however, this recommended post-emergence combination for maize crops got its toxicity decreased in formulated compound mixtures, suggesting that chemical interactions could potentially reduce the toxicity. Data comparisons to theoretical models showed a good prediction of mixture toxicity by Concentration Addition concept. Results seemed to exclude any synergistic effects on V. fischeri for the tested herbicide mixtures. Additional work coupling these bioassay data to ecosystemic level studies (aquatic and soil compartments) and data on additives and degradation products toxicity, will help to fill the gap in our knowledge of the environmental impact of these xenobiotics and in the choice of a more sustainable use of pesticides. PMID:24075530

  13. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  14. Identification and evaluation of pyrethroid insecticide mixtures in urban sediments.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Andrew J; Weston, Donald P; Belden, Jason B; Lydy, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    Organochlorine, organophosphorous, and pyrethroid insecticides frequently have been detected together as mixtures in stream sediments. To simplify mixture analyses, additive toxic responses usually are assumed but rarely are confirmed, especially for compounds with similar modes of action. The first objective of the present study was to screen a database of 24 different pesticides and 94 urban-stream sediment samples collected throughout central and northern California (USA) to identify compounds and partial mixtures that dominated sample toxicity to Hyalella azteca. Pyrethroids and chlorpyrifos were the most toxicologically relevant compounds in terms of detection frequency, contribution to overall sample toxicity, and co-occurrence in the most common mixture patterns. Organochlorine insecticides were the least toxicologically relevant compounds, with only a small percentage of samples exceeding predefined screening values. The second objective was to confirm that mixtures of type I and type II pyrethroids display additive responses. Ten-day sediment toxicity tests of binary pesticide mixtures were conducted using H. azteca as the test organism. Observed dose-response curves were compared to those predicted from concentration-addition and independent-action models. Model deviation ratios (MDRs) were calculated at the median effect level to quantify the magnitudes of deviation between observed and predicted curves. Whereas the concentration-addition model adequately predicted toxicity for all the pyrethroid mixtures (MDRs within a factor of two), dose-response values deviated from additivity enough to warrant further investigation. PMID:19245272

  15. On the consistency of MPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto-Iglesias, Antonio; Macià, Fabricio; González, Leo M.; Cercos-Pita, Jose L.

    2013-03-01

    The consistency of the Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method in reproducing the gradient, divergence and Laplacian differential operators is discussed in the present paper. Its relation to the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is rigorously established. The application of the MPS method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations using a fractional step approach is treated, unveiling inconsistency problems when solving the Poisson equation for the pressure. A new corrected MPS method incorporating boundary terms is proposed. Applications to one dimensional boundary value Dirichlet and mixed Neumann-Dirichlet problems and to two-dimensional free-surface flows are presented.

  16. Nucleation in a Sheared Liquid Binary Mixture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyung-Yang

    When a binary liquid mixture of lutidine plus water (LW) is quenched to a temperature T and is exposed to a continuous shear rate S, the result is a steady-state droplet distribution. This steady state can be probed by measuring the unscattered intensity I_{f}, or the scattered intensity I_{s}, as a function of delta T and S. In the experiments described here, S is fixed and delta T is varied in a step-wise fashion. The absence of hysteresis was probed in two separate experiments: First, I_{f} was measured as a function of S for a given delta T. Next, I_{f} was measured as a function of delta T for a given S. In either case, the hysteresis associated with the shear-free nucleation is absent. In addition, a flow-history dependent hysteresis was studied. In the 2-dimensional parameter space consisting of S and delta T, the onset of nucleation uniquely determines a cloud point line. A plot of the cloud point line exhibits two segments of different slopes with a cross-over near the temperature corresponding to the Becker-Doring limit. The classical picture of a free energy barrier was reformulated to explain this cross-over behavior. Next, photon correlation spectroscopy was used to study the dependence of the transient nucleation behavior on the initial states. A unique feature of this study is that this initial state can be conveniently adjusted by varying the shear rate S to which the mixture is initially exposed. The shear is then turned off, and the number density N(t), as well as the mean radius of the growing droplets, is monitored as a function of time. It was possible to measure the droplet density at a very early stage of phase separation where the nucleation rate J was close to zero. The measurement reveals that N(t) depends critically on the initial state of the metastable system. When the shear is large enough to rupture the droplets as small as the critical size, N(t) increases very slowly. Measurements of the nucleation rates vs. the square of the

  17. Characteristics of asphalt mixes with FT additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefunková, S.

    2012-03-01

    This article is focused on low-temperature asphalt mixture technologies using FT additive and RAP. The modern production and use of asphalt mixture technologies with reduced temperatures has many advantages. These advantages mainly help to save energy and the environment. Lower temperatures enable a reduction in energy consumption, a more acceptable working environment for workers, a reduction in negative environmental effects, such as greenhouse gas emissions, and an improvement in the workability of mixtures and a prolongation of their duration. This technology is currently becoming popular in many countries.

  18. Consistency-based rectification of nonrigid registrations

    PubMed Central

    Gass, Tobias; Székely, Gábor; Goksel, Orcun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a technique to rectify nonrigid registrations by improving their group-wise consistency, which is a widely used unsupervised measure to assess pair-wise registration quality. While pair-wise registration methods cannot guarantee any group-wise consistency, group-wise approaches typically enforce perfect consistency by registering all images to a common reference. However, errors in individual registrations to the reference then propagate, distorting the mean and accumulating in the pair-wise registrations inferred via the reference. Furthermore, the assumption that perfect correspondences exist is not always true, e.g., for interpatient registration. The proposed consistency-based registration rectification (CBRR) method addresses these issues by minimizing the group-wise inconsistency of all pair-wise registrations using a regularized least-squares algorithm. The regularization controls the adherence to the original registration, which is additionally weighted by the local postregistration similarity. This allows CBRR to adaptively improve consistency while locally preserving accurate pair-wise registrations. We show that the resulting registrations are not only more consistent, but also have lower average transformation error when compared to known transformations in simulated data. On clinical data, we show improvements of up to 50% target registration error in breathing motion estimation from four-dimensional MRI and improvements in atlas-based segmentation quality of up to 65% in terms of mean surface distance in three-dimensional (3-D) CT. Such improvement was observed consistently using different registration algorithms, dimensionality (two-dimensional/3-D), and modalities (MRI/CT). PMID:26158083

  19. A mixture of seven antiandrogens induces reproductive malformations in rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, regulatory agencies have not considered conducting cumulative risk assessments for mixtures of chemicals with diverse mechanisms of toxicity because it is assumed that the chemicals will act independently and the individual chemical doses are not additive. However, this ...

  20. Gas-phase detonation propagation in mixture composition gradients.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D A; Gamezo, V N; Oran, E S

    2012-02-13

    The propagation of detonations through several fuel-air mixtures with spatially varying fuel concentrations is examined numerically. The detonations propagate through two-dimensional channels, inside of which the gradient of mixture composition is oriented normal to the direction of propagation. The simulations are performed using a two-component, single-step reaction model calibrated so that one-dimensional detonation properties of model low- and high-activation-energy mixtures are similar to those observed in a typical hydrocarbon-air mixture. In the low-activation-energy mixture, the reaction zone structure is complex, consisting of curved fuel-lean and fuel-rich detonations near the line of stoichiometry that transition to decoupled shocks and turbulent deflagrations near the channel walls where the mixture is extremely fuel-lean or fuel-rich. Reactants that are not consumed by the leading detonation combine downstream and burn in a diffusion flame. Detonation cells produced by the unstable reaction front vary in size across the channel, growing larger away from the line of stoichiometry. As the size of the channel decreases relative to the size of a detonation cell, the effect of the mixture composition gradient is lessened and cells of similar sizes form. In the high-activation-energy mixture, detonations propagate more slowly as the magnitude of the mixture composition gradient is increased and can be quenched in a large enough gradient. PMID:22213660

  1. Realistic environmental mixtures of micropollutants in surface, drinking, and recycled water: herbicides dominate the mixture toxicity toward algae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2014-06-01

    Mixture toxicity studies with herbicides have focused on a few priority components that are most likely to cause environmental impacts, and experimental mixtures were often designed as equipotent mixtures; however, real-world mixtures are made up of chemicals with different modes of toxic action at arbitrary concentration ratios. The toxicological significance of environmentally realistic mixtures has only been scarcely studied. Few studies have simultaneously compared the mixture effect of water samples with designed reference mixtures comprised of the ratios of analytically detected concentrations in toxicity tests. In the present study, the authors address the effect of herbicides and other chemicals on inhibition of photosynthesis and algal growth rate. The authors tested water samples including secondary treated wastewater effluent, recycled water, drinking water, and storm water in the combined algae assay. The detected chemicals were mixed in the concentration ratios detected, and the biological effects of the water samples were compared with the designed mixtures of individual detected chemicals to quantify the fraction of effect caused by unknown chemicals. The results showed that herbicides dominated the algal toxicity in these environmentally realistic mixtures, and the contribution by the non-herbicides was negligible. A 2-stage model, which used concentration addition within the groups of herbicides and non-herbicides followed by the model of independent action to predict the mixture effect of the two groups, could predict the experimental mixture toxicity effectively, but the concentration addition model for herbicides was robust and sufficient for complex mixtures. Therefore, the authors used the bioanalytical equivalency concept to derive effect-based trigger values for algal toxicity for monitoring water quality in recycled and surface water. All water samples tested would be compliant with the proposed trigger values associated with the

  2. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  3. Self-consistent klystron simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical analysis of large-signal klystron behavior based on general wave-particle interaction theory is presented. The computer code presented is tailored for the minimum amount of complexity needed in klystron simulation. The code includes self-consistent electron motion, space-charge fields, and intermediate and output fields. It also includes use of time periodicity to simplify the problem, accurate representation of the space-charge fields, accurate representation of the cavity standing-wave fields, and a sophisticated particle-pushing routine. In the paper, examples are given that show the effects of cavity detunings, of varying the magnetic field profile, of electron beam asymmetries from the gun, and of variations in external load impedance. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Thermodynamically consistent continuum dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochrainer, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Dislocation based modeling of plasticity is one of the central challenges at the crossover of materials science and continuum mechanics. Developing a continuum theory of dislocations requires the solution of two long standing problems: (i) to represent dislocation kinematics in terms of a reasonable number of variables and (ii) to derive averaged descriptions of the dislocation dynamics (i.e. material laws) in terms of these variables. The kinematic problem (i) was recently solved through the introduction of continuum dislocation dynamics (CDD), which provides kinematically consistent evolution equations of dislocation alignment tensors, presuming a given average dislocation velocity (Hochrainer, T., 2015, Multipole expansion of continuum dislocations dynamics in terms of alignment tensors. Philos. Mag. 95 (12), 1321-1367). In the current paper we demonstrate how a free energy formulation may be used to solve the dynamic closure problem (ii) in CDD. We do so exemplarily for the lowest order CDD variant for curved dislocations in a single slip situation. In this case, a thermodynamically consistent average dislocation velocity is found to comprise five mesoscopic shear stress contributions. For a postulated free energy expression we identify among these stress contributions a back-stress term and a line-tension term, both of which have already been postulated for CDD. A new stress contribution occurs which is missing in earlier CDD models including the statistical continuum theory of straight parallel edge dislocations (Groma, I., Csikor, F.F., Zaiser, M., 2003. Spatial correlations and higher-order gradient terms in a continuum description of dislocation dynamics. Acta Mater. 51, 1271-1281). Furthermore, two entirely new stress contributions arise from the curvature of dislocations.

  5. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  6. Phase behavior of mixtures of colloidal rods and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Marie Elizabeth

    In this thesis we study entropy driven order in mixtures of rods and spheres. Systems of rod-like particles, as pure systems, exhibit rich liquid crystalline phase behavior. We chose to work with aqueous suspensions of either TMV or fd virus particles, both rod-like lyotropic systems. We complicate the phase behavior by adding a second component, colloidal spheres (PEG/PEO, BSA, polystyrene latex, or Dextran). Our first paper explores the phase behavior of TMV mixed with BSA or PEO, mapping out a phase diagram based on optical microscopy observations. We found our qualitative observations of TMV mixtures to be consistent with theoretical models of the depletion force. The second paper extends our study of phase behavior to mixtures of fd virus and polystyrene latex spheres. We qualitatively observe bulk demixing for very small diameter added spheres and for very large diameter added spheres. In addition, we observed microphase separation morphologies, such as lamellar and columnar structures, which formed for fd mixed with polystyrene latex spheres 0.1 microns in diameter. All of these microphase samples were viewed with differential interference microscopy (a few samples were further investigated using electron microscopy). Both our data and theoretical calculations illustrated that 0.1 micron diameter spheres have a stabilizing effect on the smectic phase. Our final work focused on fd virus mixed with Dextran. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the effect of added polymer on the isotropic-cholesteric co-existence region. I-Ch samples were prepared and fd and Dextran concentrations were measured using a spectrophotometer. Several conditions were explored, including two different molecular weights of Dextran and a range of ionic strengths. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the I-Ch coexistence region widens with added Dextran with the polymer preferentially partioned into the isotropic phase.

  7. Analysis of real-time mixture cytotoxicity data following repeated exposure using BK/TD models.

    PubMed

    Teng, S; Tebby, C; Barcellini-Couget, S; De Sousa, G; Brochot, C; Rahmani, R; Pery, A R R

    2016-08-15

    Cosmetic products generally consist of multiple ingredients. Thus, cosmetic risk assessment has to deal with mixture toxicity on a long-term scale which means it has to be assessed in the context of repeated exposure. Given that animal testing has been banned for cosmetics risk assessment, in vitro assays allowing long-term repeated exposure and adapted for in vitro - in vivo extrapolation need to be developed. However, most in vitro tests only assess short-term effects and consider static endpoints which hinder extrapolation to realistic human exposure scenarios where concentration in target organs is varies over time. Thanks to impedance metrics, real-time cell viability monitoring for repeated exposure has become possible. We recently constructed biokinetic/toxicodynamic models (BK/TD) to analyze such data (Teng et al., 2015) for three hepatotoxic cosmetic ingredients: coumarin, isoeugenol and benzophenone-2. In the present study, we aim to apply these models to analyze the dynamics of mixture impedance data using the concepts of concentration addition and independent action. Metabolic interactions between the mixture components were investigated, characterized and implemented in the models, as they impacted the actual cellular exposure. Indeed, cellular metabolism following mixture exposure induced a quick disappearance of the compounds from the exposure system. We showed that isoeugenol substantially decreased the metabolism of benzophenone-2, reducing the disappearance of this compound and enhancing its in vitro toxicity. Apart from this metabolic interaction, no mixtures showed any interaction, and all binary mixtures were successfully modeled by at least one model based on exposure to the individual compounds. PMID:27317371

  8. Bayesian mixture analysis for metagenomic community profiling

    PubMed Central

    Morfopoulou, Sofia; Plagnol, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Deep sequencing of clinical samples is now an established tool for the detection of infectious pathogens, with direct medical applications. The large amount of data generated produces an opportunity to detect species even at very low levels, provided that computational tools can effectively profile the relevant metagenomic communities. Data interpretation is complicated by the fact that short sequencing reads can match multiple organisms and by the lack of completeness of existing databases, in particular for viral pathogens. Here we present metaMix, a Bayesian mixture model framework for resolving complex metagenomic mixtures. We show that the use of parallel Monte Carlo Markov chains for the exploration of the species space enables the identification of the set of species most likely to contribute to the mixture. Results: We demonstrate the greater accuracy of metaMix compared with relevant methods, particularly for profiling complex communities consisting of several related species. We designed metaMix specifically for the analysis of deep transcriptome sequencing datasets, with a focus on viral pathogen detection; however, the principles are generally applicable to all types of metagenomic mixtures. Availability and implementation: metaMix is implemented as a user friendly R package, freely available on CRAN: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/metaMix Contact: sofia.morfopoulou.10@ucl.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bionformatics online. PMID:26002885

  9. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R.; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the (”bifurcation” or fixed-point”) equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  10. The Consistent Vehicle Routing Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, Christopher S; Golden, Bruce; Edward, Wasil

    2009-01-01

    In the small package shipping industry (as in other industries), companies try to differentiate themselves by providing high levels of customer service. This can be accomplished in several ways, including online tracking of packages, ensuring on-time delivery, and offering residential pickups. Some companies want their drivers to develop relationships with customers on a route and have the same drivers visit the same customers at roughly the same time on each day that the customers need service. These service requirements, together with traditional constraints on vehicle capacity and route length, define a variant of the classical capacitated vehicle routing problem, which we call the consistent VRP (ConVRP). In this paper, we formulate the problem as a mixed-integer program and develop an algorithm to solve the ConVRP that is based on the record-to-record travel algorithm. We compare the performance of our algorithm to the optimal mixed-integer program solutions for a set of small problems and then apply our algorithm to five simulated data sets with 1,000 customers and a real-world data set with more than 3,700 customers. We provide a technique for generating ConVRP benchmark problems from vehicle routing problem instances given in the literature and provide our solutions to these instances. The solutions produced by our algorithm on all problems do a very good job of meeting customer service objectives with routes that have a low total travel time.

  11. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Samuel D.; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-01

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry.

  12. Lateral organization of complex lipid mixtures from multiscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumaneng, Paul W.; Pandit, Sagar A.; Zhao, Guijun; Scott, H. L.

    2010-02-01

    The organizational properties of complex lipid mixtures can give rise to functionally important structures in cell membranes. In model membranes, ternary lipid-cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures are often used as representative systems to investigate the formation and stabilization of localized structural domains ("rafts"). In this work, we describe a self-consistent mean-field model that builds on molecular dynamics simulations to incorporate multiple lipid components and to investigate the lateral organization of such mixtures. The model predictions reveal regions of bimodal order on ternary plots that are in good agreement with experiment. Specifically, we have applied the model to ternary mixtures composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine:18:0 sphingomyelin:CHOL. This work provides insight into the specific intermolecular interactions that drive the formation of localized domains in these mixtures. The model makes use of molecular dynamics simulations to extract interaction parameters and to provide chain configuration order parameter libraries.

  13. A finite mixture model for genotype and environment interactions: Detecting latent population heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Nathan A.; Neale, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Approaches such as DeFries-Fulker extremes regression (LaBuda et al., 1986) are commonly used in genetically informative studies to assess whether familial resemblance varies as a function of the scores of pairs of twins. While useful for detecting such effects, formal modelling of differences in variance components as a function of pairs' trait scores is rarely attempted. We therefore present a finite mixture model which specifies that the population consists of latent groups which may differ in i) their means, and ii) the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors on within-group variation and covariation. This model may be considered as a special case of a factor mixture model, which combines the features of a latent class model with those of a latent trait model. Various models for the class membership of twin pairs may be employed, including additive genetic, common environment, specific environment or major locus (QTL) factors. Simulation results based on variance components derived from Turkheimer and colleagues (2003), illustrate the impact of factors such as the difference in group means and variance components on the feasibility of correctly estimating the parameters of the mixture model. Model-fitting analyses estimated group heritability as .49, which is significantly greater than heritability for the rest of the population in early childhood. These results suggest that factor mixture modelling is sufficiently robust for detecting heterogeneous populations even when group mean differences are modest. PMID:16790151

  14. Self-consistent flattened isochrones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, James

    2014-05-01

    We present a family of self-consistent axisymmetric stellar systems that have analytic distribution functions (DFs) of the form f(J), so they depend on three integrals of motion and have triaxial velocity ellipsoids. The models, which are generalizations of Hénon's isochrone sphere, have four dimensionless parameters, two determining the part of the DF that is even in Lz and two determining the odd part of the DF (which determines the azimuthal velocity distribution). Outside their cores, the velocity ellipsoids of all models tend to point to the model's centre, and we argue that this behaviour is generic, so near the symmetry axis of a flattened model, the long axis of the velocity ellipsoid is naturally aligned with the symmetry axis and not perpendicular to it as in many published dynamical models of well-studied galaxies. By varying one of the DF parameters, the intensity of rotation can be increased from zero up to a maximum value set by the requirement that the DF be non-negative. Since angle-action coordinates are easily computed for these models, they are ideally suited for perturbative treatments and stability analysis. They can also be used to choose initial conditions for an N-body model that starts in perfect equilibrium, and to model observations of early-type galaxies. The modelling technique introduced here is readily extended to different radial density profiles, more complex kinematics and multicomponent systems. A number of important technical issues surrounding the determination of the models' observable properties are explained in two appendices.

  15. Finite mixture model: A maximum likelihood estimation approach on time series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Phoong Seuk; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2014-09-01

    Recently, statistician emphasized on the fitting of finite mixture model by using maximum likelihood estimation as it provides asymptotic properties. In addition, it shows consistency properties as the sample sizes increases to infinity. This illustrated that maximum likelihood estimation is an unbiased estimator. Moreover, the estimate parameters obtained from the application of maximum likelihood estimation have smallest variance as compared to others statistical method as the sample sizes increases. Thus, maximum likelihood estimation is adopted in this paper to fit the two-component mixture model in order to explore the relationship between rubber price and exchange rate for Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia. Results described that there is a negative effect among rubber price and exchange rate for all selected countries.

  16. Simultaneous mixture analysis using a dynamic microbial sensor combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Slama, M; Zaborosch, C; Wienke, D; Spener, F

    1996-11-01

    A biosensor consisting of immobilized microbial cells and an oxygen electrode was used in a flow-through system as a microbial sensor flow injection analyzer (FIA). For different organic analytes, the metabolism of vital cells provides individual time-resolved responses with distinct time-dependent amplitudes. Chemometrical data analysis revealed that the individual responses are additive and depend linearly on single analyte concentrations. Based on these observations, simultaneous multicomponent analysis of organic mixtures was carried out in the FIA's time domain with analytical errors of less than 10%. For mixture analysis and monitoring in processes like enzymatic conversions, the described microbial sensor FIA ("dynamic microbial sensor") offers an alternative to expensive analytical equipment. PMID:21619259

  17. Comparison of fatty acid profile in the chicken meat after feeding with narasin, nicarbazin and salinomycin sodium and phyto-additive substances.

    PubMed

    Angelovičová, Mária; Kunová, Simona; Čapla, Jozef; Zajac, Peter; Bučko, Ondřej; Angelovič, Marek

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was an experimental investigation and a statistical evaluation of the influence of various additives in feed mixtures of broiler chickens on fatty acids content and their ratio in breast and thigh muscles. First feed additive consisted of narasin, nicarbasin and salinomycin sodium, and other five additives were of phytogenic origin. In vivo experiment was realized on the poultry experimental station with deep litter breeding system. A total of 300 one-day-old hybrid chickens Cobb 500 divided into six groups were used for the experiment. The experimental period was divided into four phases, i.e. Starter, Grower 1, Grower 2 and Final, according to the application of commercial feed mixture of soy cereal type. Additive substances used in feed mixtures were different for each group. Basic feed mixtures were equal for all groups. Fatty acid profile of breast and thigh muscles was measured by the method of FT IR Nicolet 6700. Investigated additive substances in the feed mixtures did not have statistically significant effect on fatty acid content and omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio in breast and thigh muscles. Strong statistically significant relation between omega-6 PUFAs and total PUFAs were proved by experiment. A relation between omega-3 PUFAs and total PUFAs was found only in the group with Biocitro additive. PMID:26950416

  18. Mixtures with relatives and linked markers.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Guro; Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Egeland, Thore

    2016-05-01

    Mixture DNA profiles commonly appear in forensic genetics, and a large number of statistical methods and software are available for such cases. However, most of the literature concerns mixtures where the contributors are assumed unrelated and the genetic markers are unlinked. In this paper, we consider mixtures of linked markers and related contributors. If no relationships are involved, linkage can be ignored. While unlinked markers can be treated independently, linkage introduces dependencies. The use of linked markers presents statistical and computational challenges, but may also lead to a considerable increase in power since the number of markers available is much larger if we do not require the markers to be unlinked. In addition, some cases that cannot be solved with an unlimited number of unlinked autosomal markers can be solved with linked markers. We focus on two special cases of linked markers: pairs of linked autosomal markers and X-chromosomal markers. A framework is presented for calculation of likelihood ratios for mixtures with general relationships and with linkage between any number of markers. Finally, we explore the effect of linkage disequilibrium, also called allelic association, on the likelihood ratio. PMID:26614310

  19. Continuous Crystallization of Urea-Water Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokamura, Taku; Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Seki, Mitsuo; Murakoshi, Hiromichi

    Ice slurries have been used as environmentally-friendly secondary refrigerants. In addition to such ice slurries, aqueous solutions in slurry-state have also been put to practical use at temperatures below 0 oC. Urea-water mixture is a multi-component substance that has a eutectic point. If we can form a two-phase fluid substance by the liquid-solid phases at the eutectic point, it can be used as a fluid latent heat storage material, which will maintain the secondary refrigerant in a heat exchanger at constant temperature. In the present study, we propose a urea-water mixture as a novel functional thermal fluid that can be used as a fluid latent heat material. To demonstrate its feasibility, we first measured the latent heat and density of a urea-water mixture, and then used a counter-flow double tube heat exchanger to produce a liquid-solid two-phase flow of the urea-water mixture. This work demonstrates that it is possible to make a fluid latent heat storage material continuously from an aqueous solution at the eutectic point by flowing it through a double tube heat exchanger equipped with a stirrer.

  20. Isochoric Burn, an Internally Consistent Method for the Reactant to Product Transformation in Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E; Lee, E L

    2002-07-01

    Mixture rules for partially reacted explosives differ amongst various models. For instance, JWL++ uses a partial pressure addition to compute an average zonal pressure, Ignition and Growth requires pressure equilibration and thermal equilibration of temperature dependent JWL EOSs, CHEETAH In Line RF also assumes temperature and pressure equilibration. It has been suggested in the past that a more realistic equilibration scheme should comprise isentropic pressure equilibration of the separate reacted and unreacted phases. This turns out not to be a proper path for equilibration. Rather, we find that the only internally consistent method is the evaluation of the equilibrium pressure that satisfies the particular conditions of reactant and product resulting from deflagration in a fixed volume.

  1. Excess compressibility in binary liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, F; Gapiński, J; Pochylski, M; Ponterio, R C; Saija, F; Salvato, G

    2007-06-14

    Brillouin scattering experiments have been carried out on some mixtures of molecular liquids. From the measurement of the hypersonic velocities we have evaluated the adiabatic compressibility as a function of the volume fraction. We show how the quadratic form of the excess compressibility dependence on the solute volume fraction can be derived by simple statistical effects and does not imply any interaction among the components of the system other than excluded volume effects. This idea is supported by the comparison of the experimental results with a well-established prototype model, consisting of a binary mixture of hard spheres with a nonadditive interaction potential. This naive model turns out to be able to produce a very wide spectrum of structural and thermodynamic features depending on values of its parameters. An attempt has made to understand what kind of structural information can be gained through the analysis of the volume fraction dependence of the compressibility. PMID:17581064

  2. Embedded Electronic Nose for VOC Mixture Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botre, B.; Gharpure, D.; Shaligram, A.

    2009-05-23

    This paper details the work done towards a low cost, small size, portable embedded electronic nose (e-nose) and its application for analysis of different VOC mixtures. The sensor array is composed of commercially available metal oxide semiconductor sensors by Figaro. The embedded E-nose consists of an ADuC831 and has an RS 232 interface for Desktop PC for higher level data collection and NN training. The ESP tool with database facility and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP NN) is employed to interface the embedded hardware and to process the electronic nose signals before being classified. The use of embedded e-nose for the quantification of VOCs in mixtures is investigated.

  3. Molecular Aluminum Additive for Burn Enhancement of Hydrocarbon Fuels.

    PubMed

    Guerieri, Philip M; DeCarlo, Samantha; Eichhorn, Bryan; Connell, Terrence; Yetter, Richard A; Tang, Xin; Hicks, Zachary; Bowen, Kit H; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-11-12

    Additives to hydrocarbon fuels are commonly explored to change the combustion dynamics, chemical distribution, and/or product integrity. Here we employ a novel aluminum-based molecular additive, Al(I) tetrameric cluster [AlBrNEt3]4 (Et = C2H5), to a hydrocarbon fuel and evaluate the resultant single-droplet combustion properties. This Al4 cluster offers a soluble alternative to nanoscale particulate additives that have recently been explored and may mitigate the observed problems of particle aggregation. Results show the [AlBrNEt3]4 additive to increase the burn rate constant of a toluene-diethyl ether fuel mixture by ∼20% in a room temperature oxygen environment with only 39 mM of active aluminum additive (0.16 wt % limited by additive solubility). In comparison, a roughly similar addition of nano-aluminum particulate shows no discernible difference in burn properties of the hydrocarbon fuel. High speed video shows the [AlBrNEt3]4 to induce microexplosive gas release events during the last ∼30% of the droplet combustion time. We attribute this to HBr gas release based on results of temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments of the [AlBrNEt3]4 dosed with O2 and D2O. A possible mechanism of burn rate enhancement is presented that is consistent with microexplosion observations and TPR results. PMID:26488461

  4. Prediction for the mixture toxicity of six organophosphorus pesticides to the luminescent bacterium Q67.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Hui; Liu, Shu-Shen; Song, Xiao-Qing; Ge, Hui-Lin

    2008-11-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are ubiquitous in the surface water as mixtures. To examine the mixture toxicity in the multi-component space, the uniform design (UD) which can explore the concentration changes with few experimental efforts was employed to design the mixtures. On the other hand, the fixed concentration ratio ray was applied into six UD mixtures and two equivalent-effect concentration mixtures to build the whole concentration-response curves to overcome the demerit of the classical "point-to-point" method. The experimental toxicities of six pesticides and their mixtures to the luminescent bacterium Q67 were determined. The mixture toxicities were predicted by two models, concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). The results showed that all the mixture toxicities observed had no significant differences from the ones predicted by CA. However, the mixture toxicities were also well predicted by IA especially at the low-concentration section. PMID:18308393

  5. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  6. Thermobaric investigation of coal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinskii, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    An examination of the dynamics of gas emission during the heating in vacuo of different grades of Donbass coal included a study of binary and ternary mixtures of these coals. Discrete gas emission was established at temperatures depending principally on the ratio of coals within the mixtures. The data obtained could be used as a basis for commercial processes.

  7. Encoding of mixtures in a simple olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kai; Tootoonian, Sina; Laurent, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Natural odors are usually mixtures; yet humans and animals can experience them as unitary percepts. Olfaction also enables stimulus categorization and generalization. We addressed how these computations are performed with the responses of 168 locust antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) to varying mixtures of two monomolecular odors, and 174 PNs and 209 mushroom body Kenyon cells (KCs) to mixtures of up to 8 monomolecular odors. Single PN responses showed strong hypo-additivity, and population trajectories clustered by odor concentration and mixture similarity. KC responses were much sparser on average than with PNs and often signaled the presence of single components in mixtures. Linear classifiers could read out the responses of both populations in single time bins to perform odor identification, categorization, and generalization. Our results suggest that odor representations in the mushroom body may result from competing optimization constraints to facilitate memorization (sparseness) while enabling identification, classification and generalization. PMID:24210905

  8. Interactive effects of waterborne metals in binary mixtures on short-term gill-metal binding and ion uptake in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Niyogi, Som; Nadella, Sunita R; Wood, Chris M

    2015-08-01

    Metal binding to fish gills forms the basis of the biotic ligand model (BLM) approach, which has emerged as a useful tool for conducting site-specific water quality assessments for metals. The current BLMs are designed to assess the toxicity of individual metals, and cannot account for the interactive effects of metal mixtures to aquatic organisms including fish. The present study was designed mainly to examine the interactive effects of waterborne metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Ni) in specific binary combinations on short-term (3h) gill-metal binding and essential ion (Ca(2+) and Na(+)) uptake (a physiological index of toxicity) in fish, using juvenile freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as the model species. We hypothesized that binary mixtures of metals that share a common mode of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Zn - Ca(2+) antagonists, Cu and Ag - Na(+) antagonists) would reduce the gill binding of each other via competitive interactions and induce less than additive effects on ion transport. In addition, the mixture of metals that have different modes of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Cu, or Cd and Ni) would not exhibit any interactive effects either on gill-metal binding or ion transport. We found that both Zn and Cu reduced gill-Cd binding and vice versa, however, Ni did not influence gill-Cd binding in fish. Surprisingly, Ag was found to stimulate gill-Cu binding especially at high exposure concentrations, whereas, Cu had no effect on gill-Ag binding. The inhibitory effect of Cd and Zn in mixture on branchial Ca(2+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cd or Zn alone. Similarly, the inhibitory effect of Cu and Ag in mixture on branchial Na(+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cu or Ag alone. The inhibitory effects of Cd and Zn mixture on Ca(2+) uptake as well as Cu and Ag mixture on Na(+) uptake were found to follow the principles of simple additivity. In contrast, no significant additive effect on either Ca(2+) or Na

  9. Latent classiness and other mixtures.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves' role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  10. Latent Classiness and Other Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves’ role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  11. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  12. NMRmix: A Tool for the Optimization of Compound Mixtures in 1D (1)H NMR Ligand Affinity Screens.

    PubMed

    Stark, Jaime L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Lee, Woonghee; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR ligand affinity screening is a powerful technique that is routinely used in drug discovery or functional genomics to directly detect protein-ligand binding events. Binding events can be identified by monitoring differences in the 1D (1)H NMR spectrum of a compound with and without protein. Although a single NMR spectrum can be collected within a short period (2-10 min per sample), one-by-one screening of a protein against a library of hundreds or thousands of compounds requires a large amount of spectrometer time and a large quantity of protein. Therefore, compounds are usually evaluated in mixtures ranging in size from 3 to 20 compounds to improve the efficiency of these screens in both time and material. Ideally, the NMR signals from individual compounds in the mixture should not overlap so that spectral changes can be associated with a particular compound. We have developed a software tool, NMRmix, to assist in creating ideal mixtures from a large panel of compounds with known chemical shifts. Input to NMRmix consists of an (1)H NMR peak list for each compound, a user-defined overlap threshold, and additional user-defined parameters if default settings are not used. NMRmix utilizes a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the composition of the mixtures to minimize spectral peak overlaps so that each compound in the mixture is represented by a maximum number of nonoverlapping chemical shifts. A built-in graphical user interface simplifies data import and visual evaluation of the results. PMID:26965640

  13. NMRmix: A Tool for the Optimization of Compound Mixtures in 1D 1H NMR Ligand Affinity Screens

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR ligand affinity screening is a powerful technique that is routinely used in drug discovery or functional genomics to directly detect protein–ligand binding events. Binding events can be identified by monitoring differences in the 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a compound with and without protein. Although a single NMR spectrum can be collected within a short period (2—10 min per sample), one-by-one screening of a protein against a library of hundreds or thousands of compounds requires a large amount of spectrometer time and a large quantity of protein. Therefore, compounds are usually evaluated in mixtures ranging in size from 3 to 20 compounds to improve the efficiency of these screens in both time and material. Ideally, the NMR signals from individual compounds in the mixture should not overlap so that spectral changes can be associated with a particular compound. We have developed a software tool, NMRmix, to assist in creating ideal mixtures from a large panel of compounds with known chemical shifts. Input to NMRmix consists of an 1H NMR peak list for each compound, a user-defined overlap threshold, and additional user-defined parameters if default settings are not used. NMRmix utilizes a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the composition of the mixtures to minimize spectral peak overlaps so that each compound in the mixture is represented by a maximum number of nonoverlapping chemical shifts. A built-in graphical user interface simplifies data import and visual evaluation of the results. PMID:26965640

  14. Thermodiffusion, molecular diffusion and Soret coefficient of binary and ternary mixtures of n-hexane, n-dodecane and toluene.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Mezquia, David; Wang, Zilin; Lapeira, Estela; Klein, Michael; Wiegand, Simone; Mounir Bou-Ali, M

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the thermodiffusion, molecular diffusion, and Soret coefficients of 12 binary mixtures composed of toluene, n-hexane and n-dodecane in the whole range of concentrations at atmospheric pressure and temperatures of 298.15 K and 308.15 K have been determined. The experimental measurements have been carried out using the Thermogravitational Column, the Sliding Symmetric Tubes and the Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering techniques. The results obtained using the different techniques show a maximum deviation of 9% for the thermodiffusion coefficient, 8% for the molecular diffusion coefficient and 2% for the Soret coefficient. For the first time we report a decrease of the thermodiffusion coefficient with increasing ratio of the thermal expansion coefficient and viscosity for a binary mixture of an organic ring compound with a short n-alkane. This observation is discussed in terms of interactions between the different components. Additionally, the thermogravitational technique has been used to measure the thermodiffusion coefficients of four ternary mixtures consisting of toluene, n-hexane and n-dodecane at 298.15 K. In order to complete the study, the values obtained for the molecular diffusion coefficient in binary mixtures, and the thermodiffusion coefficient of binary and ternary mixtures have been compared with recently derived correlations. PMID:25376978

  15. Scintillating Cocktail Mixtures and the Role of Water on the Optophysical Properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Feng, Patrick L.; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Murtagh, Dustin; Anstey, Mitchell

    2015-10-01

    Two types of water - containing liquid scinti llation mixtures were prepared in the present work. In the first, m ixtures of 2 - phenylethanol, water, diphenyl phosphate, sodium phenyl phosphate dibasic dihydrate, and the dye 2,5 - diphenyloxazole (PPO) have been investigated as liquid scintillators. In th e second system, nonionic and mixed surfactant systems were investigated in conjunction with water and small amounts of toluene. In both cases, increasing amounts of water led to reductions in the scintillation light yield. Understanding what factors contr ibute to this phenomenon is the focus of this report. Changes in the solution microphase structure, diminishing aromatic content of the cocktail mixtures, and inefficient energy transfer to the dye a ppear to be responsible for the decreased light yield as more water is added . In the 2 - phenylethanol system, the observed experimental results are consistent with the formation of a bicontinuous microemulsion at higher water concentrations, which incorporates PPO and shields it from the quenching effects of the increasing polar matrix. Evidence for this proposed phase chan ge c ome s from light scattering data, photo - and x - ray luminescence measurements, and optical transparency measurements . In the surfactant - based system, the quenching effect of water was found to be less than both commercially - available dioxane - naphthalene mixtures used for scintillation counting as well as the 2 - phenylethanol mixtures described above. The effect of different surfactant mixtures and concentrations were studied, revealing a benefic ial effect upon the scintillation light yield for mixed surfactant mixtures. These results are interpreted in the context of r eactive radical species formation following water ionization , which leads to light - yield quenching in aqueous systems . The presenc e of surfactant(s) in these mixtures enables the formation of organic - rich regions that are spatially separated from the

  16. Acute toxicity to goldfish of mixtures of chloramines, copper, and linear alkylate sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.F.; McKee, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity to goldfish (Carassius auratus) of mixtures of chloramines, copper, and linear alkylate sulfonate (LAS) was studied by continuous-flow toxicity tests during an exposure period of 96 hours. The individual toxicities of these three chemicals are either additive or synergistic in mixtures, depending on the rate of toxic action of the individual chemical, the toxicity ratio of the chemicals in the mixtures, and the concentration of the mixtures.

  17. Hierarchical similarity transformations between Gaussian mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rigas, George; Nikou, Christophoros; Goletsis, Yorgos; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to estimate the density of a data space represented by a geometric transformation of an initial Gaussian mixture model. The geometric transformation is hierarchical, and it is decomposed into two steps. At first, the initial model is assumed to undergo a global similarity transformation modeled by translation, rotation, and scaling of the model components. Then, to increase the degrees of freedom of the model and allow it to capture fine data structures, each individual mixture component may be transformed by another, local similarity transformation, whose parameters are distinct for each component of the mixture. In addition, to constrain the order of magnitude of the local transformation (LT) with respect to the global transformation (GT), zero-mean Gaussian priors are imposed onto the local parameters. The estimation of both GT and LT parameters is obtained through the expectation maximization framework. Experiments on artificial data are conducted to evaluate the proposed model, with varying data dimensionality, number of model components, and transformation parameters. In addition, the method is evaluated using real data from a speech recognition task. The obtained results show a high model accuracy and demonstrate the potential application of the proposed method to similar classification problems. PMID:24808615

  18. Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Amonette, J. E.; Drake, Meghan M; Brown, Steven D; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2009-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.

  19. Comparing geophysical measurements to theoretical estimates for soil mixtures at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wildenschild, D; Berge, P A; Berryman, K G; Bonner, B P; Roberts, J J

    1999-01-15

    The authors obtained good estimates of measured velocities of sand-peat samples at low pressures by using a theoretical method, the self-consistent theory of Berryman (1980), using sand and porous peat to represent the microstructure of the mixture. They were unable to obtain useful estimates with several other theoretical approaches, because the properties of the quartz, air and peat components of the samples vary over several orders of magnitude. Methods that are useful for consolidated rock cannot be applied directly to unconsolidated materials. Instead, careful consideration of microstructure is necessary to adapt the methods successfully. Future work includes comparison of the measured velocity values to additional theoretical estimates, investigation of Vp/Vs ratios and wave amplitudes, as well as modeling of dry and saturated sand-clay mixtures (e.g., Bonner et al., 1997, 1998). The results suggest that field data can be interpreted by comparing laboratory measurements of soil velocities to theoretical estimates of velocities in order to establish a systematic method for predicting velocities for a full range of sand-organic material mixtures at various pressures. Once the theoretical relationship is obtained, it can be used to estimate the soil composition at various depths from field measurements of seismic velocities. Additional refining of the method for relating velocities to soil characteristics is useful for development inversion algorithms.

  20. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  1. Additivity of Pyrethroid Actions on Sodium Influx in Cerebrocortical Neurons in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Shafer, Timothy J.; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gennings, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Although previous work has tested the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo, this has not been assessed directly at the primary molecular target using a functional measure. Objectives: We investigated the potency and efficacy of 11 structurally diverse food-use pyrethroids to evoke sodium (Na+) influx in neurons and tested the hypothesis of dose additivity for a mixture of these same 11 compounds. Methods: We determined pyrethroid-induced increases in Na+ influx in primary cultures of cerebrocortical neurons using the Na+-sensitive dye sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI). Concentration-dependent responses for 11 pyrethroids were determined, and the response to dilutions of a mixture of all 11 compounds at an equimolar mixing ratio was assessed. Additivity was tested assuming a dose-additive model. Results: Seven pyrethroids produced concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ influx. The rank order of potency was deltamethrin > S-bioallethrin > β-cyfluthrin > λ-cyhalothrin > esfenvalerate > tefluthrin > fenpropathrin. Cypermethrin and bifenthrin produced modest increases in Na+ influx, whereas permethrin and resmethrin were inactive. When all 11 pyrethroids were present at an equimolar mixing ratio, their actions on Na+ influx were consistent with a dose-additive model. Conclusions: These data provide in vitro relative potency and efficacy measurements for 7 pyrethroid compounds in intact mammalian neurons. Despite differences in individual compound potencies, we found the action of a mixture of all 11 pyrethroids to be additive when we used an appropriate statistical model. These results are consistent with a previous report of the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo. PMID:21665567

  2. Nonergodic correction to a binary mixture phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, L.

    2016-05-01

    For a binary mixture with limited miscibility of the components, the correction to the equation of state that arises from the finite diffusion velocity is discussed. It is shown that this correction corresponds to a nonergodic microheterogeneity of the mixture. We suggest that the above microheterogeneity may be accounted as corresponding fluctuations of the chemical potential. The mean square of these fluctuations C is an additional thermodynamic variable, and the nonergodic microheterogeneity is an equilibrium property of every binary mixture with limited miscibility. The experimental status of this statement is discussed for eutectic and monotectic systems.

  3. Supersonic combustion of a silane/methane mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.; Mclain, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the ignition and combustion characteristics of a 20 volume percent silane/methane mixture using a model scramjet combustor with Mach 2 combustor entrance conditions. The test gas total temperature was varied from 1200 to 3900 R. The mixture autoignited at a total temperature of 1650 R. This autoignition temperature can be contrasted with 2330 R for hydrogen and 1350 R for a 20 percent silane/hydrogen mixture in similar hardware. Methane without the silane additive did not autoignite in this configuration at temperatures as high as 3900 R.

  4. Viscosity of Mixtures of α-Tocopherol Acetate + Mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwajczaka, Elżbieta; Stagraczyński, Ryszard; Herba, Henryk; Świergielb, Jolanta; Jadżyn, Jan

    2009-08-01

    The paper presents results of the share viscosity measurements performed as a function of temperature and concentration for mixtures of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamine E acetate) and mesitylene, two liquids of essentially different viscosity (four order of magnitude difference at 280 K). The viscosity/ temperature dependence for pure α-tocopherol acetate as well as for the mixtures studied can be well described with the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation. The viscosities of the mixtures exhibit a strong negative deviation from the rule of additive dependence on concentration and for increasing temperature the maximum value of the deviation shows an exponential decreasing.

  5. Endocrine activity of mycotoxins and mycotoxin mixtures.

    PubMed

    Demaegdt, Heidi; Daminet, Britt; Evrard, Annick; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Muller, Marc; Pussemier, Luc; Callebaut, Alfons; Vandermeiren, Karine

    2016-10-01

    Reporter gene assays incorporating nuclear receptors (estrogen, androgen, thyroid β and PPARγ2) have been implemented to assess the endocrine activity of 13 mycotoxins and their mixtures. As expected, zearalenone and its metabolites α-zearalenol and β- zearalenol turned out to have the strongest estrogenic potency (EC50 8,7 10-10 ± 0,8; 3,1 10-11 ± 0,5 and 1,3 10-8 ± 0,3 M respectively). The metabolite of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol also had estrogenic activity (EC50 3,8 10-7 ± 1,1 M). Furthermore, most of the mycotoxins (and their mixtures) showed anti-androgenic effects (15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol and α-zearalenol with potencies within one order of magnitude of that of the reference compound flutamide). In particular, deoxynivalenol and 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol acted as antagonists for the PPARy2 receptor. When testing mixtures of mycotoxins on the same cell systems, we showed that most of the mixtures reacted as predicted by the concentration addition (CA) theory. Generally, the CA was within the 95% confidence interval of the observed ones, only minor deviations were detected. Although these reporter gene tests cannot be directly extrapolated in vivo, they can be the basis for further research. Especially the additive effects of ZEN and its metabolites are of importance and could have repercussions in vivo. PMID:27481073

  6. EXPLORING THE LIMITS OF ADDITIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA has published several documents describing methods to perform health risk assessment of chemical mixtures (U.S. EPA, 1986; 2000) in which three approaches (i.e, actual mixture, similar mixture or component-based) to quantifying health risk for a chemical mixture are recom...

  7. Evolution of weak disturbances in inert binary mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of weak disturbances in inert binary mixtures is determined for the one-dimensional piston problem. The interaction of the dissipative and nonlinear mechanisms is described by Burgers' equation. The binary mixture diffusion mechanisms enter as an additive term in an effective diffusivity. Results for the impulsive motion of a piston moving into an ambient medium and the sinusoidally oscillating piston are used to illustrate the results and elucidate the incorrect behavior pertaining to the associated linear theory.

  8. Familial searching on DNA mixtures with dropout.

    PubMed

    Slooten, K

    2016-05-01

    Familial searching, the act of searching a database for a relative of an unknown individual whose DNA profile has been obtained, is usually restricted to cases where the DNA profile of that person has been unambiguously determined. Therefore, it is normally applied only with a good quality single source profile as starting point. In this article we investigate the performance of the method if applied to mixtures with and without allelic dropout, when likelihood ratios are computed with a semi-continuous (binary) model. We show that mixtures with dropout do not necessarily perform worse than mixtures without, especially if some separation between the donors is possible due to their different dropout probabilities. The familial searching true and false positive rates of mixed profiles on 15 loci are in some cases better than those of single source profiles on 10 loci. Thus, the information loss due to the fact that the person of interest's DNA has been mixed with that of other, and is affected by dropout, can be less than the loss of information corresponding to having 5 fewer loci available for a single source trace. Profiles typed on 10 autosomal loci are often involved in familial searching casework since many databases, including the Dutch one, in part consist of such profiles. Therefore, from this point of view, there seems to be no objection to extend familial searching to mixed or degraded profiles. PMID:26905597

  9. Negative Binomial Process Count and Mixture Modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingyuan; Carin, Lawrence

    2015-02-01

    The seemingly disjoint problems of count and mixture modeling are united under the negative binomial (NB) process. A gamma process is employed to model the rate measure of a Poisson process, whose normalization provides a random probability measure for mixture modeling and whose marginalization leads to an NB process for count modeling. A draw from the NB process consists of a Poisson distributed finite number of distinct atoms, each of which is associated with a logarithmic distributed number of data samples. We reveal relationships between various count- and mixture-modeling distributions and construct a Poisson-logarithmic bivariate distribution that connects the NB and Chinese restaurant table distributions. Fundamental properties of the models are developed, and we derive efficient Bayesian inference. It is shown that with augmentation and normalization, the NB process and gamma-NB process can be reduced to the Dirichlet process and hierarchical Dirichlet process, respectively. These relationships highlight theoretical, structural, and computational advantages of the NB process. A variety of NB processes, including the beta-geometric, beta-NB, marked-beta-NB, marked-gamma-NB and zero-inflated-NB processes, with distinct sharing mechanisms, are also constructed. These models are applied to topic modeling, with connections made to existing algorithms under Poisson factor analysis. Example results show the importance of inferring both the NB dispersion and probability parameters. PMID:26353243

  10. Negative Binomial Process Count and Mixture Modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingyuan; Carin, Lawrence

    2013-10-17

    The seemingly disjoint problems of count and mixture modeling are united under the negative binomial (NB) process. A gamma process is employed to model the rate measure of a Poisson process, whose normalization provides a random probability measure for mixture modeling and whose marginalization leads to a NB process for count modeling. A draw from the NB process consists of a Poisson distributed finite number of distinct atoms, each of which is associated with a logarithmic distributed number of data samples. We reveal relationships between various count- and mixture-modeling distributions distributions, and construct a Poisson-logarithmic bivariate distribution that connects the NB and Chinese restaurant table distributions. Fundamental properties of the models are developed, and we derive efficient Bayesian inference. It is shown that with augmentation and normalization, the NB process and gamma-NB process can be reduced to the Dirichlet process and hierarchical Dirichlet process, respectively. These relationships highlight theoretical, structural and computational advantages of the NB process. A variety of NB processes, including the beta-geometric, beta-NB, marked-beta-NB, marked-gamma-NB and zero-inflated-NB processes, with distinct sharing mechanisms, are also constructed. These models are applied to topic modeling, with connections made to existing algorithms under Poisson factor analysis. Example results show the importance of inferring both the NB dispersion and probability parameters. PMID:24144977

  11. Time-resolved temperature and O atom measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in combustible mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, Suzanne; Bowman, Sherrie; Burnette, David; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents results of time-resolved rotational temperature measurements, by pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and absolute O atom number density measurements, by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The experiments were conducted in nanosecond pulse discharges in H2-O2-Ar and C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, initially at room temperature, operated at a high pulse repetition rate of 40 kHz, in a plane-to-plane double dielectric barrier geometry at a pressure of 40 Torr. Intensified charge-coupled device images show that O2-Ar and H2-O2-Ar plasmas remain diffuse and volume-filling during the entire burst. Images taken in C2H4-O2-Ar plasma demonstrate significant discharge filamentation and constriction along the center plane and in the corners of the test section. The experimental results demonstrate high accuracy of pure rotational psec CARS for thermometry measurements at low partial pressures of oxygen in nonequilibrium plasmas. The results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, using two different H2-O2 chemistry and C2H4-O2 chemistry mechanisms. In H2-O2-Ar mixtures, the kinetic modeling predictions are in fairly good agreement with the data, predicting temperature rise and O atom accumulation in long discharge bursts, up to 450 pulses. The results show that adding hydrogen to the mixture results in an additional temperature rise, due to its partial oxidation by radicals generated in the plasma, essentially without chain branching. In C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, the model consistently underpredicts both temperature and O atom number density. The most likely reason for the difference between the experimental data and model predictions is discharge filamentation developing when ethylene is added to the O2-Ar mixture, at fairly low temperatures.

  12. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  13. Thermobaric investigations of coal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinskii, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamics of the evolution of gas when coals of various types from the Donbass and binary and ternary mixtures of them are heated have been studied. The discrete nature of the evolution of gas has been established, the temperature intervals of which depend primarily on the ratio of the coals in the mixtures. The possibility of using the results obtained in determining rational schemes for the industrial processing of coals is suggested.

  14. Screening level mixture risk assessment of pharmaceuticals in STP effluents.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Thomas; Karlsson, Maja

    2014-02-01

    We modeled the ecotoxicological risks of the pharmaceutical mixtures emitted from STP effluents into the environment. The classic mixture toxicity concept of Concentration Addition was used to calculate the total expected risk of the analytically determined mixtures, compare the expected impact of seven effluent streams and pinpoint the most sensitive group of species. The risk quotient of a single, randomly selected pharmaceutical is often more than a factor of 1000 lower than the mixture risk, clearly indicating the need to systematically analyse the overall risk of all pharmaceuticals present. The MCR, which is the ratio between the most risky compound and the total mixture risk, varies between 1.2 and 4.2, depending on the actual scenario and species group under consideration. The mixture risk quotients, based on acute data and an assessment factor of 1000, regularly exceed 1, indicating a potential risk for the environment, depending on the dilution in the recipient stream. The top 10 mixture components explain more than 95% of the mixture risk in all cases. A mixture toxicity assessment cannot go beyond the underlying single substance data. The lack of data on the chronic toxicity of most pharmaceuticals as well as the very few data available for in vivo fish toxicity has to be regarded as a major knowledge gap in this context. On the other hand, ignoring Independent Action or even using the sum of individual risk quotients as a rough approximation of Concentration Addition does not have a major impact on the final risk estimate. PMID:24321250

  15. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  16. Method for producing hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

    1980-12-01

    It is an object of this invention to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols and ketones from an aqueous solution containing the same into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. Another object of the invention is to provide a mixture consisting of hydrocarbon, alcohols or ketones, polyoxyalkylene polymer and water which can be directly added to fuels or further purified. The above stated objects are achieved in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5 to 18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is mixed in the presence or one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers described in detail hereinafter; the fermentation alcohol being extracted into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

  17. A Consistent Phylogenetic Backbone for the Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ebersberger, Ingo; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Kupczok, Anne; Gube, Matthias; Kothe, Erika; Voigt, Kerstin; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2012-01-01

    The kingdom of fungi provides model organisms for biotechnology, cell biology, genetics, and life sciences in general. Only when their phylogenetic relationships are stably resolved, can individual results from fungal research be integrated into a holistic picture of biology. However, and despite recent progress, many deep relationships within the fungi remain unclear. Here, we present the first phylogenomic study of an entire eukaryotic kingdom that uses a consistency criterion to strengthen phylogenetic conclusions. We reason that branches (splits) recovered with independent data and different tree reconstruction methods are likely to reflect true evolutionary relationships. Two complementary phylogenomic data sets based on 99 fungal genomes and 109 fungal expressed sequence tag (EST) sets analyzed with four different tree reconstruction methods shed light from different angles on the fungal tree of life. Eleven additional data sets address specifically the phylogenetic position of Blastocladiomycota, Ustilaginomycotina, and Dothideomycetes, respectively. The combined evidence from the resulting trees supports the deep-level stability of the fungal groups toward a comprehensive natural system of the fungi. In addition, our analysis reveals methodologically interesting aspects. Enrichment for EST encoded data—a common practice in phylogenomic analyses—introduces a strong bias toward slowly evolving and functionally correlated genes. Consequently, the generalization of phylogenomic data sets as collections of randomly selected genes cannot be taken for granted. A thorough characterization of the data to assess possible influences on the tree reconstruction should therefore become a standard in phylogenomic analyses. PMID:22114356

  18. A consistent phylogenetic backbone for the fungi.

    PubMed

    Ebersberger, Ingo; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Kupczok, Anne; Gube, Matthias; Kothe, Erika; Voigt, Kerstin; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2012-05-01

    The kingdom of fungi provides model organisms for biotechnology, cell biology, genetics, and life sciences in general. Only when their phylogenetic relationships are stably resolved, can individual results from fungal research be integrated into a holistic picture of biology. However, and despite recent progress, many deep relationships within the fungi remain unclear. Here, we present the first phylogenomic study of an entire eukaryotic kingdom that uses a consistency criterion to strengthen phylogenetic conclusions. We reason that branches (splits) recovered with independent data and different tree reconstruction methods are likely to reflect true evolutionary relationships. Two complementary phylogenomic data sets based on 99 fungal genomes and 109 fungal expressed sequence tag (EST) sets analyzed with four different tree reconstruction methods shed light from different angles on the fungal tree of life. Eleven additional data sets address specifically the phylogenetic position of Blastocladiomycota, Ustilaginomycotina, and Dothideomycetes, respectively. The combined evidence from the resulting trees supports the deep-level stability of the fungal groups toward a comprehensive natural system of the fungi. In addition, our analysis reveals methodologically interesting aspects. Enrichment for EST encoded data-a common practice in phylogenomic analyses-introduces a strong bias toward slowly evolving and functionally correlated genes. Consequently, the generalization of phylogenomic data sets as collections of randomly selected genes cannot be taken for granted. A thorough characterization of the data to assess possible influences on the tree reconstruction should therefore become a standard in phylogenomic analyses. PMID:22114356

  19. Generalized net analyte signal standard addition as a novel method for simultaneous determination: application in spectrophotometric determination of some pesticides.

    PubMed

    Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Saeb, Elhameh; Vallipour, Javad; Bamorowat, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of three neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam) by a novel method named generalized net analyte signal standard addition method (GNASSAM) in some binary and ternary synthetic mixtures was investigated. For this purpose, standard addition was performed using a single standard solution consisting of a mixture of standards of all analytes. Savings in time and amount of used materials are some of the advantages of this method. All determinations showed appropriate applicability of this method with less than 5% error. This method may be applied for linearly dependent data in the presence of known interferents. The GNASSAM combines the advantages of both the generalized standard addition method and net analyte signal; therefore, it may be a proper alternative for some other multivariate methods. PMID:24672886

  20. Generalized Mixture Models for Molecular Phylogenetic Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jason; Sullivan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing availability of multigene sequence data during the past decade has enabled phylogeny estimation at phylogenomic scales. However, dealing with evolutionary process heterogeneity across the genome becomes increasingly challenging. Here we develop a mixture model approach that uses reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation to permit as many distinct models as the data require. Each additional model considered may be a fully parametrized general time-reversible model or any of its special cases. Furthermore, we expand the usual proposal mechanisms for topology changes to permit hard polytomies (i.e., zero-length internal branches). This new approach is implemented in the Crux software toolkit. We demonstrate the feasibility of using reversible jump MCMC on mixture models by reexamining a well-known 44-taxon mammalian data set comprising 22 concatenated genes. We are able to reproduce the results of the original analysis (with respect to bipartition support) when we make identical assumptions, but when we allow for polytomies and/or use data-driven mixture model estimation, we infer much lower bipartition support values for several key bipartitions. PMID:21873377

  1. Surface Consistent Finite Frequency Phase Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimman, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    Static time-delay corrections are frequency independent and ignore velocity variations away from the assumed vertical ray-path through the subsurface. There is therefore a clear potential for improvement if the finite frequency nature of wave propagation can be properly accounted for. Such a method is presented here based on the Born approximation, the assumption of surface consistency, and the misfit of instantaneous phase. The concept of instantaneous phase lends itself very well for sweep-like signals, hence these are the focus of this study. Analytical sensitivity kernels are derived that accurately predict frequency dependent phase shifts due to P-wave anomalies in the near surface. They are quick to compute and robust near the source and receivers. An additional correction is presented that re-introduces the non-linear relation between model perturbation and phase delay, which becomes relevant for stronger velocity anomalies. The phase shift as function of frequency is a slowly varying signal, its computation therefore doesn't require fine sampling even for broadband sweeps. The kernels reveal interesting features of the sensitivity of seismic arrivals to the near surface: small anomalies can have a relative large impact resulting from the medium field term that is dominant near the source and receivers. Furthermore, even simple velocity anomalies can produce a distinct frequency dependent phase behaviour. Unlike statics, the predicted phase corrections are smooth in space. Verification with spectral element simulations shows an excellent match for the predicted phase shifts over the entire seismic frequency band. Applying the phase shift to the reference sweep corrects for wavelet distortion, making the technique akin to surface consistent deconvolution, even though no division in the spectral domain is involved. As long as multiple scattering is mild, surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections outperform traditional statics for moderately large

  2. Surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimman, W. P.

    2016-07-01

    Static time-delay corrections are frequency independent and ignore velocity variations away from the assumed vertical ray path through the subsurface. There is therefore a clear potential for improvement if the finite frequency nature of wave propagation can be properly accounted for. Such a method is presented here based on the Born approximation, the assumption of surface consistency and the misfit of instantaneous phase. The concept of instantaneous phase lends itself very well for sweep-like signals, hence these are the focus of this study. Analytical sensitivity kernels are derived that accurately predict frequency-dependent phase shifts due to P-wave anomalies in the near surface. They are quick to compute and robust near the source and receivers. An additional correction is presented that re-introduces the nonlinear relation between model perturbation and phase delay, which becomes relevant for stronger velocity anomalies. The phase shift as function of frequency is a slowly varying signal, its computation therefore does not require fine sampling even for broad-band sweeps. The kernels reveal interesting features of the sensitivity of seismic arrivals to the near surface: small anomalies can have a relative large impact resulting from the medium field term that is dominant near the source and receivers. Furthermore, even simple velocity anomalies can produce a distinct frequency-dependent phase behaviour. Unlike statics, the predicted phase corrections are smooth in space. Verification with spectral element simulations shows an excellent match for the predicted phase shifts over the entire seismic frequency band. Applying the phase shift to the reference sweep corrects for wavelet distortion, making the technique akin to surface consistent deconvolution, even though no division in the spectral domain is involved. As long as multiple scattering is mild, surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections outperform traditional statics for moderately large

  3. Mixture Toxicity of SN2-Reactive Soft Electrophiles: 3. Evaluation of Ethyl α-Halogenated Acetates with α-Halogenated Acetonitriles

    PubMed Central

    Pöch, G.; Schultz, T. W.

    2014-01-01

    Mixture toxicity for each of four ethyl α-halogenated acetates (ExACs) with each of three α-halogenated acetonitriles (xANs) was assessed. Inhibition of bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri was measured after 15, 30 and 45-min of exposure. Concentration-response curves were developed for each chemical at each exposure duration and used to develop predicted concentration-response curves for the dose-addition and independence models of combined effect. Concentration-response curves for each mixture and each exposure duration were then evaluated against the predicted curves, using three metrics per model: 1) EC50-based additivity quotient (AQ) or independence quotient (IQ) values, 2) mean AQ (mAQ) or mean IQ (mIQ) values, calculated by averaging the EC25, EC50 and EC75 AQ or IQ values, and 3) deviation values from additivity (DV-A) or independence (DV-I). Mixture toxicity for ethyl iodoacetate (EIAC) was dose-additive with each of the xANs at all exposure durations and was often consistent with independence as well. The same was true for mixture toxicity of ethyl bromoacetate (EBAC) with each xAN. However, for the two more slowly reactive chemicals ethyl chloroacetate (ECAC) and ethyl fluoroacetate (EFAC) mixture toxicity with each xAN only became consistent with dose-addition upon increasing exposure duration. Consistency with independence for both ECAC and EFAC with the xANs was essentially limited to the EC50-IQ metric; thereby demonstrating the utility of calculating the mean quotient (mAQ, mIQ) and deviation value (DV-A, DV-I) metrics. Upon review of these findings with those from the first two papers in the series, the results suggest that instances in which mixture toxicity was not consistent with dose-addition relate: 1) to differences in the capability of the chemicals to form strong H-bonds with water and 2) to differences in relative reactivity and time-dependent toxicity levels of the chemicals. PMID:24368709

  4. Anthracene + Pyrene Solid Mixtures: Eutectic and Azeotropic Character

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James W.; Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize the thermodynamic behavior of a binary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixture, thermochemical and vapor pressure experiments were used to examine the phase behavior of the anthracene (1) + pyrene (2) system. A solid-liquid phase diagram was mapped for the mixture. A eutectic point occurs at 404 K at x1 = 0.22. A model based on eutectic formation can be used to predict the enthalpy of fusion associated with the mixture. For mixtures that contain x1 < 0.90, the enthalpy of fusion is near that of pure pyrene. This and X-ray diffraction results indicate that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene have pyrene-like crystal structures and energetics until the composition nears that of pure anthracene. Solid-vapor equilibrium studies show that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene form solid azeotropes at x1 of 0.03 and 0.14. Additionally, mixtures at x1 = 0.99 sublime at the vapor pressure of pure anthracene, suggesting that anthracene behavior is not significantly influenced by x2 = 0.01 in the crystal structure. PMID:21116474

  5. Flow of variably fluidized granular masses across three-dimensional terrain I. Coulomb mixture theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Denlinger, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    Rock avalanches, debris flows, and related phenomena consist of grain-fluid mixtures that move across three-dimensional terrain. In all these phenomena the same basic forces, govern motion, but differing mixture compositions, initial conditions, and boundary conditions yield varied dynamics and deposits. To predict motion of diverse grain-fluid masses from initiation to deposition, we develop a depth-averaged, threedimensional mathematical model that accounts explicitly for solid- and fluid-phase forces and interactions. Model input consists of initial conditions, path topography, basal and internal friction angles of solid grains, viscosity of pore fluid, mixture density, and a mixture diffusivity that controls pore pressure dissipation. Because these properties are constrained by independent measurements, the model requires little or no calibration and yields readily testable predictions. In the limit of vanishing Coulomb friction due to persistent high fluid pressure the model equations describe motion of viscous floods, and in the limit of vanishing fluid stress they describe one-phase granular avalanches. Analysis of intermediate phenomena such as debris flows and pyroclastic flows requires use of the full mixture equations, which can simulate interaction of high-friction surge fronts with more-fluid debris that follows. Special numerical methods (described in the companion paper) are necessary to solve the full equations, but exact analytical solutions of simplified equations provide critical insight. An analytical solution for translational motion of a Coulomb mixture accelerating from rest and descending a uniform slope demonstrates that steady flow can occur only asymptotically. A solution for the asymptotic limit of steady flow in a rectangular channel explains why shear may be concentrated in narrow marginal bands that border a plug of translating debris. Solutions for static equilibrium of source areas describe conditions of incipient slope instability

  6. The Probabilistic Admissible Region with Additional Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, C.; Hussein, I.; Wilkins, M.; Schumacher, P.

    The admissible region, in the space surveillance field, is defined as the set of physically acceptable orbits (e.g., orbits with negative energies) consistent with one or more observations of a space object. Given additional constraints on orbital semimajor axis, eccentricity, etc., the admissible region can be constrained, resulting in the constrained admissible region (CAR). Based on known statistics of the measurement process, one can replace hard constraints with a probabilistic representation of the admissible region. This results in the probabilistic admissible region (PAR), which can be used for orbit initiation in Bayesian tracking and prioritization of tracks in a multiple hypothesis tracking framework. The PAR concept was introduced by the authors at the 2014 AMOS conference. In that paper, a Monte Carlo approach was used to show how to construct the PAR in the range/range-rate space based on known statistics of the measurement, semimajor axis, and eccentricity. An expectation-maximization algorithm was proposed to convert the particle cloud into a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) representation of the PAR. This GMM can be used to initialize a Bayesian filter. The PAR was found to be significantly non-uniform, invalidating an assumption frequently made in CAR-based filtering approaches. Using the GMM or particle cloud representations of the PAR, orbits can be prioritized for propagation in a multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) framework. In this paper, the authors focus on expanding the PAR methodology to allow additional constraints, such as a constraint on perigee altitude, to be modeled in the PAR. This requires re-expressing the joint probability density function for the attributable vector as well as the (constrained) orbital parameters and range and range-rate. The final PAR is derived by accounting for any interdependencies between the parameters. Noting that the concepts presented are general and can be applied to any measurement scenario, the idea

  7. Thermal behavior of crumb-rubber modified asphalt concrete mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Amy Louise

    Thermal cracking is one of the primary forms of distress in asphalt concrete pavements, resulting from either a single drop in temperature to an extreme low or from multiple temperature cycles above the fracture temperature of the asphalt-aggregate mixture. The first mode described is low temperature cracking; the second is thermal fatigue. The addition of crumb-rubber, manufactured from scrap tires, to the binder in asphalt concrete pavements has been suggested to minimize both types of thermal cracking. Four experiments were designed and completed to evaluate the thermal behavior of crumb-rubber modified (CRM) asphalt-aggregate mixtures. Modified and unmodified mixture response to thermal stresses was measured in four laboratory tests. The Thermal Stress Restrained Specimen Test (TSRST) and the Indirect Tensile Test (IDT) were used to compare mixture resistance to low temperature cracking. Modified mixtures showed improved performance, and cooling rate did not affect mixture resistance according to the statistical analysis. Therefore results from tests with faster rates can predict performance under slower field rates. In comparison, predicted fracture temperatures and stresses (IDT) were generally higher than measured values (TSRST). In addition, predicted fracture temperatures from binder test results demonstrated that binder testing alone is not sufficient to evaluate CRM mixtures. Thermal fatigue was explored in the third experiment using conventional load-induced fatigue tests with conditions selected to simulate daily temperature fluctuations. Test results indicated that thermal fatigue may contribute to transverse cracking in asphalt pavements. Both unmodified and modified mixtures had a finite capacity to withstand daily temperature fluctuations coupled with cold temperatures. Modified mixtures again exhibited improved performance. The fourth experiment examined fracture properties of modified and unmodified mixtures using a common fracture toughness test

  8. Anisotropy of bituminous mixture in the linear viscoelastic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Hervé; Sauzéat, Cédric; Clec'h, Pauline

    2016-03-01

    Some anisotropic properties in the linear viscoelastic domain of bituminous mixtures compacted with a French LPC wheel compactor are highlighted in this paper. Bituminous mixture is generally considered as isotropic even if the compaction process on road or in laboratory induces anisotropic properties. Tension-compression complex modulus tests have been performed on parallelepipedic specimens in two directions: (i) direction of compactor wheel movement (direction I, which is horizontal) and (ii) direction of compaction (direction II, which is vertical). These tests consist in measuring sinusoidal axial and lateral strains as well as sinusoidal axial stress, when sinusoidal axial loading is applied on the specimen. Different loading frequencies and temperatures are applied. Two complex moduli, EI ^{*} and E_{II}^{*}, and four complex Poisson's ratios, ν_{II-I}^{*}, ν_{III-I}^{*}, ν_{I-II}^{*} and ν_{III-II}^{*}, were obtained. The vertical direction appears softer than the other ones for the highest frequencies. There are very few differences between the two directions I and II for parameters concerning viscous effects (phase angles \\varphi(EI) and \\varphi(E_{II}), and shift factors). The four Poisson's ratios reveal anisotropic properties but rheological tensor can be considered as symmetric when considering very similar values obtained for the two measured parameters (I-II and II-I) In addition, an anisotropic 3 dimensional version of the "2S2P1D" (2 springs, 2 parabolic creep elements and 1 dashpot) model, developed at the University of Lyon—ENTPE laboratory, is presented and used to simulate experimental results. The model simulation provides a good fit to the data. Stability of the material could also be investigated on the whole frequency-temperature range.

  9. Explosive compaction of WC+Co mixture by axisymmetric scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzyurkin, A. E.; Kraus, E. I.; Lukyanov, Ya L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of development and optimization of schemes for explosive compaction of mixtures of solid powder materials with metal bond. For this purpose, experiments were conducted on explosive compaction of mixtures of tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt (Co) using a simple cylindrical compaction system. In addition, a numerical simulation of shock waves propagation in two-phase porous medium WC+Co was carried out. Based on experimental and numerical studies of shock wave propagation, the optimal modes of explosive compaction of two-phase powder media, representing mixtures of solid powder materials with metal bond, were found. It is shown that the most preferable compaction mode for obtaining a uniform durable compact of a mixture of powders WC+Co with ratio 9:1 by volume in axially symmetric scheme with central mandrel corresponds to the detonation velocity of 4.6 km/s followed by sintering.

  10. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  11. Reflectance Spectra of Five-Component Mineral Mixtures: Implications for Mixture Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, S. G.; Mustard, J. F.

    1996-03-01

    The surfaces of the terrestrial planets consist largely of particulate materials, or soils, whose compositions and particle size distributions are products of geologic processes. The reflectance spectrum of a particulate surface represents a systematic combination of the mineralogy and particle size distribution of the material. Both composition and grain size information are useful in geologic interpretation of a surface, but are convolved in a single reflectance spectrum. We used spectral mixture analysis to separate these parameters by modeling the reflectance of five-component laboratory soils which vary in grain size. We find that successful prediction of endmember compositions requires some knowledge of grain size distribution, and that the fine particles dominate the mixed spectrum in excess of volume fractions and intimate mixture model predictions.

  12. [Psychometric properties of a scale: internal consistency].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Oviedo, Heidi C

    2008-01-01

    Internal consistency reliability is the degree of correlation between a scale's items. Internal consistency is calculated by Kuder-Richardson's formula 20 for dichotomous choices and Cronbach's alpha for polytomous items. 0.70 to 0.90 internal consistency is acceptable. 5-25 participants are needed for each item when computing the internal consistency of a twenty-item scale. Internal consistency varies according to population and then it is necessary to report it always that scale is used. PMID:19360231

  13. Bottom-up coarse-grained models with predictive accuracy and transferability for both structural and thermodynamic properties of heptane-toluene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G.

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the promise of a "bottom-up" extended ensemble framework for developing coarse-grained (CG) models that provide predictive accuracy and transferability for describing both structural and thermodynamic properties. We employ a force-matching variational principle to determine system-independent, i.e., transferable, interaction potentials that optimally model the interactions in five distinct heptane-toluene mixtures. Similarly, we employ a self-consistent pressure-matching approach to determine a system-specific pressure correction for each mixture. The resulting CG potentials accurately reproduce the site-site rdfs, the volume fluctuations, and the pressure equations of state that are determined by all-atom (AA) models for the five mixtures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these CG potentials provide similar accuracy for additional heptane-toluene mixtures that were not included their parameterization. Surprisingly, the extended ensemble approach improves not only the transferability but also the accuracy of the calculated potentials. Additionally, we observe that the required pressure corrections strongly correlate with the intermolecular cohesion of the system-specific CG potentials. Moreover, this cohesion correlates with the relative "structure" within the corresponding mapped AA ensemble. Finally, the appendix demonstrates that the self-consistent pressure-matching approach corresponds to minimizing an appropriate relative entropy.

  14. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  15. Complex mixture analysis using protein expression as a qualitative and quantitative tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.P.; Gonzalez, C.M.; Bond, J.A. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Tepper, B.E. . Paper Products Division)

    1994-07-01

    Some proteins in organisms exposed to chemicals in stressful amounts or toxic concentrations show increased expression; others show decreased expression. These inducible and repressible proteins together potentially provide qualitative and quantitative diagnoses of components in complex mixtures of chemicals. The authors examined sets of proteins synthesized by Daphnia magna after exposure to mixtures of a cationic polyamide epichlorhydrin adduct (Kymene) and a combined assortment of water-extractable substances from chemi-thermal-mechanical pulp (CTMP) in lab water. Proteins were identified, after extracting from Daphnia magna, by gel filtration and silver staining, or by radiolabeling and then gel separation. Patterns of proteins induced by Kymene[reg sign] and by CTMP extracts were distinguishable in lab water, but there was interaction between them. The method of identifying and quantifying Kymene, however, was successful using lab simulations of mixtures. The method was tested using wastewater samples from a paper manufacturing plant. Kymene could be detected against variable levels and types of additional substances. But, again, there was interference, perhaps due to Kymene binding to other anionic polymers sometimes present in the samples. Interpretation from analyses of protein expression were consistent with results from sublethal Ceriodaphnia dubia assays.

  16. Understanding the human health effects of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David O; Arcaro, Kathleen; Spink, David C

    2002-01-01

    Most research on the effects of chemicals on biologic systems is conducted on one chemical at a time. However, in the real world people are exposed to mixtures, not single chemicals. Although various substances may have totally independent actions, in many cases two substances may act at the same site in ways that can be either additive or nonadditive. Many even more complex interactions may occur if two chemicals act at different but related targets. In the extreme case there may be synergistic effects, in which case the effects of two substances together are greater than the sum of either effect alone. In reality, most persons are exposed to many chemicals, not just one or two, and therefore the effects of a chemical mixture are extremely complex and may differ for each mixture depending on the chemical composition. This complexity is a major reason why mixtures have not been well studied. In this review we attempt to illustrate some of the principles and approaches that can be used to study effects of mixtures. By the nature of the state of the science, this discussion is more a presentation of what we do not know than of what we do know about mixtures. We approach the study of mixtures at three levels, using specific examples. First, we discuss several human diseases in relation to a variety of environmental agents believed to influence the development and progression of the disease. We present results of selected cellular and animal studies in which simple mixtures have been investigated. Finally, we discuss some of the effects of mixtures at a molecular level. PMID:11834461

  17. Approximate Thermodynamics State Relations in Partially Ionized Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2003-12-30

    In practical applications, the thermodynamic state relations of partially ionized gas mixtures are usually approximated in terms of the state relations of the pure partially ionized constituent gases or materials in isolation. Such approximations are ordinarily based on an artificial partitioning or separation of the mixture into its constituent materials, with material k regarded as being confined by itself within a compartment or subvolume with volume fraction {alpha}k and possessing a fraction {beta}k of the total internal energy of the mixture. In a mixture of N materials, the quantities {alpha}k and {beta}k constitute an additional 2N--2 independent variables. The most common procedure for determining these variables, and hence the state relations for the mixture, is to require that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and pressure. This intuitively reasonable procedure is easily shown to reproduce the correct thermal and caloric state equations for a mixture of neutral (non-ionized) ideal gases. Here we wish to point out that (a) this procedure leads to incorrect state equations for a mixture of partially ionized ideal gases, whereas (b) the alternative procedure of requiring that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and free electron density reproduces the correct thermal and caloric state equations for such a mixture. These results readily generalize to the case of partially degenerate and/or relativistic electrons, to a common approximation used to represent pressure ionization effects, and to two-temperature plasmas. This suggests that equating the subvolume electron number densities or chemical potentials instead of pressures is likely to provide a more accurate approximation even in nonideal plasma mixtures.

  18. Redesigning alfalfa for use in mixtures with forage grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A lush field consisting of a mixture of grass and legumes is the goal of many producers. Such a production system has many benefits. The most important in times of high fertilizer prices is the reduced need for nitrogen (N) because of the legume's capacity for biological nitrogen fixation. However, ...

  19. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts

    PubMed Central

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  20. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  1. Amino acid mixture acutely improves the glucose tolerance of healthy overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Kammer, Lynne M; Ding, Zhenping; Lassiter, David G; Hwang, Jungyun; Nelson, Jeffrey L; Ivy, John L

    2012-01-01

    Certain amino acids have been reported to influence carbohydrate metabolism and blood glucose clearance, as well as improve the glucose tolerance in animal models. We hypothesized that an amino acid mixture consisting of isoleucine and 4 additional amino acids would improve the glucose response of healthy overweight men and women to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Twenty-two overweight healthy subjects completed 2 OGTTs after consuming 2 different test beverages. The amino acid mixture beverage (CHO/AA) consisted of 0.088 g cystine 2HCl, 0.043 g methionine, 0.086 g valine, 12.094 g isoleucine, 0.084 g leucine, and 100 g dextrose. The control beverage (CHO) consisted of 100 g dextrose only. Venous blood samples were drawn 10 minutes before the start of ingesting the drinks and 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after the completion of the drinks. During the OGTT, the plasma glucose response for the CHO/AA treatment was significantly lower than that of the CHO treatment (P < .01), as was the plasma glucose area under the curve (CHO/AA 806 ± 31 mmol/L·3 hours vs CHO 942 ± 40 mmol/L·3 hours). Differences in plasma glucose between treatments occurred at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after supplement ingestion. Plasma glucagon during the CHO/AA treatment was significantly higher than during the CHO treatment. However, there were no significant differences in plasma insulin or C-peptide responses between treatments. These results suggest that the amino acid mixture lowers the glucose response to an OGTT in healthy overweight subjects in an insulin-independent manner. PMID:22260861

  2. Unrestricted Mixture Models for Class Identification in Growth Mixture Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Growth mixture modeling has gained much attention in applied and methodological social science research recently, but the selection of the number of latent classes for such models remains a challenging issue, especially when the assumption of proper model specification is violated. The current simulation study compared the performance of a linear…

  3. Deuterium separation by infrared-induced addition reaction

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by the infrared-induced addition reaction of a deuterium halide with an unsaturated aliphatic compound. A gaseous mixture of a hydrogen halide feedstock and an unsaturated aliphatic compound, particularly an olefin, is irradiated to selectively vibrationally excite the deuterium halide contained therein. The excited deuterium halide preferentially reacts with the unsaturated aliphatic compound to produce a deuterated addition product which is removed from the reaction mixture.

  4. Landfilling ash/sludge mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.; Eighmy, T.T.; Crannell, B.S.

    1999-10-01

    The geotechnical properties of a mixture of municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge was investigated for a proposed ash/sludge secure landfill. The components as well as mixtures ranging from 10:1 to 5:1 (ash:sludge, by volume) were evaluated, where appropriate, for a number of geotechnical index and mechanical properties including particle size, water content, specific gravity, density-moisture relationships, shear strength, and compressibility. The results from a compactibility study and stability analysis of the proposed landfill were used to help approve a landfill codisposal concept; a full-scale facility was constructed and is currently operating successfully.

  5. Silage Additives and Management Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants are the most common silage additives in the United States. These products contain lactic acid bacteria to supplement the lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop and help insure a consistent fermentation in the silo. There are three types of inoculants: homofermentative lactic acid bact...

  6. Estimating proportions of materials using mixture models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydorn, R. P.; Basu, R.

    1983-01-01

    An approach to proportion estimation based on the notion of a mixture model, appropriate parametric forms for a mixture model that appears to fit observed remotely sensed data, methods for estimating the parameters in these models, methods for labelling proportion determination from the mixture model, and methods which use the mixture model estimates as auxiliary variable values in some proportion estimation schemes are addressed.

  7. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  8. Miscibility comparison for three refrigerant mixtures and four component refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.M.; Pate, M.B.

    1999-07-01

    Miscibility data were taken and compared for seven different refrigerants when mixed with the same polyol ester (POE) lubricant. Four of the seven refrigerants were single-component refrigerants while three of the refrigerants were mixtures composed of various combinations of the pure refrigerants. The purpose of this research was to investigate the difference in miscibility characteristics between refrigerant mixtures and their respective component refrigerants. The POE lubricant was a penta erythritol mixed-acid type POE which has a viscosity ISO32. The four pure refrigerants were R-32, R-125, R-134a, and R-143a and the three refrigerant mixtures were R-404A, R407C, and R-410A. The miscibility tests were performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath. The test cells were constructed to allow for complete visibility of the refrigerant/lubricant mixtures under all test conditions. The tests were performed over a concentration range of 0 to 100% and a temperature range of {minus}40 to 194 F. The miscibility test results for refrigerant mixtures are compared to component refrigerants. In all cases, the refrigerant mixtures appear to have better miscibility than their most immiscible pure component.

  9. Perceptual processing strategy and exposure influence the perception of odor mixtures.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, Elodie; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Béno, Noëlle; Coureaud, Gérard; Etiévant, Patrick; Prescott, John

    2008-02-01

    In flavor perception, both experience with the components of odor/taste mixtures and the cognitive strategy used to examine the interactions between the components influence the overall mixture perception. However, the effect of these factors on odor mixtures perception has never been studied. The present study aimed at evaluating whether 1) previous exposure to the odorants included in a mixture or 2) the synthetic or analytic strategy engaged during odorants mixture evaluation determines odor representation. Blending mixtures, in which subjects perceived a unique quality distinct from those of components, were chosen in order to induce a priori synthetic perception. In the first part, we checked whether the chosen mixtures presented blending properties for our subjects. In the second part, 3 groups of participants were either exposed to the odorants contributing to blending mixtures with a "pineapple" or a "red cordial" odor or nonexposed. In a following task, half of each group was assigned to a synthetic or an analytical task. The synthetic task consisted of rating how typical (i.e., representative) of the target odor name (pineapple or red cordial) were the mixtures and each of their components. The analytical task consisted of evaluating these stimuli on several scales labeled with the target odor name and odor descriptors of the components. Previous exposure to mixture components was found to decrease mixture typicality but only for the pineapple blending mixture. Likewise, subjects engaged in an analytical task rated both blending mixtures as less typical than did subjects engaged in a synthetic task. This study supports a conclusion that odor mixtures can be perceived either analytically or synthetically according to the cognitive strategy engaged. PMID:18071197

  10. Self consistency grouping: a stringent clustering method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous types of clustering like single linkage and K-means have been widely studied and applied to a variety of scientific problems. However, the existing methods are not readily applicable for the problems that demand high stringency. Methods Our method, self consistency grouping, i.e. SCG, yields clusters whose members are closer in rank to each other than to any member outside the cluster. We do not define a distance metric; we use the best known distance metric and presume that it measures the correct distance. SCG does not impose any restriction on the size or the number of the clusters that it finds. The boundaries of clusters are determined by the inconsistencies in the ranks. In addition to the direct implementation that finds the complete structure of the (sub)clusters we implemented two faster versions. The fastest version is guaranteed to find only the clusters that are not subclusters of any other clusters and the other version yields the same output as the direct implementation but does so more efficiently. Results Our tests have demonstrated that SCG yields very few false positives. This was accomplished by introducing errors in the distance measurement. Clustering of protein domain representatives by structural similarity showed that SCG could recover homologous groups with high precision. Conclusions SCG has potential for finding biological relationships under stringent conditions. PMID:23320864

  11. Investigation of Binary Lipid Mixtures of a Three-Chain Cationic Lipid with Phospholipids Suitable for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wölk, Christian; Janich, Christopher; Meister, Annette; Drescher, Simon; Langner, Andreas; Brezesinski, Gerald; Bakowsky, Udo

    2015-12-16

    In the present work, we characterize binary lipid mixtures consisting of a three-chain amino-functionalized cationic lipid (DiTT4) with different phospholipids, namely, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DMPE), or 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). The mixing behavior was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Additionally, aqueous dispersions of the binary mixtures were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), laser Doppler electrophoresis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to get further information about particle size, charge, and shape. The complex formation between different binary lipid mixtures and plasmid DNA (pDNA) was investigated by zeta-(ζ)-potential (laser Doppler electrophoresis) and DLS measurements, and the lipid/DNA complexes (lipoplexes) were screened for efficient DNA transfer (transfection) in cell culture. Finally, efficient lipid compositions were investigated with respect to serum stability. This work provides a detailed characterization of the cationic lipid mixtures as foundation for further research. Efficient gene transfer in the presence of serum was demonstrated for selected lipoplexes showing their capability to be used as high-potency gene delivery vehicles. PMID:26471337

  12. Toxicology of chemical mixtures: a challenging quest along empirical sciences.

    PubMed

    Groten, John P; Heijne, Wilbert H M; Stierum, Rob H; Freidig, Andreas P; Feron, Victor J

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the "quest" of our institute trying to assess the toxicology of chemical mixtures. In this overview, we will discuss some critical developments in hazard identification and risk assessment of chemical mixtures during these past 15 years. We will stand still at empirical and mechanistic modeling. "Empirical" means that only information on doses or concentrations and effects is available in addition to an often empirically selected quantitative dose-response relationship. Empirical models have played a dominant role in the last decade to identify health and safety characteristics of chemical mixtures. Many of these models are based on the work of pioneers in mixture toxicology who defined three basic types of action for combinations of chemicals: simple similar action, simple dissimilar action and interaction. Nowadays, empirical models are mainly based on response-surface analysis and make use of advanced statistical designs. However, possible interactions between components in a mixture can also be given in terms of mechanistic models. In terms of "mechanistic" (or biological) understanding, interactions between compounds may occur in the kinetic phase (processes of uptake, distribution, metabolism and excretion) or in the dynamic phase (effects of chemicals on the receptor, cellular target or organ). A biological phenomenon such as competitive agonism as described for mixtures of drugs (biotransformation enzymes) or sensory irritants (nerve receptors) can accurately predict the effect of any of these mixtures. Thus, far mechanistic and empirical analyses of interactions are usually unrelated. It is one of the future challenges for mixtures research to combine information from both approaches. Also, our current biology-based models have their limitations, since they cannot integrate every relevant biological mechanism. In this respect, mechanistic modeling of mixtures may benefit from the developments coming from the arena of molecular biology

  13. Rabbit Neonates and Human Adults Perceive a Blending 6-Component Odor Mixture in a Comparable Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sinding, Charlotte; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Chambault, Adeline; Béno, Noelle; Dosne, Thibaut; Chabanet, Claire; Schaal, Benoist; Coureaud, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Young and adult mammals are constantly exposed to chemically complex stimuli. The olfactory system allows for a dual processing of relevant information from the environment either as single odorants in mixtures (elemental perception) or as mixtures of odorants as a whole (configural perception). However, it seems that human adults have certain limits in elemental perception of odor mixtures, as suggested by their inability to identify each odorant in mixtures of more than 4 components. Here, we explored some of these limits by evaluating the perception of three 6-odorant mixtures in human adults and newborn rabbits. Using free-sorting tasks in humans, we investigated the configural or elemental perception of these mixtures, or of 5-component sub-mixtures, or of the 6-odorant mixtures with modified odorants' proportion. In rabbit pups, the perception of the same mixtures was evaluated by measuring the orocephalic sucking response to the mixtures or their components after conditioning to one of these stimuli. The results revealed that one mixture, previously shown to carry the specific odor of red cordial in humans, was indeed configurally processed in humans and in rabbits while the two other 6-component mixtures were not. Moreover, in both species, such configural perception was specific not only to the 6 odorants included in the mixture but also to their respective proportion. Interestingly, rabbit neonates also responded to each odorant after conditioning to the red cordial mixture, which demonstrates their ability to perceive elements in addition to configuration in this complex mixture. Taken together, the results provide new insights related to the processing of relatively complex odor mixtures in mammals and the inter-species conservation of certain perceptual mechanisms; the results also revealed some differences in the expression of these capacities between species putatively linked to developmental and ecological constraints. PMID:23341948

  14. A Procedure for Estimating Intrasubject Behavior Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Rubio, Victor J.; Revuelta, Javier; Santacreu, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Trait psychology implicitly assumes consistency of the personal traits. Mischel, however, argued against the idea of a general consistency of human beings. The present article aims to design a statistical procedure based on an adaptation of the pi* statistic to measure the degree of intraindividual consistency independently of the measure used.…

  15. 15 CFR 930.57 - Consistency certifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Consistency for Activities Requiring... consistent with the management program. At the same time, the applicant shall furnish to the State agency...

  16. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations. PMID:25761383

  17. Reentrant network formation in patchy colloidal mixtures under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Treffenstädt, Lucas L.; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    We study a two-dimensional binary mixture of patchy colloids in sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium using Monte Carlo simulation and Wertheim's theory. By tuning the buoyant masses of the colloids we can control the gravity-induced sequence of fluid stacks of differing density and percolation properties. We find complex stacking sequences with up to four layers and reentrant network formation, consistently in simulations and theoretically using only the bulk phase diagram as input. Our theory applies to general patchy colloidal mixtures and is relevant to understanding experiments under gravity.

  18. Inorganic salt mixtures as electrolyte media in fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, Charles Austen (Inventor); Belieres, Jean-Philippe (Inventor); Francis-Gervasio, Dominic (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cell designs and techniques for converting chemical energy into electrical energy uses a fuel cell are disclosed. The designs and techniques include an anode to receive fuel, a cathode to receive oxygen, and an electrolyte chamber in the fuel cell, including an electrolyte medium, where the electrolyte medium includes an inorganic salt mixture in the fuel cell. The salt mixture includes pre-determined quantities of at least two salts chosen from a group consisting of ammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate, ammonium trifluoroacetate, and ammonium nitrate, to conduct charge from the anode to the cathode. The fuel cell includes an electrical circuit operatively coupled to the fuel cell to transport electrons from the cathode.

  19. Intermolecular forces in acetonitrile + ethanol binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, A.; Shanmugam, R.; Arivazhagan, G.; Mahendraprabu, A.; Karthick, N. K.

    2015-10-01

    FTIR spectral measurements have been carried out on the binary mixtures of acetonitrile with ethanol at 1:0 (acetonitrile:ethanol), 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 0:1 at room temperature. DFT and isosurface calculations have been performed. The acetonitrile + ethanol binary mixtures consist of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 complexes formed through both the red and blue shifting H-bonds. Inter as well as intra molecular forces are found to exist in 1:3 and 1:4 complexes.

  20. Detonation cell widths in hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Stamps, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper I report on the influence of steam and carbon dioxide on the detonability of hydrogen-air mixtures. Data were obtained on the detonation cell width in a heated detonation tube that is 0.43 m in diameter and 13.1 m long. The detonation cell widths were correlated using a characteristic length calculated from a chemical kinetic model. The addition of either diluent to a hydrogen-air mixture increased the cell width for all equivalence ratios. For equal diluent concentrations, however, carbon dioxide not only yielded larger increases in the cell width than steam, but its efficacy relative to steam was predicted to increase with increasing concentration. The range of detonable hydrogen concentrations in a hydrogen-air mixture initially at 1 atm pressure was found to be between 11.6 percent and 74.9 percent for mixtures at 20{degree}C and 9.4 percent and 76.9 percent for mixtures at 100{degree}C. The detonation limit was between 38.8 percent and 40.5 percent steam for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixture initially at 100{degree}C and 1 atm. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Modeling phase equilibria in mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride and halocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lencka, M. ); Anderko, A. Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa )

    1993-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on the production of environmentally acceptable refrigerants, which not only offer desirable physico-chemical properties, but do not deplete the ozone layer and do not cause the greenhouse effect. The production of such refrigerants involves the separation of multicomponent mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and various chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons. Therefore, it is indispensable to know the phase behavior of these mixtures. While the phase behavior of refrigerant mixtures can be adequately modeled in the absence of HF using standard thermodynamic techniques, drastically increases the complexity of the mixture because of its unusually strong association. The association of HF manifests itself in its significantly reduced gas-phase compressibility factor and the strong nonideality of mixtures containing HF and hydrocarbons or halocarbons. In this work, the authors develop an accurate, yet simple, association model for HF and compare it with simulation data. The model is combined with a simple equation of state to yield a closed-form expression that is applicable to both pure fluids and mixtures. In addition to representing the pure-component data for HF, the theory accurately predicts phase equilibria in HF + halocarbon systems.

  2. Mutual diffusion in a binary isotopic mixture.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; Tankeshwar, K

    2010-11-17

    The mass dependence of the mutual diffusion coefficient, in a binary equimolar mixture of Lennard-Jones fluids, is studied within Mori's memory function formalism. A phenomenological form of the memory function is used to study the time evolution of the self- and relative velocity correlation functions. The diffusion coefficients are calculated from the relevant velocity correlation functions using the Green-Kubo integral formula. Like the self-diffusion coefficient, the mutual diffusion coefficient is also found to be weakly dependent on the mass ratio. The present study shows that the minimum value that the mutual diffusion coefficient in an equimolar mixture of isotopic fluids can have is √(1/2) times the self-diffusion coefficient of any of the species when in isolation. Further, the contribution of the dynamic/distinct cross correlations to the mutual diffusion coefficient is found to be small and positive for the whole range of the mass ratio which is consistent with earlier molecular dynamics results. PMID:21339621

  3. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, L.

    1999-05-25

    A process is disclosed for preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising. The process involves dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing the alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  4. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, Luc

    1999-01-01

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising: dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures thereof to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing said alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  5. Joint toxic action of binary metal mixtures of copper, manganese and nickel to Paronychiurus kimi (Collembola).

    PubMed

    Son, Jino; Lee, Yun-Sik; Kim, Yongeun; Shin, Key-Il; Hyun, Seunghun; Cho, Kijong

    2016-10-01

    The joint toxic effects of binary metal mixtures of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn) and nickel (Ni) on reproduction of Paronhchiurus kimi (Lee) was evaluated using a toxic unit (TU) approach by judging additivity across a range of effect levels (10-90%). For all metal mixtures, the joint toxic effects of metal mixtures on reproduction of P. kimi decreased in a TU-dependent manner. The joint toxic effects of metal mixtures also changed from less than additive to more than additive at an effect level lower than or equal to 50%, while a more than additive toxic effects were apparent at higher effect levels. These results indicate that the joint toxicity of metal mixtures is substantially different from that of individual metals based on additivity. Moreover, the close relationship of toxicity to effect level suggests that it is necessary to encompass a whole range of effect levels rather than a specific effect level when judging mixture toxicity. In conclusion, the less than additive toxicity at low effect levels suggests that the additivity assumption is sufficiently conservative to warrant predicting joint toxicity of metal mixtures, which may give an additional margin of safety when setting soil quality standards for ecological risk assessment. PMID:27318557

  6. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Greene, M.I.; Gelbein, A.P.

    1984-10-16

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200 to 450 C and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  7. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Marvin I.; Gelbein, Abraham P.

    1984-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200.degree. to 450.degree. C. and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  8. Assessment of the Zn-Co mixtures rhizotoxicity under Ca deficiency: using two conventional mixture models based on the cell membrane surface potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Min; Wang, Peng; Ni, Ling-Fei; Hao, Xiu-Zhen; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Toxicity assessment of Zn-Co mixtures involves multiple ions interactions. The negative potential (ψ0) at the cell membrane surface (CMs) concentrated cationic toxicants (denoted {M(2+)}0) and influenced the rhizotoxicity of Co(2+) or Zn(2+). The single and joint rhizotoxicity of Co(2+) and Zn(2+) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were examined, coupled with different Ca(2+) levels. Joint effects of Zn(2+), Co(2+) and Ca(2+) were estimated by the linearly extended concentration addition (CA) and response addition (RA) models. Incorporation of Ca(2+) in single metal toxicity assessment significantly enhanced the prediction accuracy (r(2) increased from 0.948 to 0.550 for Zn(2+) and from 0.903 to 0.611 for Co(2+), respectively). ψ0 affected the multiple metals toxicity in both conventional mixture models (r(2)=0.814 for CA model and 0.820 for RA model). Concretely, {Zn(2+)}0 alleviated the toxicity of {Co(2+)}0, while {Co(2+)}0 had non-significant effect on {Zn(2+)}0 toxicity. Growth responses to {Ca(2+)}0 were substantially affected by {Zn(2+)}0 and {Co(2+)}0. Ca addition in medium decreased the {M(2+)}0 by reducing the ψ0 negativity, moreover this addition alleviated Ca deficiency at CMs induced by Zn(2+) (or Co(2+)). These consistent results from both extended CA and RA models indicated that ψ0 provided a novel sight for understanding the rhizotoxicity of multiple metals. PMID:25048911

  9. Seeking solutions to chemical mixtures challenges in public health.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, M M; Rosa, C T De; Cibulas, W; Falk, H

    2004-11-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) identifies people near hazardous waste sites who are at potential health risk because of their exposure to environmental chemicals. Nearly, 2000 chemicals have been associated with such sites. Residents of U.S. communities are potentially exposed to hazardous substances through air, soil, drinking water, and food. The agency has determined that more than 73 million people live within a 4-mile radius of waste sites. More than 14 million Americans live within 1 mile of a National Priorities List site, of which 11% are 7 years of age or younger, 12% are 64 years of age or older, 24% are women of childbearing age, and 25% are minorities. The lack of adequate environmental sampling and information on human exposures often restricts ATSDR's evaluation and assessment activities. Assessing human exposure with its attendant health risks and outcomes is complex because many populations have a wide range of reported illnesses, and generally exposures are to mixtures of chemicals. This prompted ATSDR to consider mixtures issues more in depth and to establish a formal mixtures assessment and research program in 1994. In this paper, we present an overview of the agency activities, the genesis, legislative mandates, and pertinence of the mixtures program including applied research and the development of methods for evaluating the impact of multiple-chemical exposure. On the basis of 20-year experience of evaluating and researching environmental chemical mixtures at waste sites, ATSDR convened the International Conference on Chemical Mixtures (ICCM) in 2002. The conference was supported by several federal agencies and scientific organizations and attended by international and national experts. The conference addressed broad topics such as prevalence of exposures to chemical mixtures, importance of interactions at environmentally relevant levels, validity of assuming additivity (dose or response) as default for mixtures

  10. Radiation of nitrogen molecules in a dielectric barrier discharge with small additives of chlorine and bromine

    SciTech Connect

    Avtaeva, S. V.; Avdeev, S. M.; Sosnin, E. A.

    2010-08-15

    Spectral and energy characteristics of nitrogen molecule radiation in dielectric barrier discharges in Ar-N{sub 2}, Ar-N{sub 2}-Cl{sub 2}, and Ar-N{sub 2}-Br{sub 2} mixtures were investigated experimentally. Small additives of molecular chlorine or bromine to an Ar-N{sub 2} mixture are found to increase the radiation intensity of the second positive system of nitrogen. The conditions at which the radiation spectrum predominantly consists of vibronic bands of this system are determined. Using a numerical model of plasmachemical processes, it is shown that, at electron temperatures typical of gas discharges (2-4 eV), a minor additive of molecular chlorine to an Ar-N{sub 2} mixture leads to an increase in the concentrations of electrons, positive ions, and metastable argon atoms. In turn, collisional energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to nitrogen molecules results in the excitation of the N{sub 2}(C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}) state.

  11. Novel ferroelectric liquid crystals consisting glassy liquid crystal as chiral dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang-Ming Philip; Tsai, Yun-Yen; Lin, Chi-Wen; Shieh, Han-Ping David

    2006-08-01

    A series of ferroelectric liquid crystals consisting new glassy liquid crystals (GLCs) as chiral dopants were prepared and evaluated for their potentials in fast switching ability less than 1 ms. The properties of pure ferroelectric glassy liquid crystals (FGLCs) and mixtures were reported in this paper. In particular, the novel FGLC possessing wide chiral smectic C mesophase over 100 °C is able to suppress smectic A phase of host. The mixture containing 2.0 % GLC-1 performs greater alignment ability and higher contrast ratio than R2301 (Clariant, Japan) in a 2 μm pre-made cell (EHC, Japan). These results indicate that novel FLC mixtures consisting glassy liquid crystals present a promising liquid crystal materials for fast switching field sequential color displays.

  12. Flocculation settling characteristics of mud: sand mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Andrew J.; Baugh, John V.; Spearman, Jeremy R.; Whitehouse, Richard J. S.

    2010-04-01

    When natural muds become mixed with sandy sediments in estuaries, it has a direct effect on the flocculation process and resultant sediment transport regime. Much research has been completed on the erosion and consolidation of mud/sand mixtures, but very little is known quantitatively about how mixed sediments interact whilst in suspension, particularly in terms of flocculation. This paper presents the settling velocity findings from a recent laboratory study which examined the flocculation dynamics for three different mud/sand mixtures at different concentrations (0.2-5 g.l-1) and turbulent shear stresses (0.06-0.9 Pa) in a mini-annular flume. The low intrusive video-based Laboratory Spectral Flocculation Characteristics instrument was used to determine floc/aggregate properties (e.g., size, settling velocity, density and mass) for each population. Settling data was assessed in terms of macrofloc (>160 μm) and microfloc (<160 μm) settling parameters: Wsmacro and Wsmicro, respectively. For pure muds, the macroflocs are regarded as the most dominant contributors to the total depositional flux. The parameterised settling data indicates that by adding more sand to a mud/sand mixture, the fall velocity of the macrofloc fraction slows and the settling velocity of microflocs quickens. Generally, a mainly sandy suspension comprising 25% mud and 75% sand (25M:75S), will produce resultant Wsmacro which are slower than Wsmicro. The quickest Wsmicro appears to consistently occur at a higher level of turbulent shear stress (τ ˜ 0.6 Pa) than both the macrofloc and microfloc fractions from suspensions of pure natural muds. Flocculation within a more cohesively dominant muddy-sand suspension (i.e., 75M:25S) produced macroflocs which fell at similar speeds (±10%) to pure mud suspensions at both low (200 mg l-1) and intermediate (1 g l-1) concentrations at all shear stress increments. Also, low sand content suspensions produced Wsmacro values that were faster than the Wsmicro

  13. Toxicity and photoactivation of PAH mixtures in marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.; Ferraro, S.; Lamberson, J.; Cole, F.; Ozretich, R.; Boese, B.; Schults, D.; Behrenfeld, M.; Ankley, G.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity and toxicological photoactivation of mixtures of sediment-associated fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and acenaphthene were determined using standard 10 d sediment toxicity tests with the marine amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius. The four PAHs were spiked into sediment in a concentration series of either single compounds or an equitoxic mixture. Spiked sediment was stored at 4 C for 28 d before testing. Toxicity tests were conducted under fluorescent lighting. Survivors after 10 d in PAH-contaminated sediment were exposed for 1 h to UV light in the absence of sediment and then tested for their ability to bury in clean sediment. The 10 d LC50s for single PAHs were 3.3, 2.2, 2.8, and 2.3 mg/g oc for fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and acenaphthene, respectively. These LC50s were used to calculate the sum of toxic units ({Sigma}TU) of the four PAHs in the equitoxic mixture treatments. The {Sigma}TU LC50 was then calculated for the mixture treatments. If the toxicological interaction of the four PAHs in the mixture was additive, the {Sigma}TU LC50 should equal 1.0. The observed {Sigma}TU LC50 in the mixture was 1.55, indicating the interaction was slightly less than additive. UV enhancement of toxic effects of individual PAHs was correctly predicted by photophysical properties, i.e. pyrene and fluoranthene were photoactivated and phenanthrene and acenaphthene were not. UV effects in the mixture of four PAHs can be explained by the photoactivation of pyrene and fluoranthene alone.

  14. An assessment of the information content of likelihood ratios derived from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Clare D; Rudin, Norah; Inman, Keith; Lohmueller, Kirk E

    2016-05-01

    With the increasing sensitivity of DNA typing methodologies, as well as increasing awareness by law enforcement of the perceived capabilities of DNA typing, complex mixtures consisting of DNA from two or more contributors are increasingly being encountered. However, insufficient research has been conducted to characterize the ability to distinguish a true contributor (TC) from a known non-contributor (KNC) in these complex samples, and under what specific conditions. In order to investigate this question, sets of six 15-locus Caucasian genotype profiles were simulated and used to create mixtures containing 2-5 contributors. Likelihood ratios were computed for various situations, including varying numbers of contributors and unknowns in the evidence profile, as well as comparisons of the evidence profile to TCs and KNCs. This work was intended to illustrate the best-case scenario, in which all alleles from the TC were detected in the simulated evidence samples. Therefore the possibility of drop-out was not modeled in this study. The computer program DNAMIX was then used to compute LRs comparing the evidence profile to TCs and KNCs. This resulted in 140,000 LRs for each of the two scenarios. These complex mixture simulations show that, even when all alleles are detected (i.e. no drop-out), TCs can generate LRs less than 1 across a 15-locus profile. However, this outcome was rare, 7 of 140,000 replicates (0.005%), and associated only with mixtures comprising 5 contributors in which the numerator hypothesis includes one or more unknown contributors. For KNCs, LRs were found to be greater than 1 in a small number of replicates (75 of 140,000 replicates, or 0.05%). These replicates were limited to 4 and 5 person mixtures with 1 or more unknowns in the numerator. Only 5 of these 75 replicates (0.004%) yielded an LR greater than 1,000. Thus, overall, these results imply that the weight of evidence that can be derived from complex mixtures containing up to 5 contributors

  15. Combined toxicity of pesticide mixtures on green algae and photobacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Wang, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Xiang-Wei; Li, Wei-Ying

    2013-09-01

    Different organisms have diverse responses to the same chemicals or mixtures. In this paper, we selected the green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) and photobacteria Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 (V. qinghaiensis) as target organisms and determined the toxicities of six pesticides, including three herbicides (simetryn, bromacil and hexazinone), two fungicides (dodine and metalaxyl) and one insecticide (propoxur), and their mixtures by using the microplate toxicity analysis. The toxicities of three herbicides to C. pyrenoidosa are much higher than those to V. qinghaiensis, and the toxicities of metalaxyl and propoxur to V. qinghaiensis are higher than those to C. pyrenoidosa, while the toxicity of dodine to C. pyrenoidosa is similar to those to V. qinghaiensis. Using the concentration addition as an additive reference model, the binary pesticide mixtures exhibited different toxicity interactions, i.e., displayed antagonism to C. pyrenoidosa but synergism to V. qinghaiensis. However, the toxicities of the multi-component mixtures of more than two components are additive and can be predicted by the concentration addition model. PMID:23816361

  16. Olfactory discrimination of complex mixtures of amino acids by the black bullhead Ameiurus melas.

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Miklavc, P; Kralj, S; Zgonik, V

    2011-07-01

    On the basis of previous findings of behavioural discrimination of amino acids and on the knowledge of electrophysiology of the catfish (genera Ictalurus and Ameiurus) olfactory organs, behavioural experiments that investigated olfactory discrimination of amino acid mixtures were carried out on the black bullhead Ameiurus melas. Repeated presentations of food-rewarded mixtures released increased swimming activity measured by counting the number of turns >90° within 90 s of stimulus addition. Non-rewarded amino acids and their mixtures released little swimming activity, indicating that A. melas discriminated between the conditioned and the non-conditioned stimuli. Two questions of mixture discrimination were addressed: (1) Are A. melas able to detect components within simple and complex amino acid mixtures? (2) What are the smallest differences between two complex mixtures that A. melas can detect? Three and 13 component mixtures tested were composed primarily of equipotent amino acids [determined by equal electroolfactogram (EOG) amplitude] that contained L-Cys at ×100 the equipotent concentration. Ameiurus melas initially perceived the ternary amino acid mixture as its more stimulatory component alone [i.e. cysteine (Cys)], whereas the conditioned 13 component mixture containing the more stimulatory L-Cys was perceived immediately as different from L-Cys alone. The results indicate that components of ternary mixtures are detectable by A. melas but not those of more complex mixtures. To test for the smallest detectable differences in composition between similar multimixtures, all mixture components were equipotent. Initially, A. melas were unable to discriminate the mixtures of six amino acids from the conditioned mixtures of seven amino acids, whereas they discriminated immediately the mixtures of four and five amino acids from the conditioned mixture. Experience with dissimilar mixtures enabled the A. melas to start discriminating the seven

  17. Efficacy of Fungicide Mixtures for Management of Phytophthora infestans (US-1) on Potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicide application strategies (timing, frequency, rates and mixtures) are important for control and resistance management of late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans. The efficacy of systemic/protectant fungicide consisting of fenamidone + mancozeb, and propamocarb–HCL + mancozeb combination...

  18. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Polyimide resins having improved thermo-oxidative stability are provided having aromatic vinyl end-caps. The polyimides are prepared by the reaction of a mixture of monomers comprising (1) a diamine, (2) an ester of tetracarboxylic acid and (3) an aromatic vinyl compound in a molar ratio of 1:2:3 of n: (n + 1):2 when the aromatic vinyl compound contains nitrogen and in a ratio of (n + 1):n:2 when the aromatic vinyl compound does not contain nitrogen, wherein n ranges from about 5 to about 20.

  19. Implications of chemical mixtures in public health practice.

    PubMed

    de Rosa, C T; El-Masri, H A; Pohl, H; Cibulas, W; Mumtaz, M M

    2004-01-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is a federal public health agency that investigates and strives to prevent human health problems produced by exposure to toxic chemicals and their mixtures in the environment. Most human exposures involving toxic chemicals or mixtures are thought to originate from environmental and occupational sources; however, concurrent exposures are also likely from other sources, such as prescription and nonprescription drugs, indoor air pollutants, alcohol, and tobacco smoke. Thus, in evaluating the potential hazard following exposure to environmental mixtures, ATSDR not only considers the inherent joint toxicity of the mixture but also the influence of environmental, demographic, occupational, and lifestyle factors. To foster these goals, ATSDR has pursued a Mixtures Research and Assessment Program that consists of three component efforts: trend analysis, joint toxicity assessment, and experimental testing. Through trend analysis, ATSDR sets priorities for environmental mixtures of concern for which joint toxicity assessments are conducted as needed. If data are not available to conduct appropriate assessments, a research agenda is pursued through established extramural mechanisms. Ultimately, the data generated are used to support ATSDR's work at sites involving exposure to chemical mixtures. This pragmatic approach allows testable hypotheses or research needs to be identified and resolved and enhances our understanding of the mechanisms of joint toxicity. Several collaborative and cooperative efforts with national and international organizations such as the Toxicology and Nutrition Office, the Netherlands, and the Department of Energy are being pursued as part of these activities. ATSDR also develops guidance manuals to consistently and accurately apply current methodologies for the joint toxicity assessment of chemicals. Further, expert panels often are assembled to resolve outstanding scientific issues or

  20. Spinodal decomposition in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto; Shinnar, Reuel; Triantafyllou, George

    1996-03-01

    We study the early stage of the phase separation of a binary mixture far from its critical point of demixing. Whenever the mixture of two mutually repulsive species is quenched to a temperature below its critical point of miscibility, the effect of the enthalpic repulsive force prevails upon the entropic tendency to mix, so that the system eventually separates itno two coexisting phases. We have developed a highly nonlinear model, in close analogy with the linear theory of Cahn and Hilliard, where a generalized free energy is defined in terms of two parameters ψ and a, the first describing the equilibrium composition of the two phases, ad the second denoting a characteristic length scale that is inversely proportional to the equilibrium surface tension. The linear stability analysis predicts that any perturbation of the initial mixture composition with wave number k smaller than √2ψ /a will grow exponentially in time, with a maximum growth corresponding to kmax= √ψ /a. A numerical solution of the equation shows that nonlinear effects saturate the exponential growth, and that the concentraiton distribution tends to a steady state, peroidic profile with wavelength λ=2πa/ √ψ corresponding to the fastest growing mode of the linear regime. The main result of our theoretical model is that this steady state does not depend on the form of the initial perturbation to the homogeneous composition profile.

  1. Currently used pesticides and their mixtures affect the function of sex hormone receptors and aromatase enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldsen, Lisbeth Stigaard; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-10-15

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of pesticides is of health concern, since they are found ubiquitously in the environment and in food items. We investigated in vitro effects on estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivity, and aromatase enzyme activity, of the following pesticides: 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), terbuthylazine, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, mesosulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlormequat chloride, bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole, mancozeb, cypermethrin, tau fluvalinate, malathion and the metabolite ethylene thiourea (ETU). The pesticides were analyzed alone and in selected mixtures. Effects of the pesticides on ER and AR function were assessed in human breast carcinoma MVLN cells and hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells, respectively, using luciferase reporter gene assays. Effects on aromatase enzyme activity were analyzed in human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells, employing the classical [{sup 3}H]{sub 2}O method. Five pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole, prothioconazole, cypermethrin and malathion) weakly induced the ER transactivity, and three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole and mancozeb) antagonized the AR activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Three pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole and prothioconazole) weakly induced the aromatase activity. In addition, two mixtures, consisting of three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin) and five pesticides (terbuthylazine, bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion), respectively, induced the ER transactivity and aromatase activity, and additively antagonized the AR transactivity. In conclusion, our data suggest that currently used pesticides possess endocrine-disrupting potential in vitro which can be mediated via ER, AR and aromatase activities. The observed mixture effects emphasize the importance of considering the combined action of pesticides in order to assure proper estimations of related health effect risks

  2. Sponge Phases and Nanoparticle Dispersions in Aqueous Mixtures of Mono- and Diglycerides.

    PubMed

    Valldeperas, Maria; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata; Ram-On, Maor; Kesselman, Ellina; Danino, Dganit; Nylander, Tommy; Barauskas, Justas

    2016-08-30

    The lipid liquid crystalline sponge phase (L3) has the advantages that it is a nanoscopically bicontinuous bilayer network able to accommodate large amounts of water and it is easy to manipulate due to its fluidity. This paper reports on the detailed characterization of L3 phases with water channels large enough to encapsulate bioactive macromolecules such as proteins. The aqueous phase behavior of a novel lipid mixture system, consisting of diglycerol monooleate (DGMO), and a mixture of mono-, di- and triglycerides (Capmul GMO-50) was studied. In addition, sponge-like nanoparticles (NPs) stabilized by Polysorbate 80 (P80) were prepared based on the DGMO/GMO-50 system, and their structure was correlated with the phase behavior of the corresponding bulk system. These NPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to determine their size, shape, and inner structure as a function of the DGMO/GMO-50 ratio. In addition, the effect of P80 as stabilizer was investigated. We found that the NPs have aqueous pores with diameters up to 13 nm, similar to the ones in the bulk phase. PMID:27482838

  3. Criteria for deviation from predictions by the concentration addition model.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Jun-Ichi; Seki, Masanori; Kamo, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Loewe's additivity (concentration addition) is a well-known model for predicting the toxic effects of chemical mixtures under the additivity assumption of toxicity. However, from the perspective of chemical risk assessment and/or management, it is important to identify chemicals whose toxicities are additive when present concurrently, that is, it should be established whether there are chemical mixtures to which the concentration addition predictive model can be applied. The objective of the present study was to develop criteria for judging test results that deviated from the predictions by the concentration addition chemical mixture model. These criteria were based on the confidence interval of the concentration addition model's prediction and on estimation of errors of the predicted concentration-effect curves by toxicity tests after exposure to single chemicals. A log-logit model with 2 parameters was assumed for the concentration-effect curve of each individual chemical. These parameters were determined by the maximum-likelihood method, and the criteria were defined using the variances and the covariance of the parameters. In addition, the criteria were applied to a toxicity test of a binary mixture of p-n-nonylphenol and p-n-octylphenol using the Japanese killifish, medaka (Oryzias latipes). Consequently, the concentration addition model using confidence interval was capable of predicting the test results at any level, and no reason for rejecting the concentration addition was found. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1806-1814. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26660330

  4. Detonation cell size measurements in H/sub 2/-air-H/sub 2/O mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Shepherd, J.E.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Conclusions of this study are: (1) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures at 20/sup 0/C and a total pressure of 101 kPa, detonations have been achieved between 13.5% and 70% H/sub 2/ mole fraction. This compositional range is wider than the detonability limits previously reported for smaller tubes. (2) The addition of CO/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/-air mixtures greatly reduces the detonability of the mixture. (3) For a given initial temperature, air density and equivalence ratio, the addition of steam to a H/sub 2/-Air mixture greatly decreases the detonability of the mixture. (4) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, detonation of H/sub 2/-air mixtures with up to 30% steam have been recorded. (5) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures, the detonability increases with increasing initial temperature at constant density. Consequently, the diluent effect of the addition of steam to a fixed volume of an H/sub 2/-air mixture in reducing detonability is partially offset if there is a concomitant temperature increase. (6) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, a 13.0% H/sub 2/-air mixture has been detonated. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Student Effort, Consistency, and Online Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patron, Hilde; Lopez, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how student effort, consistency, motivation, and marginal learning, influence student grades in an online course. We use data from eleven Microeconomics courses taught online for a total of 212 students. Our findings show that consistency, or less time variation, is a statistically significant explanatory variable, whereas…

  6. 40 CFR 55.12 - Consistency updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Consistency updates. 55.12 Section 55.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF AIR REGULATIONS § 55.12 Consistency updates. (a) The Administrator will...

  7. 40 CFR 55.12 - Consistency updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Consistency updates. 55.12 Section 55.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF AIR REGULATIONS § 55.12 Consistency updates. (a) The Administrator will update this part as necessary to maintain...

  8. 15 CFR 930.96 - Consistency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Consistency review. 930.96 Section 930... and Local Governments § 930.96 Consistency review. (a)(1) If the State agency does not object to the proposed activity, the Federal agency may grant the federal assistance to the applicant...

  9. 15 CFR 930.96 - Consistency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consistency review. 930.96 Section 930... and Local Governments § 930.96 Consistency review. (a)(1) If the State agency does not object to the proposed activity, the Federal agency may grant the federal assistance to the applicant...

  10. 15 CFR 930.96 - Consistency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Consistency review. 930.96 Section 930... and Local Governments § 930.96 Consistency review. (a)(1) If the State agency does not object to the proposed activity, the Federal agency may grant the federal assistance to the applicant...

  11. 15 CFR 930.96 - Consistency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Consistency review. 930.96 Section 930... and Local Governments § 930.96 Consistency review. (a)(1) If the State agency does not object to the proposed activity, the Federal agency may grant the federal assistance to the applicant...

  12. 15 CFR 930.96 - Consistency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consistency review. 930.96 Section 930.96 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED...

  13. Consistency and Enhancement Processes in Understanding Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stets, Jan E.; Asencio, Emily K.

    2008-01-01

    Many theories in the sociology of emotions assume that emotions emerge from the cognitive consistency principle. Congruence among cognitions produces good feelings whereas incongruence produces bad feelings. A work situation is simulated in which managers give feedback to workers that is consistent or inconsistent with what the workers expect to…

  14. A new hybrid double divisor ratio spectra method for the analysis of ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Rasha M.; Maher, Hadir M.

    2008-10-01

    A new spectrophotometric method was developed for the simultaneous determination of ternary mixtures, without prior separation steps. This method is based on convolution of the double divisor ratio spectra, obtained by dividing the absorption spectrum of the ternary mixture by a standard spectrum of two of the three compounds in the mixture, using combined trigonometric Fourier functions. The magnitude of the Fourier function coefficients, at either maximum or minimum points, is related to the concentration of each drug in the mixture. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is illustrated. The method was applied for the assay of a model mixture consisting of isoniazid (ISN), rifampicin (RIF) and pyrazinamide (PYZ) in synthetic mixtures, commercial tablets and human urine samples. The developed method was compared with the double divisor ratio spectra derivative method (DDRD) and derivative ratio spectra-zero-crossing method (DRSZ). Linearity, validation, accuracy, precision, limits of detection, limits of quantitation, and other aspects of analytical validation are included in the text.

  15. Stochastic inverse consistency in medical image registration.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Sai Kit; Shi, Pengcheng

    2005-01-01

    An essential goal in medical image registration is, the forward and reverse mapping matrices should be inverse to each other, i.e., inverse consistency. Conventional approaches enforce consistency in deterministic fashions, through incorporation of sub-objective cost function to impose source-destination symmetric property during the registration process. Assuming that the initial forward and reverse matching matrices have been computed and used as the inputs to our system, this paper presents a stochastic framework which yields perfect inverse consistency with the simultaneous considerations of the errors underneath the registration matrices and the imperfectness of the consistent constraint. An iterative generalized total least square (GTLS) strategy has been developed such that the inverse consistency is optimally imposed. PMID:16685959

  16. Managing consistency in collaborative design environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Chunyan; Yang, Zhonghua; Goh, Angela; Sun, Chengzheng; Sattar, Abdul

    1999-08-01

    In today's global economy, there is a significant paradigm shift to collaborative engineering design environments. One of key issues in the collaborative setting is the consistency model, which governs how to coordinate the activities of collaborators to ensure that they do not make inconsistent changes or updates to the shared objects. In this paper, we present a new consistency model which requires that all update operations will be executed in the casual order (causality) and all participants have the same view on the operations on the shared objects (view synchrony). A simple multicast-based protocol to implement the consistency model is presented. By employing vector time and token mechanisms, the protocol brings the shared objects from one consistent state to another, thus providing collaborators with a consistent view of the shared objects. A CORBA-based on-going prototyping implementation is outlined. Some of the related work are also discussed.

  17. Detonability of H/sub 2/-air-diluent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Berman, M.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the Heated Detonation Tube (HDT). Detonation cell width and velocity results are presented for H/sub 2/-air mixtures, undiluted and diluted with CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O for a range of H/sub 2/ concentration, initial temperature and pressure. The results show that the addition of either CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O significantly increases the detonation cell width and hence reduces the detonability of the mixture. The results also show that the detonation cell width is reduced (detonability is increased) for increased initial temperature and/or pressure.

  18. Estimating the mass of mutagens in indeterminate mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D.J.; Kerster, H.W.

    1985-10-01

    A method is shown for estimating the quantity (mass) of genotoxic compounds in complex mixtures without prior identification of components. This method uses fractiles of the probability distribution of responses from the assay of interest and dose-response of the mixture. The method depends upon the assumption of additivity, on average, in the interaction of mutagens and on lognormality of the distribution of mutagen molecular weights. Mass estimates are necessary for hazard characterization, risk estimation, and risk assessment. The method is illustrated using Ames assay results from a coke plant wastewater.

  19. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of {sup 41}K induces a significant loss of coherence in {sup 87}Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices.

  20. Charge Transport and Structural Dynamics in Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, Tyler; Holt, Adam; Terheggen, Logan; Griffin, Philip; Benson, Roberto; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in a series of imidazole and carboxylic acid-based deep eutectic mixtures are investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is found that the extended hydrogen-bonded networks characteristic of imidazoles are broken down upon addition of carboxylic acids, resulting in an increase in dc conductivity of the mixtures. These results are discussed within the framework of recent theories of hydrogen bonding and proton transport.

  1. Structure Property Relationships in Imidazole-based Deep Eutectic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terheggen, Logan; Cosby, Tyler; Sangoro, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Deep eutectic mixtures of levulinic acid with a systematic series of imidazoles are measured by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the impact of steric interactions on charge transport and structural dynamics. An enhancement of dc conductivity is found in each of the imidazoles upon the addition of levulinic acid. However, the extent of increase is dependent upon the alkyl substitution on the imidazole ring. These results highlight the importance of molecular structure on hydrogen bonding and charge transport in deep eutectic mixtures.

  2. Mixtures of strongly interacting bosons in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Buonsante, P; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Penna, V; Vezzani, A

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of 41K induces a significant loss of coherence in 87Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices. PMID:18643555

  3. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  4. Uncertainty in Mixtures and Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans and environmental species are rarely exposed to single chemicals. These chemicals typically affect multiple tissues through multiple modes of action, which may depend on the dose. Mixtures risk assessment may employ dose response information from the mixture of interest,...

  5. CLUSTERING CRITERIA AND MULTIVARIATE NORMAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New clustering criteria for use when a mixture of multivariate normal distributions is an appropriate model are presented. They are derived from maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches corresponding to different assumptions about the covariance matrices of the mixture componen...

  6. Augmentation of chain formation in a magnetic fluid by the addition of halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Rucha; Upadhyay, R. V.; Mehta, R. V.

    2014-04-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of the addition of nanotubes of halloysite on the augmentation of chains observed in an aqueous magnetic fluid consisting of co-precipitated magnetite particles stabilized with lauric acid. Three samples of the mixture containing 0.5%, 1% and 2% of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) and a pure magnetic fluid are used for this study. A room temperature magnetization study shows that for 0.5% and 1% of HNT, the magnetization of the mixture significantly increases, while for the higher concentration (2%) it decreases. Such concentration dependent behaviour on the addition of a nonmagnetic system to a magnetic fluid has not previously been observed. The increase in the magnetization is attributed to smaller sized (<5-6 nm) magnetite attached to the HNT, forming a magnetite-HNT composite. Additionally, field-induced chaining is augmented by the addition of HNT in the magnetic fluid. The augmentation of chain formation is confirmed by optical microscopy, field-induced transmission changes and field-dependent diffraction effects. The augmentation will be useful in enhancing other properties of the composite, such as the viscosity and thermal conductivity of nanofluids.

  7. Coarsening in binary solid-liquid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhees, P. W.

    1990-01-01

    A theory of Ostwald ripening has been developed for a solid-liquid mixture cosisting of a low volume fraction array of spherical solid particles in a liquid wherein the coarsening process proceeds via the transport of both heat and mass. It is found that the simultaneous transport of heat and mass during ripening does not alter the exponents of the temporal power laws governing the ripening process from their classical values but does alter the amplitudes of these power laws. The growth rate of the cube of the average particle radius, the rate constant, is found to depend both on the alloy solute concentration and the ratio of the thermal to solutal diffusivities. In most metallic systems, a large decrease in the rate constant can be expected with small additions of solute to a pure metal. Possible extensions of this theory to the analogous problem of ripening in isothermal ternary alloys are also discussed.

  8. Zwanzig model of multi-component mixtures of biaxial particles: y3 theory re-visited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, E. P.; Tumanyan, N. P.; Vlasov, A. Yu.; Masters, A. J.

    The paper considers the thermodynamic and phase ordering properties of a multi-component Zwanzig mixture of hard rectangular biaxial parallelepipeds. An equation of state (EOS) is derived based on an estimate of the number of arrangements of the particles on a three- dimensional cubic lattice. The methodology is a generalization of the Flory-DiMarzio counting scheme, but, unlike previous work, this treatment is thermodynamically consistent. The results are independent of the order in which particles are placed on the lattice. By taking the limit of zero lattice spacing, a translationally continuous variant of the model (the off-lattice variant) is obtained. The EOS is identical to that obtained previously by a wide variety of different approaches. In the off-lattice limit, it corresponds to a third-level y-expansion and, in the case of a binary mixture of square platelets, it also corresponds to the EOS obtained from fundamental measure theory. On the lattice it is identical to the EOS obtained by retaining only complete stars in the virial expansion. The off-lattice theory is used to study binary mixtures of rods (R1 - R2) and binary mixtures of platelets (P1 - P2). The particles were uniaxial, of length (thickness) L and width D. The aspect ratios Γi = Li/Di of the components were kept constant (Γ1R = 15, Γ1P = 1/15 and Γ2R = 150, Γ2P = 1/150), so the second virial coefficient of R1 was identical to P1 and similarly for R2 and P2. The volume ratio of particles 1 and 2, v1/v2, was then varied, with the constraints that viR = viP and ILM0001. Results on nematic-isotropic (N - I) phase coexistence at an infinite dilution of component 2, are qualitatively similar for rods and platelets. At small values of the ratio v1/v2, the addition of component 2 (i.e. a thin rod (e.g. a polymer) or a thin plate) results in the stabilization of the nematic phase. For larger values of v1/v2, however, this effect is reversed and the addition of component 2 destabilizes the

  9. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  10. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  11. Recycled rubber, aggregate, and filler in asphalt paving mixtures. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    ;Contents(Partial): Evaluation Systems for Crumb Rubber Modified Binders and Mixtures; Hot Mix Asphalt Rubber Applications in Virginia; Evaluation of Pyrolized Carbon Black from Scrap Tires as Additive in Hot Mix Asphalt; Use of Scrap Tire Chips in Asphaltic Membrane; Effects of Mineral Fillers on Properties of Stone Matrix Asphalt Mixtures; and Quantitative Analysis of Aggregate Based on Hough Transform.

  12. Toxicity of synthetic naphthenic acids and mixtures of these to fish liver cells.

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Petersen, Karina; Rowland, Steven J

    2012-05-01

    Environmental concerns have been raised over the toxicity of crude naphthenic acids (NA) originating from oil exploration activities offshore, oil sands exploitation onshore, and use of refined NA as wood preservatives, tire additives, and in various other applications. The NA exist in highly complex mixtures, so the toxic effects of the individual acids are rarely known. The present study investigated the relationships between the chemical structures of a range of synthetic alicyclic and aromatic acids and their acute toxicities both as single chemicals and as complex mixtures in a primary culture of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. The combined toxicity of multicomponent mixtures of these NA was assessed using the concept of concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) prediction. All of the acids tested were moderately toxic, with EC(50) values in the range 108-405 μM (24-89 mg L(-1)) and 188-656 μM (43-148 mg L(-1)) when assessed by effects on metabolic inhibition or loss of membrane integrity, respectively. Binary and 6-compound mixture of NA caused combined toxicity according to the concept of additivity, although slight deviations from additivity were observed at a few mixture concentrations. Single NA and mixtures of NA with similar structures to those tested herein probably contribute to the toxicity of complex natural mixtures of NA. Toxicity tests on three commercial NA mixtures showed that these exhibited highly variable toxicities themselves probably reflecting their chemical heterogeneity. PMID:22462822

  13. RIM: A Random Item Mixture Model to Detect Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederickx, Sofie; Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul; Magis, David

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology for detecting differential item functioning (DIF). We introduce a DIF model, called the random item mixture (RIM), that is based on a Rasch model with random item difficulties (besides the common random person abilities). In addition, a mixture model is assumed for the item difficulties such that the…

  14. TOXICITY OF COMPLEX WASTE MIXTURES: A COMPARISON OF OBSERVED AND PREDICTED LETHALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to predict the biological effect of complex waste mixtures from chemical characterization data was examined by comparing observed mortality to that predicted by a mathematical additivity model with literature LD50 values for the chemicals identified in the mixtures. a...

  15. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  16. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-12-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  17. Efficacy of pesticide mixtures against the western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) under laboratory and greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Amy L; Cloyd, Raymond A; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2013-02-01

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande is a commonly encountered and economically important insect pest of greenhouses. Greenhouse producers typically apply pesticides as mixtures to mitigate western flower thrips populations; however, there is limited information available on the compatibility and efficacy of commonly used pesticide mixtures. This study assessed nine binary and three tertiary pesticide mixtures used in greenhouses which included pesticides containing abamectin, acephate, azadirachtin, bifenazate, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, imidacloprid, novaluron, pymetrozine, and spinosad. Compatibility was determined for the binary pesticide mixtures using jar tests. In addition, the binary mixtures were applied to nine horticultural plant species to determine phytotoxicity based on visual appearance assessed 7 d after treatment. Bean-dip bioassays were performed in a laboratory using green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to determine LC50 values for each individual pesticide and the mixtures to establish whether the mixtures were synergistic, antagonistic, or there was no effect. The mortality of western flower thrips was assessed after 24 h, and LC50 values were calculated. Furthermore, semifield bioassays were performed in greenhouses for binary and tertiary mixtures to evaluate the efficacy (based on percent mortality) of the pesticide mixtures against western flower thrips. Results indicated that all binary mixtures were visibly compatible, and not phytotoxic to any of the plant species evaluated. Combination index calculations based on laboratory results indicated most of the binary mixtures were synergistic; however, the mixture containing spinosad + bifenazate appeared to be antagonistic against western flower thrips. The semifield bioassays demonstrated significantly reduced efficacy associated with mixtures containing azadirachtin, however, all binary mixtures provided approximately 80% western flower thrips mortality. PMID:23448038

  18. Personality Consistency in Dogs: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fratkin, Jamie L.; Sinn, David L.; Patall, Erika A.; Gosling, Samuel D.

    2013-01-01

    Personality, or consistent individual differences in behavior, is well established in studies of dogs. Such consistency implies predictability of behavior, but some recent research suggests that predictability cannot be assumed. In addition, anecdotally, many dog experts believe that ‘puppy tests’ measuring behavior during the first year of a dog's life are not accurate indicators of subsequent adult behavior. Personality consistency in dogs is an important aspect of human-dog relationships (e.g., when selecting dogs suitable for substance-detection work or placement in a family). Here we perform the first comprehensive meta-analysis of studies reporting estimates of temporal consistency of dog personality. A thorough literature search identified 31 studies suitable for inclusion in our meta-analysis. Overall, we found evidence to suggest substantial consistency (r = 0.43). Furthermore, personality consistency was higher in older dogs, when behavioral assessment intervals were shorter, and when the measurement tool was exactly the same in both assessments. In puppies, aggression and submissiveness were the most consistent dimensions, while responsiveness to training, fearfulness, and sociability were the least consistent dimensions. In adult dogs, there were no dimension-based differences in consistency. There was no difference in personality consistency in dogs tested first as puppies and later as adults (e.g., ‘puppy tests’) versus dogs tested first as puppies and later again as puppies. Finally, there were no differences in consistency between working versus non-working dogs, between behavioral codings versus behavioral ratings, and between aggregate versus single measures. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed. PMID:23372787

  19. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a...

  4. Effects of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures on rheology of gum tragacanth - possible application for surfactant action on mucus gel simulants.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of specialised biomaterials consisting of clove oil- phospholipid mixtures as possible substitute surfactants in diseases of altered mucus viscosity by studying their effect on the viscosity of mucus gel simulants in vitro. Test surfactants consisting of phospholipid-clove oil mixtures in the ratio of 1 part of oil to 9 parts of phospholipid were prepared. The phospholipids used were dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and binary mixtures of PC: PE and PC: PG in the ratio of 2 parts of PC to 3 parts of PE or PG. The effects of the phospholipid-clove oil mixtures on the viscosity of mucus gel simulant (MGS: a polymeric gel consisting predominantly of gum tragacanth and simulating respiratory mucus), was studied by application of steady shear rates ranging from 0.512 to 51.2/s in a concentric cylinder viscometer at 37 degrees C. The change in MGS viscosity, after incubation with surfactants, was found to have a non-Newtonian character and to follow the power law model with R2 values >0.8. The addition of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity when compared with the effect of the phospholipid alone at low shear rates in case of PC, PG and PCPG. The combination of PC : PG with clove oil caused ratios of change in MGS viscosity < 1 i.e., caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity. PC: PG with clove oil was capable of lowering MGS viscosity and should be further researched as possible therapies for diseases of altered mucus rheology. PMID:11202146

  5. Study of the consistency of climatological products of Nimbus-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans L.

    1988-01-01

    The study, in addition to investigating the consistency of climatological products from Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget and Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer experiments, focussed on the climatological analysis of the specified regions of the Earth. The climatological study consisted of the effects of various types of clouds on the net radiation, albedos, and emitted radiation. In addition to a correlational study for determining consistency level of data, a population study of the regions was formulated and conducted. The regions under this study were formed by clustering the target areas using the criteria of climatological conditions such as geography, ocean, and land. Research is limited to tropics from 18 deg north to 18 deg south. A correlational study indicates that there is high positive correlation between high clouds and albedo, and a reduced negative correlation between albedo and net radiation.

  6. Inferential determination of various properties of a gas mixture

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2007-03-27

    Methods for inferentially determining various properties of a gas mixture, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. The method can be applied to natural gas mixtures, where the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for heating value calculations. The method may also be applied to inferentially determine density and molecular weight for gas mixtures other than natural gases.

  7. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  8. Modelling defined mixtures of environmental oestrogens found in domestic animal and sewage treatment effluents using an in vitro oestrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Gray, L Earl; Wilson, Vickie S

    2012-06-01

    There is growing concern of exposure of fish, wildlife and humans to water sources contaminated with oestrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental oestrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipal waste, agricultural and industrial effluents. US EPA's drinking water contaminant candidate list 3 (CCL3) includes several oestrogenic compounds. Although these contaminants are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, they are known or anticipated to occur in public water systems and may require future regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Using an in vitro transcriptional activation assay, this study evaluated oestrogens from CCL3 both individually and as a seven oestrogen mixture (fixed ray design) over a broad range of concentrations, including environmentally relevant concentrations. Log EC(50) and Hillslope values for individual oestrogens were as follows: estrone, -11.92, 1.283; estradiol-17α, -9.61, 1.486; estradiol-17β, 11.77, 1.494; estriol, -11.14, 1.074; ethinyl estradiol-17α, -12.63, 1.562; Mestranol, -11.08, 0.809 and Equilin, -11.48, 0.946. In addition, mixtures that mirrored the primary oestrogens found in swine, poultry and dairy CAFO effluent (fixed-ratio ray design), and a ternary mixture (4 × 4 × 4 factorial design) of oestrogens found in hormone replacement therapy and/or oral contraceptives were tested. Mixtures were evaluated for additivity using both the concentration addition (CA) model and oestrogen equivalence (EEQ) model. For each of the mixture studies, a broad range of concentrations were tested, both above and below environmentally relevant concentrations. Results show that the observed data did not vary consistently from either the CA or EEQ predictions for any mixture. Therefore, either the CA or EEQ model should be useful predictors for modelling oestrogen mixtures. PMID:22612477

  9. Effect of Interstitial Media on Segregation in Vertically Vibrated Granular Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Xian; Li, Liang-Sheng; Wen, Ping-Ping; Shi, Qing-Fan; Zheng, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Vertically vibrated segregation behaviors of binary granular mixtures with different interstitial media are experimentally investigated. To study the role of interstitial media on the segregation, two types of interstitial fluids are adopted and the resulting phase diagrams are compared. The water-immersed granular mixture exhibits two kinds of complete segregation behaviors: Brazil nut effect and sandwich patterns, at least the latter is absent in the same air-immersed mixture. Additionally, the segregation extent is improved remarkably for the water-immersed mixture. The experimental observation further confirms that the effect of interstitial media on the relative motion of grains is one of the predominant mechanisms for granular segregation.

  10. On the initial state and consistency relations

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q-vector → 0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  11. Ensuring the Consistency of Silicide Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramani, V.; Lampson, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    Diagram specifies optimum fusing time for given thicknesses of refractory metal-silicide coatings on columbium C-103 substrates. Adherence to indicated fusion times ensures consistent coatings and avoids underdiffusion and overdiffusion. Accuracy of diagram has been confirmed by tests.

  12. Consistent stabilizability of switched Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Wang, Yuzhen

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the consistent stabilizability of switched Boolean networks (SBNs) by using the semi-tensor product method, and presents a number of new results. First, an algebraic expression of SBNs is obtained by the semi-tensor product, based on which the consistent stabilizability is then studied for SBNs and some necessary and sufficient conditions are presented for the design of free-form and state-feedback switching signals, respectively. Finally, the consistent stabilizability of SBNs with state constraints is considered and some necessary and sufficient conditions are proposed. The study of illustrative examples shows that the new results obtained in this paper are very effective in designing switching signals for the consistent stabilizability of SBNs. PMID:23787170

  13. New additive retards coke formation in ethylene furnace tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-09

    Adding relatively small amounts of a new additive to the feed stream of a steam cracker can inhibit coke formation on the metal surfaces of processing equipment and increase furnace run time. The additive comprises a variable mixture of four to six inorganic salts in aqueous solution. The components of the additive mixture can be varied, as needed, for processing heavy feed materials such as heavy naphtha and gas oil. The process was first tested at a Korean petrochemical plant and is now operating successfully at a commercial facility in Russia. The results of the Korean trial are presented here.

  14. Consistency relations for non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Wang, Yi

    2008-09-01

    We investigate consistency relations for non-Gaussianity. We provide a model-independent dynamical proof for the consistency relation for three-point correlation functions from the Hamiltonian and field redefinition. This relation can be applied to single-field inflation, multi-field inflation and the curvaton scenario. This relation can also be generalized to n-point correlation functions up to arbitrary order in perturbation theory and with arbitrary number of loops.

  15. Thermodynamic consistency near the liquid-liquid critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-Sánchez, Germán; Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Troncoso, Jacobo; Romaní, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamic consistency of the isobaric heat capacity per unit volume at constant composition Cp,x and the density ρ near the liquid-liquid critical point is studied in detail. To this end, Cp,x(T), ρ(T ), and the slope of the critical line (dT /dp)c for five binary mixtures composed by 1-nitropropane and an alkane were analyzed. Both Cp,x(T) and ρ(T ) data were measured along various quasicritical isopleths with a view to evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in the critical composition value on the corresponding critical amplitudes. By adopting the traditionally employed strategies for data treatment, consistency within 0.01 K MPa-1 (or 8%) is attained, thereby largely improving the majority of previous results. From temperature range shrinking fits and fits in which higher-order terms in the theoretical expressions for Cp,x(T) and ρ(T ) are included, we conclude that discrepancies come mainly from inherent difficulties in determining the critical anomaly of ρ accurately: specifically, to get full consistency, higher-order terms in ρ(T ) are needed; however, the various contributions at play cannot be separated unambiguously. As a consequence, the use of Cp,x(T) and (dT /dp)c for predicting the behavior of ρ(T ) at near criticality appears to be the best choice at the actual experimental resolution levels. Furthermore, the reasonably good thermodynamic consistency being encountered confirms that previous arguments appealing to the inadequacy of the theoretical expression relating Cp,x and ρ for describing data in the experimentally accessible region must be fairly rejected.

  16. Mixture Models for Dependent Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric mixture models appropriate for data presented in homogeneous blocks of varying sizes from several unidentified source populations are considered. For most applications, the data elements within each block are dependent. Models are proposed for multivariate normal data incorporating two types of dependence, exchangeability of elements within blocks, and a Markov structure for blocks. The consequences of assuming exchangeability, when in fact the Markov structure holds, are explored. Computational problems for each model are considered, and results of a simple test of the exchangeability hypothesis for LANDSAT data are presented.

  17. Combustion of coal/water mixtures with thermal preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, M.; Roffe, G.; Miller, G.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal preconditioning is a process in which coal/water mixtures are vaporized to produce coal/steam suspensions, and then superheated to allow the coal to devolitalize producing suspensions of char particles in hydrocarbon gases and steam. This final product of the process can be injected without atomization, and burned directly in a gas turbine combustor. This paper reports on the results of an experimental program in which thermally preconditioned coal/water mixture was successfully burned with a stable flame in a gas turbine combustor test rig. Tests were performed at a mixture flowrate of 300 1b/hr and combustor pressure of 8 atmospheres. The coal/water mixture was thermally preconditioned and injected into the combustor over a temperature range from 350/sup 0/F to 600/sup 0/F, and combustion air was supplied at between 600/sup 0/F to 725/sup 0/F. Test durations varied between 10 to 20 minutes. The original mean coal particle size for these tests, prior to preconditioning was 25 microns. Results of additional tests showed that one-third of the sulfur contained in the solids of a coal/water mixture with 3 percent sulfur were evolved in gaseous form (under mild thermolized conditions) mainly as H/sub 2/S with the remainder as light mercaptans.

  18. Feasibility of separations for distillation of nonideal ternary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fidkowski, Z.T.; Doherty, M.F.; Malone, M.F. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The product compositions in single-feed distillation columns can be specified only in certain regions of the composition space, which depend only on the pressure, feed, and vapor-liquid equilibrium for the mixture. In nonideal mixtures, even without azeotropes, the regions may allow unusual product distributions. For example, the distillate in a direct split is composed primarily of the lightest component. Intuition and experience with relatively ideal mixtures suggest that the next most plentiful component is the intermediate boiler. In nonideal mixtures, however, with or without azeotropes, the next most plentiful component may be the highest-boiling species with only trace amounts of the intermediate boiler. For azeotropic mixtures, distillation boundaries may give rise to additional restrictions on the product compositions. The authors describe how simple distillation boundaries deform into continuous distillation boundaries and, in a limited number of cases, how the simple distillation boundaries can be crossed in continuous columns for certain ranges of the design variables. Unfortunately, such designs may be quite sensitive to model uncertainties or to disturbances in the parameters.

  19. Secondary organic aerosol from biogenic volatile organic compound mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, Meagan L.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

    2011-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the ozonolysis of a Siberian fir needle oil (SFNO), a Canadian fir needle oil (CFNO), and several SOA precursor mixtures containing reactive and non-reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated. The use of precursor mixtures more completely describes the atmosphere where many VOCs exist. The addition of non-reactive VOCs such as bornyl acetate, camphene, and borneol had very little to no effect on SOA yields. The oxidation of VOC mixtures with VOC mass percentages similar to the SFNO produced SOA yields that became more similar to the SOA yield from SFNO as the complexity and concentration of VOCs within the mixture became more similar to overall SFNO composition. The SOA yield produced by the oxidation of CFNO was within the error of the SOA yield produced by the oxidation of SFNO at a similar VOC concentration. The SOA yields from SFNO were modeled using the volatility basis set (VBS), which predicts the SOA yields for a given mass concentration of mixtures containing similar VOCs.

  20. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  1. Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, D.F.

    1992-07-10

    This report presents completed sealed tube stability test results for the following eight refrigerant/lubricant mixtures: R-22/mineral oil; R-124/alkylbenzene; R-134a/pentaerythritol (PE) ester (mixed acid); R- 134a/PE (branched acid); R-134a/ PE (100 cSt viscosity); R- 142b/alkylbenzene; R-143a/ PE (branched acid); R-152a/alkylbenzene. Partial results are shown for an additional eight refrigerant-lubricant mixtures. Though work is in progress, no data are available at this point in time for the five remaining test mixtures. Reported are: visual observations on aged sealed tubes, gas chromatographic analyses on the vapor phase contents of the tubes, chloride ion contents of HCFC containing mixtures or fluoride ion contents of HFC mixtures, and total acid number values and infrared analysis results for mixtures containing ester lubricants.

  2. Formation of hydrotalcite in mixtures of aluminum hydroxycarbonate and magnesium hydroxide gels.

    PubMed

    Vanderlaan, R K; White, J L; Hem, S L

    1982-07-01

    IR and X-ray analysis demonstrate that hydrotalcite forms during the aging of aluminum hydroxycarbonate gel and magnesium hydroxide gel mixtures. The formation of hydrotalcite produces a change in the pH-stat titrigram and a sharp increase in the pH of the mixture. Hydrotalcite was noted earlier in mixtures having a high molar ratio of magnesium to aluminum, a high total gel concentration, a high initial pH, or in mixtures stored at elevated temperatures. The addition of sorbitol to the mixtures substantially delayed the appearance of hydrotalcite. Nonacid-reactive hydrotalcite formed when mixtures of chloride-containing aluminum hydroxide gel and magnesium hydroxide gel were aged. PMID:7120062

  3. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  4. Marketplace Analysis of Conjugated Estrogens: Determining the Consistently Present Steroidal Content with LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michaella J; Boyne, Michael T; Rogstad, Sarah; Skanchy, David J; Jiang, Xiaohui; Geerlof-Vidavsky, Ilan

    2015-11-01

    Conjugated estrogens purified from pregnant mares urine has been used as estrogen hormone replacement therapy since 1942. Previously, methods were proposed to identify and quantify the components of this complex mixture but ultimately were withdrawn due to incomplete characterization of the product and difficulties in transferring the method between laboratories. The aim of the current study is to develop a LC method that can reliably detect multiple steroidal components in conjugated estrogen tablets and measure their relative amount. The method developed was optimized for UHPLC columns, and the elution profile was analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. A total of 60 steroidal components were identified using their exact m/z, product ion spectra of known, and predicted conjugated estrogen structures. These components were consistently present in 23 lots of Premarin tablets spanning two production years. The ten conjugated estrogens identified in the USP monograph and other additional estrogens reported elsewhere are among the 60 steroidal components reported here. The LC-MS method was tested in different laboratories using multiple samples, and the obtained results were reproducible among laboratories. PMID:26242210

  5. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs. PMID:26146475

  6. Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary

  7. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  8. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  9. Extraction of betulin, trimyristin, eugenol and carnosic acid using water-organic solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lugemwa, Fulgentius N

    2012-01-01

    A solvent system consisting of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water, in the volume ratio of 4.5:4.5:1, was developed and used to extract, at room temperature, betulin from white birch bark and antioxidants from spices (rosemary, thyme, sage, and oregano) and white oak chips. In addition, under reflux conditions, trimyristin was extracted from nutmeg using the same solvent system, and eugenol from olives was extracted using a mixture of salt water and ethyl acetate. The protocol demonstrates the use of water in organic solvents to extract natural products from plants. Measurement of the free-radical scavenging activity using by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) indicated that the extraction of plant material using ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water (4.5:4.5:1, v/v/v) was exhaustive when carried out at room temperature for 96 h. PMID:22864237

  10. Integrating perspectives on vocal performance and consistency

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Jon T.; Vehrencamp, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent experiments in divergent fields of birdsong have revealed that vocal performance is important for reproductive success and under active control by distinct neural circuits. Vocal consistency, the degree to which the spectral properties (e.g. dominant or fundamental frequency) of song elements are produced consistently from rendition to rendition, has been highlighted as a biologically important aspect of vocal performance. Here, we synthesize functional, developmental and mechanistic (neurophysiological) perspectives to generate an integrated understanding of this facet of vocal performance. Behavioral studies in the field and laboratory have found that vocal consistency is affected by social context, season and development, and, moreover, positively correlated with reproductive success. Mechanistic investigations have revealed a contribution of forebrain and basal ganglia circuits and sex steroid hormones to the control of vocal consistency. Across behavioral, developmental and mechanistic studies, a convergent theme regarding the importance of vocal practice in juvenile and adult songbirds emerges, providing a basis for linking these levels of analysis. By understanding vocal consistency at these levels, we gain an appreciation for the various dimensions of song control and plasticity and argue that genes regulating the function of basal ganglia circuits and sex steroid hormones could be sculpted by sexual selection. PMID:22189763

  11. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  12. Improvement of attenuation functions of a clayey sandstone for landfill leachate containment by bentonite addition.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Ana I; Fernández, Raúl; Sánchez Jiménez, Nicanor; Rodríguez Rastrero, Manuel; Regadío, Mercedes; de Soto, Isabel S; Cuevas, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Enhanced sand-clay mixtures have been prepared by using a sandstone arkosic material and have been evaluated for consideration as landfill liners. A lab-scale test was carried out under controlled conditions with different amended natural sandstones whereby leachate was passed through the compacted mixtures. The compacted samples consisted of siliceous sand (quartz-feldspar sand separated from the arkose sandstone) and clay (purified clay from arkose sandstone and two commercial bentonites) materials that were mixed in different proportions. The separation of mineral materials from a common and abundant natural source, for soil protection purposes, is proposed as an economic and environmentally efficient practice. The liner qualities were compared for their mineralogical, physicochemical and major ions transport and adsorption properties. Although all samples fulfilled hydraulic conductivity requirements, the addition of bentonite to arkose sandstone was determined to be an effective strategy to decrease the permeability of the soil and to improve the pollutants retention. The clay materials from arkose sandstone also contributed to pollutant retention by a significant improvement of the cation exchange capacity of the bulk material. However, the mixtures prepared with clay materials from the arkose, exhibited a slight increase of hydraulic conductivity. This effect has to be further evaluated. PMID:22285080

  13. Personalized recommendation based on unbiased consistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Tian, Hui; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Zheng; Zhou, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Recently, in physical dynamics, mass-diffusion-based recommendation algorithms on bipartite network provide an efficient solution by automatically pushing possible relevant items to users according to their past preferences. However, traditional mass-diffusion-based algorithms just focus on unidirectional mass diffusion from objects having been collected to those which should be recommended, resulting in a biased causal similarity estimation and not-so-good performance. In this letter, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus bidirectional mass diffusion abilities, no matter originated from objects having been collected or from those which should be recommended, should be consistently powerful, showing unbiased consistence. We further propose a consistence-based mass diffusion algorithm via bidirectional diffusion against biased causality, outperforming the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in disparate real data sets, including Netflix, MovieLens, Amazon and Rate Your Music.

  14. Consistency and derangements in brane tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Jejjala, Vishnu; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2016-09-01

    Brane tilings describe Lagrangians (vector multiplets, chiral multiplets, and the superpotential) of four-dimensional { N }=1 supersymmetric gauge theories. These theories, written in terms of a bipartite graph on a torus, correspond to worldvolume theories on N D3-branes probing a toric Calabi–Yau threefold singularity. A pair of permutations compactly encapsulates the data necessary to specify a brane tiling. We show that geometric consistency for brane tilings, which ensures that the corresponding quantum field theories are well behaved, imposes constraints on the pair of permutations, restricting certain products constructed from the pair to have no one-cycles. Permutations without one-cycles are known as derangements. We illustrate this formulation of consistency with known brane tilings. Counting formulas for consistent brane tilings with an arbitrary number of chiral bifundamental fields are written down in terms of delta functions over symmetric groups.

  15. Quantifying the Consistency of Scientific Databases

    PubMed Central

    Šubelj, Lovro; Bajec, Marko; Mileva Boshkoska, Biljana; Kastrin, Andrej; Levnajić, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Science is a social process with far-reaching impact on our modern society. In recent years, for the first time we are able to scientifically study the science itself. This is enabled by massive amounts of data on scientific publications that is increasingly becoming available. The data is contained in several databases such as Web of Science or PubMed, maintained by various public and private entities. Unfortunately, these databases are not always consistent, which considerably hinders this study. Relying on the powerful framework of complex networks, we conduct a systematic analysis of the consistency among six major scientific databases. We found that identifying a single "best" database is far from easy. Nevertheless, our results indicate appreciable differences in mutual consistency of different databases, which we interpret as recipes for future bibliometric studies. PMID:25984946

  16. CO2-based mixtures as working fluids for geothermal turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Ames, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for application to a variety of heat sources, including geothermal, solar, fossil, and nuclear power. This work is centered on the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) power conversion cycle, which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources and is very compact-a feature likely to reduce capital costs. One promising approach is the use of CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid mixtures. The introduction of additives to CO{sub 2} alters the equation of state and the critical point of the resultant mixture. A series of tests was carried out using Sandia's supercritical fluid compression loop that confirmed the ability of different additives to increase or lower the critical point of CO{sub 2}. Testing also demonstrated that, above the modified critical point, these mixtures can be compressed in a turbocompressor as a single-phase homogenous mixture. Comparisons of experimental data to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Standard Reference Database predictions varied depending on the fluid. Although the pressure, density, and temperature (p, {rho}, T) data for all tested fluids matched fairly well to REFPROP in most regions, the critical temperature was often inaccurate. In these cases, outside literature was found to provide further insight and to qualitatively confirm the validity of experimental findings for the present investigation.

  17. Consistent integration of geo-information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. M.; Cordua, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Probabilistically formulated inverse problems can be seen as an application of data integration. Two types of information are (almost) always available: 1) geophysical data, and 2) information about geology and geologically plausible structures. The inverse problem consists of integrating the information available from geophysical data and geological information. In recent years inversion algorithms have emerged that allow integration of such different information. However such methods only provides useful results if the geological and geophysical information provided are consistent. Using weakly informed prior models and/or sparse uncertain geophysical data typically no problems with consistency arise. However, as data coverage and quality increase and still more complex and detailed prior information can be quantified (using e.g multiple point based statistics) then the risk of problems with consistency increases. Inconsistency between two independent sources of information about the same subsurface model, means that either one or both sources of information must be wrong.We will demonstrate that using cross hole GPR tomographic data, that such consistency problems exist, and that they can dramatically affect inversion results. The problem is two folded: 1) One will typically underestimate the error associated with geophysical data, and 2) Multiple-point based prior models often provide such detailed a priori information that it will not be possible to find a priori acceptable models that lead to a data fit within measurement uncertainties. We demonstrate that if inversion is forced on inconsistent information, then the solution to the inverse problem may be earth models that neither fit the data within their uncertainty, nor represent realistic geologically features. In the worst case such models will show artefacts that appear well resolved, and that can have severe effect on subsequent flow modeling. We will demonstrate how such inconsistencies can be

  18. Anticholinergic substances: A single consistent conformation

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Peter; Datta, Narayandas

    1980-01-01

    An interactive computer-graphics analysis of 24 antagonists of acetylcholine at peripheral autonomic post-ganglionic (muscarinic) nervous junctions and at similar junctions in the central nervous system, the crystal structures of which are known, has led to the determination of a single, consistent, energetically favorable conformation for all 24 substances, although their observed crystal structure conformations vary widely. The absolute configuration and the single, consistent (ideal) conformation of the chemical groups required for maximum anticholinergic activity are described quantitatively. Images PMID:16592775

  19. Consistent Data Distribution Over Optical Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optics combined with IDE's provide consistent data communication between fault-tolerant computers. Data-transmission-checking system designed to provide consistent and reliable data communications for fault-tolerant and highly reliable computers. New technique performs variant of algorithm for fault-tolerant computers and uses fiber optics and independent decision elements (IDE's) to require fewer processors and fewer transmissions of messages. Enables fault-tolerant computers operating at different levels of redundancy to communicate with each other over triply redundant bus. Level of redundancy limited only by maximum number of wavelengths active on bus.

  20. Accuracy and consistency of modern elastomeric pumps.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Robyn S; Missair, Andres; Pham, Phung; Gutierrez, Juan F; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blockade has become a popular method of achieving postoperative analgesia for many surgical procedures. The safety and reliability of infusion pumps are dependent on their flow rate accuracy and consistency. Knowledge of pump rate profiles can help physicians determine which infusion pump is best suited for their clinical applications and specific patient population. Several studies have investigated the accuracy of portable infusion pumps. Using methodology similar to that used by Ilfeld et al, we investigated the accuracy and consistency of several current elastomeric pumps. PMID:25140510

  1. Dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Joanna; Tchoń, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    By analogy to the definition of the dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for robotic manipulators, we have designed a dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators built of a non-holonomic mobile platform and a holonomic on-board manipulator. The endogenous configuration space approach has been exploited as a source of conceptual guidelines. The new inverse guarantees a decoupling of the motion in the operational space from the forces exerted in the endogenous configuration space and annihilated by the dual Jacobian inverse. A performance study of the new Jacobian inverse as a tool for motion planning is presented.

  2. Dualising consistent IIA/IIB truncations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Emanuel; Samtleben, Henning

    2015-12-01

    We use exceptional field theory to establish a duality between certain consistent 7-dimensional truncations with maximal SUSY from IIA to IIB. We use this technique to obtain new consistent truncations of IIB on S 3 and H p,q and work out the explicit reduction formulas in the internal sector. We also present uplifts for other gaugings of 7-d maximal SUGRA, including theories with a trombone gauging. Some of the latter can only be obtained by a non-geometric compactification.

  3. Medicines, shaken and stirred: a critical review on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Backhaus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Analytical monitoring surveys routinely confirm that organisms in the environment are exposed to complex multi-component pharmaceutical mixtures. We are hence tasked with the challenge to take this into consideration when investigating the ecotoxicology of pharmaceuticals. This review first provides a brief overview of the fundamental approaches for mixture toxicity assessment, which is then followed by a critical review on the empirical evidence that is currently at hand on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures. It is concluded that, while the classical concepts of concentration addition and independent action (response addition) provide a robust scientific footing, several knowledge gaps remain. This includes, in particular, the need for more and better empirical data on the effects of pharmaceutical mixtures on soil organisms as well as marine flora and fauna, and exploring the quantitative consequences of toxicokinetic, toxicodynamic and ecological interactions. Increased focus should be put on investigating the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures in environmentally realistic settings. PMID:25405972

  4. An assessment of air quality reflecting the chemosensory irritation impact of mixtures of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Michael H; Gola, Joelle M R; Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We present a method to assess the air quality of an environment based on the chemosensory irritation impact of mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in such environment. We begin by approximating the sigmoid function that characterizes psychometric plots of probability of irritation detection (Q) versus VOC vapor concentration to a linear function. First, we apply an established equation that correlates and predicts human sensory irritation thresholds (SIT) (i.e., nasal and eye irritation) based on the transfer of the VOC from the gas phase to biophases, e.g., nasal mucus and tear film. Second, we expand the equation to include other biological data (e.g., odor detection thresholds) and to include further VOCs that act mainly by "specific" effects rather than by transfer (i.e., "physical") effects as defined in the article. Then we show that, for 72 VOCs in common, Q values based on our calculated SITs are consistent with the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) listed for those same VOCs on the basis of sensory irritation by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Third, we set two equations to calculate the probability (Qmix) that a given air sample containing a number of VOCs could elicit chemosensory irritation: one equation based on response addition (Qmix scale: 0.00 to 1.00) and the other based on dose addition (1000*Qmix scale: 0 to 2000). We further validate the applicability of our air quality assessment method by showing that both Qmix scales provide values consistent with the expected sensory irritation burden from VOC mixtures present in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor environments as reported on field studies in the literature. These scales take into account both the concentration of VOCs at a particular site and the propensity of the VOCs to evoke sensory irritation. PMID:26550706

  5. Medium-term bioassays for carcinogenicity of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, N; Imaida, K; Hirose, M; Shirai, T

    1998-01-01

    exert additive/synergistic effects on tumorigenesis in the multiorgan bioassay. These results indicate that chemical mixtures at very low doses did not enhance preneoplastic lesions synergistically but the mixtures at certain doses show synergism in the target organ. The medium-term bioassays are particularly useful tools for this purpose. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9860889

  6. Impact of Chemical Proportions on the Acute Neurotoxicity of a Mixture of Seven Carbamates in Preweanling and Adult Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statistical design and environmental relevance are important aspects of studies of chemical mixtures, such as pesticides. We used a dose-additivity model to test experimentally the default assumptions of dose-additivity for two mixtures of seven N-methylcarbamates (carbaryl, carb...

  7. Conditions of consistency for multicomponent stellar systems. II. Is a point-axial symmetric model suitable for the Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Under a common potential, a finite mixture of ellipsoidal velocity distributions satisfying the Boltzmann collisionless equation provides a set of integrability conditions that may constrain the population kinematics. They are referred to as conditions of consistency and were discussed in a previous paper on mixtures of axisymmetric populations. As a corollary, these conditions are now extended to point-axial symmetry, that is, point symmetry around the rotation axis or bisymmetry, by determining which potentials are connected with a more flexible superposition of stellar populations. Under point-axial symmetry, the potential is still axisymmetric, but the velocity and mass distributions are not necessarily. A point-axial stellar system is, in a natural way, consistent with a flat velocity distribution of a disc population. Therefore, no additional integrability conditions are required to solve the Boltzmann collisionless equation for such a population. For other populations, if the potential is additively separable in cylindrical coordinates, the populations are not kinematically constrained, although under point-axial symmetry, the potential is reduced to the harmonic function, which, for the Galaxy, is proven to be non-realistic. In contrast, a non-separable potential provides additional conditions of consistency. When mean velocities for the populations are unconstrained, the potential becomes quasi-stationary, being a particular case of the axisymmetric model. Then, the radial and vertical mean velocities of the populations can differ and produce an apparent vertex deviation of the whole velocity distribution. However, single population velocity ellipsoids still have no vertex deviation in the Galactic plane and no tilt in their intersection with a meridional Galactic plane. If the thick disc and halo ellipsoids actually have non-vanishing tilt, as the surveys of the solar neighbourhood that include RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) data seem to show, the

  8. Acute toxicity of binary and ternary mixtures of Cd, Cu, and Zn to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Joseph S; Ranville, James F; Pontasch, Mandee; Gorsuch, Joseph W; Adams, William J

    2015-04-01

    Standard static-exposure acute lethality tests were conducted with Daphnia magna neonates exposed to binary or ternary mixtures of Cd, Cu, and Zn in moderately hard reconstituted water that contained 3 mg dissolved organic carbon/L added as Suwannee River fulvic acid. These experiments were conducted to test for additive toxicity (i.e., the response to the mixture can be predicted by combining the responses obtained in single-metal toxicity tests) or nonadditive toxicity (i.e., the response is less than or greater than additive). Based on total metal concentrations (>90% dissolved) the toxicity of the tested metal mixtures could be categorized into all 3 possible additivity categories: less-than-additive toxicity (e.g., Cd-Zn and Cd-Cu-Zn mixtures and Cd-Cu mixtures when Cu was titrated into Cd-containing waters), additive toxicity (e.g., some Cu-Zn mixtures), or more-than-additive toxicity (some Cu-Zn mixtures and Cd-Cu mixtures when Cd was titrated into Cu-containing waters). Exposing the organisms to a range of sublethal to supralethal concentrations of the titrated metal was especially helpful in identifying nonadditive interactions. Geochemical processes (e.g., metal-metal competition for binding to dissolved organic matter and/or the biotic ligand, and possibly supersaturation of exposure waters with the metals in some high-concentration exposures) can explain much of the observed metal-metal interactions. Therefore, bioavailability models that incorporate those geochemical (and possibly some physiological) processes might be able to predict metal mixture toxicity accurately. PMID:25336231

  9. Modeling mixtures of thyroid gland function disruptors in a vertebrate alternative model, the zebrafish eleutheroembryo

    SciTech Connect

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Barata, Carlos; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2013-06-01

    Maternal thyroxine (T4) plays an essential role in fetal brain development, and even mild and transitory deficits in free-T4 in pregnant women can produce irreversible neurological effects in their offspring. Women of childbearing age are daily exposed to mixtures of chemicals disrupting the thyroid gland function (TGFDs) through the diet, drinking water, air and pharmaceuticals, which has raised the highest concern for the potential additive or synergic effects on the development of mild hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy. Recently we demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable alternative model for screening chemicals impairing the thyroid hormone synthesis. The present study used the intrafollicular T4-content (IT4C) of zebrafish eleutheroembryos as integrative endpoint for testing the hypotheses that the effect of mixtures of TGFDs with a similar mode of action [inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO)] was well predicted by a concentration addition concept (CA) model, whereas the response addition concept (RA) model predicted better the effect of dissimilarly acting binary mixtures of TGFDs [TPO-inhibitors and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-inhibitors]. However, CA model provided better prediction of joint effects than RA in five out of the six tested mixtures. The exception being the mixture MMI (TPO-inhibitor)-KClO{sub 4} (NIS-inhibitor) dosed at a fixed ratio of EC{sub 10} that provided similar CA and RA predictions and hence it was difficult to get any conclusive result. There results support the phenomenological similarity criterion stating that the concept of concentration addition could be extended to mixture constituents having common apical endpoints or common adverse outcomes. - Highlights: • Potential synergic or additive effect of mixtures of chemicals on thyroid function. • Zebrafish as alternative model for testing the effect of mixtures of goitrogens. • Concentration addition seems to predict better the effect of

  10. Developing consistent time series landsat data products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Landsat series satellite has provided earth observation data record continuously since early 1970s. There are increasing demands on having a consistent time series of Landsat data products. In this presentation, I will summarize the work supported by the USGS Landsat Science Team project from 20...

  11. 36 CFR 241.22 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FISH AND WILDLIFE Conservation of Fish, Wildlife, and Their Habitat, Chugach National Forest, Alaska... conservation of fish, wildlife, and their habitat. A use or activity may be determined to be consistent if it will not materially interfere with or detract from the conservation of fish, wildlife and their...

  12. 36 CFR 241.22 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FISH AND WILDLIFE Conservation of Fish, Wildlife, and Their Habitat, Chugach National Forest, Alaska... conservation of fish, wildlife, and their habitat. A use or activity may be determined to be consistent if it will not materially interfere with or detract from the conservation of fish, wildlife and their...

  13. 36 CFR 241.22 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FISH AND WILDLIFE Conservation of Fish, Wildlife, and Their Habitat, Chugach National Forest, Alaska... conservation of fish, wildlife, and their habitat. A use or activity may be determined to be consistent if it will not materially interfere with or detract from the conservation of fish, wildlife and their...

  14. Effecting Consistency across Curriculum: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devasagayam, P. Raj; Mahaffey, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement is the clarion call across all business schools which is driving the emphasis on assessing the attainment of learning outcomes. An issue that deems special attention in assurance of learning outcomes is related to consistency across courses and, more specifically, across multiple sections of the same course taught by…

  15. Grading for Speed, Consistency, and Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryder, LeeAnne G.

    2003-01-01

    Explains the rubrics the author has developed to assure some degree of consistency in grading among instructors and teaching assistants in various sections of the same writing course. Finds these rubrics particularly useful for evaluating individual student performance in group projects. (SG)

  16. 24 CFR 91.510 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consistency determinations. 91.510 Section 91.510 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... HOPWA grant is a city that is the most populous unit of general local government in an EMSA, it...

  17. Energy confinement and profile consistency in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.; Arunasalan, V.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; bush, C.E.; Callen, J.D.; Cohen, S.A.

    1987-04-01

    A new regime of enhanced energy confinement has been observed on TFTR with neutral beam injection at low plasma current. It is characterized by extremely peaked electron density profiles and broad electron temperature profiles. The electron temperature profile shapes violate the concept of profile consistency in which T/sub e/(O)//sub v/ is assumed to be a tightly constrained function of q/sub a/, but they are in good agreement with a form of profile consistency based on examining the temperature profile shape outside the plasma core. The enhanced confinement regime is only obtained with a highly degassed limiter; in discharges with gas-filled limiters convective losses are calculated to dominate the edge electron power balance. Consistent with the constraint of profile consistency, global confinement is degraded in these cases. The best heating results in the enhanced confinement regime are obtained with nearly balanced co- and counter-injection. Much of the difference between balanced and co-only injection can be explained on the basis of classically predicted effects associated with plasma rotation.

  18. Consistency criteria for generalized Cuddeford systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, Luca; Morganti, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    General criteria to check the positivity of the distribution function (phase-space consistency) of stellar systems of assigned density and anisotropy profile are useful starting points in Jeans-based modelling. Here, we substantially extend previous results, and present the inversion formula and the analytical necessary and sufficient conditions for phase-space consistency of the family of multicomponent Cuddeford spherical systems: the distribution function of each density component of these systems is defined as the sum of an arbitrary number of Cuddeford distribution functions with arbitrary values of the anisotropy radius, but identical angular momentum exponent. The radial trend of anisotropy that can be realized by these models is therefore very general. As a surprising byproduct of our study, we found that the `central cusp-anisotropy theorem' (a necessary condition for consistency relating the values of the central density slope and of the anisotropy parameter) holds not only at the centre but also at all radii in consistent multicomponent generalized Cuddeford systems. This last result suggests that the so-called mass-anisotropy degeneracy could be less severe than what is sometimes feared.

  19. Consistency of Toddler Engagement across Two Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiar, Cecilia; McWilliam, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    This study documented the consistency of child engagement across two settings, toddler child care classrooms and mother-child dyadic play. One hundred twelve children, aged 14-36 months (M = 25.17, SD = 6.06), randomly selected from 30 toddler child care classrooms from the district of Porto, Portugal, participated. Levels of engagement were…

  20. Consistency of Students' Pace in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the consistency of students' behavior regarding their pace of actions over sessions within an online course. Pace in a session is defined as the number of logged actions divided by session length (in minutes). Log files of 6,112 students were collected, and datasets were constructed for examining pace…

  1. Environmental Decision Support with Consistent Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the most effective ways to pursue environmental progress is through the use of consistent metrics within a decision making framework. The US Environmental Protection Agency’s Sustainable Technology Division has developed TRACI, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of...

  2. Consistent Visual Analyses of Intrasubject Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Chung, Kyong-Mee; Gutshall, Katharine; Pitts, Steven C.; Kao, Joyce; Girolami, Kelli

    2010-01-01

    Visual inspection of single-case data is the primary method of interpretation of the effects of an independent variable on a dependent variable in applied behavior analysis. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend the results of DeProspero and Cohen (1979) by reexamining the consistency of visual analysis across raters. We…

  3. Taking Another Look: Sensuous, Consistent Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townley, Mary Ross

    1983-01-01

    There is a natural progression from making single objects to creating sculpture. By modeling the forms of objects like funnels and light bulbs, students become aware of the quality of curves and the edges of angles. Sculptural form in architecture can be understood as consistency in the forms. (CS)

  4. Mixtures Research at NIEHS: An Evolving Program

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Cynthia V; Carlin, Danielle J; DeVito, Micheal J; Thompson, Claudia L; Walker, Nigel J

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has a rich history in evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. The types of mixtures assessed by the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) and the extramural community (through the Division of Extramural Research and Training (DERT)) have included a broad range of chemicals and toxicants, with each study having a unique set of questions and design considerations. Some examples of the types of mixtures studied include: groundwater contaminants, pesticides/fertilizers, dioxin-like chemicals (assessing the toxic equivalency approach), drug combinations, air pollution, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, technical mixtures (e.g. pentachlorophenol, flame retardants), and mixed entities (e.g. herbals, asbestos). These endeavors have provided excellent data on the toxicity of specific mixtures and have been informative to the human health risk assessment process in general (e.g. providing data on low dose exposures to environmental chemicals). However, the mixtures research effort at NIEHS, to date, has been driven by test article nominations to the DNTP or by investigator-initiated research through DERT. Recently, the NIEHS has embarked upon an effort to coordinate mixtures research across both intramural and extramural divisions in order to maximize mixtures research results. A path forward for NIEHS mixtures research will be based on feedback from a Request for Information (RFI) designed to gather up-to-date views on the knowledge gaps and roadblocks to evaluating mixtures and performing cumulative risk assessment, and a workshop organized to bring together mixtures experts from risk assessment, exposure science, biology, epidemiology, and statistics. The future of mixtures research at NIEHS will include projects from nominations to DNTP, studies by extramural investigators, and collaborations across government agencies that address high-priority questions in the field of mixtures research

  5. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  6. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  7. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  8. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  9. Chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fun-In; Kuo, Min-Liang; Shun, Chia-Tung; Ma, Yee-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der; Ueng, Tzuu-Huei

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes (CA) consisting of chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene. These chlorinated organic solvents were present in the underground water near an electronic appliances manufactory in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Male and female weanling ICR mice were treated with low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures in drinking water for 16 and 18 mo, respectively. A significant number of male mice treated with the high-dose CA mixture developed tail alopecia and deformation, which was not prominent in CA-treated female mice. Medium- and high-dose CA mixtures induced marginal increases of liver and lung weights, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels in male mice. In female mice, the high-dose CA mixture increased liver, kidney, and uterus and ovary total weights, without affecting serum biochemistry parameters. CA mixtures had no effects on the total glutathione content or the level of glutathione S-transferase activity in the livers and kid- neys of male and female mice. Treatments with CA mixtures produced a trend of increasing frequency of hepatocelluar neoplasms in male mice, compared to male and female controls and CA-treated female mice. The high-dose CA mixture induced a significantly higher incidence of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice. The calculated odds ratios of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice induced by low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures were 1.14, 1.37, and 3.53 times that of the controls, respectively. The low-dose CA mixture induced a higher incidence of cysts and inflammation in and around the ovaries. This study has demonstrated that the CA mixture is a potential carcinogen to male and female mice. These animal toxicology data may be important in assessing the health effects of individuals exposed to the CA mixture. PMID:11911491

  10. Surface chemistry of a pine-oil cleaner and other terpene mixtures with ozone on vinyl flooring tiles.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jason E; Wells, J Raymond

    2011-04-01

    Indoor environments are dynamic reactors where consumer products (such as cleaning agents, deodorants, and air fresheners) emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can subsequently interact with indoor oxidants such as ozone (O(3)), hydroxyl radicals, and nitrate radicals. Typically, consumer products consist of mixtures of VOCs and semi-VOCs which can react in the gas-phase or on surfaces with these oxidants to generate a variety of oxygenated products. In this study, the reaction of a pine-oil cleaner (POC) with O(3) (100ppb) on a urethane-coated vinyl flooring tile was investigated at 5% and 50% relative humidity. These results were compared to previous α-terpineol+O(3) reactions on glass and vinyl surfaces. Additionally, other terpene and terpene alcohol mixtures were formulated to understand the emission profiles as seen in the POC data. Results showed that the α-terpineol+O(3) reaction products were the prominent species that were also observed in the POC/O(3) surface experiments. Furthermore, α-terpineol+O(3) reactions generate the largest fraction of oxygenated products even in equal mixtures of other terpene alcohols. This finding suggests that the judicial choice of terpene alcohols for inclusion in product formulations may be useful in reducing oxidation product emissions. PMID:21237482

  11. A Preliminary Investigation on the Antimicrobial Activity of Listerine®, Its Components, and of Mixtures Thereof.

    PubMed

    Vlachojannis, C; Chrubasik-Hausmann, S; Hellwig, E; Al-Ahmad, A

    2015-10-01

    Listerine® is one of the most popular mouthwashes worldwide and claims to combat harmful bacteria. In the past century, its recipe was changed from an essential oil mouthwash to a five-component mixture (thymol, menthol, eucalyptol, and methyl salicylate dissolved in 27% ethanol). The aim of this study was to get preliminary information about the antimicrobial activities of individual Listerine® components and their mixtures. We tested the bacterial strains Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, and Eikenella corrodens and the yeast Candida albicans. The established minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and the minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration (MBC/MFC) assay were applied. None of the combinations of two phenols at the concentrations contained within Listerine® were associated with either an additive or synergistic effect. Thymol had lower MIC and MBC/MFC values than the other Listerine® components and Listerine® against E. corrodens and C. albicans. The mixtures consisting of eucalyptol, methyl salicylate, and thymol were the most effective against S. mutans and E. faecalis and more effective than Listerine®. Our results demonstrate that the phenols and their concentrations as contained within Listerine® could be further optimized in terms of selecting those which increase their general effectiveness, at concentrations that do not induce harm. PMID:26104602

  12. A Solution Methodology and Computer Program to Efficiently Model Thermodynamic and Transport Coefficients of Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlemann, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    A solution methodology has been developed to efficiently model multi-specie, chemically frozen, thermally perfect gas mixtures. The method relies on the ability to generate a single (composite) set of thermodynamic and transport coefficients prior to beginning a CFD solution. While not fundamentally a new concept, many applied CFD users are not aware of this capability nor have a mechanism to easily and confidently generate new coefficients. A database of individual specie property coefficients has been created for 48 species. The seven coefficient form of the thermodynamic functions is currently used rather then the ten coefficient form due to the similarity of the calculated properties, low temperature behavior and reduced CPU requirements. Sutherland laminar viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients were computed in a consistent manner from available reference curves. A computer program has been written to provide CFD users with a convenient method to generate composite specie coefficients for any mixture. Mach 7 forebody/inlet calculations demonstrated nearly equivalent results and significant CPU time savings compared to a multi-specie solution approach. Results from high-speed combustor analysis also illustrate the ability to model inert test gas contaminants without additional computational expense.

  13. Behavioral avoidance of a metals mixture by rainbow trout and brown trout

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.A.; Bergman, H.L.; Woodward, D.F.; Little, E.E.; Deloney, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    Behavioral avoidance responses by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) were determined in the laboratory to predict the effect of mixtures of copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc on the spatial distribution of fishes in the Clark fork River (CFR), Montana. The typical ambient concentration of these metals (in {micro}g/l) in the CFR was 12 Cu, 1.1 Cd, 3.2 Pb, and 50 Zn. Laboratory tests were conducted in an opposing-flow avoidance chamber using metals concentrations ranging from 10% to 1,000% of this CFR ambient concentration. Rainbow trout avoided all metals concentrations tested from 10% to 1,000% of ambient. Brown trout failed to avoid the 10% metals concentration but did avoid all concentrations higher than 50%. In a further experiment, both species were acclimated to pH 8.0 water and avoided all changes in acidity. However, the avoidance of metals was not altered by acidity additions in brown trout and only slightly altered in rainbow trout. In all experiments, brown trout were less sensitive than rainbow trout, which was consistent with observed species distributions within the river. Behavior avoidance of this metals mixture by rainbow and brown trout in the laboratory indicates metals may have contributed to reduced abundance and altered distribution of salmonids in the CFR.

  14. Does the addition of proteases affect the biogas yield from organic material in anaerobic digestion?

    PubMed

    Müller, Liane; Kretzschmar, Jörg; Pröter, Jürgen; Liebetrau, Jan; Nelles, Michael; Scholwin, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical disintegration effect of hydrolytic enzymes in lab scale experiments. Influences of enzyme addition on the biogas yield as well as effects on the process stability were examined. The addition of proteases occurred with low and high dosages in batch and semi-continuous biogas tests. The feed mixture consisted of maize silage, chicken dung and cow manure. Only very high concentrated enzymes caused an increase in biogas production in batch experiments. In semi-continuous biogas tests no positive long-term effects (100 days) were observed. Higher enzyme-dosage led to a reduced biogas-yield (13% and 36% lower than the reference). Phenylacetate and -propionate increased (up to 372 mgl(-1)) before the other volatile fatty acids did. Volatile organic acids rose up to 6.8 gl(-1). The anaerobic digestion process was inhibited. PMID:26741852

  15. Stochastic downscaling of precipitation with neural network conditional mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreau, Julie; Vrac, Mathieu

    2011-10-01

    We present a new class of stochastic downscaling models, the conditional mixture models (CMMs), which builds on neural network models. CMMs are mixture models whose parameters are functions of predictor variables. These functions are implemented with a one-layer feed-forward neural network. By combining the approximation capabilities of mixtures and neural networks, CMMs can, in principle, represent arbitrary conditional distributions. We evaluate the CMMs at downscaling precipitation data at three stations in the French Mediterranean region. A discrete (Dirac) component is included in the mixture to handle the "no-rain" events. Positive rainfall is modeled with a mixture of continuous densities, which can be either Gaussian, log-normal, or hybrid Pareto (an extension of the generalized Pareto). CMMs are stochastic weather generators in the sense that they provide a model for the conditional density of local variables given large-scale information. In this study, we did not look for the most appropriate set of predictors, and we settled for a decent set as the basis to compare the downscaling models. The set of predictors includes the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalyses sea level pressure fields on a 6 × 6 grid cell region surrounding the stations plus three date variables. We compare the three distribution families of CMMs with a simpler benchmark model, which is more common in the downscaling community. The difference between the benchmark model and CMMs is that positive rainfall is modeled with a single Gamma distribution. The results show that CMM with hybrid Pareto components outperforms both the CMM with Gaussian components and the benchmark model in terms of log-likelihood. However, there is no significant difference with the log-normal CMM. In general, the additional flexibility of mixture models, as opposed to using a single distribution, allows us to better represent the

  16. Combustion of coal/water mixtures with thermal preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, M.; Roffe, G.; Miller, G.

    1987-07-01

    Thermal preconditioning is a process in which coal/water mixtures are vaporized to produce coal/steam suspensions, and then superheated to allow the coal to devolatilize producing suspensions of char particles in hydrocarbon gases and steam. This final product of the process can be injected without atomization, and burned directly in a gas turbine combustor. This paper reports on the results of an experimental program in which thermally preconditioned coal/water mixture was successfully burned with a stable flame in a gas turbine combustor test rig. Tests were performed at a mixture flowrate of 300 lb/hr and combustor pressure of 8 atm. The coal/water mixture was thermally preconditioned and injected into the combustor over a temperature range from 340/sup 0/F to 600/sup 0/F, and combustion air was supplied at between 600/sup 0/F to 725/sup 0/F. Test durations varied between 10 and 20 min. Major results of the combustion testing were that: A stable flame was maintained over a wide equivalence ratio range, between phi = 2.2 (rich) and 0.2 (lean); and combustion efficiency of over 99 percent was achieved when the mixture was preconditioned to 600/sup 0/F and the combustion air preheated to 725/sup 0/F. Measurements of ash particulates, captured in the exhaust sampling probe located 20 in. from the injector face, show typical sizes collected to be about 1 ..mu..m, with agglomerates of these particulates to be not more than 8 ..mu..m. The original mean coal particle size for these tests, prior to preconditioning, was 25 ..mu..m. Results of additional tests showed that one third of the sulfur contained in the solids of a coal/water mixture with 3 percent sulfur was evolved in gaseous form (under mild thermolized conditions) mainly as H/sub 2/S with the remainder as light mercaptans.

  17. Novel spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of Amlodipine, Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide in their ternary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Hayam M.; Hegazy, Maha A.; Mowaka, Shereen; Mohamed, Ekram Hany

    2015-04-01

    This work represents a comparative study of two smart spectrophotometric techniques namely; successive resolution and progressive resolution for the simultaneous determination of ternary mixtures of Amlodipine (AML), Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) and Valsartan (VAL) without prior separation steps. These techniques consist of several consecutive steps utilizing zero and/or ratio and/or derivative spectra. By applying successive spectrum subtraction coupled with constant multiplication method, the proposed drugs were obtained in their zero order absorption spectra and determined at their maxima 237.6 nm, 270.5 nm and 250 nm for AML, HCT and VAL, respectively; while by applying successive derivative subtraction they were obtained in their first derivative spectra and determined at P230.8-246, P261.4-278.2, P233.7-246.8 for AML, HCT and VAL respectively. While in the progressive resolution, the concentrations of the components were determined progressively from the same zero order absorption spectrum using absorbance subtraction coupled with absorptivity factor methods or from the same ratio spectrum using only one divisor via amplitude modulation method can be used for the determination of ternary mixtures using only one divisor where the concentrations of the components are determined progressively. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. Moreover comparative study between spectrum addition technique as a novel enrichment technique and a well established one namely spiking technique was adopted for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulations containing low concentration of AML. The methods were validated as per ICH guidelines where accuracy, precision and specificity were found to be within their acceptable limits. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with the reported one where no significant

  18. Novel spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of Amlodipine, Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide in their ternary mixture.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Hayam M; Hegazy, Maha A; Mowaka, Shereen; Mohamed, Ekram Hany

    2015-04-01

    This work represents a comparative study of two smart spectrophotometric techniques namely; successive resolution and progressive resolution for the simultaneous determination of ternary mixtures of Amlodipine (AML), Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) and Valsartan (VAL) without prior separation steps. These techniques consist of several consecutive steps utilizing zero and/or ratio and/or derivative spectra. By applying successive spectrum subtraction coupled with constant multiplication method, the proposed drugs were obtained in their zero order absorption spectra and determined at their maxima 237.6 nm, 270.5 nm and 250 nm for AML, HCT and VAL, respectively; while by applying successive derivative subtraction they were obtained in their first derivative spectra and determined at P230.8-246, P261.4-278.2, P233.7-246.8 for AML, HCT and VAL respectively. While in the progressive resolution, the concentrations of the components were determined progressively from the same zero order absorption spectrum using absorbance subtraction coupled with absorptivity factor methods or from the same ratio spectrum using only one divisor via amplitude modulation method can be used for the determination of ternary mixtures using only one divisor where the concentrations of the components are determined progressively. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. Moreover comparative study between spectrum addition technique as a novel enrichment technique and a well established one namely spiking technique was adopted for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulations containing low concentration of AML. The methods were validated as per ICH guidelines where accuracy, precision and specificity were found to be within their acceptable limits. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with the reported one where no significant

  19. On the Theory of Reactive Mixtures for Modeling Biological Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    Mixture theory, which can combine continuum theories for the motion and deformation of solids and fluids with general principles of chemistry, is well suited for modeling the complex responses of biological tissues, including tissue growth and remodeling, tissue engineering, mechanobiology of cells and a variety of other active processes. A comprehensive presentation of the equations of reactive mixtures of charged solid and fluid constituents is lacking in the biomechanics literature. This study provides the conservation laws and entropy inequality, as well as interface jump conditions, for reactive mixtures consisting of a constrained solid mixture and multiple fluid constituents. The constituents are intrinsically incompressible and may carry an electrical charge. The interface jump condition on the mass flux of individual constituents is shown to define a surface growth equation, which predicts deposition or removal of material points from the solid matrix, complementing the description of volume growth described by the conservation of mass. A formu-lation is proposed for the reference configuration of a body whose material point set varies with time. State variables are defined which can account for solid matrix volume growth and remodeling. Constitutive constraints are provided on the stresses and momentum supplies of the various constituents, as well as the interface jump conditions for the electrochem cal potential of the fluids. Simplifications appropriate for biological tissues are also proposed, which help reduce the governing equations into a more practical format. It is shown that explicit mechanisms of growth-induced residual stresses can be predicted in this framework. PMID:17206407

  20. Binary mixtures of simple fluids in structured slit micropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J. E.; Cushman, John H.

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to study a binary mixture of Lennard-Jones atoms confined to an atomically structured slit micropore which is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its bulk phase counterpart. In one example, the mixture consists of atoms of two distinct sizes, but with the same minimum depth in potential energy. In another example a binary mixture of different size atoms is again considered, but in the latter case the larger atom has a deeper potential energy minimum. Three mechanisms are found which influence selective adsorption of a mixture species: (i) liquid-like fluid layering, (ii) inplane solid-like ordering and (iii) molecular sieving. The large atoms are completely eliminated from the pore when the wall separation is physically too small for the large atoms to fit, or when both species physically fit in the pore and the small component epitaxially aligns with the surface or freezes. Complete elimination of the small species is not observed. A significant excess of large atoms in the pore relative to the composition in the bulk phase is found only when the large atoms attain transverse order within the fluid layers. The adsorption of the large component is either enhanced or reduced depending on the relative magnitude of the potential energy well depth of the fluid and wall species.

  1. Dynamic self-organization of microwell-aggregated cellular mixtures.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Tung, Chih-Kuan; Lu, Yen-Chun; Pardo, Yehudah; Wu, Mingming; Das, Moumita; Kao, Der-I; Chen, Shuibing; Ma, Minglin

    2016-06-29

    Cells with different cohesive properties self-assemble in a spatiotemporal and context-dependent manner. Previous studies on cell self-organization mainly focused on the spontaneous structural development within a short period of time during which the cell numbers remained constant. However the effect of cell proliferation over time on the self-organization of cells is largely unexplored. Here, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of self-organization of a co-culture of MDA-MB-231 and MCF10A cells seeded in a well defined space (i.e. non-adherent microfabricated wells). When cell-growth was chemically inhibited, high cohesive MCF10A cells formed a core surrounded by low cohesive MDA-MB-231 cells on the periphery, consistent with the differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH). Interestingly, this aggregate morphology was completely inverted when the cells were free to grow. At an initial seeding ratio of 1 : 1 (MDA-MB-231 : MCF10A), the fast growing MCF10A cells segregated in the periphery while the slow growing MDA-MB-231 cells stayed in the core. Another morphology developed at an inequal seeding ratio (4 : 1), that is, the cell mixtures developed a side-by-side aggregate morphology. We conclude that the cell self-organization depends not only on the cell cohesive properties but also on the cell seeding ratio and proliferation. Furthermore, by taking advantage of the cell self-organization, we purified human embryonic stem cells-derived pancreatic progenitors (hESCs-PPs) from co-cultured feeder cells without using any additional tools or labels. PMID:27275624

  2. Toxicological evaluation of complex mixtures: fingerprinting and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Eide, Ingvar; Neverdal, Gunhild; Thorvaldsen, Bodil; Arneberg, Reidar; Grung, Bjørn; Kvalheim, Olav M

    2004-11-01

    The present paper describes a strategy for toxicological evaluation of complex mixtures based on chemical "fingerprinting" followed by pattern recognition (multivariate data analysis). The purpose is to correlate chemical fingerprints to measured toxicological endpoints, identify all major contributors to toxicity, and predict toxicity of additional mixtures. The strategy is illustrated with organic extracts of exhaust particles which are characterized by full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The complex GC-MS data are resolved into peaks and spectra for individual compounds using an automated curve resolution procedure. Projections to latent structures (PLS) is used for the regression modeling to correlate the GC-MS data to the measured responses; mutagenicity in the Ames Salmonella assay. The regression model identifies those peaks that co-vary with the observed mutagenicity. These peaks may be identified chemically from their spectra. Furthermore, the regression model can be used to predict mutagenicity from GC-MS chromatograms of additional samples. PMID:21782741

  3. The ideas behind self-consistent expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Moshe; Katzav, Eytan

    2008-04-01

    In recent years we have witnessed a growing interest in various non-equilibrium systems described in terms of stochastic nonlinear field theories. In some of those systems, like KPZ and related models, the interesting behavior is in the strong coupling regime, which is inaccessible by traditional perturbative treatments such as dynamical renormalization group (DRG). A useful tool in the study of such systems is the self-consistent expansion (SCE), which might be said to generate its own 'small parameter'. The self-consistent expansion (SCE) has the advantage that its structure is just that of a regular expansion, the only difference is that the simple system around which the expansion is performed is adjustable. The purpose of this paper is to present the method in a simple and understandable way that hopefully will make it accessible to a wider public working on non-equilibrium statistical physics.

  4. Human Pose Estimation Using Consistent Max Covering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao

    2011-09-01

    A novel consistent max-covering method is proposed for human pose estimation. We focus on problems in which a rough foreground estimation is available. Pose estimation is formulated as a jigsaw puzzle problem in which the body part tiles maximally cover the foreground region, match local image features, and satisfy body plan and color constraints. This method explicitly imposes a global shape constraint on the body part assembly. It anchors multiple body parts simultaneously and introduces hyperedges in the part relation graph, which is essential for detecting complex poses. Using multiple cues in pose estimation, our method is resistant to cluttered foregrounds. We propose an efficient linear method to solve the consistent max-covering problem. A two-stage relaxation finds the solution in polynomial time. Our experiments on a variety of images and videos show that the proposed method is more robust than previous locally constrained methods. PMID:21576747

  5. Consistent Numerical Expressions for Precession Formulae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, M.

    The precession formulae by Lieske et al. (1977) have been used since 1984 for calculating apparent positions and reducing astrometric observations of celestial objects. These formulae are based on the IAU (1976) Astronomical Constants, some of which deviate from their recently determined values. They are also derived using the secular variations of the ecliptic pole from Newcomb's theory, which is not consistent with the recent planetary theories. Accordingly Simon et al. (1994) developed new precession formulae using the recently determined astronomical constants and also being based on the new planetary theory VSOP87. There are two differing definitions of the ecliptic: ecliptic in the inertial sense and ecliptic in the rotating sense (Standish 1981). The ecliptic given by the VSOP87 theory is that in the inertial sense, but the value for obliquity Simon et al. used is the obliquity in the rotating sense. Therefore their precession formulae has inconsistency. This paper gives corrections for consistent precession formulae.

  6. Consistent Pauli reduction on group manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baguet, A.; Pope, C. N.; Samtleben, H.

    2016-01-01

    We prove an old conjecture by Duff, Nilsson, Pope and Warner asserting that the NSsbnd NS sector of supergravity (and more general the bosonic string) allows for a consistent Pauli reduction on any d-dimensional group manifold G, keeping the full set of gauge bosons of the G × G isometry group of the bi-invariant metric on G. The main tool of the construction is a particular generalised Scherk-Schwarz reduction ansatz in double field theory which we explicitly construct in terms of the group's Killing vectors. Examples include the consistent reduction from ten dimensions on S3 ×S3 and on similar product spaces. The construction is another example of globally geometric non-toroidal compactifications inducing non-geometric fluxes.

  7. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S.

    2012-12-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and large scale structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show that there exists a new simple consistency relation for the non-Gaussian cross correlation function of the scalar metric perturbation with two powers of the magnetic field in the squeezed limit where the momentum of the metric perturbation vanishes. We emphasize that such a consistency relation turns out to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields.

  8. Self-Consistent Scattering and Transport Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    An average-atom model with ion correlations provides a compact and complete description of atomic-scale physics in dense, finite-temperature plasmas. The self-consistent ionic and electronic distributions from the model enable calculation of x-ray scattering signals and conductivities for material across a wide range of temperatures and densities. We propose a definition for the bound electronic states that ensures smooth behavior of these measurable properties under pressure ionization and compare the predictions of this model with those of less consistent models for Be, C, Al, and Fe. SNL is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp, for the U.S. DoE NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by DoE OFES Early Career grant FWP-14-017426.

  9. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  10. Self-Consistent Random Phase Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, Daniel; Hellgren, Maria; Gross, E. K. U.

    2012-02-01

    We report self-consistent Random Phase Approximation (RPA) calculations within the Density Functional Theory. The calculations are performed by the direct minimization scheme for the optimized effective potential method developed by Yang et al. [1]. We show results for the dissociation curve of H2^+, H2 and LiH with the RPA, where the exchange correlation kernel has been set to zero. For H2^+ and H2 we also show results for RPAX, where the exact exchange kernel has been included. The RPA, in general, over-correlates. At intermediate distances a maximum is obtained that lies above the exact energy. This is known from non-self-consistent calculations and is still present in the self-consistent results. The RPAX energies are higher than the RPA energies. At equilibrium distance they accurately reproduce the exact total energy. In the dissociation limit they improve upon RPA, but are still too low. For H2^+ the RPAX correlation energy is zero. Consequently, RPAX gives the exact dissociation curve. We also present the local potentials. They indicate that a peak at the bond midpoint builds up with increasing bond distance. This is expected for the exact KS potential.[4pt] [1] W. Yang, and Q. Wu, Phys. Rev. Lett., 89, 143002 (2002)

  11. Towards a consistent modeling framework across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagers, B.

    2013-12-01

    The morphodynamic evolution of river-delta-coastal systems may be studied in detail to predict local, short-term changes or at a more aggregated level to indicate the net large scale, long-term effect. The whole spectrum of spatial and temporal scales needs to be considered for environmental impact studies. Usually this implies setting up a number of different models for different scales. Since the various models often use codes that have been independently developed by different researchers and include different formulations, it may be difficult to arrive at a consistent set of modeling results. This is one of the reasons why Deltares has taken on an effort to develop a consistent suite of model components that can be applied over a wide range of scales. The heart of this suite is formed by a flexible mesh flow component that supports mixed 1D-2D-3D domains, a equally flexible transport component with an expandable library of water quality and ecological processes, and a library of sediment transport and morphology routines that can be linked directly to the flow component or used as part of the process library. We will present the latest developments with a focus on the status of the sediment transport and morphology component for running consistent 1D, 2D and 3D models.

  12. Thermodynamic Calculations for Complex Chemical Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    General computer program, CECTRP, developed for calculation of thermodynamic properties of complex mixtures with option to calculate transport properties of these mixtures. Free-energy minimization technique used in equilibrium calculation. Rigorous equations used in transport calculations. Program calculates equilibrium compositions and corresponding thermodynamic and transport properties of mixtures. CECTRP accommodates up to 24 reactants, 20 elements, and 600 products, 400 of which are condensed. Written in FORTRAN IV for any large computer system.

  13. Performance-based asphalt mixture design methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Al-Hosain Mansour

    Today, several State D.O.T.s are being investigating the use of tire rubber with local conventional materials. Several of the ongoing investigations identified potential benefits from the use of these materials, including improvements in material properties and performance. One of the major problems is being associated with the transferability of asphalt rubber technology without appropriately considering the effects of the variety of conventional materials on mixture behavior and performance. Typically, the design of these mixtures is being adapted to the physical properties of the conventional materials by using the empirical Marshall mixture design and without considering fundamental mixture behavior and performance. Use of design criteria related to the most common modes of failure for asphalt mixtures, such as rutting, fatigue cracking, and low temperature thermal cracking have to be developed and used for identifying the "best mixture," in term of performance, for the specific local materials and loading conditions. The main objective of this study was the development of a mixture design methodology that considers mixture behavior and performance. In order to achieve this objective a laboratory investigation able to evaluate mixture properties that can be related to mixture performance, (in terms of rutting, low temperature cracking, moisture damage and fatigue), and simulating the actual field loading conditions that the material is being exposed to, was conducted. The results proved that the inclusion of rubber into asphalt mixtures improved physical characteristics such as elasticity, flexibility, rebound, aging properties, increased fatigue resistance, and reduced rutting potential. The possibility of coupling the traditional Marshall mix design method with parameters related to mixture behavior and performance was investigated. Also, the SHRP SUPERPAVE mix design methodology was reviewed and considered in this study for the development of an integrated

  14. Evaporation and dryout in a screen wick saturated with a fluid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruzan, D. A.; Torrance, K. E.; Avedisian, C. T.

    1988-06-01

    An everted heat pipe using ethanol-water mixtures for the coolant has been constructed for the purpose of assessing the effects of using such mixtures. The heat pipe capillary wick consists of four layers of 325 mesh stainless steel screen wrapped around a stainless steel tube. Measurements of steady state and dryout heat fluxes as a function of mixture composition and capillary rise height are reported. For small capillary rise height it was observed that the maximum operating heat flux could be increased by 235 percent with ethanol-water mixtures as compared to pure water. As the capillary rise height was increased the performance of ethanol-water mixtures became comparable to that of pure water. The measured dryout heat fluxes for water are in reasonable agreement with the predictions of an analytical model which allows for nucleate boiling in the heat pipe wick.

  15. Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of friction modifier additives analyzed directly from base oil solutions.

    PubMed

    Widder, Lukas; Brennerb, Josef; Huttera, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    To develop new products and to apply measures of quality control quick and simple accessibility of additive composition in automo- tive lubrication is important. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analyzing organic friction modifier additives by means of atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry [AP-MALDI-MS] from lubricant solu- tions without the use of additional separation techniques. Analyses of selected friction modifier ethoxylated tallow amines and oleic acid amide were compared using two ionization methods, positive-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and AP-MALDI, using a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Pure additives were characterized from solvent solutions, as well as from synthetic and mineral base oil mixtures. Detected ions of pure additive samples consisted mainly of [M + H]+, but also alkaLi metal adducts [M + Na]+ and [M + K]+ could be seen. Characterizations of blends of both friction modifiers from the base oil mixtures were carried out as well and showed significant inten- sities for several additive peaks. Thus, this work shows a method to directly analyze friction modifier additives used in the automotive industry from an oil blend via the use of AP-MALDI without any further separation steps. The method presented will further simplify the acquisition of data on lubricant composition and additives. Furthermore, it allows the perspective of analyzing additive reaction products directly from formulated oil blends. PMID:25507326

  16. Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of friction modifier additives analyzed directly from base oil solutions.

    PubMed

    Widder, Lukas; Brennerb, Josef; Huttera, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    To develop new products and to apply measures of quality control quick and simple accessibility of additive composition in automo- tive lubrication is important. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analyzing organic friction modifier additives by means of atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry [AP-MALDI-MS] from lubricant solu- tions without the use of additional separation techniques. Analyses of selected friction modifier ethoxylated tallow amines and oleic acid amide were compared using two ionization methods, positive-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and AP-MALDI, using a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Pure additives were characterized from solvent solutions, as well as from synthetic and mineral base oil mixtures. Detected ions of pure additive samples consisted mainly of [M + H]+, but also alkaLi metal adducts [M + Na]+ and [M + K]+ could be seen. Characterizations of blends of both friction modifiers from the base oil mixtures were carried out as well and showed significant inten- sities for several additive peaks. Thus, this work shows a method to directly analyze friction modifier additives used in the automotive industry from an oil blend via the use of AP-MALDI without any further separation steps. The method presented will further simplify the acquisition of data on lubricant composition and additives. Furthermore, it allows the perspective of analyzing additive reaction products directly from formulated oil blends. PMID:25420342

  17. Self-Consistent Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling: Theoretical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Newman, T. S.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fok, M.-C.; Spiro, R. W.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A self-consistent ring current (RC) model has been developed that couples electron and ion magnetospheric dynamics with the calculation of the electric field. Two new features were taken into account in order to close the self-consistent magnetosphere- ionosphere coupling loop. First, in addition to the RC ions, we solve an electron kinetic equation in our model. Second, using the relation of Galand and Richmond [2001], we calculate the height integrated ionospheric conductances as a function of the precipitated high energy magnetospheric electrons and ions that are produced by our code. To validate the results of our model we simulate the magnetic storm of May 2, 1986, a storm that has has been comprehensively studied, and compare our results with different theoretical approaches. The self-consistent inclusion of the hot electrons and, their effect on the conductance results in deeper penetration of the magnetospheric electric field. In addition, a slight westward rotation of the potential pattern (compared to previous self-consistent results) is evident in the inner magnetosphere. This changes the hot plasma distribution, especially by allowing increased access of plasma sheet ions and electrons to low L shells.

  18. Consistency of color representation in smart phones.

    PubMed

    Dain, Stephen J; Kwan, Benjamin; Wong, Leslie

    2016-03-01

    One of the barriers to the construction of consistent computer-based color vision tests has been the variety of monitors and computers. Consistency of color on a variety of screens has necessitated calibration of each setup individually. Color vision examination with a carefully controlled display has, as a consequence, been a laboratory rather than a clinical activity. Inevitably, smart phones have become a vehicle for color vision tests. They have the advantage that the processor and screen are associated and there are fewer models of smart phones than permutations of computers and monitors. Colorimetric consistency of display within a model may be a given. It may extend across models from the same manufacturer but is unlikely to extend between manufacturers especially where technologies vary. In this study, we measured the same set of colors in a JPEG file displayed on 11 samples of each of four models of smart phone (iPhone 4s, iPhone5, Samsung Galaxy S3, and Samsung Galaxy S4) using a Photo Research PR-730. The iPhones are white LED backlit LCD and the Samsung are OLEDs. The color gamut varies between models and comparison with sRGB space shows 61%, 85%, 117%, and 110%, respectively. The iPhones differ markedly from the Samsungs and from one another. This indicates that model-specific color lookup tables will be needed. Within each model, the primaries were quite consistent (despite the age of phone varying within each sample). The worst case in each model was the blue primary; the 95th percentile limits in the v' coordinate were ±0.008 for the iPhone 4 and ±0.004 for the other three models. The u'v' variation in white points was ±0.004 for the iPhone4 and ±0.002 for the others, although the spread of white points between models was u'v'±0.007. The differences are essentially the same for primaries at low luminance. The variation of colors intermediate between the primaries (e.g., red-purple, orange) mirror the variation in the primaries. The variation in

  19. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  20. Relative efficacy and palatability of three activated charcoal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R P; Navarro, K R; Krenzelok, E P

    1980-02-01

    The addition of bentonite with or without chocolate syrup improved the palatability of activated charcoal preparations. Furthermore, bentonite did not significantly reduce the efficacy of charcoal to absorb aspirin. Chocolate syrup reduced the adsorption effectiveness significantly. The mixtures have a reduced shelf-life when premixed with water. However, the dry ingredients can be pre-weighed and sealed in a large jar. Water can be added just prior to administration. PMID:7361450