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Sample records for additive quark model

  1. The Unquenched Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2008-10-13

    We present a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, pair creation mechanism. As an application, we study the effect of quark-antiquark pairs on the spin of the proton.

  2. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  3. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  4. Chirality and the Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Swanson; Adam P. Szczepaniak

    2002-06-07

    The relationship of the quark model to the known chiral properties of QCD is a long-standing problem in the interpretation of low energy QCD. In particular, how can the pion be viewed as both a collective Goldstone boson quasiparticle and as a valence quark antiquark bound state? A comparison of the many-body solution of a simplified model of QCD to the constituent quark model demonstrates that the quark model is sufficiently flexible to describe meson hyperfine splitting provided proper renormalization conditions and correct degrees of freedom are employed consistently.

  5. Quark model and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    After a short review of the activities of Shoichi Sakata and his group, how the six-quark model explains CP violation is described. Experimental verification of the model at the B-factories is also briefly discussed.

  6. Nucleon quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; W. Bentz; Anthony Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Spin-dependent and spin-independent quark light-cone momentum distributions and structure functions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquarks channels are included. We find excellent agreement between our model results and empirical data.

  7. Stability of Quark Star Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M., Azam; S. A., Mardan; M. A., Rehman

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of quark stars with four different types of inner matter configurations; isotropic, charged isotropic, anisotropic and charged anisotropic by using the concept of cracking. For this purpose, we have applied local density perturbations technique to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation as well as on physical parameters involved in the model. We conclude that quark stars become potentially unstable when inner matter configuration is changed and electromagnetic field is applied.

  8. Transversity quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    I.C. Cloet; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Transversity quark light-cone momentum distributions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the relativistic Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquark channels are included. Particular attention is paid to comparing our results with the recent experimental extraction of the transversity distributions by Anselmino et al. We also compare our transversity results with earlier spin-independent and helicity quark distributions calculated in the same approach.

  9. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  10. Confining quark condensate model of the nucleon.

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Michael; Tandy, Peter

    1992-07-01

    We obtain a mean-field solution for the nucleon as a quark-meson soliton obtained from the action of the global color-symmetry model of QCD. All dynamics is generated from an effective interaction of quark currents. At the quark-meson level there are two novel features: (1) absolute confinement is produced from the space-time structure of the dynamical self-energy in the vacuum quark propagator; and (2) the related scalar meson field is an extended q-barq composite that couples nonlocally to quarks. The influence of these features upon the nucleon mass contributions and other nucleon properties is presented.

  11. Relativistic quantum model of confinement and the current quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, L. D.

    1998-08-01

    We consider a relativistic quantum model of confined massive spinning quarks and antiquarks which describes the leading Regge trajectories of mesons. The quarks are described by the Dirac equations and the gluon contribution is approximated by the Nambu-Goto straight-line string. The string tension and the current quark masses are the main parameters of the model. Additional parameters are phenomenological constants which approximate nonstring short-range contributions. A comparison of the measured meson masses with the model predictions allows one to determine the current quark masses (in MeV) to be ms=227+/-5, mc=1440+/-10, and mb=4715+/-20. The chiral SU3 model makes it possible to estimate from here the u- and d-quark masses to be mu=6.2+/-0.2 Mev and md=11.1+/-0.4 Mev.

  12. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm‑3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (∼ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  13. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm-3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (˜ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  14. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  15. Quark Interchange Model of Baryon Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslow, Joel Neal

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point -like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and we assume that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (qq) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of Yn scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  16. Single Spin Asymmetry in Strongly Correlated Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Musulmanbekov, G.

    2007-06-13

    The Single Transverse - Spin Asymmetry (SSA) is analysed in the framework of the Strongly Correlated Quark Model proposed by author, where the proton spin emerges from the orbital momenta of quark and qluon condensates circulating around the valence quarks. It is shown that dominating factors of appearance of SSA are the orbiting around the valence quarks sea quark and qluon condensates and spin dependent quark-quark cross sections.

  17. Quark Model in the Quantum Mechanics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussar, P. E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses in detail the totally symmetric three-quark karyonic wave functions. The two-body mesonic states are also discussed. A brief review of the experimental efforts to identify the quark model multiplets is given. (Author/SK)

  18. Flavor signatures of isosinglet vector-like down quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alok, Ashutosh Kumar; Banerjee, Subhashish; Kumar, Dinesh; Uma Sankar, S.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a model where the standard model is extended by the addition of a vector-like isosinglet down-type quark b‧. We perform a χ2 fit to the flavor physics data and obtain the preferred central values along with errors of all the elements of the measurable 3 × 4 quark mixing matrix. The fit indicates that all the new-physics parameters are consistent with zero and the mixing of the b‧ quark with the other three is constrained to be small. The current flavor physics data rules out possibility of detectable new physics signals in most of the flavor physics observables. We also investigate possible deviations in the standard model Wtb couplings and bottom quark coupling to Higgs boson. We find that these deviations are less than a percent level which is too small to be observed at the LHC with current precision.

  19. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  20. An Unquenched Quark Model of Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, Roelof; Santopinto, Elena

    2007-10-26

    We present the formalism for a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. The present approach is an extension of the fiux-tube breaking model of Geiger and Isgur in which now the contribution of quark-antiquark pairs can be studied for any inital baryon, for any fiavor of the qq-bar pair (not only ss-bar but also uu-bar and dd-bar) and for arbitrary hadron wave functions. The method is illustrated with an application to the spin of the proton and the flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea.

  1. Heavy Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Winston Roberts; Muslema Pervin

    2007-11-14

    A quark model is applied to the spectrum of baryons containing heavy quarks. The model gives masses for the known heavy baryons that are in agreement with experiment, but for the doubly-charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}$, the model prediction is too heavy. Mixing between the $\\Xi_Q$ and $\\Xi_Q^\\prime$ states is examined and is found to be small for the lowest lying states. In contrast with this, mixing between the $\\Xi_{bc}$ and $\\Xi_{bc}^\\prime$ states is found to be large, and the implication of this mixing for properties of these states is briefly discussed. We also examine heavy-quark spin-symmetry multiplets, and find that many states in the model can be placed in such multiplets.

  2. Updated S3 model of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest; Melić, Blaženka

    2013-10-01

    A model proposed in 2004 using the non-Abelian discrete symmetry S3 for understanding the flavor structure of quarks and leptons is updated, with special focus on the quark and scalar sectors. We show how the approximate residual symmetries of this model explain both the pattern of the quark mixing matrix and why the recently observed particle of 126 GeV at the Large Hadron Collider is so much like the one Higgs boson of the Standard Model. We identify the strongest phenomenological bounds on the scalar masses of this model, and predict a possibly observable decay b → sτ-μ+ (Bs →τ+μ-), but not b → sτ+μ- (Bs →τ-μ+).

  3. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  4. Relativistic constituent quark model with infrared confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Tanja; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-02-01

    We refine the relativistic constituent quark model developed in our previous papers to include the confinement of quarks. It is done, first, by introducing the scale integration in the space of {alpha} parameters, and, second, by cutting this scale integration on the upper limit which corresponds to an infrared cutoff. In this manner one removes all possible thresholds present in the initial quark diagram. The cutoff parameter is taken to be the same for all physical processes. We adjust other model parameters by fitting the calculated quantities of the basic physical processes to available experimental data. As an application, we calculate the electromagnetic form factors of the pion and the transition form factors of the {omega} and {eta} Dalitz decays.

  5. The Constituent Quark Model: a Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Swanson

    2002-06-07

    A brief and biased overview of the status of the constituent quark model is presented. We concentrate on open issues and goals of hadronic phenomenology, rather than specific physics conundrums in the field. Modern attempts at addressing these issues are also presented.

  6. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Hsin -Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-03-14

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ~ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of themore » model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. As a result, depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ~ 2.5 TeV at the LHC and beyond 10 TeV at a future 100 TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.« less

  7. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-03-01

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ˜ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of the model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. Depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ˜ 2.5TeV at the LHC and beyond 10TeV at a future 100TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.

  8. The Bonn nuclear quark model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Providencia, Constanca; Providencia, Joao da Cordeiro, Flavio; Yamamura, Masatoshi; Tsue, Yasuhiko; Nishiyama, Seiya

    2009-08-15

    We present the exact solutions to the equations of the lowest energy states of the colored and color-symmetric sectors of the Bonn quark model, which is SU(3) symmetric and is defined in terms of an effective pairing force with su(4) algebraic structure. We show that the groundstate of the model is not color symmetrical except for a narrow interval in the range of possible quark numbers. We also study the performance of the Glauber coherent state, as well as of superconducting states of the BCS type, with respect to the description, not only of the absolute (colored) groundstate, but also of the minimum energy state of the color-symmetrical sector, finding that it is remarkably good. We use the model to discuss, in a schematic context, some controversial aspects of the conventional treatment of color superconductivity.

  9. A composite model of quarks and bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    A composite model of quarks and bosons is proposed in which a spin 1/2 isospin doublet ψ is the basic building block of quarks and bosons in the standard model. The ψ has two components v and w with charges Q = (1)/(3)e and Q = 0, respectively, that combine to form the three generations of colored quark flavors. A strong force described by a triplet of massless gluons binds the constituents called geminis. The confining constituent non-Abelian SU(2)C field theory is called constituent dynamics with a confining energy scale ΛCD. The constituent dynamics condensate <\\bar {v}v+\\bar {w}w>!=q 0 spontaneously breaks the electroweak symmetry SU(2)L×U(1)Y→U(1)EM and a triplet of Nambu-Goldstone bosons make the gauge bosons W± and Z0 massive, while retaining a massless photon. A global custodial SU(2)L×SU(2)R symmetry guarantees that the symmetry breaking in the weak interaction sector agrees with electroweak data. The non-Abelian SU(2)C color dynamics satisfies asymptotic freedom, which resolves the gauge and Higgs mass hierarchy problems and makes the model ultraviolet complete. The composite constituent dynamics model can realize a SU(3)C×SU(2)L×U(1)Y electroweak and strong interaction model that satisfies the naturalness principle. The three generations of colorless quarks α and β with charges Q = +1e and Q = 0, respectively, which are predicted to exist in the composite model can form bound states which can be identified with the spectrum of exotic mesons.

  10. Quark susceptibility in a generalized dynamical quasiparticle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrehrah, H.; Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Steinert, Th.

    2016-04-01

    The quark susceptibility χq at zero and finite quark chemical potential provides a critical benchmark to determine the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP) degrees of freedom in relation to the results from lattice QCD (lQCD) in addition to the equation of state and transport coefficients. Here we extend the familiar dynamical quasiparticle model (DQPM) to partonic propagators that explicitly depend on the three-momentum with respect to the partonic medium at rest in order to match perturbative QCD (pQCD) at high momenta. Within the extended dynamical quasiparticle model (DQPM*) we reproduce simultaneously the lQCD results for the quark number density and susceptibility and the QGP pressure at zero and finite (but small) chemical potential μq. The shear viscosity η and the electric conductivity σe from the extended quasiparticle model (DQPM*) also turn out to be in close agreement with lattice results for μq=0 . The DQPM*, furthermore, allows one to evaluate the momentum p , temperature T , and chemical potential μq dependencies of the partonic degrees of freedom also for larger μq, which are mandatory for transport studies of heavy-ion collisions in the regime 5 <√{sN N}<10 GeV.

  11. Rare top quark decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2006-09-25

    Flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decays t {yields} H0 + c, t {yields} Z + c, and H0 {yields} t + c-bar are discussed in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions where FCNC decays may take place at tree-level and are only suppressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks, which is poorly constraint by current experimental values. The non-manifest case is also briefly discussed.

  12. Model for quark and lepton constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairlie, D.; Nuyts, J.; Taormina, A.

    1983-01-01

    A model of subconstituents for quarks and leptons is presented in which each of three different types transforms under a different group which is gauged. The binding is taken as magnetic, the dual of the usual electric charge, and hence very strong. The spin of the constituents is zero. The spin of the bound states arises dynamically. Weak interactions violate parity maximally and the Weinberg angle, related to the generation problem, comes out well numerically. Two exotic states are predicted.

  13. Semiclassical projection of hedgehog models with quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, T.D.; Broniowski, W.

    1986-12-01

    A simple semiclassical method is presented for calculating physical observables in states with good angular momentum and isospin for models whose mean-field solutions are hedgehogs. The method is applicable for theories which have both quark and meson degrees of freedom. The basic approach is to find slowly rotating solutions to the time-dependent mean-field equations. A nontrivial set of differential equations must be solved to find the quark configuration for these rotating hedgehogs. The parameters which specify the rotating solutions are treated as the collective degrees of freedom. They are requantized by imposing a set of commutation relations which ensures the correct algebra for the SU(2) x SU(2) group of angular momentum and isospin. Collective wave functions can then be found and with these wave functions all matrix elements can be calculated. The method is applied to a simple version of the chiral quark-meson model. A number of physical quantities such as magnetic moments, charge distributions, g/sub A/, g/sub ..pi..//sub N//sub N/, N-..delta.. mass splitting, properties of the N-..delta.. transition, etc., are calculated.

  14. Semiclassical projection of hedgehog models with quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Thomas D.; Broniowski, Wojciech

    1986-12-01

    A simple semiclassical method is presented for calculating physical observables in states with good angular momentum and isospin for models whose mean-field solutions are hedgehogs. The method is applicable for theories which have both quark and meson degrees of freedom. The basic approach is to find slowly rotating solutions to the time-dependent mean-field equations. A nontrivial set of differential equations must be solved to find the quark configuration for these rotating hedgehogs. The parameters which specify the rotating solutions are treated as the collective degrees of freedom. They are requantized by imposing a set of commutation relations which ensures the correct algebra for the SU(2)×SU(2) group of angular momentum and isospin. Collective wave functions can then be found and with these wave functions all matrix elements can be calculated. The method is applied to a simple version of the chiral quark-meson model. A number of physical quantities such as magnetic moments, charge distributions, gA, gπNN, N-Δ mass splitting, properties of the N-Δ transition, etc., are calculated.

  15. Hybrid neutron stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model and various quark-gluon vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2015-05-01

    We study cold dense quark matter and hybrid neutron stars with a Dyson-Schwinger quark model and various choices of the quark-gluon vertex. We obtain the equation of state of quark matter in beta equilibrium and investigate the hadron-quark phase transition in combination with a hadronic equation of state derived within the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock many-body theory. Comparing with the results for quark matter within the rainbow approximation, the Ball-Chiu (BC) Ansatz and the 1BC Ansatz for the quark-gluon vertex lead to a reduction of the effective interaction at finite chemical potential, qualitatively similar to the effect of our gluon propagator. We find that the phase transition and the equation of state of the quark or mixed phase and consequently the resulting hybrid star mass and radius depend mainly on a global reduction of the effective interaction due to effects of both the quark-gluon vertex and gluon propagator, but are not sensitive to details of the vertex Ansatz.

  16. Quark-Gluon Plasma Model and Origin of Magic Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghahramany, N.; Ghanaatian, M.; Hooshmand, M.

    2008-04-21

    Using Boltzman distribution in a quark-gluon plasma sample it is possible to obtain all existing magic numbers and their extensions without applying the spin and spin-orbit couplings. In this model it is assumed that in a quark-gluon thermodynamic plasma, quarks have no interactions and they are trying to form nucleons. Considering a lattice for a central quark and the surrounding quarks, using a statistical approach to find the maximum number of microstates, the origin of magic numbers is explained and a new magic number is obtained.

  17. Phase diagram of neutral quark matter in nonlocal chiral quark models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Dumm, D.; Blaschke, D. B.; Grunfeld, A. G.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2006-06-01

    We consider the phase diagram of two-flavor quark matter under neutron star constraints for two nonlocal, covariant quark models within the mean-field approximation. In the first case (Model I) the nonlocality arises from the regularization procedure, motivated by the instanton liquid model, whereas in the second one (Model II) a separable approximation of the one-gluon exchange interaction is applied. We find that Model II predicts a larger quark mass gap and a chiral symmetry breaking (CSB) phase transition line which extends 15 20% further into the phase diagram spanned by temperature (T) and chemical potential (μ). The corresponding critical temperature at μ=0, Tc(0)≃140MeV, is in better accordance to recent lattice QCD results than the prediction of the standard local NJL model, which exceeds 200 MeV. For both Model I and Model II we have considered various coupling strengths in the scalar diquark channel, showing that different low-temperature quark matter phases can occur at intermediate densities: a normal quark matter (NQM) phase, a two-flavor superconducting (2SC) quark matter phase and a mixed 2SC-NQM phase. Although in most cases there is also a gapless 2SC phase, this occurs in general in a small region at nonzero temperatures, thus its effect should be negligible for compact star applications.

  18. Quark matter and meson properties in a Nonlocal SU(3) chiral quark model at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Contrera, G. A.

    2012-06-15

    We study the finite temperature behavior of light scalar and pseudoscalar meson properties in the context of a three-flavor nonlocal chiral quark model. The model includes mixing with active strangeness degrees of freedom, and takes care of the effect of gauge interactions by coupling the quarks with a background color field. We analyze the chiral restoration and deconfinement transitions, as well as the temperature dependence of meson masses, mixing angles, and decay constants.

  19. Top Quark Properties in Little Higgs Models

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Perelstein, M.; Petriello, F.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-12-08

    Identifying the mechanism which breaks electroweak symmetry and generates fermion masses is one of the main physics goals for both the LHC and the ILC. Studies of the top quark have the potential to illuminate this issue; since it is the heaviest of the Standard Model (SM) fermions, the top is expected to couple strongly to the symmetry-breaking sector. Consequently, the structure of that sector can have significant, potentially observable effects on the properties of the top. for example, it is well known that the vector and axial t{bar t}Z form factors receive large corrections (of order 5-10%) in certain models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking [1]. At future colliders such as the LHC and the ILC, we will be able to pursue a program of precision top physics, similar to the program studying the Z at LEP and SLC. In this manuscript, they study the corrections to the top quark properties in ''Little Higgs'' models of electroweak symmetry breaking [2], and compare the expected deviations from the SM predictions with expected sensitivities of experiments at the LHC and the ILC. In the Little Higgs models, electroweak symmetry is driven by the radiative effects from the top sector, including the SM-like top and its heavy counterpart, a TeV-scale ''heavy top'' T. Probing this structure experimentally is quite difficult. While the LHC should be able to discover the T quark, its potential for studying its couplings is limited [3,4]. Direct production of the T will likely be beyond the kinematic reach of the ILC. However, we will show below that the corrections to the gauge couplings of the SM top, induced by its mixing with the T, will be observable at the ILC throughout the parameter range consistent with naturalness. Measuring these corrections will provide a unique window on the top sector of the Little Higgs. Many Little Higgs models have been proposed in the literature. We will consider two examples in this study, the ''Littlest Higgs'' model [5], and its

  20. Quark-jet model for transverse momentum dependent fragmentation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, W.; Kotzinian, A.; Matevosyan, H. H.; Ninomiya, Y.; Thomas, A. W.; Yazaki, K.

    2016-08-01

    In order to describe the hadronization of polarized quarks, we discuss an extension of the quark-jet model to transverse momentum dependent fragmentation functions. The description is based on a product ansatz, where each factor in the product represents one of the transverse momentum dependent splitting functions, which can be calculated by using effective quark theories. The resulting integral equations and sum rules are discussed in detail for the case of inclusive pion production. In particular, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional momentum sum rules are satisfied naturally in this transverse momentum dependent quark-jet model. Our results are well suited for numerical calculations in effective quark theories and can be implemented in Monte Carlo simulations of polarized quark hadronization processes.

  1. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  2. Semileptonic meson decays in the quark model: An update

    SciTech Connect

    D. Scora; N. Isgur

    1995-03-01

    The authors present the predictions of ISGW2, an update of the ISGW quark model for semileptonic meson decays. The updated model incorporates a number of features which should make it more reliable, including the constraints imposed by Heavy Quark Symmetry, hyperfine distortions of wave-functions, and form factors with more realistic high recoil behaviors.

  3. Quark Number Fluctuations in a Chiral Model with a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lidens; Incera, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    An important consequence of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the existence of a phase transition between the hadronic and quark-gluon phases. The hadronic phase exhibits confinement and broken chiral symmetry. The quark-gluon phase exhibits deconfinement and chiral symmetry. The phase boundary can be seen in the temperature-quark chemical potential plane. For large chemical potential, there is a first order chiral transition. For small chemical potential and 2 massless quarks flavors, there is a second order chiral transition. Thus, a critical end point (CEP) is expected where the first order phase transitions end. In the chiral limit or for finite quark masses, the net quark number susceptibility diverges at the CEP. However, when clear from the CEP, it is finite. Hence, the net quark number susceptibility is non-monotonic along the phase boundary if there is a CEP. In this case, the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model is composed at finite temperature and quark and isospin chemical potentials. The addition of a strong magnetic field in the model is significant because strong magnetic fields are produced in off-central heavy-ion collisions and are present at the core of neutron stars.

  4. Successes and failures of the constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Our approach considers the model as a possible bridge between QCD and the experimental data and examines its predictions to see where these succeed and where they fail. We also attempt to improve the model by looking for additional simple assumptions which give better fits to the experimental data. But we avoid complicated models with too many ad hoc assumptions and too many free parameters; these can fit everything but teach us nothing. We define our constituent quark model by analogy with the constituent electron model of the atom and the constituent nucleon model of the nucleus. In the same way that an atom is assumed to consist only of constituent electrons and a central Coulomb field and a nucleus is assumed to consist only of constituent nucleons hadrons are assumed to consist only of their constituent valence quarks with no bag, no glue, no ocean, nor other constituents. Although these constituent models are oversimplified and neglect other constituents we push them as far as we can. Atomic physics has photons and vacuum polarization as well as constituent electrons, but the constituent model is adequate for calculating most features of the spectrum when finer details like the Lamb shift are neglected. 54 references.

  5. The Thomas–Fermi quark model: Non-relativistic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Quan Wilcox, Walter

    2014-02-15

    The first numerical investigation of non-relativistic aspects of the Thomas–Fermi (TF) statistical multi-quark model is given. We begin with a review of the traditional TF model without an explicit spin interaction and find that the spin splittings are too small in this approach. An explicit spin interaction is then introduced which entails the definition of a generalized spin “flavor”. We investigate baryonic states in this approach which can be described with two inequivalent wave functions; such states can however apply to multiple degenerate flavors. We find that the model requires a spatial separation of quark flavors, even if completely degenerate. Although the TF model is designed to investigate the possibility of many-quark states, we find surprisingly that it may be used to fit the low energy spectrum of almost all ground state octet and decuplet baryons. The charge radii of such states are determined and compared with lattice calculations and other models. The low energy fit obtained allows us to extrapolate to the six-quark doubly strange H-dibaryon state, flavor symmetric strange states of higher quark content and possible six quark nucleon–nucleon resonances. The emphasis here is on the systematics revealed in this approach. We view our model as a versatile and convenient tool for quickly assessing the characteristics of new, possibly bound, particle states of higher quark number content. -- Highlights: • First application of the statistical Thomas–Fermi quark model to baryonic systems. • Novel aspects: spin as generalized flavor; spatial separation of quark flavor phases. • The model is statistical, but the low energy baryonic spectrum is successfully fit. • Numerical applications include the H-dibaryon, strange states and nucleon resonances. • The statistical point of view does not encourage the idea of bound many-quark baryons.

  6. Relativistic quark model for the Omega- electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima, Franz Gross

    2009-08-01

    We compute the Omega- electromagnetic form factors and the decuplet baryon magnetic moments using a quark model application of the Covariant Spectator Theory. Our predictions for the Omega- electromagnetic form factors can be tested in the future by lattice QCD simulations at the physical strange quark mass.

  7. CP Violation in Six Quark Scheme -- Legacy of Sakata Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    After a short review of the activities of Shoichi Sakata and his group, how the six-quark model explains CP violation is described. Experimental verification of the model at the B-factories is also briefly discussed.

  8. Quark born diagrams: Meson-meson scattering amplitudes from the nonrelativistic quark potential model

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. |

    1992-12-31

    In this talk I summarize recent calculations of meson-meson scattering amplitudes in the nonrelativistic quark potential model, which assume that the scattering mechanism is one-gluon-exchange followed by constituent exchange (OGE+CEX). We refer to the scattering diagrams as ``quark Born diagrams``. For the cases chosen to isolate this mechanism, I=2 {pi}{pi} and I=3/2 K{pi}, the theoretical results are in remarkably good agreement with experimental S- and P-wave phase shifts and PCAC scattering lengths, given standard potential-model parameters.

  9. Quark born diagrams: Meson-meson scattering amplitudes from the nonrelativistic quark potential model

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    In this talk I summarize recent calculations of meson-meson scattering amplitudes in the nonrelativistic quark potential model, which assume that the scattering mechanism is one-gluon-exchange followed by constituent exchange (OGE+CEX). We refer to the scattering diagrams as quark Born diagrams''. For the cases chosen to isolate this mechanism, I=2 [pi][pi] and I=3/2 K[pi], the theoretical results are in remarkably good agreement with experimental S- and P-wave phase shifts and PCAC scattering lengths, given standard potential-model parameters.

  10. Automorphism groups of composition algebras and quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerregard, P.A.; Gonzalez, C.M.

    1996-12-01

    In this the authors study the automorphisms and derivations of real composition algebras with a view to its physical interpretations. They obtain canonical forms with a special stress in the four and eight dimensional cases. Also, using this description, they work with two mathematical models which describe some particles with certain observables in a surprising way. A first model, split g{sub 2}, describes two observables for three quarks, their antiquarks, and eight mesons combining the quarks involved. A second one, so(4,4) {circle_plus} so(2,2), describes all the observables for all quarks (u, d, s, c, b and t).

  11. Exotic multi-quark states in the deconfined phase from gravity dual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burikham, P.; Chatrabhuti, A.; Hirunsirisawat, E.

    2009-05-01

    In the deconfined phase of quark-gluon plasma, it seems that most of the quarks, antiquarks and gluons should be effectively free in the absence of the linear confining potential. However, the remaining Coulomb-type potential between quarks in the plasma could still be sufficiently strong that certain bound states, notably of heavy quarks such as J/ψ are stable even in the deconfined plasma up to a certain temperature. Baryons can also exist in the deconfined phase provided that the density is sufficiently large. We study three kinds of exotic multi-quark bound states in the deconfined phase of quark-gluon plasma from gravity dual models in addition to the normal baryon. They are k-baryon, (N+bar k)-baryon and a bound state of j mesons which we call ``j-mesonance''. Binding energies and screening lengths of these exotic states are studied and are found to have similar properties to those of mesons and baryons at the leading order. Phase diagram for the exotic nuclear phases is subsequently studied in the Sakai-Sugimoto model. Even though the exotics are less stable than normal baryons, in the region of high chemical potential and low temperature, they are more stable thermodynamically than the vacuum and chiral-symmetric quark-gluon plasma phases (χS-QGP).

  12. Dibaryons with two strange quarks and total spin zero in a constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Woosung; Park, Aaron; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the symmetry property and construct the wave function of the dibaryon states containing two strange quarks with S =0 in both the flavor SU(3) symmetric and breaking cases. We discuss how the color ⊗ isospin ⊗ spin states of dibaryon in the symmetry broken case of flavor SU(3) can be extracted from the fully antisymmetric states in flavor SU(3). The stability of the dibaryon against the strong decay into two baryons is then discussed, by using the variational method within a constituent quark model with confining and color-spin interactions. To compare our results with those from lattice QCD in the flavor SU(3) limit, we search for the stable H-dibaryon in a wide range of π meson masses. We find that with the given potential, there is no compact six-quark dibaryon state in the SU(3) flavor symmetry broken case with realistic quark masses as well as in the flavor SU(3) symmetric case in a wide range of quark masses.

  13. Quark model study of the semileptonic B {yields} {pi} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Albertus, C.; Flynn, J. M.; Hernandez, E.; Verde-Velasco, J. M.; Nieves, J.

    2007-02-27

    The semileptonic decay B {yields} {pi}l{nu}-barl is studied starting from a simple quark model and taking into account the effect of the B* resonance. A novel, multiply subtracted, Omnes dispersion relation has been implemented to extend the predictions of the quark model to all physical q2 values. We find |Vub| = 0.0034 {+-} 0.0003(exp.) {+-} 0.0007(theory), in good agreement with experiment.

  14. Finite Hypernuclei in the Latest Quark-Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre A. M. Guichon; Anthony W. Thomas; Kazuo Tsushima

    2007-12-12

    The most recent development of the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model, in which the effect of the mean scalar field in-medium on the hyperfine interaction is also included self-consistently, is used to compute the properties of finite hypernuclei. The calculations for $\\Lambda$ and $\\Xi$ hypernuclei are of comparable quality to earlier QMC results without the additional parameter needed there. Even more significantly, the additional repulsion associated with the increased hyperfine interaction in-medium completely changes the predictions for $\\Sigma$ hypernuclei. Whereas in the earlier work they were bound by an amount similar to $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei, here they are unbound, in qualitative agreement with the experimental absence of such states. The equivalent non-relativistic potential felt by the $\\Sigma$ is repulsive inside the nuclear interior and weakly attractive in the nuclear surface, as suggested by the analysis of $\\Sigma$-atoms.

  15. Isospin symmetry breaking in the chiral quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huiying; Zhang, Xinyu; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the isospin symmetry breaking (ISB) of the valence- and sea-quark distributions between the proton and the neutron in the framework of the chiral quark model. We assume that isospin symmetry breaking is the result of mass differences between isospin multiplets and then analyze the effects of isospin symmetry breaking on the Gottfried sum rule and the NuTeV anomaly. We show that, although both flavor asymmetry in the nucleon sea and the ISB between the proton and the neutron can lead to the violation of the Gottfried sum rule, the main contribution is from the flavor asymmetry in the framework of the chiral quark model. We also find that the correction to the NuTeV anomaly is in an opposite direction, so the NuTeV anomaly cannot be removed by isospin symmetry breaking in the chiral quark model. It is remarkable that our results of ISB for both valence- and sea-quark distributions are consistent with the Martin-Roberts-Stirling-Thorne parametrization of quark distributions.

  16. Linearized Boltzmann transport model for jet propagation in the quark-gluon plasma: Heavy quark evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Luo, Tan; Qin, Guang-You; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-07-01

    A linearized Boltzmann transport (LBT) model coupled with hydrodynamical background is established to describe the evolution of jet shower partons and medium excitations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. We extend the LBT model to include both elastic and inelastic processes for light and heavy partons in the quark-gluon plasma. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is developed for the hadronization of heavy quarks. Within this framework, we investigate how heavy flavor observables depend on various ingredients, such as different energy loss and hadronization mechanisms, the momentum and temperature dependences of the transport coefficients, and the radial flow of the expanding fireball. Our model calculations show good descriptions of the D meson suppression and elliptic flow observed at the Larege Hadron Collider and the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The prediction for the Pb-Pb collisions at √{sN N}=5.02 TeV is provided.

  17. Mixed additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Francisco; Covas, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We consider mixed models y =∑i =0 w Xiβi with V (y )=∑i =1 w θiMi Where Mi=XiXi⊤ , i = 1, . . ., w, and µ = X0β0. For these we will estimate the variance components θ1, . . ., θw, aswell estimable vectors through the decomposition of the initial model into sub-models y(h), h ∈ Γ, with V (y (h ))=γ (h )Ig (h )h ∈Γ . Moreover we will consider L extensions of these models, i.e., y˚=Ly+ɛ, where L=D (1n1, . . ., 1nw) and ɛ, independent of y, has null mean vector and variance covariance matrix θw+1Iw, where w =∑i =1 n wi .

  18. Thermodynamics of an exactly solvable confining quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintz, Bruno W.

    2016-04-01

    The grand partition function of a model of confined quarks is exactly calculated at arbitrary temperatures and quark chemical potentials. The model is inspired by a version of QCD where the usual (perturbative) BRST symmetry is broken in the infrared, while possessing a quark mass function compatible with nonperturbative analyses of lattice simulations and Dyson-Schwinger equations. Even though the model is defined at tree level, we show that it produces a non-trivial and stable thermodynamic behaviour at any temperature or chemical potential. Results for the pressure, the entropy and the trace anomaly as a function of the temperature are qualitatively compatible with the effect of non-perturbative interactions as observed in lattice simulations. The finite density thermodynamics is also shown to contain non-trivial features, being far away from an ideal gas picture.

  19. Non-leptonic decays in an extended chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Eeg, J. O.

    2012-10-23

    We consider the color suppressed (nonfactorizable) amplitude for the decay mode B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. We treat the b-quark in the heavy quark limit and the energetic light (u,d,s) quarks within a variant of Large Energy Effective Theory combined with an extension of chiral quark models. Our calculated amplitude for B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is suppressed by a factor of order {Lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b} with respect to the factorized amplitude, as it should according to QCD-factorization. Further, for reasonable values of the (model dependent) gluon condensate and the constituent quark mass, the calculated nonfactorizable amplitude for B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} can easily accomodate the experimental value. Unfortunately, the color suppressed amplitude is very sensitive to the values of these model dependent parameters. Therefore fine-tuning is necessary in order to obtain an amplitude compatible with the experimental result for B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  20. Magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons using effective quark masses in a chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdhar, Aarti; Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have been calculated in the chiral constituent quark model (χ CQM ) with explicit results for the contribution coming from the valence quark polarizations, sea quark polarizations, and their orbital angular momentum. Since the JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have short lifetimes, the experimental information about them is limited. The χ CQM has important implications for chiral symmetry breaking as well as SU(3) symmetry breaking since it works in the region between the QCD confinement scale and the chiral symmetry breaking scale. The predictions in the model not only give a satisfactory fit when compared with the experimental data but also show improvement over the other models. The effect of the confinement on quark masses has also been discussed in detail and the results of χ CQM are found to improve further with the inclusion of effective quark masses.

  1. Shear and bulk viscosities of quark matter from quark-meson fluctuations in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Peixoto, Thiago C.; Roy, Victor; Serna, Fernando E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-04-01

    We have calculated the temperature dependence of shear η and bulk ζ viscosities of quark matter due to quark-meson fluctuations. The quark thermal width originating from quantum fluctuations of quark-π and quark-σ loops at finite temperature is calculated with the formalism of real-time thermal field theory. Temperature-dependent constituent-quark and meson masses and quark-meson couplings are obtained in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We found a nontrivial influence of the temperature-dependent masses and couplings on the Landau-cut structure of the quark self-energy. Our results for the ratios η /s and ζ /s , where s is the entropy density (also determined in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the quasiparticle approximation), are in fair agreement with results of the literature obtained from different models and techniques. In particular, our result for η /s has a minimum very close to the quantum lower bound, η /s =1 /4 π .

  2. NN interaction from bag-model quark interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, B. L. G.; Bozoian, M.; Maslow, J. N.; Weber, H. J.

    1982-03-01

    A partial-wave helicity-state analysis of elastic nucleon-nuclon scattering is carried out in momentum space. Its basis is a one- and two-boson exchange amplitude from a bag-model quark interchange mechanism. The resulting phase shifts and bound-state parameters of the deuteron are compared with other meson theoretic potentials and data up to laboratory energies of ~350 MeV. NUCLEAR REACTIONS NN elastic scattering, Elab<=350 MeV. Coupling constants, form factors of renormalized OBE calculated from bag-model quark interchange. Phase shifts, deuteron parameters calculated from covariant partial-wave analysis.

  3. Octet Baryon Electromagnetic Form Factors in a Relativistic Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gilberto Ramalho, Kazuo Tsushima

    2011-09-01

    We study the octet baryon electromagnetic properties by applying the covariant spectator quark model, and provide covariant parametrization that can be used to study baryon electromagnetic reactions. While we use the lattice QCD data in the large pion mass regime (small pion cloud effects) to determine the parameters of the model in the valence quark sector, we use the nucleon physical and octet baryon magnetic moment data to parameterize the pion cloud contributions. The valence quark contributions for the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors are estimated by extrapolating the lattice parametrization in the large pion mass regime to the physical regime. As for the pion cloud contributions, we parameterize them in a covariant, phenomenological manner, combined with SU(3) symmetry. We also discuss the impact of the pion cloud effects on the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors and their radii.

  4. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields in chiral models

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, Aziz; Providencia, Constanca

    2011-05-15

    The chiral model is used to describe quark matter under strong magnetic fields and is compared to other models, the MIT bag model and the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The effect of vacuum corrections due to the magnetic field is discussed. It is shown that if the magnetic-field vacuum corrections are not taken into account explicitly, the parameters of the models should be fitted to low-density meson properties in the presence of the magnetic field.

  5. Nucleation of quark matter in the PQM model

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, Bruno W.; Stiele, Rainer; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2013-03-25

    We use Langer's theory to calculate the surface tension of critical bubbles in a first-order quark-hadron phase transition at moderate and high baryon chemical potential, as predicted by the Polyakov-Quark-Meson (PQM) model at the mean-field level. We define an effective 4-dimensional order parameter, which is used to overestimate the surface tension of nucleating bubbles within the thin-wall approximation. We find relatively low values for the surface tension, {Sigma} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 15MeV/fm{sup 2}. This implies that a metastable state, such as a supercooled quark-gluon plasma (QGP), quickly decays even in regions relatively close to the coexistence line of the phase diagram. Possible consequences for cosmology are briefly outlined.

  6. Nucleation of quark matter in the PQM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintz, Bruno W.; Stiele, Rainer; Ramos, Rudnei O.; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    We use Langer's theory to calculate the surface tension of critical bubbles in a first-order quark-hadron phase transition at moderate and high baryon chemical potential, as predicted by the Polyakov-Quark-Meson (PQM) model at the mean-field level. We define an effective 4-dimensional order parameter, which is used to overestimate the surface tension of nucleating bubbles within the thin-wall approximation. We find relatively low values for the surface tension, Σ ≲ 15MeV/fm2. This implies that a metastable state, such as a supercooled quark-gluon plasma (QGP), quickly decays even in regions relatively close to the coexistence line of the phase diagram. Possible consequences for cosmology are briefly outlined.

  7. Rare {Lambda}{sub b} decays in a quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, L.; Roberts, W.

    2010-08-05

    Hadronic form factors for the rare weak transitions {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}{sup (*)} are calculated using a nonrelativistic quark model. The form factors obtained in this way are found to satisfy the relationships expecetd from the heavy quark effective theory. Differential decay rates and branching ratios are calculated for the dileptonic decays {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}, for both ground state and excited daughter baryons. Inclusion of the long distance contributions from charmonium resonances significantly enhances the decay rates. Future work is outlined.

  8. Constituent quarks in the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    Tuning effect in particle masses manifests itself in integer relations between masses of leptons, quarks, meson and baryons. It includes also dimensionless relation between such well-known SM-parameters as masses of the muon and Z-boson, mμ/MZ=115.9·10-5 coinciding with the QED radiative correction α/2π=115.9·10-5 considered for the electron mass me by V. Belokurov and D. Shirkov. Integer presentation of particle masses (n=1,13,16,17,18,115) for values mμ, fπ, mπ, ΔMΔ, neutron mass and (n=3x16, n=3x18) for constituent quarks M"q=mp,mω/2=780 MeV and Mq=3ΔMΔ=mΞ/3=441 MeV were found with the period δ=16me. More accurate relations with δ were found from precise ratio mn/me=1838.6836605(11). The shift δmn=161.65(6) keV of neutron mass from 115δ-me accounts integer ratio δmN/δmn=8(1.0001(1)) with nucleon mass splitting. With fundamental boson masses the parameters Mq=3ΔMΔ=mΞ/3=441 MeV and M”q =mρ/2=388.8(2) MeV are in ratios MZ/Mq=LZ=206.8 and MW/M”q =LW=207.3 coinciding with lepton ratio L=mμ/me=13·16-1=207.

  9. Quark-meson coupling model with the cloudy bag

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, S.; Miyatsu, T.; Saito, Kenji; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2008-07-01

    Using the volume coupling version of the cloudy bag model, the quark-meson coupling model is extended to study the role of pion field and the properties of nuclear matter. The extended model includes the effect of gluon exchange as well as the pion-cloud effect, and provides a good description of the nuclear matter properties. The relationship between the extended model and the EFT approach to nuclear matter is also discussed.

  10. An economic subcomponent model of quarks and leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Fang-Xiao; Tu, Tung-Sheng; Xue, Pei-You

    1981-04-01

    The Casalbuoni-Gatto subcomponent model of quarks and leptons in generalized to extend SU(5) of Georgi and Glashow to the high rank group SU(m) to solve the family problem. It is shown that there is an unique solution with an integral number of families, viz. SU(10) × SU(3)sc.

  11. Two potential quark models for double heavy baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, A. M.; Kozhedub, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Baryons containing two heavy quarks (QQ' q) are treated in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Two non-relativistic potential models are proposed, in which the Schrödinger equation admits a separation of variables in prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates, respectively. In the first model, the potential is equal to the sum of Coulomb potentials of the two heavy quarks, separated from each other by a distance - R and linear potential of confinement. In the second model the center distance parameter R is assumed to be purely imaginary. In this case, the potential is defined by the two-sheeted mapping with singularities being concentrated on a circle rather than at separate points. Thus, in the first model diquark appears as a segment, and in the second - as a circle. In this paper we calculate the mass spectrum of double heavy baryons in both models, and compare it with previous results.

  12. Quark and gluon decay functions in QCD and recombination model

    SciTech Connect

    Change, V.; Hwa, R.C.

    1980-04-01

    Inclusive longitudinal-momentum distributions of pions in jets initiated by quarks and gluons are determined in perturbative QCD and recombination model. The quark and antiquark joint distributions in jets are first calculated in the leading-order approximation at high Q/sup 2/. Gluons in the jets are completely converted to quark pairs. From the overall distribution q anti q pairs with definite quantum numbers then recombine to form pions. The recombination function for the process is well determined in the valon model. No adjustable parameters are involved in these calculations, and no data at low Q/sup 2/ are used as phenomenological input. The result for the quark decay functions can be compared with data on e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, and the agreement is very good in both shape and normalization. Predictions for the gluon decay functions are presented, but they cannot yet be checked by experiments. The x and Q/sup 2/ dependences of both types of decay functions have been parametrized in simple form suitable for use in theoretical and experimental applications. 17 figures, 1 table.

  13. Quark fragmentation functions in NJL-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Matevosyan, Hrayr; Thomas, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    We report on our studies of quark fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) - jet model. The results of Monte-Carlo simulations for the fragmentation functions to mesons and nucleons, as well as to pion and kaon pairs (dihadron fragmentation functions) are presented. The important role of intermediate vector meson resonances for those semi-inclusive deep inelastic production processes is emphasized. Our studies are very relevant for the extraction of transverse momentum dependent quark distribution functions from measured scattering cross sections. We report on our studies of quark fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) - jet model. The results of Monte-Carlo simulations for the fragmentation functions to mesons and nucleons, as well as to pion and kaon pairs (dihadron fragmentation functions) are presented. The important role of intermediate vector meson resonances for those semi-inclusive deep inelastic production processes is emphasized. Our studies are very relevant for the extraction of transverse momentum dependent quark distribution functions from measured scattering cross sections. Supported by Grant in Aid for Scientific Research, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Project No. 20168769.

  14. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  15. A composite supersymmetric model of quarks and leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, R.

    1983-01-01

    A supersymmetric model is presented in which quarks and leptons (and perhaps weak vector bosons) are composite of fermions and scalars. It may be considered as the supersymmetric extension of a model previously discussed (by Barbieri, Mohapatra and Masiero, and Casalbuoni and Gatto), based on the weak group SU(2) L × SU(2) R × U(1). A speculative interpretation of the families emerges.

  16. Meson phenomenology and phase transitions in nonlocal chiral quark models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlomagno, J. P.; Gomez Dumm, D.; Pagura, V.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2015-07-01

    We study the features of nonlocal chiral quark models that include wave function renormalization. Model parameters are determined from meson phenomenology, considering different nonlocal form factor shapes. In this context we analyze the characteristics of the deconfinement and chiral restoration transitions at finite temperature and chemical potential, introducing the couplings of fermions to the Polyakov loop for different Polyakov potentials. The results for various thermodynamical quantities are compared with data obtained from lattice QCD calculations.

  17. Searching the Inclusive Lepton + Photon + Missing E(T) + b-quark Signature for Radiative Top Quark Decay and Non-Standard-Model Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    In a search for new phenomena in a signature suppressed in the standard model of elementary particles (SM), we compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton ({ell}), a photon ({gamma}), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E{sub T}), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find 28 {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} events versus an expectation of 31.0{sub -3.5}{sup +4.1} events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, simulations predict that the largest SM source is top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, t{bar t} + {gamma}. In the data we observe 16 t{bar t}{gamma} candidate events versus an expectation from non-top-quark SM sources of 11.2{sub -2.1}{sup +2.3}. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total is due to SM top quark production, we estimate the t{bar t} cross section to be 0.15 {+-} 0.08 pb.

  18. Decay constants of pseudoscalar mesons in a relativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Micu, L.

    1997-04-01

    The decay constants of pseudoscalar mesons are calculated in a relativistic quark model which assumes that mesons are made of a valence quark-antiquark pair and of an effective vacuumlike component. The results are given as functions of quark masses and of some free parameters entering the expression of the internal wave functions of the mesons. Using F{sub {pi}{sup +}}=130.7 MeV, F{sub K{sup +}}=159.8 MeV to fix the parameters of the model, we predict 60MeV{le}F{sub D{sup +}}{le}185 MeV, 95MeV{le}F{sub D{sub s}}{le}230 MeV, 80MeV{le}F{sub B{sup +}}{le}205 MeV, 90MeV{le}F{sub B{sub s}}{le}235 MeV for the light quark masses m{sub u}=5.1 MeV, m{sub d}=9.3 MeV, m{sub s}=175 MeV and the heavy quark masses in the range 1GeV{le}m{sub c}{le}1.6 GeV, 4.1GeV{le}m{sub b}{le}4.5 GeV. In the case of light neutral mesons one obtains with the same set of parameters F{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{approx}138 MeV, F{sub {eta}}{approx}130 MeV, F{sub {eta}{sup {prime}}}{approx}78 MeV. The values are in agreement with the experimental data and other theoretical results. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Large degeneracy of excited hadrons and quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Bicudo, P.

    2007-11-01

    The pattern of a large approximate degeneracy of the excited hadron spectra (larger than the chiral restoration degeneracy) is present in the recent experimental report of Bugg. Here we try to model this degeneracy with state of the art quark models. We review how the Coulomb Gauge chiral invariant and confining Bethe-Salpeter equation simplifies in the case of very excited quark-antiquark mesons, including angular or radial excitations, to a Salpeter equation with an ultrarelativistic kinetic energy with the spin-independent part of the potential. The resulting meson spectrum is solved, and the excited chiral restoration is recovered, for all mesons with J>0. Applying the ultrarelativistic simplification to a linear equal-time potential, linear Regge trajectories are obtained, for both angular and radial excitations. The spectrum is also compared with the semiclassical Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization relation. However, the excited angular and radial spectra do not coincide exactly. We then search, with the classical Bertrand theorem, for central potentials producing always classical closed orbits with the ultrarelativistic kinetic energy. We find that no such potential exists, and this implies that no exact larger degeneracy can be obtained in our equal-time framework, with a single principal quantum number comparable to the nonrelativistic Coulomb or harmonic oscillator potentials. Nevertheless we find it plausible that the large experimental approximate degeneracy will be modeled in the future by quark models beyond the present state of the art.

  20. Meson properties in a nonlocal SU(3) chiral quark model at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Contrera, G. A.; Gomez Dumm, D.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2010-11-12

    Finite temperature meson properties are studied in the context of a nonlocal SU(3) quark model which includes flavor mixing and the coupling of quarks to the Polyakov loop (PL). We analyze the behavior of scalar and pseudoscalar meson masses and mixing angles, as well as quark-meson couplings and pseudoscalar meson decay constants.

  1. Semileptonic Decays of Heavy Omega Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts; Simon Capstick

    2006-03-24

    The semileptonic decays of {Omega}{sub c} and {Omega}{sub b} are treated in the framework of a constituent quark model developed in a previous paper on the semileptonic decays of heavy {Lambda} baryons. Analytic results for the form factors for the decays to ground states and a number of excited states are evaluated. For {Omega}{sub b} to {Omega}{sub c} the form factors obtained are shown to satisfy the relations predicted at leading order in the heavy-quark effective theory at the non-recoil point. A modified fit of nonrelativistic and semirelativistic Hamiltonians generates configuration-mixed baryon wave functions from the known masses and the measured {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}e{sup +}{nu} rate, with wave functions expanded in both harmonic oscillator and Sturmian bases. Decay rates of {Omega}{sub b} to pairs of ground and excited {Omega}{sub c} states related by heavy-quark symmetry calculated using these configuration-mixed wave functions are in the ratios expected from heavy-quark effective theory, to a good approximation. Our predictions for the semileptonic elastic branching fraction of {Omega}{sub Q} vary minimally within the models we use. We obtain an average value of (84 {+-} 2%) for the fraction of {Omega}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup (*)} decays to ground states, and 91% for the fraction of {Omega}{sub c} {yields} {Omega}{sup (*)} decays to the ground state {Omega}. The elastic fraction of {Omega}{sub b} {yields} {Omega}{sub c} ranges from about 50% calculated with the two harmonic-oscillator models, to about 67% calculated with the two Sturmian models.

  2. Spin Structure Functions in a Covariant Spectator Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, Franz Gross and M. T. Peña

    2010-12-01

    We apply the covariant spectator quark–diquark model, already probed in the description of the nucleon elastic form factors, to the calculation of the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) spin-independent and spin-dependent structure functions of the nucleon. The nucleon wave function is given by a combination of quark–diquark orbital states, corresponding to S, D and P-waves. A simple form for the quark distribution function associated to the P and D waves is tested.

  3. NN interaction from bag-model quark interchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Bozoian, M.; Maslow, J.N.; Weber, H.J.

    1982-03-01

    A partial-wave helicity-state analysis of elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering is carried out in momentum space. Its basis is a one- and two-boson exchange amplitude from a bag-model quark interchange mechanism. The resulting phase shifts and bound-state parameters of the deuteron are compared with other meson theoretic potentials and data up to laboratory energies of approx.350 MeV.

  4. Semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the semileptonic decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit, which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  5. Quark-gluon vertex model and lattice-QCD data

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M.S.; Tandy, P.C.

    2004-11-01

    A model for the dressed-quark-gluon vertex, at zero gluon momentum, is formed from a nonperturbative extension of the two Feynman diagrams that contribute at one loop in perturbation theory. The required input is an existing ladder-rainbow model Bethe-Salpeter kernel from an approach based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations; no new parameters are introduced. The model includes an Ansatz for the triple-gluon vertex. Two of the three vertex amplitudes from the model provide a pointwise description of the recent quenched-lattice-QCD data. An estimate of the effects of quenching is made.

  6. Models of quark-hadron matter and compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, S.; Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.; Steinheimer, J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenological approaches to Quantum Chromodynamics covering the whole region of low and high temperatures and/or densities must address the problem that the effective degrees of freedom change from hadrons to quarks and gluons. We approach this task with a unified description of hadronic and quark matter allowing for cross-over as well as first or second-order phase transitions. As a further benefit of such an approach, a quantitatively satisfactory description of nuclear ground state matter as well as nuclear and hypernuclear properties can be achieved. We apply this model to neutron stars and consider potential constraints on star properties arising from lattice gauge results in relation with the observation of 2 solar mass stars.

  7. Nontopological soliton in the Polyakov quark-meson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jinshuang; Mao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Within a mean-field approximation, we study a nontopological soliton solution of the Polyakov quark-meson model in the presence of a fermionic vacuum term with two flavors at finite temperature and density. The profile of the effective potential exhibits a stable soliton solution below a critical temperature T ≤Tχc for both the crossover and the first-order phase transitions, and these solutions are calculated here with appropriate boundary conditions. However, it is found that only if T ≤Tdc is the energy of the soliton MN less than the energy of the three free constituent quarks 3 Mq . As T >Tdc , there is an instant delocalization phase transition from hadron matter to quark matter. The phase diagram together with the location of a critical end point has been obtained in the T and μ plane. We notice that two critical temperatures always satisfy Tdc≤Tχc . Finally, we present and compare the result of thermodynamic pressure at zero chemical potential with lattice data.

  8. Additional information on heavy quark parameters from charged lepton forward-backward asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turczyk, Sascha

    2016-04-01

    The determination of | V cb | using inclusive and exclusive (semi-)leptonic decays exhibits a long-standing tension of varying O(3σ ) significance. For the inclusive determination the decay rate is expanded in 1/ m b using heavy quark expansion, and from moments of physical observables the higher order heavy quark parameters are extracted from experimental data in order to assess | V cb | from the normalisation. The drawbacks are high correlations both theoretically as well as experimentally among these observables. We will scrutinise the inclusive determination in order to add a new and less correlated observable. This observable is related to the decay angle of the charged lepton and can help to constrain the important heavy quark parameters in a new way. It may validate the current seemingly stable extraction of | V cb | from inclusive decays or hints to possible issues, and even may be sensitive to New Physics operators.

  9. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, P. K.; Providência, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-01

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  10. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Providencia, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-15

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  11. Exotic hadron production in a quark combination model

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wei; Shao Fenglan; Li Shiyuan; Shang Yonghui; Yao Tao

    2009-09-15

    The philosophy on production of exotic hadrons (multiquark states) in the framework of the quark combination model is investigated, taking f{sub 0}(980) as an example. The production rate and p{sub T} spectra of f{sub 0}(980) considered as (ss) or (sqsq), respectively, are calculated and compared in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. The unitarity of various combination models, when open for exotic hadron production, is addressed.

  12. Azimuthal spin asymmetries in light-cone constituent quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Boffi, S.; Pasquini, B.; Efremov, A. V.; Schweitzer, P.

    2009-05-01

    We present results for all leading-twist azimuthal spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering due to T-even transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions on the basis of a light-cone constituent quark model. Attention is paid to discuss the range of applicability of the model, especially with regard to the scale dependence of the observables and the transverse-momentum dependence of the distributions. We find good agreement with available experimental data and present predictions to be further tested by future CLAS, COMPASS, and HERMES data.

  13. Top Quark Phenomenology in CP-Violating Supersymmetric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Briceno, Alexander

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics so far has successfully described all measurements of phenomena at the subatomic level of ordinary matter at very high precision. The theoretical developments and experimental observations during the last 50 years, including the long sought and recently observed SM Higgs-like boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), have provided us with a framework to understand the strong and the electroweak interactions between fermions, gauge bosons and the scalar boson, the Higgs boson, which is called the SM. However, the SM is considered to be incomplete. It does not provide a framework to include gravity and it does not provide an explanation for a number of observations such as the baryon asymmetry of the Universe (BAU), neutrino oscillations and dark matter. One possible extension of the SM is Supersymmetry, which provides for instance a dark matter candidate. No direct or indirect evidence of Supersymmetry has been observed so far. Searches for supersymmetric particles at high energy collider experiments, for instance, have set limits on parameters of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM (MSSM). Supersymmetry may also affect the properties of SM particles through their virtual presence in higher order corrections in perturbation theory. Here we study indirect, i.e. virtual effects, of Supersymmetry in the production of top quark pairs at the LHC. In particular, we investigate possible CP violating effects due to one loop corrections to top-quark pair production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the context of the complex (MSSM) with minimal flavor violation (MFV). We include the complete supersymmetric QCD as well as supersymmetric electroweak contributions to the two main top-quark pair production mechanisms at the LHC, namely quark-antiquark annihilation, qq → tt, and gluon fusion, gg → tt. At the level of the top quarks, we study in detail spin-spin correlating observables that are sensitive to CP

  14. Strangeness in the Nucleon or the quark model beyond the valence approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1999-01-01

    Simple arguments based on unitarity indicate that meson loops diagrams, induced by an underlying qq pair creation process, should badly disturb the phenomenologically successful spectroscopy and dynamics of the valence quark model, including such simple but mysterious regularities as the OZI rule. The author discusses some recent progress in adding pair creation to the valence quark model in a way which provides rationale for the quark model's success.

  15. General structure of democratic mass matrix of quark sector in E6 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftci, R.; ćiftci, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    An extension of the Standard Model (SM) fermion sector, which is inspired by the E6 Grand Unified Theory (GUT) model, might be a good candidate to explain a number of unanswered questions in SM. Existence of the isosinglet quarks might explain great mass difference of bottom and top quarks. Also, democracy on mass matrix elements is a natural approach in SM. In this study, we have given general structure of Democratic Mass Matrix (DMM) of quark sector in E6 model.

  16. Constituent-quark model for production of forward hyperons in proton-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, F.

    1983-04-01

    Cross sections for the inclusive reactions p+A..--> lambda.. or ..xi../sup 0/+anything in the proton fragmentation region are analyzed in terms of the constituent-quark model. Contributions from the leading single quarks and leading diquarks are determined separately and the results are interpreted in terms of the quark-fragmentation-recombination picture. It is strongly suggested that recombination of leading quarks with a heavy (anti)quark (s,s-bar,c,c-bar, . . .) or a pair of (anti)quarks from the central sea is strongly suppressed compared to recombination with a single light (anti)quark (u, u-bar, d, or d-bar) from the sea.

  17. Parton distribution in pseudoscalar mesons with a light-front constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, J. P. B. C.; Ahmed, Isthiaq; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    We compute the distribution amplitudes of the pion and kaon in the light-front constituent quark model with the symmetric quark-bound state vertex function [1, 2, 3]. In the calculation we explicitly include the flavor-SU(3) symmetry breaking effect in terms of the constituent quark masses of the up (down) and strange quarks. To calculate the kaon parton distribution functions (PDFs), we use both the conditions in the light-cone wave function, i.e., when s ¯ quark is on-shell, and when u quark is on-shell, and make a comparison between them. The kaon PDFs calculated in the two different conditions clearly show asymmetric behaviour due to the flavor SU(3)-symmetry breaking implemented by the quark masses [4, 5].

  18. Hypernuclei in the quark-meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Tsushima, P. A. M. Guichon

    2010-07-01

    We present results of hypernuclei calculated in the latest quark-meson coupling (QMC) model, where the effect of the mean scalar field in-medium on the one-gluon exchange hyperfine interaction, is also included self-consistently. The extra repulsion associated with this increased hyperfine interaction in-medium completely changes the predictions for {\\Sigma} hypernuclei. Whereas in the earlier version of QMC they were bound by an amount similar to {\\Lambda} hypernuclei, they are unbound in the latest version of QMC, in qualitative agreement with the experimental absence of such states.

  19. Viscous quark-gluon plasma model through fluid QCD approach

    SciTech Connect

    Djun, T. P.; Soegijono, B.; Mart, T.; Handoko, L. T. E-mail: Laksana.tri.handoko@lipi.go.id

    2014-09-25

    A Lagrangian density for viscous quark-gluon plasma has been constructed within the fluid-like QCD framework. Gauge symmetry is preserved for all terms inside the Lagrangian, except for the viscous term. The transition mechanism from point particle field to fluid field, and vice versa, are discussed. The energy momentum tensor that is relevant to the gluonic plasma having the nature of fluid bulk of gluon sea is derived within the model. By imposing conservation law in the energy momentum tensor, shear viscosity appears as extractable from the equation.

  20. Particle production within the quark meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.

    2009-07-15

    Quark-meson coupling (QMC) models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter. In the regime of hot hadronic matter very few calculations exist using the QMC model, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. In the present work, we identify the free energy of the bag with the effective mass of the baryons and we calculate the particle production yields on a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with the QMC model and compare them with results obtained previously with other relativistic models. A smaller temperature for the fireball, T=132 MeV, is obtained because of the smaller effective baryon masses predicted by QMC. QMC was also applied to the description of particle yields at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in Pb+Pb collisions.

  1. Proton spin problem and chiral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, J. M. S.; Dahiya, H.; Gupta, M.

    2008-10-13

    Some of the non-relativistic quark model (NRQM) predictions of some spin and flavor parameters are in sharp conflict with the observations made from deep inelastic scattering experiments. Besides this there are other spin and flavor dependent quantities which could not be explained by NRQM. These contradictions are referred to as Proton spin problem. These issues get resolved, to some extent, in Chiral Constituent Quark Model (CQM) which incorporates the basic features of NRQM and chiral symmetry. The implications of the latest data pertaining to u-bar-d-bar asymmetry and the spin polarization functions on the contributions of singlet Goldstone Boson {eta}' within CQM with configuration mixing for explaining the proton spin problem have been investigated. It is found that the present data favors smaller values of the coupling of singlet Goldstone Boson as compared to the corresponding contributions from {pi}, K and {eta}' Goldstone bosons. It seems that a small non-zero value of the coupling of {eta}'({zeta}{ne}0)({zeta}{ne}0) is preferred over {zeta} = -0.10 phenomenologically.

  2. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Reinhard, P. G.; Thomas, A. W.

    2016-03-01

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter.

  3. Understanding the structure of d*(2380) in chiral quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Shen, PengNian; Dong, YuBing; Zhang, ZongYe

    2016-02-01

    The structure and decay properties of d* have been detailedly investigated in both the chiral SU(3) quark model and the extended chiral SU(3) quark model that describe the energies of baryon ground states and the nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering data satisfactorily. By performing a dynamical coupled-channels study of the system of ΔΔ and hidden-color channel (CC) with quantum numbers I( J P ) = 0(3+) in the framework of the resonating group method (RGM), we find that the d* has a mass of about 2.38-2.42 GeV and a root-mean-square radius (RMS) of about 0.76-0.88 fm. The channel wave function is extracted by a projection of the RGM wave function onto the physical basis, and the fraction of CC component in the d* is found to be about 66%-68%, which indicates that the d* is a hexaquark-dominated exotic state. Based on this scenario the partial decay widths of d* → d π 0 π 0 and d∗ → d π + π - are further explicitly evaluated and the total width is then obtained by use of the branching ratios extracted from the measured cross sections of other possible decay channels. Both the mass and the decay width of d* calculated in this work are compatible with the data ( M ≈ 2380 MeV, Γ ≈ 70 MeV) reported by WASA-at-COSY Collaboration.

  4. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model.

    PubMed

    Stone, J R; Guichon, P A M; Reinhard, P G; Thomas, A W

    2016-03-01

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter. PMID:26991171

  5. Charm quark energy loss in infinite QCD matter using a parton cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younus, Mohammed; Coleman-Smith, Christopher E.; Bass, Steffen A.; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2015-02-01

    We utilize the parton cascade model to study the evolution of charm quarks propagating through a thermal brick of QCD matter. We determine the energy loss and the transport coefficient q ̂ for charm quarks. The calculations are done at a constant temperature of 350 MeV and the results are compared to analytical calculations of heavy-quark energy loss in order to validate the applicability of using a parton cascade model for the study of heavy-quark dynamics in hot and dense QCD matter.

  6. Compact stars with a quark core within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, C. H.; Schneider, A. S.; Providencia, C.; Marinho, R. M. Jr.

    2010-07-15

    An ultraviolet cutoff dependent on the chemical potential as proposed by Casalbuoni et al. is used in the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The model is applied to the description of stellar quark matter and compact stars. It is shown that with a new cutoff parametrization it is possible to obtain stable hybrid stars with a quark core. A larger cutoff at finite densities leads to a partial chiral symmetry restoration of quark s at lower densities. A direct consequence is the onset of the s quark in stellar matter at lower densities and a softening of the equation of state.

  7. Quark matter in an SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with two types of vector interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Bin; Ma, Hong-Yang; Dong, Yu-Min; Chang, Su-Ling; Zheng, Chun-Hong; Liu, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the properties of asymmetric quark matter and strange quark matter in the framework of the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with two types of vector interactions: (1) the flavor-dependent repulsion among different flavors of quarks with the coupling constant GV , and (2) the universal repulsion and the vector-isovector interaction among different flavors of quarks with the coupling constants gV and GI V. Using these two types of vector interactions in the NJL model, we study the quark symmetry energy in asymmetric quark matter, the constituent quark mass, the quark fraction, the equation of state in strange quark matter, the maximum mass of a quark star, and the properties of the QCD phase diagram. We find that including the two types of vector interactions in the SU(3) NJL model can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. In particular, our results indicate that we can describe PSR J 1614 -2230 and PSR J 0348 +0432 as quark stars by considering the universal repulsion and the vector-isovector interaction among quark matter in the SU(3) NJL model.

  8. Charmed baryon strong decays in a chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Xianhui; Zhao Qiang

    2008-04-01

    Charmed baryon strong decays are studied in a chiral quark model. The data for the decays of {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}(2593), {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}(2625), {sigma}{sub c}{sup ++,+,0}, and {sigma}{sub c}{sup +,0}(2520) are accounted for successfully, which allows one to fix the pseudoscalar-meson-quark couplings in an effective chiral Lagrangian. Extending this framework to analyze the strong decays of the newly observed charmed baryons, we classify that {lambda}{sub c}(2880) and {lambda}{sub c}(2940) as D-wave states in the N=2 shell; {lambda}{sub c}(2880) could be |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 2}D{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}(3/2){sup +}> and {lambda}{sub c}(2940) could be |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 2}D{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}(5/2){sup +}>. Our calculation also suggests that {lambda}{sub c}(2765) is very likely a {rho}-mode P-wave excited state in the N=1 shell, and favors a |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 4}P{sub {rho}}(1/2){sup -}> configuration. The {sigma}{sub c}(2800) favors being a |{sigma}{sub c}{sup 2}P{sub {lambda}}(1/2){sup -}> state. But its being |{sigma}{sub c}{sup ++4}P{sub {lambda}}(5/2){sup -}> cannot be ruled out.

  9. Exclusive versus inclusive semileptonic {anti B} decays in the quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1996-10-01

    Some emerging difficulties in the theoretical description of exclusive semileptonic {anti B} decays are discussed in the context of the quark model. While there are no unambiguous problems at this time, the author discusses physics beyond the valence quark model which should eventually be probed by precision measurements of B semileptonic decays.

  10. Baryon spectroscopy in a three-quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a three-body quark model for investigating the internal structure of baryons as well as baryon spectroscopy. In order to describe the SU(6) -invariant part of the spectrum, we assumed the spin-independent part of the interaction hypercentral, and treated using the hyperspherical formalism. For SU(6) -invariant potential, we used a generalized version of the popular "Coulomb-plus-linear" potential which contains "linear-plus-logarithmic" terms as confinement part and some inverse power terms. To obtain an analytical solution, we applied some approximations for dealing with problematic linear and logarithmic terms, leading to a qualitative reproducing of the spectrum. Then, to describe the hyperfine structure of the baryon and the splittings within the SU(6) -multiplets, we used the generalized Gürsey-Radicati Mass Formula as a SU(6) breaking interaction. Our calculations lead to a generally fair description of the baryon spectrum.

  11. Aspects of the strongly interacting matter phase diagram within non-local quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Pagura, V.; Dumm, D. G.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2013-03-25

    We study a nonlocal extension of the so-called Polyakov Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and chemical potential, considering the impact of the presence of dynamical quarks on the scale parameter appearing in the Polyakov potential. Both real and imaginary chemical potentials are considered. The effect of varying the current quark mass is also investigated.

  12. TMDs and Azimuthal Spin Asymmetries in a Light-Cone Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquini, B.; Boffi, S.; Efremov, A. V.; Schweitzer, P.

    2009-08-04

    The main properties of the leading-twist transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in a light-cone constituent quark model of the nucleon are reviewed, with focus on the role of the spin-spin and spin-orbit correlations of quarks. Results for azimuthal single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering are also discussed.

  13. Semileptonic decay constants of octet baryons in the chiral quark-soliton model

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.; Polyakov, M.V.; Praszalowicz, M.; Goeke, K.

    1998-01-01

    Based on the recent study of the magnetic moments and axial-vector constants within the framework of the chiral quark-soliton model, we investigate the baryon semileptonic decay constants (f{sub 1},f{sub 2}) and (g{sub 1},g{sub 2}). Employing the relations between the diagonal transition matrix elements and off-diagonal ones in the vector and axial-vector channels, we obtain the ratios of baryon semileptonic decay constants f{sub 2}/f{sub 1} and g{sub 1}/f{sub 1}. The F/D ratio is also discussed and found that the value predicted by the present model naturally lies between that of the Skyrme model and that of the nonrelativistic quark model. The singlet axial-vector constant g{sub A}{sup (0)} can be expressed in terms of the F/D ratio and g{sub A}{sup (3)} in the present model and turns out to be small. The results are compared with available experimental data and found to be in good agreement with them. In addition, the induced pseudotensor coupling constants g{sub 2}/f{sub 1} are calculated, the SU(3) symmetry breaking being considered. The results indicate that the effect of SU(3) symmetry breaking might play an important role for some decay modes in hyperon semileptonic decay. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Dual quark condensate in the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2009-12-01

    The dual quark condensate {sigma}{sup (n)} proposed recently as a new order parameter of the spontaneous breaking of the Z{sub 3} symmetry are evaluated by the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model, where n are winding numbers. The Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model well reproduces lattice QCD data on {sigma}{sup (1)} measured very lately. The dual quark condensate {sigma}{sup (n)} at higher temperatures is sensitive to the strength of the vector-type four-quark interaction in the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and hence a good quantity to determine the strength.

  15. The Top Quark as a Window to Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chiu-Tien

    2013-01-01

    The top quark was the last of the Standard Model quarks to be discovered, and is of considerable interest. The closeness of the top quark mass to the electroweak scale is suggestive that the top quark could be closely related to the mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking. Any new physics in electroweak symmetry breaking models could then preferentially couple to the top quark, making the top quark a promising probe for new physics. In this thesis, we will explore two aspects of the top quark as a harbinger to new physics: the top forward-backward asymmetry as seen at the Tevatron and the search for stops. In this thesis, we will discuss the Asymmetric Left-Right Model (ALRM), a model that is based on the gauge group $U'(1)\\times SU(2)\\times SU'(2)$ with couplings $g_1^\\prime, g_2^\\prime,$ and $g'$ associated with the fields $B',W,W'$, respectively, and show how this model can explain the top forward-backward asymmetry. We will then explore the scalar sector of the ALRM, and provide a specific Higgs mechanism that provides the masses for the $W'$ and $Z'$ bosons. The top forward-backward asymmetry is a test of invariance of charge-conjugation. Thus, we look at the $X$-gluon model, a model that was motivated by the top forward-backward asymmetry, and show that one can look at the longitudinal polarization of the top-quark to test parity conservation. Finally, we investigate searches for stop squarks, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using shape-based analyses.

  16. The Top Quark as a Window to Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chiu-Tien

    The top quark was the last of the Standard Model quarks to be discovered, and is of considerable interest. The closeness of the top quark mass to the electroweak scale is suggestive that the top quark could be closely related to the mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking. Any new physics in electroweak symmetry breaking models could then preferentially couple to the top quark, making the top quark a promising probe for new physics. In this thesis, we will explore two aspects of the top quark as a harbinger to new physics: the top forward-backward asymmetry as seen at the Tevatron and the search for stops. In this thesis, we will discuss the Asymmetric Left-Right Model (ALRM), a model that is based on the gauge group U'(1) x SU(2) x SU'(2) with couplings g' 1,g'2; and g' associated with the fields B',W,W', respectively, and show how this model can explain the top forwardbackward asymmetry. We will then explore the scalar sector of the ALRM, and provide a specific Higgs mechanism that provides the masses for the W' and Z' bosons. The top forward-backward asymmetry is a test of invariance of chargeconjugation. Thus, we look at the X-gluon model, a model that was motivated by the top forward-backward asymmetry, and show that one can look at the longitudinal polarization of the top-quark to test parity conservation. Finally, we investigate searches for stop squarks, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using shape-based analyses.

  17. Confronting effective models for deconfinement in dense quark matter with lattice data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jens O.; Brauner, Tomáš; Naylor, William R.

    2015-12-01

    Ab initio numerical simulations of the thermodynamics of dense quark matter remain a challenge. Apart from the infamous sign problem, lattice methods have to deal with finite volume and discretization effects as well as with the necessity to introduce sources for symmetry-breaking order parameters. We study these artifacts in the Polyakov-loop-extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model and compare its predictions to existing lattice data for cold and dense two-color matter with two flavors of Wilson quarks. To achieve even qualitative agreement with lattice data requires the introduction of two novel elements in the model: (i) explicit chiral symmetry breaking in the effective contact four-fermion interaction, referred to as the chiral twist, and (ii) renormalization of the Polyakov loop. The feedback of the dense medium to the gauge sector is modeled by a chemical-potential-dependent scale in the Polyakov-loop potential. In contrast to previously used analytical Ansätze, we determine its dependence on the chemical potential from lattice data for the expectation value of the Polyakov loop. Finally, we propose adding a two-derivative operator to our effective model. This term acts as an additional source of explicit chiral symmetry breaking, mimicking an analogous term in the lattice Wilson action.

  18. Dark matter and dark energy from quark bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Brilenkov, Maxim; Eingorn, Maxim; Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Zhuk, Alexander E-mail: maxim.eingorn@gmail.com E-mail: ai.zhuk2@gmail.com

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the present expansion of our Universe endowed with relict colored objects — quarks and gluons — that survived hadronization either as isolated islands of quark-gluon ''nuggets'' or spread uniformly in the Universe. In the first scenario, the QNs can play the role of dark matter. In the second scenario, we demonstrate that uniform colored objects can play the role of dark energy providing the late-time accelerating expansion of the Universe.

  19. Forward-backward asymmetry of the top quark in diquark models

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Chen, Chuan-Hung

    2010-08-01

    Motivated by the recent unexpected large forward-backward asymmetry of the top-quark observed by D0 and CDF at the Tevatron, we investigate a possible explanation for the anomaly within the framework of diquark models. In the diquark models, the top-quark pair production is mediated by the u-channel diagram. It is found that the color-triplet diquark can generate the forward-backward asymmetry of 20% when the constraint from the cross section of the top-quark pair production is taken into account.

  20. Matching the quark model to the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2011-10-24

    We compute the coefficients of the effective mass operator of the 1/N{sub c} expansion for negative parity L = 1 excited baryons using the Isgur-Karl model in order to compare the general approach, where the coefficients are obtained by fitting to data, with a specific constituent quark model calculation. We discuss the physics behind the fitted coefficients for the scalar part of the most general two-body quark-quark interaction. We find that both pion exchange and gluon exchange lead to the dominance of the same operator at the level of the effective mass operator, which is also observed from data.

  1. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  2. Confinement-deconfinement phase transition for heavy quarks in a soft wall holographic QCD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Yuan, Pei-Hung

    2015-12-01

    We study confinement-deconfinement phase transition for heavy quarks in a soft wall holographic QCD model. We consider a black hole background in an Einstein-Maxwell-scalar system and add probe open strings to the background. Combining the various configurations of the open strings and the phase structure of the black hole background itself, we obtain the confinement-deconfinement phase diagram for heavy quarks in the holographic QCD model.

  3. Pion generalized parton distributions within a fully covariant constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Cristiano; Pace, Emanuele; Romanelli, Giovanni; Salmè, Giovanni; Salmistraro, Marco

    2016-05-01

    We extend the investigation of the generalized parton distribution for a charged pion within a fully covariant constituent quark model, in two respects: (1) calculating the tensor distribution and (2) adding the treatment of the evolution, needed for achieving a meaningful comparison with both the experimental parton distribution and the lattice evaluation of the so-called generalized form factors. Distinct features of our phenomenological covariant quark model are: (1) a 4D Ansatz for the pion Bethe-Salpeter amplitude, to be used in the Mandelstam formula for matrix elements of the relevant current operators, and (2) only two parameters, namely a quark mass assumed to be m_q=~220 MeV and a free parameter fixed through the value of the pion decay constant. The possibility of increasing the dynamical content of our covariant constituent quark model is briefly discussed in the context of the Nakanishi integral representation of the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude.

  4. Axially symmetric multi-baryon solutions and their quantization in the chiral quark soliton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, S.; Sawado, N.; Shiiki, N.

    2004-05-01

    We study axially symmetric solutions with B=2-5 in the chiral quark soliton model. In the background of axially symmetric chiral fields, the quark eigenstates and profile functions of the chiral fields are computed self-consistently. The resultant quark bound spectrum are doubly degenerate due to the symmetry of the chiral field. Upon quantization, various observable spectra of the chiral solitons are obtained. Taking account of the Finkelstein-Rubinstein constraints, we show that the quantum numbers of our solitons coincide with the physical observations for B=2 and 4 while B=3 and 5 do not.

  5. Transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in a light-cone quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, B.; Cazzaniga, S.; Boffi, S.

    2008-08-01

    The leading twist transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) are studied in a light-cone description of the nucleon where the Fock expansion is truncated to consider only valence quarks. General analytic expressions are derived in terms of the six amplitudes needed to describe the three-quark sector of the nucleon light-cone wave function. Numerical calculations for the T-even TMDs are presented in a light-cone constituent quark model, and the role of the so-called pretzelosity is investigated to produce a nonspherical shape of the nucleon.

  6. Nucleon structure functions and longitudinal spin asymmetries in the chiral quark constituent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the phenomenological dependence of the spin independent (F1p ,n and F2p ,n) and the spin dependent (g1p ,n) structure functions of the nucleon on the Bjorken scaling variable x using the unpolarized distribution functions of the quarks q (x ) and the polarized distribution functions of the quarks Δ q (x ) respectively. The chiral constituent quark model, which is known to provide a satisfactory explanation of the proton spin crisis and related issues in the nonperturbative regime, has been used to compute explicitly the valence and sea quark flavor distribution functions of p and n . In light of the improved precision of the world data, the p and n longitudinal spin asymmetries [A1p(x ) and A1n(x )] have been calculated. The implication of the presence of the sea quarks has been discussed for the ratio of polarized to unpolarized quark distribution functions for up and down quarks in the p and n Δ/up(x ) up(x ) , Δ/dp(x ) dp(x ) , Δ/un(x ) un(x ) , and Δ/dn(x ) dn(x ) . The ratio of the n and p structure functions Rn p(x )=F/2n(x ) F2p(x ) has also been presented. The results have been compared with the recent available experimental observations. The results on the spin sum rule have also been included and compared with data and other recent approaches.

  7. Solvable model for many-quark systems in QCD Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Yepez-Martinez, Tochtli; Hess, P. O.; Civitarese, O.

    2010-04-15

    Motivated by a canonical QCD Hamiltonian, we propose an effective Hamiltonian to represent an arbitrary number of quarks in hadronic bags. The structure of the effective Hamiltonian is discussed and the BCS-type solutions that may represent constituent quarks are presented. The single-particle orbitals are chosen as three-dimensional harmonic oscillators, and we discuss a class of exact solutions that can be obtained when a subset of single-particle basis states is restricted to include a certain number of orbital excitations. The general problem, which includes all possible orbital states, can also be solved by combining analytical and numerical methods.

  8. Flavor-changing decays of the top quark in 5D warped models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Furlong, Alfonso; Frank, Mariana; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel; Xoxocotzi, Reyna

    2016-08-01

    We study flavor-changing neutral current decays of the top quark in the context of general warped extra dimensions, where the five-dimensional (5D) metric is slightly modified from 5D anti-de Sitter (AdS5 ). These models address the Planck-electroweak hierarchies of the Standard Model and can obey all the low-energy flavor bounds and electroweak precision tests, while allowing the scale of new physics to be at the TeV level, and thus within the reach of the LHC at Run II. We perform the calculation of these exotic top decay rates for the case of a bulk Higgs, and thus include in particular the effect of the additional Kaluza-Klein (KK) Higgs modes running in the loops, along with the usual KK fermions and KK gluons.

  9. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  10. Quark masses and mixings in the RS1 model with a condensing 4th generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, A. E. Cárcamo; Dib, Claudio O.; Neill, Nicolás A.; Zerwekh, Alfonso R.

    2012-02-01

    We study the hierarchy of quark masses and mixings in a model based on a 5-dimensional spacetime with constant curvature of Randall-Sundrum type with two branes, where the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking is caused dynamically by the condensation of a 4th generation of quarks, due to underlying physics from the 5D bulk and the first KK gluons. We first study the hierarchy of quark masses and mixings that can be obtained from purely adjusting the profile localizations, finding that realistic masses are not reproduced unless non trivial hierarchies of underlying 4-fermion interactions from the bulk are included. Then we study global U(1) symmetries that can be imposed in order to obtain non-symmetric modified Fritzsch-like textures in the mass matrices that reproduce reasonably well quark masses and CKM mixings.

  11. Axial form factors of the octet baryons in a covariant quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, G.; Tsushima, K.

    2016-07-01

    We study the weak interaction axial form factors of the octet baryons, within the covariant spectator quark model, focusing on the dependence of four-momentum transfer squared, Q2. In our model the axial form factors GA(Q2) (axial-vector form factor) and GP(Q2) (induced pseudoscalar form factor) are calculated based on the constituent quark axial form factors and the octet baryon wave functions. The quark axial current is parametrized by the two constituent quark form factors, the axial-vector form factor gAq(Q2), and the induced pseudoscalar form factor gPq(Q2). The baryon wave functions are composed of a dominant S -state and a P -state mixture for the relative angular momentum of the quarks. First, we study in detail the nucleon case. We assume that the quark axial-vector form factor gAq(Q2) has the same function form as that of the quark electromagnetic isovector form factor. The remaining parameters of the model, the P -state mixture and the Q2 dependence of gPq(Q2), are determined by a fit to the nucleon axial form factor data obtained by lattice QCD simulations with large pion masses. In this lattice QCD regime the meson cloud effects are small, and the physics associated with the valence quarks can be better calibrated. Once the valence quark model is calibrated, we extend the model to the physical regime and use the low Q2 experimental data to estimate the meson cloud contributions for GA(Q2) and GP(Q2). Using the calibrated quark axial form factors and the generalization of the nucleon wave function for the other octet baryon members, we make predictions for all the possible weak interaction axial form factors GA(Q2) and GP(Q2) of the octet baryons. The results are compared with the corresponding experimental data for GA(0 ) and with the estimates of baryon-meson models based on S U (6 ) symmetry.

  12. LHC limits on the top-Higgs in models with strong top-quark dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Logan, Heather E.; Martin, Adam

    2011-11-01

    LHC searches for the standard model Higgs boson in WW or ZZ decay modes place strong constraints on the top-Higgs state predicted in many models with new dynamics preferentially affecting top quarks. Such a state couples strongly to top quarks, and is therefore produced through gluon fusion at a rate enhanced relative to the rate for the standard model Higgs boson. A top-Higgs state with mass less than 300 GeV is excluded at 95% C.L. if the associated top-pion has a mass of 150 GeV, and the constraint is even stronger if the mass of the top-pion state exceeds the top-quark mass or if the top-pion decay constant is a substantial fraction of the weak scale. These results have significant implications for theories with strong top dynamics, such as topcolor-assisted technicolor, top-seesaw models, and certain Higgsless models.

  13. Octet baryon magnetic moments in the chiral quark model with configuration mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, J.; Ohlsson, T.; Snellman, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Coleman{endash}Glashow sum-rule for magnetic moments is always fulfilled in the chiral quark model, independently of SU(3) symmetry breaking. This is due to the structure of the wave functions, coming from the non-relativistic quark model. Experimentally, the Coleman{endash}Glashow sum-rule is violated by about ten standard deviations. To overcome this problem, two models of wave functions with configuration mixing are studied. One of these models violates the Coleman{endash}Glashow sum-rule to the right degree and also reproduces the octet baryon magnetic moments rather accurately. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. rule, and in and models with FCNC quark couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; De Fazio, Fulvia; Girrbach, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    The experimental value for the isospin amplitude in decays has been successfully explained within the standard model (SM), both within the large approach to QCD and by QCD lattice calculations. On the other hand within the large approach the value of is by at least below the data. While this deficit could be the result of theoretical uncertainties in this approach and could be removed by future precise QCD lattice calculations, it cannot be excluded that the missing piece in comes from new physics (NP). We demonstrate that this deficit can be significantly softened by tree-level FCNC transitions mediated by a heavy colourless gauge boson with a flavour-violating left-handed coupling and an approximately universal flavour diagonal right-handed coupling to the quarks. The approximate flavour universality of the latter coupling assures negligible NP contributions to . This property, together with the breakdown of the GIM mechanisms at tree level, allows one to enhance significantly the contribution of the leading QCD-penguin operator to . A large fraction of the missing piece in the rule can be explained in this manner for in the reach of the LHC, while satisfying the constraints from , , , LEP-II and the LHC. The presence of a small right-handed flavour-violating coupling and of enhanced matrix elements of left-right operators allows one to satisfy simultaneously the constraints from and , although this requires some fine-tuning. We identify the quartic correlation between contributions to , , and . The tests of this proposal will require much improved evaluations of and within the SM, of as well as precise tree-level determinations of and . We present correlations between , and with and without the rule constraint and generalise the whole analysis to with colour () and with FCNC couplings. In the latter case no improvement on can be achieved without destroying the agreement of the SM with the data on . Moreover, this scenario is very tightly constrained by . On the

  15. Systematic Model Building Based on Quark-Lepton Complementarity Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Walter

    2008-02-01

    In this talk, we present a procedure to systematically generate a large number of valid mass matrix textures from very generic assumptions. Compared to plain anarchy arguments, we postulate some structure for the theory, such as a possible connection between quarks and leptons, and a mechanism to generate flavor structure. We illustrate how this parameter space can be used to test the exclusion power of future experiments, and we point out that one can systematically generate embeddings in ZN product flavor symmetry groups.

  16. Physics of the nucleon sea quark distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2000-03-10

    Sea quark distributions in the nucleon have naively been expected to be generated perturbatively by gluon splitting. In this case, there is no reason for the light quark and anti-quark sea distributions to be different. No asymmetries in the strange or heavy quark sea distributions are predicted in the improved parton model. However,recent experiments have called these naive expectations into question. A violation of the Gottfried sum rule has been measured in several experiments, suggesting that (bar u) < (bar d) in the proton. Additionally, other measurements, while not definitive, show that there may be an asymmetry in the strange and anti-strange quark sea distributions. These effects may require nonperturbative explanations. In this review we first discuss the perturbative aspects of the sea quark distributions. We then describe the experiments that could point to nonperturbative contributions to the nucleon sea. Current phenomenological models that could explain some of these effects are reviewed.

  17. Quark-mass dependence of the three-flavor QCD phase diagram at zero and imaginary chemical potential: Model prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    We draw the three-flavor phase diagram as a function of light- and strange-quark masses for both zero and imaginary quark-number chemical potential, using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with an effective four-quark vertex depending on the Polyakov loop. The model prediction is qualitatively consistent with 2+1 flavor lattice QCD prediction at zero chemical potential and with degenerate three-flavor lattice QCD prediction at imaginary chemical potential.

  18. Isovector channel of quark-meson-coupling model and its effect on symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. B.; Qi, C.; Xu, F. R.

    2011-08-01

    The non-relativistic approximation of the quark-meson-coupling model has been discussed and compared with the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model which includes spin exchanges. Calculations show that the spin-exchange interaction has important effect on the descriptions of finite nuclei and nuclear matter through the Fock exchange. Also in the quark-meson-coupling model, it is the Fock exchange that leads to a nonlinear density-dependent isovector channel and changes the density-dependent behavior of the symmetry energy.

  19. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Computational Process and Material Modeling of Powder Bed additive manufacturing of IN 718. Optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling. Increase understanding of build properties. Increase reliability of builds. Decrease time to adoption of process for critical hardware. Potential to decrease post-build heat treatments. Conduct single-track and coupon builds at various build parameters. Record build parameter information and QM Meltpool data. Refine Applied Optimization powder bed AM process model using data. Report thermal modeling results. Conduct metallography of build samples. Calibrate STK models using metallography findings. Run STK models using AO thermal profiles and report STK modeling results. Validate modeling with additional build. Photodiode Intensity measurements highly linear with power input. Melt Pool Intensity highly correlated to Melt Pool Size. Melt Pool size and intensity increase with power. Applied Optimization will use data to develop powder bed additive manufacturing process model.

  20. Thomas-Fermi Quark Model and Techniques to Improve Lattice QCD Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan

    Two topics are discussed separately in this thesis. In the first part a semiclassical quark model, called the Thomas-Fermi quark model, is reviewed. After a modified approach to spin in the model is introduced, I present the calculation of the spectra of octet and decuplet baryons. The six-quark doubly strange H-dibaryon state is also investigated. In the second part, two numerical techniques which improve latice QCD calculations are covered. The first one, which we call Polynomial-Preconditioned GMRES-DR(PP-GMRESDR), is used to speed up the calculation of large systems of linear equations in LQCD. The second one, called the Polynomial-Subtraction method, is used to help reduce the noise variance of the calculations for disconnected loops in LQCD.

  1. Orbital structure of quarks inside the nucleon in the light-cone diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan

    2010-11-01

    We study the orbital angular momentum structure of the quarks inside the proton. By employing the light-cone diquark model and the overlap representation formalism, we calculate the chiral-even generalized parton distribution functions H{sub q}(x,{xi},{Delta}{sup 2}), H-tilde{sub q}(x,{xi},{Delta}{sup 2}), and E{sub q}(x,{xi},{Delta}{sup 2}) at zero skewedness for q=u and d quarks. In our model, E{sub u} and E{sub d} have opposite sign with similar size. Those generalized parton distribution functions are applied to calculate the orbital angular momentum distributions, showing that L{sub u}(x) is positive, while L{sub d}(x) is consistent with zero compared with L{sub u}(x). We introduce the impact parameter dependence of the quark orbital angular momentum distribution. It describes the position space distribution of the quark orbital angular momentum at given x. We found that the impact parameter dependence of the quark orbital angular momentum distribution is axially symmetric in the light-cone diquark model.

  2. {rho}-{omega} mixing self-energy and model quark-gluon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Mitchell, K.L.; Tandy, P.C.; Cahill, R.T.

    1995-08-01

    The u-d quark-loop vacuum polarization process that mixes the {omega} and {rho} mesons and its contribution to the Charge-Symmetry-Breaking (CSB) piece of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction has been studied in a QCD-based, model field theory: the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), using a confining quark propagator obtained in earlier studies. In fitting NN phase shifts it was found necessary to include a term in the NN potential that has, conventionally, been attributed to the mixing between {omega} and {rho} mesons that arises because of isospin asymmetry at the quark level, as manifest in the small u-d current-quark-mass difference. To the present, this term was modeled and assumed to be momentum independent. It is important to understand this term in the context of QCD. The results of this study indicate that the modification of the meson propagators produced by the quark loop is alone not sufficient to account for the observed charge symmetry breaking effects in the NN interaction. We are exploring other possible mechanisms which may describe the origin of CSB in the NN interaction.

  3. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  4. Systematic Model Building Based on Quark-Lepton Complementarity Assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Walter

    2008-02-21

    In this talk, we present a procedure to systematically generate a large number of valid mass matrix textures from very generic assumptions. Compared to plain anarchy arguments, we postulate some structure for the theory, such as a possible connection between quarks and leptons, and a mechanism to generate flavor structure. We illustrate how this parameter space can be used to test the exclusion power of future experiments, and we point out that one can systematically generate embeddings in Z{sub N} product flavor symmetry groups.

  5. New quark-model calculations of photo-and electroproduction of N* and and Delta * resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, Simon

    1992-06-01

    An introduction is given to the calculation of resonance electromagnetic coupling in the nonrelativistic quark model. Recent improvements brought about by the inclusion of relativistic corrections to the transition operator are described. We show how such calculations may be further improved by the use of relativized-model wave functions, a modestly increased effective quark mass, and an ab initio calculation of the signs of the N-pidecay amplitudes of the resonances. A summary is given of the results for the photocouplings of all nonstrage baryons, as well as for certain amplitude ratios in electroproduction.

  6. Equation of state of a quasiparticle model at finite chemical potential and quark star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ya-Lan; Yan, Yan; Li, Hua; Luo, Xin-Lian; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we employ the equation of state (EOS) of the quasiparticle model proposed in A. M. Zhao , Mod. Phys. Lett. A 25, 47 (2010)MPLAEQ0217-732310.1142/S0217732310031361] which incorporates the effect of vacuum negative pressure to study the properties of quark stars. In our model the EOS has the correct behavior required by QCD in the small and large μ limit. We employ this EOS to calculate the mass-radii relation and mass-energy density relation of quark stars. Our results are found to be consistent with the most recent astronomical observations.

  7. Isgur-Wise function within a modified heavy-light chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Eeg, Jan O.; Kumericki, Kresimir

    2010-04-01

    We consider the Isgur-Wise function {xi}({omega}) within a new modified version of a heavy-light chiral quark model. While early versions of such models gave an absolute value of the slope that was too small, namely {xi}{sup '}(1){approx_equal}-0.4 to -0.3, we show how extended version(s) may lead to values around -1, in better agreement with recent measurements. This is obtained by introducing a new mass parameter in the heavy-quark propagator. We also shortly comment on the consequences for the decay modes B{yields}DD.

  8. Quantum chromodynamic quark model study of hadron and few hadron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chueng-Ryong.

    1990-10-01

    This report details research progress and results obtained during the five month period July 1, 1990 to November 30, 1990. The research project, entitled Quantum Chromodynamic Quark Model Study of Hadron and Few Hadron Systems,'' is supported by grant FG05-90ER40589 between North Carolina State University and the United States Department of Energy. This is a research program addressing theoretical investigations of hadron structure and reactions using quantum chromodynamic quark models. The new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following sections.

  9. Quark-lepton mass relation in a realistic A4 extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. F.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2013-07-01

    We propose a realistic A4 extension of the Standard Model involving a particular quark-lepton mass relation, namely that the ratio of the third family mass to the geometric mean of the first and second family masses are equal for down-type quarks and charged leptons. This relation, which is approximately renormalization group invariant, is usually regarded as arising from the Georgi-Jarlskog relations, but in the present model there is no unification group or supersymmetry. In the neutrino sector we propose a simple modification of the so-called Zee-Wolfenstein mass matrix pattern which allows an acceptable reactor angle along with a deviation of the atmospheric and solar angles from their bi-maximal values. Quark masses, mixing angles and CP violation are well described by a numerical fit.

  10. Studying top quark decay into the polarized W boson in the topcolor-assisted technicolor model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xuelei; Zhang Qiaoli; Qiao Qingpeng

    2005-01-01

    We study the decay mode of the top quark decaying into Wb in the topcolor-assisted technicolor (TC2) model where the top quark is distinguished from other fermions by participating in a strong interaction. We find that the TC2 correction to the decay width {gamma}(t{yields}bW) is generally several percent and the maximum value can reach 8% for the currently allowed parameters. The magnitude of such a correction is comparable with the QCD correction and larger than that of the minimal supersymmetric model. Such a correction might be observable in the future colliders. We also study the TC2 correction to the branching ratio of top quark decay into the polarized W bosons and find the correction is below 1%. After considering the TC2 correction, we find that our theoretical predictions about the decay branching ratio are also consistent with the experimental data.

  11. Top quark rare three-body decays in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect

    Han Jinzhong; Li Bingzhong; Wang Xuelei

    2011-02-01

    In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT), the mirror quarks have flavor structures and will contribute to the top quark flavor changing neutral current. In this work, we perform an extensive investigation of the top quark rare three-body decays t{yields}cVV, (V={gamma}, Z, g) and t{yields}cff, (f=b, {tau}, {mu}, e) at one-loop level. Our results show that the branching ratios of t{yields}cgg and t{yields}cbb could reach O(10{sup -3}) in the favorite parameter space of the littlest Higgs model with T-parity, which implies that these decays may be detectable at the LHC or ILC, while for the other decays, their rates are too small to be observable at the present or future colliders.

  12. Associated production of a single heavy T quark in the littlest and simplest little Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kingman; Kim, C. S.; Lee, Kang Young; Song, Jeonghyeon

    2006-12-01

    The colored SU(2)L-singlet heavy T-quark is one of the most crucial ingredients in little Higgs models, which is introduced to cancel the largest contribution of the standard model (SM) top quark to the Higgs boson mass at one-loop level. In two representative little Higgs models, the littlest Higgs model and the SU(3) simplest Higgs model, we comprehensively study the single heavy T-quark production at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). After presenting the possibility of relatively light (˜500GeV) T-quark in the simplest little Higgs model, we consider all the relevant processes, the 2→2 process of qb→q'T, the 2→3 process of qg→q'Tb¯, the s-channel process of qq¯'→Tb¯, and the gluon-fusion process of gg→Tt¯. We found that the 2→3 process can be quite important, as its cross section is about 30% of the 2→2 one and it is dominant in high pT distributions. The s-channel and the gluon-fusion processes also show distinctive features in spite of their suppressed cross sections. In the gluon-fusion process of the simplest little Higgs model, for example, the pseudoscalar contribution is rather dominant over the Higgs contribution for relatively light MT.

  13. The phase diagram in the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with 't Hooft and eight-quark interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, J.; Hiller, B.; Blin, A. H.; Osipov, A. A.

    2010-08-05

    It is shown that the endpoint of the first order transition line which merges into a crossover regime in the phase diagram of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, extended to include the six-quark 't Hooft and eight-quark interaction Lagrangians, is pushed towards vanishing chemical potential and higher temperatures with increasing strength of the OZI-violating eight-quark interactions. We clarify a connection between the location of the endpoint in the phase diagram and the mechanism of chiral symmetry breaking at the quark level. Constraints on the coupling strengths based on groundstate stability and physical considerations are explained.

  14. The Quark-Deconfinement Nova model for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Bombaci, I.

    2005-10-21

    We report on a new model which is able to explain how a gamma-ray burst (GRB) can take place days or years after a supernova explosion. We show that above a threshold value of the gravitational mass a pure hadronic star ('neutron star') is metastable to the conversion into a quark star (hybrid star or strange star), i.e. a star made at least in part of deconfined quark matter. The stellar conversion process can be delayed if finite size effects at the interface between hadronic and deconfined quark matter phases are taken into account. A huge amount of energy, on the order of 1052 - 1053 ergs, is released during the conversion process and can produce a powerful gamma-ray burst. The delay between the supernova explosion generating the metastable neutron star and the new collapse can explain the delay inferred in GRB 990705 and in GRB 011211.

  15. Hadronic contributions to the muon anomaly in the Constituent Chiral Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greynat, David

    2016-04-01

    The hadronic contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon which are relevant for the confrontation between theory and experiment at the present level of accuracy, are evaluated within the same framework: the constituent chiral quark model. This includes the contributions from the dominant hadronic vacuum polarization as well as from the next-to-leading order hadronic vacuum polarization, the contributions from the hadronic light-by-light scattering, and the contributions from the electroweak hadronic Zγγ vertex. They are all evaluated as a function of only one free parameter: the constituent quark mass. We also comment on the comparison between our results and other phenomenological evaluations.

  16. Pion and Kaon Masses and Pion Form Factors from Dynamical Chiral-Symmetry Breaking with Light Constituent Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Scadron, Michael D.; Kleefeld, Frieder; Rupp, George

    2007-02-27

    Light constituent quark masses and the corresponding dynamical quark masses are determined by data, the quark-level linear {sigma} model, and infrared QCD. This allows to define effective nonstrange and strange current quark masses, which reproduce the experimental pion and kaon masses very accurately, by simple additivity. In contrast, the usual nonstrange and strange current quarks employed by the Particle Data Group and Chiral Perturbation Theory do not allow a straightforward quantitative explanation of the pion and kaon masses.

  17. Skyrme model πNN form factor and the sea quark distribution of the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, R. J.; Schäfer, A.

    1998-06-01

    We calculate the sea quark distribution of the nucleon in a meson cloud model. The novel feature of our calculation is the implementation of a special πNN form factor recently obtained by Holzwarth and Machleidt. This form factor is hard for small and soft for large momentum transfers. We show that this feature leads to a substantial improvement.

  18. From chiral quark dynamics with Polyakov loop to the hadron resonance gas model

    SciTech Connect

    Arriola, E. R.; Salcedo, L. L.; Megias, E.

    2013-03-25

    Chiral quark models with Polyakov loop at finite temperature have been often used to describe the phase transition. We show how the transition to a hadron resonance gas is realized based on the quantum and local nature of the Polyakov loop.

  19. The 3P0-VERSUS 3S1-MODELS for Quark-Antiquark Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. M.; Niskanen, J. A.

    A comparison is made between the 3S1- and 3P0-models for quark-antiquark annihilation or creation. Even though the former appears, at first sight, to be superior for Nbar {N} annihilation into two mesons, it is argued from their effects in meson decays that this conclusion is premature.

  20. Light-Front Quark Model Analysis of Meson-Photon Transition Form Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2016-07-01

    We discuss {(π0, η, η') to γ^{*}γ} transition form factors using the light-front quark model. Our discussion includes the analysis of the mixing angles for {η-η'}. Our results for {Q2 F_{(π^0,η,η')toγ^*γ}(Q^2)} show scaling behavior for high Q 2 consistent with pQCD predictions.

  1. Longitudinal and Transverse Parton Momentum Distributions for Hadrons within Relativistic Constituent Quark Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, T.; Pace, E.; Pasquini, B.; Salme, G.

    2010-08-05

    Longitudinal and transverse parton distributions for pion and nucleon are calculated from hadron vertexes obtained by a study of form factors within relativistic quark models. The relevance of the one-gluon-exchange dominance at short range for the behavior of the form factors at large momentum transfer and of the parton distributions at the end points is stressed.

  2. Radiative decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model including hyperfine mixing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Tanja; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Oexl, Bettina; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-06-01

    We study flavor-conserving radiative decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit. We discuss in some detail hyperfine mixing effects.

  3. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  4. Propagation of cosmic rays through the atmosphere in the quark-gluon strings model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Krutikova, N. P.; Shabelski, Y. M.

    1985-01-01

    The quark-gluon strings model succeeds in the description of multiple hadron production in the central rapidity region of nucleon-nucleon interctions. This model was developed for hadron-nucleus interactions and used for calculation of the cosmic ray propagation through the atmosphere. It is shown that at energies 10 to the 11th power to the 12th power eV, this model gives a satisfactory description of experimental data. But with the increase of the energy up to approximately 10 to the 14th power eV, results of calculations and of experiments begin to differ and this difference rises with the energy. It may indicate that the scaling violation in the fragmentation region of inclusive spectra for hadron-nucleus interactions is stronger than in the quark-gluon strings model.

  5. Quark confinement potential examined by excitation energy of the Λc and Λb baryons in a quark-diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jido, Daisuke; Sakashita, Minori

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of having a diquark configuration in heavy baryons, such as Λ and Λ, is examined by a nonrelativistic potential model with a heavy quark and a light scalar diquark. Assuming that the Λ and Λ baryons are composed of the heavy quark and the point-like scalar-isoscalar ud diquark, we solve the two-body Schrödinger equation with the Coulomb plus linear potential and obtain the energy spectra for the heavy baryons. Contrary to our expectation, it is found that the potential determined by the quarkonium spectra fails to reproduce the excitation spectra of the Λ and Λ in the quark-diquark picture, while the Λ and Λ spectra are reproduced with half the strength of the confinement string tension than for the quarkonium. The finite size effect of the diquark is also examined and it is found that the introduction of a finite size diquark would resolve the failure of the spectrum reproduction. The Ξ excitation energy is also calculated and is found to be smaller than Λ in the quark-diquark model. This is not consistent with experimental observations.

  6. Quark model with chiral-symmetry breaking and confinement in the Covariant Spectator Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Peña, M. T.; Ribeiro, J. E.; Stadler, A.; Gross, F.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a model for the quark-antiquark interaction in Minkowski space using the Covariant Spectator Theory. We show that with an equal-weighted scalar-pseudoscalar structure for the confining part of our interaction kernel the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity is preserved and our model complies with the Adler-zero constraint for π-π-scattering imposed by chiral symmetry.

  7. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J.; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard W^± and Z^0 gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }, KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν }, K_L→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ X_sγ , B_{s,d}→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ν bar{ν }, and \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon . Taking into account the constraints from Δ F=2 processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν } and KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-) ≥ B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-)_SM, which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^- decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of

  8. Properties of quark matter in a new quasiparticle model with QCD running coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, ZhenYan; Peng, GuangXiong; Xu, JianFeng; Zhang, ShiPeng

    2016-06-01

    The running of the QCD coupling in the effective mass causes thermodynamic inconsistency problem in the conventional quasiparticle model. We provide a novel treatment which removes the inconsistency by an effective bag constant. The chemical potential dependence of the renormalization subtraction point is constrained by the Cauchy condition in the chemical potential space. The stability and microscopic properties of strange quark matter are then studied within the completely self-consistent quasiparticle model, and the obtained equation of state of quark matter is applied to the investigation of strange stars. It is found that our improved model can describe well compact stars with mass about two times the solar mass, which indicates that such massive compact stars could be strange stars.

  9. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. I. Model and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gelman, Boris A.; Shuryak, Edward V.; Zahed, Ismail

    2006-10-15

    We propose a model for the description of strongly interacting quarks and gluon quasiparticles at T=(1-3)T{sub c} as a classical and nonrelativistic colored Coulomb gas. The sign and strength of the interparticle interactions are fixed by the scalar product of their classical color vectors subject to Wong's equations. The model displays a number of phases as the Coulomb coupling is increased ranging from a gas, to a liquid, to a crystal with antiferromagnetic-like color ordering. We analyze the model using molecular dynamics simulations and discuss the density-density correlator in real time. We extract pertinent decorrelation times, diffusion, and viscosity constants for all phases. The classical results when extrapolated to the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma suggest that the phase is liquid-like, with a diffusion constant D{approx_equal}0.1/T and a shear viscosity to entropy density ratio {eta}/s{approx_equal}1/3.

  10. Consistent parameter fixing in the quark-meson model with vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignano, Stefano; Buballa, Michael; Elkamhawy, Wael

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the renormalization prescription for the quark-meson model in an extended mean-field approximation, where vacuum quark fluctuations are included. At a given cutoff scale the model parameters are fixed by fitting vacuum quantities, typically including the sigma-meson mass mσ and the pion decay constant fπ. In most publications the latter is identified with the expectation value of the sigma field, while for mσ the curvature mass is taken. When quark loops are included, this prescription is however inconsistent, and the correct identification involves the renormalized pion decay constant and the sigma pole mass. In the present article we investigate the influence of the parameter-fixing scheme on the phase structure of the model at finite temperature and chemical potential. Despite large differences between the model parameters in the two schemes, we find that in homogeneous matter the effect on the phase diagram is relatively small. For inhomogeneous phases, on the other hand, the choice of the proper renormalization prescription is crucial. In particular, we show that if renormalization effects on the pion decay constant are not considered, the model does not even present a well-defined renormalized limit when the cutoff is sent to infinity.

  11. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2006-08-01

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and D0 collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass.

  12. Cold Uniform Matter and Neutron Stars in the Quark-Meson-Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Stone; P.A.M. Guichon; H.H. Matevosyan; A.W. Thomas

    2007-08-01

    A new density dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction has been recently derived from the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model, offering impressive results in application to finite nuclei and dense baryon matter. This self-consistent, relativistic quark-level approach is used to construct the Equation of State (EoS) and to calculate key properties of high density matter and cold, slowly rotating neutron stars. The results include predictions for the maximum mass of neutron star models, together with the corresponding radius and central density, as well the properties of neutron stars with mass of order 1.4 M{sub {circle_dot}}. The cooling mechanism allowed by the QMC EoS is explored and the parameters relevant to slow rotation, namely the moment of inertia and the period of rotation investigated. The results of the calculation, which are found to be in good agreement with available observational data, are compared with the predictions of more traditional EoS, based on the A18+{delta}v+UIX* and modified Reid soft core potentials, the Skyrme SkM* interaction and two relativistic mean field (RMF) models for a hybrid stars including quark matter. The QMC EoS provides cold neutron star models with maximum mass 1.9-2.1 M{sub {circle_dot}}, with central density less than 6 times nuclear saturation density (n{sub 0} = 0.16 fm{sup -3}) and offers a consistent description of the stellar mass up to this density limit. In contrast with other models, QMC predicts no hyperon contribution at densities lower than 3n{sub 0}, for matter in {beta}-equilibrium. At higher densities, {Xi}{sup -,0} and {Lambda} hyperons are present. The absence of lighter {Sigma}{sup {+-},0} hyperons is understood as a consequence of antisymmetrization, together with the implementation of the color hyperfine interaction in the response of the quark bag to the nuclear scalar field.

  13. Strong decays of excited 1D charmed(-strange) mesons in the covariant oscillator quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tomohito; Yoshida, Kento; Yamada, Kenji; Ishida, Shin; Oda, Masuho

    2016-05-01

    Recently observed charmed mesons, D1* (2760), D3* (2760) and charmed-strange mesons, Ds1 * (2860), Ds3 * (2860), by BaBar and LHCb collaborations are considered to be plausible candidates for c q ¯ 13 DJ (q = u, d, s) states. We calculate the strong decays with one pion (kaon) emission of these states including well-established 1S and 1P charmed(-strange) mesons within the framework of the covariant oscillator quark model. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data and the typical nonrelativistic quark-model calculations. Concerning the results for 1S and 1P states, we find that, thanks to the relativistic effects of decay form factors, our model parameters take reasonable values, though our relativistic approach and the nonrelativistic quark model give similar decay widths in agreement with experiment. While the results obtained for 13 DJ=1,3 states are roughly consistent with the present data, they should be checked by the future precise measurement.

  14. Sivers and Boer-Mulders functions in Light-Cone Quark Models

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquini, Barbara; Yuan, Feng

    2010-01-29

    Results for the naive-time-reversal-odd quark distributions in a light-cone quark model are presented. The final-state interaction effects are generated via single-gluon exchange mechanism. The formalism of light-cone wave functions is used to derive general expressions in terms of overlap of wave-function amplitudes describing the different orbital angular momentum components of the nucleon. In particular, the model predictions show a dominant contribution from S- and P-wave interference in the Sivers function and a significant contribution also from the interference of P and D waves in the Boer-Mulders function. The favourable comparison with existing phenomenological parametrizations motivates further applications to describe azimuthal asymmetries in hadronic reactions.

  15. Variational Monte Carlo study of pentaquark states in a correlated quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Paris

    2005-10-25

    Accurate numerical solution of the five-body Schrodinger equation is effected via variational Monte Carlo in a correlated quark model. The spectrum is assumed to exhibit a narrow resonance with strangeness $S=+1$. A fully antisymmetrized and pair-correlated five-quark wave function is obtained for the assumed non-relativistic Hamiltonian which has spin, isospin, and color dependent pair interactions and many-body confining terms which are fixed by the non-exotic spectra. Gauge field dynamics are modeled via flux tube exchange factors. The energy determined for the ground states with spin-parity 1/2- (1/2+) is 2.22 GeV (2.50 GeV). A lower energy negative parity state is consistent with recent lattice results.

  16. Pion-to-Photon Transition Distribution Amplitudes in the Non-Local Chiral Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotko, P.; Praszałowicz, M.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the non-local chiral quark model to study vector and axial pion-to-photon transition amplitudes that are needed as a nonperturbative input to estimate the cross-section of pion annihilation into the real and virtual photon. We use a simple form of the non-locality that allows to perform all calculations in the Minkowski space and guaranties polynomiality of the TDAs. We note only residual dependence on the precise form of the cut-off function, however vector TDA that is symmetric in skewedness parameter in the local quark model is no longer symmetric in the non-local case. We calculate also the transition form-factors and compare them with existing experimental parametrizations.

  17. Radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant in the chiral soliton quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Duck, I. )

    1993-04-01

    Second-order radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant from gluon, pion, and sigma meson exchange are calculated in the chiral soliton quark model. Many apparent processes are found not to contribute. The soliton is elastically decoupled from meson radiative corrections which are dominated by a gluon exchange contribution equivalent to a gluonic hybrid component of the nucleon. A 30% radiative reduction of the axial coupling strength is indicated.

  18. Rare top quark decays in Alternative Left-Right Symmetric Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2007-06-19

    We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t {yields} H0 + c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t {yields} c + {gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  19. Meson properties at finite temperature in a three flavor nonlocal chiral quark model with Polyakov loop

    SciTech Connect

    Contrera, G. A.; Dumm, D. Gomez; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2010-03-01

    We study the finite temperature behavior of light scalar and pseudoscalar meson properties in the context of a three-flavor nonlocal chiral quark model. The model includes mixing with active strangeness degrees of freedom, and takes care of the effect of gauge interactions by coupling the quarks with the Polyakov loop. We analyze the chiral restoration and deconfinement transitions, as well as the temperature dependence of meson masses, mixing angles and decay constants. The critical temperature is found to be T{sub c{approx_equal}}202 MeV, in better agreement with lattice results than the value recently obtained in the local SU(3) PNJL model. It is seen that above T{sub c} pseudoscalar meson masses get increased, becoming degenerate with the masses of their chiral partners. The temperatures at which this matching occurs depend on the strange quark composition of the corresponding mesons. The topological susceptibility shows a sharp decrease after the chiral transition, signalling the vanishing of the U(1){sub A} anomaly for large temperatures.

  20. Top quark electric dipole moment in a minimal supersymmetric standard model extension with vectorlike multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Nath, Pran

    2010-09-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of the top quark is calculated in a model with a vector like multiplet which mixes with the third generation in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Such mixings allow for new CP violating phases. Including these new CP phases, the EDM of the top in this class of models is computed. The top EDM arises from loops involving the exchange of the W, the Z as well as from the exchange involving the charginos, the neutralinos, the gluino, and the vector like multiplet and their superpartners. The analysis of the EDM of the top is more complicated than for the light quarks because the mass of the external fermion, in this case the top quark mass cannot be ignored relative to the masses inside the loops. A numerical analysis is presented and it is shown that the top EDM could be close to 10{sup -19} ecm consistent with the current limits on the EDM of the electron, the neutron and on atomic EDMs. A top EDM of size 10{sup -19} ecm could be accessible in collider experiments such as the International Linear Collider.

  1. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-03-17

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  2. Bottom-quark forward-backward asymmetry in the standard model and beyond.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, Benjamín; Murphy, Christopher W

    2013-08-01

    We computed the bottom-quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron in the standard model (SM) and for several new physics scenarios. Near the Z pole, the SM bottom asymmetry is dominated by tree level exchanges of electroweak gauge bosons. While above the Z pole, next-to-leading order QCD dominates the SM asymmetry as was the case with the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. Light new physics, M(NP)≲150  GeV, can cause significant deviations from the SM prediction for the bottom asymmetry. The bottom asymmetry can be used to distinguish between competing new physics (NP) explanations of the top asymmetry based on how the NP interferes with s-channel gluon and Z exchange. PMID:23971563

  3. Stable hybrid stars within a SU(3) quark-meson-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacchi, Andreas; Hanauske, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The inner regions of the most massive compact stellar objects might be occupied by a phase of quarks. Since the observations of the massive pulsars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J 0348 +0432 with about two solar masses, the equations of state constructing relativistic stellar models have to be constrained respecting these new limits. We discuss stable hybrid stars, i.e. compact objects with an outer layer composed of nuclear matter and with a core consisting of quark matter (QM). For the outer nuclear layer we utilize a density dependent nuclear equation of state and we use a chiral SU(3) quark-meson model with a vacuum energy pressure to describe the object's core. The appearance of a disconnected mass-radius branch emerging from the hybrid star branch implies the existence of a third family of compact stars, so-called twin stars. Twin stars did not emerge as the transition pressure has to be relatively small with a large jump in energy density, which could not be satisfied within our approach. This is, among other reasons, due to the fact that the speed of sound in QM has to be relatively high, which can be accomplished by an increase of the repulsive coupling. This increase on the other hand yields transition pressures that are too high for twins stars to appear.

  4. Thermodynamics and quark susceptibilities: A Monte Carlo approach to the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Cristoforetti, M.; Hell, T.; Klein, B.; Weise, W.

    2010-06-01

    The Monte-Carlo method is applied to the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. This leads beyond the saddle-point approximation in a mean-field calculation and introduces fluctuations around the mean fields. We study the impact of fluctuations on the thermodynamics of the model, both in the case of pure gauge theory and including two quark flavors. In the two-flavor case, we calculate the second-order Taylor expansion coefficients of the thermodynamic grand canonical partition function with respect to the quark chemical potential and present a comparison with extrapolations from lattice QCD. We show that the introduction of fluctuations produces only small changes in the behavior of the order parameters for chiral symmetry restoration and the deconfinement transition. On the other hand, we find that fluctuations are necessary in order to reproduce lattice data for the flavor nondiagonal quark susceptibilities. Of particular importance are pion fields, the contribution of which is strictly zero in the saddle point approximation.

  5. The polarized structure function of the nucleons with a non-extensive statistical quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the polarized structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution, often used in the statistical models, were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and the chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon and by Δu and Δd of the polarized functions.

  6. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with Top Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jonathan Samuel

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks in the lepton plus jets channel. We impose no constraints on the decay of the Higgs boson. We employ ensembles of neural networks to discriminate events containing a Higgs boson from the dominant tt¯background, and set upper bounds on the Higgs production cross section. At a Higgs boson mass mH = 120 GeV/c2 , we expect to exclude a cross section 12.7 times the Standard Model prediction, and we observe an exclusion 27.4 times the Standard Model prediction with 95 % confidence.

  7. The polarized structure function of the nucleons with a non-extensive statistical quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-05-06

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the polarized structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution, often used in the statistical models, were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and the chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon and by {Delta}u and {Delta}d of the polarized functions.

  8. Generalized Ginzburg-Landau approach to inhomogeneous phases in nonlocal chiral quark models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlomagno, J. P.; Gómez Dumm, D.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the presence of inhomogeneous phases in the QCD phase diagram within the framework of nonlocal chiral quark models. We concentrate in particular in the positions of the tricritical (TCP) and Lifshitz (LP) points, which are studied in a general context using a generalized Ginzburg-Landau approach. We find that for all the phenomenologically acceptable model parametrizations considered the TCP is located at a higher temperature and a lower chemical potential in comparison with the LP. Consequently, these models seem to favor a scenario in which the onset of the first order transition between homogeneous phases is not covered by an inhomogeneous, energetically favored phase.

  9. Network Reconstruction Using Nonparametric Additive ODE Models

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, James; Michailidis, George

    2014-01-01

    Network representations of biological systems are widespread and reconstructing unknown networks from data is a focal problem for computational biologists. For example, the series of biochemical reactions in a metabolic pathway can be represented as a network, with nodes corresponding to metabolites and edges linking reactants to products. In a different context, regulatory relationships among genes are commonly represented as directed networks with edges pointing from influential genes to their targets. Reconstructing such networks from data is a challenging problem receiving much attention in the literature. There is a particular need for approaches tailored to time-series data and not reliant on direct intervention experiments, as the former are often more readily available. In this paper, we introduce an approach to reconstructing directed networks based on dynamic systems models. Our approach generalizes commonly used ODE models based on linear or nonlinear dynamics by extending the functional class for the functions involved from parametric to nonparametric models. Concomitantly we limit the complexity by imposing an additive structure on the estimated slope functions. Thus the submodel associated with each node is a sum of univariate functions. These univariate component functions form the basis for a novel coupling metric that we define in order to quantify the strength of proposed relationships and hence rank potential edges. We show the utility of the method by reconstructing networks using simulated data from computational models for the glycolytic pathway of Lactocaccus Lactis and a gene network regulating the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells. For purposes of comparison, we also assess reconstruction performance using gene networks from the DREAM challenges. We compare our method to those that similarly rely on dynamic systems models and use the results to attempt to disentangle the distinct roles of linearity, sparsity, and derivative

  10. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing (OSU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is being used by NASA and the Aerospace industry to "print" parts that traditionally are very complex, high cost, or long schedule lead items. The process spreads a thin layer of metal powder over a build platform, then melts the powder in a series of welds in a desired shape. The next layer of powder is applied, and the process is repeated until layer-by-layer, a very complex part can be built. This reduces cost and schedule by eliminating very complex tooling and processes traditionally used in aerospace component manufacturing. To use the process to print end-use items, NASA seeks to understand SLM material well enough to develop a method of qualifying parts for space flight operation. Traditionally, a new material process takes many years and high investment to generate statistical databases and experiential knowledge, but computational modeling can truncate the schedule and cost -many experiments can be run quickly in a model, which would take years and a high material cost to run empirically. This project seeks to optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling.

  11. Composite quarks and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J.

    1982-01-01

    Calculability of quark and lepton masses and mixing angles is stressed as the primary motivation for constructing models in which quarks and leptons are composite particles. A general strategy for constructing such models is outlined, in which quarks and leptons are kept light compared to their inverse sizes by approximate chiral symmetries. The origin of multiple families is discussed, and an unrealistic model is exhibited which has several generations and a complicated pattern of masses and generation-mixing angles. The new physics responsible for binding quarks and leptons tends to induce various rare processes at rates which are potentially too large.

  12. Quark-lepton mass relation and CKM mixing in an A4 extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, S.; Nebot, M.; Patel, Ketan M.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2013-08-01

    An interesting mass relation between down-type quarks and charged leptons has been recently predicted within a supersymmetric SU(3)c⊗SU(2)L⊗U(1)Y model based on the A4 flavor symmetry. Here we propose a simple extension which provides an adequate full description of the quark sector. By adding a pair of vectorlike up quarks, we show how the CKM entries Vub, Vcb, Vtd and Vts arise from deviations of the unitarity. We perform an analysis including the most relevant observables in the quark sector, such as oscillations and rare decays of kaons, Bd and Bs mesons. In the lepton sector, the model predicts an inverted hierarchy for the neutrino masses, leading to a potentially observable rate of neutrinoless double beta decay.

  13. A very simple statistical model to the quarks asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, Luis Augusto; Mirez, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    A simple statistical model is developed with the Fock states being the meson-hadron fluctuations. As expected, a insight about the violation of the Gottfried sum rule is obtained, and also a small difference between the strangeness amount in proton and neutron is explained.

  14. CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

    2010-05-25

    In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

  15. Probing top quark neutral couplings in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory at NLO in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylund, Olga Bessidskaia; Maltoni, Fabio; Tsinikos, Ioannis; Vryonidou, Eleni; Zhang, Cen

    2016-05-01

    Top quark pair production in association with a Z-boson or a photon at the LHC directly probes neutral top-quark couplings. We present predictions for these two processes in the Standard Model (SM) Effective Field Theory (EFT) at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. We include the full set of CP-even dimension-six operators that enter the top-quark interactions with the SM gauge bosons. For comparison, we also present predictions in the SMEFT for top loop-induced HZ production at the LHC and for toverline{t} production at the ILC at NLO in QCD. Results for total cross sections and differential distributions are obtained and uncertainties coming from missing higher orders in the strong coupling and in the EFT expansions are discussed. NLO results matched to the parton shower are available, allowing for event generation to be directly employed in an experimental analyses. Our framework provides a solid basis for the interpretation of current and future measurements in the SMEFT, with improved accuracy and precision.

  16. Spectroscopy without quarks: a Skyrme-model sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Karliner, M.; Mattis, M.P.

    1986-06-01

    Focusing on the characteristic energy range of the baryon resonances (typically 1.5 to 2.5 GeV) meson-nucleon scattering in skyrmion models of the nucleon is studied. It is shown that the purely mesonic Lagrangian yields accurate predictions concerning the spectrum of nucleon and delta resonances and the qualitative behavior of the large majority of pion-nucleon and antikaon-nucleon partial wave amplitudes. 16 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  17. Measurements and searches with top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne; /Wuppertal U.

    2008-10-01

    In 1995 the last missing member of the known families of quarks, the top quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab near Chicago. Until today, the Tevatron is the only place where top quarks can be produced. The determination of top quark production and properties is crucial to understand the Standard Model of particle physics and beyond. The most striking property of the top quark is its mass--of the order of the mass of a gold atom and close to the electroweak scale--making the top quark not only interesting in itself but also as a window to new physics. Due to the high mass, much higher than of any other known fermion, it is expected that the top quark plays an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking, which is the most prominent candidate to explain the mass of particles. In the Standard Model, electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by one Higgs field, producing one additional physical particle, the Higgs boson. Although various searches have been performed, for example at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), no evidence for the Higgs boson could yet be found in any experiment. At the Tevatron, multiple searches for the last missing particle of the Standard Model are ongoing with ever higher statistics and improved analysis techniques. The exclusion or verification of the Higgs boson can only be achieved by combining many techniques and many final states and production mechanisms. As part of this thesis, the search for Higgs bosons produced in association with a top quark pair (t{bar t}H) has been performed. This channel is especially interesting for the understanding of the coupling between Higgs and the top quark. Even though the Standard Model Higgs boson is an attractive candidate, there is no reason to believe that the electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by only one Higgs field. In many models more than one Higgs boson are expected to exist, opening even more channels

  18. Detecting contaminated birthdates using generalized additive models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Erroneous patient birthdates are common in health databases. Detection of these errors usually involves manual verification, which can be resource intensive and impractical. By identifying a frequent manifestation of birthdate errors, this paper presents a principled and statistically driven procedure to identify erroneous patient birthdates. Results Generalized additive models (GAM) enabled explicit incorporation of known demographic trends and birth patterns. With false positive rates controlled, the method identified birthdate contamination with high accuracy. In the health data set used, of the 58 actual incorrect birthdates manually identified by the domain expert, the GAM-based method identified 51, with 8 false positives (resulting in a positive predictive value of 86.0% (51/59) and a false negative rate of 12.0% (7/58)). These results outperformed linear time-series models. Conclusions The GAM-based method is an effective approach to identify systemic birthdate errors, a common data quality issue in both clinical and administrative databases, with high accuracy. PMID:24923281

  19. Lightning Climatology with a Generalized Additive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Thorsten; Mayr, Georg; Umlauf, Nikolaus; Zeileis, Achim

    2016-04-01

    This study present a lightning climatology on a 1km x 1km grid estimated via generalized additive models (GAM). GAMs provide a framework to account for non-linear effects in time and space and for non-linear spatial-temporal interaction terms simultaneously. The degrees of smoothness of the non-linear effects is selected automatically in our approach. Furthermore, the influence of topography is captured in the model by including a non-linear term. To illustrate our approach we use lightning data from the ALDIS networks and selected a region in Southeastern Austria, where complex terrain extends from 200 an 3800 m asl and summertime lightning activity is high compared to other parts of the Eastern Alps. The temporal effect in the GAM shows a rapid increase in lightning activity in early July and a slow decay in activity afterwards. The estimated spatial effect is not very smooth and requires approximately 225 effective degrees of freedom. It reveals that lightning is more likely in the Eastern and Southern part of the region of interest. This spatial effect only accounts for variability not already explained by the topography. The topography effect shows lightning to be more likely at higher altitudes. The effect describing the spatio-temporal interactions takes approximately 200 degrees of freedom, and reveals local deviations of the climatology.

  20. Ward identities and the analogous Goldberger-Treiman relation in a three-flavor Spectral Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, E. A.; Mota, A. L.; Dias, E. W.

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the first results of an extension of the spectral quark model which includes different flavors. The spectral quark model is an approach based on a generalization of the Lehmann representation for the quark propagator. Gauge and chiral invariance are ensured with the help of gauge technique which provides particular solutions to the Ward-Takahashi identities. General conditions on the quark spectral function follow from natural physical requirements. In particular, the function is normalized, its positive momenta must vanish, while the physical observables depend on negative moments and the so-called log moments. As a consequence, the model is made finite. To allow the description of mesons constituted by different flavors of quarks we introduce different spectral functions and obtain vertex functions constructed from Ward-Takahashi identities that includes two different spectral (constituent) quark masses, allowing the physical description of strange mesons, for example. We obtain some observables based on the current approach and, in particular, the spectral version of the Kaon analogous Goldberger-Treiman relation.

  1. Weak Interaction Models with New Quarks and Right-handed Currents

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wilczek, F. A.; Zee, A.; Kingsley, R. L.; Treiman, S. B.

    1975-06-01

    We discuss various weak interaction issues for a general class of models within the SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory framework, with special emphasis on the effects of right-handed, charged currents and of quarks bearing new quantum numbers. In particular we consider the restrictions on model building which are imposed by the small KL - KS mass difference and by the .I = = rule; and we classify various possibilities for neutral current interactions and, in the case of heavy mesons with new quantum numbers, various possibilities for mixing effects analogous to KL - KS mixing.

  2. Light pseudoscalar mesons in a nonlocal three flavor chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Scarpettini, A.; Scoccola, N.N.

    2004-12-02

    We study the properties of light pseudoscalar mesons in a three flavor chiral quark model with nonlocal separable interactions. We consider the case of a Gaussian regulator, evaluating meson masses and decay constants. Our results are found to be in good agreement with empirical values, in particular, in the case of the ratio f{kappa}/f{pi} and the decay {pi}0 {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. The model leads also to a reasonable description of the observed phenomenology in the {eta} - {eta}' sector, where two significantly different mixing angles are required. Detailed description of the work sketched here can be found elsewhere.

  3. Electroweak properties of octet baryons in a light-cone quark-diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    We study the electroweak properties of ground state octet baryons in a relativistic quark-spectator-diquark model, with a light-front formalism applied to take relativistic effects into account. Our model provides a consistent picture of the electroweak properties of the ground state octet baryons in the low momentum transfer region. The Melosh-Wigner rotation is applied as the transformation relation between spinors in the instant form and front form. Numerical results are presented for the magnetic moments, weak transition charges, and Sachs form factors. Our results are in good agreement with experimental measurements and other theoretical results.

  4. Testing the Standard Model by precision measurement of the weak charges of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Ross Young; Roger Carlini; Anthony Thomas; Julie Roche

    2007-05-01

    In a global analysis of the latest parity-violating electron scattering measurements on nuclear targets, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the experimental knowledge of the weak neutral-current lepton-quark interactions at low-energy. The precision of this new result, combined with earlier atomic parity-violation measurements, limits the magnitude of possible contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model - setting a model-independent, lower-bound on the scale of new physics at ~1 TeV.

  5. Quark distributions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Catara, F.; Sambataro, M. Italy Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita, 95129 Catania )

    1992-08-01

    By making use of a mapping procedure recently proposed, we construct the nucleon image of the one-body quark density operator in the framework of the nonrelativistic quark model of the nucleons. We evaluate the expectation value of this operator in the ground state of the doubly magic nuclei {sup 4}He, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca described within the nuclear shell model. We analyze the role of quark exchanges between nucleons. We also investigate the effect on the quark density of short-range correlations in the nuclear wave functions as well as of variations in the nucleon size.

  6. Phase diagram of quark-antiquark and diquark condensates in the 3-dimensional Gross-Neveu model with the 4-component spinor representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kohyama, Hiroaki

    2008-07-01

    We construct the phase diagram of the quark-antiquark and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 2+1 dimensional (3D) two flavor massless Gross-Neveu (GN) model with the 4-component quarks. In contrast to the case of the 2-component quarks, there appears the coexisting phase of the quark-antiquark and diquark condensates. This is the crucial difference between the 2-component and 4-component quark cases in the 3D GN model. The coexisting phase is also seen in the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio model. Then we see that the 3D GN model with the 4-component quarks bears closer resemblance to the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio model.

  7. Ground state heavy baryon production in a relativistic quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    Gomshi Nobary, M. A.; Sepahvand, R.

    2007-12-01

    We use current-current interaction to calculate the fragmentation functions to describe the production of spin-1/2, spin-1/2{sup '}, and spin-3/2 baryons with massive constituents in a relativistic quark-diquark model. Our results are in their analytic forms and are applicable for singly, doubly, and triply heavy baryons. We discuss the production of {omega}{sub bbc}, {omega}{sub bcc}, and {omega}{sub ccc} baryons in some detail. The results are satisfactorily compared with those obtained for triply heavy baryons calculated in a perturbative regime within reasonable values of the parameters involved.

  8. Decay Bs→ϕ ℓ+ℓ- in covariant quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubnička, S.; Dubničková, A. Z.; Issadykov, A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Liptaj, A.; Sakhiyev, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Our article is devoted to the study of the rare Bs→ϕ ℓ+ℓ- decay where ℓ=μ , τ . We compute the relevant form factors in the framework of the covariant quark model with infrared confinement in the full kinematical momentum transfer region. The calculated form factors are used to evaluate branching fractions and polarization observables in the cascade decay B →ϕ (→K+K-)ℓ+ℓ-. We compare the obtained results with available experimental data and the results from other theoretical approaches.

  9. A relativistic quark model with infrared confinement and the tetraquark state

    SciTech Connect

    Dubnicka, S.; Dubnickova, A. Z.; Ivanov, M. A.; Koerner, J. G.; Saidullaeva, G. G.

    2011-05-23

    We explore the consequences of treating the X(3872) meson as a tetraquark bound state. As dynamical framework we employ a relativistic constituent quark model which includes infrared confinement in an effective way. We calculate the decay widths of the observed channels X{yields}J/{psi}+2{pi}(3{pi}) and X{yields}D-bar{sup 0}+D{sup 0}+{pi}{sup 0} via the intermediate off-shell states X{yields}J/{psi}+{rho}({omega}) and X{yields}D-bar+D*. For reasonable values of the size parameter {Lambda}{sub X} of the X(3872) we find consistency with the available experimental data.

  10. Simplified models for Higgs physics: singlet scalar and vector-like quark phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Hewett, J. L.; Krämer, M.; Rizzo, T. G.

    2016-07-01

    Simplified models provide a useful tool to conduct the search and exploration of physics beyond the Standard Model in a model-independent fashion. In this work we consider the complementarity of indirect searches for new physics in Higgs couplings and distributions with direct searches for new particles, using a simplified model which includes a new singlet scalar resonance and vector-like fermions that can mix with the SM top-quark. We fit this model to the combined ATLAS and CMS 125 GeV Higgs production and coupling measurements and other precision electroweak constraints, and explore in detail the effects of the new matter content upon Higgs production and kinematics. We highlight some novel features and decay modes of the top partner phenomenology, and discuss prospects for Run II.

  11. Simplified models for Higgs physics: singlet scalar and vector-like quark phenomenology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Hewett, J. L.; Krämer, M.; Rizzo, T. G.

    2016-07-08

    Simplified models provide a useful tool to conduct the search and exploration of physics beyond the Standard Model in a model-independent fashion. In this study, we consider the complementarity of indirect searches for new physics in Higgs couplings and distributions with direct searches for new particles, using a simplified model which includes a new singlet scalar resonance and vector-like fermions that can mix with the SM top-quark. We fit this model to the combined ATLAS and CMS 125 GeV Higgs production and coupling measurements and other precision electroweak constraints, and explore in detail the effects of the new matter contentmore » upon Higgs production and kinematics. Finally, we highlight some novel features and decay modes of the top partner phenomenology, and discuss prospects for Run II.« less

  12. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  13. Quarks, QCD (quantum chromodynamics) and the real world of experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1987-07-01

    The experimental evidence that supports quantum chromodynamics as the theory that describes how the quarks interact is briefly discussed. The indications of the existence of quarks are reviewed, and calculation of hadron masses is discussed. Additional evidence of hadron substructure as seen in the antiproton is reviewed. Arguments for the existence of color as the ''charge'' carried by quarks by which they interact are given. Hadron masses and the hyperfine interaction are presented, followed by more exotic quark systems and a study of multiquark systems. Weak interactions in the quark model are discussed. (LEW)

  14. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  15. Prediction of new Quarks, Generations and Quark Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Thedore

    2002-04-01

    The Standard model currently suggests no relationship between the quark and lepton masses. The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an up quark mass of 237.31 MeV/c2 and a dn quark mass of 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new quarks help explain the numerical relationship between all the quark and lepton masses in a single function. The mass of each SNU-P (quark or lepton) is just the geometric mean of two related SNU-Ps, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.743828 (predicted), 117.3520, 1778.38, 26950.08 MeV. The resulting slope of these masses when plotted on semi log paper is "e" to 5 significant figures using the currently accepted mass for Tau. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these quarks, and lepton.

  16. Exploring the speed and performance of molecular replacement with AMPLE using QUARK ab initio protein models

    SciTech Connect

    Keegan, Ronan M.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Thomas, Jens; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yang; Mayans, Olga; Winn, Martyn D.; Rigden, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    Two ab initio modelling programs solve complementary sets of targets, enhancing the success of AMPLE with small proteins. AMPLE clusters and truncates ab initio protein structure predictions, producing search models for molecular replacement. Here, an interesting degree of complementarity is shown between targets solved using the different ab initio modelling programs QUARK and ROSETTA. Search models derived from either program collectively solve almost all of the all-helical targets in the test set. Initial solutions produced by Phaser after only 5 min perform surprisingly well, improving the prospects for in situ structure solution by AMPLE during synchrotron visits. Taken together, the results show the potential for AMPLE to run more quickly and successfully solve more targets than previously suspected.

  17. Effects of the symmetry energy on the kaon condensates in the quark-meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Prafulla K.; Menezes, Débora P.; Providência, Constança

    2014-04-01

    In this work we investigate protoneutron star properties within a modified version of the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model that incorporates an ω-ρ interaction plus kaon condensed matter at finite temperature. Fixed entropy and trapped neutrinos are taken into account. Our results are compared with the ones obtained with the GM1 parametrization of the nonlinear Walecka model for similar values of the symmetry energy slope. Contrary to GM1, within the QMC model the formation of low mass black holes during cooling are not probable. It is shown that the evolution of the protoneutron star may include the melting of the kaon condensate driven by the neutrino diffusion, followed by the formation of a second condensate after cooling. The signature of this complex process could be a neutrino signal followed by a gamma ray burst. We have seen that both models can, in general, describe very massive stars.

  18. Light quarks in the screened dyon-antidyon Coulomb liquid model. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Shuryak, Edward; Zahed, Ismail

    2015-10-01

    We discuss an extension of the dyon-antidyon liquid model that includes light quarks in the dense center symmetric phase. In this work, like in our previous one, we use the simplest color SU(2) group. We start with a single fermion flavor Nf=1 and explicitly map the model onto a three-dimensional quantum effective theory with a fermion that is only UV(1 ) symmetric. We use it to show, in the mean-field approximation, that in the dense center, the symmetric regime leads to the nonzero chiral condensate. We estimate its value and the σ ,η meson masses. We then extend our analysis to an arbitrary number of quark flavors Nf>1 and colors Nc>2 and show that in the dense plasma phase the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking disappears when Nf/Nc≥2 . A reorganization of the ensemble into a gas of dyon-antidyon molecules restores chiral symmetry but may still preserve center symmetry in the linearized approximation.

  19. Dark decay of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  20. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger tt¯ + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, μ, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is μ < 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value μ^ = 1.2+1.6-1.5.

  1. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger tt¯ + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratiomore » between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, μ, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is μ < 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value μ^ = 1.2+1.6-1.5.« less

  2. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Mittag, G.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Tziaferi, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Strologas, J.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Sagir, S.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. 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K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Smith, G.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, [Authorinst]The CMS

    2015-06-01

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8. In order to separate the signal from the larger + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, , relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value.

  3. Binding of hypernuclei, and phtoproduction of $\\Lambda$-hypernuclei in the latest quark-meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Tsushima, P. A. M. Guichon, R. Shyam, A. W. Thomas

    2010-12-01

    We study the binding of hypernuclei based on the latest version of quark-meson coupling model, and estimate the phtoproduction cross sections for the {sup 12}C({gamma},K{sup +}){sub {Lambda}}{sup 12}B reaction using the bound {Lambda} spinors obtained in the model.

  4. Model of the N-quark potential in SU(N) gauge theory using gauge-string duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Oleg

    2016-05-01

    We use gauge-string duality to model the N-quark potential in pure Yang-Mills theories. For SU (3), the result agrees remarkably well with lattice simulations. The model smoothly interpolates between almost the Δ-law at short distances and the Y-law at long distances.

  5. Decay widths of ground-state and excited {Xi}{sub b} baryons in a nonrelativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Limphirat, Ayut; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Suebka, Prasart; Yan, Yupeng

    2010-11-15

    Decay processes of ground and excited bottom baryons are studied in the {sup 3}P{sub 0} nonrelativistic quark model with all model parameters fixed in the sector of light quarks. Using as an input the recent mass of {Xi}{sub b} and the theoretical masses of {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}, narrow decay widths are predicted for the ground-state bottom baryons {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}. The work predicts large decay widths, about 100 MeV for the {rho}-type orbital excitation states of {Xi}{sub b}.

  6. Chiral quark model of nucleon spin-flavor structure with SU(3) and axial-U(1) breakings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, T.P.; Li, L.

    1998-01-01

    The chiral quark model with a nonet of Goldstone bosons can yield an adequate description of the observed proton flavor and spin structure. In a previous publication we have compared the results of an SU(3) symmetric calculation with the phenomenological findings based on experimental measurements and SU(3) symmetry relations. In this paper we discuss their SU(3) and axial U(1) breaking corrections. Our result demonstrates the broad consistency of the chiral quark model with the experimental observations of the proton spin-flavor structure. With two parameters, we obtain a very satifactory fit to the F/D ratios for the octet baryon masses and for their axial vector couplings, as well as the different quark flavor contributions to the proton spin. The result also can account for not only the light quark asymmetry {bar u}{minus}{bar d} but also the strange quark content {bar s} of the proton sea. SU(3) breaking is the key in reconciling the {bar s} value as measured in the neutrino charm production and that as deduced from the pion nucleon {sigma} term. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Meson Clouds and Dressed Constituent Quarks in the Complete Rg-Improvement Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzian, K.; Mirjalili, A.; Yazdanpanah, M. M.

    Sea quark densities in the nucleon, based on the constituent quark model are analyzed. To model the asymmetry of these densities, the meson cloud or alternatively chiral quark model (χQM) is used. Valence quark densities of the meson which are required to extract the sea quark densities in the constituent quarks are obtained using the phenomenological valon model. In addition to the standard perturbative QCD approach which uses the /lineMS scheme with a physical choice of renormalization scale, the calculations are also performed using the complete RG-improvement (CORGI) approach. To avoid a physically unacceptable Q2 behavior of the sea densities inside the constituent quarks, we assume that the free parameter which exists in the vertex function of the boson-quark splitting function, is Q2-dependent. Using the unsymmetrized sea densities of the nucleon which result from convoluting the constituent density in a nucleon with the quark density in the constituent quark, the Gottfried sum rule (GSR) is calculated using the standard perturbative and CORGI approaches. The CORGI result is closer to the reported experimental value for the GSR. The extracted sea and valence quark density in a nucleon, using χQM and also the CORGI approach, have been compared with available experimental data and what was obtained, based on χQM in the standard approach. This comparison confirms the anticipated better agreement of the CORGI approach with the data.

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. Comparing symmetry restoration trends for meson masses and mixing angles in the QCD-like three quark flavor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vivek Kumar

    2013-10-01

    We are computing the modifications for the scalar and pseudoscalar meson masses and mixing angles due to the proper accounting of fermionic vacuum fluctuation in the framework of the generalized 2+1 flavor quark meson model and the Polyakov loop augmented quark meson model (PQM). The renormalized contribution of the divergent fermionic vacuum fluctuation at one loop level makes these models effective QCD-like models. It has been explicitly shown that analytical expressions for the model parameters, meson masses, and mixing angles do not depend on any arbitrary renormalization scale. We have investigated how the incorporation of fermionic vacuum fluctuation in quark meson and PQM models qualitatively and quantitatively affects the convergence in the masses of the chiral partners in pseudoscalar (π,η,η',K) and scalar (σ,a0,f0,κ) meson nonets as the temperature is varied on the reduced temperature scale. Comparison of present results in the quark meson model with vacuum term and the PQM model with vacuum term with the already existing calculations in the bare 2+1 quark meson and PQM models shows that the restoration of chiral symmetry becomes smoother due to the influence of the fermionic vacuum term. We find that the melting of the strange condensate registers a significant increase in the presence of the fermionic vacuum term and its highest melting is found in the PQM model with vacuum term. The role of the UA(1) anomaly in determining the isoscalar masses and mixing angles for the pseudoscalar (η and η') and scalar (σ and f0) meson complex has also been significantly modified due to the fermionic vacuum correction. In its influence, the interplay of chiral symmetry restoration and the setting up of the UA(1) restoration trends have also been shown to be significantly modified.

  10. Top Quarks Spin Correlations with Graviton in ADD and RS Models at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika; Smolek, Karel; Šimák, Vladislav

    2008-03-01

    In LHC physics we study the spin correlation of top-antitop pairs production to investigate the production mechanism of heavy quarks[F. Hubard et al. Eur. Phys. J. C 44 (2006) 13]. The s-channel process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in ADD model with several extra dimensions[N. Arkani-Hamed, S. Dimopoulos and G. Dvali, Phys. Lett. 429B (1998) 263, hep-ph/9803315] or in the Randall-Sundrum model with only one extra dimension[L. Randall and R. Sundrum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3370 hep-ph/9905221] contribute to the top-antitop pair production and affects the resulting top spin correlations. We calculated the full density matrix for the top-antitop pair production. We find a sizable deviation of the top spin correlations from the Standard.

  11. Constituent Quarks and Gluons, Polyakov loop and the Hadron Resonance Gas Model ***

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.; Salcedo, L. L.

    2014-03-01

    Based on first principle QCD arguments, it has been argued in [1] that the vacuum expectation value of the Polyakov loop can be represented in the hadron resonance gas model. We study this within the Polyakov-constituent quark model by implementing the quantum and local nature of the Polyakov loop [2, 3]. The existence of exotic states in the spectrum is discussed. Presented by E. Megías at the International Nuclear Physics Conference INPC 2013, 2-7 June 2013, Firenze, Italy.Supported by Plan Nacional de Altas Energías (FPA2011-25948), DGI (FIS2011-24149), Junta de Andalucía grant FQM-225, Spanish Consolider-Ingenio 2010 Programme CPAN (CSD2007-00042), Spanish MINECO's Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa Program grant SEV-2012-0234, and the Juan de la Cierva Program.

  12. Top Quark Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A. P.

    2006-11-17

    First observed in 1995, the top quark is one of a pair of third-generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV, about 40 times heavier than its partner, the bottom quark. The CDF and DO collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top-antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark's mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model, and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as-yet-unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass. It is based on a talk I gave at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in Puerto Rico, May 2006, which also included discussion of measurements of other top quark properties.

  13. Constant-sound-speed parametrization for Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models of quark matter in hybrid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F.; Han, Sophia; Orsaria, Milva G.; Contrera, Gustavo A.; Weber, Fridolin; Alford, Mark G.

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of pulsars as heavy as 2 solar masses has led astrophysicists to rethink the core compositions of neutron stars, ruling out many models for the nuclear equations of state (EoS). We explore the hybrid stars that occur when hadronic matter is treated in a relativistic mean-field approximation and quark matter is modeled by three-flavor local and nonlocal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) models with repulsive vector interactions. The NJL models typically yield equations of state that feature a first-order transition to quark matter. Assuming that the quark-hadron surface tension is high enough to disfavor mixed phases and restricting to EoSs that allow stars to reach 2 solar masses, we find that the appearance of the quark-matter core either destabilizes the star immediately (this is typical for nonlocal NJL models) or leads to a very short hybrid star branch in the mass-radius relation (this is typical for local NJL models). Using the constant-sound-speed parametrization we can see that the reason for the near absence of hybrid stars is that the transition pressure is fairly high and the transition is strongly first order.

  14. Transverse-momentum-dependent fragmentation and quark distribution functions from the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Bentz, Wolfgang; Cloët, Ian C.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    Using the model of Nambu and Jona-Lasinio to provide a microscopic description of both the structure of the nucleon and of the quark to hadron elementary fragmentation functions, we investigate the transverse-momentum dependence of the unpolarized quark distributions in the nucleon and of the quark to pion and kaon fragmentation functions. The transverse-momentum dependence of the fragmentation functions is determined within a Monte Carlo framework, with the notable result that the average P⊥2 of the produced kaons is significantly larger than that of the pions. We also find that ⟨P⊥2⟩ has a sizable z dependence, in contrast with the naive Gaussian ansatz for the fragmentation functions. Diquark correlations in the nucleon give rise to a nontrivial flavor dependence in the unpolarized transverse-momentum-dependent quark distribution functions. The ⟨kT2⟩ of the quarks in the nucleon are also found to have a sizable x dependence. Finally, these results are used as input to a Monte Carlo event generator for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS), which is used to determine the average transverse momentum squared of the produced hadrons measured in SIDIS, namely, ⟨PT2⟩. Again, we find that the average PT2 of the produced kaons in SIDIS is significantly larger than that of the pions and in each case ⟨PT2⟩ has a sizable z dependence.

  15. Testing realistic quark mass matrices in the custodial Randall-Sundrum model with flavor changing top decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, We-Fu; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2008-11-01

    We study quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with bulk symmetry SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)B-L. The Yukawa couplings are assumed to be within an order of magnitude of each other, and perturbative. We find that quark mass matrices of the symmetrical form proposed by Koide et al. [Y. Koide, H. Nishiura, K. Matsuda, T. Kikuchi, and T. Fukuyama, Phys. Rev. D 66, 093006 (2002)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.66.093006] can be accommodated in the RS framework with the assumption of hierarchyless Yukawa couplings, but not the Hermitian Fritzsch-type mass matrices. General asymmetrical mass matrices are also found which fit well simultaneously with the quark masses and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Both left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) quark rotation matrices are obtained that allow analysis of flavor changing decay of both LH and RH top quarks. At a warped down scale of 1.65 TeV, the total branching ratio of t→Z+jets can be as high as ˜5×10-6 for symmetrical mass matrices and ˜2×10-5 for asymmetrical ones. This level of signal is within reach of the LHC.

  16. Modeling techniques for gaining additional urban space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thunig, Holger; Naumann, Simone; Siegmund, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    One of the major accompaniments of the globalization is the rapid growing of urban areas. Urban sprawl is the main environmental problem affecting those cities across different characteristics and continents. Various reasons for the increase in urban sprawl in the last 10 to 30 years have been proposed [1], and often depend on the socio-economic situation of cities. The quantitative reduction and the sustainable handling of land should be performed by inner urban development instead of expanding urban regions. Following the principal "spare the urban fringe, develop the inner suburbs first" requires differentiated tools allowing for quantitative and qualitative appraisals of current building potentials. Using spatial high resolution remote sensing data within an object-based approach enables the detection of potential areas while GIS-data provides information for the quantitative valuation. This paper presents techniques for modeling urban environment and opportunities of utilization of the retrieved information for urban planners and their special needs.

  17. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, Robin D.; /UC, Davis

    2005-10-01

    While the top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab Tevatron, a decade later they still have very little information about the top. As the heaviest particle yet discovered, the top quark is interesting in and of itself, but some speculate that it may play a special role in physics beyond the Standard Model. With Run 2 of the Tevatron well underway, they have the opportunity to study top quark properties with much better sensitivity, and to test whether top quarks behave as predicted by current theories. This article focuses on the basics of top quark physics at the Tevatron, highlighting only a sample of the many recent measurements, as new results are being released monthly, and constantly changing the landscape of our knowledge of top.

  18. The nonlocal chiral quark model and the muon g - 2 problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhov, A. E.; Radzhabov, A. E.; Shamakhov, F. A.; Zhevlakov, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    In the first part of the review we discuss the effective nonlocal approach in the quantum field theory. It concerns primary the historical retrospective of this approach, and than we concentrate on the interaction of matter particles (fermions and bosons) with the (abelian and nonabelian) gauge fields. In the second part of the review we consider the hadronic corrections (vacuum polarization) to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon g - 2 factor discussed within the SUf(2) nonlocal chiral quark model. This is considered in the leading and, partially, in the next-to-leading orders (the effect of the fermion propagator dressing due to pion field) of expansion in small parameter 1/ N c ( N c is the number of colors in QCD).

  19. Spectroscopy and Regge trajectories of heavy quarkonia in the relativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, D.; Faustov, R. N.; Galkin, V. O.

    2013-12-15

    The mass spectra of charmonia and bottomonia are calculated in the framework of the relativistic quark model up to high orbital and radial excitations. The Regge trajectories of heavy quarkonia are constructed both in the (J,M{sup 2}) and (n{sub r},M{sup 2}) planes, where J is the total angular momentum and nr is the radial quantum number. All daughter trajectories turn out to be almost linear and parallel, while parent trajectories exhibit some nonlinearity. Such nonlinearity occurs only in the vicinity of ground states and few lowest excitations and is more pronounced for bottomonia, while it is only marginal for charmonia. The obtained results are compared with available experimental data, and a possible interpretation of the new charmonium-like states above open charm production threshold is discussed.

  20. Relativistic Quark-Model Results for Baryon Ground and Resonant States

    SciTech Connect

    Plessas, W.; Melde, T.

    2008-10-13

    Latest results from a study of baryon ground and resonant states within relativistic constituent quark models are reported. After recalling some typical spectral properties, the description of ground states, especially with regard to the nucleon and hyperon electromagnetic structures, is addressed. In the following, recent covariant predictions for pion, eta, and kaon partial decay widths of light and strange baryon resonances below 2 GeV are summarized. These results exhibit a characteristic pattern that is distinct from nonrelativistic or relativized decay studies performed so far. Together with a detailed analysis of the spin, flavor, and spatial structures of the wave functions, it supports a new and extended classification scheme of baryon ground and resonant states into SU(3) flavor multiplets.

  1. Quantum chromodynamic quark model study of hadron and few hadron systems. Technical report, 1990--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, C.R.

    1999-04-01

    This report details research progress and results obtained during the entire period of the research project. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator, Professor Chueng-Ryong Ji, has conducted a research program addressing theoretical investigations of hadron structure and reactions using quantum chromodynamic quark models. This Principal Investigator has devoted 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. This percent effort has continued during the entire period of the grant. The new, significant research results are briefly summarized in this report. Finally, full, detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the project publications which are listed at the end of this technical report.

  2. Multiplicity fluctuations at the quark-hadron phase transition from a fluid dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Christoph; Nahrgang, Marlene; Yan, Yupeng; Kobdaj, Chinorat

    2015-04-01

    The region of large net-baryon densities in the QCD phase diagram is expected to exhibit a first-order phase transition. Experimentally, its study will be one of the primary objectives for the upcoming FAIR accelerator. We model the transition between quarks and hadrons in a heavy-ion collision using a fluid which is coupled to the explicit dynamics of the chiral order parameter and a dilaton field. This allows us to investigate signals stemming from the nonequilibrium evolution during the expansion of the hot plasma. Special emphasis is put on an event-by-event analysis of baryon number fluctuations which have long since been claimed to be sensitive to a critical point.

  3. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. |

    1996-05-08

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the standard model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the standard model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  4. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. |

    1997-01-01

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the Standard Model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the Standard Model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  5. Higgs singlet boson as a diphoton resonance in a vectorlike quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbrik, R.; Chen, Chuan-Hung; Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-03-01

    ATLAS and CMS recently showed the first results from run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at √{s }=13 TeV . A resonant bump at a mass of around 750 GeV in the diphoton invariant mass spectrum was indicated and the corresponding diphoton production cross section is around 3-10 fb. Motivated by the LHC diphoton excess, we propose that the possible resonance candidate is a Higgs singlet. To produce the Higgs singlet via the gluon-gluon fusion process, we embed the Higgs singlet in the framework of the vector-like triplet quark (VLTQ) model. As a result, the Higgs singlet decaying to the diphoton final state is via VLTQ loops. Using the enhanced number of new quarks and new Yukawa couplings of the VLTQs and Higgs singlet, we successfully explain the diphoton production cross section. We find that the width of the Higgs singlet is below 1 GeV, its production cross section can be of the order of 1 pb at √{s }=13 TeV , and the branching ratio for it decaying to a diphoton is around 0.017 and is insensitive to the masses of VLTQs and new Yukawa couplings. We find a strong correlation between the Higgs Yukawa couplings to s -b and c -t ; the resulted branching ratio for t →c h can be 1.1 ×10-4 when the constraint from Bs oscillation is applied. With the constrained parameter values, the signal strength for the standard model Higgs decaying to a diphoton is μγ γ<1.18 , which is consistent with the current measurements at ATLAS and CMS.

  6. Parton-distribution functions for the pion and kaon in the gauge-invariant nonlocal chiral-quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Seung-il

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the parton-distribution functions (PDFs) for the positively charged pion and kaon at a low renormalization scale ˜1GeV. To this end, we employ the gauge-invariant effective chiral action from the nonlocal chiral-quark model, resulting in the vector currents being conserved. All the model parameters are determined phenomenologically with the normalization condition for PDF and the empirical values for the pseudoscalar meson weak-decay constants. We consider the momentum dependence of the effective quark mass properly within the model calculations. It turns out that the leading local contribution provides about 70% of the total strength for PDF, whereas the nonlocal one, which is newly taken into account in this work for the gauge invariance, does the rest. High-Q2 evolution to 27GeV2 is performed for the valance-quark distribution function, using the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi equation. The moments for the pion and kaon valance-quark distribution functions are also computed. The numerical results are compared with the empirical data and theoretical estimations, and show qualitatively agreement with them.

  7. CP violation in a two-Higgs doublet model for the top quark: B-->ψKS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, Ken; Soni, Amarjit; Wu, Guo-Hong

    1999-05-01

    We explore charged-Higgs CP-violating effects in an intriguing two-Higgs doublet model which accords special status to the top quark. In this model the heaviness of the top quark originates naturally from the much larger VEV of the second Higgs doublet compared to that of the first. The phenomenology of this model is quite distinct from that of the usual formulations of the two-Higgs doublet model. In particular, the model can easily account for the observed CP violation in the kaon sector even if the CKM matrix is real. The associated non-standard CP phase can be monitored through measurements of the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B-->ψKS in experiments at the upcoming B factories.

  8. The transport exponent in percolation models with additional loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalievski, F.

    1994-10-01

    Several percolation models with additional loops were studied. The transport exponents for these models were estimated numerically by means of a transfer-matrix approach. It was found that the transport exponent has a drastically changed value for some of the models. This result supports some previous numerical studies on the vibrational properties of similar models (with additional loops).

  9. Inverse magnetic catalysis and confinement within a contact interaction model for quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Raya, A.

    2016-06-01

    We evaluate the impact of an external magnetic field on the chiral symmetry and confinement–deconfinement transition temperatures by using a vector–vector contact interaction model for quarks regularized so as to include an explicit confining scale in the corresponding gap equation. Exploring the evolution of the chiral condensate and the confining scale with temperature T and magnetic field strength eB (e represents the fundamental electric charge), we determine the pseudo-critical temperatures for the chiral ({T}cχ ) and deconfinement (T c c ) transitions from their inflection points, respectively. By construction, {T}cχ ={T}cc in the chiral limit. Within a mean-field approximation, we observe the magnetic catalysis phenomenon, characterized by a rising behavior of {T}cχ and T c c with growing eB. By considering a lattice-inspired running coupling which monotonically decreases with eB, inverse magnetic catalysis takes place in our model. We explore the role of the magnetic field in the traits of the confinement–deconfinement transition described by the model. Our findings are also in agreement with predictions derived from effective models of strong interactions.

  10. Self-consistent covariant description of vector meson decay constants and chirality-even quark-antiquark distribution amplitudes up to twist 3 in the light-front quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2014-02-01

    Although the meson decay amplitude described by a two-point function may be regarded as one of the simplest possible physical observables, it is interesting that this apparently simple amplitude bears abundant fundamental information on QCD vacuum dynamics and chiral symmetry. The light-front zero-mode issue of the vector meson decay constant fV is in this respect highly nontrivial and deserves careful analysis. We discuss the zero-mode issue in the light-front quark model (LFQM) prediction of fV from the perspective of the vacuum fluctuation consistent with the chiral symmetry of QCD. We extend the exactly solvable, manifestly covariant Bethe-Salpeter model calculation to the more phenomenologically accessible, realistic light-front quark model and present a self-consistent covariant description of fV, analyzing the twist-2 and twist-3 quark-antiquark distribution amplitudes with even chirality.

  11. SusHi: A program for the calculation of Higgs production in gluon fusion and bottom-quark annihilation in the Standard Model and the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, Robert V.; Liebler, Stefan; Mantler, Hendrik

    2013-06-01

    This article describes the code SusHi (for "Supersymmetric Higgs") [108] which calculates the cross sections pp/pp ¯ →ϕ+X in gluon fusion and bottom-quark annihilation in the SM and the MSSM, where ϕ is any of the neutral Higgs bosons within these models. Apart from inclusive cross sections up to NNLO QCD, differential cross sections with respect to the Higgs transverse momentum pT and (pseudo-)rapidity y(η) can be calculated through NLO QCD. In the case of gluon fusion, SusHi contains NLO QCD contributions from the third family of quarks and squarks, NNLO corrections due to top-quarks, approximate NNLO corrections due to top-squarks, and electro-weak effects. It supports various renormalization schemes for the sbottom sector and the bottom Yukawa coupling, as well as resummation effects of higher order tanβ-enhanced sbottom contributions. SusHi provides a link to FeynHiggs for the calculation of the Higgs masses. Program SummaryProgram title: SusHi Catalogue identifier: AEOY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 47725 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 338380 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77. Computer: Personal computer. Operating system: Unix/Linux, Mac OS. RAM: A few 100 MB Classification: 11.1. External routines: LHAPDF (http://lhapdf.hepforge.org), FeynHiggs (http://www.feynhiggs.de) Nature of problem: Calculation of inclusive and exclusive Higgs production cross sections in gluon fusion and bottom-quark annihilation in the Standard Model and the MSSM through next-to-leading order QCD, includes next-to-next-to-leading order top-(s)quark contributions and electro-weak effects Solution method: Numerical Monte Carlo integration

  12. The effect of finite temperature and chemical potential on nucleon properties in the logarithmic quark sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Shady, M.; Abu-Nab, A.

    2015-12-01

    The logarithmic quark sigma model is applied to study the nucleon properties at finite temperature and chemical potential. The field equations have been solved numerically in the mean-field approximation by using the extended iteration method at finite temperature and baryon chemical potential. Baryon properties are investigated, such as the hedgehog mass, the magnetic moments of the proton and neutron, and the pion-nucleon coupling constant. We find that the hedgehog mass and the magnetic moments of the proton and neutron increase with increasing temperature and chemical potential, while the pion-nucleon coupling constant decreases. A comparison with the original sigma model and QCD sum rules is presented. We conclude that the logarithmic quark sigma model successfully describes baryon properties of a hot and dense medium.

  13. Pion- and strangeness-baryon σ terms in the extended chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, C. S.; Saghai, B.

    2015-07-01

    Within an extended chiral constituent quark formalism, we investigate contributions from all possible five-quark components in the octet baryons to the pion-baryon (σπ B) and strangeness-baryon (σs B) sigma terms: B ≡N ,Λ ,Σ ,Ξ . The probabilities of the quark-antiquark components in the ground-state baryon octet wave functions are calculated by taking the baryons to be admixtures of three- and five-quark components, with the relevant transitions handled via the 3P0 mechanism. Predictions for σπ B and σs B obtained by using input parameters taken from the literature are reported. Our results turn out to be, in general, consistent with the findings via lattice QCD and chiral perturbation theory.

  14. Top quark as a probe of physics beyond the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, G.

    2016-07-01

    We provide a qualitative and quantitative unified picture of the charge asymmetry in top quark pair production at hadron colliders in the SM and beyond, and summarise the most recent experimental measurements.

  15. DSE inspired model for the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L.; Mezrag, C.; Moutarde, H.; Roberts, C. D.; Rodríguez-Quintero, J.; Sabatié, F.

    2015-07-01

    We sketch here an approach to the computation of genaralised parton distributions (GPDs), based upon a rainbow-ladder (RL) truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations and exemplified via the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD, Hvπ(x,ξ,t). Our analysis focuses on the case of zero skewness, ξ = 0, and underlines that the impulse-approximation used hitherto to define the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD is generally invalid owing to omission of contributions from the gluons which bind dressed-quarks into the pion. A simple correction enables us to identify a practicable improvement to the approximation for Hvπ(x,0,t), expressed as the Radon transform of a single amplitude. Therewith we obtain results for Hvπ(x,0,t) and the associated impact-parameter dependent distribution, , which provide a qualitatively sound picture of the pion's dressed-quark structure at an hadronic scale.

  16. Valence quark spin distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1998-09-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the constituent quark model provide a natural explanation for many nucleon properties, including the {Delta} - N splitting, the charge radius of the neutron, and the observation that the proton's quark distribution function ratio d(x)/u(x) {r_arrow} 0 as x {r_arrow} 1. The hyperfine-perturbed quark model also makes predictions for the nucleon spin-dependent distribution functions. Precision measurements of the resulting asymmetries A{sub 1}{sup p}(x) and A{sub 1}{sup n}(x) in the valence region can test this model and thereby the hypothesis that the valence quark spin distributions are ''normal''.

  17. Phenomenology of the three-flavor PNJL model and thermal strange quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hung-Ming; Müller, Berndt

    2009-07-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the adjoint Polyakov loop and its implication for the momentum spectrum of gluons in the mean-field approximation. This allows us to calculate the contribution of the thermal (transverse) gluons to the thermodynamic pressure. As an application, we evaluate the rates for the strange quark pair-production processes q\\barq \\tos\\bars and gg \\tos\\bars as functions of temperature including thermal effects on quark deconfinement and chiral symmetry breaking.

  18. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  19. Criteria for deviation from predictions by the concentration addition model.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Jun-Ichi; Seki, Masanori; Kamo, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Loewe's additivity (concentration addition) is a well-known model for predicting the toxic effects of chemical mixtures under the additivity assumption of toxicity. However, from the perspective of chemical risk assessment and/or management, it is important to identify chemicals whose toxicities are additive when present concurrently, that is, it should be established whether there are chemical mixtures to which the concentration addition predictive model can be applied. The objective of the present study was to develop criteria for judging test results that deviated from the predictions by the concentration addition chemical mixture model. These criteria were based on the confidence interval of the concentration addition model's prediction and on estimation of errors of the predicted concentration-effect curves by toxicity tests after exposure to single chemicals. A log-logit model with 2 parameters was assumed for the concentration-effect curve of each individual chemical. These parameters were determined by the maximum-likelihood method, and the criteria were defined using the variances and the covariance of the parameters. In addition, the criteria were applied to a toxicity test of a binary mixture of p-n-nonylphenol and p-n-octylphenol using the Japanese killifish, medaka (Oryzias latipes). Consequently, the concentration addition model using confidence interval was capable of predicting the test results at any level, and no reason for rejecting the concentration addition was found. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1806-1814. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26660330

  20. SU(5) without SU(5): why B-L is conserved and baryon number not in unified models of quarks and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1980-09-01

    Quark-lepton unification is examined without assuming higher symmetries on more general gauge theories. In particular, properties are sought which are generally attributed to SU(5) models which are already present without the assumption of SU(5). (GHT)

  1. Some heavy vector and tensor meson decay constants in light-front quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lih, Chong-Chung; Xia, Chuanhui

    2016-06-01

    We study the decay constants (f_M) of the heavy vector (D^{*}, D^{*}s, B^{*}, B^{*}s, B^{*}c) and tensor (D2^{*}, D_{s2}^{*}, B^{*}2, B^{*}_{s2}) mesons in the light-front quark model. With the known pseudoscalar meson decay constants of f_D, f_{D_s}, f_B, f_{B_s}, and f_{B_c} as the input parameters to determine the light-front meson wave functions, we obtain f_{D^{*}, D^{*}s, B^{*},B^{*}_s,B^{*}_c} = (252.0^{+13.8}_{-11.6}, 318.3^{+15.3}_{-12.6}, 201.9^{+43.2}_{-41.4}, 244.2± 7.0, 473.4± 18.2) and (264.9^{+10.2}_{-9.5}, 330.9^{+9.9}_{-9.0}, 220.2^{+49.1}_{-46.2}, 265.7± 8.0, 487.6± 19.2) MeV with Gaussian and power-law wave functions, respectively, while we have f_{D2^{*},D_{s2}^{*},B^{*}2,B^{*}_{s2}}= (143.6^{+24.9}_{-21.8}, 209.5^{+29.1}_{-24.2}, 80.9^{+33.8}_{-27.7}, 109.7^{+15.7}_{-15.0}) MeV with only Gaussian wave functions.

  2. Calculation of the hadron contribution from light-by-light scattering to the anomalous (g-2)μ muon magnetic moment for a nonlocal quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevlakov, A. S.; Radzhabov, A. E.; Dorokhov, A. E.

    2010-11-01

    The muon contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment from light-by-light scattering diagrams with pion participation is calculated for a nonlocal chiral quark model. For various nonlocal model parameterizations, the contribution makes a μ Had,LbL = 5.1(0.2) 10-10. Later on, we plan to calculate contributions from diagrams with an intermediate scalar meson and quark boxing.

  3. Top quark pair production via e{sup +}e{sup -} collision in the littlest Higgs model with T parity at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Bingfang; Han Jinzhong; Wang Lin; Wang Xuelei

    2011-05-01

    In the framework of the littlest Higgs model with T parity, we studied the contributions of the new particles to the top-quark pair production via e{sup +}e{sup -} collision at the International Linear Collider. We calculated the top-quark pair production cross section and found this process can generate significantly relative correction. The result may be a sensitive probe of the littlest Higgs model with T parity.

  4. Rare Down Quark Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Kwong-Kwai Humphrey

    1992-01-01

    The rare decays bto sX are sensitive to strong interaction corrections. The effects can be estimated by a renormalization group technique which requires the evaluation of QCD mixing among effective operators. In the dimensional reduction and the naive dimensional regularization methods, there are discrepancies in evaluating the QCD mixing of the four-quark operators with the bto sgamma and bto s+gluon dipole operators. In this thesis, the problem is investigated by considering the contributions of the epsilon -scalar field and the epsilon -dimensional operators that distinguish between the two methods. The discrepancies are shown to come from the epsilon-dimensional four-quark operators in dimensional reduction and not from the epsilon -scalar field. In the decay bto sl^+l^ -, the intermediate of cc pairs in the charm-penguin diagram can form the resonance states J/psi and psi^'. In the published literature, there is a sign discrepancy in the Breit-Wigner amplitude for the resonance effects. Here, the sign difference is settled by considering the unitarity limit of the amplitude in the Argand diagram. The effects of the resonances are quite substantial on the invariant mass spectrum for this decay. However, they are shown to be negligible on the dilepton energy spectrum below 0.95 GeV. The energy spectrum is, thus, more useful than the invariant mass spectrum for measurements of the top -quark mass. The decays Bto K^*X are well modeled by the quark-level decays bto sX. In the quark model, the hadronization is done using a nonrelativistic wave function. In the decay B to K^*gamma, the large K ^* recoil creates an uncertainty in calculating the branching ratio using the quark model. The problem is explored by considering other meson processes where data exist. The data on the pi form factor and the omegapi^0 transition form factor suggest the necessity to retain relativistic spinor and meson normalizations in the quark -model; however, the data do not resolve the

  5. A Cloudy Quark Bag Model of S, P, and D wave interactions for the coupled channel antikaon-nucleon system

    SciTech Connect

    He, Guangliang.

    1992-05-15

    The Cloudy Quark Bag Model is extended from S-wave to P- and D-wave. The parameters of the model are determined by K{sup {minus}}p scattering cross section data, K{sup {minus}}p {yields}{Sigma}{pi}{pi}{pi} production data, K{sup {minus}}p threshold branching ratio data, and K{sup {minus}}p {yields}{Lambda}{pi}{pi}{pi} production data. The resonance structure of the {Lambda}(1405), {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) are studied in the model. The shift and width of kaonic hydrogen are calculated using the model.

  6. Anomalous tensor magnetic moments and form factors of the proton in the self-consistent chiral quark-soliton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledwig, Tim; Silva, Antonio; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the form factors of the chiral-odd nucleon matrix element of the tensor current. In particular, we aim at the anomalous tensor magnetic form factors of the nucleon within the framework of the SU(3) and SU(2) chiral quark-soliton model. We consider 1/Nc rotational corrections and linear effects of SU(3) symmetry breaking with the symmetry-conserving quantization employed. We first obtain the results of the anomalous tensor magnetic moments for the up and down quarks: κTu=3.56 and κTd=1.83, respectively. The strange anomalous tensor magnetic moment is yielded to be κTs=0.2˜-0.2, that is compatible with zero. We also calculate the corresponding form factors κTq(Q2) up to a momentum transfer Q2≤1GeV2 at a renormalization scale of 0.36GeV2.

  7. Light-light and heavy-light mesons in the model of QCD string with quarks at the ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefediev, A. V.

    2002-06-01

    The variational einbein field method is applied to the model of the QCD string with quarks at the ends for the case of light-light and heavy-light mesons. Special attention is payed to the proper string dynamics. The correct string slope of the Regge trajectories is reproduced for light-light states which comes out from the picture of rotating string. Masses of several low-lying orbitally and radially excited states in the D, Ds, B, and Bs meson spectra are calculated and a good agreement with the experimental data as well as with recent lattice calculations is found. The role of the string correction to the interquark interaction is discussed at the example of the identification of D*' (2637) state recently claimed by DELPHI Collaboration. For the heavy-light mesons the standard constants used in Heavy Quark Effective Theory are extracted and compared to the results of other approaches.

  8. Quark-gluon vertex from the Landau gauge Curci-Ferrari model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, Marcela; Tissier, Matthieu; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the quark-gluon three-point correlation function within a one-loop computation performed in the Curci-Ferrari massive extension of the Faddeev-Popov gauge-fixed action. The mass term is used as a minimal way for taking into account the influence of the Gribov ambiguity. Our results, with renormalization-group improvement, are compared with lattice data. We show that the comparison is, in general, very satisfactory for the functions which are compatible with chiral symmetry, except for one. We argue that this may be due to large systematic errors when extracting this function from lattice simulations. The quantities which break chiral symmetry are more sensitive to the details of the renormalization scheme. We, however, manage to reproduce some of them with good precision. The chosen parameters allow us to simultaneously fit the quark mass function coming from the quark propagator with reasonable agreement.

  9. Low-lying hypernuclei in the relativistic quark-gluon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasyuta, S. M.; Matskevich, E. E.

    2013-06-01

    Low-lying hypernuclei HΛ3, Σ3​0H, HeΛ3, Σ3​0He are described by the relativistic nine-quark equations in the framework of the dispersion relation technique. The approximate solutions of these equations are obtained using a method based on the extraction of leading singularities of the amplitudes. The relativistic nine-quark amplitudes of hypernuclei, including the quarks of three flavors (u,d,s), are calculated. The poles of these amplitudes determine the masses of hypernuclei. The mass of state HΛ3 with the isospin projection I3=0 and the spin-parity JP=(1)/(2)(+)/() is equal to M=2991MeV.

  10. nd scattering lengths from a quark-model based NN interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Garcilazo, H.; Valcarce, A.

    2007-11-15

    We calculate the doublet and quartet neutron-deuteron scattering lengths using a nonlocal nucleon-nucleon interaction fully derived from quark-quark interactions. We use as input the NN{sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} partial waves. Our result for the quartet scattering length agrees well with the experimental value but the result for the doublet scattering length does not. However, if we take the result for the doublet scattering length together with the one for the triton binding energy they agree well with the so-called Phillips line.

  11. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-12-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions analyzed by the CDF collaboration. The large number of top quark events analyzed, of the order of several thousands, allows stringent checks of the standard model predictions. Also, the top quark is widely believed to be a window to new physics. We present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  12. Influence of the Polyakov loop on the chiral phase transition in the two flavor chiral quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markó, G.; Szép, Zs.

    2010-09-01

    The SU(2)L×SU(2)R chiral quark model consisting of the (σ,π→) meson multiplet and the constituent quarks propagating on the homogeneous background of a temporal gauge field is solved at finite temperature and quark baryon chemical potential μq using an expansion in the number of flavors Nf, both in the chiral limit and for the physical value of the pion mass. Keeping the fermion propagator at its tree level, several approximations to the pion propagator are investigated. These approximations correspond to different partial resummations of the perturbative series. Comparing their solution with a diagrammatically formulated resummation relying on a strict large-Nf expansion of the perturbative series, one concludes that only when the local part of the approximated pion propagator resums infinitely many orders in 1/Nf of fermionic contributions a sufficiently rapid crossover transition at μq=0 is achieved allowing for the existence of a tricritical point or a critical end point in the μq-T phase diagram. The renormalization and the possibility of determining the counterterms in the resummation provided by a strict large-Nf expansion are investigated.

  13. Spinodal instabilities of baryon-rich quark-gluon plasma in the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Ko, Che Ming

    2016-03-01

    Using the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, we study the spinodal instability of a baryon-rich quark-gluon plasma in the linear response theory. We find that the spinodal unstable region in the temperature and density plane shrinks with increasing wave number of the unstable mode and is also reduced if the effect of the Polyakov loop is not included. In the small wave number or long wavelength limit, the spinodal boundaries in both cases of with and without the Polyakov loop coincide with those determined from the isothermal spinodal instability in the thermodynamic approach. Also, the vector interactions among quarks are found to suppress unstable modes of all wave numbers. Moreover, the growth rate of unstable modes initially increases with the wave number but is reduced when the wave number becomes large. Including the collisional effect from quark scattering via the linearized Boltzmann equation, we further find that it decreases the growth rate of unstable modes of all wave numbers. The relevance of these results to relativistic heavy ion collisions is discussed.

  14. Prediction of new Quarks, Generations & low Mass Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2003-04-01

    The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an "up" quark of mass 237.31 MeV/c2 and a "dn" quark of mass 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new predicted quarks helped to determine that the masses of the quarks and leptons are all related by a geometric progression relationship. The mass of each quark or lepton is just the "geometric mean" of two related elementary particles, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.74 (predicted), 117.3, 1778.4 (tau), 26950.1 MeV. The geometric ratio of this progression is 15.154 (e to the power e). The mass of the tau in this theory agrees very well with accepted values. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237.31 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these new quarks, and lepton. Ref. Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/ 0008026, @ http://xxx.lanl.gov. Infinite Energy, Vol 5, issue 30.

  15. Complex Modelling Scheme Of An Additive Manufacturing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Liliana Georgeta

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a modelling scheme sustaining the development of an additive manufacturing research centre model and its processes. This modelling is performed using IDEF0, the resulting model process representing the basic processes required in developing such a centre in any university. While the activities presented in this study are those recommended in general, changes may occur in specific existing situations in a research centre.

  16. Baryon-baryon interactions in the SU6 quark model and their applications to light nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakamoto, C.

    2007-04-01

    Interactions between the octet-baryons ( B8) in the spin-flavor SU6 quark model are investigated in a unified coupled-channels framework of the resonating-group method (RGM). The interaction Hamiltonian for quarks consists of the phenomenological confinement potential, the color Fermi-Breit interaction with explicit flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB), and effective-meson exchange potentials of scalar-, pseudoscalar- and vector-meson types. The model parameters are determined to reproduce the properties of the nucleon-nucleon ( NN) system and the low-energy cross section data for the hyperon-nucleon interactions. Mainly due to the introduction of the vector mesons, the NN phase shifts at non-relativistic energies up to T=350 MeV are greatly improved in comparison with the previous quark-model NN interactions. The deuteron properties and the low-energy observables of the B8B8 interactions, including the inelastic capture ratio at rest for the Σ-p scattering, are examined in the particle basis with the pion-Coulomb correction. The nuclear saturation properties and the single-particle (s.p.) potentials of B8 in nuclear medium are examined through the G-matrix calculations, using the quark-exchange kernel. The Σ s.p. potential is weakly repulsive in symmetric nuclear matter. The s.p. spin-orbit strength for Λ is very small, due to the strong antisymmetric spin-orbit force generated from the Fermi-Breit interaction. The qualitative behavior of the B8B8 interactions is systematically understood by (1) the spin-flavor SU6 symmetry of B8, (2) the special role of the pion exchange, and (3) the FSB of the underlying quark Hamiltonian. In particular, the B8B8 interaction becomes less attractive according to the increase of strangeness, implying that there exists no B8B8 di-baryon bound state except for the deuteron. The strong ΛN-ΣN coupling results from the important tensor component of the one-pion exchange. The ΛΛ-ΞN-ΣΣ coupling in the strangeness S=-2 and isospin I=0

  17. Peturbative gluon exchange in a covariant quark model of the pion

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hiroshi; Buck, W.W. . Dept. of Physics); Gross, F. . Dept. of Physics Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA )

    1990-01-01

    A covariant pion wave function, which reproduces the low energy data, is used to calculate the perturbative gluon exchange contributions to the pion charge form factor. It is found that the perturbative process dominates at q > 3.5 GeV/c. The dependence on the quark mass and the asymptotic behavior of the form factor are explicitly displayed.

  18. Effects of quark family nonuniversality in SU(3){sub c} x SU(4){sub L} x U(1){sub X} models

    SciTech Connect

    Nisperuza, Jorge L.; Sanchez, Luis A.

    2009-08-01

    Flavor changing neutral currents arise in the SU(3){sub c} x SU(4){sub L} x U(1){sub X} extension of the standard model because anomaly cancellation among the fermion families requires one generation of quarks to transform differently from the other two under the gauge group. In the weak basis the distinction between quark families is meaningless. However, in the mass eigenstates basis, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix motivates us to classify left-handed quarks in families. In this sense there are, in principle, three different assignments of quark weak eigenstates into mass eigenstates. In this work, by using measurements at the Z pole, atomic parity violation data, and experimental input from neutral meson mixing, we examine two different models without exotic electric charges based on the 3-4-1 symmetry, and address the effects of quark family nonuniversality on the bounds on the mixing angle between two of the neutral currents present in the models and on the mass scales M{sub Z{sub 2}} and M{sub Z{sub 3}} of the new neutral gauge bosons predicted by the theory. The heaviest family of quarks must transform differently in order to keep lower bounds on M{sub Z{sub 2}} and M{sub Z{sub 3}} as low as possible without violating experimental constraints.

  19. Comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) for food additives.

    PubMed

    Tennant, David R

    2016-05-01

    European methods for assessing dietary exposures to nutrients, additives and other substances in food are limited by the availability of detailed food consumption data for all member states. A proposed comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) applies summary data published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in a deterministic model based on an algorithm from the EFSA intake method for food additives. The proposed approach can predict estimates of food additive exposure provided in previous EFSA scientific opinions that were based on the full European food consumption database. PMID:26987377

  20. Magnetized color superconducting cold quark matter within the SU(2 ) f NJL model: A novel regularization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, P.; Grunfeld, A. G.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of intense magnetic fields on the behavior of color superconducting cold quark matter is investigated using an SU(2 ) f Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model for which a novel regulation scheme is introduced. In such a scheme the contributions which are explicitly dependent on the magnetic field turn out to be finite and, thus, do not require to be regularized. As a result of this, nonphysical oscillations that might arise in the alternative regularization schemes previously used in the literature are naturally removed. In this way, a clearer interpretation of the physical oscillations is possible. The sensitivity of our results to the model parametrization is analyzed.

  1. Progress in Top Quark Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Evelyn J.

    2006-07-11

    Experimental measurements of the properties of the top quark have improved and will continue to improve significantly, with the excellent operation of the CDF and D0 experiments and the Tevatron pp-bar collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. All of the final state experimental signatures from top quark production and decay are being analysed to test if this most massive quark is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model. So far, observations are consistent with the standard model. New techniques have dramatically improved the precision of the top quark mass measurement to 1.7% and set the stage for a sub-1% measurement by 2008. This improved knowledge of the top quark mass sharpens the standard model prediction for the mass of the undiscovered Higgs boson, with implications for Higgs studies at the future LHC and ILC.

  2. Progress in top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Evelyn J.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-02-01

    Experimental measurements of the properties of the top quark have improved and will continue to improve significantly, with the excellent operation of the CDF and D0 experiments and the Tevatron p{bar p} collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. All of the final state experimental signatures from top quark production and decay are being analyzed to test if this most massive quark is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model. So far, observations are consistent with the standard model. New techniques have dramatically improved the precision of the top quark mass measurement to 1.7% and set the stage for a sub-1% measurement by 2008. This improved knowledge of the top quark mass sharpens the standard model prediction for the mass of the undiscovered Higgs boson, with implications for Higgs studies at the future LHC and ILC.

  3. The discovery of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    In the period following World War II, there was a rapid development of particle physics. With the construction of synchrotrons and the development of detector technology, many new particles were discovered and the systematics of their interactions investigated. The invention of the bubble chamber played an especially important role in uncovering the rich array of hadrons that were discovered in this period.In 1961 Murray Gell-Mann [1] and Yuval Ne'eman [2] independently introduced a classification scheme, based on SU(3) symmetry, which placed hadrons into families on the basis of spin and parity. Like the periodic table for the elements, this scheme was predictive as well as descriptive, and various hadrons, such as the - , were predicted within this framework and were later discovered.In 1964 Gell-Mann [3] and George Zweig [4] independently proposed quarks as the building blocks of hadrons as a way of generating the SU(3) classification scheme. When the quark model was first proposed, it postulated three types of quarks: up (u), down (d), and strange (s), with charges 2/3, - 1/3, and - 1/3 respectively. Each of these was hypothesized to be a spin1/2 particle. In this model the nucleon (and all other baryons) is made up of three quarks, and each meson consists of a quark and an antiquark. For example, as the proton and neutron both have ero strangeness, they are (u,u,d) and (d,d,u) systems respectively.

  4. Additive-multiplicative rates model for recurrent events.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyan; Wu, Yuanshan; Cai, Jianwen; Zhou, Haibo

    2010-07-01

    Recurrent events are frequently encountered in biomedical studies. Evaluating the covariates effects on the marginal recurrent event rate is of practical interest. There are mainly two types of rate models for the recurrent event data: the multiplicative rates model and the additive rates model. We consider a more flexible additive-multiplicative rates model for analysis of recurrent event data, wherein some covariate effects are additive while others are multiplicative. We formulate estimating equations for estimating the regression parameters. The estimators for these regression parameters are shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed under appropriate regularity conditions. Moreover, the estimator of the baseline mean function is proposed and its large sample properties are investigated. We also conduct simulation studies to evaluate the finite sample behavior of the proposed estimators. A medical study of patients with cystic fibrosis suffered from recurrent pulmonary exacerbations is provided for illustration of the proposed method. PMID:20229314

  5. Testing the littlest Higgs model with T parity in bottom quark pair production at high energy photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jinshu; Lu Gongru; Wang Xuelei

    2009-07-01

    We have calculated the cross section of the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}{yields}bb in the littlest Higgs model with T parity (LHT). We find that, for the favorable parameters, the total cross section {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}{yields}bb) is sensitive to the breaking scale f, mixing parameter x{sub L}, the masses of the mirror quarks m{sub Hi}, and the relative correction of the LHT model is a few percent to dozens of percent. The cross section is significantly larger than the corresponding results in the standard model and in the other typical new physics models. Therefore the prediction in the LHT model is quite different from the predictions in other new physics models and such a process is really interesting in searching for the signs of the LHT model.

  6. Some aspects of three-quark potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Oleg

    2016-05-01

    We analytically evaluate the expectation value of a baryonic Wilson loop in a holographic model of an S U (3 ) pure gauge theory. We then discuss three aspects of a static three-quark potential: an aspect of universality which concerns properties independent of a geometric configuration of quarks, a heavy diquark structure, and a relation between the three- and two-quark potentials.

  7. Accelerated Nucleation Due to Trace Additives: A Fluctuating Coverage Model.

    PubMed

    Poon, Geoffrey G; Peters, Baron

    2016-03-01

    We develop a theory to account for variable coverage of trace additives that lower the interfacial free energy for nucleation. The free energy landscape is based on classical nucleation theory and a statistical mechanical model for Langmuir adsorption. Dynamics are modeled by diffusion-controlled attachment and detachment of solutes and adsorbing additives. We compare the mechanism and kinetics from a mean-field model, a projection of the dynamics and free energy surface onto nucleus size, and a full two-dimensional calculation using Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory. The fluctuating coverage model predicts rates more accurately than mean-field models of the same process primarily because it more accurately estimates the potential of mean force along the size coordinate. PMID:26485064

  8. Can the four-zero-texture mass matrix model reproduce the observed quark and lepton mixing angles and CP-violating phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Koichi; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2006-08-01

    We reconsider a universal mass matrix model which has a seesaw-invariant structure with four-zero texture common to all quarks and leptons. The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark and Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (MNS) lepton mixing matrices of the model are analyzed analytically. We show that the model can be consistent with all the experimental data of neutrino oscillation and quark mixings by tuning free parameters of the model. It is also shown that the model predicts a relatively large value for the (1, 3) element of the MNS lepton mixing matrix (U{sub MNS}){sub 13}{sup 2}{approx_equal}(0.041-9.6)x10{sup -2}. Using the seesaw mechanism, we also discuss the conditions for the components of the Dirac and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrices which lead to the neutrino mass matrix consistent with the experimental data.

  9. Dynamical study of the X(3915) as a D*D* bound state in a quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Youchang; Ping Jialun

    2010-06-01

    Considering the coupling of color 1 x 1 and 8 x 8 structures, we calculate the energy of the newly observed X(3915) as an S-wave D*D* state in the Bhaduri, Cohler, and Nogami quark model by the Gaussian expansion method. Because of the color coupling, the bound state of D*D* with J{sup PC}=0{sup ++} is found, which is well consonant with the experimental data of the X(3915). The bound states of B*B* with J{sup PC}=0{sup ++} and 2{sup ++} are also predicted in this work.

  10. High Q{sup 2} behavior of the electromagnetic form factors in the relativistic hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.; Giannini, M. M.; De Sanctis, M.

    2010-12-15

    The ratio R{sub p} between the electric and magnetic proton form factors has been recently measured at Jefferson Lab up to Q{sup 2}=8.5 GeV{sup 2}. We have extended the calculation of the nucleon form factors with the hypercentral constituent quark model and compared them with the data on R{sub p} and on the Q{sup 2} behavior of the ratio Q{sup 2}F{sub 2}/F{sub 1}. In both cases, the theoretical curves agree with the experimental points.

  11. Boosted top quarks and jet structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schätzel, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is the first particle accelerator that provides high enough energy to produce large numbers of boosted top quarks. The decay products of these top quarks are confined to a cone in the top quark flight direction and can be clustered into a single jet. Top quark reconstruction then amounts to analysing the structure of the jet and looking for subjets that are kinematically compatible with top quark decay. Many techniques have been developed in this context to identify top quarks in a large background of non-top jets. This article reviews the results obtained using data recorded in the years 2010-2012 by the experiments ATLAS and CMS. Studies of Standard Model top quark production and searches for new massive particles that decay to top quarks are presented.

  12. Modeling Errors in Daily Precipitation Measurements: Additive or Multiplicative?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Tang, Ling; Sapiano, Matthew; Maggioni, Viviana; Wu, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The definition and quantification of uncertainty depend on the error model used. For uncertainties in precipitation measurements, two types of error models have been widely adopted: the additive error model and the multiplicative error model. This leads to incompatible specifications of uncertainties and impedes intercomparison and application.In this letter, we assess the suitability of both models for satellite-based daily precipitation measurements in an effort to clarify the uncertainty representation. Three criteria were employed to evaluate the applicability of either model: (1) better separation of the systematic and random errors; (2) applicability to the large range of variability in daily precipitation; and (3) better predictive skills. It is found that the multiplicative error model is a much better choice under all three criteria. It extracted the systematic errors more cleanly, was more consistent with the large variability of precipitation measurements, and produced superior predictions of the error characteristics. The additive error model had several weaknesses, such as non constant variance resulting from systematic errors leaking into random errors, and the lack of prediction capability. Therefore, the multiplicative error model is a better choice.

  13. Modelling the behaviour of additives in gun barrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, N.; Ludwig, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model which predicts the flow and heat transfer in a gun barrel is described. The model is transient, two-dimensional and equations are solved for velocities and enthalpies of a gas phase, which arises from the combustion of propellant and cartridge case, for particle additives which are released from the case; volume fractions of the gas and particles. Closure of the equations is obtained using a two-equation turbulence model. Preliminary calculations are described in which the proportions of particle additives in the cartridge case was altered. The model gives a good prediction of the ballistic performance and the gas to wall heat transfer. However, the expected magnitude of reduction in heat transfer when particles are present is not predicted. The predictions of gas flow invalidate some of the assumptions made regarding case and propellant behavior during combustion and further work is required to investigate these effects and other possible interactions, both chemical and physical, between gas and particles.

  14. Heavy quark signals from radiative corrections to the Z{sup '} boson decay in 3-3-1 models

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.

    2009-10-01

    One-loop corrections to the Z{sup '} decay width are derived and analyzed in the framework of the general form of the 3-3-1 models. We identify two important sources of corrections: oblique corrections associated to the Z{sup '} propagator through vacuum polarizations induced by virtual particle-antiparticle pairs of new heavy quarks J, and vertex corrections to the Z{sup '}qq vertex through virtual exchange of new K{sup Q{sub 1,2}} gauge bosons. Fixing a specific renormalization scheme, we obtain dominant oblique corrections that exhibit a quadratic dependence on the J quark mass, which are absorbed into two oblique parameters: a global parameter {rho}{sub f}{sup '} which modify the Z{sup '} decay width, and a parameter {kappa}{sub f}{sup '} that define effective Z{sup '} couplings. Numerical results in an specific 3-3-1 model gives a strong contribution of the oblique corrections from about 1.3% in the d(s) quark channel to 10.5% in the neutrino channel, for m{sub J}=2 TeV. The vertex corrections contribute to the oblique corrections up to 1.4% for the same channel and m{sub J} value. For pp collisions at the CERN LHC collider, we find that the corrections significantly modify the shape of the cross section distributions for e{sup +}e{sup -} and tt final states, where the distributions including the radiative corrections increases up to 1.23 times the tree-level distribution for the dielectron events and to 1.07 for the top events when m{sub J}=3 TeV.

  15. An Additional Symmetry in the Weinberg-Salam Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Veselov, A.I.; Zubkov, M.A.

    2005-06-01

    An additional Z{sub 6} symmetry hidden in the fermion and Higgs sectors of the Standard Model has been found recently. It has a singular nature and is connected to the centers of the SU(3) and SU(2) subgroups of the gauge group. A lattice regularization of the Standard Model was constructed that possesses this symmetry. In this paper, we report our results on the numerical simulation of its electroweak sector.

  16. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  17. Using Set Model for Learning Addition of Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lestari, Umi Puji; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Hartono, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how set model can help students' understanding of addition of integers in fourth grade. The study has been carried out to 23 students and a teacher of IVC SD Iba Palembang in January 2015. This study is a design research that also promotes PMRI as the underlying design context and activity. Results showed that the…

  18. Search for mirror quarks at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakdar, Shreyashi; Ghosh, K.; Hoang, V.; Hung, P. Q.; Nandi, S.

    2016-02-01

    Observation of nonzero neutrino masses at a scale ˜1 0-1- 1 0-2 eV is a major problem in the otherwise highly successful Standard Model. The most elegant mechanism to explain such tiny neutrino masses is the seesaw mechanism with right-handed neutrinos. However, the required seesaw scale is so high, ˜1014 GeV , it will not have any collider implications. Recently, an explicit model has been constructed to realize the seesaw mechanism with the right-handed neutrinos at the electroweak scale. The model has a mirror symmetry, having both the left and right lepton and quark doublets and singlets for the same S U (2 )W gauge symmetry. Additional Higgs multiplets have been introduced to realize this scenario. It turns out that these extra Higgs fields also help to satisfy the precision electroweak tests, and other observables. Because the scale of the symmetry breaking is electroweak, both the mirror quark and the mirror leptons have masses in the electroweak scale in the range ˜150 - 800 GeV . The mirror quarks/leptons decay to ordinary quarks/leptons plus very light neutral scalars. In this work, we calculate the final-state signals arising from the pair productions of these mirror quarks and their subsequent decays. We find that these signals are well observable over the Standard Model background for the 13 TeV LHC. Depending on the associated Yukawa couplings, these decays can also give rise to displaced vertices with long decay lengths, very different from the usual displaced vertices associated with b decays.

  19. Nonequilibrium hadronization and constituent quark number scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zschocke, Sven; Horvat, Szabolcs; Mishustin, Igor N.; Csernai, Laszlo P.

    2011-04-15

    The constituent quark number scaling of elliptic flow is studied in a nonequilibrium hadronization and freeze-out model with rapid dynamical transition from ideal, deconfined, and chirally symmetric quark-gluon plasma, to final noninteracting hadrons. In this transition a bag model of constituent quarks is considered, where the quarks gain constituent quark mass while the background bag field breaks up and vanishes. The constituent quarks then recombine into simplified hadron states, while chemical, thermal, and flow equilibrium break down one after the other. In this scenario the resulting temperatures and flow velocities of baryons and mesons are different. Using a simplified few source model of the elliptic flow, we are able to reproduce the constituent quark number scaling, with assumptions on the details of the nonequilibrium processes.

  20. Thermodynamics and jet-quenching in the quark-gluon plasma from an AdS/QCD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilleskov, Elias; Bartz, Sean

    2015-10-01

    The Anti-de Sitter Space/Conformal Field Theory Correspondence (AdS/CFT) has been used to study both hadronic dynamics and the thermodynamics and jet quenching behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. We attempt to connect the two regimes by adapting an AdS/QCD model previously used to study meson spectra to apply to the quark-gluon plasma. The model includes three fields: a dilaton to introduce confinement, and chiral and glueball condensates to reflect the zero-temperature dynamics. We dynamically solve the Einstein field equations to numerically determine the metric, which asymptotically describes an anti-de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole solution. We then numerically calculate the temperature as a function of the black hole horizon location. Next, we determine the behavior of the entropy density, the speed of sound, and the jet quenching parameter as functions of the temperature. These quantities approach the behavior of a conformal plasma in the high temperature limit. The minimum of the temperature-horizon plot is interpreted as the plasma's deconfinement temperature, found to be 104 MeV.

  1. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; et al

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W',more » is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark → pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.« less

  2. Estimating soil water retention using soil component additivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Ermolaeva, O.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Soil water retention is a major soil hydraulic property that governs soil functioning in ecosystems and greatly affects soil management. Data on soil water retention are used in research and applications in hydrology, agronomy, meteorology, ecology, environmental protection, and many other soil-related fields. Soil organic matter content and composition affect both soil structure and adsorption properties; therefore water retention may be affected by changes in soil organic matter that occur because of both climate change and modifications of management practices. Thus, effects of organic matter on soil water retention should be understood and quantified. Measurement of soil water retention is relatively time-consuming, and become impractical when soil hydrologic estimates are needed for large areas. One approach to soil water retention estimation from readily available data is based on the hypothesis that soil water retention may be estimated as an additive function obtained by summing up water retention of pore subspaces associated with soil textural and/or structural components and organic matter. The additivity model and was tested with 550 soil samples from the international database UNSODA and 2667 soil samples from the European database HYPRES containing all textural soil classes after USDA soil texture classification. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the volumetric water content estimates for UNSODA vary from 0.021 m3m-3 for coarse sandy loam to 0.075 m3m-3 for sandy clay. Obtained RMSEs are at the lower end of the RMSE range for regression-based water retention estimates found in literature. Including retention estimates of organic matter significantly improved RMSEs. The attained accuracy warrants testing the 'additivity' model with additional soil data and improving this model to accommodate various types of soil structure. Keywords: soil water retention, soil components, additive model, soil texture, organic matter.

  3. Search for the standard model Higgs Boson produced in association with top quarks using the full CDF data set.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Connors, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-11-01

    A search is presented for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full Run II proton-antiproton collision data set, corresponding to 9.45 fb(-1), collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. No significant excess over the expected background is observed, and 95% credibility-level upper bounds are placed on the cross section σ(ttH → lepton + missing transverse energy+jets). For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c(2), we expect to set a limit of 12.6 and observe a limit of 20.5 times the standard model rate. This represents the most sensitive search for a standard model Higgs boson in this channel to date. PMID:23215271

  4. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full CDF data set

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-08-01

    A search is presented for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full Run II proton-antiproton collision data set, corresponding to 9.45 fb{sup -1}, collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. No significant excess over the expected background is observed, and 95% credibility-level upper bounds are placed on the cross section {sigma}(t{bar t}H {yields} lepton + missing transverse energy + jets). For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c{sup 2}, we expect to set a limit of 12.6, and observe a limit of 20.5 times the standard model rate. This represents the most sensitive search for a standard model Higgs boson in this channel to date.

  5. Top quark spin correlations in the Randall-Sundrum model at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika; Smolek, Karel

    2007-05-01

    In the Randall-Sundrum model, we study top-antitop pair production and top spin correlations at the Large Hadron Collider. In addition to the standard model processes, there is a new contribution to the top-antitop pair production process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in the s-channel. We calculate the density matrix for the top-antitop pair production including the new contribution. With a reasonable parameter choice in the Randall-Sundrum model, we find a sizable deviation of the top-antitop pair production cross section and the top spin correlations from those in the standard model. In particular, resonant productions of the graviton Kaluza-Klein modes give rise to a remarkable enhancement of such a deviation.

  6. Observation of $t$-channel electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle, with a mass of 172.0+0.9-1.3GeV. This is nearly twice the mass of the second heaviest known particle, the Z boson, and roughly the mass of a gold atom. Because of its unusually large mass, studying the top quark may provide insight into the Higgs mechanism and other beyond the standard model physics. Only two accelerators in the world are powerful enough to produce top quarks. The Tevatron, which first accelerated protons in 1983, has produced almost 400,000 top quarks, roughly half at each of its two detectors: DO and CDF. The LHC is a much newer accelerator which currently has accumulated about 0.5% as much data as the Tevatron. However, when running at full luminosity, the LHC is capable of producing a top quark about once every second and will quickly surpass the Tevatron as the leading producer of top quarks. This analysis uses data from the DØ detector at the Tevatron, which are described in chapter 3. Top quarks are produced most often in pairs of top and anti-top quarks through an interaction of the strong force. This production mode was first observed in 1995 at the Tevatron. However, top quarks can also be produced though an electroweak interaction, which produces just one top quark. This production mode was first observed at the Tevatron in 2008. Single top quark production can occur in different channels. In this analysis, a measurement of the cross section of the t-channel production mode is performed. This measurement uses 5.4 fb-1 of data and uses the technique of boosted decision trees in order to separate signal from background events. The t-channel cross section is measured to be: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tqb + X) = 3.03+0.78-0.66 pb (0.0.1). Additional cross section measurements were also performed for the s-channel as well as the s + t-channel. The measurement of each one of these three cross sections was repeated three times using

  7. Dark decay of the top quark

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant topmore » quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.« less

  8. Synthesis of baryons from unconfined quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, D.A.; Pati, J.C.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1980-02-15

    We calculate, for a number of cases, the cosmic temperature at which primordial quarks condense into baryons, within a field theory of partially confined quarks that enjoys temporary asymptotic freedom. We assume that the mass of a quark in a dense quark-antiquark medium is a monotonic function of the medium: that is, we assume the validity of the so-called ''Archimedes effect.'' We show that, within such models, unbound-quark lifetimes are larger than the age of the universe at the time of the transition.

  9. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.

    1991-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification has also been made which allows heights to go below local terrain height and return realistic pressure, density, and temperature (not the surface values) as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local valley areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch version of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  10. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (MARS-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification was also made which allows heights to go 'below' local terrain height and return 'realistic' pressure, density, and temperature, and not the surface values, as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local 'valley' areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch versions of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  11. Scaling of elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions with the number of constituent quarks in a transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Subhash; Nasim, Md.

    2016-03-01

    We studied the number of constituent quark scaling (NCQ) behavior of elliptic flow (v2) under the framework of a multiphase transport model (AMPT) at both top-RHIC and LHC energies. The NCQ-scaling in v2 holds at top RHIC energy with AMPT string melting version, while it breaks in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy using the same framework. The breaking of NCQ scaling at LHC energy has been studied by varying the magnitude of parton-parton scattering cross sections and lifetime of hadronic cascade as implemented in AMPT. We find that the breaking of NCQ scaling in Pb+Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV is independent of the magnitude of parton-parton cross sections and the later stage hadronic interactions. Further we observed that scaling holds in a small collision system like Si+Si at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV. We discussed that the breaking of NCQ scaling is possibly due to high phase-space density of constituents quarks in Pb+Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV.

  12. Scalar-quark systems and chimera hadrons in SU(3){sub c} lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, H.; Takahashi, T. T.; Suganuma, H.

    2007-06-01

    In terms of mass generation in the strong interaction without chiral symmetry breaking, we perform the first study for light scalar-quarks {phi} (colored scalar particles with 3{sub c} or idealized diquarks) and their color-singlet hadronic states using quenched SU(3){sub c} lattice QCD with {beta}=5.70 (i.e., a{approx_equal}0.18 fm) and lattice size 16{sup 3}x32. We investigate ''scalar-quark mesons'' {phi}{sup {dagger}}{phi} and ''scalar-quark baryons'' {phi}{phi}{phi} as the bound states of scalar-quarks {phi}. We also investigate the color-singlet bound states of scalar-quarks {phi} and quarks {psi}, i.e., {phi}{sup {dagger}}{psi}, {psi}{psi}{phi}, and {phi}{phi}{psi}, which we name ''chimera hadrons.'' All the new-type hadrons including {phi} are found to have a large mass even for zero bare scalar-quark mass m{sub {phi}}=0 at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1 GeV. We find a ''constituent scalar-quark/quark picture'' for both scalar-quark hadrons and chimera hadrons. Namely, the mass of the new-type hadron composed of m {phi}'s and n {psi}'s, M{sub m{phi}}{sub +n{psi}}, approximately satisfies M{sub m{phi}}{sub +n{psi}}{approx_equal}mM{sub {phi}}+nM{sub {psi}}, where M{sub {phi}} and M{sub {psi}} are the constituent scalar-quark and quark masses, respectively. We estimate the constituent scalar-quark mass M{sub {phi}} for m{sub {phi}}=0 at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1 GeV as M{sub {phi}}{approx_equal}1.5-1.6 GeV, which is much larger than the constituent quark mass M{sub {psi}}{approx_equal}400 MeV in the chiral limit. Thus, scalar quarks acquire a large mass due to large quantum corrections by gluons in the systems including scalar quarks. Together with other evidences of mass generation of glueballs and charmonia, we conjecture that all colored particles generally acquire a large effective mass due to dressed gluon effects. In addition, the large mass generation of pointlike colored scalar particles indicates that plausible diquarks used in effective hadron models cannot

  13. Understanding Rasch Measurement: The Rasch Model, Additive Conjoint Measurement, and New Models of Probabilistic Measurement Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabatsos, George

    2001-01-01

    Describes similarities and differences between additive conjoint measurement and the Rasch model, and formalizes some new nonparametric item response models that are, in a sense, probabilistic measurement theory models. Applies these new models to published and simulated data. (SLD)

  14. Backbone additivity in the transfer model of protein solvation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2010-01-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of −54 cal/mol/M compares quite favorably with −43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally. PMID:20306490

  15. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C.; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-05-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of –54 cal/mol/Mcompares quite favorably with –43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally.

  16. Quark Physics without Quarks: A Review of Recent Developments in S-Matrix Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capra, Fritjof

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the developments in S-matrix theory over the past five years which have made it possible to derive results characteristic of quark models without any need to postulate the existence of physical quarks. In the new approach, the quark patterns emerge as a consequence of combining the general S-matrix principles with the concept of order.…

  17. A Wave Equation including Leptons and Quarks for the Standard Model of Quantum Physics in Clifford Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daviau, Claude; Bertrand, Jacques

    A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and antiparticles of the first generation: electron and its neutrino, positron and antineutrino, quarks $u$ and $d$ with three states of color and antiquarks $\\overline{u}$ and $\\overline{d}$. This wave equation is form invariant under the $Cl_3^*$ group generalizing the relativistic invariance. It is gauge invariant under the $U(1)\\times SU(2) \\times SU(3)$ group of the standard model of quantum physics. The wave is a function of space and time with value in the Clifford algebra $Cl_{1,5}$. All features of the standard model, charge conjugation, color, left waves, Lagrangian formalism, are linked to the geometry of this extended space-time.

  18. Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling of Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Frank; Newkirk, Joseph; Fan, Zhiqiang; Sparks, Todd; Chen, Xueyang; Fletcher, Kenneth; Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Yunlu; Kumar, Kannan Suresh; Karnati, Sreekar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this proposed project is to research and develop a prediction tool for advanced additive manufacturing (AAM) processes for advanced materials and develop experimental methods to provide fundamental properties and establish validation data. Aircraft structures and engines demand materials that are stronger, useable at much higher temperatures, provide less acoustic transmission, and enable more aeroelastic tailoring than those currently used. Significant improvements in properties can only be achieved by processing the materials under nonequilibrium conditions, such as AAM processes. AAM processes encompass a class of processes that use a focused heat source to create a melt pool on a substrate. Examples include Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Direct Metal Deposition. These types of additive processes enable fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. To achieve the desired material properties and geometries of the final structure, assessing the impact of process parameters and predicting optimized conditions with numerical modeling as an effective prediction tool is necessary. The targets for the processing are multiple and at different spatial scales, and the physical phenomena associated occur in multiphysics and multiscale. In this project, the research work has been developed to model AAM processes in a multiscale and multiphysics approach. A macroscale model was developed to investigate the residual stresses and distortion in AAM processes. A sequentially coupled, thermomechanical, finite element model was developed and validated experimentally. The results showed the temperature distribution, residual stress, and deformation within the formed deposits and substrates. A mesoscale model was developed to include heat transfer, phase change with mushy zone, incompressible free surface flow, solute redistribution, and surface tension. Because of excessive computing time needed, a parallel computing approach was also tested. In addition

  19. Search for scalar top quark pair production in natural gauge mediated supersymmetry models with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. 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P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The results of a search for pair production of the lighter scalar partners of top quarks (t˜1) in 2.05 fb-1 of pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV using the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are reported. Scalar top quarks are searched for in events with two same flavour opposite-sign leptons (e , μ) with invariant mass consistent with the Z boson mass, large missing transverse momentum and jets in the final state. At least one of the jets is identified as originating from a b-quark. No excess over Standard Model expectations is found. The results are interpreted in the framework of R-parity conserving, gauge mediated Supersymmetry breaking 'natural' scenarios, where the neutralino (χ˜10) is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle. Scalar top quark masses up to 310 GeV are excluded for 115 GeV quark masses below 240 GeV are excluded for all values of m χ˜10 >mZ.

  20. Quantifying zigzag motion of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, D.; Ribeiro, J. E. F. T.

    2010-03-01

    The quark condensate is calculated in terms of the effective string tension and the constituent quark mass. For 3 colors and 2 light flavors, the constituent mass is bounded from below by the value of 460 MeV. This value is only accessible when the string tension decreases linearly with the Schwinger proper time. For this reason, the Hausdorff dimension of a light-quark trajectory is equal to 4, indicating that these trajectories are similar to branched polymers, which can describe a weak first-order deconfinement phase transition in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. Using this indication, we develop a gluon-chain model based on such trajectories.

  1. Quark number fluctuations at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky, P.; Hegde, P.; Velytsky, A.

    2009-11-01

    We calculate the second, fourth and sixth order quark number fluctuations in the deconfined phase of 2+1 flavor QCD using lattices with temporal extent N{sub t} = 4,6,8 and 12. We consider light, strange and charm quarks. We use p4 action for valence quarks and gauge configurations generated with p4 action with physical value of the strange quark mass and light quark mass m{sub q} = 0.1 m{sub s} generated by the RBC-Bielefeld collaboration. We observe that for all quark masses the quark number fluctuations rapidly get close to the corresponding ideal gas limits. We compare our results to predictions of a quasi-particle model and resummed high temperature perturbative calculations. We also investigate correlations among different flavor channels.

  2. Addition Table of Colours: Additive and Subtractive Mixtures Described Using a Single Reasoning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, A. R.; Lopes dos Santos, J. M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Students' misconceptions concerning colour phenomena and the apparent complexity of the underlying concepts--due to the different domains of knowledge involved--make its teaching very difficult. We have developed and tested a teaching device, the addition table of colours (ATC), that encompasses additive and subtractive mixtures in a single…

  3. Tests of constituent-quark generation methods which maintain both the nucleon center of mass and the desired radial distribution in Monte Carlo Glauber models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. T.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Stankus, P. W.

    2016-05-01

    Several methods of generating three constituent quarks in a nucleon are evaluated which explicitly maintain the nucleon's center of mass and desired radial distribution and can be used within Monte Carlo Glauber frameworks. The geometric models provided by each method are used to generate distributions over the number of constituent quark participants (Nqp) in p +p ,d +Au , and Au +Au collisions. The results are compared with each other and to a previous result of Nqp calculations, without this explicit constraint, used in measurements of √{sNN}=200 GeV p +p ,d +Au , and Au +Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. PMID:25649961

  5. Additive Manufacturing of Medical Models--Applications in Rhinology.

    PubMed

    Raos, Pero; Klapan, Ivica; Galeta, Tomislav

    2015-09-01

    In the paper we are introducing guidelines and suggestions for use of 3D image processing SW in head pathology diagnostic and procedures for obtaining physical medical model by additive manufacturing/rapid prototyping techniques, bearing in mind the improvement of surgery performance, its maximum security and faster postoperative recovery of patients. This approach has been verified in two case reports. In the treatment we used intelligent classifier-schemes for abnormal patterns using computer-based system for 3D-virtual and endoscopic assistance in rhinology, with appropriate visualization of anatomy and pathology within the nose, paranasal sinuses, and scull base area. PMID:26898064

  6. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; Baker, O. K.; Benmouna, N.; Bertoncini, C.; Blok, H. P.; Boeglin, W. U.; Bosted, P. E.; Breuer, H.; Christy, M. E.; Connell, S. H.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M. M.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; El Khayari, N.; Fenker, H. C.; Frolov, V. V.; Gan, L.; Gaskell, D.; Hafidi, K.; Hinton, W.; Holt, R. J.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; Hungerford, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelly, J. J.; Keppel, C. E.; Kubarovsky, V.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mack, D.; Malace, S. P.; Markowitz, P.; McGrath, E.; McKee, P.; Meekins, D. G.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Moziak, B.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Opper, A. K.; Ostapenko, T.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Roche, J.; Rock, S. E.; Schulte, E.; Segbefia, E.; Smith, C.; Smith, G. R.; Stoler, P.; Tang, L.; Ungaro, M.; Uzzle, A.; Vidakovic, S.; Villano, A.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wang, M.; Warren, G.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S. A.; Xu, C.; Yuan, L.; Zheng, X.

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2>4 GeV2 (up to ≈7 GeV2) and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark→pion production mechanisms. The x, z, and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Powder Bed–Based Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Matthias; Körner, Carolin

    2016-07-01

    Powder bed fusion processes are additive manufacturing technologies that are expected to induce the third industrial revolution. Components are built up layer by layer in a powder bed by selectively melting confined areas, according to sliced 3D model data. This technique allows for manufacturing of highly complex geometries hardly machinable with conventional technologies. However, the underlying physical phenomena are sparsely understood and difficult to observe during processing. Therefore, an intensive and expensive trial-and-error principle is applied to produce components with the desired dimensional accuracy, material characteristics, and mechanical properties. This review presents numerical modeling approaches on multiple length scales and timescales to describe different aspects of powder bed fusion processes. In combination with tailored experiments, the numerical results enlarge the process understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms and support the development of suitable process strategies and component topologies.

  8. Triton and hypertriton binding energies with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-04-29

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction which is obtained by a resonating-group method for two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction which is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  9. Addendum to triton and hypertriton binding energies calculated from SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-02-15

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction obtained by a resonating-group method of two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction that is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  10. Production and elliptic flow of dileptons and photons in a matrix model of the quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    Gale, Charles; Hidaka, Yoshimasa; Jeon, Sangyong; Lin, Shu; Paquet, Jean-François; Pisarski, Robert D; Satow, Daisuke; Skokov, Vladimir V; Vujanovic, Gojko

    2015-02-20

    We consider a nonperturbative approach to the thermal production of dileptons and photons at temperatures near the critical temperature in QCD. The suppression of colored excitations at low temperature is modeled by including a small value of the Polyakov loop, in a "semi"-quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Comparing the semi-QGP to the perturbative QGP, we find a mild enhancement of thermal dileptons. In contrast, to leading logarithmic order in weak coupling there are far fewer hard photons from the semi-QGP than the usual QGP. To illustrate the possible effects on photon and dilepton production in heavy-ion collisions, we integrate the rate with a simulation using ideal hydrodynamics. Dileptons uniformly exhibit a small flow, but the strong suppression of photons in the semi-QGP tends to weight the elliptical flow of photons to that generated in the hadronic phase. PMID:25763954

  11. Quark-Novae in massive binaries: a model for double-humped, hydrogen-poor, superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2015-12-01

    LSQ14bdq and SN 2006oz are superluminous, hydrogen-poor, SNe with double-humped light curves. We show that a Quark-Nova (QN; explosive transition of the Neutron Star - NS - to a quark star -QS) occurring in a massive binary, experiencing two Common Envelope (CE) phases, can quantitatively explain the light curves of LSQ14bdq and SN 2006oz. The more massive component (A) explodes first as a normal SN, yielding a NS which ejects the hydrogen envelope of the companion when the system enters its first CE phase. During the second CE phase, the NS spirals into and inflates the second He-rich CE. In the process it gains mass and triggers a QN, outside of the CO core, leaving behind a QS. The first hump in our model is the QN shock re-energizing the expanded He-rich CE. The QN occurs when the He-rich envelope is near maximum size (˜1000 R⊙) and imparts enough energy to unbind and eject the envelope. Subsequent merging of the QS with the CO core of component B, driven by gravitational radiation, turns the QS to a black hole. The ensuing black hole accretion provides sufficient power for the second brighter and long lasting hump. Our model suggests a possible connection between SLSNe-I and type Ic-BL SNe which occur when the QN is triggered inside the CO core. We estimate the rate of QNe in massive binaries during the second CE phase to be ˜5 × 10-5 of that of core-collapse SNe.

  12. Quark mean field approach with derivative coupling for nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, M.; Akiyama, S.; Futami, Y.; Nakasone, T.; Yukino, T.

    2008-05-15

    We propose the quark mean field model including derivative coupling between quarks and scalar mesons in nuclear matter. This model concisely interprets an increasing size of the nucleon as well as a modification of coupling constant in the nuclear environment.

  13. From Sakata Model to Goldberg-Ne'eman Quarks and Nambu QCD Phenomenology and ``Right" and ``Wrong" Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkin, H. J.

    The basic theoretical milestones were the Sakata SU(3) symmetry, theGoldberg-Ne'eman composite model with SU(3) triplets having baryon number (1/3) and the Nambu color gauge Lagrangian. The transition was led in right and wrong directions by experiments interpreted by phenomenology. A ``good" experiment on bar{p}p annihilation at rest showed that the Sakata model predictions disagreed with experiment. A ``bad" experiment prevented the use of the Goldberg-Ne'eman triplet model to predict the existence and masses of the Xi(*) and Omega(-) . More ``good" experiments revealed the existence and mass of the Xi(*) and the Omega(-) and the absence of positive strangeness baryon resonances, thus confirming the ``tenfold way". Further ``good experiments" revealed the existence of the vector meson nonet, SU(3) breaking with singlet-octet mixing and the suppression of the phi -> rho pi decay. These led to the quark triplet model. The paradox of peculiar statistics then arose as the Delta(++) and Omega(-) contained three identical spin-1/2 fermions coupled symmetrically to spin (3/2). This led to color and the Nambu QCD. The book ``Lie Groups for Pedestrians" used the Sakata model with the name ``sakaton" for the pnLambda triplet to teach the algebra of SU(3) to particle physicists in the U.S. and Europe who knew no group theory. The Sakata model had a renaissance in hypernuclear physics in the 1970's.

  14. From Sakata model to Goldberg-Ne'eman quarks and Nambu QCD phenomenology and "right" and "wrong" experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Tel Aviv Univ /

    2007-01-01

    The basic theoretical milestones were the Sakata SU(3) symmetry, the Goldberg-Ne'eman composite model with SU(3) triplets having baryon number (1/3) and the Nambu color gauge Lagrangian. The transition was led in right and wrong directions by experiments interpreted by phenomenology. A 'good' experiment on {bar p}p annihilation at rest showed that the Sakata model predictions disagreed with experiment. A 'bad' experiment prevented the use of the Goldberg-Ne'eman triplet model to predict the existence and masses of the of the {Xi} and {Omega}{sup -}. More 'good' experiments revealed the existence and mass of the {Xi}* and the {Omega}{sup -} and the absence of positive strangeness baryon resonances, thus confirming the 'tenfold way'. Further 'good experiments' revealed the existence of the vector meson nonet, SU(3) breaking with singlet-octet mixing and the suppression of the {phi} {yields} {rho} {pi} decay. These led to the quark triplet model. The paradox of peculiar statistics then arose as the {Delta}{sup ++} and {Omega}{sup -} contained three identical spin-1/2 fermions coupled symmetrically to spin (3/2). This led to color and the Nambu QCD. The book 'Lie Groups for Pedestrians' used the Sakata model with the name 'sakaton' for the {Lambda} triplet to teach the algebra of SU(3) to particle physicists in the U.S. and Europe who knew no group theory. The Sakata model had a renaissance in hypernuclear physics in the 1970's.

  15. Leptons, Quarks, and Their Antiparticles: A Phase-Space View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żenczykowski, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    Recently, a correspondence has been shown to exist between the structure of a single Standard Model generation of elementary particles and the properties of the Clifford algebra of nonrelativistic phase space. Here, this correspondence is spelled out in terms of phase-space variables. Thus, a phase-space interpretation of the connections between leptons, quarks and their antiparticles is proposed, in particular providing a timeless alternative to the standard Stückelberg-Feynman interpretation. The issue of the additivity of canonical momenta is raised and argued to be intimately related to the unobservability of free quarks and the emergence of mesons and baryons.

  16. FY07 LDRD Final Report Heavy Quark Jet Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Newby, J; Glenn, A; Klay, J

    2008-09-26

    We propose and develop a new signature, the measurement of hadron-electron correlations to measure energy loss of heavy quarks in the quark-gluon plasma. This measurements will be used in future analyses to quantify the energy densities created in collisions of heavy ions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. In addition we develop and implement a computing model that will leverage LLNL expertise in cost-effective high performance computing to perform data analyses and simulations for the ALICE experiment at CERN.

  17. Measurement of toverline{t} production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at √{s} = 8 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Yonamine, R.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El Sawy, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair ({t}{overline{t}}) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^ {-1}. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e^+e^-, μ^+ μ^-, and e^{±} μ^{∓}). The absolute and normalized differential cross sections for {t}overline{t} production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential {t overline{t} b} and {t overline{t} b overline{b}} cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. The data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading order calculation.

  18. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair (tt) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e+e-+μ- and e±μ). Furthermore, the absolute and normalized differential cross sections for tt production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential tt-b and tt-bb- cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. Finally, the data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading ordercalculation.

  19. Measurement of $$\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $$ production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-07-07

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair (tt) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e+e-,μ+μ- and e±μ∓). Furthermore, the absolute and normalized differential cross sections for tt production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential tt-b and tt-bb- cross sections are presented formore » the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. Finally, the data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading ordercalculation.« less

  20. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect. PMID:18387273

  1. Hadronic physics of q anti q light quark mesons, quark molecules and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1980-10-01

    A brief introduction reviews the development of QCD and defines quark molecules and glueballs. This review is concerned primarily with u, d, and s quarks, which provide practically all of the cross section connected with hadronic interactions. The following topics form the bulk of the paper: status of quark model classification for conventional u, d, s quark meson states; status of multiquark or quark molecule state predictions and experiments; glueballs and how to find them; and the OZI rule in decay and production and how glueballs might affect it. 17 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  2. Gluonic structure of the constituent quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochelev, Nikolai; Lee, Hee-Jung; Zhang, Baiyang; Zhang, Pengming

    2016-06-01

    Based on both the constituent quark picture and the instanton model for QCD vacuum, we calculate the unpolarized and polarized gluon distributions in the constituent quark and in the nucleon. Our approach consists of the two main steps. At the first step, we calculate the gluon distributions inside the constituent quark generated by the perturbative quark-gluon interaction, the non-perturbative quark-gluon interaction, and the non-perturbative quark-gluon-pion anomalous chromomagnetic interaction. The non-perturbative interactions are related to the existence of the instantons, strong topological fluctuations of gluon fields, in the QCD vacuum. At the second step, the convolution model is applied to derive the gluon distributions in the nucleon. A very important role of the pion field in producing the unpolarized and the polarized gluon distributions in the hadrons is discovered. We discuss a possible solution of the proton spin problem.

  3. Top Quark Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Mietlicki, David J.

    2011-12-01

    The top quark is the most recently discovered of the standard model quarks, and because of its very large mass, studies of the top quark and its interactions are important both as tests of the standard model and searches for new phenomena. In this document, recent results of analyses of top quark production, via both the electroweak and strong interactions, from the CDF and D0 experiments are presented. The results included here utilize a dataset corresponding to up to 6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, slightly more than half of the dataset recorded by each experiment before the Tevatron was shutdown in September 2011.

  4. Strange Quark Star Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2007-02-27

    If strange quark matter is absolutely stable, some neutron stars may be strange quark stars. Strange quark stars are usually assumed to have a simple liquid surface. We show that if the surface tension of droplets of quark matter in the vacuum is sufficiently small, droplets of quark matter on the surface of a strange quark star may form a solid crust on top of the strange quark star. This solid crust can significantly modify the predictions for the photon emission for the surface in an observable way.

  5. Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, P; Luu, T; Platter, L

    2010-12-13

    We study the impact on the primordial abundances of light elements created of a variation of the quark masses at the time of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). In order to navigate through the particle and nuclear physics required to connect quark masses to binding energies and reaction rates in a model-independent way we use lattice QCD data and an hierarchy of effective field theories. We find that the measured {sup 4}He abundances put a bound of {delta}-1% {approx}< m{sub q}/m{sub 1} {approx}< 0.7%. The effect of quark mass variations on the deuterium abundances can be largely compensated by changes of the baryon-to-photon ratio {eta}. Including the bounds on the variation of {eta} coming from WMAP results and some additional assumptions narrows the range of allowed values of {delta}m{sub q}/m{sub q} somewhat.

  6. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Relativistic quark-diquark model of baryons with a spin-isospin transition interaction: Non-strange baryon spectrum and nucleon magnetic moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sanctis, M.; Ferretti, J.; Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.

    2016-05-01

    The relativistic interacting quark-diquark model of baryons, recently developed, is here extended introducing in the mass operator a spin-isospin transition interaction. This refined version of the model is used to calculate the non-strange baryon spectrum. The results are compared to the present experimental data. A preliminary calculation of the magnetic moments of the proton and neutron is also presented.

  8. Renormalization of the quark mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, S. H.; Kuo, T. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using a set of rephasing-invariant variables, it is shown that the renormalization group equations for quark mixing parameters can be written in a form that is compact, in addition to having simple properties under flavor permutation. We also found approximate solutions to these equations if the quark masses are hierarchical or nearly degenerate.

  9. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in final states with $b$ quarks at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-11-01

    We present the result of searches for a low mass Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or a Z boson at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The search is performed in events containing one or two b tagged jets in association with either two leptons, or one lepton and an imbalance in transverse energy, or simply a large imbalance in transverse energy. Datasets corresponding to up to 8.5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are considered in the analyses. These are the most powerful channels in the search for a low mass Higgs boson at the Tevatron. Recent sensitivity improvements are discussed. For a Higgs mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, the expected sensitivity for the most sensitive individual analyses reaches 2.3 times the SM prediction at 95% confidence level (C.L.), with all limits below 5 times the SM. Additionally, a WZ/ZZ cross-section measurement is performed to validate the analysis techniques deployed for searching for the Higgs.

  10. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; Baker, O. K.; Benmouna, N.; Bertoncini, C.; Blok, H. P.; Boeglin, W. U.; Bosted, P. E.; Breuer, H.; Christy, M. E.; Connell, S. H.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M. M.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; El Khayari, N.; Fenker, H. C.; Frolov, V. V.; Gan, L.; Gaskell, D.; Hafidi, K.; Hinton, W.; Holt, R. J.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; Hungerford, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelly, J. J.; Keppel, C. E.; Kubarovsky, V.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mack, D.; Malace, S. P.; Markowitz, P.; McGrath, E.; McKee, P.; Meekins, D. G.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Moziak, B.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Opper, A. K.; Ostapenko, T.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Roche, J.; Rock, S. E.; Schulte, E.; Segbefia, E.; Smith, C.; Smith, G. R.; Stoler, P.; Tang, L.; Ungaro, M.; Uzzle, A.; Vidakovic, S.; Villano, A.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wang, M.; Warren, G.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S. A.; Xu, C.; Yuan, L.; Zheng, X.

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W', is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark → pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.

  11. Light colored scalar as messenger of up-quark flavor dynamics in grand unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsner, Ilja; Fajfer, Svjetlana; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Kosnik, Nejc

    2010-11-01

    The measured forward-backward asymmetry in the tt production at the Tevatron might be explained by the additional exchange of a colored weak singlet scalar. Such state appears in some of the grand unified theories, and its interactions with the up-quarks are purely antisymmetric in flavor space. We systematically investigate the resulting impact on charm and top quark physics. The constraints on the relevant Yukawa couplings come from the experimentally measured observables related to D{sup 0}-D{sup 0} oscillations, as well as dijet and single-top production measurements at the Tevatron. After fully constraining the relevant Yukawa couplings, we predict possible signatures of this model in rare top quark decays. In a class of grand unified models we demonstrate how the obtained information enables to constrain the Yukawa couplings of the up-quarks at very high energy scale.

  12. Quark and lepton masses at the GUT scale including supersymmetric threshold corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the effect of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale within the large tan{beta} regime of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons and show that they can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, m{sub e}/m{sub d}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} for three example ranges of SUSY parameters. We discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings.

  13. Planets orbiting Quark Nova compact remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, P.; Ouyed, R.

    2003-08-01

    We explore planet formation in the Quark Nova scenario. If a millisecond pulsar explodes as a Quark Nova, a protoplanetary disk can be formed out of the metal rich fall-back material. The propeller mechanism transfers angular momentum from the born quark star to the disk that will go through viscous evolution with later plausible grain condensation and planet formation. As a result, earth-size planets on circular orbits may form within short radii from the central quark star. The planets in the PSR 1257+12 system can be explained by our model if the Quark Nova compact remnant is born with a period of ~ 0.5 ms following the explosion. We suggest that a good portion of the Quark Nova remnants may harbour planetary systems.

  14. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    SciTech Connect

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay; /Michigan State U.

    2007-11-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p{bar p}) collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t {yields} W{sup +}b and an exotic event as t {yields} W{sup -}b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0:35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  15. Vector transition form factors of the NK→Θ and NK→Σ10 OverBar∗- in the SU(3) chiral quark soliton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledwig, Tim; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Goeke, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the vector transition form factors of the nucleon and vector meson K to the pentaquark baryon Θ within the framework of the SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model. We take into account the rotational 1/N and linear m corrections, assuming isospin symmetry and employing the symmetry-conserving quantization. It turns out that the leading-order contributions to the form factors are almost cancelled by the rotational corrections. Because of this, the flavor SU(3) symmetry-breaking terms yield sizeable effects on the vector transition form factors. In particular, the main contribution to the electric-like transition form factor comes from the wave-function corrections, which is a consequence of the generalized Ademollo-Gatto theorem derived in the present work. We estimate with the help of the vector meson dominance the K vector and tensor coupling constants for the Θ: g=0.74-0.87 and f=0.53-1.16. We argue that the outcome of the present work is consistent with the null results of the CLAS experiments in the reactions γn→KΘ and γp→KΘ. The results of the present work are also consistent with the recent experiments at KEK. In addition, we present the results of the Σ→NK transition form factors and its KNΣ coupling constants.

  16. Axial-vector transitions and strong decays of the baryon antidecuplet in the self-consistent SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledwig, Tim; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Goeke, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the axial-vector transition constants of the baryon antidecuplet to the octet and decuplet within the framework of the self-consistent SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model. Taking into account rotational 1/N{sub c} and linear m{sub s} corrections and using the symmetry-conserving quantization, we calculate the axial-vector transition constants. It is found that the leading-order contributions are generally almost canceled by the rotational 1/N{sub c} corrections. Thus, the m{sub s} corrections turn out to be essential contributions to the axial-vector constants. The decay width of the {theta}{sup +}{yields}NK transition is determined to be {gamma}({theta}{yields}NK)=0.71 MeV, based on the result of the axial-vector transition constant g{sub A}*({theta}{yields}NK)=0.05. In addition, other strong decays of the baryon antidecuplet are investigated. The forbidden decays from the baryon antidecuplet to the decuplet are also studied.

  17. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  18. Single Top Quarks at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, Ann P.; /UC, Riverside

    2008-09-01

    After many years searching for electroweak production of top quarks, the Tevatron collider experiments have now moved from obtaining first evidence for single top quark production to an impressive array of measurements that test the standard model in several directions. This paper describes measurements of the single top quark cross sections, limits set on the CKM matrix element |Vtb|, searches for production of single top quarks produced via flavor-changing neutral currents and from heavy W-prime and H+ boson resonances, and studies of anomalous Wtb couplings. It concludes with projections for future expected significance as the analyzed datasets grow.

  19. Static quark potential in three flavor QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, James E.; Sugar, Bob

    2000-08-01

    We study the effects of dynamical quarks on the static quark potential at distances shorter than those where string breaking is expected. Quenched calculations and calculations with three flavors of dynamical quarks are done on sets of lattices with the lattice spacings matched within about one percent. The effect of the sea quarks on the shape of the potential is clearly visible. We investigate the consequences of these effects in a very crude model, namely solving Schroedinger's equation in the resulting potential. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  20. Percolation model with an additional source of disorder.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S S

    2016-06-01

    The ranges of transmission of the mobiles in a mobile ad hoc network are not uniform in reality. They are affected by the temperature fluctuation in air, obstruction due to the solid objects, even the humidity difference in the environment, etc. How the varying range of transmission of the individual active elements affects the global connectivity in the network may be an important practical question to ask. Here a model of percolation phenomena, with an additional source of disorder, is introduced for a theoretical understanding of this problem. As in ordinary percolation, sites of a square lattice are occupied randomly with probability p. Each occupied site is then assigned a circular disk of random value R for its radius. A bond is defined to be occupied if and only if the radii R_{1} and R_{2} of the disks centered at the ends satisfy a certain predefined condition. In a very general formulation, one divides the R_{1}-R_{2} plane into two regions by an arbitrary closed curve. One defines a point within one region as representing an occupied bond; otherwise it is a vacant bond. The study of three different rules under this general formulation indicates that the percolation threshold always varies continuously. This threshold has two limiting values, one is p_{c}(sq), the percolation threshold for the ordinary site percolation on the square lattice, and the other is unity. The approach of the percolation threshold to its limiting values are characterized by two exponents. In a special case, all lattice sites are occupied by disks of random radii R∈{0,R_{0}} and a percolation transition is observed with R_{0} as the control variable, similar to the site occupation probability. PMID:27415234

  1. Percolation model with an additional source of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    The ranges of transmission of the mobiles in a mobile ad hoc network are not uniform in reality. They are affected by the temperature fluctuation in air, obstruction due to the solid objects, even the humidity difference in the environment, etc. How the varying range of transmission of the individual active elements affects the global connectivity in the network may be an important practical question to ask. Here a model of percolation phenomena, with an additional source of disorder, is introduced for a theoretical understanding of this problem. As in ordinary percolation, sites of a square lattice are occupied randomly with probability p . Each occupied site is then assigned a circular disk of random value R for its radius. A bond is defined to be occupied if and only if the radii R1 and R2 of the disks centered at the ends satisfy a certain predefined condition. In a very general formulation, one divides the R1-R2 plane into two regions by an arbitrary closed curve. One defines a point within one region as representing an occupied bond; otherwise it is a vacant bond. The study of three different rules under this general formulation indicates that the percolation threshold always varies continuously. This threshold has two limiting values, one is pc(sq) , the percolation threshold for the ordinary site percolation on the square lattice, and the other is unity. The approach of the percolation threshold to its limiting values are characterized by two exponents. In a special case, all lattice sites are occupied by disks of random radii R ∈{0 ,R0} and a percolation transition is observed with R0 as the control variable, similar to the site occupation probability.

  2. Measurements of top quark properties at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of the top quark in 1995 opened a whole new sector of investigation of the Standard Model; today top quark physics remains a key priority of the Tevatron program. Some of the measurements of top quark properties, for example its mass, will be a long-standing legacy. The recent evidence of an anomalously large charge asymmetry in top quark events suggests that new physics could couple preferably with top quarks. I will summarize this long chapter of particle physics history and discuss the road the top quark is highlighting for the LHC program.

  3. Baryons as Fock states of 3,5,... Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov; Victor Petrov

    2004-09-01

    We present a generating functional producing quark wave functions of all Fock states in the octet, decuplet and antidecuplet baryons in the mean field approximation, both in the rest and infinite momentum frames. In particular, for the usual octet and decuplet baryons we get the SU(6)-symmetric wave functions for their 3-quark component but with specific corrections from relativism and from additional quark-antiquark pairs. For the exotic antidecuplet baryons we obtain the 5-quark wave function.

  4. Quarks in the Bootstrap Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, D.

    2015-03-01

    The quark model emerged from the Gell-Mann-Ne'eman flavor SU(3) symmetry. Its development, in the context of strong interactions, took place in a heuristic theoretical framework, referred to as the Bootstrap Era. Setting the background for the dominant ideas in strong interaction of the early 1960s, we outline some aspects of the constituent quark model. An independent theoretical development was the emergence of hadron duality in 1967, leading to a realization of the Bootstrap idea by relating hadron resonances (in the s-channel) with Regge pole trajectories (in t- and u-channels). The synthesis of duality with the quark-model has been achieved by duality diagrams, serving as a conceptual framework for discussing many aspects of hadron dynamics toward the end of the 1960s.

  5. Quarks in the bootstrap era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, D.

    2014-12-01

    The quark model emerged from the Gell-Mann-Ne'eman flavor SU(3) symmetry. Its development, in the context of strong interactions, took place in a heuristic theoretical framework, referred to as the Bootstrap Era. Setting the background for the dominant ideas in strong interaction of the early 1960s, we outline some aspects of the constituent quark model. An independent theoretical development was the emergence of hadron duality in 1967, leading to a realization of the Bootstrap idea by relating hadron resonances (in the s-channel) with Regge pole trajectories (in t- and u-channels). The synthesis of duality with the quark-model has been achieved by duality diagrams, serving as a conceptual framework for discussing many aspects of hadron dynamics toward the end of the 1960s.

  6. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces. PMID:25541769

  7. Electroexcitation of the Δ(1232)3/2+ and Δ(1600)3/2+ in a light-front relativistic quark model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-09-30

    The magnetic-dipole form factor and the ratios REM and RSM for the γ* N → Δ(1232)3/2+ transition are predicted within light-front relativistic quark model up to photon virtuality Q2=12 GeV2. Furthermore, we predict the helicity amplitudes of the γ* N → Δ(1600)3/2+ transition assuming the Δ(1600)3/2+ is the first radial excitation of the ground state Delta(1232)3/2+.

  8. {Sigma}{sub c}D and {Lambda}{sub c}D states in a chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. L.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zou, B. S.; Huang, F.

    2011-07-15

    The S-wave {Sigma}{sub c}D and {Lambda}{sub c}D states with isospin I=1/2 and spin S=1/2 are dynamically investigated within the framework of a chiral constituent quark model by solving a resonating group method equation. The results show that the interaction between {Sigma}{sub c} and D is attractive, which consequently results in a {Sigma}{sub c}D bound state with a binding energy of about 5-42 MeV, unlike the case of the {Lambda}{sub c}D state, which has a repulsive interaction and thus is unbound. The channel-coupling effect of {Sigma}{sub c}D and {Lambda}{sub c}D is found to be negligible owing to the fact that the gap between the {Sigma}{sub c}D and {Lambda}{sub c}D thresholds is relatively large and the {Sigma}{sub c}D and {Lambda}{sub c}D transition interaction is weak.

  9. Top Quark Pair Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2005-05-17

    The measurement of the top quark pair production crosssection inproton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV is a test ofquantumchromodynamics and could potentially be sensitive to newphysics beyondthe standard model. I report on the latest t-tbarcross section resultsfrom the CDF and DZero experiments in various finalstate topologies whicharise from decays of top quark pairs.

  10. Quark and pion effective couplings from polarization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braghin, Fábio L.

    2016-05-01

    A flavor SU(2) effective model for pions and quarks is derived by considering polarization effects departing from the usual quark-quark effective interaction induced by dressed gluon exchange, i.e. a global color model for QCD. For that, the quark field is decomposed into a component that yields light mesons and the quark-antiquark condensate, being integrated out by means of the auxiliary field method, and another component which yields constituent quarks, which is basically a background quark field. Within a long-wavelength and weak quark field expansion (or large quark effective mass expansion) of a quark determinant, the leading terms are found up to the second order in a zero-order derivative expansion, by neglecting vector mesons that are considerably heavier than the pion. Pions are considered in the structureless limit and, besides the chiral invariant terms that reproduce previously derived expressions, symmetry breaking terms are also presented. The leading chiral quark-quark effective couplings are also found corresponding to a NJL and a vector-NJL couplings. All the resulting effective coupling constants and parameters are expressed in terms of the current and constituent quark masses and of the coupling g.

  11. SUSY Threshold Effects on Quark and Lepton Masses at the GUT Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan

    2008-11-23

    We discuss the impact of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the GUT scale within the large tan{beta} regime of the MSSM. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons which can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m{sub {mu}}/m{sub s}, m{sub e}/m{sub d}, y{sub {tau}}/y{sub b} and y{sub t}/y{sub b} for three example ranges of SUSY parameters and discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings. This is a brief summary of the work of Ref. [1].

  12. Transverse momentum dependent distribution functions in a covariant parton model approach with quark orbital motion

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. V.; Teryaev, O. V.; Schweitzer, P.; Zavada, P.

    2009-07-01

    Transverse parton momentum dependent distribution functions (TMDs) of the nucleon are studied in a covariant model, which describes the intrinsic motion of partons in terms of a covariant momentum distribution. The consistency of the approach is demonstrated, and model relations among TMDs are studied. As a by-product it is shown how the approach allows to formulate the nonrelativistic limit.

  13. Using Generalized Additive Models to Analyze Single-Case Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William; Sullivan, Kristynn

    2013-01-01

    Many analyses for single-case designs (SCDs)--including nearly all the effect size indicators-- currently assume no trend in the data. Regression and multilevel models allow for trend, but usually test only linear trend and have no principled way of knowing if higher order trends should be represented in the model. This paper shows how Generalized…

  14. The Top Quark, QCD, And New Physics.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dawson, S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup+}e{sup -}+ t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup+}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  15. THE TOP QUARK, QCD, AND NEW PHYSICS.

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON,S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup +}e{sup -} + t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup +}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  16. Search for Standard Model Production of Four Top Quarks in the Lepton + Jets Channel in pp Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-27

    Our search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t¯tt¯t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM t¯tt¯t production is σSMt¯tt¯t≈1fb. A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. We determined that the data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 ± 17 fb is expected.

  17. Search for Standard Model Production of Four Top Quarks in the Lepton + Jets Channel in pp Collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-27

    Our search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t¯tt¯t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM t¯tt¯t production is σSMt¯tt¯t≈1fb. A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. We determined that the data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set atmore » a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 ± 17 fb is expected.« less

  18. How much additional model complexity do the use of catchment hydrological signatures, additional data and expert knowledge warrant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Fovet, O.; RUIZ, L.; Gascuel-odoux, C.; Savenije, H.

    2013-12-01

    In the frequent absence of sufficient suitable data to constrain hydrological models, it is not uncommon to represent catchments at a range of scales by lumped model set-ups. Although process heterogeneity can average out on the catchment scale to generate simple catchment integrated responses whose general flow features can frequently be reproduced by lumped models, these models often fail to get details of the flow pattern as well as catchment internal dynamics, such as groundwater level changes, right to a sufficient degree, resulting in considerable predictive uncertainty. Traditionally, models are constrained by only one or two objectives functions, which does not warrant more than a handful of parameters to avoid elevated predictive uncertainty, thereby preventing more complex model set-ups accounting for increased process heterogeneity. In this study it was tested how much additional process heterogeneity is warranted in models when optimizing the model calibration strategy, using additional data and expert knowledge. Long-term timeseries of flow and groundwater levels for small nested experimental catchments in French Brittany with considerable differences in geology, topography and flow regime were used in this study to test which degree of model process heterogeneity is warranted with increased availability of information. In a first step, as a benchmark, the system was treated as one lumped entity and the model was trained based only on its ability to reproduce the hydrograph. Although it was found that the overall modelled flow generally reflects the observed flow response quite well, the internal system dynamics could not be reproduced. In further steps the complexity of this model was gradually increased, first by adding a separate riparian reservoir to the lumped set-up and then by a semi-distributed set-up, allowing for independent, parallel model structures, representing the contrasting nested catchments. Although calibration performance increased

  19. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models. PMID:26336695

  20. Addition of Diffusion Model to MELCOR and Comparison with Data

    SciTech Connect

    Brad Merrill; Richard Moore; Chang Oh

    2004-06-01

    A chemical diffusion model was incorporated into the thermal-hydraulics package of the MELCOR Severe Accident code (Reference 1) for analyzing air ingress events for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor.

  1. Modelling dissimilarity: generalizing ultrametric and additive tree representations.

    PubMed

    Hubert, L; Arabie, P; Meulman, J

    2001-05-01

    Methods for the hierarchical clustering of an object set produce a sequence of nested partitions such that object classes within each successive partition are constructed from the union of object classes present at the previous level. Any such sequence of nested partitions can in turn be characterized by an ultrametric. An approach to generalizing an (ultrametric) representation is proposed in which the nested character of the partition sequence is relaxed and replaced by the weaker requirement that the classes within each partition contain objects consecutive with respect to a fixed ordering of the objects. A method for fitting such a structure to a given proximity matrix is discussed, along with several alternative strategies for graphical representation. Using this same ultrametric extension, additive tree representations can also be generalized by replacing the ultrametric component in the decomposition of an additive tree (into an ultrametric and a centroid metric). A common numerical illustration is developed and maintained throughout the paper. PMID:11393895

  2. Measurements of the u valence quark distribution function in the proton and u quark fragmentation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I. G.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; De Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S. C.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffre, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, A.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Poensgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Sandacz, A.; Scheer, M.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schouten, M.; Schröder, T.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thenard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; De la Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.; European Muon Collaboration

    1989-07-01

    A new determination of the u valence quark distribution function in the proton is obtained from the analysis of identified charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons produced in muon-proton and muon-deuteron scattering. The comparison with results obtained in inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering provides a further test of the quark-parton model. The u quark fragmentation functions into positive and negative pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons are also measured.

  3. Additional Research Needs to Support the GENII Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen

    2013-11-30

    In the course of evaluating the current parameter needs for the GENII Version 2 code (Snyder et al. 2013), areas of possible improvement for both the data and the underlying models have been identified. As the data review was implemented, PNNL staff identified areas where the models can be improved both to accommodate the locally significant pathways identified and also to incorporate newer models. The areas are general data needs for the existing models and improved formulations for the pathway models. It is recommended that priorities be set by NRC staff to guide selection of the most useful improvements in a cost-effective manner. Suggestions are made based on relatively easy and inexpensive changes, and longer-term more costly studies. In the short term, there are several improved model formulations that could be applied to the GENII suite of codes to make them more generally useful. • Implementation of the separation of the translocation and weathering processes • Implementation of an improved model for carbon-14 from non-atmospheric sources • Implementation of radon exposure pathways models • Development of a KML processor for the output report generator module data that are calculated on a grid that could be superimposed upon digital maps for easier presentation and display • Implementation of marine mammal models (manatees, seals, walrus, whales, etc.). Data needs in the longer term require extensive (and potentially expensive) research. Before picking any one radionuclide or food type, NRC staff should perform an in-house review of current and anticipated environmental analyses to select “dominant” radionuclides of interest to allow setting of cost-effective priorities for radionuclide- and pathway-specific research. These include • soil-to-plant uptake studies for oranges and other citrus fruits, and • Development of models for evaluation of radionuclide concentration in highly-processed foods such as oils and sugars. Finally, renewed

  4. Study of the top-quark pair production in association with a bottom-quark pair from fast simulations at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Young Kwon; Choi, Su Yong; Roh, Youn Jung; Kim, Tae Jeong

    2015-09-01

    A large number of top quarks will be produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the Run II period. This will allow us to measure the rare processes from the top sector in great details. We present a study of top-quark pair production in association with a bottom-quark pair (tbar tbbar b) from fast simulations for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The differential distributions of tbar tbbar b are compared with the top-quark pair production with two additional jets (tbar tjj) and with the production in association with the Higgs (tbar tH), where the Higgs decays to a bottom-quark pair. The significances of the tbar tbbar b process in the dileptonic and the semileptonic decay modes are calculated with the data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10 fb-1, which is foreseen to be collected in the early Run II period. This study will provide an important input in searching for new physics beyond the standard model, as well as in searching for the tbar tH process where the Yukawa coupling with the top quark can be directly measured.

  5. A model for QCD at high density and large quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    De Pietri, Roberto; Feo, Alessandra; Seiler, Erhard; Stamatescu, Ion-Olimpiu

    2007-12-01

    We study the high density region of QCD within an effective model obtained in the frame of the hopping parameter expansion and choosing Polyakov-type loops as the main dynamical variables representing the fermionic matter. To get a first idea of the phase structure, the model is analyzed in strong coupling expansion and using a mean field approximation. In numerical simulations, the model still shows the so-called sign problem, a difficulty peculiar to nonzero chemical potential, but it permits the development of algorithms which ensure a good overlap of the Monte Carlo ensemble with the true one. We review the main features of the model and present calculations concerning the dependence of various observables on the chemical potential and on the temperature, in particular, of the charge density and the diquark susceptibility, which may be used to characterize the various phases expected at high baryonic density. We obtain in this way information about the phase structure of the model and the corresponding phase transitions and crossover regions, which can be considered as hints for the behavior of nonzero density QCD.

  6. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  7. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  8. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  9. NLO QCD corrections to the same-sign T-odd quark pair production in the littlest Higgs model with T parity at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shou-Jian; Ma, Wen-Gan; Guo, Lei; Chen, Chong; Zhang, Ren-You

    2014-06-01

    We present the calculations for the same-sign T-odd mirror quark pair production of the first two generations in the littlest Higgs model with T parity (LHT) at the √s =14 TeV LHC up to the QCD next-to-leading order (NLO) including the subsequent decays of the T-odd mirror quarks. The uncertainties from the factorization/renormalization scale and parton distribution functions are discussed. Our numerical results show that the parton distribution function uncertainty of the NLO QCD corrected cross section for the same-sign T-odd mirror quark pair production of the first two generations is comparable with the scale uncertainty, and the combined uncertainty at the QCD NLO is much smaller than that at the LO with the factorization/renormalization scale μ in the range of [μ0/4,4μ0]. We also study the dependence of the total cross section on the LHT parameters, and provide the transverse momentum, rapidity, invariant mass and HT distributions of final products.

  10. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-09

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.

  11. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; El Sawy, M.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.

    2016-04-01

    A first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. A differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03(stat) ± 0.10(syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is usedmore » to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.« less

  13. The addition of algebraic turbulence modeling to program LAURA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Thompson, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is modified to allow the calculation of turbulent flows. This is accomplished using the Cebeci-Smith and Baldwin-Lomax eddy-viscosity models in conjunction with the thin-layer Navier-Stokes options of the program. Turbulent calculations can be performed for both perfect-gas and equilibrium flows. However, a requirement of the models is that the flow be attached. It is seen that for slender bodies, adequate resolution of the boundary-layer gradients may require more cells in the normal direction than a laminar solution, even when grid stretching is employed. Results for axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows are presented. Comparison with experimental data and other numerical results reveal generally good agreement, except in the regions of detached flow.

  14. Properties of Non-Conformal Quark Gluon Plasma of Holographic QCD Models from Compactified D4 Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we obtain some thermodynamics quantities of non-conformal gluonic matter. We extract specific heat, enthalpy and equation of state in terms of the temperature. Using transport properties we find important quantities of corresponding quark gluon plasma like drag force and jet-quenching.

  15. Properties of Non-Conformal Quark Gluon Plasma of Holographic QCD Models from Compactified D4 Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, J.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we obtain some thermodynamics quantities of non-conformal gluonic matter. We extract specific heat, enthalpy and equation of state in terms of the temperature. Using transport properties we find important quantities of corresponding quark gluon plasma like drag force and jet-quenching.

  16. Quarks and gluons in hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-12-01

    These lectures discuss the particle-nuclear interface -- a general introduction to the ideas and application of colored quarks in nuclear physics, color, the Pauli principle, and spin flavor correlations -- this lecture shows how the magnetic moments of hadrons relate to the underlying color degree of freedom, and the proton's spin -- a quark model perspective. This lecture reviews recent excitement which has led some to claim that in deep inelastic polarized lepton scattering very little of the spin of a polarized proton is due to its quarks. This lecture discusses the distribution functions of quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, and how knowledge of these is necessary before some quark-gluon plasma searches can be analyzed. 56 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Naive time-reversal odd phenomena in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from light-cone constituent quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara Pasquini, Peter Schweitzer

    2011-06-01

    We present results for leading-twist azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering due to naively time-reversal odd transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions from the light-cone constituent quark model. We carefully discuss the range of applicability of the model, especially with regard to positivity constraints and evolution effects. We find good agreement with available experimental data from COMPASS and HERMES, and present predictions to be tested in forthcoming experiments at Jefferson Lab.

  18. Search for production of vector-like quark pairs and of four top quarks in the lepton-plus-jets final state in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-20

    A search for pair production of vector-like quarks, both up-type (T) and down-type (B), as well as for four-top-quark production, is presented. The search is based on pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large missing transverse momentum and multiple jets. Dedicated analyses are performed targeting three cases: a T quark with significant branching ratio to a W bosonmore » and a b-quark \\( \\left(T\\overline{T}\\to Wb+\\mathrm{X}\\right) \\), and both a T quark and a B quark with significant branching ratio to a Higgs boson and a third-generation quark (\\( T\\overline{T}\\to Ht+X\\;\\mathrm{and}\\;B\\overline{B}\\to Hb+\\mathrm{X} \\) respectively). No significant excess of events above the Standard Model expectation is observed, and 95% CL lower limits are derived on the masses of the vector-like T and B quarks under several branching ratio hypotheses assuming contributions from T → Wb, Zt, Ht and B → Wt, Zb, Hb decays. The 95% CL observed lower limits on the T quark mass range between 715 GeV and 950 GeV for all possible values of the branching ratios into the three decay modes, and are the most stringent constraints to date. In addition, the most restrictive upper bounds on four-top-quark production are set in a number of new physics scenarios.« less

  19. Search for production of vector-like quark pairs and of four top quarks in the lepton-plus-jets final state in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-20

    A search for pair production of vector-like quarks, both up-type (T) and down-type (B), as well as for four-top-quark production, is presented. The search is based on pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large missing transverse momentum and multiple jets. Dedicated analyses are performed targeting three cases: a T quark with significant branching ratio to a W boson and a b-quark \\( \\left(T\\overline{T}\\to Wb+\\mathrm{X}\\right) \\), and both a T quark and a B quark with significant branching ratio to a Higgs boson and a third-generation quark (\\( T\\overline{T}\\to Ht+X\\;\\mathrm{and}\\;B\\overline{B}\\to Hb+\\mathrm{X} \\) respectively). No significant excess of events above the Standard Model expectation is observed, and 95% CL lower limits are derived on the masses of the vector-like T and B quarks under several branching ratio hypotheses assuming contributions from T → Wb, Zt, Ht and B → Wt, Zb, Hb decays. The 95% CL observed lower limits on the T quark mass range between 715 GeV and 950 GeV for all possible values of the branching ratios into the three decay modes, and are the most stringent constraints to date. In addition, the most restrictive upper bounds on four-top-quark production are set in a number of new physics scenarios.

  20. Software reliability: Additional investigations into modeling with replicated experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, P. M.; Schotz, F. M.; Skirvan, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of programmer experience level, different program usage distributions, and programming languages are explored. All these factors affect performance, and some tentative relational hypotheses are presented. An analytic framework for replicated and non-replicated (traditional) software experiments is presented. A method of obtaining an upper bound on the error rate of the next error is proposed. The method was validated empirically by comparing forecasts with actual data. In all 14 cases the bound exceeded the observed parameter, albeit somewhat conservatively. Two other forecasting methods are proposed and compared to observed results. Although demonstrated relative to this framework that stages are neither independent nor exponentially distributed, empirical estimates show that the exponential assumption is nearly valid for all but the extreme tails of the distribution. Except for the dependence in the stage probabilities, Cox's model approximates to a degree what is being observed.

  1. A model of the holographic principle: Randomness and additional dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarsky, Abraham; Góra, Paweł; Proppe, Harald

    2010-01-01

    In recent years an idea has emerged that a system in a 3-dimensional space can be described from an information point of view by a system on its 2-dimensional boundary. This mysterious correspondence is called the Holographic Principle and has had profound effects in string theory and our perception of space-time. In this note we describe a purely mathematical model of the Holographic Principle using ideas from nonlinear dynamical systems theory. We show that a random map on the surface S of a 3-dimensional open ball B has a natural counterpart in B, and the two maps acting in different dimensional spaces have the same entropy. We can reverse this construction if we start with a special 3-dimensional map in B called a skew product. The key idea is to use the randomness, as imbedded in the parameter of the 2-dimensional random map, to define a third dimension. The main result shows that if we start with an arbitrary dynamical system in B with entropy E we can construct a random map on S whose entropy is arbitrarily close to E.

  2. Additional Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert F.; Knox, James C.; Cummings, Ramona; Brooks, Thomas; Schunk, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach. This paper describes the continuing development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM)

  3. Additional Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert F.; Knox, James C.; Cummings, Ramona; Brooks, Thomas; Schunk, Richard G.; Gomez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach. This paper describes the continuing development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program.

  4. Top quark properties from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Klute, Markus; /MIT, LNS

    2006-05-01

    This report describes latest measurements and studies of top quark properties from the Tevatron in Run II with an integrated luminosity of up to 750 pb{sup -1}. Due to its large mass of about 172 GeV/c{sup 2}, the top quark provides a unique environment for tests of the Standard Model and is believed to yield sensitivity to new physics beyond the Standard Model. With data samples of close to 1 fb{sup -1} the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron enter a new area of precision top quark measurements.

  5. Transferability of regional permafrost disturbance susceptibility modelling using generalized linear and generalized additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudy, Ashley C. A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Treitz, Paul; van Ewijk, Karin Y.

    2016-07-01

    To effectively assess and mitigate risk of permafrost disturbance, disturbance-prone areas can be predicted through the application of susceptibility models. In this study we developed regional susceptibility models for permafrost disturbances using a field disturbance inventory to test the transferability of the model to a broader region in the Canadian High Arctic. Resulting maps of susceptibility were then used to explore the effect of terrain variables on the occurrence of disturbances within this region. To account for a large range of landscape characteristics, the model was calibrated using two locations: Sabine Peninsula, Melville Island, NU, and Fosheim Peninsula, Ellesmere Island, NU. Spatial patterns of disturbance were predicted with a generalized linear model (GLM) and generalized additive model (GAM), each calibrated using disturbed and randomized undisturbed locations from both locations and GIS-derived terrain predictor variables including slope, potential incoming solar radiation, wetness index, topographic position index, elevation, and distance to water. Each model was validated for the Sabine and Fosheim Peninsulas using independent data sets while the transferability of the model to an independent site was assessed at Cape Bounty, Melville Island, NU. The regional GLM and GAM validated well for both calibration sites (Sabine and Fosheim) with the area under the receiver operating curves (AUROC) > 0.79. Both models were applied directly to Cape Bounty without calibration and validated equally with AUROC's of 0.76; however, each model predicted disturbed and undisturbed samples differently. Additionally, the sensitivity of the transferred model was assessed using data sets with different sample sizes. Results indicated that models based on larger sample sizes transferred more consistently and captured the variability within the terrain attributes in the respective study areas. Terrain attributes associated with the initiation of disturbances were

  6. Observation of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  7. Proton Quark Helicity Structure via W-Boson Production in PP Collision @ Phenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, F.

    2016-02-01

    The spin structure of the proton has been long studied in the past decades, but, while the contributions to the proton spin from valence quarks is by now precisely known, large uncertainties are still affecting our knowledge of the sea quark contributions. The measurement of single-spin asymmetries of the parity violating W production in pp collision allows a (quasi-)model independent access to the flavor-dependent light sea quark contributions. Being maximally parity violating, the W charge can be directly realted to the quark and antiquark flavor, and in addition, moving from forward to backward rapidities with respect to the polarized proton beam direction it is possible to change the relative contributions of u, d, anti-u, anti-d quarks, thus accessing each light-quark spin alignment with respect to the proton spin. At PHENIX, the W boson produced in pp collision at center of mass energies of about 500 GeV is accessed via its decays into electron (muon) at central (forward) rapidities. Here the status of the analysis and the most updated results is reported.

  8. Production and decay of heavy top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.P.

    1989-08-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the top quark exists and has a mass between 50 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. The decays of a top quark with a mass in this range are studied with emphasis placed on the mass region near the threshold for production of real W bosons. Topics discussed are: (1) possible enhancement of strange quark production when M{sub W} + m{sub s} < m{sub t} < M{sub W} + m{sub b}; (2) exclusive decays of T mesons to B and B{asterisk} mesons using the non-relativistic quark model; (3) polarization of intermediate W's in top quark decay as a source of information on the top quark mass. The production of heavy top quarks in an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV is studied. The effective-boson approximation for photons, Z{sup 0}'s and W's is reviewed and an analogous approximation for interfaces between photons and Z{sup 0}'s is developed. The cross sections for top quark pair production from photon-photon, photon-Z{sup 0}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} fusion are calculated using the effective-boson approximation. Production of top quarks along with anti-bottom quarks via {gamma}W{sup +} and Z{sup 0}W{sup +} fusion is studied. An exact calculation of {gamma}e{sup +} {yields} {bar {nu}}t{bar b} is made and compared with the effective-W approximation. 31 refs., 46 figs.

  9. Quark number fluctuations at finite temperature and finite chemical potential via the Dyson-Schwinger equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xian-yin; Qin, Si-xue; Liu, Yu-xin

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the quark number fluctuations up to the fourth order in the matter composed of two light flavor quarks with isospin symmetry and at finite temperature and finite chemical potential using the Dyson-Schwinger equation approach of QCD. In order to solve the quark gap equation, we approximate the dressed quark-gluon vertex with the bare one and adopt both the Maris-Tandy model and the infrared constant (Qin-Chang) model for the dressed gluon propagator. Our results indicate that the second, third, and fourth order fluctuations of net quark number all diverge at the critical endpoint (CEP). Around the CEP, the second order fluctuation possesses obvious pump while the third and fourth order ones exhibit distinct wiggles between positive and negative. For the Maris-Tandy model and the Qin-Chang model, we give the pseudocritical temperature at zero quark chemical potential as Tc=146 MeV and 150 MeV, and locate the CEP at (μEq,TE)=(120,124) MeV and (124,129) MeV, respectively. In addition, our results manifest that the fluctuations are insensitive to the details of the model, but the location of the CEP shifts to low chemical potential and high temperature as the confinement length scale increases.

  10. Electroexcitation of the Δ(1232)3/2+ and Δ(1600)3/2+ in a light-front relativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-09-30

    The magnetic-dipole form factor and the ratios REM and RSM for the γ* N → Δ(1232)3/2+ transition are predicted within light-front relativistic quark model up to photon virtuality Q2=12 GeV2. Furthermore, we predict the helicity amplitudes of the γ* N → Δ(1600)3/2+ transition assuming the Δ(1600)3/2+ is the first radial excitation of the ground state Delta(1232)3/2+.

  11. Modified Fragmentation Function from Quark Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Within the framework of the constituent quark model, it isshown that the single hadron fragmentation function of a parton can beexpressed as a convolution of shower diquark or triquark distributionfunction and quark recombination probability, if the interference betweenamplitudes of quark recombination with different momenta is neglected.Therecombination probability is determined by the hadron's wavefunction inthe constituent quark model. The shower diquark or triquark distributionfunctions of a fragmenting jet are defined in terms of overlappingmatrices of constituent quarks and parton field operators. They aresimilar in form to dihadron or trihadron fragmentation functions in termsof parton operator and hadron states. Extending the formalism to thefield theory at finite temperature, we automatically derive contributionsto the effective single hadron fragmentation function from therecombination of shower and thermal constituent quarks. Suchcontributions involve single or diquark distribution functions which inturn can be related to diquark or triquark distribution functions via sumrules. We also derive QCD evolution equations for quark distributionfunctions that in turn determine the evolution of the effective jetfragmentation functions in a thermal medium.

  12. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  13. Challenges to quantum chromodynamics: Anomalous spin, heavy quark, and nuclear phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1989-11-01

    The general structure of QCD meshes remarkably well with the facts of the hadronic world, especially quark-based spectroscopy, current algebra, the approximate point-like structure of large momentum transfer inclusive reactions, and the logarithmic violation of scale invariance in deep inelastic lepton-hadron reactions. QCD has been successful in predicting the features of electron-positron and photon-photon annihilation into hadrons, including the magnitude and scaling of the cross sections, the shape of the photon structure function, the production of hadronic jets with patterns conforming to elementary quark and gluon subprocesses. The experimental measurements appear to be consistent with basic postulates of QCD, that the charge and weak currents within hadrons are carried by fractionally-charged quarks, and that the strength of the interactions between the quarks, and gluons becomes weak at short distances, consistent with asymptotic freedom. Nevertheless in some cases, the predictions of QCD appear to be in dramatic conflict with experiment. The anomalies suggest that the proton itself as a much more complex object than suggested by simple non-relativistic quark models. Recent analyses of the proton distribution amplitude using QCD sum rules points to highly-nontrival proton structure. Solutions to QCD in one-space and one-time dimension suggest that the momentum distributions of non-valence quarks in the hadrons have a non-trival oscillatory structure. The data seems also to be suggesting that the intrinsic'' bound state structure of the proton has a non- negligible strange and charm quark content, in addition to the extrinsic'' sources of heavy quarks created in the collision itself. 144 refs., 46 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Our Electron, Proton and Neutron Models Predict Atom Building from Three-ring Orthogonal Interlocks of Properly Quarked Nucleons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Roger; McLeod, David

    2008-04-01

    We posited flatland electron loop strings from transversely vibrating neutrino strings. Loop traveling waves TWs alternately become upwardly deflecting standing waves SWs along each half-wave segment between non-vibrating node pairs. Descending SWs again revert to TWs at flatland, as far as the next two adjacent nodal pairs, where folding continues and new SWs descend, then ascend, and repetition follows. Three dimensional objects, not points, result. A broken ``linear'' electron string and its electron spring constant are compressed within stars until linear mass density is compatible with incorporation into a stable three-ring proton string. The created neutron has two down quarks and one up, but must be unstable because it lacks overpass-underpass interlocks of our proton that shared its linear charge density of two up quarks and one down quark with the electron, becoming neutral. Anu transversely aligned neutron can have one of its ``notches'' pushed into the acceptor notch of a proton, and deuterium results. Tritium may be a compatible ``catch'' of another neutron. An alpha particle follows when a second proton is forced in, creating a stable ``tic-tac-toe'' grid. Atom building proceeds routinely.

  15. Modeling the cardiovascular system using a nonlinear additive autoregressive model with exogenous input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, M.; Suhrbier, A.; Malberg, H.; Penzel, T.; Bretthauer, G.; Kurths, J.; Wessel, N.

    2008-07-01

    The parameters of heart rate variability and blood pressure variability have proved to be useful analytical tools in cardiovascular physics and medicine. Model-based analysis of these variabilities additionally leads to new prognostic information about mechanisms behind regulations in the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we analyze the complex interaction between heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration by nonparametric fitted nonlinear additive autoregressive models with external inputs. Therefore, we consider measurements of healthy persons and patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), with and without hypertension. It is shown that the proposed nonlinear models are capable of describing short-term fluctuations in heart rate as well as systolic blood pressure significantly better than similar linear ones, which confirms the assumption of nonlinear controlled heart rate and blood pressure. Furthermore, the comparison of the nonlinear and linear approaches reveals that the heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects is caused by a higher level of noise as well as nonlinearity than in patients suffering from OSAS. The residue analysis points at a further source of heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects, in addition to heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration. Comparison of the nonlinear models within and among the different groups of subjects suggests the ability to discriminate the cohorts that could lead to a stratification of hypertension risk in OSAS patients.

  16. Heavy quark transport in heavy ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider within the UrQMD hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Thomas; van Hees, Hendrik; Inghirami, Gabriele; Steinheimer, Jan; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    We implement a Langevin approach for the transport of heavy quarks in the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) hybrid model, which uses the transport model UrQMD to determine realistic initial conditions for the hydrodynamical evolution of quark gluon plasma and heavy charm and bottom quarks. It provides a realistic description of the background medium for the evolution of relativistic heavy ion collisions. The diffusion of heavy quarks is simulated with a relativistic Langevin approach, using two sets of drag and diffusion coefficients, one based on a T -matrix approach and one based on a resonance model for elastic scattering of heavy quarks within the medium. In the case of the resonance model we investigate the effects of different decoupling temperatures of heavy quarks from the medium, ranging between 130 and 180 MeV . We present calculations of the nuclear modification factor RA A, as well as of the elliptic flow v2 in Au + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV and Pb + Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV . To make our results comparable to experimental data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we implement a Peterson fragmentation and a quark coalescence approach followed by semileptonic decay of the D and B mesons to electrons. We find that our results strongly depend on the decoupling temperature and the hadronization mechanism. At a decoupling temperature of 130 MeV we reach a good agreement with the measurements at both the RHIC and the LHC energies simultaneously for the elliptic flow v2 and the nuclear modification factor RA A.

  17. Scalar excitation with Leggett frequency in 3He -B and the 125 GeV Higgs particle in top quark condensation models as pseudo-Goldstone bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.; Zubkov, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    We consider the scenario in which the light Higgs scalar boson appears as the pseudo-Goldstone boson. We discuss examples in both condensed matter and relativistic field theory. In 3He -B the symmetry breaking gives rise to four Nambu-Goldstone (NG) modes and 14 Higgs modes. At lower energy one of the four NG modes becomes the Higgs boson with a small mass. This is the mode measured in experiments with the longitudinal NMR, and the Higgs mass corresponds to the Leggett frequency MH=ℏΩB . The formation of the Higgs mass is the result of the violation of the hidden spin-orbit symmetry at low energy. In this scenario the symmetry-breaking energy scale Δ (the gap in the fermionic spectrum) and the Higgs mass scale MH are highly separated: MH≪Δ . On the particle physics side we consider the model inspired by the models of Refs. Cheng et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 08 (014) 095] and Fukano et al. [Phys. Rev. D 90, 055009 (2014)]. At high energies the SU(3) symmetry is assumed which relates the left-handed top and bottom quarks to the additional fermion χL. This symmetry is softly broken at low energies. As a result the only C P -even Goldstone boson acquires a mass and may be considered as a candidate for the 125 GeV scalar boson. We consider a condensation pattern different from that typically used in top-seesaw models, where the condensate ⟨t¯ LχR⟩ is off-diagonal. In our case the condensates are mostly diagonal. Unlike the work of Cheng et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 08 (014) 095] and Fukano et al. [Phys. Rev. D 90, 055009 (2014)], the explicit mass terms are absent and the soft breaking of SU(3) symmetry is given solely by the four-fermion terms. This reveals a complete analogy with 3He, where there is no explicit mass term and the spin-orbit interaction has the form of the four-fermion interaction.

  18. Observation of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlee, H.; D0 Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The DO collaboration reports on a search for the Standard Model top quark in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50 pb{sup {minus}1}. We have searched for t{bar t} production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels, with and without tagging of b quark jets. We observe 17 events with an expected background of 3.8 {plus_minus} 0.6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measure its mass to be 199{sub {minus}21}{sup +19} (stat.) {plus_minus}22 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2} and its production cross section to be 6.4 {plus_minus} 2.2 pb.

  19. QCD quark condensate in external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, G. S.; Bruckmann, F.; Endrődi, G.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Schäfer, A.

    2012-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the light condensates in QCD with 1+1+1 sea quark flavors (with mass-degenerate light quarks of different electric charges) at zero and nonzero temperatures of up to 190 MeV and external magnetic fields B<1GeV2/e. We employ stout smeared staggered fermions with physical quark masses and extrapolate the results to the continuum limit. At low temperatures we confirm the magnetic catalysis scenario predicted by many model calculations while around the crossover the condensate develops a complex dependence on the external magnetic field, resulting in a decrease of the transition temperature.

  20. Effect of quark gluon plasma on charm quark produced in relativistic heavy ion collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younus, Mohammed; Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Bass, Steffen A.

    2014-05-01

    Charm quarks are produced mainly in the pre-equilibrium stage of heavy ion collision and serve as excellent probes entering the thermalized medium. They come out with altogether different momenta and energies and fragments into D-mesons and decay into non-photonic electrons which are observed experimentally. Here we present the effect of QGP on charm quark production using two different models: first one based on Wang-Huang-Sarcevic model of multiple scattering of partons and the second one is based on Parton Cascade Model with Boltzmann transport equation used for charm quark evolution in QGP.

  1. Collider signature of T-quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Hubisz, Jay; Perelstein, Maxim; Verdier, Patrice; /Lyon, IPN

    2006-10-01

    Little Higgs models with T Parity contain new vector-like fermions, the T-odd quarks or ''T-quarks'', which can be produced at hadron colliders with a QCD-strength cross section. Events with two acoplanar jets and large missing transverse energy provide a simple signature of T-quark production. We show that searches for this signature with the Tevatron Run II data can probe a significant part of the Little Higgs model parameter space not accessible to previous experiments, exploring T-quark masses up to about 400 GeV. This reach covers parts of the parameter space where the lightest T-odd particle can account for the observed dark matter relic abundance. We also comment on the prospects for this search at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  2. Review of recent top quark measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.; /UC, Riverside

    2004-11-01

    At the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab, a large number of top quarks have been produced in the ongoing run. The CDF and D0 collaborations have made first measurements of the t{bar t} cross section in several decay channels, and have measured the top quark mass. In addition, they have set new limits on the cross sections for single top quark production, and have started to measure some of the properties of the top quark via studies of its decays. This paper summarizes the status of these measurements and discusses where they are heading in the next few years. The paper is based on a talk I gave at the Rencontres du Vietnam in Hanoi, August 2004; the results have been updated to show the latest values and new measurements.

  3. Quark structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics involved in the relativistic quark structure of nuclei such as the infinite momentum variables, scaling variables, counting rules, forward-backward variables, thermodynamic-like limit, QCD effects, higher quark bags, confinement, and many unanswered questions.

  4. The Quantum Quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction; 2. Symmetry; 3. The quantum world; 4. Towards QCD; 5. The one number of QCD; 6. The gregarious gluon; 7. Quarks and hadrons; 8. Quarks under the microscope; 9. Much ado about nothing; 10. Checkerboard QCD; Appendix 1. A QCD chronology; Appendix 2. Greek alphabet and SI prefixes; Appendix 3. Glossary; Appendix 4. Further reading; Index.

  5. Cold quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2010-05-15

    We perform an O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) perturbative calculation of the equation of state of cold but dense QCD matter with two massless and one massive quark flavor, finding that perturbation theory converges reasonably well for quark chemical potentials above 1 GeV. Using a running coupling constant and strange quark mass, and allowing for further nonperturbative effects, our results point to a narrow range where absolutely stable strange quark matter may exist. Absent stable strange quark matter, our findings suggest that quark matter in (slowly rotating) compact star cores becomes confined to hadrons only slightly above the density of atomic nuclei. Finally, we show that equations of state including quark matter lead to hybrid star masses up to M{approx}2M{sub {center_dot},} in agreement with current observations. For strange stars, we find maximal masses of M{approx}2.75M{sub {center_dot}}and conclude that confirmed observations of compact stars with M>2M{sub {center_dot}}would strongly favor the existence of stable strange quark matter.

  6. New Mechanism for Quark Energy Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Fernandez, Daniel; Mateos, David

    2010-04-30

    We show that a heavy quark moving sufficiently fast through a quark-gluon plasma may lose energy by Cherenkov-radiating mesons. We demonstrate that this takes place in all strongly coupled, large-N{sub c} plasmas with a gravity dual. The energy loss is exactly calculable in these models despite being an O(1/N{sub c}) effect. We discuss implications for heavy-ion collision experiments.

  7. Studies of top quark properties and search for electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Mousumi; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron during the Run I operation. Since the start of the Tevatron Run II in 2001, both experiments have collected {approx}2 fb{sup -1} data samples, which are over twenty times larger than that used in the Run 1 discovery. This larger data sample allows more precise studies of top-quark properties; differences between observed top-quark properties and the Standard Model (SM) prediction may give hints to possible physics beyond the SM. Here we present the latest results on the measurements of top-quark properties and the search for electroweak (EW) single top quark production from the CDF and D0 collaborations. The integrated luminosity used for the measurements corresponds to about 1 fb{sup -1}.

  8. Domain growth and ordering kinetics in dense quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Puri, S.; Mishra, H.

    2012-06-15

    The kinetics of chiral transitions in quark matter is studied in a two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We focus on the phase-ordering dynamics subsequent to a temperature quench from the massless quark phase to the massive quark phase. We study the dynamics by considering a phenomenological model (Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional). The morphology of the ordering system is characterized by the scaling of the order-parameter correlation function.

  9. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Jain, S.; Rominsky, M.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Abolins, M.; Benitez, J. A.; Brock, R.; Dyer, J.

    2008-07-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top-quark partner that is always produced from strong-coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top-quark production has been searched for in ever larger data sets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} data set that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top-quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and tt events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix-element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top-quark production of {sigma}(pp{yields}tb+X,tqb+X)=4.7{+-}1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top-quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}|=1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68<|V{sub tb}|{<=}1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  10. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top quark partner that is always produced from strong coupling processes. Top quarks were first observed in pair production in 1995, and since then, single top quark production has been searched for in ever larger datasets. In this analysis, we select events from a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset that have an electron or muon and missing transverse energy from the decay of a W boson from the top quark decay, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of the jets identified as originating from a b hadron decay. The selected events are mostly backgrounds such as W+jets and t{bar t} events, which we separate from the expected signals using three multivariate analysis techniques: boosted decision trees, Bayesian neural networks, and matrix element calculations. A binned likelihood fit of the signal cross section plus background to the data from the combination of the results from the three analysis methods gives a cross section for single top quark production of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.7 {+-} 1.3 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.014%, corresponding to a 3.6 standard deviation significance. The measured cross section value is compatible at the 10% level with the standard model prediction for electroweak top quark production. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find |V{sub tb}f{sub 1}{sup L}| = 1.31{sub -0.21}{sup +0.25}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is a generic vector coupling. This model-independent measurement translates into 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at the 95% C.L. in the standard model.

  11. The Cabibbo angle as a universal seed for quark and lepton mixings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Morisi, S.; Singh, N. N.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-09-01

    A model-independent ansatz to describe lepton and quark mixing in a unified way is suggested based upon the Cabibbo angle. In our framework neutrinos mix in a "Bi-Large" fashion, while the charged leptons mix as the "down-type" quarks do. In addition to the standard Wolfenstein parameters (λ, A) two other free parameters (ψ, δ) are needed to specify the physical lepton mixing matrix. Through this simple assumption one makes specific predictions for the atmospheric angle as well as leptonic CP violation in good agreement with current observations.

  12. Searches for new quarks and leptons in Z boson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kooten, R.J.

    1990-06-01

    Searches for the decay of Z bosons into pairs of new quarks and leptons in a data sample including 455 hadronic Z decays are presented. The Z bosons were produced in electon-positron annihilations at the SLAC Linear Collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 89.2 to 93.0 GeV. The Standard Model provides no prediction for fermion masses and does not exclude new generations of fermions. The existence and masses of these new particles may provide valuable information to help understand the pattern of fermion masses, and physics beyond the Standard Model. Specific searches for top quarks and sequential fourth generation charge--1/3(b{prime}) quarks are made considering a variety of possible standard and non-standard decay modes. In addition, searches for sequential fourth generation massive neutrinos {nu}{sub 4} and their charged lepton partners L{sup {minus}} are pursued. The {nu}{sub 4} may be stable or decay through mixing to the lighter generations. The data sample is examined for new particle topologies of events with high-momentum isolated tracks, high-energy isolated photons, spherical event shapes, and detached vertices. No evidence is observed for the production of new quarks and leptons. 95% confidence lower mass limits of 40.7 GeV/c{sup 2} for the top quark and 42.0 GeV/c{sup 2} for the b{prime}-quark mass are obtained regardless of the branching fractions to the considered decay modes. A significant range of mixing matrix elements of {nu}{sub 4} to other generation neutrinos for a {nu}{sub 4} mass from 1 GeV/c{sup 2} to 43 GeV/c{sup 2} is excluded at 95% confidence level. Measurements of the upper limit of the invisible width of the Z exclude additional values of the {nu}{sub 4} mass and mixing matrix elements, and also permit the exclusion of a region in the L{sup {minus}} mass versus {nu}{sub 4} mass plane.

  13. Discovery of single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Gillberg, Dag

    2009-04-01

    The top quark is by far the heaviest known fundamental particle with a mass nearing that of a gold atom. Because of this strikingly high mass, the top quark has several unique properties and might play an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking - the mechanism that gives all elementary particles mass. Creating top quarks requires access to very high energy collisions, and at present only the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is capable of reaching these energies. Until now, top quarks have only been observed produced in pairs via the strong interaction. At hadron colliders, it should also be possible to produce single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. Studies of single top quark production provide opportunities to measure the top quark spin, how top quarks mix with other quarks, and to look for new physics beyond the standard model. Because of these interesting properties, scientists have been looking for single top quarks for more than 15 years. This thesis presents the first discovery of single top quark production. An analysis is performed using 2.3 fb-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. Boosted decision trees are used to isolate the single top signal from background, and the single top cross section is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb. Using the same analysis, a measurement of the amplitude of the CKM matrix element Vtb, governing how top and b quarks mix, is also performed. The measurement yields: |V{sub tb}|f1L| = 1.05 -0.12+0.13, where f1L is the left-handed Wtb coupling. The separation of signal from background is improved by combining the boosted decision trees with two other multivariate techniques. A new cross section measurement is performed, and the significance for the excess over the predicted background exceeds 5

  14. Search for the production of single vector-like and excited quarks in the Wt final state in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. 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E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-02-01

    A search for vector-like quarks and excited quarks in events containing a top quark and a W boson in the final state is reported here. The search is based on 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data taken at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector. Events with one or two leptons, and one, two or three jets are selected with the additional requirement that at least one jet contains a b-quark. Single-lepton events are also required to contain at least one large-radius jet from the hadronic decay of a high- p T W boson or a top quark. No significant excess over the expected background is observed and upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio for different vector-like quark and excited-quark model masses are derived. For the excited-quark production and decay to Wt with unit couplings, quarks with masses below 1500 GeV are excluded and coupling-dependent limits are set. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Search for the production of single vector-like and excited quarks in the Wt final state in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-02-17

    A search for vector-like quarks and excited quarks in events containing a top quark and a W boson in the final state is reported here. The search is based on 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data taken at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector. Events with one or two leptons, and one, two or three jets are selected with the additional requirement that at least one jet contains a b-quark. Single-lepton events are also required to contain at least one large-radius jet from the hadronic decay of a high-pT W boson ormore » a top quark. No significant excess over the expected background is observed and upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio for different vector-like quark and excited-quark model masses are derived. As a result, for the excited-quark production and decay to Wt with unit couplings, quarks with masses below 1500 GeV are excluded and coupling-dependent limits are set.« less

  16. Dark Decay of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye-Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. The top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6sigma deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t-->bW+Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t-->bW) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  17. Top Quark Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.

    2015-05-21

    An overview of recent top quark measurements using the full Run II data set of CDF or D0 at the Tevatron is presented. Results are complementary to the ones at the LHC. Recent measurements of the production cross section of top quarks in strong and electroweak production and of top quark production asymmetries are presented. The latter includes the measurement of the tt-bar production asymmetry by D0 in the dilepton decay channel. Within their uncertainties the results from all these measurements agree with their respective Standard Model expectation. Finally latest updates on measurements of the top quark mass are discussed, which at the time of the conference are the most precise determinations.

  18. Quark ensembles with the infinite correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Zinov’ev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-01-15

    A number of exactly integrable (quark) models of quantum field theory with the infinite correlation length have been considered. It has been shown that the standard vacuum quark ensemble—Dirac sea (in the case of the space-time dimension higher than three)—is unstable because of the strong degeneracy of a state, which is due to the character of the energy distribution. When the momentum cutoff parameter tends to infinity, the distribution becomes infinitely narrow, leading to large (unlimited) fluctuations. Various vacuum ensembles—Dirac sea, neutral ensemble, color superconductor, and BCS state—have been compared. In the case of the color interaction between quarks, the BCS state has been certainly chosen as the ground state of the quark ensemble.

  19. Quark gluon bags as reggeons

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, K. A.; Petrov, V. K.; Zinovjev, G. M.

    2009-05-15

    The influence of the medium-dependent finite width of quark gluon plasma (QGP) bags on their equation of state is analyzed within an exactly solvable model. It is argued that the large width of the QGP bags not only explains the observed deficit in the number of hadronic resonances but also clarifies the reason why the heavy QGP bags cannot be directly observed as metastable states in a hadronic phase. The model allows us to estimate the minimal value of the width of QGP bags being heavier than 2 GeV from a variety of the lattice QCD data and get that the minimal resonance width at zero temperature is about 600 MeV, whereas the minimal resonance width at the Hagedorn temperature is about 2000 MeV. As shown, these estimates are almost insensitive to the number of the elementary degrees of freedom. The recent lattice QCD data are analyzed and it is found that in addition to the {sigma}T{sup 4} term the lattice QCD pressure contains T-linear and T{sup 4}lnT terms in the range of temperatures between 240 and 420 MeV. The presence of the last term in the pressure bears almost no effect on the width estimates. Our analysis shows that at high temperatures the average mass and width of the QGP bags behave in accordance with the upper bound of the Regge trajectory asymptotics (the linear asymptotics), whereas at low temperatures they obey the lower bound of the Regge trajectory asymptotics (the square root one). Since the model explicitly contains the Hagedorn mass spectrum, it allows us to remove an existing contradiction between the finite number of hadronic Regge families and the Hagedorn idea of the exponentially growing mass spectrum of hadronic bags.

  20. Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Yvonne

    2011-12-01

    Since its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, the top quark has undergone intensive studies. Besides the Tevatron experiments, with the start of the LHC in 2010 a top quark factory started its operation. It is now possible to measure top quark properties simultaneously at four different experiments, namely ATLAS and CMS at LHC and CDF and D0 at Tevatron. Having collected thousands of top quarks each, several top quark properties have been measured precisely, while others are being measured for the first time. In this article, recent measurements of top quark properties from ATLAS, CDF, CMS and D0 are presented, using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Tevatron and 1.1 fb{sup -1} at the LHC. In particular, measurements of the top quark mass, mass difference, foward backward charge asymmetry, t{bar t} spin correlations, the ratio of branching fractions, W helicity, anomalous couplings, color flow and the search for flavor changing neutral currents are discussed.

  1. Tensor charges and form factors of SU(3) baryons in the self-consistent SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledwig, Tim; Silva, Antonio; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the tensor form factors of the baryon octet within the framework of the chiral quark-soliton model, emphasizing those of the nucleon, taking linear 1/Nc rotational as well as linear ms corrections into account, and applying the symmetry-conserving quantization. We explicitly calculate the tensor form factors HTq(Q2) corresponding to the generalized parton distributions HT(x,ξ,t). The tensor form factors are obtained for the momentum transfer up to Q2≤1GeV2 and at a renormalization scale of 0.36GeV2. We find for the tensor charges δu=1.08, δd=-0.32, and δs=-0.01 and discuss their physical consequences, comparing them with those from other models. Results for tensor charges for the baryon octet are also given.

  2. Additive Manufacturing Modeling and Simulation A Literature Review for Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seufzer, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is coming into industrial use and has several desirable attributes. Control of the deposition remains a complex challenge, and so this literature review was initiated to capture current modeling efforts in the field of additive manufacturing. This paper summarizes about 10 years of modeling and simulation related to both welding and additive manufacturing. The goals were to learn who is doing what in modeling and simulation, to summarize various approaches taken to create models, and to identify research gaps. Later sections in the report summarize implications for closed-loop-control of the process, implications for local research efforts, and implications for local modeling efforts.

  3. Nucleon sigma term and quark condensate in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    K. Tsushima; K. Saito; A. W. Thomas; A. Valcarce

    2007-03-01

    We study the bound nucleon sigma term and its effect on the quark condensate in nuclear matter. In the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model it is shown that the nuclear correction to the sigma term is small and negative. Thus, the correction decelerates the decrease of the quark condensate in nuclear matter. However, the quark condensate in nuclear matter is controlled primarily by the scalar-isoscalar sigma field of the model. It appreciably moderates the decrease relative to the leading term at densities around and larger than the normal nuclear matter density.

  4. Multiprocessing and Correction Algorithm of 3D-models for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anamova, R. R.; Zelenov, S. V.; Kuprikov, M. U.; Ripetskiy, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    This article addresses matters related to additive manufacturing preparation. A layer-by-layer model presentation was developed on the basis of a routing method. Methods for correction of errors in the layer-by-layer model presentation were developed. A multiprocessing algorithm for forming an additive manufacturing batch file was realized.

  5. Hunting for New Physics with Up Vector-like Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebot, Miguel

    2015-07-01

    An interesting class of scenarios beyond the Standard Model extends the fermionic content of the theory through the addition of vector-like isosinglet quarks. Through a detailed analysis of available experimental constraints, potential deviations from the Standard Model expectations are addressed in observables such as the time-dependent CP asymmetry in Bs → J/ΨΦ decays, the D0 same charge dimuon asymmetry in B meson systems AbSL, rare kaon and B decays and deviations from a 3 x 3 unitary mixing matrix.

  6. Validation analysis of probabilistic models of dietary exposure to food additives.

    PubMed

    Gilsenan, M B; Thompson, R L; Lambe, J; Gibney, M J

    2003-10-01

    The validity of a range of simple conceptual models designed specifically for the estimation of food additive intakes using probabilistic analysis was assessed. Modelled intake estimates that fell below traditional conservative point estimates of intake and above 'true' additive intakes (calculated from a reference database at brand level) were considered to be in a valid region. Models were developed for 10 food additives by combining food intake data, the probability of an additive being present in a food group and additive concentration data. Food intake and additive concentration data were entered as raw data or as a lognormal distribution, and the probability of an additive being present was entered based on the per cent brands or the per cent eating occasions within a food group that contained an additive. Since the three model components assumed two possible modes of input, the validity of eight (2(3)) model combinations was assessed. All model inputs were derived from the reference database. An iterative approach was employed in which the validity of individual model components was assessed first, followed by validation of full conceptual models. While the distribution of intake estimates from models fell below conservative intakes, which assume that the additive is present at maximum permitted levels (MPLs) in all foods in which it is permitted, intake estimates were not consistently above 'true' intakes. These analyses indicate the need for more complex models for the estimation of food additive intakes using probabilistic analysis. Such models should incorporate information on market share and/or brand loyalty. PMID:14555358

  7. Properties of color-flavor locked strange quark matter and strange stars in a new quark mass scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qian; Chen, ShiWu; Peng, GuangXiong; Xu, JianFeng

    2013-09-01

    Considering the effect of one-gluon-exchange interaction between quarks, the color-flavor locked strange quark matter and strange stars are investigated in a new quark mass density-dependent model. It is found that the color-flavor locked strange quark matter can be more stable if the one-gluon-exchange effect is included. The lower density behavior of the sound velocity in this model is different from the previous results. Moreover, the new equation of state leads to a heavier acceptable maximum mass, supporting the recent observation of a compact star mass as large as about 2 times the solar mass.

  8. Model-independent measurement of $\\boldsymbol{t}$-channel single top quark production in $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\boldsymbol{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a model-independent measurement of t-channel electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and selecting events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy and one or two jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tqb + X) = 2.90 {+-} 0.59 (stat + syst) pb for a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV. The probability of the background to fluctuate and produce a signal as large as the one observed is 1.6 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of 5.5 standard deviations.

  9. Model-independent measurement of t-channel single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at,root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, R.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cochran, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Eller, P.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Focke, C.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; et al.

    2011-11-17

    We present a model-independent measurement of t-channel electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and selecting events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy and one or two jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tqb + X) = 2.90 {+-} 0.59 (stat + syst) pb for a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV. The probability of the background to fluctuate and produce a signal as large as the one observed is 1.6 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of 5.5 standard deviations.

  10. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in Dilepton Final States with the Neutrino Weighting Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2012-12-15

    The top quark is the heaviest fundamental particle observed to date. The mass of the top quark is a free parameter in the Standard Model (SM). A precise measurement of its mass is particularly important as it sets an indirect constraint on the mass of the Higgs boson. It is also a useful constraint on contributions from physics beyond the SM and may play a fundamental role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. I present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel using the Neutrino Weighting Method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the DØ detector. Kinematically under-constrained dilepton events are analyzed by integrating over neutrino rapidity. Weight distributions of t$\\bar{t}$ signal and background are produced as a function of the top quark mass for different top quark mass hypotheses. The measurement is performed by constructing templates from the moments of the weight distributions and input top quark mass, followed by a subsequent likelihood t to data. The dominant systematic uncertainties from jet energy calibration is reduced by using a correction from `+jets channel. To replicate the quark avor dependence of the jet response in data, jets in the simulated events are additionally corrected. The result is combined with our preceding measurement on 1 fb-1 and yields mt = 174.0± 2.4 (stat.) ±1.4 (syst.) GeV.

  11. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical model. We have considered evolution of baryon-free droplets which have different initial temperatures and expansion rates. As a typical trend we observe an oscillating behavior of the droplet radius superimposed with a gradual shrinkage due to the hadron emission. The characteristic life time of droplets with radii 1.5-2 fm are about 9-16 fm/c.

  12. Bounds on the Slope and Curvature of Isgur-Wise Function in a QCD-Inspired Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Bhaskar Jyoti; Choudhury, D. K.

    2011-09-01

    The quantum chromodynamics-inspired potential model pursued by us earlier has been recently modified to incorporate an additional factor ` c' in the linear cum Coulomb potential. While it felicitates the inclusion of standard confinement parameter b = 0.183 GeV2 unlike in previous work, it still falls short of explaining the Isgur-Wise function for the B mesons without ad hoc adjustment of the strong coupling constant. In this work, we determine the factor ` c' from the experimental values of decay constants and masses and show that the reality constraint on ` c' yields bounds on the strong coupling constant as well as on slope and curvature of Isgur-Wise function allowing more flexibility to the model.

  13. Debye mass and heavy quark potential in a PNJL quark plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, J. Blaschke, D.

    2012-07-15

    We calculate the Debye mass for the screening of the heavy quark potential in a plasma of massless quarks coupled to the temporal gluon background governed by the Polyakov loop potential within the PNJL model in RPA approximation. We give a physical motivation for a recent phenomenological fit of lattice data by applying the calculated Debye mass with its suppression in the confined phase due to the Polyakov loop to a description of the temperature dependence of the singlet free energy for QCD with a heavy quark pair at infinite separation. We compare the result to lattice data.

  14. Bounds on the mixing of the down-type quarks with vector-like singlet quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Lavoura, L.; Silva, J.P.

    1992-09-08

    We derive bounds on the mixing of the standard charge -1/3 quarks with vector-like isosinglet quarks, as they exist in some extensions of the standard model. We make no assumptions about the unitarity or any other features of the mixing matrix. We find that the mixing is quite constrained: we are able to set bounds on all the extra parameters which arise in the mixing matrix (CKM matrix), except on two phases. The assumption that there exists only one exotic quark leads to some extra relationships among the parameters of the mixing matrix.

  15. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, hadronic top decays with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hegeman, Jeroen Guido

    2009-01-16

    Of the six quarks in the standard model the top quark is by far the heaviest: 35 times more massive than its partner the bottom quark and more than 130 times heavier than the average of the other five quarks. Its correspondingly small decay width means it tends to decay before forming a bound state. Of all quarks, therefore, the top is the least affected by quark confinement, behaving almost as a free quark. Its large mass also makes the top quark a key player in the realm of the postulated Higgs boson, whose coupling strengths to particles are proportional to their masses. Precision measurements of particle masses for e.g. the top quark and the W boson can hereby provide indirect constraints on the Higgs boson mass. Since in the standard model top quarks couple almost exclusively to bottom quarks (t → Wb), top quark decays provide a window on the standard model through the direct measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element Vtb. In the same way any lack of top quark decays into W bosons could imply the existence of decay channels beyond the standard model, for example charged Higgs bosons as expected in two-doublet Higgs models: t → H+b. Within the standard model top quark decays can be classified by the (lepton or quark) W boson decay products. Depending on the decay of each of the W bosons, t$\\bar{t}$ pair decays can involve either no leptons at all, or one or two isolated leptons from direct W → e$\\bar{v}${sub e} and W → μ$\\bar{v}$μ decays. Cascade decays like b → Wc → e$\\bar{v}$ec can lead to additional non-isolated leptons. The fully hadronic decay channel, in which both Ws decay into a quark-antiquark pair, has the largest branching fraction of all t$\\bar{t}$ decay channels and is the only kinematically complete (i.e. neutrino-less) channel. It lacks, however, the clear isolated lepton signature and is therefore hard to distinguish from the multi-jet QCD background. It

  16. Nonleptonic two-body decays of the B{sub c} meson in the light-front quark model and the QCD factorization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2009-12-01

    We study exclusive nonleptonic two-body B{sub c}{yields}(D{sub (s)},{eta}{sub c},B{sub (s)})+F decays with F (pseudoscalar or vector mesons) factored out in the QCD factorization approach. The nonleptonic decay amplitudes are related to the product of meson decay constants and the form factors for semileptonic B{sub c} decays. As inputs in obtaining the branching ratios for a large set of nonleptonic B{sub c} decays, we use the weak form factors for the semileptonic B{sub c}{yields}(D{sub (s)},{eta}{sub c},B{sub (s)}) decays in the whole kinematical region and the unmeasured meson decay constants obtained from our previous light-front quark model. We compare our results for the branching ratios with those of other theoretical studies.

  17. An introduction to modeling longitudinal data with generalized additive models: applications to single-case designs.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kristynn J; Shadish, William R; Steiner, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Single-case designs (SCDs) are short time series that assess intervention effects by measuring units repeatedly over time in both the presence and absence of treatment. This article introduces a statistical technique for analyzing SCD data that has not been much used in psychological and educational research: generalized additive models (GAMs). In parametric regression, the researcher must choose a functional form to impose on the data, for example, that trend over time is linear. GAMs reverse this process by letting the data inform the choice of functional form. In this article we review the problem that trend poses in SCDs, discuss how current SCD analytic methods approach trend, describe GAMs as a possible solution, suggest a GAM model testing procedure for examining the presence of trend in SCDs, present a small simulation to show the statistical properties of GAMs, and illustrate the procedure on 3 examples of different lengths. Results suggest that GAMs may be very useful both as a form of sensitivity analysis for checking the plausibility of assumptions about trend and as a primary data analysis strategy for testing treatment effects. We conclude with a discussion of some problems with GAMs and some future directions for research on the application of GAMs to SCDs. PMID:24885341

  18. Quark masses and their hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, M.

    1987-12-01

    Electroweak symmetry breaking is attributed to dynamical generation of quark masses. Quarks q (and leptons l) are assumed to be produced by hypercolor confinement of preons at an intermediate scale Λ hc. Hierarchies observed in the q mass spectra can be explained by a BCS mechanism if the color interaction is enough asymptotically free and if residual ones emerging by the confinement are medium strong. The former assumption claims that N≦4, where N is the family number of q and l. Dynamical equations to determine q masses and mixings are given, but they require knowledge on the physics at Λ hc. A phenomenological approach is also made on the basis of an SU(7)× SU(7) chiral preon model with N=4. The mass ratio m t/ mb is related to ( m c/ m s)ηB with η B≃1.1 and m t'/ mb' to ( m u/ m d)ηA with η A≃1.4. In this scheme the fourth down quark is the heaviest (˜ 110 GeV) and contributes dominantly to F 2, where F is the Fermi scale.

  19. Heavy flavor production and top quark search at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    We review heavy flavor production at hadron colliders, with an eye towards the physics of the top quark. Motivation for existence of top, and current status of top search are reviewed. The physics of event simulation at hadron colliders is reviewed. We discuss characteristics of top quark events at p{bar p} colliders that may aid in distinguishing the top quark signal from Standard Model backgrounds, and illustrate various cuts which may be useful for top discovery. Top physics at hadron supercolliders is commented upon, as well as top quark mass measurement techniques. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  1. Fitting additive hazards models for case-cohort studies: a multiple imputation approach.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinhyouk; Harel, Ofer; Kang, Sangwook

    2016-07-30

    In this paper, we consider fitting semiparametric additive hazards models for case-cohort studies using a multiple imputation approach. In a case-cohort study, main exposure variables are measured only on some selected subjects, but other covariates are often available for the whole cohort. We consider this as a special case of a missing covariate by design. We propose to employ a popular incomplete data method, multiple imputation, for estimation of the regression parameters in additive hazards models. For imputation models, an imputation modeling procedure based on a rejection sampling is developed. A simple imputation modeling that can naturally be applied to a general missing-at-random situation is also considered and compared with the rejection sampling method via extensive simulation studies. In addition, a misspecification aspect in imputation modeling is investigated. The proposed procedures are illustrated using a cancer data example. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26194861

  2. Search for pair-produced vector-like B quarks in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-28

    A search for the production of a heavy B quark, having electric charge -1/3 and vector couplings to W, Z, and H bosons, is carried out using proton-proton collision data recorded at the CERN LHC by the CMS experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . The B quark is assumed to be pair-produced and to decay in one of three ways: to tW, bZ, or bH. The search is carried out in final states with one, two, and more than two charged leptons, as well as in fully hadronic final states. Each of the channels in the exclusive final-state topologies is designed to be sensitive to specific combinations of the B quark-antiquark pair decays. The observed event yields are found to be consistent with the standard model expectations in all the fi- nal states studied. Our statistical combination of these results was performed and upper limits were set on the cross section of the strongly produced B quark-antiquark pairs as a function of the B quark mass. Additionally, lower limits on the B quark mass between 740 and 900 GeV are set at a 95% confidence level, depending on the values of the branching fractions of the B quark to tW, bZ, and bH. Overall, these limits are the most stringent to date.

  3. Constraints on Models of the Higgs Boson with Exotic Spin and Parity using Decays to Bottom-Antibottom Quarks in the Full CDF Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity JP=0- and a gravitonlike Higgs boson with JP=2+, assuming for both a mass of 125 GeV /c2 . We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV , and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb-1 . We exclude deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV /c2 at the level of 5 standard deviations, assuming signal strengths for exotic boson production equal to the prediction for the standard model Higgs boson, and set upper limits of approximately 30% relative to the standard model rate on the possible rate of production of each exotic state.

  4. Top quark property measurements with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, M.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    This contribution covers recent results on the properties of the top quark as measured with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, using data collected at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8TeV during 2011 and 2012. Results on the t bar{{t}} charge asymmetry and spin correlation, and on the mass of the top quark are discussed. The most recent results expand on the first ATLAS measurements with complementary analysis channels, new observables, and direct comparisons to new physics models. No significant deviations from Standard Model predictions have been found.

  5. Nucleons, Nuclear Matter and Quark Matter: A unified NJL approach

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lawley; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2006-02-10

    We use an effective quark model to describe both hadronic matter and deconfined quark matter. By calculating the equations of state and the corresponding neutron star properties, we show that the internal properties of the nucleon have important implications for the properties of these systems.

  6. Attenuation and recombination of quarks in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, A.; Takagi, F.

    1980-03-24

    Quark models of hadron production in the beam-fragmentation region are extended to production off nuclei by taking into account quark attenuation in nuclear matter. Simple expressions are derived for the A dependence of the production of beam fragments. They reproduce well the experimental data on hadron-nucleus and virtual photon-nucleus collisions.

  7. The Quark Box--A Particle Physics Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedler, James A.

    This game is designed to be used in junior and senior high school science classes with the purpose of introducing quark theory to students. This material expands on atomic theory and subatomic structure. Quarks are the fundamental building blocks of protons and neutrons. The game will teach students about the standard model of elementary…

  8. Light quark spin symmetry in Zb resonances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshin, M. B.

    2016-04-01

    It is argued that the recent Belle data, consistent with no activity in the spectrum of the B*B ¯ +B B¯ * pairs at the mass of the Zb(10650 ) resonance, imply that the part of the interaction between heavy mesons that depends on the total spin of the light quark and antiquark is strongly suppressed. In particular, this part appears to be significantly weaker than can be inferred from pion exchange. If confirmed by future more detailed data, the symmetry with respect to the light quark spins, in combination with the heavy quark spin symmetry, would imply existence of four additional IG=1- resonances at the thresholds for heavy meson-antimeson pairs.

  9. Search for a Vectorlike Quark with Charge 2/3 in t+Z Events from pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Eroe, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Haensel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.

    2011-12-30

    A search for pair-produced heavy vectorlike charge-2/3 quarks, T, in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with the flavor-changing-neutral-current decay of a T quark to a top quark and a Z boson are selected by requiring two leptons from the Z-boson decay, as well as an additional isolated charged lepton. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.14 fb{sup -1}, the number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model background prediction. Assuming a branching fraction of 100% for the decay T{yields}tZ, a T quark with a mass less than 475 GeV/c{sup 2} is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  10. Search for a Vectorlike Quark with Charge 2/3 in t+Z Events from pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-12-29

    A search for pair-produced heavy vectorlike charge-2/3 quarks, T, in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with the flavor-changing-neutral-current decay of a T quark to a top quark and a Z boson are selected by requiring two leptons from the Z-boson decay, as well as an additional isolated charged lepton. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.14 fb⁻¹, the number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model background prediction. Assuming a branching fraction of 100% for themore » decay T→tZ, a T quark with a mass less than 475 GeV/c² is excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  11. Search for a vectorlike quark with charge 2/3 in t+Z events from pp collisions at √s=7 TeV.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Trauner, C; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Benucci, L; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Marage, P E; Raval, A; Thomas, L; Vander Marcken, G; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Adler, V; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; Cortina Gil, E; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Ovyn, S; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Brito, L; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Karadzhinova, A; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Elgammal, S; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Mikami, Y; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Mohr, N; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Erdmann, M; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Lingemann, J; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Bontenackels, M; Cherepanov, V; Davids, M

    2011-12-30

    A search for pair-produced heavy vectorlike charge-2/3 quarks, T, in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with the flavor-changing-neutral-current decay of a T quark to a top quark and a Z boson are selected by requiring two leptons from the Z-boson decay, as well as an additional isolated charged lepton. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.14  fb(-1), the number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model background prediction. Assuming a branching fraction of 100% for the decay T→tZ, a T quark with a mass less than 475  GeV/c(2) is excluded at the 95% confidence level. PMID:22243304

  12. On an Additive Semigraphoid Model for Statistical Networks With Application to Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Chun, Hyonho; Zhao, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a nonparametric method for estimating non-gaussian graphical models based on a new statistical relation called additive conditional independence, which is a three-way relation among random vectors that resembles the logical structure of conditional independence. Additive conditional independence allows us to use one-dimensional kernel regardless of the dimension of the graph, which not only avoids the curse of dimensionality but also simplifies computation. It also gives rise to a parallel structure to the gaussian graphical model that replaces the precision matrix by an additive precision operator. The estimators derived from additive conditional independence cover the recently introduced nonparanormal graphical model as a special case, but outperform it when the gaussian copula assumption is violated. We compare the new method with existing ones by simulations and in genetic pathway analysis. PMID:26401064

  13. Testing a Gender Additive Model: The Role of Body Image in Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearman, Sarah Kate; Stice, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence that adolescent girls are at greater risk of developing depression than adolescent boys, risk factor models that account for this difference have been elusive. The objective of this research was to examine risk factors proposed by the "gender additive" model of depression that attempts to partially explain the increased…

  14. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  15. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  16. Heavy quark physics in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, G.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The most recent results which concern the heavy quark hadrons done in the CMS experiment are reported. The searching area spans over the heavy quark spectroscopy, production cross sections, beauty meson decay properties, rare decays, and CP violation.

  17. Quark search at the CBA

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-03-13

    An experiment to search for quarks at the CBA is described. The cross sections for the production of massive quark-antiquark pairs in nucleon-nucleon interactions is estimated, and the experimental design and procedures are described. (WHK)

  18. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  19. Spin-Orbit and Tensor Forces in Heavy-quark Light-quark Mesons: Implications of the New Ds state at 2.32 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, Robert N.; Jackson, J. David

    2003-05-01

    We consider the spectroscopy of heavy-quark light-quark mesons with a simple model based on the non-relativistic reduction of vector and scalar exchange between fermions. Four forces are induced: the spin-orbit forces on the light and heavy quark spins, the tensor force, and a spin-spin force. If the vector force is Coulombic, the spin-spin force is a contact interaction, and the tensor force and spin-orbit force on the heavy quark to order $1/m_1m_2$ are directly proportional. As a result, just two independent parameters characterize these perturbations. The measurement of the masses of three p-wave states suffices to predict the mass of the fourth. This technique is applied to the $D_s$ system, where the newly discovered state at 2.32 GeV provides the third measured level, and to the $D$ system. The mixing of the two $J^P=1^+$ p-wave states is reflected in their widths and provides additional constraints. The resulting picture is at odds with previous expectations and raises new puzzles.

  20. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-01

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  1. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-24

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  2. From fundamental fields to constituent quarks and nucleon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1990-01-01

    Constituent-quark models formulated in the frame work of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics have been successful in accounting for the mass spectra of mesons and baryons. Applications to elastic electron scattering require relativistic dynamics. Relativistic quantum mechanics of constituent quarks can be formulated by constructing a suitable unitary representation of the Poincare group on the three-quark Hilbert space. The mass and spin operators of this representation specify the relativistic model dynamics. The dynamics of fundamental quark fields, on the other hand, is specified by a Euclidean functional integral. In this paper I show how the dynamics of the fundamental fields can be related in principle to the Hamiltonian dynamics of quark particles through the properties of the Wightman functions. 14 refs.

  3. Threshold corrections to the bottom quark mass revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2015-05-01

    Threshold corrections to the bottom quark mass are often estimated under the approximation that tan β enhanced contributions are the most dominant. In this work we revisit this common approximation made to the estimation of the supersymmetric thresh-old corrections to the bottom quark mass. We calculate the full one-loop supersymmetric corrections to the bottom quark mass and survey a large part of the phenomenological MSSM parameter space to study the validity of considering only the tan β enhanced corrections. Our analysis demonstrates that this approximation underestimates the size of the threshold corrections by ˜ 12.5% for most of the considered parameter space. We discuss the consequences for fitting the bottom quark mass and for the effective couplings to Higgses. We find that it is important to consider the additional contributions when fitting the bottom quark mass but the modifications to the effective Higgs couplings are typically (few)% for the majority of the parameter space considered.

  4. Genomic prediction of growth in pigs based on a model including additive and dominance effects.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M S; Bastiaansen, J W M; Janss, L; Knol, E F; Bovenhuis, H

    2016-06-01

    Independent of whether prediction is based on pedigree or genomic information, the focus of animal breeders has been on additive genetic effects or 'breeding values'. However, when predicting phenotypes rather than breeding values of an animal, models that account for both additive and dominance effects might be more accurate. Our aim with this study was to compare the accuracy of predicting phenotypes using a model that accounts for only additive effects (MA) and a model that accounts for both additive and dominance effects simultaneously (MAD). Lifetime daily gain (DG) was evaluated in three pig populations (1424 Pietrain, 2023 Landrace, and 2157 Large White). Animals were genotyped using the Illumina SNP60K Beadchip and assigned to either a training data set to estimate the genetic parameters and SNP effects, or to a validation data set to assess the prediction accuracy. Models MA and MAD applied random regression on SNP genotypes and were implemented in the program Bayz. The additive heritability of DG across the three populations and the two models was very similar at approximately 0.26. The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by dominance effects ranged from 0.04 (Large White) to 0.11 (Pietrain), indicating that importance of dominance might be breed-specific. Prediction accuracies were higher when predicting phenotypes using total genetic values (sum of breeding values and dominance deviations) from the MAD model compared to using breeding values from both MA and MAD models. The highest increase in accuracy (from 0.195 to 0.222) was observed in the Pietrain, and the lowest in Large White (from 0.354 to 0.359). Predicting phenotypes using total genetic values instead of breeding values in purebred data improved prediction accuracy and reduced the bias of genomic predictions. Additional benefit of the method is expected when applied to predict crossbred phenotypes, where dominance levels are expected to be higher. PMID:26676611

  5. Spin-orbit splitting of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be excited states studied with the SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2004-10-01

    The previous Faddeev calculation of the two-alpha plus {lambda} system for {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be is extended to incorporate the spin-orbit components of the SU{sub 6} quark-model (QM) baryon-baryon interactions. We employ the Born kernel of the QM {lambda}N LS interaction and generate the spin-orbit component of the {lambda}{alpha} potential by {alpha}-cluster folding. The Faddeev calculation in the jj-coupling scheme implies that the direct use of the QM Born kernel for the {lambda}N LS component is not good enough to reproduce the small experimental value {delta}E{sub ls}{sup expt}=43{+-}5 keV for the 5/2{sup +}-3/2{sup +} splitting. This procedure predicts 3-5 times larger values in the models FSS and fss2. The spin-orbit contribution from the effective meson-exchange potentials in fss2 is argued to be unfavorable to the small ls splitting, through the analysis of the Scheerbaum factors for the single-particle spin-orbit potentials calculated in the G-matrix formalism.

  6. Model-Dependent Constraint on Quark Total Angular Momentum Based on the Transverse Target-spin Asymmetry Measured in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Wolf-Dieter

    2007-06-13

    Results are reported on the transverse target-spin asymmetry (TTSA) associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton. The data have been accumulated in the years 2002-2004 by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV e+ beam scattered on a transversely polarized hydrogen target. Two azimuthal amplitudes of the TTSA appearing to LO in 1/Q and {alpha}s, A{sub UT}{sup sin({phi}-{phi}{sub S})cos{phi}} and A{sub UT}{sup cos({phi} -{phi}{sub S})sin{phi}}, are given as a function of -t,xB,Q2 in the kinematic range |t| < 0.7 GeV2, 0.03 < xB < 0.35 and 1 < Q2 < 10 GeV2. The first amplitude is found to be sensitive to the generalized parton distribution (GPD) E of the proton, which can be parameterized in a GPD model through quark total angular momentum Jq(q = u, d). Within the context of this model, a constraint in the (Ju,Jd) plane is obtained from HERMES TTSA data.

  7. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a Top-Antitop Quark Pair in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Stanley T.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the first search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with a top-antitop quark pair in proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The integrated luminosity for othis search corresponds to 319 pb-1 of data recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We outline the even selection criteria, evaluate the even acceptance and estimate backgrounds from Standard Model sources. These events are observed that satisfy our event selection, while 2.16 ± 0.66 events are expected from background processes. no significant excess of events above background is thus observed, and we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section for this process as a function of the Higgs mass. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c2 we find that σ$t\\bar{t}H$ x BR (Hbb) < 690 fb at 95% C.L. These are the first limits set for $t\\bar{t}H$ production. This search also allows us to anticipate the challenges and necessary strategies needed for future searches of $t\\bar{t}H$ production.

  8. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; /Chicago U., EFI

    2006-05-01

    The mass of the top quark M{sub top} is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model and as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has a robust program of top quark mass analyses, including the most precise single measurement, M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, using 680 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. A combination of current results from CDF gives M{sub top} = 172.0 {+-} 2.7 GeV/c{sup 2}, surpassing the stated goal of 3 GeV/c{sup 2} precision using 2 fb{sup -1} of data. Finally, a combination with current D0 results gives a world average top quark mass of 172.5 {+-} 2.3 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  9. Quark mass effect on axial charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of finite quark mass on the dynamics of the axial charge using the D3/D7 model in holography. The mass term in the axial anomaly equation affects both the fluctuation (generation) and dissipation of the axial charge. We studied the dependence of the effect on quark mass and an external magnetic field. For axial charge generation, we calculated the mass diffusion rate, which characterizes the helicity flipping rate. The rate is a nonmonotonous function of mass and can be significantly enhanced by the magnetic field. The diffusive behavior is also related to a divergent susceptibility of the axial charge. For axial charge dissipation, we found that in the long time limit, the mass term dissipates all the charge effectively generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields. The result is consistent with a relaxation time approximation. The rate of dissipation through mass term is a monotonous increasing function of both quark mass and a magnetic field.

  10. Strange quark matter fragmentation in astrophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulucci, L.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-06-01

    The conjecture of Bodmer-Witten-Terazawa suggesting a form of quark matter (Strange Quark Matter) as the ground state of hadronic interactions has been studied in laboratory and astrophysical contexts by a large number of authors. If strange stars exist, some violent events involving these compact objects, such as mergers and even their formation process, might eject some strange matter into the interstellar medium that could be detected as a trace signal in the cosmic ray flux. To evaluate this possibility, it is necessary to understand how this matter in bulk would fragment in the form of strangelets (small lumps of strange quark matter in which finite effects become important). We calculate the mass distribution outcome using the statistical multifragmentation model and point out several caveats affecting it. In particular, the possibility that strangelets fragmentation will render a tiny fraction of contamination in the cosmic ray flux is discussed.

  11. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-01

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars.

  12. Observation of Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, Ann; Junk, Tom R.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The field of experimental particle physics has become more sophisticated over time, as fewer, larger experimental collaborations search for small signals in samples with large components of background. The search for and the observation of electroweak single top quark production by the CDF and D0 collaborations at Fermilab's Tevatron collider are an example of an elaborate effort to measure the rate of a very rare process in the presence of large backgrounds and to learn about the properties of the top quark's weak interaction. We present here the techniques used to make this groundbreaking measurement and the interpretation of the results in the context of the Standard Model.

  13. Quark and gluon condensates in isospin matter

    SciTech Connect

    He Lianyi; Jiang Yin; Zhuang Pengfei

    2009-04-15

    By applying the Hellmann-Feynman theorem to a charged pion gas, the quark and gluon condensates at low isospin density are determined by precise pion properties. At intermediate density around f{sub {pi}}{sup 2}m{sub {pi}}, from both the estimation for the dilute pion gas and the calculation with the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, the quark condensate is strongly and monotonously suppressed, while the gluon condensate is enhanced and can be larger than its vacuum value. This unusual behavior of the gluon condensate is universal for Bose condensed matter of mesons. Our results can be tested by lattice calculations at finite isospin density.

  14. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-15

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars. PMID:27472110

  15. Modeling oxygen dissolution and biological uptake during pulse oxygen additions in oenological fermentations.

    PubMed

    Saa, Pedro A; Moenne, M Isabel; Pérez-Correa, J Ricardo; Agosin, Eduardo

    2012-09-01

    Discrete oxygen additions during oenological fermentations can have beneficial effects both on yeast performance and on the resulting wine quality. However, the amount and time of the additions must be carefully chosen to avoid detrimental effects. So far, most oxygen additions are carried out empirically, since the oxygen dynamics in the fermenting must are not completely understood. To efficiently manage oxygen dosage, we developed a mass balance model of the kinetics of oxygen dissolution and biological uptake during wine fermentation on a laboratory scale. Model calibration was carried out employing a novel dynamic desorption-absorption cycle based on two optical sensors able to generate enough experimental data for the precise determination of oxygen uptake and volumetric mass transfer coefficients. A useful system for estimating the oxygen solubility in defined medium and musts was also developed and incorporated into the mass balance model. Results indicated that several factors, such as the fermentation phase, wine composition, mixing and carbon dioxide concentration, must be considered when performing oxygen addition during oenological fermentations. The present model will help develop better oxygen addition policies in wine fermentations on an industrial scale. PMID:22349928

  16. Measurement of the mass of the top quark in dilepton final states with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; /Bonn U.

    2006-08-01

    In the Standard Model (SM) the top quark mass is a fundamental parameter. Its precise measurement is important to test the self-consistency of the SM. Additionally, it offers sensitivity to New Physics beyond the Standard Model. In proton anti-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV t{bar t} quarks are pair-produced, each decaying into a W boson and a b quark. In the dilepton channel both W bosons decay leptonically. Because of the presence of two neutrinos in the final state the kinematics are underconstrained. A so-called Neutrino Weighting algorithm is used to calculate a weight for the consistency of a hypothesized top quark mass with the event kinematics. To render the problem solvable, the pseudorapidities of the neutrinos are assumed. The Maximum Method, which takes the maximum to the weight distribution as input to infer the top quark mass, is applied to approximately 370 pb{sup -1} of Run-II data, recorded by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron. The e{mu}-channel of the 835 pb{sup -1} dataset is analyzed.

  17. Vector generalized additive models for extreme rainfall data analysis (study case rainfall data in Indramayu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Eka Putri Nur; Wigena, Aji Hamim; Djuraidah, Anik

    2016-02-01

    Rainfall pattern are good indicators for potential disasters. Global Circulation Model (GCM) contains global scale information that can be used to predict the rainfall data. Statistical downscaling (SD) utilizes the global scale information to make inferences in the local scale. Essentially, SD can be used to predict local scale variables based on global scale variables. SD requires a method to accommodate non linear effects and extreme values. Extreme value Theory (EVT) can be used to analyze the extreme value. One of methods to identify the extreme events is peak over threshold that follows Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). The vector generalized additive model (VGAM) is an extension of the generalized additive model. It is able to accommodate linear or nonlinear effects by involving more than one additive predictors. The advantage of VGAM is to handle multi response models. The key idea of VGAM are iteratively reweighted least square for maximum likelihood estimation, penalized smoothing, fisher scoring and additive models. This works aims to analyze extreme rainfall data in Indramayu using VGAM. The results show that the VGAM with GPD is able to predict extreme rainfall data accurately. The prediction in February is very close to the actual value at quantile 75.

  18. Constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quarks in the full CDF data set

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2015-04-10

    In this study, a search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity JP = 0 and a gravitonlike Higgs boson with JP = 2+, assuming for both a mass of 125 GeV/c2. We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb–1. We exclude deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV/c2 at the level of 5 standard deviations, assuming signal strengths for exotic boson production equal to the prediction for the standard model Higgs boson, and set upper limits of approximately 30% relative to the standard model rate on the possible rate of production of each exotic state.

  19. Constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quarks in the full CDF data set.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-04-10

    A search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity J^{P}=0^{-} and a gravitonlike Higgs boson with J^{P}=2^{+}, assuming for both a mass of 125  GeV/c^{2}. We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45  fb^{-1}. We exclude deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125  GeV/c^{2} at the level of 5 standard deviations, assuming signal strengths for exotic boson production equal to the prediction for the standard model Higgs boson, and set upper limits of approximately 30% relative to the standard model rate on the possible rate of production of each exotic state. PMID:25910110

  20. Integrated reservoir characterization: Improvement in heterogeneities stochastic modelling by integration of additional external constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Doligez, B.; Eschard, R.; Geffroy, F.

    1997-08-01

    The classical approach to construct reservoir models is to start with a fine scale geological model which is informed with petrophysical properties. Then scaling-up techniques allow to obtain a reservoir model which is compatible with the fluid flow simulators. Geostatistical modelling techniques are widely used to build the geological models before scaling-up. These methods provide equiprobable images of the area under investigation, which honor the well data, and which variability is the same than the variability computed from the data. At an appraisal phase, when few data are available, or when the wells are insufficient to describe all the heterogeneities and the behavior of the field, additional constraints are needed to obtain a more realistic geological model. For example, seismic data or stratigraphic models can provide average reservoir information with an excellent areal coverage, but with a poor vertical resolution. New advances in modelisation techniques allow now to integrate this type of additional external information in order to constrain the simulations. In particular, 2D or 3D seismic derived information grids, or sand-shale ratios maps coming from stratigraphic models can be used as external drifts to compute the geological image of the reservoir at the fine scale. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these new tools, their impact on the final reservoir model, and their sensitivity to some key parameters.