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Sample records for additives gasoline benzene

  1. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  11. Mobil-Badger technologies for benzene reduction in gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Goelzer, A.R.; Ram, S.; Hernandez, A. ); Chin, A.A.; Harandi, M.N.; Smith, C.M. Mobil Research and Development Corp., Paulsboro, NJ )

    1993-01-01

    Many refiners will need to reduce the barrels per day of benzene entering the motor gasoline pool. Mobil and Badger have developed and now jointly license three potential refinery alternatives to conventional benzene hydrosaturation to achieve this: Mobil Benzene Reduction, Ethylbenzene and Cumene. The Mobil Benzene Reduction Process (MBR) uses dilute olefins in FCC offgas to extensively alkylate dilute benzene as found in light reformate, light FCC gasoline, or cyclic C[sub 6] naphtha. MBR raises octanes and lowers C[sub 5]+ olefins. MBR does not involve costly hydrogen addition. The refinery-based Mobil/Badger Ethylbenzene Process reacts chemical-grade benzene extracted from light reformate with dilute ethylene found in treated FCC offgas to make high-purity ethylbenzene. EB is the principal feedstock for the production of styrene. The Mobil/Badger Cumene Process alkylates FCC-derived dilute propylene and extracted benzene to selectively yield isopropyl benzene (cumene). Cumene is the principal feedstock for the production of phenol. All three processes use Mobil developed catalysts.

  12. Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, E.; Kimbrough, R.D.

    1993-12-01

    The acute toxicity of gasoline; its components benzene, toluene, and xylene; and the additives ethanol, methanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether are reviewed. All of these chemicals are only moderately to mildly toxic at acute doses. Because of their volatility, these compounds are not extensively absorbed dermally unless the exposed skin is occluded. Absorption through the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract is quite efficient. After ingestion, the principal danger for a number of these chemicals, particularly gasoline, is aspiration pneumonia, which occurs mainly in children. It is currently not clear whether aspiration pneumonia would still be a problem if gasoline were diluted with ethanol or methanol. During the normal use of gasoline or mixtures of gasoline and the other solvents as a fuel, exposures would be much lower than the doses that have resulted in poisoning. No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course of using automotive fuels. 128 refs., 7 tabs.

  13. Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives.

    PubMed Central

    Reese, E; Kimbrough, R D

    1993-01-01

    The acute toxicity of gasoline; its components benzene, toluene, and xylene; and the additives ethanol, methanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether are reviewed. All of these chemicals are only moderately to mildly toxic at acute doses. Because of their volatility, these compounds are not extensively absorbed dermally unless the exposed skin is occluded. Absorption through the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract is quite efficient. After ingestion, the principal danger for a number of these chemicals, particularly gasoline, is aspiration pneumonia, which occurs mainly in children. It is currently not clear whether aspiration pneumonia would still be a problem if gasoline were diluted with ethanol or methanol. During the normal use of gasoline or mixtures of gasoline and the other solvents as a fuel, exposures would be much lower than the doses that have resulted in poisoning. No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course of using automotive fuels. PMID:8020435

  14. 40 CFR 80.1338 - What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1338 Section 80.1338... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1338 What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? (a) A...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1338 - What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1338 Section 80.1338... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1338 What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? (a) A...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1338 - What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1338 Section 80.1338... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1338 What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? (a) A...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of... not include the volume and benzene content of the oxygenate in any compliance calculations or...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  17. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  18. 40 CFR 80.1354 - What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1354 Section 80.1354 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1354 What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Beginning with earliest applicable date specified in § 80.1347(a)(2),...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1354 - What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1354 Section 80.1354 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1354 What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Beginning with earliest applicable date specified in § 80.1347(a)(2),...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1354 - What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1354 Section 80.1354 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1354 What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Beginning with earliest applicable date specified in § 80.1347(a)(2),...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1354 - What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1354 Section 80.1354 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1354 What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Beginning with earliest applicable date specified in § 80.1347(a)(2),...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1354 - What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1354 Section 80.1354 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1354 What are the reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Beginning with earliest applicable date specified in § 80.1347(a)(2),...

  3. Impact of a new gasoline benzene regulation on ambient air pollutants in Anchorage, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yuriko; Morris, Stephen S.; Salerno, Christopher; Schlapia, Anne M.; Stichick, Mathew

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard that limits the amount of benzene allowed in gasoline on ambient benzene concentrations. This new standard, together with two companion regulations that limit cold-temperature automotive emissions and the permeability of portable fuel containers, was expected to lower the levels of ambient benzene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nationwide. In this study the impact of the gasoline benzene standard was evaluated in Anchorage, Alaska in a two-phase ambient air monitoring study conducted before and after the new gasoline standard was implemented. Gasoline sold by Anchorage retailers was also evaluated in each phase to determine the content of benzene and other gasoline components. The average benzene content in Anchorage gasoline was reduced by 70%, from 5.05% (w/w) to 1.53% (w/w) following the implementation of the standard. The annual mean ambient benzene concentration fell by 51%, from 0.99 ppbv in Phase 1 to 0.49 ppbv in Phase 2. Analysis suggests the change in gasoline benzene content alone reduced benzene emissions by 46%. The changes in toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene content in gasoline between Phase 1 and 2 were relatively small and the differences in the mean ambient concentrations of these compounds between phases were modest. Our results suggest that cold winter communities in high latitude and mountainous regions may benefit more from the gasoline benzene standard because of high benzene emissions resulting from vehicle cold start and a tendency to develop atmospheric stagnation conditions in the winter.

  4. Impact of a new gasoline benzene regulation on ambient air pollutants in Anchorage, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yuriko; Morris, Stephen S.; Salerno, Christopher; Schlapia, Anne M.; Stichick, Mathew

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard that limits the amount of benzene allowed in gasoline on ambient benzene concentrations. This new standard, together with two companion regulations that limit cold-temperature automotive emissions and the permeability of portable fuel containers, was expected to lower the levels of ambient benzene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nationwide. In this study the impact of the gasoline benzene standard was evaluated in Anchorage, Alaska in a two-phase ambient air monitoring study conducted before and after the new gasoline standard was implemented. Gasoline sold by Anchorage retailers was also evaluated in each phase to determine the content of benzene and other gasoline components. The average benzene content in Anchorage gasoline was reduced by 70%, from 5.05% (w/w) to 1.53% (w/w) following the implementation of the standard. The annual mean ambient benzene concentration fell by 51%, from 0.99 ppbv in Phase 1 to 0.49 ppbv in Phase 2. Analysis suggests the change in gasoline benzene content alone reduced benzene emissions by 46%. The changes in toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene content in gasoline between Phase 1 and 2 were relatively small and the differences in the mean ambient concentrations of these compounds between phases were modest. Our results suggest that cold winter communities in high latitude and mountainous regions may benefit more from the gasoline benzene standard because of high benzene emissions resulting from vehicle cold start and a tendency to develop atmospheric stagnation conditions in the winter.

  5. 40 CFR 80.1334 - What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene program? 80.1334 Section 80.1334 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1334 What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program? (a)(1) A refinery may comply with the benzene requirements at § 80.1230 for its RFG...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1334 - What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene program? 80.1334 Section 80.1334 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1334 What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program? (a)(1) A refinery may comply with the benzene requirements at § 80.1230 for its RFG...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1334 - What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene program? 80.1334 Section 80.1334 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1334 What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program? (a)(1) A refinery may comply with the benzene requirements at § 80.1230 for its RFG...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1334 - What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene program? 80.1334 Section 80.1334 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1334 What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program? (a)(1) A refinery may comply with the benzene requirements at § 80.1230 for its RFG...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1334 - What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene program? 80.1334 Section 80.1334 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1334 What are the requirements for early compliance with the gasoline benzene program? (a)(1) A refinery may comply with the benzene requirements at § 80.1230 for its RFG...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1352 - What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1352 Section 80.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1352 What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1352 - What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1352 Section 80.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1352 What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1352 - What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1352 Section 80.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1352 What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1352 - What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1352 Section 80.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1352 What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1352 - What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for the gasoline benzene program? 80.1352 Section 80.1352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.1352 What are the pre-compliance reporting requirements for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section,...

  15. GASOLINE-CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER AS A SOURCE OF RESIDENTIAL BENZENE EXPOSURE: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a private residence using gasoline-contaminated water (approximately 300 ug/l benzene), a series of experiments were performed to assess the potential benzene exposures that may occur in the shower stall, bathroom, master bedroom, and living room as a result of a single 20-min...

  16. DECISION-MAKING, SCIENCE AND GASOLINE ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to serve two major purposes. The first use was as an octane-enhancer to replace organic lead, beginning in 1979. The second use, which began about 1992, was as an oxygenated additive to meet requirements ...

  17. Effects of reformulated gasoline and motor vehicle fleet turnover on emissions and ambient concentrations of benzene.

    PubMed

    Harley, Robert A; Hooper, Daniel S; Kean, Andrew J; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Hesson, James M; Balberan, Nancy T; Stevenson, Eric D; Kendall, Gary R

    2006-08-15

    Gasoline-powered motor vehicles are a major source of toxic air contaminants such as benzene. Emissions from light-duty vehicles were measured in a San Francisco area highway tunnel during summers 1991, 1994-1997, 1999, 2001, and 2004. Benzene emission rates decreased over this time period, with a large (54 +/- 5%) decrease observed between 1995 and 1996 when California phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG) was introduced. We attribute this one-year change in benzene mainly to RFG effects: 36% from lower aromatics in gasoline that led to a lower benzene mass fraction in vehicle emissions, 14% due to RFG effects on total nonmethane organic compound mass emissions, and the remaining 4% due to fleet turnover. Fleet turnover effects accumulate over longer time periods: between 1995 and 2004, fleet turnover led to a 32% reduction in the benzene emission rate. A approximately 4 microg m(-3) decrease in benzene concentrations was observed at a network of ambient air sampling sites in the San Francisco Bay area between the late 1980s and 2004. The largest decrease in annual average ambient benzene concentrations (1.5 +/- 0.7 microg m(-3) or 42 +/- 19%) was observed between 1995 and 1996. The reduction in ambient benzene between spring/summer months of 1995 and 1996 due to phase 2 RFG was larger (60 +/- 20%). Effects of fuel changes on benzene during fall/winter months are difficult to quantify because some wintertime fuel changes had already occurred prior to 1995. PMID:16955911

  18. Ferreting Out the Identity of Gasoline Additives

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical dispersing agents for oil spills, hydraulic fracturing fluids for natural-gas production, and chemicals serving as gasoline additives share a common characteristic—for the most part, they are proprietary compounds. In the name of competitive advantage, companies carefull...

  19. 7 CFR 3201.103 - Gasoline fuel additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Gasoline fuel additives. 3201.103 Section 3201.103 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY... Designated Items § 3201.103 Gasoline fuel additives. (a) Definition. Chemical agents added to gasoline...

  20. Decision-Making, Science and Gasoline Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. W.; Small, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    Methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to serve two major purposes. The first use was as an octane-enhancer to replace organic lead, beginning in 1979. The second use, which began about 1992, was as a oxygenated additive to meet requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Generally, the amount of MTBE used for octane enhancement was lower than that required to meet CAAA requirements. An unintended consequence of MTBE use has been widespread groundwater contamination. The decision to use certain amounts of MTBE or other chemcials as gasoline additives is the outcome of economic, regulatory, policy, political, and scientific considerations. Decision makers ask questions such as "How do ground water impacts change with changing MTBE content? How many wells would be impacted? and What are the associated costs?" These are best answered through scientific inquiry, but many different approaches could be developed. Decision criteria include time, money, comprehensiveness, and complexity of the approach. Because results must be communicated to a non-technical audience, there is a trade off between the complexity of the approach and the ability to convince economists, lawyers and policy makers that results make sense. The question on MTBE content posed above was investigated using transport models, a release scenario and gasoline composition. Because of the inability of transport models to predict future concentrations, an approach was chosen to base comparative assessment on a calibrated model. By taking this approach, "generic" modeling with arbitrarily selected parameters was avoided and the validity of the simulation results rests upon relatively small extrapolations from the original calibrated models. A set of simulations was performed that assumed 3% (octane enhancement) and 11% (CAAA) MTBE in gasoline. The results were that ground water concentrations would be reduced in proportion to the reduction of MTBE in the fuel

  1. The EPA National Fuels Surveillance Network. I. Trace constituents in gasoline and commercial gasoline fuel additives.

    PubMed

    Jungers, R H; Lee, R E; von Lehmden, D J

    1975-04-01

    A National Fuels Surveillance Network has been established to collect gasoline and other fuels through the 10 regional offices of the Environmental Protection Agency. Physical, chemical, and trace element analytical determinations are made on the collected fuel samples to detect components which may present an air pollution hazard or poison exhaust catalytic control devices. A summary of trace elemental constituents in over 50 gasoline samples and 18 commercially marketed consumer purchased gasoline additives is presented. Quantities of Mn, Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu, Fe, Sb, B, Mg, Pb, and S were found in most regular and premium gasoline. Environmental implications of trace constituents in gasoline are discussed. PMID:1157783

  2. The EPA National Fuels Surveillance Network. I. Trace constituents in gasoline and commercial gasoline fuel additives.

    PubMed Central

    Jungers, R H; Lee, R E; von Lehmden, D J

    1975-01-01

    A National Fuels Surveillance Network has been established to collect gasoline and other fuels through the 10 regional offices of the Environmental Protection Agency. Physical, chemical, and trace element analytical determinations are made on the collected fuel samples to detect components which may present an air pollution hazard or poison exhaust catalytic control devices. A summary of trace elemental constituents in over 50 gasoline samples and 18 commercially marketed consumer purchased gasoline additives is presented. Quantities of Mn, Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu, Fe, Sb, B, Mg, Pb, and S were found in most regular and premium gasoline. Environmental implications of trace constituents in gasoline are discussed. PMID:1157783

  3. Coast Guard exposure to gasoline, MTBE, and benzene vapors during inspection of tank barges.

    PubMed

    Davenport, A C; Glynn, T J; Rhambarose, H

    2000-01-01

    A field study was conducted June through August 1996 in an attempt to quantify short-term exposure levels to Coast Guard personnel performing routine inspection activities aboard commercial tank barges carrying gasoline. Transfer and fleeting operations were monitored in the ports of Pittsburgh, Pa., Huntington, W.Va., Baton Rouge, La., and Galveston, Tex. A total of 43 personal and 68 area samples were analyzed for benzene and total hydrocarbons as gasoline ("gasoline"). Results can be summarized as follows: Personal exposure to benzene gave 15-min time-weighted-average (TWA) results ranging from <0.10 to 0.50 ppm. Area benzene levels ranged from <0.04 to 170 ppm. Personal monitoring for gasoline revealed a range of <2.0 to 590 mg/m3 with a GM of 23 mg/m3. Area sample results for gasoline ranged from 1.7 to 90,000 mg/m3. Twelve personal samples were collected for methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE). Only two of these were above the limit of detection and had 15-min time-weighted averages of 22 ppm and 1.3 ppm. Eighteen MTBE area samples ranged in value from <3.0 to 38 ppm. Although none of the personal samples met or exceeded proposed or established short-term exposure standards, many of the area sampling results indicated that a significant risk of acute exposure exists in the vicinity of valves, pressure lines, and connections. This includes anticipated sources such as pressure vent valves as well as unexpected sources resulting from structural deficiencies onboard the vessels. These results further emphasize the value of safe work practices and proper vessel maintenance in controlling exposure to harmful chemicals. PMID:11192221

  4. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... submitted to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, under the requirements of 40 CFR part 80... 40 CFR part 80, subpart L, including 40 CFR 80.1363 apply to . Pursuant to Clean Air Act section 113... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Foreign Refiners § 80.1363 What are the additional requirements under...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... submitted to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, under the requirements of 40 CFR part 80... 40 CFR part 80, subpart L, including 40 CFR 80.1363 apply to . Pursuant to Clean Air Act section 113... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Foreign Refiners § 80.1363 What are the additional requirements under...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... submitted to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, under the requirements of 40 CFR part 80... 40 CFR part 80, subpart L, including 40 CFR 80.1363 apply to . Pursuant to Clean Air Act section 113... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Foreign Refiners § 80.1363 What are the additional requirements under...

  7. Gasoline Composition Regulations Affecting LUST Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments in 1990 imposed requirements on gasoline composition in the United States. Impacts to ground water are affected by the provisions that required oxygenated additives and limited benzene concentration. Reformulated and oxygenated gasoline w...

  8. RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing and Isolation of Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading Bacteria from Gasoline-Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Yuki; Takahata, Yoh; Manefield, Mike; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of benzene-degrading bacteria in gasoline-contaminated groundwater was coupled to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of DNA fragments amplified by reverse transcription-PCR from community 16S rRNA molecules. Supplementation of the groundwater with [13C6]benzene together with an electron acceptor (nitrate, sulfate, or oxygen) showed that a phylotype affiliated with the genus Azoarcus specifically appeared in the 13C-RNA fraction only when nitrate was supplemented. This phylotype was also observed as the major band in DGGE analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified by PCR from the gasoline-contaminated groundwater. In order to isolate the Azoarcus strains, the groundwater sample was streaked on agar plates containing nonselective diluted CGY medium, and the DGGE analysis was used to screen colonies formed on the plates. This procedure identified five bacterial isolates (from 60 colonies) that corresponded to the SIP-identified Azoarcus phylotype, among which two strains (designated DN11 and AN9) degraded benzene under denitrifying conditions. Incubation of these strains with [14C]benzene showed that the labeled carbon was mostly incorporated into 14CO2 within 14 days. These results indicate that the Azoarcus population was involved in benzene degradation in the gasoline-contaminated groundwater under denitrifying conditions. We suggest that RNA-based SIP identification coupled to phylogenetic screening of nonselective isolates facilitates the isolation of enrichment/isolation-resistant microorganisms with a specific function. PMID:16672506

  9. Health studies indicate MTBE is safe gasoline additive

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.V.

    1993-09-01

    Implementation of the oxygenated fuels program by EPA in 39 metropolitan areas, including Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, in the winter of 1992, encountered some unexpected difficulties. Complaints of headaches, dizziness, nausea, and irritated eyes started in Fairbanks, jumped to Anchorage, and popped up in various locations in the lower 48 states. The suspected culprit behind these complaints was the main additive for oxygenation of gasoline is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). A test program, hastily organized in response to these complaints, has indicated that MTBE is a safe gasoline additive. However, official certification of the safety of MTBE is still awaited.

  10. Methane, benzene and alkyl benzene cold start emission data of gasoline-driven passenger cars representing the vehicle technology of the last two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeb, Norbert V.; Forss, Anna-Maria; Saxer, Christian J.; Wilhelm, Patrick

    The US urban driving cycle (FTP-75) is widely used to estimate both the emissions under hot engine conditions as well as those associated with the cold start. Applying fast analysis techniques such as chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS) the warm-up behavior of individual vehicles can be monitored at a time resolution of 1 s. CI-MS has been used to investigate the emissions of methane, benzene and the alkyl benzene class of compounds. The amount of the emissions at cold start influence was deduced from the time-resolved emission data of four gasoline-driven vehicle classes representing the vehicle technology of the last two decades. Overall, the emissions of five EURO-0, 20 EURO-1, 18 EURO-2 and so far of six EURO-3 passenger cars were recorded. The test vehicles were selected from the currently operating Swiss car fleet based on the car sales statistics. The average methane, benzene and alkyl benzene cold start emissions are reported using both, the traditional bag method as well as the regression model. At room temperature a clear reduction of 94%, 81% and 85% was found for the methane, benzene and alkyl benzene cold start emissions from EURO-0 to EURO-3 technology, respectively.

  11. 40 CFR 80.1613 - Standards and other requirements for gasoline additive manufacturers and blenders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... manufacturers, as defined in 40 CFR 79.2(f), who manufacture additives with a maximum allowed treatment rate of... gasoline additive manufacturers and blenders. 80.1613 Section 80.1613 Protection of Environment... Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1613 Standards and other requirements for gasoline additive manufacturers and...

  12. Multifunctional additives for automotive gasolines based on oxyethylated compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lykov, O.P.; Vishnyakova, T.P.; Tsygan, L.V.; Emel'yanov, V.E.

    1987-03-01

    The authors have investigated various oil-soluble nonionic surfactants with different degrees of oxyethylation as multifunctional additives for gasolines. The following products were taken for oxyethylation: C/sub 17/-C/sub 20/ synthetic fatty acids; concentrate of isocarboxylic and unsaturated acids segregated from C/sub 17/-C/sub 20/ SFA by cold acetone; technical C/sub 10/-C/sub 18/ alkylsalicylic acids; products from the condensation of AC acids with C/sub 10/-C/sub 16/ aliphatic amines; primary aliphatic amines.

  13. Influence of MTBE addition into gasoline on automotive exhaust emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulopoulos, S.; Philippopoulos, C.

    The effect of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE) addition into gasoline on the exhaust emissions from internal combustion engines was studied. A four-cylinder OPEL 1.6 l engine equipped with a hydraulic brake dynamometer was used in all the experiments. Fuels containing 0.0-11.0% MTBE were used in a wide range of engine operations, and the exhaust gases were analyzed for CO, HC (total unburned hydrocarbons, methane, ethylene) and MTBE, before and after their catalytic treatment by a three-way catalytic converter. The addition of MTBE into gasoline resulted in a decrease in CO and HC emissions only at high engine loading. During cold-start up of the engine, MTBE, HC, CO emissions were significant and increased with MTBE addition into fuel. At the catalytic converter outlet MTBE was detected when its concentration in fuels was greater than 8% and only as long as the catalytic converter operates at low temperatures. Methane and ethylene emissions were comparable for all fuels tested at engine outlet, but methane emissions remained almost at the same level while ethylene emissions were significantly decreased by the catalytic converter.

  14. Gasoline poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing gasoline or breathing in its fumes. This article is ... The poisonous ingredients in gasoline are chemicals called ... only hydrogen and carbon. Examples are benzene and methane.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE ALTERNATIVES: MTBE AND ETHANOL ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the U.S. is considering options for additives to reformulated gasoline. To inform this debate the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development is conducting a screening life cycle assessment (LCA) of three gasoline alternatives. These alternatives include gasoline w...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  1. HOUSEHOLD EXPOSURES TO BENZENE FROM SHOWERING WITH GASOLINE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a private residence using benzene contaminated groundwater (= 300 ug/l), a series of experiments were performed to assess the benzene exposures that occur in the shower stall, bathroom, master bedroom, and living room as a result of a single 20 minute shower. Sampling methodol...

  2. Improving the environmental and performance characteristics of vehicles by introducing the surfactant additive into gasoline.

    PubMed

    Magaril, Elena; Magaril, Romen

    2016-09-01

    The operation of modern vehicles requires the introduction of package of fuel additives to ensure the required level of operating characteristics, some of which cannot be achieved by current oil refining methods. The use of additives allows flexibility of impact on the properties of the fuel at minimal cost, increasing the efficiency and environmental safety of vehicles. Among the wide assortment of additives available on the world market, many are surfactants. It has been shown that the introduction of some surfactants into gasoline concurrently reduces losses from gasoline evaporation, improves the mixture formation during injection of gasoline into the engine and improves detergent and anticorrosive properties. The surfactant gasoline additive that provides significant improvement in the quality of gasoline used and environmental and operating characteristics of vehicles has been developed and thoroughly investigated. The results of studies confirming the efficiency of the gasoline additive application are herein presented. PMID:27206755

  3. The elimination of lead in gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.M.

    1995-11-01

    Due to the health consequences of lead exposure, as well as to the introduction of catalytic converters, many countries have reduced or eliminate use of lead additives in motor gasolines. But in many other countries, leaded gasoline remains the norm. In these countries there is often confusion about the health significance of gasoline lead, the ability of cars to use unleaded gasoline, and the costs of unleaded gasoline. This chapter shows that leaded gasoline is a major source of human lead exposure. All cars, with or without catalytic converters, and with or without hardened exhaust valve seats, can use unleaded gasoline exclusively. Unleaded gasoline typically costs on the order of $0.01 more per liter than leaded gasoline to produce. Recent concerns about benzene exposure from unleaded gasoline have been addressed through choice of gasoline formulation and other measures. 115 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Benzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzene ; CASRN 71 - 43 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  5. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  10. 40 CFR 80.8 - Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. To enforce any edition other than... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel... Provisions § 80.8 Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels....

  11. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce... care, EPA may permit a refinery or importer to exceed the allowable average benzene levels specified...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce... care, EPA may permit a refinery or importer to exceed the allowable average benzene levels specified...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce... care, EPA may permit a refinery or importer to exceed the allowable average benzene levels specified...

  14. Effect of alcohol addition on shock-initiated formation of soot from benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael; Yuan, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Soot formation in benzene-methanol and benzene-ethanol argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1580-2250 K, pressures 2.0-3.0 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations (2.0-2.7) x 10 to the 17th atoms/cu cm. The results obtained indicate that the addition of alcohol suppresses the formation of soot from benzene at all temperatures, and that the reduction in soot yields is increased with the amount of alcohol added. The analysis of the results indicates that the suppression effect is probably due to the oxidation of soot and soot precursors by OH and the removal of hydrogen atoms by alcohol and water molecules.

  15. 40 CFR 80.1290 - How are standard benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are standard benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1290 How are standard benzene credits generated? (a) The standard credit...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1275 - How are early benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are early benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1275 How are early benzene credits generated? (a) For each averaging period...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1290 - How are standard benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How are standard benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1290 How are standard benzene credits generated? (a) The standard credit...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1290 - How are standard benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are standard benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1290 How are standard benzene credits generated? (a) The standard credit...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1275 - How are early benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are early benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1275 How are early benzene credits generated? (a) For each averaging period...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1290 - How are standard benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are standard benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1290 How are standard benzene credits generated? (a) The standard credit...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1270 - Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who may generate benzene credits under... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1270 Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1270 - Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Who may generate benzene credits under... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1270 Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1275 - How are early benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are early benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1275 How are early benzene credits generated? (a) For each averaging period...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1270 - Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who may generate benzene credits under... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1270 Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1275 - How are early benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are early benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1275 How are early benzene credits generated? (a) For each averaging period...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1270 - Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Who may generate benzene credits under... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1270 Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1275 - How are early benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How are early benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1275 How are early benzene credits generated? (a) For each averaging period...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1290 - How are standard benzene credits generated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are standard benzene credits... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1290 How are standard benzene credits generated? (a) The standard credit...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1280 - How are refinery benzene baselines calculated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are refinery benzene baselines... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1280 How are refinery benzene baselines calculated? (a) A refinery's...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1270 - Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Who may generate benzene credits under... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1270 Who may generate benzene credits under the ABT program?...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1348 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1348 What gasoline sample retention...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1348 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1348 What gasoline sample retention...

  17. Evaluation of fuel additives for reduction of material imcompatibilities in methanol-gasoline blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, C. F.; Barbee, J. G.; Knutson, W. K.; Cuellar, J. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Screening tests determined the efficacy of six commercially available additives as modifiers of methanol's corrosivity toward metals and its weakening of tensile properties of nonmetals in automotive fuel systems. From the screening phase, three additives which seemed to protect some of the metals were tested in higher concentrations and binary combinations in search of optimal application conditions. Results indicate that two of the additives have protective properties and combining them increases the protection of the metals corroded by methanol-gasoline blends. Half of the metals in the tests were not corroded. Testing at recommended concentrations and then at higher concentrations and in combinations shows that the additives would have no protective or harmful effects on the nonmetals. Two additives emerged as candidates for application to the protection of metals in automotive methanol-gasoline fuel systems. The additives tested were assigned letter codes to protect their proprietary nature.

  18. Numerical analysis of the effect of acetylene and benzene addition to low-pressure benzene-rich flat flames on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kunioshi, Nilson; Komori, Seisaku; Fukutani, Seishiro

    2006-10-15

    A modification of the CHEMKIN II package has been proposed for modeling addition of an arbitrary species at an arbitrary temperature to an arbitrary distance from the burner along a flat flame. The modified program was applied to the problem of addition of acetylene or benzene to different positions of a 40-Torr, {phi}=2.4 benzene/O{sub 2}/40%-N{sub 2} premixed flame to reach final equivalence ratios of {phi}=2.5 and 2.681. The results obtained showed that acetylene addition to early positions of the flame led to significant increase in pyrene production rates, but pyrene concentrations were lower in the flames with acetylene addition in both the {phi}=2.5 and 2.681 cases. Addition of benzene to the flame did not alter pyrene production rates in either the {phi}=2.5 or 2.681 cases; however, for {phi}=2.5, pyrene concentrations increased with benzene addition, while for {phi}=2.681, pyrene contents decreased in comparison to the correspondent flames with no addition. Acetylene addition led to a significant increase in pyrene production rates, but the pyrene levels dropped due to increase in the flow velocity. Pyrene production rates were not sensitive to benzene addition, but pyrene contents increased with benzene addition when the flow velocity decreased. These results show that PAH concentration changes accompanying species addition to flames should be interpreted carefully, because an increase or decrease in the content of a PAH species does not necessarily reflect an effect on its formation rate or mechanism. (author)

  19. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.1336 Section 80.1336 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In extreme, unusual, and unforeseen...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1349 - Alternative sampling and testing requirements for importers who import gasoline into the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for importers who import gasoline into the United States by truck. 80.1349 Section 80.1349... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1349 Alternative sampling and testing requirements for importers who import gasoline into the United States...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.1336 Section 80.1336 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In extreme, unusual, and unforeseen...

  2. Effect of organometallic fuel additives on nanoparticle emissions from a gasoline passenger car.

    PubMed

    Gidney, Jeremy T; Twigg, Martyn V; Kittelson, David B

    2010-04-01

    Particle size measurements were performed on the exhaust of a car operating on a chassis dynamometer fueled with standard gasoline and gasoline containing low levels of Pb, Fe, and Mn organometallic additives. When additives were present there was a distinct nucleation mode consisting primarily of sub-10 nm nanoparticles. At equal molar dosing Mn and Fe gave similar nanoparticle concentrations at the tailpipe, whereas Pb gave a considerably lower concentration. A catalytic stripper was used to remove the organic component of these particles and revealed that they were mainly solid and, because of their association with inorganic additives, presumably inorganic. Solid nucleation mode nanoparticles of similar size and concentration to those observed here from a gasoline engine with Mn and Fe additives have also been observed from modern heavy-duty diesel engines without aftertreatment at idle, but these solid particles are a small fraction of the primarily volatile nucleation mode particles emitted. The solid nucleation mode particles emitted by the diesel engines are likely derived from metal compounds in the lubrication oil, although carbonaceous particles cannot be ruled out. Significantly, most of these solid nanoparticles emitted by both engine types fall below the 23 nm cutoff of the PMP number regulation. PMID:20192164

  3. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40{degrees}C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54{degrees}C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  4. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40[degrees]C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54[degrees]C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  5. Effect of Ethanol and Ethanol Biodegradation Products on Prospects for Natural Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene at Gasoline Spill Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of biofuels (ethanol in particular) in the fuel supply nationwide, and an increase in the number of stations that sell gasoline that contains more than 10% ethanol. The U.S. EPA needs to understand the fate of these materials if they are released ...

  6. 40 CFR 80.410 - What are the additional requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries having...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries having individual small refiner sulfur baselines, foreign refineries granted temporary relief under § 80.270, or baselines for generating credits during 2000 through 2003? 80.410 Section 80.410...

  7. Renewable Gasoline, Solvents, and Fuel Additives from 2,3-Butanediol.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Benjamin G; Merriman, Walter W; Quintana, Roxanne L

    2016-07-21

    2,3-Butanediol (2,3-BD) is a renewable alcohol that can be prepared in high yield from biomass sugars. 2,3-BD was selectively dehydrated in a solvent-free process to a complex mixture of 2-ethyl-2,4,5-trimethyl-1,3-dioxolanes and 4,5-dimethyl-2isopropyl dioxolanes with the heterogeneous acid catalyst Amberlyst-15. The purified dioxolane mixture exhibited an anti-knock index of 90.5, comparable to high octane gasoline, and a volumetric net heat of combustion 34 % higher than ethanol. The solubility of the dioxolane mixture in water was only 0.8 g per 100 mL, nearly an order of magnitude lower than the common gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether. The dioxolane mixture has potential applications as a sustainable gasoline blending component, diesel oxygenate, and industrial solvent. PMID:27304610

  8. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  13. Determination of detergent and dispensant additives in gasoline by ring-oven and near infrared hypespectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues e Brito, Lívia; da Silva, Michelle P F; Rohwedder, Jarbas J R; Pasquini, Celio; Honorato, Fernanda A; Pimentel, Maria Fernanda

    2015-03-10

    A method using the ring-oven technique for pre-concentration in filter paper discs and near infrared hyperspectral imaging is proposed to identify four detergent and dispersant additives, and to determine their concentration in gasoline. Different approaches were used to select the best image data processing in order to gather the relevant spectral information. This was attained by selecting the pixels of the region of interest (ROI), using a pre-calculated threshold value of the PCA scores arranged as histograms, to select the spectra set; summing up the selected spectra to achieve representativeness; and compensating for the superimposed filter paper spectral information, also supported by scores histograms for each individual sample. The best classification model was achieved using linear discriminant analysis and genetic algorithm (LDA/GA), whose correct classification rate in the external validation set was 92%. Previous classification of the type of additive present in the gasoline is necessary to define the PLS model required for its quantitative determination. Considering that two of the additives studied present high spectral similarity, a PLS regression model was constructed to predict their content in gasoline, while two additional models were used for the remaining additives. The results for the external validation of these regression models showed a mean percentage error of prediction varying from 5 to 15%. PMID:25732308

  14. Evaporative Gasoline Emissions and Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gordian, Mary Ellen; Stewart, Alistair W; Morris, Stephen S

    2010-01-01

    Attached garages are known to be associated with indoor air volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study looked at indoor exposure to VOCs presumably from evaporative emissions of gasoline. Alaskan gasoline contains 5% benzene making benzene a marker for gasoline exposure. A survey of randomly chosen houses with attached garages was done in Anchorage Alaska to determine the exposure and assess respiratory health. Householders were asked to complete a health survey for each person and a household survey. They monitored indoor air in their primary living space for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes for one week using passive organic vapor monitoring badges. Benzene levels in homes ranged from undetectable to 58 parts per billion. The median benzene level in 509 homes tested was 2.96 ppb. Elevated benzene levels in the home were strongly associated with small engines and gasoline stored in the garage. High concentrations of benzene in gasoline increase indoor air levels of benzene in residences with attached garages exposing people to benzene at levels above ATSDR’s minimal risk level. Residents reported more severe symptoms of asthma in the homes with high gasoline exposure (16%) where benzene levels exceeded the 9 ppb. PMID:20948946

  15. Evaporative gasoline emissions and asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gordian, Mary Ellen; Stewart, Alistair W; Morris, Stephen S

    2010-08-01

    Attached garages are known to be associated with indoor air volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study looked at indoor exposure to VOCs presumably from evaporative emissions of gasoline. Alaskan gasoline contains 5% benzene making benzene a marker for gasoline exposure. A survey of randomly chosen houses with attached garages was done in Anchorage Alaska to determine the exposure and assess respiratory health. Householders were asked to complete a health survey for each person and a household survey. They monitored indoor air in their primary living space for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes for one week using passive organic vapor monitoring badges. Benzene levels in homes ranged from undetectable to 58 parts per billion. The median benzene level in 509 homes tested was 2.96 ppb. Elevated benzene levels in the home were strongly associated with small engines and gasoline stored in the garage. High concentrations of benzene in gasoline increase indoor air levels of benzene in residences with attached garages exposing people to benzene at levels above ATSDR's minimal risk level. Residents reported more severe symptoms of asthma in the homes with high gasoline exposure (16%) where benzene levels exceeded the 9 ppb. PMID:20948946

  16. Production of aromatic green gasoline additives via catalytic pyrolysis of acidulated peanut oil soap stock.

    PubMed

    Hilten, R; Speir, R; Kastner, J; Das, K C

    2011-09-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis was used to generate gasoline-compatible fuel from peanut oil soap stock (PSS), a high free fatty acid feedstock, using a fixed-bed reactor at temperatures between 450 and 550°C with a zeolite catalyst (HZSM-5). PSS fed at 81 gh(-1) along with 100 mL min(-1) inert gas was passed across a 15 g catalyst bed (WHSV=5.4h(-1), gas phase residence time=34s). Results indicate that fuel properties of PSS including viscosity, heating value, and O:C ratio were improved significantly. For PSS processed at 500°C, viscosity was reduced from 59.6 to 0.9 mm(2)s(-1), heating value was increased from 35.8 to 39.3 MJL(-1), and the O:C ratio was reduced from 0.07 to 0.02. Aromatic gasoline components (e.g., BTEX), were formed in concentrations as high as 94% (v/v) in catalytically-cracked PSS with yields ranging from 22% to 35% (v/v of PSS feed). PMID:21741232

  17. Combined ab initio molecular dynamics and experimental studies of carbon atom addition to benzene.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael L; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Schreiner, Peter R

    2014-04-17

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics was used to explore the reactions between triplet and singlet carbon atoms with benzene. The computations reveal that, in the singlet C atom reaction, products are very exothermic where nearly every collision yields a product that is determined by the initial encounter geometry. The singlet C atom reaction does not follow the minimum energy path because the bimolecular reaction is controlled by dynamics (i.e., initial orientation of encounter). On the other hand, in a 10 K solid Ar matrix, ground state C((3)P) atoms do tend to follow RRKM kinetics. Thus, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) results indicate that a significant fraction of C-H insertion occurs to form phenylcarbene whereas, in marked contrast to previous theoretical and experimental conclusions, the Ar matrix isolation studies indicate a large fraction of direct cycloheptatetraene formation, without the intermediacy of phenylcarbene. The AIMD calculations are more consistent with vaporized carbon atom experiments where labeling studies indicate the initial formation of phenylcarbene. This underlines that the availability of thermodynamic sinks can completely alter the observed reaction dynamics. PMID:24661002

  18. Dissolution of monoaromatic hydrocarbons into groundwater from gasoline-oxygenate mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, M.; Lemon, L.; Barker, J.F. )

    1992-12-01

    The effects of the [open quotes]oxygenate[close quotes] additives methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) on the aqueous solubility of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from gasoline were evaluated through equilibrium batch experiments. For a gasoline:water ratio of 1:10 (v/v), up to 15% MTBE or up to 85% methanol in gasoline produced no enhanced BTEX solubility. However, at higher gasoline:water ratios, aqueous methanol concentrations above 10% enhanced BTEX solubility. The initial methanol content of the gasoline and the equilibrating gasoline- to water-phase ratio controlled the aqueous methanol concentration. Partitioning theory and the experimental results were used to calculate aqueous benzene and methanol concentrations in successive batches of fresh groundwater equilibrating with the fuel and subsequent residuals. These successive batches simulated formation of a plume of contaminated groundwater. The front of the plume generated from high-methanol gasoline equilibrating with groundwater at a gasoline:water ratio of more than 1 had high methanol content and elevated BTEX concentrations. Thus, release of high-methanol fuels could have a more serious, initial impact on groundwater than do releases of methanol-free gasoline. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Gasoline Composition in 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gasoline composition in the U.S is determined by factors related to crude oil source, refinery capacity, geography and regulatory factors. Major regulation derived from the Clean Air Act and its amendments determines the benzene and former oxygenate requirements for reformulated...

  20. Investigation of gasoline distributions within petrol stations: spatial and seasonal concentrations, sources, mitigation measures, and occupationally exposed symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sairat, Theerapong; Homwuttiwong, Sahalaph; Homwutthiwong, Kritsana; Ongwandee, Maneerat

    2015-09-01

    We measured levels of VOCs and determined the distributions of benzene concentrations over the area of two petrol stations in all three seasons. Using the concentrations and sampling positions, we created isoconcentration contour maps. The average concentrations ranged 18-1288 μg m(-3) for benzene and 12-81 μg m(-3) for toluene. The contour maps indicate that high-level contours of benzene were found not only at the fuel dispenser areas but also at the storage tank refilling points, open drainage areas where gasoline-polluted wastewater was flowing, and the auto service center located within the station area. An assessment of the benzene to toluene ratio contour plots implicates that airborne benzene and toluene near the fuel dispenser area were attributed to gasoline evaporation although one of the studied stations may be influenced by other VOC sources besides gasoline evaporation. Additionally, during the routine refilling of the underground fuel storage tanks by a tank truck, the ambient levels of benzene and toluene increased tremendously. The implementation of source control by replacing old dispensers with new fuel dispensers that have an efficient cutoff feature and increased delivery speed can reduce spatial benzene concentrations by 77%. Furthermore, a questionnaire survey among 63 service attendants in ten stations revealed that headache was the most reported health complaint with a response rate of 32%, followed by fatigue with 20%. These prominent symptoms could be related to an exposure to high benzene concentrations. PMID:25943517

  1. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON THE NATURAL FERMENTATION OF BENZENE IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate in California and in the mid continent area around the Great Lakes. The presence of ethanol in a gasoline spill has raised concerns about the effects of the additive on the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzen...

  2. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON THE NATURAL FERMENTATION OF BENZENE IN GROUNDWATER (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate in California and in the mid continent area around the Great Lakes. The presence of ethanol in a gasoline spill has raised concerns about the effects of the additive on the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzen...

  3. FCC process options for reformulated gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, L.E.; Letzsch, W.S.; Martin, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    In addition to certain process modifications, the main focus for RFG in the United States has been the addition of oxygenates, primarily MTBE, and to a lesser extent TAME and ETBE. As FCC-derived isobutylene is the primary feedstock source for MTBE, much interest has been shown in increasing its yield. At the same time, increasing the C3-C5 olefin yield is highly desirable as these olefins can be further processed into alkylate and/or oxygenates for gasoline blending. The incremental volumetric yield associated with these products will help offset the RFG pool volumetric loss due to distillation, benzene, aromatics and sulfur specifications. The paper discusses catalyst and process choices for the future. Three catalytic cracking technologies are described which can be applied to existing FCC units. These are DCC (deep catalytic cracking), MGG (more gasoline and gas), and MIO (maximum iso olefin).

  4. Effect of gasoline composition on exhaust hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kameoka, Atsushi; Akiyama, Ken-ichi; Hosoi, Kenzo

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of individual hydrocarbons in gasoline and to clarify the effect of the gasoline composition on engine-out exhaust hydrocarbons. Experiments were performed on a single cylinder research engine operating under steady state condition. The test fuels were blended gasolines of alkylate, catalytic reformate and fluid catalytic cracking gasoline. Chemically defined binary fuel mixtures of isooctane, benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene were used as variables to study their impact on exhaust hydrocarbons. The individual exhaust hydrocarbon species were analyzed using a gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector. The results of tests with blended gasoline indicated that the exhaust hydrocarbons were classified into the unburned fuel and the cracked products such as methane, ethane and various olefins. The production coefficients of benzene were 5% for toluene, 4% for xylene and 6% for ethylbenzene. These values suggested that alkylbenzene in the fuel produced benzene in the exhaust. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Gasoline marketing

    SciTech Connect

    Metzenbaum, H.M.

    1991-02-01

    Consumers have the option of purchasing several different grades of unleaded gasoline regular, mid-grade, and premium which are classified according to an octane rating. Because of concern that consumers may be needlessly buying higher priced premium unleaded gasoline for their automobiles when regular unleaded gasoline would meet their needs, this paper determines whether consumers were buying premium gasoline that they may not need, whether the higher retail price of premium gasoline includes a price mark-up added between the refinery and the retail pump which is greater than that included in the retail price for regular gasoline, and possible reasons for the price differences between premium and regular gasoline.

  6. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... submitted to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, under the requirements of 40 CFR part 80... 40 CFR part 80, subpart L, including 40 CFR 80.1363 apply to . Pursuant to Clean Air Act section 113... under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries? 80.1363 Section 80.1363 Protection...

  7. Outdoor and indoor benzene evaluation by GC-FID and GC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sousa, José A; Domingues, Valentina F; Rosas, Mónica S; Ribeiro, Susana O; Alvim-Ferraz, Conceiçao M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina F

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of benzene in different environments such as indoor (with and without tobacco smoke), a city area, countryside, gas stations and near exhaust pipes from cars running on different types of fuels was performed. The samples were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID) and tandem mass spectrometric detection (MS/MS) (to confirm the identification of benzene in the air samples). Operating conditions for the GC-MS analysis were optimized as well as the sampling and sample preparation. The results obtained in this work indicate that i) the type of fuel directly influences the benzene concentration in the air. Gasoline with additives provided the highest amount of benzene followed by unleaded gasoline and diesel; ii) the benzene concentration in the gas station was always higher than the advisable limit established by law (5 μg m⁻³) and during the unloading of gasoline the achieved concentration was 8371 μg m⁻³; iii) the data from the countryside (Taliscas) and the urban city (Matosinhos) were below 5 μg m⁻³ except 5 days after a fire on a petroleum refinery plant located near the city; iv) it was proven that in coffee shops where smoking is allowed the benzene concentration is higher (6 μg m⁻³) than in coffee shops where this is forbidden (4 μg m⁻³). This method may also be helpful for environmental analytical chemists who use GC-MS/MS for the confirmation or/and quantification of benzene. PMID:21240706

  8. 40 CFR 80.1348 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1348 What gasoline sample retention requirements... independent laboratory shall also include with the retained sample the test result for benzene as...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1348 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1348 What gasoline sample retention requirements... independent laboratory shall also include with the retained sample the test result for benzene as...

  10. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  11. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  12. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  13. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  14. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  15. Benzene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atlanta, GA. Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 94. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  16. Motor gasoline assessment, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The springs of 1996 and 1997 provide an excellent example of contrasting gasoline market dynamics. In spring 1996, tightening crude oil markets pushed up gasoline prices sharply, adding to the normal seasonal gasoline price increases; however, in spring 1997, crude oil markets loosened and crude oil prices fell, bringing gasoline prices down. This pattern was followed throughout the country except in California. As a result of its unique reformulated gasoline, California prices began to vary significantly from the rest of the country in 1996 and continued to exhibit distinct variations in 1997. In addition to the price contrasts between 1996 and 1997, changes occurred in the way in which gasoline markets were supplied. Low stocks, high refinery utilizations, and high imports persisted through 1996 into summer 1997, but these factors seem to have had little impact on gasoline price spreads relative to average spread.

  17. Neurotoxic effects of gasoline and gasoline constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Burbacher, T.M.

    1993-12-01

    This overview was developed as part of a symposium on noncancer end points of gasoline and key gasoline components. The specific components included are methyl tertiary butyl ether, ethyl tertiary butyl ether, tertiary amyl methyl ether, butadiene, benzene, xylene, toluene, methyl alcohol, and ethyl alcohol. The overview focuses on neurotoxic effects related to chronic low-level exposures. A few general conclusions and recommendations can be made based on the results of the studies to date. (a) All the compounds reviewed are neuroactive and, as such, should be examined for their neurotoxicity. (b) For most of the compounds, there is a substantial margin of safety between the current permissible exposure levels and levels that would be expected to cause overt signs of neurotoxicity in humans. This is not the case for xylene, toluene, and methanol, however, where neurologic effects are observed at or below the current Threshold Limit Value. (c) For most of the compounds, the relationship between chronic low-level exposure and subtle neurotoxic effects has not been studied. Studies therefore should focus on examining the dose-response relationship between chronic low-level exposure and subtle changes in central nervous system function. 96 refs., 7 tabs.

  18. Refiner upgrades to meet world`s toughest gasoline specs

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1996-09-23

    Ultramar Inc. has completed a $300 million upgrade of its refinery at Wilmington, California, near Los Angeles. The three-step program enables the refinery to produce reformulated gasolines meeting federal and California standards. The upgrade was done in three steps: Step 1 included a new naphtha hydrotreater (NHT) for sulfur reduction and a splitter for benzene reduction, these additions enabled Ultramar to produce the reformulated gasoline (RFG) required by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) beginning in January 1995; Step 2 included an olefin treater for gasoline from the fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit (cat gasoline), a hydrotreated naphtha rerun tower, and modifications to the FCC unit (FCCU) main fractionator and debutanizer, to support the changes made in Steps 2 and 3, Ultramar expanded utilities, sulfur handling, and hydrogen production facilities during Step 2; Step 3 comprised a new, 48,000 b/d gas oil hydrotreater (GOH) which started up in mid-March. This was a discretionary project driven by an expected return on investment. Step 3 enabled Ultramar to produce more alkylate, which the general manager of engineering and support services for Ultramar, calls the ultimate clean fuel.

  19. Gasoline poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The poisonous ingredients in gasoline are chemicals called hydrocarbons, which are substances that contain only hydrogen and ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1348 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1348 What gasoline sample retention requirements... include with the retained sample the test result for benzene as conducted pursuant to § 80.46(e). (b... sample the test result for benzene as conducted pursuant to § 80.47....

  1. Catalytic conversion of pyrolysis gasoline and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Syunyakova, Z.F.; Valitov, R.B.; Shmelev, A.S.; Mazitov, M.F.; Faskhutdinova, R.A.; Sokolova, G.P.

    1984-11-01

    A basic process for production of benzene from petroleum, along with catalytic reforming, is processing of liquid pyrolysis products and toluene. The conversion of pyrolysis gasoline and toluene on an iron-chromium oxide catalyst in a medium of steam and hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was investigated. Catalytic conversion of the pyrolysis gasoline was carried out in a medium of steam in a gradientless spherical reactor made of Kh23N18T steel under the following conditions: temperature 750 to 840/sup 0/C; steam pyrolysis gasoline weight ratio 1:1; pyrolysis gasoline feed rate 1 g per g catalyst per hour; experiment time 1 hour; catalyst volume 8 cm/sup 3/. Hydrodealkylation of toluene was also studied with the goal of producing benzene. In contrast to the conversion of pyrolysis gasoline in a medium of steam, hydrodealkylation was accomplished in a medium of steam and hydrogen. The preliminary tests showed that higher selectivity for formation of benzene is achieved in the presence of hydrogen. 11 references, 4 tables.

  2. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  3. Mechanistic considerations in benzene physiological model development

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Kenyon, E.M.; Seaton, M.J.; Schlosser, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, the risks of leukemia at low exposure concentrations have not been established. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) may be necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Because benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol, and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. Zonal localization of phase I and phase 11 enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus also impacts this competition. Biologically based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Mechanistic considerations in benzene physiological model development.

    PubMed Central

    Medinsky, M A; Kenyon, E M; Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P M

    1996-01-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, the risks of leukemia at low exposure concentrations have not been established. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) may be necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Because benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol, and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. Zonal localization of phase I and phase II enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus also impacts this competition. Biologically based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans. PMID:9118926

  5. Importance of Rhodococcus strains in a bacterial consortium degrading a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives revealed by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Marc D; Yergeau, Etienne; Labbé, Diane; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial consortium (Mix3) composed of microorganisms originating from different environments (soils and wastewater) was obtained after enrichment in the presence of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives. After addition of the mixture, the development of the microbial composition of Mix3 was monitored at three different times (35, 113, and 222 days) using fingerprinting method and dominant bacterial species were identified. In parallel, 14 bacteria were isolated after 113 days and identified. Degradation capacities for Mix3 and the isolated bacterial strains were characterized and compared. At day 113, we induced the expression of catabolic genes in Mix3 by adding the substrate mixture to resting cells and the metatranscriptome was analyzed. After addition of the substrate mixture, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased at day 222 while a shift between Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium was observed after 113 days. Mix3 was able to degrade 13 compounds completely, with partial degradation of isooctane and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, but tert-butyl alcohol was not degraded. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016 isolated from Mix3 showed almost the same degradation capacities as Mix3: these results were not observed with the other isolated strains. Transcriptomic results revealed that Actinobacteria and in particular, Rhodococcus species, were major contributors in terms of total and catabolic gene transcripts while other species were involved in cyclohexane degradation. Not all the microorganisms identified at day 113 were active except R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 that appeared to be a major player in the degradation activity observed in Mix3. PMID:25343979

  6. Fuel Dependence of Benzene Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Eddings, E; Sarofim, A; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    The relative importance of formation pathways for benzene, an important precursor to soot formation, was determined from the simulation of 22 premixed flames for a wide range of equivalence ratios (1.0 to 3.06), fuels (C{sub 1}-C{sub 12}), and pressures (20 to 760 torr). The maximum benzene concentrations in 15 out of these flames were well reproduced within 30% of the experimental data. Fuel structural properties were found to be critical for benzene production. Cyclohexanes and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} fuels were found to be among the most productive in benzene formation; and long-chain normal paraffins produce the least amount of benzene. Other properties, such as equivalence ratio and combustion temperatures, were also found to be important in determining the amount of benzene produced in flames. Reaction pathways for benzene formation were examined critically in four premixed flames of structurally different fuels of acetylene, n-decane, butadiene, and cyclohexane. Reactions involving precursors, such as C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, were examined. Combination reactions of C{sub 3} species were identified to be the major benzene formation routes with the exception of the cyclohexane flame, in which benzene is formed exclusively from cascading fuel dehydrogenation via cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene intermediates. Acetylene addition makes a minor contribution to benzene formation, except in the butadiene flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced directly from the fuel, and in the n-decane flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced from large alkyl radical decomposition and H atom abstraction from the resulting large olefins.

  7. Benzene exposure: An overview of monitoring methods and their findings

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Clifford P.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued sub to low ppm occupational exposures, though higher exposures exist in small, uncontrolled workshops in developing countries. Emissions from gasoline/petrochemical industry are its main sources to the ambient air, but a person’s total inhalation exposure can be elevated from emissions from cigarettes, consumer products and gasoline powered engines/tools stored in garages attached to homes. Air samples are collected in canisters or on adsorbent with subsequent quantification by gas chromatography. Ambient air concentrations vary from sub-ppb range, low ppb, and tens of ppb in rural/suburban, urban, and source impacted areas, respectively. Short-term environmental exposures of ppm occur during vehicle fueling. Indoor air concentrations of tens of ppb occur in microenvironments containing indoor sources. Occupational and environmental exposures have declined where regulations limit benzene in gasoline (<1%) and cigarette smoking has been banned from public and work places. Similar controls should be implemented worldwide to reduce benzene exposure. Biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk include: benzene in breath, blood and urine; its urinary metabolites: phenol, t,t-muconic acid (t,tMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (sPMA); and blood protein adducts. The biomarker studies suggest benzene environmental exposures are in the sub to low ppb range though non-benzene sources for urinary metabolites

  8. Benzene exposure: an overview of monitoring methods and their findings.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Clifford P

    2010-03-19

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued sub to low ppm occupational exposures, though higher exposures exist in small, uncontrolled workshops in developing countries. Emissions from gasoline/petrochemical industry are its main sources to the ambient air, but a person's total inhalation exposure can be elevated from emissions from cigarettes, consumer products and gasoline powered engines/tools stored in garages attached to homes. Air samples are collected in canisters or on adsorbent with subsequent quantification by gas chromatography. Ambient air concentrations vary from sub-ppb range, low ppb, and tens of ppb in rural/suburban, urban, and source impacted areas, respectively. Short-term environmental exposures of ppm occur during vehicle fueling. Indoor air concentrations of tens of ppb occur in microenvironments containing indoor sources. Occupational and environmental exposures have declined where regulations limit benzene in gasoline (<1%) and cigarette smoking has been banned from public and work places. Similar controls should be implemented worldwide to reduce benzene exposure. Biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk include: benzene in breath, blood and urine; its urinary metabolites: phenol, t,t-muconic acid (t,tMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (sPMA); and blood protein adducts. The biomarker studies suggest benzene environmental exposures are in the sub to low ppb range though non-benzene sources for urinary metabolites, differences

  9. Review of the carcinogenic potential of gasoline.

    PubMed Central

    Raabe, G K

    1993-01-01

    This review examines the animal, human, and mechanistic studies that precede the new studies reported in this volume. Wholly vaporized unleaded gasoline was found to produce a dose-dependent increase in renal carcinoma in male rats and an excess above background incidence of hepatocellular tumors in female mice in the high-dose group. Mechanistic studies suggest that gasoline is not mutagenic and that the probable mechanism for the male rat renal tumors involves a rat-specific protein, alpha 2u-globulin, whose binding with highly branched aliphatic compounds results in renal tubule cell death and, in turn, a proliferative sequence that increases renal tubule tumors. Human evidence generated predominantly from studies of refinery workers does not support a kidney or liver cancer risk in humans. The current epidemiologic database is inadequate to access leukemia risk from low-level benzene exposure from gasoline. Studies of gasoline-exposed workers that incorporate quantitative exposure information are needed. PMID:8020448

  10. Review of the carcinogenic potential of gasoline.

    PubMed

    Raabe, G K

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the animal, human, and mechanistic studies that precede the new studies reported in this volume. Wholly vaporized unleaded gasoline was found to produce a dose-dependent increase in renal carcinoma in male rats and an excess above background incidence of hepatocellular tumors in female mice in the high-dose group. Mechanistic studies suggest that gasoline is not mutagenic and that the probable mechanism for the male rat renal tumors involves a rat-specific protein, alpha 2u-globulin, whose binding with highly branched aliphatic compounds results in renal tubule cell death and, in turn, a proliferative sequence that increases renal tubule tumors. Human evidence generated predominantly from studies of refinery workers does not support a kidney or liver cancer risk in humans. The current epidemiologic database is inadequate to access leukemia risk from low-level benzene exposure from gasoline. Studies of gasoline-exposed workers that incorporate quantitative exposure information are needed. PMID:8020448

  11. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. 80.35 Section 80.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Oxygenated Gasoline § 80.35...

  12. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. 80.35 Section 80.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Oxygenated Gasoline § 80.35...

  13. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. 80.35 Section 80.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Oxygenated Gasoline § 80.35...

  14. Effects of different mixing ratios on emissions from passenger cars fueled with methanol/gasoline blends.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; Yin, Hang; Guo, Jiadong; Zhao, Wei; Dai, Peipei

    2011-01-01

    Regulated and unregulated emissions from four passenger cars fueled with methanol/gasoline blends at different mixing ratios (M15, M20, M30, M50, M85 and M100) were tested over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled by Tenax TA and analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (TD-GC/MS). Carbonyls were trapped on dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that total emissions of VOCs and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p, m, o-xylene) from all vehicles fueled with methanol/gasoline blends were lower than those from vehicles fueled with only gasoline. Compared to the baseline, the use of M85 decreased BTEX emissions by 97.4%, while the use of M15 decreased it by 19.7%. At low-to-middle mixing ratios (M15, M20, M30 and M50), formaldehyde emissions showed a slight increase while those of high mixing ratios (M85 and M100) were three times compared with the baseline gasoline only. When the vehicles were retrofitted with new three-way catalytic converters (TWC), emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbon (THC), and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) were decreased by 24%-50%, 10%-35%, and 24%-58% respectively, compared with the cars using the original equipment manufacture (OEM) TWC. Using the new TWC, emissions of formaldehyde and BTEX were decreased, while those of other carbonyl increased. It is necessary that vehicles fueled with methanol/gasoline blends be retrofitted with a new TWC. In addition, the specific reactivity of emissions of vehicles fueled with M15 and retrofitted with the new TWC was reduced from 4.51 to 4.08 compared to the baseline vehicle. This indicates that the use of methanol/gasoline blend at a low mixing ratio may have lower effect on environment than gasoline. PMID:22432307

  15. Persulfate injection into a gasoline source zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sra, Kanwartej S.; Thomson, Neil R.; Barker, Jim F.

    2013-07-01

    One pore volume of unactivated sodium persulfate was delivered into an emplaced gasoline residual source zone at CFB Borden. Concentrations of inorganic species (S2O82 -, SO42 -, Na+, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)) and selected gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene) were monitored across a transect equipped with 90 multilevel sampling points for > 10 months post-injection. Mass loading (M˙) of compounds constructed from the transect data was used for assessment purposes. Breakthrough of inorganic species was observed when the injection slug crossed the monitoring transect. An increase in M indicated persulfate consumption during oxidation of gasoline compounds or degradation due to the interaction with aquifer materials. M increased by > 100% suggesting some mineralization of gasoline compounds during treatment. Mass loading for all the monitored gasoline compounds reduced by 46 to 86% as the inorganic slug crossed the monitoring transect. The cumulative mass discharge across the monitoring transect was 19 to 58% lower than that expected without persulfate injection. After the inorganic injection slug was flushed from the source zone a partial rebound (40 to 80% of baseline levels) of mass discharge of the monitored gasoline compounds was observed. The ensemble of data collected provides insight into the fate and transport of the injected persulfate solution, and the accompanying treatment of a gasoline the source zone.

  16. [Exposure to benzene and genotoxic effects among filling station attendants].

    PubMed

    Carere, A; Antoccia, A; Crebelli, R; Di Chiara, D; Fuselli, S; Iavarone, I; Isacchi, G; Lagorio, S; Leopardi, P; Marcon, F

    1995-03-01

    Exposure to gasoline vapors is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as possibly carcinogenic to humans, mainly on the basis of the established carcinogenicity of some component chemicals such as benzene. The mechanism of benzene toxicity, particularly its leukemogenic effects, is far from being fully understood. Different studies, aimed at evaluating the risk associated with exposure to benzene through fuels and coordinated by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, are in progress in Italy. In an environmental monitoring survey on a sample of 111 service stations, conducted in Rome (Italy) in 1992, average yearly personal exposure to benzene, toluene and xylenes were estimated. Chemical determination of benzene and methylbenzene was carried out by GL-gas chromatography. From a sample of 27 service stations 34 fuel samples were collected, and their benzene content was measured by hr-gas chromatography. Subgroups of the filling station attendants undergoing the exposure assessment study, were included in biological monitoring surveys of early indicators of genotoxicity. In particular, 65 subjects were enrolled in a study aimed at evaluating the urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a biological marker of oxidative DNA damage, and 23 filling station attendants were selected for a survey of the frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and micronuclei (MN) in peripheral T lymphocytes. In the exposure assessment survey levels of 0.53, 0.71 e 0.32 mg/m3 in the average yearly personal exposure to benzene, toluene and xylenes, respectively, were estimated (individual means based on 6.5 repeated samples per employee). The daily quantities of super premium gasoline sold proved to be associated with the average yearly personal exposure to benzene, and current smokers showed a significantly lower exposure intensity compared with non-smokers. Among the latter, an increase of 0.11 ln mg/m3 in benzene exposure per unit increase

  17. SPECIES COMPARISON OF HEPATIC AND PULMONARY METABOLISM OF BENZENE. (R826191)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Benzene is an occupational hazard and environmental toxicant found in cigarette smoke, gasoline, and the chemical industry. The major health concern associated with benzene exposure is leukemia. Studies using microsomal preparations from human, mouse, rabbit, ...

  18. REDUCTIONS IN HUMAN BENZENE EXPOSURE IN THE CALIFORNIA SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN. (R827352C004)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene typically contributes a significant fraction of the human cancer risk associated with exposure to urban air pollutants. In recent years, concentrations of benzene in ambient air have declined in many urban areas due to the use of reformulated gasolines, lower vehicle e...

  19. The dissolution of BTEX compounds from oxygenated gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Heermann, S.E.; Powers, S.E.

    1996-10-01

    The cosolvency effects of the reformulated gasoline additive ethanol is being studied to determine its influence on the migration of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) compounds in the subsurface. Batch equilibrium experiments showed that the solubility of m-xylene in water increases exponentially with a linear increase in ethanol concentration. Numerical simulations using the computer program CHEMSEP, which incorporates the UNIFAC activity coefficient model, shows that this thermodynamic model is adequate for describing the equilibrium of ethanol BTEX compounds between the aqueous and organic phases in this nonideal system. Both experimental and modeling results show that, because of the essentially infinite solubility of ethanol in water, the cosolvency effect is short lived as the ethanol is rapidly depleted in the organic phase.

  20. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON THE NATURAL ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate. A concern has been raised that the presence of ethanol from a spill of gasoline may inhibit the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzene. Ethanol is miscible in water, and ethanol is readily metabolized by micr...

  1. Genotoxicity and oxidative stress in gasoline station attendants.

    PubMed

    Moro, Angela M; Charão, Mariele F; Brucker, Natália; Durgante, Juliano; Baierle, Marília; Bubols, Guilherme; Goethel, Gabriela; Fracasso, Rafael; Nascimento, Sabrina; Bulcão, Rachel; Gauer, Bruna; Barth, Anelise; Bochi, Guilherme; Moresco, Rafael; Gioda, Adriana; Salvador, Mirian; Farsky, Sandra; Garcia, Solange C

    2013-06-14

    We evaluated genotoxic effects of exposure to low levels of benzene, a class I human carcinogen, among gasoline station attendants (GSA). Oxidative stress and the protective effects of antioxidants on DNA damage were also analyzed. Although exposures were below ACGIH (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists) limits, the GSA group presented higher DNA damage indices and micronucleus frequencies, increased oxidative protein damage, and decreased antioxidant capacity relative to the control group. Duration of benzene exposure was correlated with DNA and protein damage. The biomarkers evaluated in this work may provide early signals of damage in subjects occupationally exposed to benzene. PMID:23628435

  2. Gasoline and vapor exposures in service station and leaking underground storage tank scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Guldberg, P.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to gasoline and gasoline vapors from service station operations and leaking underground storage tanks is a major health concern. Six scenarios for human exposure were examined, based primarily on measured air and water concentrations of total hydrocarbons, benzene, xylenes, and toluene. Calculated mean and upper limit lifetime exposures provide a tool for assisting public health officials in assessing and managing gasoline-related health risks.

  3. Gasoline and vapor exposures in service station and leaking underground storage tank scenarios.

    PubMed

    Guldberg, P H

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to gasoline and gasoline vapors from service station operations and leaking underground storage tanks is a major health concern. Six scenarios for human exposure were examined, based primarily on measured air and water concentrations of total hydrocarbons, benzene, xylenes, and toluene. Calculated mean and upper limit lifetime exposures provide a tool for assisting public health officials in assessing and managing gasoline-related health risks. PMID:1504635

  4. Phase II metabolism of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Schrenk, D; Orzechowski, A; Schwarz, L R; Snyder, R; Burchell, B; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Bock, K W

    1996-01-01

    The hepatic metabolism of benzene is thought to be a prerequisite for its bony marrow toxicity. However, the complete pattern of benzene metabolites formed in the liver and their role in bone marrow toxicity are not fully understood. Therefore, benzene metabolism was studied in isolated rodent hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes released benzene-1,2-dihydrodiol, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CT), phenol (PH), trans-trans-muconic acid, and a number of phase II metabolites such as PH sulfate and PH glucuronide. Pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) markedly increased PH glucuronide formation while PH sulfate formation was decreased. Likewise, V79 cells transfected with the 3-MC-inducible rat UGT1.6 cDNA showed a considerable rate of PH and HQ glucuronidation. In addition to inducing glucuronidation of phenols, 3-MC treatment (reported to protect rats from the myelotoxicity of benzene) resulted in a decrease of hepatic CYP2E1. In contrast, pretreatment of rats with the CYP2E1-inducer isopropanol strongly enhanced benzene metabolism and the formation of phenolic metabolites. Mouse hepatocytes formed much higher amounts of HQ than rat hepatocytes and considerable amounts of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB) sulfate and HQ sulfate. In conclusion, the protective effect of 3-MC in rats is probably due to a shift from the labile PH sulfate to the more stable PH glucuronide, and to a decrease in hepatic CYP2E1. The higher susceptibility of mice toward benzene may be related to the high rate of formation of the myelotoxic metabolite HQ and the semistable phase II metabolites HQ sulfate and THB sulfate. Images Figure 4. PMID:9118891

  5. ITP Filtrate Benzene Removal Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    Existing ITP filtrate hold tanks may provide sufficient capacity and residence time to strip dissolved benzene from the incoming filtrate using nitrogen sparging in the bottom of the old tanks. This is based on equilibrium supported by late Wash test data using aged washed slurry. Theoretical considerations indicate that benzene stripping will be more difficult from the ITP unwashed high salt filtrates due to reduced mass transfer. Therefore experimental sparging data is needed to quantify the theoretical effects.Foaming limits which dictate allowable sparging rate will also have to be established. Sparging in the hold tanks will require installation of sintered metal spargers, and possibly stirrers and foam monitoring/disengagement equipment. The most critical sparging needs are at the start of the precipitation/concentration cycle, when the filtrate flux rate is the highest,and at the end of wash cycle where Henry`s equilibrium constant falls off,requiring more gas to sparge the dissolved benzene. With adequate recycle (for proper distribution) or sparging in the old tanks, the 30 inch column could be used for the complete ITP process. A courser packing would reduce back pressure while enabling benzene stripping. The Late Wash Tests indicate adequate benzene stripping even at reduced gas flow. This will require experimental verification under ITP conditions. Using the 30 in. column vs 18 in. during the wash cycle will enhance stripping without need for additional sparging provided the minimum flow requirements are met.

  6. Critical issues in benzene toxicity and metabolism: the effect of interactions with other organic chemicals on risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Medinsky, M A; Schlosser, P M; Bond, J A

    1994-01-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia. Some individuals exposed repeatedly to cytotoxic concentrations of benzene develop acute myeloblastic anemia. It has been hypothesized that metabolism of benzene is required for its toxicity, although administration of no single benzene metabolite duplicates the toxicity of benzene. Several investigators have demonstrated that a combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) is necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene. Enzymes implicated in the metabolic activation of benzene and its metabolites include the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. Other organic molecules that are substrates for cytochrome P450 can inhibit the metabolism of benzene. For example, toluene has been shown to inhibit the oxidation of benzene in a noncompetitive manner. Enzyme inducers, such as ethanol, can alter the target tissue dosimetry of benzene metabolites by inducing enzymes responsible for oxidation reactions involved in benzene metabolism. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes, such as enzymatic oxidation, and deactivation processes, like conjugation and excretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7698073

  7. KINETICS OF ETHANOL BIODEGRADATION UNDER METHANOGENIC CONDITIONS IN GASOLINE SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate. A concern has been raised that biodegradation of ethanol from a spill of gasoline may inhibit the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzene. Ethanol is miscible in water, and ethanol is readily metabolized by mi...

  8. Major sources of benzene exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis.

  9. Major sources of benzene exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L A

    1989-01-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis. PMID:2477239

  10. Combination processing of pyrolysis naphtha to obtain aromatic hydrocarbons and high-octane gasolines

    SciTech Connect

    Guseinova, A.D.; Asker-Zade, S.M.; Mubarak, A.R.M.

    1994-07-01

    In the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon feedstocks, production of the desired monomer - ethylene - is accompanied by the formation of pyrolysis naphtha, which has a high content of benzene (30%) and hence is processed solely for benzene recovery. In view of the increased demand for automotive gasolines, this processing scheme is extremely illogical. One of the possible means for rational utilization of pyrolysis naphtha is the combined production of high-octane unleaded gasolines and aromatic hydrocarbons, mainly benzene. With such a scheme, the pyrolysis naphtha and the fractions segregated from the naphtha can be processed separately. Another problem that requires a fast solution is the production of ecologically clean modified gasolines. The production and use of leaded gasolines are being phased out universally, in the interest of improving environmental health. For the improvement of octane number, tetraethyllead is being replaced by oxygen-containing compounds, mainly methyl tert-butyl ether and methyl tert-amyl ether. These oxygenates are used at concentrations of 2.0-2.7% in the gasoline. The content of aromatic hydrocarbons (particularly benzene) is limited to 1%. In this article we will describe an optimal scheme for processing pyrolysis naphtha, yielding benzene and AI-93 high-quality unleaded gasoline.

  11. CONTROLLED FIELD STUDY ON THE USE OF NITRATE AND OXYGEN FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF A GASOLINE SOURCE ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controlled releases of unleaded gasoline were used to evaluate the biotransformation of the soluble aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene isomers, trimethylbenzene isomers, and naphthalene) within a source zone using nitrate and oxygen as electron accepto...

  12. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  13. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  14. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  15. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  16. 40 CFR 80.141 - Interim detergent gasoline program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interim detergent gasoline program. 80.141 Section 80.141 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.141 Interim detergent gasoline program. (a) Effective dates...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1654 - California gasoline requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false California gasoline requirements. 80.1654 Section 80.1654 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1654 California gasoline...

  18. Critical issues in benzene toxicity and metabolism: The effect of interactions with other organic chemicals on risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Schlosser, P.M.; Bond, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia. Some individuals exposed repeatedly to cytotoxic concentrations of benzene develop acute myeloblastic anemia. It has been hypothesized that metabolism of benzene is required for its toxicity, although administration of no single benzene metabolite duplicates the toxicity of benzene. Several investigators have demonstrated that a combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) is necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene. Enzymes implicated in the metabolic activation of benzene and its metabolites include the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. Other organic molecules that are substrates for cytochrome P450 can inhibit the metabolism of benzene. For example, toluene has been shown to inhibit the oxidation of benzene in a noncompetitive manner. Enzyme inducers, such as ethanol, can alter the target tissue dosimetry of benzene metabolites by inducing enzymes responsible for oxidation reactions involved in benzene metabolism. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. 40 CFR 80.1640 - Standards and requirements that apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG). 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1640 Standards and requirements that apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline...

  20. Persulfate Oxidation of Gasoline Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sra, K.; Thomson, N.; Barker, J.

    2009-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using persulfate is a promising remediation technology that can be potentially applied to a wide range of organic contaminants. Gasoline compounds are of particular interest because they extensively impact the soil and groundwater, and are highly persistent and toxic. In this investigation, destruction of specific gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzenes, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes (TMBs) and naphthalene), and fractions (F1 and F2) by activated and inactivated persulfate was studied at the bench-scale. Aqueous phase batch reactors (25 mL) for inactivated systems employed persulfate at two concentrations (1 or 20 g/L), and activated systems were conducted with a persulfate concentration of 20 g/L. In the activated systems, the ability of hydrogen peroxide or chelated-ferrous as an activator was examined at two experimental conditions (peroxide molar ratio 0.1 and 1.0 with respect to persulfate; and citric acid chelated ferrous at 150 and 600 mg/L). All treatments and controls contained an initial gasoline concentration of approximately 25 mg/L and were run in triplicate. Sampling for gasoline compounds was conducted over <28 day reaction period. The controls showed insignificant degradation for all the gasoline compounds and fractions examined while inactivated persulfate at 1 g/L showed little (<10%) decrease in the concentration of gasoline compounds over the 28 day reaction period. Inactivated persulfate at 20 g/L demonstrated a significant decrease in the aqueous concentration of BTEX (>99%), TMB (>94%) and naphthalene (>71%). Oxidation of the F1 fraction (>94%) was more pronounced than the F2 fraction (>80%), and >93% TPH was oxidized. Use of peroxide as an activator at a molar ratio of 0.1 improved the destruction of TMBs (>99%) and naphthalene (>85%) while maintaining the high removal of BTEX (>99%) compounds. Increase in activator strength (molar ratio 1.0) decreased the destruction of xylenes (>86%) and TMBs (>81

  1. Dangerous properties of petroleum-refining products: carcinogenicity of motor fuels (gasoline).

    PubMed

    Mehlman, M A

    1990-01-01

    Gasoline contains large numbers of dangerous and cancer-causing chemicals such as benzene, butadiene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, trimethyl pentane, methyltertbutylether (MTBE) and many others. For the U.S. alone approximately 140 billion gallons of gasoline were consumed in 1989. An increase in only ten cents per gallon in price of gasoline generates 14 billion dollars in extra profit per year for oil industry cartel. Laboratory animals exposed to gasoline developed cancers in different tissues and organs. A number of epidemiological studies in humans provide evidence of increased cancer risk of leukemia, kidney, liver, brain, lymphosarcoma, lymphatic tissue pancreas and other tissues and organs. PMID:1981951

  2. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  3. Selection of composite stabilizer for automotive gasolines

    SciTech Connect

    Golubeva, I.A.; Klinaeva, E.V.; Kharitonov, V.V.

    1995-03-01

    An important and very promising approach in expanding the volume of automotive gasoline production is the incorporation of products from secondary processes, namely, pyrolysis, coking, catalytic cracking and thermal cracking. Naturally, the addition of such components gives a very sharp reduction of the gasoline`s oxidation resistance. To stabilize this sort of blended gasoline, new and highly efficient antioxidants, are required. The selection of antioxidants for this purpose is hampered by the lack of information on the mechanisms of mixed-fuel oxidation and the action of stabilizers under these conditions. Since the investigation of oxidation processes involves extended test periods, it becomes important to obtain an objective evaluation of stabilizer efficiency by standard methods, and to improve these methods. The work reported here was aimed at finding and evaluating (by standard methods) a new stabilizer for A-76 automotive gasoline containing unstable catalytic naphtha; the work was also aimed at improving the standard methods. This program consisted of several stages.

  4. Pilot-Scale Benzene Retention and Release Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.C.

    2003-11-10

    During the initial months of In-Tank Precipitation radioactive operation in 1995 the process experienced high rates of tetraphenylborate decomposition with assumed corresponding high rates of benzene generation. In March 1996 after a two month quiescent period, a water addition to Tank 48H resulted in an unexpected benzene release to the tank vapor phase. This was the first time a low energy input resulted in a significant release rate. This led to questions about how benzene, generated in-situ by TPB decomposition, was retained in the surrounding potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. It was postulated the retention mechanism may have changed during the quiescent period prior to March so the benzene present became readily releasable to the vapor phase with low energy input to the slurry or that enough benzene accumulated that some of it was in a different, more releasable form. Readily releasable is a qualitative term defined as a rapid release of benzene at a rate approaching evaporation of a free benzene layer. It is intended to distinguish between benzene in a form with high liquid phase resistance to mass transfer diffusion controlled from benzene in a form with minimal liquid phase resistance to mass transfer free benzene layer evaporation. If a readily releasable form of benzene was present, the vapor space profile during release tests was anticipated to have an initial benzene vapor space concentration peak followed by a lower vapor concentration, longer duration release.

  5. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  6. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  7. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  8. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  9. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  10. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  11. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  12. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  13. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  14. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  15. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  16. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  17. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  18. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  19. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  20. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  1. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  2. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  3. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  4. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  5. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  6. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  7. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  8. The toxicology of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Witz, G; Goldstein, B D

    1993-01-01

    Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a series of phenolic and ring-opened products and their conjugates. The mechanism of benzene-induced aplastic anemia appears to involve the concerted action of several metabolites acting together on early stem and progenitor cells, as well as on early blast cells, such as pronormoblasts and normoblasts to inhibit maturation and amplification. Benzene metabolites also inhibit the function of microenvironmental stromal cells necessary to support the growth of differentiating and maturing marrow cells. The mechanism of benzene-induced leukemogenesis is less well understood. Benzene and its metabolites do not function well as mutagens but are highly clastogenic, producing chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, and micronuclei. Benzene has been shown to be a multi-organ carcinogen in animals. Epidemiological studies demonstrate that benzene is a human leukemogen. There is need to better define the lower end of the dose-response curve for benzene as a human leukemogen. The application of emerging methods in biologically based risk assessment employing pharmacokinetic and mechanistic data may help to clarify the uncertainties in low-dose risk assessment. PMID:8354177

  9. Bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with gasoline hydrocarbons and oxygenates using a membrane-based reactor.

    PubMed

    Zein, Maher M; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study was to operate a novel, field-scale, aerobic bioreactor and assess its performance in the ex situ treatment of groundwater contaminated with gasoline from a leaking underground storage tank in Pascoag, RI. The groundwater contained elevated concentrations of MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether), TBA (tert-butyl alcohol), TBF (tert-butyl formate), BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene isomers), and other gasoline additives (tert-amyl methyl ether, di-isopropyl ether, tert-amyl alcohol, methanol, and acetone). The bioreactor was a gravity-flow membrane-based system called a Biomass Concentrator Reactor (BCR) designed to retain all biomass within the reactor. It was operated for six months at an influent flow rate that ultimately reached 5 gpm. The goal was to achieve a removal of all contaminants to <5 microg/L, which is the California Drinking Water advisory for MTBE. The concentration of TBA, an MTBE biodegradation byproduct, was consistently lower than that of MTBE. The other daughter compound detected in the influent, TBF, was degraded to concentrations below the detection limit of 0.02 microg/L. BTEX were consistently degraded to significantly lower levels in the effluent throughout the duration of the study (<1 microg/L). A similar high removal efficiency of the other gasoline oxygenates present in the groundwater (TAME, DIPE, and TAA) was also achieved. Dissolved organic carbon analysis demonstrated the ability of the bioreactor to produce high quality effluents with nonpurgeable organic carbon (NPOC) averaging approximately 50% lowerthan the NPOC concentrations in the influent contaminated groundwater. PMID:16570627

  10. Biomarkers of human exposure to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1993-01-01

    Three biomarkers for benzene exposure were developed. The first biomarker, muconic acid in urine, results from the ring opening of a benzene metabolite. A gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) assay was developed to measure urinary muconic acid, and the analyte in urine samples from workers occupationally exposed to benzene was determined. Workers exposed to benzene concentrations as low as 4.4 ppm over an 8-h day showed higher urinary muconic acid concentrations than did any control individual (p < .005). The second biomarker, S-phenylcysteine (SPC) in hemoglobin (Hb), results from the addition of benzene oxide to a cysteine sulfhydryl group. A GC/MS assay was developed to measure SPC in the blood of F344/N rats and B67C3F mice exposed to benzene by inhalation. The cysteine moiety on rat Hb is at a more accessible site than on Hb of mice or humans, and rats showed considerably higher levels of SPC than did mice. As yet, we have been unable to detect SPC in the globin of humans occupationally exposed to benzene. The third biomarker is SPC in albumin. In humans occupationally exposed to average concentrations of 0, 4.4, 8.4, and 23.1 ppm benzene, 8 h/d, 5 d/wk, SPC increased in the exposed groups linearly, giving a statistically significant slope (p < .001) of 0.044 [+-] 0.008 pmol/mg albumin/ppm. The assay for SPC is arduous and often imprecise; assuming these difficulties can be overcome, muconic acid in urine and SPC in albumin may be useful for accurately determining benzene exposure. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Geographical distribution of benzene in air in northwestern Italy and personal exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Gilli, G; Scursatone, E; Bono, R

    1996-01-01

    Benzene is a solvent strictly related to some industrial activities and to automotive emissions. After the reduction in lead content of fuel gasoline, and the consequent decrease in octane number, an increase in benzene and other aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline occurred. Therefore, an increase in the concentration of these chemicals in the air as primary pollutants and as precursors of photochemical smog could occur in the future. The objectives of this study were to describe the benzene air pollution at three sites in northwestern Italy throughout 1991 and 1994; to examine the relationship between benzene air pollution in indoor, outdoor, and personal air as measured by a group of nonsmoking university students; and to determine the influence of environmental tobacco smoke on the level of benzene exposure in indoor air environments. The results indicate a direct relationship between population density and levels of contamination; an indoor/outdoor ratio of benzene air pollution higher than 1 during day and night; a similar level of personal and indoor air contamination; and a direct relationship between levels of personal exposure to benzene and intensity of exposure to tobacco smoke. Human exposure to airborne benzene has been found to depend principally on indoor air contamination not only in the home but also in many other confined environments. PMID:9118883

  12. The effects of amine/nitro/hydroxyl groups on the benzene rings of redox additives on the electrochemical performance of carbon-based supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuan; Wang, Qian; Chen, Xiang Ying; Zhang, Zhong Jie

    2016-04-21

    In this work, a series of porous carbon materials with hierarchical porosities have been synthesized via a template carbonization method, in which cheap CaCO3 serves as a template and glucose as a carbon precursor. During the carbonization process, CO2 produced by the decomposition of the CaCO3 template can act as an internal activating agent, significantly improving microporosity and mesoporosity. All the carbon materials obtained by regulating the ratio of glucose to CaCO3 exhibit the amorphous features with a low graphitization degree. Among them, the carbon-1 : 2 sample shows a high BET surface area of up to 818.5 m(2) g(-1) and a large total pore volume of 1.78 cm(3) g(-1) as well as a specific capacitance of 107.0 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1). In addition, a series of hydroquinone (HQ), p-aminophenol (PAP) and p-nitrophenol (PNP) as novel redox additives that can produce pseudo-capacitances have been added into the KOH electrolyte for promoting the total capacitive performances via redox reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface. As expected, a 2.5-fold increase in the galvanostatic capacitance of 240.0 F g(-1) in the HQ-0.5 electrolyte occurs, compared with the conventional KOH electrolyte. Similarly, the PAP-0.5 electrolyte and the PNP-0.5 electrolyte also show a high specific capacitance of 184.0 F g(-1) at 2 A g(-1) (156.6 F g(-1) at 3 A g(-1)) and 153.0 F g(-1) at 3 A g(-1), respectively. Additionally, the three kinds of electrolytes exhibit excellent cyclic stability. The remarkable improvement of supercapacitors is attributed to the quick reversible Faradaic reactions of amine and hydroxyl groups adhering to the phenyl rings, which largely accelerates electron migration and brings additional pseudocapacitive contribution for carbon-based supercapacitors. PMID:27030290

  13. Benzene release. status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.; Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-11-04

    Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB `DEMO` formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study.

  14. Benzene contamination at a metal plating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, B. A.; Burston, M. R.

    2005-08-01

    A metal plating facility in central Kentucky was required to complete a RCRA Facility Investigation to address a number of Solid Waste Management Units at the site. Twenty monitoring wells were installed at the facility. Ground water from the wells was sampled for total and dissolved metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid extractable compounds, base neutral compounds, and volatile organic compounds. Unexpectedly, relatively large concentrations of benzene, up to 120 μg/l, were detected in samples from some of the wells, including wells that should have been hydraulically upgradient from the facility. As a result of the detection of benzene, the facility completed an investigation to identify the source. A nearby facility had completed a gasoline underground storage tank (UST) closure at about the time of the installation of the 20 wells. Reportedly the UST had small holes when removed. Three potential pathways of migration (a ditch, sanitary sewer, and a sink hole) from the nearby facility to the metal-plating facility and residual soils with very large concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes have been identified.

  15. Facts about Benzene

    MedlinePlus

    ... of benzene from tobacco smoke, gas stations, motor vehicle exhaust, and industrial emissions. Indoor air generally contains ... to anemia. Also, it can damage the immune system by changing blood levels of antibodies and causing ...

  16. Benzene Monitor System report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  17. Simulation: Gasoline Compression Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-13

    The Mira supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility helped Argonne researchers model what happens inside an engine when you use gasoline in a diesel engine. Engineers are exploring this type of combustion as a sustainable transportation option because it may be more efficient than traditional gasoline combustion engines but produce less soot than diesel.

  18. Study of absorption spectra of gasolines and other hydrocarbon mixtures in the second overtone region of the CH3, CH2, CH groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradov, V. G.; Sannikov, D. G.

    2007-03-01

    We have obtained experimental and model absorption spectra for individual hydrocarbons (toluene, benzene, n-heptane, and iso-octane) and their mixtures in the near IR range (λ = 1080 1220 nm). We model the spectra of nonsynthetic gasolines obtained under the same conditions by combining the spectra of three pure hydrocarbons. We show that the octane number of the studied gasoline is linearly related to the toluene (or benzene) concentrations in the model mixture.

  19. Fluid catalytic cracking catalyst for reformulated gasolines: Kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetto, A. ); Farag, H.I. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Blasetti, A.P. . Dept. de Procesos); Lasa, H.I. de . Faculty of Engineering Science)

    1994-12-01

    Changes of the relative importance of intradiffusion on USY zeolite crystals were studied as a way of affecting selectivity of catalytic cracking reactions. Zeolite crystals were synthesized (Si/Al = 2.4), activated and stabilized using ion exchange and steam calcination to obtain USSY (Ultra Stable Submicron Y) zeolites. After the activation the zeolites were pelletized (45--60 [mu]m particles). USSYs were tested in a novel Riser Simulator. Results obtained show that total aromatics (BTX), benzene, C[sub 4] olefins, and coke were significantly affected with the change of zeolite crystal sizes. Gasolines produced with USSY zeolites contain less aromatics and particularly lower benzene levels. Experimental results were analyzed with a model including several lumps: unconverted gas oil, gasoline, light gases, and coke. This model also accounts for catalyst deactivation as a function of coke on catalyst. Various kinetic parameters were determined with their corresponding spans for the 95% level of confidence.

  20. Permeation of gasoline, diesel, bioethanol (E85), and biodiesel (B20) fuels through six glove materials.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jo-Yu; Batterman, Stuart A

    2010-07-01

    Biofuels and conventional fuels differ in terms of their evaporation rates, permeation rates, and exhaust emissions, which can alter exposures of workers, especially those in the fuel refining and distribution industries. This study investigated the permeation of biofuels (bioethanol 85%, biodiesel 20%) and conventional petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel) through gloves used in occupational settings (neoprene, nitrile, and Viton) and laboratories (latex, nitrile, and vinyl), as well as a standard reference material (neoprene sheet). Permeation rates and breakthrough times were measured using the American Society for Testing and Materials F739-99 protocol, and fuel and permeant compositions were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, we estimated exposures for three occupational scenarios and recommend chemical protective clothing suitable for use with motor fuels. Permeation rates and breakthrough times depended on the fuel-glove combination. Gasoline had the highest permeation rate among the four fuels. Bioethanol (85%) had breakthrough times that were two to three times longer than gasoline through neoprene, nitrile Sol-Vex, and the standard reference materials. Breakthrough times for biodiesel (20%) were slightly shorter than for diesel for the latex, vinyl, nitrile examination, and the standard neoprene materials. The composition of permeants differed from neat fuels, e.g., permeants were significantly enriched in the lighter aromatics including benzene. Viton was the best choice among the tested materials for the four fuels tested. Among the scenarios, fuel truck drivers had the highest uptake via inhalation based on the personal measurements available in the literature, and gasoline station attendants had highest uptake via dermal exposure if gloves were not worn. Appropriate selection and use of gloves can protect workers from dermal exposures; however, current recommendations from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and

  1. State of the science on the carcinogenicity of gasoline with particular reference to cohort mortality study results

    SciTech Connect

    Infante, P.F.

    1993-12-01

    As a result of the content of benzene in various streams of refinery products, including gasoline, it is not surprising that over the years studies and case reports have linked gasoline exposure to lymphopoietic cancers (LPC), particularly leukemia and multiple myeloma (MM). Of three recently conducted studies of gasoline-exposed workers, one shows strong associations with leukemia and MM, a second suggests some association with leukemia and did not analyze data for MM, and the third study is not possible to evaluate because of a major problem with study design. Other diseases of particular interest in relation to gasoline exposure are kidney cancer, malignant melanoma, and heart disease. One study suggests an association with kidney cancer, but the second study did not. There appears to be no association between employment in refineries or gasoline exposure and heart disease. However, evaluation of risk of kidney cancer and heart disease is somewhat difficult because investigators did not control for cigarette smoking, even though it is related to these diseases. This is of particular concern when studying gasoline-exposed workers, who because of the explosive nature of gasoline probably smoke less than the general population used for comparison of mortality. Some studies of refinery workers and gasoline-exposed workers in particular show an excess risk of death from malignant melanoma. Whether this latter association is the result of benzene/gasoline exposure, sunlight exposure, or a combination of the two cannot be determined with the data currently available. The National Toxicology Program benzene cancer bioassay and the Dow Chemical Company epidemiologic study argue in favor of a benzene etiology; the fact that the workers spend a great amount of time outdoors argues in favor of a sunlight etiology. Finally, the American Petroleum Institute is challenged to apply warning labels and filling instructions to gasoline pumps and containers. 32 refs.

  2. Performance of an advanced immunoassay system for detecting benzene contamination in water

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, K.R.; McDonald, P.P.; Cohen, M.M.

    1995-09-01

    Usually found associated with leaking underground storage tanks, benzene is a serious risk to the general population when it impacts a nearby water supply. As a result of the threat it may pose, benzene must be monitored in drinking water and storm run-off, and is often used as a regulatory driver for leaking underground storage tank cleanups. Traditionally, benzene testing has been performed in a laboratory by GC. The costs associated with sending these samples to a laboratory are not limited to analytical efforts, but also include costs associated with downtime while waiting for results. EnSys has developed a benzene test that provides the user with a rapid, cost-effective alternative to GC testing--results are realized in 30 minutes in the field. The Benzene RIS{copyright}{reg_sign} Water Test detects benzene in ground water, surface water, drinking water and storm water. The test system is completely portable and can detect benzene in water down to 5 ppb. This paper will detail the field trial application of the immunoassay system at an Air Force Base. The site had previously been evaluated for gasoline contamination of ground water. Three sides of the gasoline plume had been identified, and the goal of the study was to determine the remaining border of contamination using the EnSys test system.

  3. Gasoline immersion injury

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.A.; Cruse, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical burns and pulmonary complications are the most common problems encountered in the patient immersed in gasoline. Our patient demonstrated a 46-percent total-body-surface area, partial-thickness chemical burn. Although he did not develop bronchitis or pneumonitis, he did display persistent atelectasis, laryngeal edema, and subsequent upper airway obstruction. This had not previously been reported in gasoline inhalation injuries. Hydrocarbon hepatitis secondary to the vascular endothelial damage is apparently a reversible lesion with no reported long-term sequelae. Gasoline immersion injuries may be a series multisystem injury and require the burn surgeon to take a multisystem approach to its diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Gasoline toxicology: overview of regulatory and product stewardship programs.

    PubMed

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    Significant efforts have been made to characterize the toxicological properties of gasoline. There have been both mandatory and voluntary toxicology testing programs to generate hazard characterization data for gasoline, the refinery process streams used to blend gasoline, and individual chemical constituents found in gasoline. The Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) is the primary tool for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate gasoline and this supplement presents the results of the Section 211(b) Alternative Tier 2 studies required for CAA Fuel and Fuel Additive registration. Gasoline blending streams have also been evaluated by EPA under the voluntary High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program through which the petroleum industry provide data on over 80 refinery streams used in gasoline. Product stewardship efforts by companies and associations such as the American Petroleum Institute (API), Conservation of Clean Air and Water Europe (CONCAWE), and the Petroleum Product Stewardship Council (PPSC) have contributed a significant amount of hazard characterization data on gasoline and related substances. The hazard of gasoline and anticipated exposure to gasoline vapor has been well characterized for risk assessment purposes. PMID:24956589

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Benzene (Noncancer Effects) (1998 External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene is a widely used as an industrial solvent, an intermediate in chemical synthesis of commercial products, and a component of gasoline. The potential for human exposure via inhalation, dermal, and oral routes is great under environmental and occupational situations. The U.S...

  6. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  7. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  8. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  9. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  10. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1604 - Gasoline sulfur standards and requirements for parties downstream of refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1604 Gasoline sulfur standards and requirements for parties downstream of refiners and importers. (a) The sulfur standard for gasoline at any downstream location shall be...

  12. Gasoline-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.L.; Swanson, B.Z. Jr.; Lutins, N.D.

    1980-02-01

    Gasoline-induced mucositis may become more common because of fuel shortages or increased fuel cost. Dentists should, therefore, consider this oral irritant in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

  13. Gasoline engine choking arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Armes, P.W.

    1987-10-13

    In combination with a gasoline engine including a fuel tank having a fuel inlet and outlet, an automatic choke is described having a pivotal choke butterfly plate, an air filter, and a rod mounting the air filter. A choking arrangement comprises means immobilizing the pivotal choke butterfly plate at an open position and means communicating with the fuel inlet selectively urging fuel passage from the fuel tank outlet during gasoline engine starting.

  14. Controlled field study on the use of nitrate and oxygen for bioremediation of a gasoline source zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, J.R.; Barker, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    Controlled releases of unleaded gasoline were utilized to evaluate the biotransformation of the soluble aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene isomers, trimethylbenzene isomers, and naphthalene) within a source zone using nitrate and oxygen as electron acceptors. Experiments were conducted within two 2 m ?? 2 m ?? 3.5 m deep sheet-piling cells. In each treatment cell, a gasoline-contaminated zone was created below the water table. Groundwater amended with electron acceptors was then flushed continuously through the cells for 174 day. Electron-acceptor utilization and hydrocarbon-metabolite formation were noted in both cells, indicating that some microbial activity had been induced in response to flushing. Relative to the cell residence time, nitrate utilization was slow and aromatic-hydrocarbon mass losses in response to microaerophilic dissolved oxygen addition were not obvious under these in situ conditions. There was relatively little biotransformation of the aromatic hydrocarbons over the 2-m flow path monitored in this experiment. A large denitrifying population capable of aromatic hydrocarbon biotransformation failed to develop within the gasoline source zone over a 14-mo period of nitrate exposure.

  15. Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The final rules adopted by the President for a Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan are presented. The plan provides that eligibility for ration allotments will be determined primarily on the basis of motor vehicle registrations, taking into account historical differences in the use of gasoline among states. The regulations also provide authority for supplemental allotments to firms so that their allotment will equal a specified percentage of gasoline use during a base period. Priority classifications, i.e., agriculture, defense, etc., are established to assure adequate gasoline supplies for designated essential services. Ration rights must be provided by end-users to their suppliers for each gallon sold. DOE will regulate the distribution of gasoline at the wholesale level according to the transfer by suppliers of redeemed ration rights and the gasoline allocation regulations. Ration rights are transferable. A ration banking system is created to facilitate transfers of ration rights. Each state will be provided with a reserve of ration rights to provide for hardship needs and to alleviate inequities. (DC)

  16. Gasolines as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Ma Pinto, R.; Sillero, A.

    1986-11-01

    Gasolines from several commercial sources have been used as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting of dry and aqueous samples of either /sup 3/H- or /sup 14/C-labeled compounds. Dry samples can be counted only by the addition of fluors to the gasolines, and compared to a standard liquid scintillator, efficiencies of around 75% were attained. For the counting of aqueous samples, gasolines must also be supplemented with secondary solvents (i.e., 10% naphthalene, 5% Triton X-100, or 10% methanol). Simply with Triton X-100, efficiencies similar to those obtained with a dioxane-based liquid scintillator were observed in the case of some gasolines. Drawbacks to gasoline are the higher toxicity and the variation of efficiency, probably depending on the presence of color markers. On the positive side is the low price of the gasolines, compared with either toluene or dioxane, and the facility of purchasing.

  17. Phase Partitioning from Theanol Blend Gasolines

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, the use of ethanol and other alcohols as motor fuel additives has increased. Additionally, ethanol production has expanded due to the potential use of ethanol as a primary fuel source. Historical patterns of gasoline composition show strong dependency on regulato...

  18. Pollutant emissions from gasoline combustion. 1. Dependence on fuel structural functionalities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongzhi R; Eddings, Eric G; Sarofim, Adel F

    2008-08-01

    To study the formation of air pollutants and soot precursors (e.g., acetylene, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and higher aromatics) from aliphatic and aromatic fractions of gasoline fuels, the Utah Surrogate Mechanisms is extended to include submechanisms of gasoline surrogate compounds using a set of mechanism generation techniques. The mechanism yields very good predictions of species concentrations in premixed flames of n-heptane, isooctane, benzene, cyclohexane, olefins, oxygenates, and gasoline using a 23-component surrogate formulation. The 1,3-butadiene emission comes mainly from minor fuel fractions of olefins and cyclohexane. The benzene formation potential of gasoline components shows the following trends as functions of (i) chemical class: n-paraffins < isoparaffins < olefins < naphthalenes < alkylbenzenes < cycloparaffins < toluene; (ii) carbon number: n-butane < n-pentane < n-hexane; and (iii) branching: n-hexane < isohexane < 2,2,4-trimethylpentane < 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane. In contrast, fuel structure is not the main factor in determining acetylene formation. Therefore, matching the benzene formation potential of the surrogate fuel to that produced by the real fuel should have priority when selecting candidate surrogate components for combustion simulations. PMID:18754484

  19. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL (TBA) IN GROUND WATER AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The state agencies that implement the Underground Storage Tank program rely heavily on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) to clean up contaminants such as benzene and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) at gasoline spill sites. This is possible because the contaminants are biolo...

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF THE GASOLINE OXYGENATE ETHANOL ON AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC BTX BIODEGRADATION. (R823420)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is frequently found along with benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) in groundwater contaminated with gasoline. Yet, little is known about its effect on bioremediation of the toxic BTX contaminants. Aquifer microcosms were used to investigate the effect of ethanol on microb...

  1. Consecutive C[subscript 60] Fullerene Dissociation from Ir([eta][superscript 2]-C[subscript 60])(CO)(Cl)(PPh[subscript 3])[subscript 2] and the Oxidative Addition of Benzene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felix, Tamara; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.

    2010-01-01

    This laboratory activity is a mechanistic exploration of the interactions between electronically deficient organometallic compounds and solvent molecules. Simple kinetics experiments designed to explore the mechanism of C[subscript 60] fullerene-benzene exchange on Ir(([eta][superscript 2]-C[subscript 60])(CO)(Cl)(PPh[subscript 3])[subscript 2]…

  2. Fate of gasoline oxygenates in conventional and multilevel wells of a contaminated groundwater table in Düsseldorf, Germany.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Monica; Lacorte, Sílvia; Forner, Claudia; Rohns, Hans-Peter; Irmscher, Rudolf; Barceló, Damià

    2005-11-01

    In a gasoline-contaminated site in Düsseldorf, Germany a two-year monitoring program was carried out to determine the presence, behavior, and fate of 12 gasoline additives in a total of 96 samples from 14 groundwater wells. The origin of contamination was suspected to be a gasoline spill at a gas station. Target compounds were methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), its main degradation products, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and tert-butyl formate (TBF); other gasoline additives, oxygenate dialkyl ethers: Ethyl-tert-butyl ether (ETBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE); aromatics: Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX), and other compounds causing odor problems: Dicyclopentadiene and trichloroethylene. Purge and trap coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry permitted detection of ng/L concentrations. Ninety of the 96 samples analyzed contained MTBE at levels varying between 0.01 to 645 microg/L. Five contaminated hot spots were identified with levels up to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) drinking water advisory values (20-40 microg/L) and one of them doubling Danish suggested toxicity level of 350 microg/L at a depth of 11 m. No significant natural attenuation was found in MTBE degradation, although samples with high levels of MTBE contained 0.1 to 440 microg/L of TBA. These levels were attributed to its presence in the contamination source more than MTBE degradation. tert-Butyl alcohol was found to be recalcitrant in groundwater. In all cases, BTEX were at low concentrations or not detected, showing less persistence than MTBE. The monitoring of the contamination plume showed that the distribution of the MTBE and TBA in the aquifer formed a similar vertical concentration profile that was influenced by the groundwater flow direction. PMID:16398114

  3. 40 CFR 80.66 - Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties. 80.66 Section 80.66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.66 Calculation...

  4. 40 CFR 80.66 - Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties. 80.66 Section 80.66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.66 Calculation...

  5. Dehydrogenation of benzene on Pt(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W.; Zheng, W. T.; Jiang, Q.

    2008-10-01

    The dehydrogenation of benzene on Pt(111) surface is studied by ab initio density functional theory. The minimum energy pathways for benzene dehydrogenation are found with the nudge elastic band method including several factors of the associated barriers, reactive energies, intermediates, and transient states. The results show that there are two possible parallel minimum energy pathways on the Pt(111) surface. Moreover, the tilting angle of the H atom in benzene can be taken as an index for the actual barrier of dehydrogenation. In addition, the properties of dehydrogenation radicals on the Pt(111) surface are explored through their adsorption energy, adsorption geometry, and electronic structure on the surface. The vibrational frequencies of the dehydrogenation radicals derived from the calculations are in agreement with literature data.

  6. An overview of benzene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.; Hedli, C.C.

    1996-12-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities; associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. 52 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. An overview of benzene metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Hedli, C C

    1996-01-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. PMID:9118888

  8. Identifying the usage patterns of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and other oxygenates in gasoline using gasoline surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, M.J.; Clawges, R.M.; Zogorski, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Data on the volumes of oxygenates and other compounds in gasoline are available from several sources collectively referred as gasoline surveys. The gasoline surveys provide the most definitive knowledge of which oxygenate, if any, and what volumes of that oxygenate are being used in various areas of the country. This information is important in water-quality assessments for relating the detection of MTBE in water to patterns of usage of MTBE in gasoline. General information on three surveys that have been conducted by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association, and the EPA was presented. The samples were tested for physical properties and constituents including octane number, specific gravity, and volumes of olefins, aromatics, benzene, alcohols, and various ether oxygenates. The data in each survey had its own utility based on the type of assessment that is undertaken. Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Using NAWQA data, the percent occurrence of MTBE in ground water in metropolitan areas that use substantial amounts of MTBE (> 5% by vol) was ??? 21%, compared to ??? 2% in areas that do not use substantial amounts of MTBE (< 5% by vol). When several other factors are considered in a logistic regression model including MTBE usage in RFG or OXY gasoline areas (??? 3% by vol) as a factor, a 4-6 fold increase in the detection frequency of MTBE in ground water was found when compared to areas that do not use MTBE or use it only for octane enhancement (< 3% by vol).

  9. Desulfurization of gasoline.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, J E

    1975-01-01

    Although gasoline blending streams exhibit widely varying sulfur concentrations, significant quantities of low-sulfur motor gasoline cannot be manufactured by reallocation of existing components without substantial sacrifices in the useful properties of the remaining fuels having normal sulfur levels. To meet the anticipated demand for low-sulfur unleaded gasoline which may be required for catalyst-equipped automobiles it will be necessary to install process equipment based on known hydrotreating technology. The effects which this construction program would exert on the activities, abilities and needs of one petroleum refiner are sketched for two degrees of sulfur removal. The impacts of installing the process facilities which would be necessary are discussed in terms of time requirements, capital needs, and added energy expenditures. PMID:1157782

  10. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  11. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur... gasoline. The requirements of this section apply to any refiner approved for small refiner standards...

  12. 40 CFR 80.78 - Controls and prohibitions on reformulated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reformulated gasoline. 80.78 Section 80.78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.78 Controls and prohibitions on reformulated gasoline. (a) Prohibited activities. (1) No person may...

  13. 40 CFR 80.810 - Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.810 Section 80.810 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics General Information § 80.810 Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Refiners and...

  14. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  15. 40 CFR 80.810 - Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.810 Section 80.810 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics General Information § 80.810 Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Refiners and...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  18. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  20. 40 CFR 80.810 - Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.810 Section 80.810 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics General Information § 80.810 Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Refiners and...

  1. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  2. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  7. 40 CFR 80.810 - Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.810 Section 80.810 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics General Information § 80.810 Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Refiners and...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  9. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  11. A Classroom Demonstration of Water-Induced Phase Separation of Alcohol-Gasoline Biofuel Blends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Sherry A.; Anderson, James E.; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    A significant issue associated with ethanol-gasoline blends is the phase separation that occurs with the addition of small volumes of water, producing an ethanol-deficient gasoline layer and an ethanol-rich aqueous layer. The gasoline layer may have a lower-than-desired octane rating due to the decrease in ethanol content, resulting in engine…

  12. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  13. 40 CFR 80.810 - Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.810 Section 80.810 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics General Information § 80.810 Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Refiners and...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  16. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  17. 40 CFR 80.46 - Measurement of reformulated gasoline fuel parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Measurement of reformulated gasoline fuel parameters. 80.46 Section 80.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.46 Measurement of reformulated gasoline...

  18. 40 CFR 80.46 - Measurement of reformulated gasoline fuel parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement of reformulated gasoline fuel parameters. 80.46 Section 80.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.46 Measurement of reformulated gasoline...

  19. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  20. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  1. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  2. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  3. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  4. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  5. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  6. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  7. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1603 - Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1603 Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers. (a) Sulfur standards—(1) Annual average standard....

  9. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  10. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  11. Comparative performance study of spark ignition engines burning alcohols, gasoline, and alcohol-gasoline blends

    SciTech Connect

    Desoky, A.A.; Rabie, L.H.

    1983-12-01

    In recent years it has been clear that the reserves of oil, from which petrol is refined, are becoming limited. In order to conserve these stocks of oil, and to minimize motoring costs as the price of dwindling oil resources escalates, it's obviously desirable to improve the thermal efficiency of the spark ignition engine. There are also obvious benefits to be obtained from making spark ignition engines run efficiently on alternative fuel, (non-crude based fuel). It has been claimed that hydrogen is an ideal fuel for the internal combustion engine it certainly causes little pollution, but is difficult to store, high in price, and difficult to burn efficiently in the engine without it knocking and backfiring. These problems arise because of the very wide flammability limits and the very high flame velocity of hydrogen. Alcohols used an additive or substitute for gasoline could immediately help to solve both energy and pollution problems. An experimental tests were carried out at Mansoura University Laboratories using a small single cylinder SIE, fully instrumented to measure the engine performance. The engine was fueled with pure methonol, pure ethonol, gasoline methanol blends and gasaline ethanol blends. The results showed that in principle, from kechnological aspects it's possible to use alcohols as a gasoline extender or as alcohol's gasoline, blends for automobiles. With regard to energy consumptions alcohols and alcohols gasoline blends lead to interesting results. The fuel economy benefits of using alcohols gasoline blends was found to be interesting in the part throltle operation.

  12. [Unregulated emissions from the gasoline vehicle].

    PubMed

    You, Qiu-Wen; Ge, Ytun-Shan; You, Ke-Wei; Wang, Jun-Fang; He, Chao

    2009-02-15

    Based on the emission test cycle of China National Regulation Stage III, the aldehyde and alkone emissions and VOCs emissions of three typical gasoline cars were studied with HPLC and TD-GC/MS and the exhausted particulates number and mass concentration were researched using ELPI. The results indicate that the unregulated emissions of different cars is diverse changed, the brake specific emission of the carbonyls in three cars are 36.44, 16.71 and 10.43 mg/km respectively and TVOC are 155.39, 103.75 and 42.29 mg/km respectively. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, acetone and cyclohexanone are the main compounds in gasoline cars exhaust, which accounted for 77.9%-89.7% of total carbonyl compounds. Aromatic hydrocarbons and alkane are the main part of VOCs, the detected number of which is occupied 31.6%-39.2% and 23.1%-27.9% of VOCs. Toluene, xylene and benzene have high concentration, which are occupied 16.68%, 16.87% and 5.23% of TVOC in average. Ultra-fine particles (< 100 nm) dominate the particulates emission. Exhausted particulate number of high speeds is higher than that of slow and medium speeds. PMID:19402478

  13. Reformulated gasoline study, executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.E.; Michalski, G.W.; Baron, R.E.; Lyons, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of adopting alternative standards for reformulated gasoline (RFG) in New York State has been studied for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (the Energy Authority). In addition to Federal RFG (EPA 1) and EPA II, California Air Resources Board RFG (CARB 2) and a modified Federal low sulfur RFG (LS-EPA II) were investigated. The effects of these alternative RFGs on petroleum refinery gasoline production costs, gasoline distribution costs, New York State air quality and the New York State economy were considered. New York has already adopted the California low emission vehicle (LEV) and other emission control programs that will affect vehicles and maintenance. From 1998 to 2012 without the introduction of any type of RFG, these programs are estimated to reduce New York State mobile source summer emissions by 341 tons per day (or 40%) of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and by 292 tons per day (or 28%) of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and to reduce winter emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) by 3,072 tons per day (or 39%). By 2012, the planned imposition of Federal RFG will produce further reductions (percent of 1998 levels) of 10 %, 4 % and 11%, respectively, for NMHC, NO{sub x} and CO. If New York State goes beyond EPA II and adopts CARB 2 specifications, further reductions achieved in 2012 are estimated to be very small, equaling 2% or less of 1998 levels of NMHC and NO{sub x} emissions, while CO emissions would actually increase by about 2%. When compared to EPA II over the same time frame, LS-EPA II would produce negligible (less than 1%) reductions in each of the above emissions categories.

  14. Effect of Hydrologic and Geochemical Conditions on Oxygen-Enhanced Bioremediation in a Gasoline-Contaminated Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of pre-existing factors, e.g., hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological properties, on the results of oxygen addition to a reformulated gasoline-contaminated groundwater system was studied. Oxygen addition with an oxygen-release compound (a proprietary form of magnesium peroxide produced different results with respect to dissolved oxygen (DO) generation and contaminant decrease in the two locations. Oxygen-release compound injected at the former UST source area did not significantly change measured concentrations of DO, benzene, toluene, or MTBE. Conversely, oxygen-release compound injected 200 m downgradient of the former UST source area rapidly increased DO levels, and benzene, toluene, and MTBE concentrations decreased substantially. The different results could be related to differences in hydrologic and geochemical conditions that characterized the two locations prior to oxygen addition. The lack of recharge to ground water in the paved UST source area led to a much larger geochemical sink for DO compared to ground water in the unpaved area.

  15. Benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emissions of 4-stroke motorbikes: Benefits and risks of the current TWC technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxer, Christian J.; Forss, Anna-Maria; Rüdy, Claudio; Heeb, Norbert V.

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been applied to determine benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emission rates of 4-stroke motorbikes. Extra emissions and duration of the cold start were deduced from the legislative urban driving cycle. The Common Artemis driving cycle was investigated to study the emission characteristics at transient driving from 0 to 135 km h -1. In addition, the benefits and risks of the currently available 3-way catalyst technology (TWC) are explored. Benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene cold start emissions of 230-290, 920-980 and 950-1270 mg start -1 were obtained for the TWC motorbikes, exceeding those without catalyst by more than a factor of 3. At hot engine/catalyst, benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emission factors in the range of 10-140, 10-160 and 10-170 mg km -1 were found for the TWC motorbikes. Without catalyst, the corresponding emission factors were higher, varying from 40 to 260, 100 to 500 and 110 to 480 mg km -1, respectively. A comparison with the latest passenger car technology, with reported aromatic hydrocarbon (HC) emission factors of 0.2-3.0 mg km -1, revealed that the investigated 4-stroke motorbikes, indeed, are an important source of air pollution. Furthermore, cold start duration, driving distance under cold start influence and velocity dependence of aromatic HC emissions were deduced from time-resolved data. In addition, variations of aromatic HC mixing ratios were studied. Narrow and unimodal distributions of, e.g. benzene/C 2-benzene mixing ratios with median values of 0.46-0.73 were found for all motorbikes but one. This motorcycle, equipped with a TWC, showed a broad and bimodal distribution with a median mixing ratio of 1.47. Catalyst-induced formation of benzene from alkylbenzenes is the assumed process, leading to increased benzene/alkylbenzene mixing ratios.

  16. Dangerous and cancer-causing properties of products and chemicals in the oil refining and petrochemical industry. VIII. Health effects of motor fuels: Carcinogenicity of gasoline--scientific update

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlman, M.A. )

    1992-10-01

    Significant increases in tumors of kidney, liver, and other tissues and organs following exposure to gasoline provide sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity. Benzene, a significant component of gasoline, has been established without question as a human carcinogen by IARC, EPA, and WHO. 1,3-Butadiene, a component of gasoline, is a powerful carcinogen in both animals and humans. Sufficient evidence for the carcinogenicity of alkyl benzenes, very significant components of gasoline, has also been established. Human epidemiologic studies show important increases in cancers of the kidney, stomach, brain, pancreas, prostate, lung, and skin as well as hematopoietic and lymphatic leukemias as a result of exposure to gasoline, its components, and its vapors. Stage 2 controls are being implemented to reduce exposure of the human population to gasoline vapors. 59 refs.

  17. Benzene oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Coates, J.D.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Highly reduced sediments from San Diego Bay, Calif., that were incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions metabolized benzene within 55 days when they were exposed initially to I ??M benzene. The rate of benzene metabolism increased as benzene was added back to the benzene-adapted sediments. When a [14C]benzene tracer was included with the benzene added to benzene-adapted sediments, 92% of the added radioactivity was recovered as 14CO2. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, inhibited benzene uptake and production of 14CO2 from [14C]benzene. Benzene metabolism stopped when the sediments became sulfate depleted, and benzene uptake resumed when sulfate was added again. The stoichiometry of benzene uptake and sulfate reduction was consistent with the hypothesis that sulfate was the principal electron acceptor for benzene oxidation. Isotope trapping experiments performed with [14C]benzene revealed that there was no production of such potential extracellular intermediates of benzene oxidation as phenol, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, cyclohexane, catechol, and acetate. The results demonstrate that benzene can be oxidized in the absence of O2, with sulfate serving as the electron acceptor, and suggest that some sulfate reducers are capable of completely oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide without the production of extracellular intermediates. Although anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to chelated Fe(III) has been documented previously, the study reported here provides the first example of a natural sediment compound that can serve as an electron acceptor for anaerobic benzene oxidation.

  18. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D.; Beckenbach, E.; Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R.; Dooher, B.

    1996-11-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites.

  19. Reactive ring-opened aldehyde metabolites in benzene hematotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Witz, G; Zhang, Z; Goldstein, B D

    1996-01-01

    The hematotoxicity of benzene is mediated by reactive benzene metabolites and possibly by other intermediates including reactive oxygen species. We previously hypothesized that ring-opened metabolites may significantly contribute to benzene hematotoxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, our studies initially demonstrated that benzene is metabolized in vitro to trans-trans-muconaldehyde (MUC), a reactive six-carbon diene dialdehyde, and that MUC is toxic to the bone marrow in a manner similar to benzene. Benzene toxicity most likely involves interactions among several metabolites that operate by different mechanisms to produce more than one biological effect. Our studies indicate that MUC coadministered with hydroquinone is a particularly potent metabolite combination that causes bone marrow damage, suggesting that the involvement of ring-opened metabolites in benzene toxicity may be related to their biological effects in combination with other benzene metabolites. Studies in our laboratory and by others indicate that MUC is metabolized to a variety of compounds by oxidation or reduction of the aldehyde groups. The aldehydic MUC metabolite 6-hydroxy-trans-trans-2,4-hexadienal (CHO-M-OH), similar to MUC but to a lesser extent, is reactive toward glutathione, mutagenic in V79 cells, and hematotoxic in mice. It is formed by monoreduction of MUC, a process that is reversible and could be of biological significance in benzene bone marrow toxicity. The MUC metabolite 6-hydroxy-trans-trans-2,4-hexadienoic (COOH-M-OH) is an end product of MUC metabolism in vitro. Our studies indicate that COOH-M-OH is a urinary metabolite of benzene in mice, a finding that provides further indirect evidence for the in vivo formation of MUC from benzene. Mechanistic studies showed the formation of cis-trans-muconaldehyde in addition to MUC from benzene incubated in a hydroxyl radical-generating Fenton system. These results suggest that the benzene ring is initially opened to cis

  20. Risk of cancer as a result of community exposure to gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami S; Talbott, Evelyn O; Zborowski, Jeanne V; Rycheck, Juley A; Dell, Danielle; Xu, Xiaohui; Schwerha, Joseph

    2004-10-01

    The Tranguch Gasoline Spill leaked 50,000-900,000 gallons of gasoline from underground storage tanks, potentially exposing an area of Hazle Township and Hazleton, Pennsylvania, to chronic low levels of benzene since at least 1990. A retrospective cohort study of 663 individuals representing 275 households assessed whether affected residents were at increased risk for cancer from 1990-2000 compared with the Pennsylvania populace. Age-adjusted standard incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated using Pennsylvania rates to determine expected numbers. The age-adjusted SIR for the gasoline-affected area was 4.40 (95% confidence interval: 1.09-10.24) for leukemia. These results suggest an association between living within the area affected by the Tranguch Gasoline Spill and increased risk for leukemia. PMID:16425659

  1. Influence of benzene emission from motorcycle on Bangkok air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Shing Tet; Muttamara, S.; Laortanakul, Preecha

    This study investigated the influence of benzene concentration from motorcycle exhaust emissions on ambient air quality in Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). Measurement of benzene concentration in exhaust emissions is performed on a standard test driving cycle through which each motorcycle to be tested is driven. The test result revealed that average benzene concentrations in exhaust emission for the test motorcycles ranged from 3.02 to 109.68 mg/m 3. The finding also indicated that two-stroke motorcycles emitted five times more benzene than that of four-stroke motorcycles. Four air monitoring sites were strategically established to determine the relationship between average benzene concentrations with different traffic configurations in each traffic zone of BMR during peak/non-peak hours, day/night times and weekday/weekend. The shape of the curve for benzene level usually shows two peaks corresponding to the morning and evening traffic rush or commuter rush hours. The finding shows that the mean concentrations for benzene in all monitoring stations in the ambient air for peak hours (07:00-09:00 and 16:00-18:00 h) ranged from 15.1 to 42.4 μg/m 3. For non-peak hour (11:30-15:00 h), benzene levels were found in the range 16.3-30.9 μg/m 3. It is observed that higher levels of benzene are found among roadside stations with slow moving traffic while lower levels are found among roadside stations with fast traffic movement. Additional factors such as temperature, wind speed, rainfall, etc. are also considered in this study to determine the relationship between traffic conditions and ambient benzene levels.

  2. Assessment of Summer 1997 motor gasoline price increase

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    Gasoline markets in 1996 and 1997 provided several spectacular examples of petroleum market dynamics. The first occurred in spring 1996, when tight markets, following a long winter of high demand, resulted in rising crude oil prices just when gasoline prices exhibit their normal spring rise ahead of the summer driving season. Rising crude oil prices again pushed gasoline prices up at the end of 1996, but a warm winter and growing supplies weakened world crude oil markets, pushing down crude oil and gasoline prices during spring 1997. The 1996 and 1997 spring markets provided good examples of how crude oil prices can move gasoline prices both up and down, regardless of the state of the gasoline market in the United States. Both of these spring events were covered in prior Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports. As the summer of 1997 was coming to a close, consumers experienced yet another surge in gasoline prices. Unlike the previous increase in spring 1996, crude oil was not a factor. The late summer 1997 price increase was brought about by the supply/demand fundamentals in the gasoline markets, rather than the crude oil markets. The nature of the summer 1997 gasoline price increase raised questions regarding production and imports. Given very strong demand in July and August, the seemingly limited supply response required examination. In addition, the price increase that occurred on the West Coast during late summer exhibited behavior different than the increase east of the Rocky Mountains. Thus, the Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) 5 region needed additional analysis (Appendix A). This report is a study of this late summer gasoline market and some of the important issues surrounding that event.

  3. BENZENE OXIDE PROTEIN ADDUCTS AS BIOMARKERS OF BENZENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene is known to be hematotoxic and carcinogenic in animals and humans. While metabolism is required for toxicity, the identity of the ultimate carcinogen(s) remains unknown. Benzene oxide (BO) is the first and most abundant of the metabolites, but very little is known about...

  4. Effect of oxygenates blending with gasoline to improve fuel properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazadeh Shayan, Soheil; Seyedpour, Seyed Morteza; Ommi, Fathollah

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of oxygenate additives into gasoline for the improvement of physicochemical properties of blends. Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE), Methanol, Tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA), and Tertiary amyl alcohol (TAA) blend into unleaded gasoline with various blended rates of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. Physicochemical properties of blends are analyzed by the standard American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) methods. Methanol, TBA, and TAA increase density of the mixtures, but MTBE decreases density. The addition of oxygenates lead to a distortion of the base gasoline's distillation curves. The Reid vapor pressure (RVP) of gasoline is found to increase with the addition of the oxygenated compounds. All oxygenates improve both motor and research octane numbers. Among these four additives, TBA shows the best fuel properties.

  5. Hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, M. )

    1989-07-01

    The hematotoxicity of benzene exposure has been well known for a century. Benzene causes leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, etc. The clinical and hematologic picture of aplastic anemia resulting from benzene exposure is not different from classical aplastic anemia; in some cases, mild bilirubinemia, changes in osmotic fragility, increase in lactic dehydrogenase and fecal urobilinogen, and occasionally some neurological abnormalities are found. Electromicroscopic findings in some cases of aplastic anemia with benzene exposure were similar to those observed by light microscopy. Benzene hepatitis-aplastic anemia syndrome was observed in a technician with benzene exposure. Ten months after occurrence of hepatitis B, a severe aplastic anemia developed. The first epidemiologic study proving the leukemogenicity of benzene was performed between 1967 and 1973 to 1974 among shoe workers in Istanbul. The incidence of leukemia was 13.59 per 100,000, which is a significant increase over that of leukemia in the general population. Following the prohibition and discontinuation of the use of benzene in Istanbul, there was a striking decrease in the number of leukemic shoe workers in Istanbul. In 23.7% of the series, consisting of 59 leukemic patients with benzene exposure, there was a preceding pancytopenic period. Furthermore, a familial connection was found in 10.2% of them. The 89.8% of the series showed the findings of acute leukemia. The possible factors that may determine the types of leukemia in benzene toxicity are discussed. The possible role of benzene exposure is presented in the development of malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and lung cancer.

  6. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  8. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  9. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  13. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  14. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  15. Dissolution of multi-component LNAPL gasolines: the effects of weathering and composition.

    PubMed

    Lekmine, Greg; Bastow, Trevor P; Johnston, Colin D; Davis, Greg B

    2014-05-01

    The composition of light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) gasoline and other petroleum products changes profoundly over their life once released into aquifers. However limited attention has been given to how such changes affect key parameters such as the activity coefficients which control partitioning of components of petroleum fuel into groundwater and are used to predict long-term risk from fuel releases. Laboratory experiments were conducted on a range of fresh, weathered and synthetic gasoline mixtures designed to mimic the expected changes in composition in an aquifer. Weathered gasoline created under controlled evaporation and water washing, and naturally weathered gasoline, were investigated. Equilibrium concentrations in water and molar fractions in the gasoline mixtures were compared with equilibrium concentrations predicted by Raoult's law assuming ideal behaviour of the solutions. The experiments carried out allowed the relative sensitivity of the activity coefficients of key risk drivers such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) compounds to be quantified with respect to the presence of other types of compounds and where the source LNAPL had undergone different types of weathering. Results differed for the mixtures examined but in some cases higher than predicted dissolved equilibrium concentrations showed non-ideal behaviour for toluene, benzene and xylenes. Comparison of the activity coefficients showed that the naturally weathered gasoline and a 50% evaporated unleaded gasoline present a similar range of values varying between 1.0 and 1.2, suggesting close to ideal partitioning between the LNAPL and water. The fresh and water-washed gasoline had higher values for the activity coefficient, from 1.2 to 1.4, indicating non-ideal partitioning. Results from synthetic mixtures demonstrated that these differences could be due to the different molar fractions of the nC5 and nC6 aliphatic hydrocarbons acting on the molecular interactions

  16. Dissolution of multi-component LNAPL gasolines: The effects of weathering and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekmine, Greg; Bastow, Trevor P.; Johnston, Colin D.; Davis, Greg B.

    2014-05-01

    The composition of light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) gasoline and other petroleum products changes profoundly over their life once released into aquifers. However limited attention has been given to how such changes affect key parameters such as the activity coefficients which control partitioning of components of petroleum fuel into groundwater and are used to predict long-term risk from fuel releases. Laboratory experiments were conducted on a range of fresh, weathered and synthetic gasoline mixtures designed to mimic the expected changes in composition in an aquifer. Weathered gasoline created under controlled evaporation and water washing, and naturally weathered gasoline, were investigated. Equilibrium concentrations in water and molar fractions in the gasoline mixtures were compared with equilibrium concentrations predicted by Raoult's law assuming ideal behaviour of the solutions. The experiments carried out allowed the relative sensitivity of the activity coefficients of key risk drivers such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) compounds to be quantified with respect to the presence of other types of compounds and where the source LNAPL had undergone different types of weathering. Results differed for the mixtures examined but in some cases higher than predicted dissolved equilibrium concentrations showed non-ideal behaviour for toluene, benzene and xylenes. Comparison of the activity coefficients showed that the naturally weathered gasoline and a 50% evaporated unleaded gasoline present a similar range of values varying between 1.0 and 1.2, suggesting close to ideal partitioning between the LNAPL and water. The fresh and water-washed gasoline had higher values for the activity coefficient, from 1.2 to 1.4, indicating non-ideal partitioning. Results from synthetic mixtures demonstrated that these differences could be due to the different molar fractions of the nC5 and nC6 aliphatic hydrocarbons acting on the molecular interactions

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase: ethanol, gasoline and ethanol - gasoline predicted by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Neto, A F G; Lopes, F S; Carvalho, E V; Huda, M N; Neto, A M J C; Machado, N T

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study using density functional theory to calculate thermodynamics properties of major molecules compounds at gas phase of fuels like gasoline, ethanol, and gasoline-ethanol mixture in thermal equilibrium on temperature range up to 1500 K. We simulated a composition of gasoline mixture with ethanol for a thorough study of thermal energy, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, entropy, heat capacity at constant pressure with respect to temperature in order to study the influence caused by ethanol as an additive to gasoline. We used semi-empirical computational methods as well in order to know the efficiency of other methods to simulate fuels through this methodology. In addition, the ethanol influence through the changes in percentage fractions of chemical energy released in combustion reaction and the variations on thermal properties for autoignition temperatures of fuels was analyzed. We verified how ethanol reduces the chemical energy released by gasoline combustion and how at low temperatures the gas phase fuels in thermal equilibrium have similar thermodynamic behavior. Theoretical results were compared with experimental data, when available, and showed agreement. Graphical Abstract Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase. PMID:26386958

  18. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  19. Production of reformulated gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.J.; Raghuram, S.

    1992-08-04

    This patent describes a process combination for producing a gasoline component from a naphtha feedstock. It comprises: contacting the naphtha feedstock in a reforming zone at reforming conditions with a reforming catalyst comprising a Group VIII metal on a refractory support to produce a reformate and a hydrogen-rich gas; separating the reformate, in a first separation zone, into a light hydrocarbon product and a heavy reformate; separating the heavy reformate, in a second separation zone, into a low-octane paraffin fraction and an aromatic-rich fraction; contacting a low-octane paraffin fraction in a paraffin-isomerization zone at primary isomerization conditions with a paraffin-isomerizing catalyst to produce an isomerized heavy-paraffin product; and, combining at least a portion of each of the aromatic-rich fraction and the isomerized heavy-paraffin product to produce the gasoline component.

  20. 26 CFR 48.4081-4 - Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks..., Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4081-4 Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks... gasoline blendstocks. Generally, under prescribed conditions, tax is not imposed on gasoline...

  1. Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.

    1994-02-01

    Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

  2. Law and regulation of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Feitshans, I L

    1989-01-01

    OSHA has created final benzene regulations after extensive rulemakings on two occasions, 1978 and 1987. These standards have been the subject of extensive litigation for nearly 20 years. This article examines in detail the conceptual underpinnings of the Benzene Case, (which was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1980) in light of U.S. administrative law precedents that have set limits upon administrative discretion under the test for "substantial evidence" and the "hard look doctrine." This article also addresses recent developments in the wake of the Benzene Case and their implications for benzene regulations following the "significant risk" doctrine in that case. This article briefly describes other national, regional, and international laws governing the use of benzene. This article concludes that the revisions of the benzene regulation and subsequent rulemaking provide substantial evidence of scientific underpinnings for regulatory action and that laws from other nations reflect an international consensus that occupational exposure to benzene is a proper subject of regulation. Such regulations and policies are therefore likely to withstand scrutiny and remain enforceable as widely accepted norms. PMID:2792048

  3. Species profiles and normalized reactivity of volatile organic compounds from gasoline evaporation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Zhou; Lü, Sujun; Shao, Min; Lee, Frank S. C.; Yu, Jianzhen

    2013-11-01

    In China, fast increase in passenger cars and gasoline consumption with yet quite limited vapor recovery during gasoline distribution has procured growing concern about gasoline evaporation as an important emission source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particularly in megacities hard-hit by air quality problems. This study presents VOC species profiles related to major pathways of gasoline evaporative loss in China, including headspace displacement, refueling operations and spillage/leakage. Apart from liquid gasoline and headspace vapors, gasoline vapors emitted when refueling cars in service stations or tank trucks in oil marketing depots were also sampled in situ with vapor recovery units (VRUs) turning on/off. Alkanes, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons accounted for 55-66, 21-35 and 4-8% in refueling vapors, 59-72, 18-28 and 4-10% in headspace vapors and 33-51, 8-15 and 38-48% in liquid gasoline samples, respectively. During refueling with VRUs turning on, total VOCs in vapors were less than one fifth of that with VRUs turning off, and aromatic hydrocarbons had higher weight percentages of about 8% in contrast with that of about 4% during refueling with VRUs turning off. Refueling vapors, especially for that with VRUs turning off, showed a larger fraction of light hydrocarbons including C3-C5 light alkenes when compared to headspace vapors, probably due to splashing and disturbance during filling operation. In refueling or headspace vapors the ratios of i-pentane/benzene, i-pentane/toluene, and MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether)/benzene ranged 8.7-57, 2.7-4.8, and 1.9-6.6, respectively; and they are distinctively much higher than those previously reported in vehicle exhausts. Calculated normalized reactivity or ozone formation potential of the gasoline vapors in China ranged 3.3-4.4 g O3 g-1 VOC, about twice that of gasoline headspace vapors reported in USA as a result of larger fractions of alkenes in China's gasoline vapors. The results suggested that

  4. Microbial degradation of benzene and toluene in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, U.; Frankenberger, W.T. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    Certain organic pollutants reaching the groundwater are subject to biotransformations. Currently, remedial measures promoting microbial degradation of pollutants are becoming very attractive because of their cost-effectiveness in removal of the contaminants. Current technology for reclaiming groundwater polluted with petroleum hydrocarbons involves (i) pumping the water into an aerated stripping tower, (ii) removal by sorbents, or (iii) biodegradation in situ or pumped into a bioreactor. Among the bioreactors, fixed film and suspended growth reactors are the most popular systems. Gasoline contamination of groundwaters is becoming an alarming and widespread problem. A major concern with petroleum contamination is the benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) content reaching the groundwater because of their solubility and high toxicity. The state of California Department of Health Services now recommends that remedial action be taken when the concentration of benzene and toluene exceeds 0.7 and 100 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The purpose of this study was to assess biodegradation of benzene and toluene in groundwater upon amendment with nutrients and an enriched hydrocarbon oxidizing culture.

  5. 40 CFR 80.380 - What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? 80.380 Section 80...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.380 What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? Any person...

  6. 40 CFR 80.380 - What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? 80.380 Section 80...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.380 What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? Any person...

  7. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by truck? 80.350 Section 80.350 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  8. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by truck? 80.350 Section 80.350 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  9. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  10. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  11. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  12. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  13. 40 CFR 80.380 - What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? 80.380 Section 80...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.380 What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? Any person...

  14. Data on Ethanol in Gasoline

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gasoline composition varies for technical, market and regulatory reasons. Knowledge of any one of these is insufficient for understanding the chemical composition of gasoline at any specific location in the U.S. Historical data collected by the National Institute of Petroleum ...

  15. Toxicological profile for automotive gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This Statement was prepared to give you information about gasoline and to empahsize the human health effects that may result from exposure to it. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified 1,397 sites on its National Priorities List (NPL). Gasoline has been found in at least 23 of these sites.

  16. Combustion behavior of gasoline and gasoline/ethanol blends in a modern direct-injection 4-cylinder engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Miers, S. A.

    2008-04-01

    Early in 2007 President Bush announced in his State of the Union Address a plan to off-set 20% of gasoline with alternative fuels in the next ten years. Ethanol, due to its excellent fuel properties for example, high octane number, renewable character, etc., appears to be a favorable alternative fuel from an engine perspective. Replacing gasoline with ethanol without any additional measures results in unacceptable disadvantages mainly in terms of vehicle range.

  17. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1995-12-19

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

  18. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

  19. The seasonal impact of blending oxygenated organics with gasoline on motor vehicle tailpipe and evaporative emissions. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, F.D.; Knapp, K.T.; Ray, W.D.; Burton, C.; Snow, R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporative and tailpipe emissions from a 1987 GM Corsica with adaptive learning closed loop control were measured with six fuels and four temperatures. Measured emissions were total (THC) and speciated hydrocarbons, aldehydes, ethanol, MTBE, benzene, 1,3,-butadiene, Co, and NO{sub x}. Tests were also performed to determine the effect of air conditioning (AC) and oxygen sensor failure. In general, AC reduced Highway Fuel Economy emissions, increased FTP emissions, and reduced fuel economy for both test cycles. Oxygen sensor malfunction increased tailpipe emissions and fuel economy. Higher levels of regulated tailpipe emissions were generally produced at the low test temperature. None of the fuels tested appeared to offer a consistent reduction in tailpipe THC and CO emissions under the conditions tested. This paper is the second in a series describing the effects of oxygenated fuels on the evaporative and tailpipe emissions from current technology light-duty gasoline powered motor vehicles. The study resulted from recent considerations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning the benefits of blending certain oxygenated compounds (alcohols and ethers) at specified levels with gasoline to be used as a vehicle fuel. This action was taken because these gasoline blends should provide the following benefits: Oxygenation can enhance fuel octane rating and thus compensate for the elimination of lead, and octane booster; the presence of oxygen in the field should reduce tailpipe emissions of total hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide; the addition of these oxygenated compounds will extend the present fuel supply and therefore could reduce oil imports; and surplus grain crops can be turned into ethanol, which can be used directly in fuel blends or reacted with isobutylene to form ethyl tertiary butyl ether.

  20. Electrostatic-field-enhanced photoexfoliation of bilayer benzene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Kazuki; Silaeva, Elena P.; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Photoexfoliation of bilayer benzene in an external electrostatic (dc) field is studied using time-dependent density functional theory combined with molecular dynamics. We find that the dc-field-induced force on the upper benzene in addition to the repulsive interaction between the positively charged benzene molecules induced by the laser field leads to fast athermal exfoliation. Thus, we conclude that the dc field enhances the photoexfoliation due to dc-field emission in addition to laser-assisted photoemission. The athermal exfoliation process is shown to depend crucially on the charge state of benzene molecules rather than on the excitation energy supplied by the laser.

  1. Bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil using poultry litter

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G; Tao, J.

    1996-10-01

    Contaminated soil, excavated from around a leaking underground gasoline storage tank, is commonly subjected to thermal degradation to remove the gasoline. Bioremediation as an alternative treatment technology is now becoming popular. The important hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria include Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, and Flavobacterium. Poultry litter contains a large number of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas, as well as many inorganic nutrients and organic biomass that may assist in biodegrading gasoline in contaminated soil. During bioremediation of contaminated soil, microbial densities are known to increase by 2-3 orders of magnitude. However, bioremediation may result in a increase in the toxic characteristics of the soil due to the production of potentially toxic degradation intermediates. The objective of this research was to study the influence of the addition of poultry litter on the bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil by quantifying the changes in the densities of microorganisms and by monitoring the toxicity of the degradation products. 25 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Vibrational Relaxation in Several Derivatives of Benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Bogumił B. J.; Skrodzka, Ewa B.; Lezhnev, Nikołaj B.

    2012-04-01

    Acoustical spectroscopy at frequencies up to 10 GHz gives the possibility of the investigation of liquid substances, where the relaxation process observed is caused by energy transfer between translational and vibrational degrees of freedom. The compounds presented in this article belong to this group of liquids. The acoustic investigations in the group of benzene derivatives, particularly research of the dependencies of acoustic parameters and the structure of organic liquids, demonstrated some interesting regularities in the group of these compounds in gas and liquid states. In this article, the results of research on five cyclic liquids: bromo-, chloro-, fluoro-, iodo-, and nitrobenzene as well as toluene and aniline are discussed and compared to benzene. The acoustic relaxation observed in all these compounds was found to result from Kneser's processes (vibrational relaxation). Based on investigations reported in this article, as well as by other authors, and taking into account experimental and literature data concerning a great number of compounds, one can draw a conclusion that almost all acoustic relaxation (Kneser-type) processes in liquids can be described using a single relaxation time. It also seems that all vibrational degrees of freedom of the molecule take part in this process. It is known that the appearance of differences in transition probabilities could be caused by additional attraction in interactions of molecules having dipole moments. Halogen derivatives have higher values of dipole moments than benzene. This difference could be responsible for the difference of transition probabilities and changes in the relaxation times. However, benzene derivatives with amino, nitro, and methyl groups and halides show the other type of relaxation.

  3. Enhanced Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene-Toluene-Ethylbenzene-Xylene-Ethanol Mixtures in Bioaugmented Aquifer Columns

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Marcio L. B.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.

    2004-01-01

    Methanogenic flowthrough aquifer columns were used to investigate the potential of bioaugmentation to enhance anaerobic benzene-toluene-ethylbenzene-xylene (BTEX) degradation in groundwater contaminated with ethanol-blended gasoline. Two different methanogenic consortia (enriched with benzene or toluene and o-xylene) were used as inocula. Toluene was the only hydrocarbon degraded within 3 years in columns that were not bioaugmented, although anaerobic toluene degradation was observed after only 2 years of acclimation. Significant benzene biodegradation (up to 88%) was observed only in a column bioaugmented with the benzene-enriched methanogenic consortium, and this removal efficiency was sustained for 1 year with no significant decrease in permeability due to bioaugmentation. Benzene removal was hindered by the presence of toluene, which is a more labile substrate under anaerobic conditions. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the highest numbers of bssA gene copies (coding for benzylsuccinate synthase) occurred in aquifer samples exhibiting the highest rate of toluene degradation, which suggests that this gene could be a useful biomarker for environmental forensic analysis of anaerobic toluene bioremediation potential. bssA continued to be detected in the columns 1 year after column feeding ceased, indicating the robustness of the added catabolic potential. Overall, these results suggest that anaerobic bioaugmentation might enhance the natural attenuation of BTEX in groundwater contaminated with ethanol-blended gasoline, although field trials would be needed to demonstrate its feasibility. This approach may be especially attractive for removing benzene, which is the most toxic and commonly the most persistent BTEX compound under anaerobic conditions. PMID:15294807

  4. Biodegradation of gasoline: kinetics, mass balance and fate of individual hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Solano-Serena, F; Marchal, R; Ropars, M; Lebeault, J M; Vandecasteele, J P

    1999-06-01

    The degradation of gasoline by a microflora from an urban waste water activated sludge was investigated in detail. Degradation kinetics were studied in liquid cultures at 30 degrees C by determination of overall O2 consumption and CO2 production and by chromatographic analysis of all 83 identifiable compounds. In a first fast phase (2 d) of biodegradation, 74% of gasoline, involving mostly aromatic hydrocarbons, was consumed. A further 20%, involving other hydrocarbons, was consumed in a second slow phase (23 d). Undegraded compounds (6% of gasoline) were essentially some branched alkanes with a quaternary carbon or/and alkyl chains on consecutive carbons but cycloalkanes, alkenes and C10- and C11-alkylated benzenes were degraded. The degradation kinetics of individual hydrocarbons, determined in separate incubations, followed patterns similar to those observed in cultures on gasoline. Carbon balance experiments of gasoline degradation were performed. The carbon of degraded gasoline was mainly (61.7%) mineralized into CO2, the remaining carbon being essentially converted into biomass. PMID:10389248

  5. Clinical features of hematopoietic malignancies and related disorders among benzene-exposed workers in China. Benzene Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Linet, M S; Yin, S N; Travis, L B; Li, C Y; Zhang, Z N; Li, D G; Rothman, N; Li, G L; Chow, W H; Donaldson, J; Dosemeci, M; Wacholder, S; Blot, W J; Hayes, R B

    1996-01-01

    Previous occupational cohort studies of benzene-exposed workers have for the most part used only death certificates to validate diagnoses of workers developing leukemia and other hematopoietic and lymphoproliferative malignancies and related disorders (HLD). In a follow-up study of 74,828 benzene-exposed workers and a comparison group of 35,805 nonexposed workers from 12 cities in China, we sought to characterized clinicopathologically and to confirm diagnoses of all cases of HLD. Using medical records, laboratory hematology results, and histopathology, U.S. and Chinese expert hematopathologists, blinded to exposure status, carried out a detailed review using standardized evaluation forms. Key among the findings were a notable diversity of malignant and nonneoplastic hematopoietic and lymphoproliferative disorders, documentation of excess myelodysplastic syndromes among benzene workers, and widespread dyspoiesis involving all hematopoietic cell lines. As sophisticated clinicopathologic characterization and corresponding classification schemes for HLD become increasingly widespread, it is recommended that future epidemiologic investigations of benzene workers incorporate similarly detailed morphologic evaluation. In extending follow-up of this cohort of young workers, we will continue to use all available clinical, laboratory hematology, and pathology data as well as cytogenetic and biochemical markers to characterized various HLD outcomes. These careful surveillance mechanisms should also provide additional insight into carcinogenic mechanisms of benzene and allow comparison of the molecular pathogenesis of HLD induced by benzene versus chemotherapy, radiation, or other exposure. PMID:9118920

  6. Molecular biomarkers of oxidative stress and role of dietary factors in gasoline station attendants.

    PubMed

    Costa, Chiara; Ozcagli, Eren; Gangemi, Silvia; Schembri, Federico; Giambò, Federica; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Fenga, Concettina

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to benzene promotes oxidative stress through the production of ROS, which can damage biological structures with the formation of new metabolites which can be used as markers of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance. This study aims to assess modifications in circulating levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and serum reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) in a group of gasoline station attendants exposed to low-dose benzene and to evaluate the influence of antioxidant food intake on these biomarkers of oxidative stress. The diet adopted by the population examined consisted of compounds belonging to the classes of terpenoids, stilbenes and flavonoids, notably resveratrol, lycopene and apigenin. Ninety one gasoline station attendants occupationally exposed to benzene and 63 unexposed male office workers were recruited for this study. Urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) concentration, determined to assess individual exposure level, resulted significantly higher in exposed workers. In subjects exposed to benzene, we observed a significant increase (p < 0.001) in ROMs and AOPP levels, which were also negatively correlated with fruit and vegetables consumption. By contrast, AGE did not show a significant increase and consequently any relation with antioxidant food intake. Only ROMs, representing a global biomarker of oxidative status, resulted correlated to t,t-MA levels (p < 0.01), probably due to low-dose exposure. Increase of ROS induced by reactive benzene metabolites may promote specific biochemical pathways with a major production of AOPP, which seem to represent a more sensitive biochemical marker of oxidative stress in workers exposed to benzene compared to AGE. Furthermore, this is the first study demonstrating ROMs increment in subject exposed to benzene. These biomarkers may be useful for screening purposes in gasoline station workers and other subjects exposed to low-dose benzene. Moreover, a diet rich

  7. Modeling theta-theta Interactions with the Effective Fragment Potential Method: The Benzene Dimer and Substituents

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Smithl; Lyudmila V. Slipchenko; Mark S. Gordon

    2008-02-27

    This study compares the results of the general effective fragment potential (EFP2) method to the results of a previous combined coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) study [Sinnokrot and Sherrill, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 7690] on substituent effects in {pi}-{pi} interactions. EFP2 is found to accurately model the binding energies of the benzene-benzene, benzene-phenol, benzene-toluene, benzene-fluorobenzene, and benzene-benzonitrile dimers, as compared with high-level methods [Sinnokrot and Sherrill, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 7690], but at a fraction of the computational cost of CCSD(T). In addition, an EFP-based Monte Carlo/simulated annealing study was undertaken to examine the potential energy surface of the substituted dimers.

  8. Enhanced degradation of benzene by percarbonate activated with Fe(II)-glutamate complex.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaori; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Miao, Zhouwei; Xu, Minhui; Zhang, Xiang; Danish, Muhammad; Cui, Hang; Farooq, Usman; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Effective degradation of benzene was achieved in sodium percarbonate (SPC)/Fe(II)-Glu system. The presence of glutamate (Glu) could enhance the regeneration of Fe(III) to Fe(II), which ensures the benzene degradation efficiency at wider pH range and eliminate the influence of HCO3 (-) in low concentration. Meanwhile, the significant scavenging effects of high HCO3 (-) concentration could also be overcome by increasing the Glu/SPC/Fe(II)/benzene molar ratio. Free radical probe compound tests, free radical scavenger tests, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis were conducted to explore the reaction mechanism for benzene degradation, in which hydroxyl radical (HO•) and superoxide anion radical (O2 (•-)) were confirmed as the predominant species responsible for benzene degradation. In addition, the results obtained in actual groundwater test strongly indicated that SPC/Fe(II)-Glu system is applicable for the remediation of benzene-contaminated groundwater in practice. PMID:26662563

  9. Economic and environmental benefits of higher-octane gasoline.

    PubMed

    Speth, Raymond L; Chow, Eric W; Malina, Robert; Barrett, Steven R H; Heywood, John B; Green, William H

    2014-06-17

    We quantify the economic and environmental benefits of designing U.S. light-duty vehicles (LDVs) to attain higher fuel economy by utilizing higher octane (98 RON) gasoline. We use engine simulations, a review of experimental data, and drive cycle simulations to estimate the reduction in fuel consumption associated with using higher-RON gasoline in individual vehicles. Lifecycle CO2 emissions and economic impacts for the U.S. LDV fleet are estimated based on a linear-programming refinery model, a historically calibrated fleet model, and a well-to-wheels emissions analysis. We find that greater use of high-RON gasoline in appropriately tuned vehicles could reduce annual gasoline consumption in the U.S. by 3.0-4.4%. Accounting for the increase in refinery emissions from production of additional high-RON gasoline, net CO2 emissions are reduced by 19-35 Mt/y in 2040 (2.5-4.7% of total direct LDV CO2 emissions). For the strategies studied, the annual direct economic benefit is estimated to be $0.4-6.4 billion in 2040, and the annual net societal benefit including the social cost of carbon is estimated to be $1.7-8.8 billion in 2040. Adoption of a RON standard in the U.S. in place of the current antiknock index (AKI) may enable refineries to produce larger quantities of high-RON gasoline. PMID:24870412

  10. European Lean Gasoline Direct Injection Vehicle Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Chambon, Paul H; Huff, Shean P; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Norman, Kevin M; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Thomas, John F

    2011-01-01

    Lean Gasoline Direct Injection (LGDI) combustion is a promising technical path for achieving significant improvements in fuel efficiency while meeting future emissions requirements. Though Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct Injection (SGDI) technology is commercially available in a few vehicles on the American market, LGDI vehicles are not, but can be found in Europe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) obtained a European BMW 1-series fitted with a 2.0l LGDI engine. The vehicle was instrumented and commissioned on a chassis dynamometer. The engine and after-treatment performance and emissions were characterized over US drive cycles (Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), and US06 Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06)) and steady state mappings. The vehicle micro hybrid features (engine stop-start and intelligent alternator) were benchmarked as well during the course of that study. The data was analyzed to quantify the benefits and drawbacks of the lean gasoline direct injection and micro hybrid technologies from a fuel economy and emissions perspectives with respect to the US market. Additionally that data will be formatted to develop, substantiate, and exercise vehicle simulations with conventional and advanced powertrains.

  11. Biofiltration of gasoline and ethanol-amended gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marlene; Woiciechowski, Adenise L; Kozliak, Evguenii I; Paca, Jan; Soccol, Carlos R

    2012-01-01

    Assuming the projected increase in use of ethanol as a biofuel, the current study was conducted to compare the biofiltration efficiencies for plain and 25% ethanol-containing gasoline. Two biofilters were operated in a downflow mode for 7 months, one of them being compost-based whereas the other using a synthetic packing material, granulated tire rubber, inoculated with gasoline-degrading microorganisms. Inlet concentrations measured as total hydrocarbon (TH) ranged from 1.9 to 5.8 g m(-3) at a constant empty bed retention time of 6.84 min. Contrary to the expectations based on microbiological considerations, ethanol-amended gasoline was more readily biodegraded than plain hydrocarbons, with the respective steady state elimination capacities of 26-43 and 14-18 gTH m(-3) h(-1) for the compost biofilter. The efficiency of both biofilters significantly declined upon the application of higher loads of plain gasoline, yet immediately recovering when switched back to ethanol-blended gasoline. The unexpected effect of ethanol in promoting gasoline biodegradation was explained by increasing hydrocarbon partitioning into the aqueous phase, with mass transfer being rate limiting for the bulk of components. The tire rubber biofilter, after a long acclimation, surpassed the compost biofilter in performance, presumably due to the 'buffering' effect of this packing material increasing the accessibility of gasoline hydrocarbons to the biofilm. With improved substrate mass transfer, biodegradable hydrocarbons were removed in the tire rubber biofilter's first reactor stage, with most of the remaining poorly degradable smaller-size hydrocarbons being degraded in the second stage. PMID:22486670

  12. Demographic, residential, and behavioral determinants of elevated exposures to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes among the U.S. population: results from 1999-2000 NHANES.

    PubMed

    Symanski, Elaine; Stock, Thomas H; Tee, P Grace; Chan, Wenyaw

    2009-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) represent a broad spectrum of compounds and there is growing concern that VOC exposures, in addition to increasing risks for cancer, may be implicated in exacerbating asthma and other adverse respiratory effects. Yet little is known about exposures in the U.S. population beyond the seminal Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) studies that were conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) between 1979 and 1987. This investigation was carried out to evaluate the relationship between personal exposures to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and socioeconomic, behavioral, demographic, and residential characteristics using a subsample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (636 participants who represented an estimated 141,363,503 persons aged 20 to 59 yr in the United States). Personal VOC exposures were evaluated using organic vapor monitors for periods that ranged from 48 to 72 h, and participants were administered a questionnaire regarding personal behaviors and residential characteristics while wearing the monitor. Geometric mean (GM) levels were significantly higher for males for all compounds except toluene. For benzene, GM levels were elevated among smokers and Hispanics. Sociodemographic characteristics could not be evaluated simultaneously in the weighted multiple regression models with the VOC questionnaire data because of issues associated with multicollinearity. Results from the regression analyses suggest that the presence of an attached garage (BTEX), having windows closed in the home during the monitoring period (benzene, toluene), pumping gasoline (toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), or using paint thinner, brush cleaner, or stripper (xylenes) results in higher exposure in the general population and confirm previous findings of studies that were more regional in scope. Once the complete NHANES VOC data are released, additional study is warranted to

  13. Reformulated gasoline quality issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.G.; Felch, D.E.; Edgar, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    One year ago, a panel of industry experts were interviewed in the November/December 1994 issue of Fuel Reformulation (Vol. 4, No. 6). With the focus then and now on refinery investments, the panelists were asked to forecast which refining processes would grow in importance. It is apparent from their response, and from other articles and discussions throughout the year, that hydroprocessing and catalytic conversion processes are synergistic in the overall refinery design, with flexibility and process objectives varying on a unit-by-unit case. To an extent, future refinery investments in downstream petrochemicals, such as for paraxylene production, are based on available catalytic reforming feedstock. Just a importantly, hydroprocessing units (hydrotreating, hydrocracking) needed for clean fuel production (gasoline, diesel, aviation fuel), are heavily dependent on hydrogen production from the catalytic reformer. Catalytic reforming`s significant influence in the refinery hydrogen balance, as well as its status as a significant naphtha conversion route to higher-quality fuels, make this unit a high-priority issue for engineers and planners striving for flexibility.

  14. Process for making anhydrous alcohol for mixing with gasoline to make gasohol motor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J.M.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a process for making an anhydrous fraction from a fermented feed material or beer. The process consists of contacting the fermented feed material or beer directly with steam vapor volatilizing the alcohol in the feed or beer and producing an alcohol free bottom. The alcohol vapor is conducted through a oneway flow mechanism into a column provided with trays located one above the other, refluxing the alcohol vapor over the trays and concentrating the alcohol vapor to high-proof alcohol. The reflux and vapor are utilized to concentrate additional alcohol from a dilute aqueous gasoline-containing recycle. The net total water bottoms are contacted from the concentration step with direct steam prior to discharge to sewer, feeding the concentrated alcohol with recovered gasoline from the recycle as contaminant along with additional gasoline. The gasoline is optimally heated to eliminate light ends, into a drying column, heating the alcohol gasoline feed with heat from a reboiler and vaporizing overhead the azeotropic fractions containing alcohol, gasoline and water. The azeotropic fractions are condensed and form two liquid phases. The gasoline phase returns as reflux to the drying column, recycling the water phase as initiator prior to the alcohol concentrating column, cooling and subcooling the anhydrous alcohol-gasoline bottoms. This process produces a final product which is completely denatured alcohol ready for removal from premises and containing the entire component of the originally added gasoline.

  15. Effects of ethanol-blended gasoline on air pollutant emissions from motorcycle.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-09-15

    The effect of ethanol-gasoline blends on criteria air pollutant emissions was investigated in a four-stroke motorcycle. The ethanol was blended with unleaded gasoline in four percentages (3, 10, 15, and 20% v/v) and controlled at a constant research octane number, RON (95), to accurately represent commercial gasoline. CO, THC, and NOx emissions were evaluated using the Economic Commission for Europe cycle on the chassis dynamometers. The results of the ethanol-gasoline blends were compared to those of commercial unleaded gasoline with methyl tert-butyl ether as the oxygenated additive. In general, the exhaust CO and NOx emissions decreased with increasing oxygen content in fuels. In contrast, ethanol added in the gasoline did not reduce the THC emissions for a constant RON gasoline. The 15% ethanol blend had the highest emission reductions relative to the reference fuel. The high ethanol-gasoline blend ratio (20%) resulted in a less emission reduction than those of low ratio blends (<15%). This may be attributed to the changes in the combustion conditions in the carburetor engine with 20% ethanol addition. Furthermore, the influence of ethanol-gasoline blends on the reduction of exhaust emissions was observed at different driving modes, especially at 15km/h cruising speed for CO and THC and acceleration stages for NOx. PMID:19595441

  16. Field Measurements of Gasoline Direct Injection Emission Factors: Spatial and Seasonal Variability.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Wang, Jonathan M; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Ramos, Manuel; Hilker, Nathan; Healy, Robert M; Sabaliauskas, Kelly; Wallace, James S; Evans, Greg J

    2016-02-16

    Four field campaigns were conducted between February 2014 and January 2015 to measure emissions from light-duty gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles (2013 Ford Focus) in an urban near-road environment in Toronto, Canada. Measurements of CO2, CO, NOx, black carbon (BC), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene-xylenes (BTEX), and size-resolved particle number (PN) were recorded 15 m from the roadway and converted to fuel-based emission factors (EFs). Other than for NOx and CO, the GDI engine had elevated emissions compared to the Toronto fleet, with BC EFs in the 73rd percentile, BTEX EFs in the 80-90th percentile, and PN EFs in the 75th percentile during wintertime measurements. Additionally, for three campaigns, a second platform for measuring PN and CO2 was placed 1.5-3 m from the roadway to quantify changes in PN with distance from point of emission. GDI vehicle PN EFs were found to increase by up to 240% with increasing distance from the roadway, predominantly due to an increasing fraction of sub-40 nm particles. PN and BC EFs from the same engine technology were also measured in the laboratory. BC EFs agreed within 20% between the laboratory and real-world measurements; however, laboratory PN EFs were an order of magnitude lower due to exhaust conditioning. PMID:26794244

  17. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater. PMID:24034892

  18. Benzene levels in ambient air and breath of smokers and nonsmokers in urban and pristine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Gruenke, L.D.; Craig, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Benzene levels in human breath and in ambient air were compared in the urban area of San Francisco (SF) and in a more remote coastal pristine setting of Stinson Beach, Calif. (SB). Benzene analysis was done by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Ambient benzene levels were sevenfold higher in SF (2.6 +/- 1.3 ppb, n = 25) than SB (0.38 +/- 0.39 ppb, n = 21). In SF, benzene in smokers' breath (6.8 +/- 3.0 ppb) was greater than in nonsmokers' breath (2.5 +/- 0.8 ppb) and smokers' ambient air (3.3 +/- 0.8 ppb). In SB the same pattern was observed: benzene in smokers' breath was higher than in nonsmokers' breath and ambient air. Benzene in SF nonsmokers' breath was greater than in SB nonsmokers' breath. Marijuana-only smokers had benzene breath levels between those of smokers and nonsmokers. There was little correlation between benzene in breath and number of cigarettes smoked, or with other benzene exposures such as diet. Of special interest was the finding that benzene in breath of SF nonsmokers (2.5 +/- 0.8 ppb) was greater than that in nonsmokers ambient air (1.4 +/- 0.1 ppb). The same was true in SB, where benzene in nonsmokers breath was greater than ambient air (1.8 +/- 0.2 ppb versus 1.0 +/- 0.1 ppb on d 1 and 1.3 +/- 0.3 ppb versus 0.23 +/- 0.18 ppb on d 2). This suggests an additional source of benzene other than outdoor ambient air.

  19. Reductions in human benzene exposure in the California South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruin, Scott A.; Denis, Michael J. St; Winer, Arthur M.; Colome, Steven D.; Lurmann, Frederick W.

    Benzene typically contributes a significant fraction of the human cancer risk associated with exposure to urban air pollutants. In recent years, concentrations of benzene in ambient air have declined in many urban areas due to the use of reformulated gasolines, lower vehicle emissions, and other control measures. In the California South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) ambient benzene concentrations have been reduced by more than 70% since 1989. To estimate the resulting effect on human exposures, the Regional Human Exposure (REHEX) model was used to calculate benzene exposures in the SoCAB for the years 1989 and 1997. Benzene concentration distributions in 14 microenvironments (e.g. outdoor, home, vehicle, work) were combined with California time-activity patterns and census data to calculate exposure distributions for 11 demographic groups in the SoCAB. For 1997, the calculated average benzene exposure for nonsmoking adults in the SoCAB was 2 ppb, compared to 6 ppb for 1989. For nonsmokers, about half of the 1997 exposure was due to ambient air concentrations (including their contributions to other microenvironments), but only 4% for smokers. Passive tobacco smoke contributed about one-fourth of all exposure for adult nonsmokers. In-transit microenvironments and attached garages contributed approximately 15 and 10%, respectively. From 1989 to 1997, decreases in passive smoke exposure accounted for about one-sixth of the decrease in exposure for nonsmoking adults, with the remainder due to decreases in ambient concentrations. The reductions in exposure during this time period indicate the effectiveness of reformulated fuels, more stringent emission standards, and smoking restrictions in significantly reducing exposure to benzene.

  20. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  1. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  2. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  3. ATMOSPHERIC BENZENE DEPLETION BY SOIL MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous benzene was rapidly depleted in exposure chambers containing viable soils and plants. When separate components of the system were analyzed, no benzene was detected in soils, plants, or water. Soil microorganisms were shown to be responsible for metabolizing benzene, yield...

  4. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... certify that the procedures meet the requirements of the ASTM procedures required under 40 CFR 80.330. (d... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline...

  5. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certify that the procedures meet the requirements of the ASTM procedures required under 40 CFR 80.330. (d... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline...

  6. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... certify that the procedures meet the requirements of the ASTM procedures required under 40 CFR 80.330. (d... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1631 - Gasoline, RBOB, and CBOB sample retention requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... procedures required under 40 CFR 80.1630. (d) Requirements for refiners who analyze composited samples. Prior... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline, RBOB, and CBOB sample... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur §...

  8. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certify that the procedures meet the requirements of the ASTM procedures required under 40 CFR 80.330. (d... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline...

  9. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.255 Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low...

  10. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.255 Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low...

  11. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.255 Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low...

  12. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF PHOSPHORUS IN GASOLINE BY FLAMELESS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method is presented for the determination of phosphorus in gasoline using flameless atomic absorption. Lanthanum nitrate solution is inserted in a graphite furnace prior to direct addition of gasoline. The organic matrix is charred prior to atomization of the phosphorus. Th...

  13. Methanol as a gasoline extender: a critique.

    PubMed

    Wigg, E E

    1974-11-29

    The tests conducted with the three vehicles at different emission control levels suggest that, in the area of fuel economy and emissions, potential benefits with methanol blends are related to carburetion and are only significant in the case of the rich-operating cars built before emission control standards were imposed. Theoretical considerations related to methanol's leaning effect on carburetion support this conclusion. Potential advantages for methanol in these areas are therefore continuously diminishing as the older cars leave the roads. At present, these older cars use only about one-fourth of the totalc motor gasoline consumed and, before methanol could be used on a large scale, this fraction would be much smaller. The use of methanol in gasoline would almost certainly create severe product quality problems. Water contamination could lead to phase separation in the distribution system and possibly in the car tank as well, and this would require additional investment in fuel handling and blending equipment. Excess fuel volatility in hot weather may also have adverse effects on car performance if the methanol blends include typical concentrations of butanes and pentanes. Removal of these light hydrocarbon components would detract from methanol's role as a gasoline extender and if current fuel volatility specifications were maintained, its use could lead to a net loss in the total available energy for use in motor fuels. Car performance problems associated with excessively lean operation would also be expected in the case of a significant proportion of late-model cars which are adjusted to operate on lean fuel-air mixtures. If methanol does become available in large quantities, these factors suggest that it would be more practical to use it for purposes other than those related to the extending of motor gasoline, such as for gas turbines used for electric power generation. In this case, the "pure" methanol would act as a cleanburning fuel, having none of the

  14. Products of the Benzene + O(3P) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Trevitt, Adam J.; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.; Sirjean, Baptiste; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Hai

    2009-12-21

    The gas-phase reaction of benzene with O(3P) is of considerable interest for modeling of aromatic oxidation, and also because there exist fundamental questions concerning the prominence of intersystem crossing in the reaction. While its overall rate constant has been studied extensively, there are still significant uncertainties in the product distribution. The reaction proceeds mainly through the addition of the O atom to benzene, forming an initial triplet diradical adduct, which can either dissociate to form the phenoxy radical and H atom, or undergo intersystem crossing onto a singlet surface, followed by a multiplicity of internal isomerizations, leading to several possible reaction products. In this work, we examined the product branching ratios of the reaction between benzene and O(3P) over the temperature range of 300 to 1000 K and pressure range of 1 to 10 Torr. The reactions were initiated by pulsed-laser photolysis of NO2 in the presence of benzene and helium buffer in a slow-flow reactor, and reaction products were identified by using the multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Phenol and phenoxy radical were detected and quantified. Cyclopentadiene and cyclopentadienyl radical were directly identified for the first time. Finally, ab initio calculations and master equation/RRKM modeling were used to reproduce the experimental branching ratios, yielding pressure-dependent rate expressions for the reaction channels, including phenoxy + H, phenol, cyclopentadiene + CO, which are proposed for kinetic modeling of benzene oxidation.

  15. Exhaust and evaporative emissions from motorcycles fueled with ethanol gasoline blends.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Ge, Yunshan; Wang, Mingda; Peng, Zihang; Song, Yanan; Zhang, Liwei; Yuan, Wanli

    2015-01-01

    The emission characteristics of motorcycles using gasoline and E10 (90% gasoline and 10% ethanol by volume) were investigated in this article. Exhaust and evaporative emissions of three motorcycles were investigated on the chassis dynamometer over the Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) and in the Sealed Housing for Evaporative Determination (SHED) including regulated and unregulated emissions. The regulated emissions were detected by an exhaust gas analyzer directly. The unregulated emissions including carbonyls and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled through battery-operated air pumps using tubes coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and Tenax TA, respectively. The experimental results showed that the emission factors of total hydrocarbons (THC) and carbon monoxide (CO) from E10 fueling motorcycles decreased by 26%-45% and 63%-73%, while the emission factor of NOx increased by 36%-54% compared with those from gasoline fueling motorcycles. For unregulated emissions, the emission amount of VOCs from motorcycles fueled with E10 decreased by 18%-31% while total carbonyls were 2.6-4.5 times higher than those for gasoline. For evaporative emissions of THC and VOCs, for gasoline or E10, the diurnal breathing loss (DBL) was higher than hot soak loss (HSL). Using E10 as a fuel does not make much difference in the amount of evaporative THC, while resulted in a slightly growth of 14%-17% for evaporative BETX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene). PMID:25302450

  16. Limited recovery of soil microbial activity after transient exposure to gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    Modrzyński, Jakub J; Christensen, Jan H; Mayer, Philipp; Brandt, Kristian K

    2016-09-01

    During gasoline spills complex mixtures of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released to terrestrial environments. Gasoline VOCs exert baseline toxicity (narcosis) and may thus broadly affect soil biota. We assessed the functional resilience (i.e. resistance and recovery of microbial functions) in soil microbial communities transiently exposed to gasoline vapors by passive dosing via headspace for 40 days followed by a recovery phase of 84 days. Chemical exposure was characterized with GC-MS, whereas microbial activity was monitored as soil respiration (CO2 release) and soil bacterial growth ([(3)H]leucine incorporation). Microbial activity was strongly stimulated and inhibited at low and high exposure levels, respectively. Microbial growth efficiency decreased with increasing exposure, but rebounded during the recovery phase for low-dose treatments. Although benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) concentrations decreased by 83-97% during the recovery phase, microbial activity in high-dose treatments did not recover and numbers of viable bacteria were 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than in control soil. Re-inoculation with active soil microorganisms failed to restore microbial activity indicating residual soil toxicity, which could not be attributed to BTEX, but rather to mixture toxicity of more persistent gasoline constituents or degradation products. Our results indicate a limited potential for functional recovery of soil microbial communities after transient exposure to high, but environmentally relevant, levels of gasoline VOCs which therefore may compromise ecosystem services provided by microorganisms even after extensive soil VOC dissipation. PMID:27376993

  17. Determination of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene by means of an ion mobility spectrometer device using photoionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhardt, J. W.; Bensch, H.; Berger, D.; Nolting, M.; Baumbach, J. I.

    1995-01-01

    The continuous monitoring of changes on the quality of ambient air is a field of advantage of ion mobility spectrometry. Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene are substances of special interest because of their toxicity. We present an optimized drift tube for ion mobility spectrometers, which uses photo-ionization tubes to produce the ions to be analyzed. The actual version of this drift tube has a length of 45 mm, an electric field strength established within the drift tube of about 180 V/cm and a shutter-opening-time of 400 mus. With the hydrogen tube used for ionisation a mean flux of 10(exp 12) photons/sq cm s was established for the experiments described. We discuss the results of investigations on Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene in normal used gasoline SUPER. The detection limits obtained with the ion mobility spectrometer developed in co-operation are in the range of 10 ppbv in this case. Normally, charge transfer from Benzene ions to Toluene takes place. Nevertheless the simultaneous determination in mixtures is possible by a data evaluation procedure developed for this case. The interferences found between Xylene and others are rather weak. The ion mobility spectra of different concentrations of gasoline SUPER are attached as an example for the resolution and the detection limit of the instrument developed. Resolution and sensitivity of the system are well demonstrated. A hand-held portable device produced just now is to be tested for special environmental analytical problems in some industrial and scientific laboratories in Germany.

  18. In utero and in vitro effects of benzene and its metabolites on erythroid differentiation and the role of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Badham, Helen J.; Winn, Louise M.

    2010-05-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous occupational and environmental toxicant. Exposures to benzene both prenatally and during adulthood are associated with the development of disorders such as aplastic anemia and leukemia. Mechanisms of benzene toxicity are unknown; however, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by benzene metabolites may play a role. Little is known regarding the effects of benzene metabolites on erythropoiesis. Therefore, to determine the effects of in utero exposure to benzene on the growth and differentiation of fetal erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E), pregnant CD-1 mice were exposed to benzene and CFU-E numbers were assessed in fetal liver (hematopoietic) tissue. In addition, to determine the effect of benzene metabolite-induced ROS generation on erythropoiesis, HD3 chicken erythroblast cells were exposed to benzene, phenol, or hydroquinone followed by stimulation of erythrocyte differentiation. Our results show that in utero exposure to benzene caused significant alterations in female offspring CFU-E numbers. In addition, exposure to hydroquinone, but not benzene or phenol, significantly reduced the percentage of differentiated HD3 cells, which was associated with an increase in ROS. Pretreatment of HD3 cells with polyethylene glycol-conjugated superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD) prevented hydroquinone-induced inhibition of erythropoiesis, supporting the hypothesis that ROS generation is involved in the development of benzene erythrotoxicity. In conclusion, this study provided evidence that ROS generated as a result of benzene metabolism may significantly alter erythroid differentiation, potentially leading to the development of Blood Disorders.

  19. Mortality among chemical workers exposed to benzene and other agents

    SciTech Connect

    Decoufle, P.; Blattner, W.A.; Blair, A.

    1983-02-01

    A historical cohort mortality study was conducted of 259 male employees of a chemical plant where benzene has been used in large quantites. The study group included all persons who were employed by the Company any time between January 1, 1947 and December 31, 1960. The cohort was followed through December 31, 1977 at which time 58 known deaths were identified. The only unusual findings was four deaths from lymphoreticular cancers when 1.1 would have been expected on the basis of national mortality rates. Three of the deaths were due to leukemia and one was caused by multiple myeloma. In addition, one of the leukemia deaths had multiple myeloma listed on the death certificate. The findings are consistent with previous reports of leukemia following occupational exposure to benzene and raise the possibility that multiple myeloma could be linked to benzene, also.

  20. A lack of consensus in the literature findings on the removal of airborne benzene by houseplants: Effect of bacterial enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriprapat, Wararat; Strand, Stuart E.

    2016-04-01

    Removal rates of benzene and formaldehyde gas by houseplants reported by several laboratories varied by several orders of magnitude. We hypothesized that these variations were caused by differential responses of soil microbial populations to the high levels of pollutant used in the studies, and tested responses to benzene by plants and soils separately. Five houseplant species and tobacco were exposed to benzene under hydroponic conditions and the uptake rates compared. Among the test plants, Syngonium podophyllum and Chlorophytum comosum and Epipremnum aureum had the highest benzene removal rates. The effects of benzene addition on populations of soil bacteria were determined using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays targeting microbial genes involved in benzene degradation. The total bacterial population increased as shown by increases in the levels of eubacteria 16S rRNA, which was significantly higher in the high benzene incubations than in the low benzene incubations. Transcripts (mRNA) of genes encoding phenol monooxygenases, catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and the housekeeping gene rpoB increased in all soils incubated with high benzene concentrations. Therefore the enrichment of soils with benzene gas levels typical of experiments with houseplants in the literature artificially increased the levels of total soil bacterial populations, and especially the levels and activities of benzene-degrading bacteria.

  1. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  2. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  3. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  4. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  5. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  6. Diesel engines vs. spark ignition gasoline engines -- Which is ``greener``?

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbanks, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    Criteria emissions, i.e., NO{sub x}, PM, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}, from recently manufactured automobiles, compared on the basis of what actually comes out of the engines, the diesel engine is greener than spark ignition gasoline engines and this advantage for the diesel engine increases with time. SI gasoline engines tend to get out of tune more than diesel engines and 3-way catalytic converters and oxygen sensors degrade with use. Highway measurements of NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO revealed that for each model year, 10% of the vehicles produce 50% of the emissions and older model years emit more than recent model year vehicles. Since 1974, cars with SI gasoline engines have uncontrolled emission until the 3-way catalytic converter reaches operating temperature, which occurs after roughly 7 miles of driving. Honda reports a system to be introduced in 1998 that will alleviate this cold start problem by storing the emissions then sending them through the catalytic converter after it reaches operating temperature. Acceleration enrichment, wherein considerable excess fuel is introduced to keep temperatures down of SI gasoline engine in-cylinder components and catalytic converters so these parts meet warranty, results in 2,500 times more CO and 40 times more H{sub 2} being emitted. One cannot kill oneself, accidentally or otherwise, with CO from a diesel engine vehicle in a confined space. There are 2,850 deaths per year attributable to CO from SI gasoline engine cars. Diesel fuel has advantages compared with gasoline. Refinery emissions are lower as catalytic cracking isn`t necessary. The low volatility of diesel fuel results in a much lower probability of fires. Emissions could be improved by further reducing sulfur and aromatics and/or fuel additives. Reformulated fuel has become the term covering reducing the fuels contribution to emissions. Further PM reduction should be anticipated with reformulated diesel and gasoline fuels.

  7. Review of quantitative surveys of the length and stability of MTBE, TBA, and benzene plumes in groundwater at UST sites.

    PubMed

    Connor, John A; Kamath, Roopa; Walker, Kenneth L; McHugh, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the length and stability condition of groundwater plumes of benzene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has been compiled from thousands of underground storage tank (UST) sites in the United States where gasoline fuel releases have occurred. This paper presents a review and summary of 13 published scientific surveys, of which 10 address benzene and/or MTBE plumes only, and 3 address benzene, MTBE, and TBA plumes. These data show the observed lengths of benzene and MTBE plumes to be relatively consistent among various regions and hydrogeologic settings, with median lengths at a delineation limit of 10 µg/L falling into relatively narrow ranges from 101 to 185 feet for benzene and 110 to 178 feet for MTBE. The observed statistical distributions of MTBE and benzene plumes show the two plume types to be of comparable lengths, with 90th percentile MTBE plume lengths moderately exceeding benzene plume lengths by 16% at a 10-µg/L delineation limit (400 feet vs. 345 feet) and 25% at a 5-µg/L delineation limit (530 feet vs. 425 feet). Stability analyses for benzene and MTBE plumes found 94 and 93% of these plumes, respectively, to be in a nonexpanding condition, and over 91% of individual monitoring wells to exhibit nonincreasing concentration trends. Three published studies addressing TBA found TBA plumes to be of comparable length to MTBE and benzene plumes, with 86% of wells in one study showing nonincreasing concentration trends. PMID:25040137

  8. Gasoline leaking from underground storage tanks: impact on drinking water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Page, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    Of the 1.4 million underground storage tanks (USTs) now in use for storing gasoline, it is estimated that 10-35% are leaking or fail to pass a tightness test. In order to assess the potential for pollution of drinking water due to gasoline leaking from USTs, it is necessary to understand the complex composition of gasoline, the movement of individual gasoline components through the soil matrix to the water table and their transport via groundwater movement to receptor wells. The primary factors that contribute to the environmental movement of gasoline components are water solubility, soil-sorption, biodegradation, and rainfall. Gasoline is a complex mixture of at least 150 hydrocarbons with about 60-70% paraffins and 25-30% aromatics. Of these, the aromatics are of greatest concern due to their water solubility and resistance to biodegradation. Benzene, toluene, and xylenes are of particular concern. Another chemical of concern is methyl tertbutyl ether (MTBE), a hydrocarbon now being added in large quantities in many brands as an octane-enhancer. MTBE has been found in many wells as the first chemical arriving at receptor wells following a gasoline leak or spill. Models are available for predicting concentrations at receptor wells; however, site specific input, e.g., soil type, biodegradation, and rainfall, are necessary for the meaningful and reliable application of the models. Movement of chemicals through the environment is a slow process; often it may take several years for a chemical to move from a leaking tank to the nearest receptor well.

  9. 40 CFR 80.374 - What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.374 Section 80.374... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.374 What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In appropriate extreme and...

  10. 40 CFR 80.374 - What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.374 Section 80.374... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.374 What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In appropriate extreme and...

  11. 40 CFR 80.382 - What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What requirements apply to gasoline...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.382 What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands? The...

  12. 40 CFR 80.382 - What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements apply to gasoline...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.382 What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands? The...

  13. 40 CFR 80.374 - What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.374 Section 80.374... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.374 What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In appropriate extreme and...

  14. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE BLENDING OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A life cycle assessment has been done to compare the potential environmental impacts of various gasoline blends that meet octane and vapour pressure specifications. The main blending components of alkylate, cracked gasoline and reformate have different octane and vapour pressure...

  15. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE BLENDING OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most petroleum refineries are facing the challenge of producing gasoline, which contains the desirable properties and complies with the ever-increasing environmental regulations and health restrictions. The impact of gasoline on the environment is directly related to its composit...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.710 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gasoline. 1065.710 Section 1065.710 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.710 Gasoline. (a) Gasoline for testing must...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.710 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gasoline. 1065.710 Section 1065.710 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.710 Gasoline. (a) Gasoline for testing must...

  18. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  19. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  20. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  1. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  2. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  3. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  4. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  5. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.710 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (a) This section specifies test fuel properties for gasoline with ethanol (low-level blend only) and for gasoline without ethanol. Note that the “fuel type” for the fuels specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section is considered to be gasoline. In contrast, fuels with higher...

  7. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  8. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  9. A silver lining? The connection between gasoline prices and obesity.

    PubMed

    Courtemanche, Charles

    2011-01-01

    I find evidence of a negative association between gasoline prices and body weight using a fixed effects model with several robustness checks. I also show that increases in gas prices are associated with additional walking and a reduction in the frequency with which people eat at restaurants, explaining their effect on weight. My estimates imply that 8% of the rise in obesity between 1979 and 2004 can be attributed to the concurrent drop in real gas prices, and that a permanent $1 increase in gasoline prices would reduce overweight and obesity in the United States by 7% and 10%. PMID:22022734

  10. Evaluation of biomass production in unleaded gasoline and BTEX-fed batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Askar, K; Englande, A J; Ramirez-Medrano, A; Coronado-Guardiola, J E; Chavez-Gomez, B

    2003-01-01

    BTEX removal under aerobic conditions by unleaded gasoline acclimated biomass and BTEX acclimated biomass, and the effect of surfactant on BTEX biodegradation were evaluated. The effect of BTEX concentration as the sole source of carbon for biomass acclimation and the effect of yeast extract on cell growth in unleaded gasoline-fed reactors were also evaluated. For the unleaded gasoline acclimated biomass, benzene was shown the most recalcitrant among all BTEX, followed by o-xylene and toluene with 16-23%, 35-41% and 57-69% biodegradation, respectively. Ethylbenzene was consistently the fastest BTEX chemical removed with 99% biodegradation for the four bioreactor acclimated biomasses tested. For the 1,200 ppm BTEX acclimated biomass, benzene showed the highest removal efficiency (99%) among the four biomass environmental conditions tested, along with 99% toluene and 99% ethylbenzene biodegradation. O-xylene showed 92-94% removal. In all bioassays tested Tergitol NP-10 was fully removed, and did not have a substantial effect on BTEX biodegradation at the end of a 10-day evaluation. PMID:14682579

  11. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    PubMed

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:24852493

  12. Containment of groundwater pollution (methyl tertiary butyl ether and benzene) to protect a drinking-water production site in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haest, Pieter Jan; Lookman, Richard; van Keer, Ilse; Patyn, Johan; Bronders, Jan; Joris, Marjan; Bellon, Jan; de Smedt, Florimond

    2010-12-01

    The subsurface migration of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene towards a drinking-water production site in Belgium was monitored for 9 years. A large gasoline spill at a nearby fuel station had caused a 500-m long and 50-m-wide pollution plume of MTBE (10-30 mg/L) and benzene (2-10 mg/L). In order to prevent any intrusion of pollutants into the drinking-water supply, a conceptual model was used to design a pump-and-treat system that intercepted the gasoline-contaminated groundwater emanating from the spill. The contaminated soil in the spill zone was excavated. A numerical mass transport model was developed to evaluate the ongoing plume containment. The model describes the subsurface MTBE migration and was regularly updated, based on groundwater monitoring data and the measured mass of MTBE extracted with the pump-and-treat system. With continued interception pumping, the MTBE plume can be remediated in 14 years. Without it, MTBE and benzene concentrations up to 600 μg/L could have reached the drinking-water production site and the plume would persist for 9 years longer. Source zone treatment combined with plume interception pumping is a suitable risk-based remediation strategy for the containment of MTBE and benzene groundwater pollution.

  13. Transformation of toluene and benzene by mixed methanogenic cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Grbić-Galić, D; Vogel, T M

    1987-01-01

    The aromatic hydrocarbons toluene and benzene were anaerobically transformed by mixed methanogenic cultures derived from ferulic acid-degrading sewage sludge enrichments. In most experiments, toluene or benzene was the only semicontinuously supplied carbon and energy source in the defined mineral medium. No exogenous electron acceptors other than CO2 were present. The cultures were fed 1.5 to 30 mM unlabeled or 14C-labeled aromatic substrates (ring-labeled toluene and benzene or methyl-labeled toluene). Gas production from unlabeled substrates and 14C activity distribution in products from the labeled substrates were monitored over a period of 60 days. At least 50% of the substrates were converted to CO2 and methane (greater than 60%). A high percentage of 14CO2 was recovered from the methyl group-labeled toluene, suggesting nearly complete conversion of the methyl group to CO2 and not to methane. However, a low percentage of 14CO2 was produced from ring-labeled toluene or from benzene, indicating incomplete conversion of the ring carbon to CO2. Anaerobic transformation pathways for unlabeled toluene and benzene were studied with the help of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The intermediates detected are consistent with both toluene and benzene degradation via initial oxidation by ring hydroxylation or methyl oxidation (toluene), which would result in the production of phenol, cresols, or aromatic alcohol. Additional reactions, such as demethylation and ring reduction, are also possible. Tentative transformation sequences based upon the intermediates detected are discussed. PMID:3105454

  14. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement..., or made available for sale as a motor vehicle fuel in the State of California and that: (i) Is... for sale, or made available for sale as a motor fuel in the State of California is, with regard...

  15. Applicability of gasoline containing ethanol as Thailand's alternative fuel to curb toxic VOC pollutants from automobile emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Shing Tet; Muttamara, S.; Laortanakul, Preecha

    Emission rates of benzene, toluene, m-xylene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were measured in a fleet of 16 in-use vehicles. The test was performed on a chassis dynamometer incorporated with Bangkok Driving Cycle test mode. Three different test fuels: unleaded gasoline, gasoline blended with 10% ethanol (E10) and gasoline blended with 15% ethanol (E15) were used to determine the different compositions of exhaust emissions from various vehicles. The effects of ethanol content fuels on emissions were tested by three types of vehicles: cars with no catalytic converter installation, cars with three-way catalytic converter and cars with dual-bed catalytic converter. The test result showed wide variations in the average emission rates with different mileages, fuel types and catalytic converters (benzene: 3.33-56.48 mg/km, toluene: 8.62-124.66 mg/km, m-xylene: 2.97-51.65 mg/km, formaldehyde: 20.82-477.57 mg/km and acetaldehyde: 9.46-219.86 mg/km). There was a modest reduction in emission rate of benzene, toluene and m-xylene in cars using E10 and E15 fuels. Use of ethanol fuels, however, leads to increased formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emission rates. Our analysis revealed that alternative fuels and technologies give significant reduction in toxic VOC pollutants from automobile emission—particularly car with dual-bed catalytic converter using E10 fuel.

  16. Current understanding of the mechanism of benzene-induced leukemia in humans: implications for risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.

    2012-01-01

    Benzene causes acute myeloid leukemia and probably other hematological malignancies. As benzene also causes hematotoxicity even in workers exposed to levels below the US permissible occupational exposure limit of 1 part per million, further assessment of the health risks associated with its exposure, particularly at low levels, is needed. Here, we describe the probable mechanism by which benzene induces leukemia involving the targeting of critical genes and pathways through the induction of genetic, chromosomal or epigenetic abnormalities and genomic instability, in a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC); stromal cell dysregulation; apoptosis of HSCs and stromal cells and altered proliferation and differentiation of HSCs. These effects modulated by benzene-induced oxidative stress, aryl hydrocarbon receptor dysregulation and reduced immunosurveillance, lead to the generation of leukemic stem cells and subsequent clonal evolution to leukemia. A mode of action (MOA) approach to the risk assessment of benzene was recently proposed. This approach is limited, however, by the challenges of defining a simple stochastic MOA of benzene-induced leukemogenesis and of identifying relevant and quantifiable parameters associated with potential key events. An alternative risk assessment approach is the application of toxicogenomics and systems biology in human populations, animals and in vitro models of the HSC stem cell niche, exposed to a range of levels of benzene. These approaches will inform our understanding of the mechanisms of benzene toxicity and identify additional biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility useful for risk assessment. PMID:22166497

  17. Structural Studies of Pyrrole-Benzene Complexes by Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Perez, Cristobal; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks H.; Pfaffen, Chantal; Trachsel, Maria A.; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2013-06-01

    Non-covalent intermolecular interactions are important in structural biology. The N-H \\cdots π hydrogen bond between amino acid side chains is an important structural determinant and highly affects the secondary structure of proteins. The pyrrole-benzene complex can be viewed as a model system for studying these fundamental interactions. Previous IR and UV spectroscopic studies of the pyrrole-benzene complex by Dauster et al. support a T-shaped structure with an N-H \\cdots π hydrogen bond to the benzene ring. In order to obtain accurate structural information we have investigated the broadband rotational spectrum of the supersonic-jet cooled complexes of pyrrole with benzene and benzene-d_{1} in the 2-18 GHz frequency range. In addition to the hetero dimer we have also observed the two cyclic mixed trimers (pyrrole)_{2}-benzene and pyrrole-(benzene)_{2}. I. Dauster, C. A. Rice, P. Zielke, and M. A. Suhm Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. {10}, 2827 (2008) C. Pfaffen, D. Infanger, P. Ottiger, H. M. Frey, and S. Leutwyler Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. {13}, 14110 (2011)

  18. The relationship between low-level benzene exposure and leukemia in Canadian petroleum distribution workers.

    PubMed

    Schnatter, A R; Armstrong, T W; Thompson, L S; Nicolich, M J; Katz, A M; Huebner, W W; Pearlman, E D

    1996-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between leukemia occurrence and long-term, low-level benzene exposures in petroleum distribution workers. Fourteen cases were identified among a previously studied cohort [Schnatter et al., Environ Health Perspect 101 (Suppl 6):85-89 (1993)]. Four controls per case were selected from the same cohort, controlling for birth year and time at risk. Industrial hygienists estimated workplace exposures for benzene, without knowledge of case-control status. Average benzene concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.2 ppm. Company medical records were used to abstract information on other potential confounders such as cigarette smoking. Odds ratios were calculated for several exposure metrics. Conditional logistic regression modeling was used to control for potential confounders. The risk of leukemia was not associated with increasing cumulative exposure to benzene for these exposure levels. Duration of benzene exposure was more closely associated with leukemia risk than other exposure metrics, although results were not statistically significant. A family history of cancer and cigarette smoking were the two strongest risk factors for leukemia, with cumulative benzene exposure showing no additional risk when considered in the same models. This study is consistent with other data in that it was unable to demonstrate a relationship between leukemia and long-term, low-level benzene exposures. The power of the study was limited. Thus, further study on benzene exposures in this concentration range are warranted. PMID:9118923

  19. Formation of a new benzene-ethane co-crystalline structure under cryogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tuan Hoang; Cable, Morgan L; Choukroun, Mathieu; Hodyss, Robert; Beauchamp, Patricia

    2014-06-12

    We report the first experimental finding of a solid molecular complex between benzene and ethane, two small apolar hydrocarbons, at atmospheric pressure and cryogenic temperatures. Considerable amounts of ethane are found to be incorporated inside the benzene lattice upon the addition of liquid ethane onto solid benzene at 90-150 K, resulting in formation of a distinctive co-crystalline structure that can be detected via micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two new features characteristic of these co-crystals are observed in the Raman spectra at 2873 and 1455 cm(-1), which are red-shifted by 12 cm(-1) from the υ1 (a1g) and υ11 (eg) stretching modes of liquid ethane, respectively. Analysis of benzene and ethane vibrational bands combined with quantum mechanical modeling of isolated molecular dimers reveal an interaction between the aromatic ring of benzene and the hydrogen atoms of ethane in a C-H···π fashion. The most favored configuration for the benzene-ethane dimer is the monodentate-contact structure, with a calculated interaction energy of 9.33 kJ/mol and an equilibrium bonding distance of 2.66 Å. These parameters are comparable to those for a T-shaped co-crystalline complex between benzene and acetylene that has been previously reported in the literature. These results are relevant for understanding the hydrocarbon cycle of Titan, where benzene and similar organics may act as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs due to this incorporation mechanism. PMID:24809894

  20. Exposure to benzene, toluene, xylenes and total hydrocarbons among snowmobile drivers in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Kåre; Tjärner, Dan; Marqvardsen, Inger; Järvholm, Bengt

    2003-03-01

    The exposure to benzene, toluene, xylenes and total hydrocarbons among 25 individuals exposed to exhaust from a snowmobile equipped with a two-stroke engine has been evaluated. Sampling was performed by pumped and diffusive sampling in parallel. There was a relatively bad agreement between the two air-sampling methods. The bad agreement can in part be explained by back diffusion of the substances from the samplers, a high face velocity, and deposition of droplets of unburned gasoline onto or in the vicinity of the samplers. The levels of benzene ranged from not detectable (< or =0.01 mgm(-3)) to 2.5 mgm(-3). For toluene, xylenes and total hydrocarbons the exposure was 0.10-12.0, < or =0.05-13.0 and 0.90-273 mgm(-3) respectively. The result from two measurements on individuals travelling on an open sleigh at the rear of the vehicle indicated higher levels of benzene, 0.7-0.8 mgm(-3). Children are often riding as a passenger on a sledge and may thus have a higher exposure than their parents. This study indicates that spare time driving a snowmobile may cause a considerable exposure to benzene. Using a four-stroke engine equipped with a catalyst could reduce the exposure. To reduce the exposure for the passenger on a sleigh an extension of the exhaust pipe may be effective. PMID:12586165

  1. Increasing the octane number of gasoline using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Sara Safari; Rashidi, Alimorad; Aghabozorg, Hamid Reza; Moradi, Leila

    2010-03-01

    The octane number is one of the characteristics of spark-ignition fuels such as gasoline. Octane number of fuels can be improved by addition of oxygenates such as ethanol, MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether), TBF (tertiary butyl formate) and TBA (tertiary butyl alcohol) as well as their blends with gasoline that reduce the cost impact of fuels. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are as useful additives for increasing the octane number. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing amide groups have a high reactivity and can react with many chemicals. These compounds can be solubilized in gasoline to increase the octane number. In this study, using octadecylamine and dodecylamine, CNTs were amidated and the amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes were added to gasoline. Research octane number analysis showed that these additives increase octane number of the desired samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA) were used for characterization of the prepared functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  2. Gasoline risk management: a compendium of regulations, standards, and industry practices.

    PubMed

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    This paper is part of a special series of publications regarding gasoline toxicology testing and gasoline risk management; this article covers regulations, standards, and industry practices concerning gasoline risk management. Gasoline is one of the highest volume liquid fuel products produced globally. In the U.S., gasoline production in 2013 was the highest on record (API, 2013). Regulations such as those pursuant to the Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) and many others provide the U.S. federal government with extensive authority to regulate gasoline composition, manufacture, storage, transportation and distribution practices, worker and consumer exposure, product labeling, and emissions from engines and other sources designed to operate on this fuel. The entire gasoline lifecycle-from manufacture, through distribution, to end-use-is subject to detailed, complex, and overlapping regulatory schemes intended to protect human health, welfare, and the environment. In addition to these legal requirements, industry has implemented a broad array of voluntary standards and best management practices to ensure that risks from gasoline manufacturing, distribution, and use are minimized. PMID:24995590

  3. An analysis of strategic price setting in retail gasoline markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaureguiberry, Florencia

    This dissertation studies price-setting behavior in the retail gasoline industry. The main questions addressed are: How important is a retail station's brand and proximity to competitors when retail stations set price? How do retailers adjust their pricing when they cater to consumers who are less aware of competing options or have less discretion over where they purchase gasoline? These questions are explored in two separate analyses using a unique datasets containing retail pricing behavior of stations in California and in 24 different metropolitan areas. The evidence suggests that brand and location generate local market power for gasoline stations. After controlling for market and station characteristics, the analysis finds a spread of 11 cents per gallon between the highest and the lowest priced retail gasoline brands. The analysis also indicates that when the nearest competitor is located over 2 miles away as opposed to next door, consumers will pay an additional 1 cent per gallon of gasoline. In order to quantify the significance of local market power, data for stations located near major airport rental car locations are utilized. The presumption here is that rental car users are less aware or less sensitive to fueling options near the rental car return location and are to some extent "captured consumers". Retailers located near rental car locations have incentives to adjust their pricing strategies to exploit this. The analysis of pricing near rental car locations indicates that retailers charge prices that are 4 cent per gallon higher than other stations in the same metropolitan area. This analysis is of interest to regulators who are concerned with issues of consolidation, market power, and pricing in the retail gasoline industry. This dissertation concludes with a discussion of the policy implications of the empirical analysis.

  4. Production of Phenol from Benzene via Cumene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, D. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment involving the production of phenol from benzene with the intermediate production of isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene hydroperoxide. (SL)

  5. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  6. Dangerous and cancer-causing properties of products and chemicals in the oil refining and petrochemical industry: Part I. Carcinogenicity of motor fuels: gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlman, M.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Studies in humans and animals have shown that gasoline contains a number of cancer-causing and toxic chemicals such as 1,3-butadiene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, isoparaffins, methyltert-butylether, and others. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in its Monograph Supplement 7 (1987) concludes that in the absence of adequate data on humans, it is biologically plausible and prudent to regard agents for which there is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals as if they present a carcinogenic risk to humans.' Epidemiological studies in humans provide important evidence of potential increased risk of leukemia, lymphatic tissue cancers, cancers of the brain, liver, and other organs and tissues. Recently (July, 1990) the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene (ACGIH) recommended that the TLV-TWA for benzene be reduced from 1 ppm to 0.1 ppm (ACGIH, 1990). The Collegium Ramazzini and others have also recommended that the exposure level for 1,3-Butadiene be reduced from 1,000 ppm to below 0.2 ppm. This recommendation is based on the findings that were presented at the Symposium on Toxicology, Carcinogenesis, and Human Health Aspects of 1,3-Butadiene (Environ. Health Perspec., 1990). Thus, studies on health effects resulting from very low levels of benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and other cancer-causing chemicals--components of gasoline--necessitate that all avoidable exposure to gasoline or gasoline vapors be avoided.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF BENZENE OXIDE IN THE BLOOD OF RATS FOLLOWING ADMINISTRATION OF BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although it is generally assumed that metabolism of benzene proceeds through an initial step involving oxidation to benzene oxide (BO) by CYP450 in the liver, the production of BO has never been unambiguously confirmed in animals dosed with benzene. Furthermore, prevailing hypo...

  8. Rotational Spectroscopic and Theoretical Investigations on Benzene-Ethylene Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiswarya Lakshmi, P.; Arunan, E.

    2009-06-01

    Theoretical studies and condensed phase experimental studies point towards a π stacked structure for benzene dimer, for which experimental evidence has not been found yet. This structure has no dipole moment and hence microwave spectroscopy can not be used. Benzene and ethylene can dimerise to give π stacked complex which will have a net dipole moment. Rotational spectroscopic technique can be used to detect this π stacked structure, if present, in the gas phase. Depending upon the nature of interaction, in addition to the π stacked structure, other geometries are also possible where either benzene or ethylene can act as hydrogen bond donor. Theoretical investigations led to five different structures including the π stacked one. Pulsed Nozzle Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer has been used to study the rotational spectrum of the benzene-ethylene complex, with helium as the carrier gas. A total of 24 `a' dipole transitions were observed. Out of these 24 transitions, 20 lines were fitted to the structure with C_2H_4 as the hydrogen bond donor. In the observed transitions the K=0 lines show doubling. The line centres of the K=0 doublets were used along with K=1 transitions for the fitting. The fitted rotational constants are, A= 5.4(1) GHz, B= 1221.879(3) MHz, C=1206.794(4) MHz. Search and assignments for C_6H_6-C_2D_4 and C_6D_6-C_2H_4 complexes are in progress.

  9. Dynamical and structural properties of benzene in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Draghi, Carlos; Bonet Avalos, Josep; Contreras, Oliver; Ungerer, Philippe; Ridard, Jacqueline

    2004-12-01

    We have employed an anisotropic united atom model of benzene (R. O. Contreras, Ph.D. thesis, Universitat Rovira i Virgili 2002) that reproduces the quadrupolar moment of this molecule through the inclusion of seven point charges. We show that this kind of interaction is required to reproduce the solvation of these molecules in supercritical water. We have computed self-diffusion coefficient and Maxwell-Stefan coefficients as well as the shear viscosity for the mixture water-benzene at supercritical conditions. A strong density and composition dependence of these properties is observed. In addition, our simulations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental evidence that, at medium densities (0.6 g/cm(3) and 673 K), almost half of the benzene molecules have one hydrogen bond with water molecules. We also observe that these bonds are longer lived than the corresponding hydrogen bonds between water molecules. Similarly, we obtain an important reduction of the dielectric constant of the mixture with the increment of the amount of benzene molecules at medium and high densities. PMID:15549940

  10. Environmental implications on the oxygenation of gasoline with ethanol in the metropolitan area of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Schifter, I; Vera, M; Díaz, L; Guzmán, E; Ramos, F; López-Salinas, E

    2001-05-15

    Motor vehicle emission tests were performed on 12 in-use light duty vehicles, made up of the most representative emission control technologies in Mexico City: no catalyst, oxidative catalyst, and three way catalyst. Exhaust regulated (CO, NOx, and hydrocarbons) and toxic (benzene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and 1,3-butadiene) emissions were evaluated for MTBE (5 vol %)- and ethanol (3, 6, and 10 vol %)-gasoline blends. The most significant overall emissions variations derived from the use of 6 vol % ethanol (relative to a 5% MTBE base gasoline) were 16% decrease in CO, 28% reduction in formaldehyde, and 80% increase in acetaldehyde emissions. A 26% reduction in CO emissions from the oldest fleet (< MY 1991, without catalytic converter), which represents about 44% of the in-use light duty vehicles in Mexico city, can be attained when using 6 vol% ethanol-gasoline, without significant variation in hydrocarbons and NOx emissions, when compared with a 5% vol MTBE-gasoline. On the basis of the emissions results, an estimation of the change in the motor vehicle emissions of the metropolitan area of Mexico city was calculated for the year 2010 if ethanol were to be used instead of MTBE, and the outcome was a considerable decrease in all regulated and toxic emissions, despite the growing motor vehicle population. PMID:11393966

  11. Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CARB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4%, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6%. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CARB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

  12. Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.; Glaser, R.; Richardson, J.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CAROB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4 %, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6 %. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CAROB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

  13. Systems biology of human benzene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Li, Guilan; Ji, Zhiying; Vermeulen, Roel; Hubbard, Alan E.; Ren, Xuefeng; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; North, Matthew; Skibola, Christine F.; Yin, Songnian; Vulpe, Christopher; Chanock, Stephen J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Toxicogenomic studies, including genome-wide analyses of susceptibility genes (genomics), gene expression (transcriptomics), protein expression (proteomics), and epigenetic modifications (epigenomics), of human populations exposed to benzene are crucial to understanding gene-environment interactions, providing the ability to develop biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility. Comprehensive analysis of these toxicogenomic and epigenomic profiles by bioinformatics in the context of phenotypic endpoints, comprises systems biology, which has the potential to comprehensively define the mechanisms by which benzene causes leukemia. We have applied this approach to a molecular epidemiology study of workers exposed to benzene. Hematotoxicity, a significant decrease in almost all blood cell counts, was identified as a phenotypic effect of benzene that occurred even below 1ppm benzene exposure. We found a significant decrease in the formation of progenitor colonies arising from bone marrow stem cells with increasing benzene exposure, showing that progenitor cells are more sensitive to the effects of benzene than mature blood cells, likely leading to the observed hematotoxicity. Analysis of transcriptomics by microarray in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of exposed workers, identified genes and pathways (apoptosis, immune response, and inflammatory response) altered at high (>10ppm) and low (<1ppm) benzene levels. Serum proteomics by SELDI-TOF-MS revealed proteins consistently down-regulated in exposed workers. Preliminary epigenomics data showed effects of benzene on the DNA methylation of specific genes. Genomic screens for candidate genes involved in susceptibility to benzene toxicity are being undertaken in yeast, with subsequent confirmation by RNAi in human cells, to expand upon the findings from candidate gene analyses. Data on these and future biomarkers will be used to populate a large toxicogenomics database, to which we will apply bioinformatic

  14. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasoline and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  15. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasolines and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  16. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasolines and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  17. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasoline and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  18. Resonant photodissociation in substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Tim; McAcy, Collin; Foote, David; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2011-05-01

    Cyclic aromatic molecules are abundant in organic chemistry, with a wide variety of applications, including pharmacology, pollution studies and genetic research. Among the simplest of these molecules is benzene (C6H6) , with many relevant molecules being benzene-like with a single atomic substitution. In such a substitution, the substituent determines a characteristic perturbation of the electronic structure of the molecule. We discuss the substitution of halogens into the ring (C6H5X), and its effects on the dynamics of ionization and dissociation of the molecule without the focal volume effect. In particular, using 800-nm, 50-fs laser pulses, we present results in the dissociation of fluorobenzene, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and iodobenzene into the phenyl ring (C6H5) and the atomic halogen, and the subsequent ionization of these fragments. The impact of the ``heavy atom effect'' on a 1 (π , π*) -->3 (n , σ*) singlet-triplet intersystem crossing will be emphasized. Currently under investigation is whether such a dissociation can be treated as an effective source of the neutral substituent. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0355235.

  19. Endocrine-mediated effects of two benzene related compounds, 1-chloro-4-(chloromethyl)benzene and 1,3-diethyl benzene, based on subacute oral toxicity studies using rats.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Kanji; Ishii, Satoko; Kikuno, Tsukasa; Minobe, Yasushi

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the endocrine-mediated effects of the benzene-related compounds with reference to Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guideline No. 407. Rats were orally gavaged with 0, 10, 50, and 250 mg/kg/day of 1-chloro-4-(chloromethyl)benzene, and 0, 25, 150, and 1000 mg/kg/day of 1,3-diethyl benzene for at least 28 days, beginning at 8 weeks of age. Thyroid dysfunction was observed in rats given the 1,3-diethyl benzene. Serum T4 values increased in all groups of male rats and in the 1000 mg/kg group of female rats, and TSH values also increased in the 1000 mg/kg groups of both sexes after 28 days' administration. Decreased T3 values were observed in the 1000 mg/kg group of female rats after 28 days' administration, and hormone values increased in the 1000 mg/kg groups of both sexes after the 14-day recovery period. In addition, thyroid weight increased in the 1000 mg/kg groups and thyroid follicular cell hyperplasia was detected in one male rat from the 1000 mg/kg group after 28 days' administration. Endocrine-mediated effects, including thyroid dysfunction were not observed in any groups of rats treated with 1-chloro-4-(chloromethyl)benzene. Our results indicated that endocrine-mediated effects such as thyroid dysfunction were associated with some benzene-related compounds. PMID:22643015

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  3. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  6. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  8. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  9. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  11. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  14. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  16. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  18. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  19. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  20. Degradation of benzene in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, F.; Klein, W.

    1982-01-01

    A test system for measurement of benzene and other aromatic compounds using a carbon 14 label is described. The biodegradability test of ecotoxicological profile analysis is performed in a closed system, thus allowing the investigation of volatile compounds. Results show that benzene is readily biodegradable. (JMT)