Science.gov

Sample records for additives reformulated gasoline

  1. Reformulated Gasoline

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Reformulated gasoline (RFG) is gasoline blended to burn cleaner and reduce smog-forming and toxic pollutants in the air we breathe. The Clean Air Act requires that RFG be used to reduce harmful emissions of ozone.

  2. Extension of the Reformulated Gasoline Program to Maine’s Southern Counties Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Supporting documents on EPA's decision about extending the Clean Air Act prohibition against the sale of conventional gasoline in reformulated gasoline areas to the southern Maine counties of York, Cumberland,Sagadahoc

  3. Reformulated gasoline quality issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.G.; Felch, D.E.; Edgar, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    One year ago, a panel of industry experts were interviewed in the November/December 1994 issue of Fuel Reformulation (Vol. 4, No. 6). With the focus then and now on refinery investments, the panelists were asked to forecast which refining processes would grow in importance. It is apparent from their response, and from other articles and discussions throughout the year, that hydroprocessing and catalytic conversion processes are synergistic in the overall refinery design, with flexibility and process objectives varying on a unit-by-unit case. To an extent, future refinery investments in downstream petrochemicals, such as for paraxylene production, are based on available catalytic reforming feedstock. Just a importantly, hydroprocessing units (hydrotreating, hydrocracking) needed for clean fuel production (gasoline, diesel, aviation fuel), are heavily dependent on hydrogen production from the catalytic reformer. Catalytic reforming`s significant influence in the refinery hydrogen balance, as well as its status as a significant naphtha conversion route to higher-quality fuels, make this unit a high-priority issue for engineers and planners striving for flexibility.

  4. 40 CFR 80.66 - Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculation of reformulated gasoline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.66 Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties. (a) All volume measurements required by these regulations shall...

  5. 40 CFR 80.66 - Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calculation of reformulated gasoline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.66 Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties. (a) All volume measurements required by these regulations shall...

  6. Production of reformulated gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.J.; Raghuram, S.

    1992-08-04

    This patent describes a process combination for producing a gasoline component from a naphtha feedstock. It comprises: contacting the naphtha feedstock in a reforming zone at reforming conditions with a reforming catalyst comprising a Group VIII metal on a refractory support to produce a reformate and a hydrogen-rich gas; separating the reformate, in a first separation zone, into a light hydrocarbon product and a heavy reformate; separating the heavy reformate, in a second separation zone, into a low-octane paraffin fraction and an aromatic-rich fraction; contacting a low-octane paraffin fraction in a paraffin-isomerization zone at primary isomerization conditions with a paraffin-isomerizing catalyst to produce an isomerized heavy-paraffin product; and, combining at least a portion of each of the aromatic-rich fraction and the isomerized heavy-paraffin product to produce the gasoline component.

  7. Reformulated gasoline study, executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.E.; Michalski, G.W.; Baron, R.E.; Lyons, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of adopting alternative standards for reformulated gasoline (RFG) in New York State has been studied for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (the Energy Authority). In addition to Federal RFG (EPA 1) and EPA II, California Air Resources Board RFG (CARB 2) and a modified Federal low sulfur RFG (LS-EPA II) were investigated. The effects of these alternative RFGs on petroleum refinery gasoline production costs, gasoline distribution costs, New York State air quality and the New York State economy were considered. New York has already adopted the California low emission vehicle (LEV) and other emission control programs that will affect vehicles and maintenance. From 1998 to 2012 without the introduction of any type of RFG, these programs are estimated to reduce New York State mobile source summer emissions by 341 tons per day (or 40%) of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and by 292 tons per day (or 28%) of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and to reduce winter emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) by 3,072 tons per day (or 39%). By 2012, the planned imposition of Federal RFG will produce further reductions (percent of 1998 levels) of 10 %, 4 % and 11%, respectively, for NMHC, NO{sub x} and CO. If New York State goes beyond EPA II and adopts CARB 2 specifications, further reductions achieved in 2012 are estimated to be very small, equaling 2% or less of 1998 levels of NMHC and NO{sub x} emissions, while CO emissions would actually increase by about 2%. When compared to EPA II over the same time frame, LS-EPA II would produce negligible (less than 1%) reductions in each of the above emissions categories.

  8. Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently, 1995

    EIA Publications

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the costs of producing reformulated gasoline (RFG) as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate.

  9. Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.; Glaser, R.; Richardson, J.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CAROB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4 %, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6 %. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CAROB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

  10. Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CARB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4%, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6%. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CARB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

  11. Reformulated gasoline deal with Venezuela draws heat

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.

    1994-04-06

    A fight is brewing in Congress over a deal to let Venezuela off the hook in complying with the Clean Air Act reformulated gasoline rule. When Venezuela threatened to call for a GATT panel to challenge the rule as a trade barrier, the Clinton Administration negotiated to alter the rule, a deal that members of Congress are characterizing as {open_quotes}secret{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}back door.{close_quotes}

  12. Gasoline additive

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, O.A.; Smith, G.G.

    1990-03-06

    This patent describes a method for improving the quality and performance of an internal combustion engine. It comprises: introducing gasoline into the fuel tank of the internal combustion engine; and adding to the gasoline, in an amount effective to improve the performance of an internal combustion engine, a stable dispersion of 3 to 20 volume percent of a compound consisting essentially of polyoxyethylene sorbitol polyoleate in a gasoline-miscible oxygenated organic solvent; and operating the engine.

  13. Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000

    EIA Publications

    1999-01-01

    Phase 2 of the U.S. reformulated gasoline program begins at the end of this year. This article, published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly, April 1999, provides a forecast and analysis of the demand and price for Phase 2 reformulated gasoline for the year 2000.

  14. Southern Maine Counties Included in the Federal Reformulated Gasoline Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    At the request of the State of Maine, EPA has finalized a rule requiring the sale of reformulated gasoline (RFG) in York, Cumberland, Sagadahoc, Androscoggin, Kennebec, Knox and Lincoln counties in southern Maine.

  15. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Shabtai, Joseph S.; Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W.; Chornet, Esteban

    1999-09-28

    A process for converting lignin into high-quality reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline compositions in high yields is disclosed. The process is a two-stage, catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage, a lignin material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction in the presence of a supercritical alcohol as a reaction medium, to thereby produce a depolymerized lignin product. In the second stage, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to a sequential two-step hydroprocessing reaction to produce a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product. In the first hydroprocessing step, the depolymerized lignin is contacted with a hydrodeoxygenation catalyst to produce a hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product. In the second hydroprocessing step, the hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product is contacted with a hydrocracking/ring hydrogenation catalyst to produce the reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product which includes various desirable naphthenic and paraffinic compounds.

  16. 78 FR 20102 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Reformulated Gasoline Commingling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... AGENCY Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Reformulated Gasoline Commingling... Protection Agency is planning to submit an information collection request (ICR), ``Reformulated Gasoline... comments to OMB. Abstract: EPA would like to continue collecting notifications from gasoline retailers...

  17. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995

    EIA Publications

    1994-01-01

    Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gasoline in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining industry.

  18. 40 CFR 80.66 - Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... properties. 80.66 Section 80.66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... reformulated gasoline properties. (a) All volume measurements required by these regulations shall be... blend, based upon its percentage oxygenate by volume and density, shall exclude denaturants and...

  19. 40 CFR 80.78 - Controls and prohibitions on reformulated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... person may combine any ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline with any non-ethanol-blended...-consumers may combine at a retail outlet or wholesale purchaser-consumer facility ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline with non-ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline, provided...

  20. 40 CFR 80.78 - Controls and prohibitions on reformulated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... person may combine any ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline with any non-ethanol-blended...-consumers may combine at a retail outlet or wholesale purchaser-consumer facility ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline with non-ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline, provided...

  1. 40 CFR 80.78 - Controls and prohibitions on reformulated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... person may combine any ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline with any non-ethanol-blended...-consumers may combine at a retail outlet or wholesale purchaser-consumer facility ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline with non-ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline, provided...

  2. 40 CFR 80.78 - Controls and prohibitions on reformulated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... person may combine any ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline with any non-ethanol-blended...-consumers may combine at a retail outlet or wholesale purchaser-consumer facility ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline with non-ethanol-blended VOC-controlled reformulated gasoline, provided...

  3. Reformulated gasoline will change FCC operations and catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, G.M.; Wear, C.C.; Suarez, W.; Young, G.W. )

    1990-07-02

    Operation of fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCUs) will be significantly affected by new regulations that will in all probability require gasoline to be produced with lower aromatics and olefins contents, lower vapor pressure, and a minimum oxygen content. This paper reports on a study conducted to better define the basic relationship between operating variables, including catalyst and naphtha quality, in the context of reformulated gasoline. The study helped to define specific operating strategies, potential problem areas, and opportunities for improved FCC unit and catalyst technologies. FCC feedstock quality can have a significant influence on the composition of FCC naphtha. However, even extremely paraffinic or aromatic feeds can yield substantial levels of both olefins and aromatics in FCC naphtha, particularly when compared to the levels proposed in a reformulated gasoline pool.

  4. Reformulated gasolines: The experience of Mexico City Metropolitan Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, H.B.; Jardon, R.T.; Echeverria, R.S.

    1997-12-31

    The introduction of several reformulated gasolines into the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone (MCMZ) in the middle 1986 is an example of using fuel composition to improve, in theory, the air quality. However, although these changes have resulted in an important reduction of lead airborne concentrations, a worsened situation has been created. Ozone levels in the atmosphere MCMZ have presented a sudden rise since the introduction of the first reformulated gasoline, reaching in the 1990`s an annual average of 1,700 exceedances to the Mexican Ozone Air Quality Standard (0.11 ppm not to be exceeded 1 hr. a day one day a year). The authors examine the tendency on ozone air quality in MCMZ in relation with the changes in gasoline composition since 1986. The authors also discuss the importance to perform an air quality impact analysis before the introduction of reformulated gasolines in countries where the local economy do not allow to change the old car fleet not fitted with exhaust treatment devices.

  5. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Shabtai, Joseph S.; Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W.; Chornet, Esteban

    2001-01-09

    A high-yield process for converting lignin into reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline compositions of high quality is provided. The process is a two-stage catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage of the process, a lignin feed material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction, followed by a selective hydrocracking reaction which utilizes a superacid catalyst to produce a high oxygen-content depolymerized lignin product mainly composed of alkylated phenols, alkylated alkoxyphenols, and alkylbenzenes. In the second stage of the process, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to an exhaustive etherification reaction, optionally followed by a partial ring hydrogenation reaction, to produce a reformulated, partially oxygenated/etherified gasoline product, which includes a mixture of substituted phenyl/methyl ethers, cycloalkyl methyl ethers, C.sub.7 -C.sub.10 alkylbenzenes, C.sub.6 -C.sub.10 branched and multibranched paraffins, and alkylated and polyalkylated cycloalkanes.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE ALTERNATIVES: MTBE AND ETHANOL ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the U.S. is considering options for additives to reformulated gasoline. To inform this debate the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development is conducting a screening life cycle assessment (LCA) of three gasoline alternatives. These alternatives include gasoline w...

  7. 40 CFR 80.66 - Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... temperature adjusted to 60 degrees Fahrenheit. (b) The percentage of oxygen by weight contained in a gasoline blend, based upon its percentage oxygenate by volume and density, shall exclude denaturants and...

  8. 40 CFR 80.66 - Calculation of reformulated gasoline properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... temperature adjusted to 60 degrees Fahrenheit. (b) The percentage of oxygen by weight contained in a gasoline blend, based upon its percentage oxygenate by volume and density, shall exclude denaturants and...

  9. Additive composition, for gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Vataru, M.

    1989-01-10

    An admixture is described that comprises Diesel fuel and an additive composition added thereto which is between about 0.05 to about 2.0 percent by weight of the fuel, the composition comprising: (a) between about 0.05 and 25% relative weight parts of an organic peroxide, and (b) between about 0.1 and 25% relative weight parts of detergent selected from the component group that consists of: (i) fatty amines; (ii) ethoxylated and propoxylated derivatives of fatty amines; (iii) fatty diamines; (iv) fatty imidazlines; (v) polymeric amines and derivatives thereof; (vi) combination of one or more of the (i) through (v) components with carboxylic acid or acids having from three to forth carbon atoms, (c) from about 99.0 to about 50% by weight of a hydrocarbon solvent.

  10. 40 CFR 80.46 - Measurement of reformulated gasoline and conventional gasoline fuel parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Chromatography, approved October 1, 2010. (vii) ASTM D4468-85 (Reapproved 2011), Standard Test..., tertiary-Amyl Alcohol and C1 to C4 Alcohols in Gasoline by Gas Chromatography, approved October 1, 2013... Determination of Oxygenates in Gasoline by Gas Chromatography and Oxygen Selective Flame Ionization...

  11. The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report (Part II) concludes a two part study of The Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) assessment of Reformulated Gasoline (RFG). The data contained herein updates EIA`s previous findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The major findings of Part II have not changed considerably from Part I: Supplies of RFG are adequate to meet demand, but a tight supply-demand balance exists, leaving the RFG system with little ability to absorb unexpected supply or delivery system disruption. In December 1994, the estimated demand for RFG was 2.6 million barrels per day, with the production capability just meeting this demand. The study concludes that current prices for RFG are consistent with the costs underlying the product, and the difference in RFG and conventional gasoline indicates confidence in supply. The study also follows the impact of recent events such as: postponement of the Renewable Oxygenate Standard, the decision to require importers to use the U.S. average baseline for limiting emissions, the disruption of the Colonial Pipeline in Texas, and Pennsylvania`s request to opt-out of the RFG program.

  12. The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-29

    This report is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains EIA`s findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The data contained herein should assist members of the Congress, Federal, State and local governments, analysts, researchers, the media and academia to understand the RFG program and the current status of implementation. The second volume contains 10 appendices that include letter from Congressman Dingell, survey results, survey forms, and historical summary data. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are printed in Volumes 1 and 2.

  13. The Energy Information Administration`s assessment of reformulated gasoline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-28

    This report is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains EIA`s findings and analyses on reformulated gasoline as it affects the petroleum industry. The data contained herein should assist members of the Congress, Federal, State and local governments, analysts, researchers, the media and academia to understand the RFG program and the current status of implementation. This second volume contains 10 appendices that include letter from Congressman Dingell, survey results, survey forms, and historical summary data. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are printed in Volumes 1 and 2.

  14. Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives.

    PubMed Central

    Reese, E; Kimbrough, R D

    1993-01-01

    The acute toxicity of gasoline; its components benzene, toluene, and xylene; and the additives ethanol, methanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether are reviewed. All of these chemicals are only moderately to mildly toxic at acute doses. Because of their volatility, these compounds are not extensively absorbed dermally unless the exposed skin is occluded. Absorption through the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract is quite efficient. After ingestion, the principal danger for a number of these chemicals, particularly gasoline, is aspiration pneumonia, which occurs mainly in children. It is currently not clear whether aspiration pneumonia would still be a problem if gasoline were diluted with ethanol or methanol. During the normal use of gasoline or mixtures of gasoline and the other solvents as a fuel, exposures would be much lower than the doses that have resulted in poisoning. No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course of using automotive fuels. PMID:8020435

  15. Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, E.; Kimbrough, R.D.

    1993-12-01

    The acute toxicity of gasoline; its components benzene, toluene, and xylene; and the additives ethanol, methanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether are reviewed. All of these chemicals are only moderately to mildly toxic at acute doses. Because of their volatility, these compounds are not extensively absorbed dermally unless the exposed skin is occluded. Absorption through the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract is quite efficient. After ingestion, the principal danger for a number of these chemicals, particularly gasoline, is aspiration pneumonia, which occurs mainly in children. It is currently not clear whether aspiration pneumonia would still be a problem if gasoline were diluted with ethanol or methanol. During the normal use of gasoline or mixtures of gasoline and the other solvents as a fuel, exposures would be much lower than the doses that have resulted in poisoning. No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course of using automotive fuels. 128 refs., 7 tabs.

  16. Fuel cycle evaluations of biomass-ethanol and reformulated gasoline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, K.S.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is using the total fuel cycle analysis (TFCA) methodology to evaluate energy choices. The National Energy Strategy (NES) identifies TFCA as a tool to describe and quantify the environmental, social, and economic costs and benefits associated with energy alternatives. A TFCA should quantify inputs and outputs, their impacts on society, and the value of those impacts that occur from each activity involved in producing and using fuels, cradle-to-grave. New fuels and energy technologies can be consistently evaluated and compared using TFCA, providing a sound basis for ranking policy options that expand the fuel choices available to consumers. This study is limited to creating an inventory of inputs and outputs for three transportation fuels: (1) reformulated gasoline (RFG) that meets the standards of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE); (2) gasohol (E10), a mixture of 10% ethanol made from municipal solid waste (MSW) and 90% gasoline; and (3) E95, a mixture of 5% gasoline and 95% ethanol made from energy crops such as grasses and trees. The ethanol referred to in this study is produced from lignocellulosic material-trees, grass, and organic wastes -- called biomass. The biomass is converted to ethanol using an experimental technology described in more detail later. Corn-ethanol is not discussed in this report. This study is limited to estimating an inventory of inputs and outputs for each fuel cycle, similar to a mass balance study, for several reasons: (1) to manage the size of the project; (2) to provide the data required for others to conduct site-specific impact analysis on a case-by-case basis; (3) to reduce data requirements associated with projecting future environmental baselines and other variables that require an internally consistent scenario.

  17. DECISION-MAKING, SCIENCE AND GASOLINE ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to serve two major purposes. The first use was as an octane-enhancer to replace organic lead, beginning in 1979. The second use, which began about 1992, was as an oxygenated additive to meet requirements ...

  18. Ferreting Out the Identity of Gasoline Additives

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical dispersing agents for oil spills, hydraulic fracturing fluids for natural-gas production, and chemicals serving as gasoline additives share a common characteristic—for the most part, they are proprietary compounds. In the name of competitive advantage, companies carefull...

  19. 7 CFR 3201.103 - Gasoline fuel additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Gasoline fuel additives. 3201.103 Section 3201.103... Designated Items § 3201.103 Gasoline fuel additives. (a) Definition. Chemical agents added to gasoline to increase octane levels, improve lubricity, and provide engine cleaning properties to gasoline-fired...

  20. Urban ozone air quality impact of emissions from vehicles using reformulated gasolines and M85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chock, D. P.; Winkler, S. L.; Chang, T. Y.; Rudy, S. J.; Shen, Z. K.

    The urban ozone air quality impact of exhaust emissions from vehicles using reformulated gasolines and flexible/variable-fuel vehicles using M85 has been studied using emissions data from the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program and a single-cell trajectory air quality model with two different chemical mechanisms (the updated version of Carbon-Bond-IV (CB4) and the LCC mechanism). Peak ozone concentrations are predicted for each fuel for all combinations of the following ambient conditions: low and high atmospheric dilution or mixing height, four NMOG/NO x ratios, two each of the initial NMOG concentration, the vehicular contribution to the ambient air, and the NMOG composition of the initial ambient mixture. The ozone impact of a fuel dependent strongly on the atmospheric dilution and NMOG/NO x ratio of an area. The differences in ozone impact among fuels are limited under the condition of high atmospheric dilution and a high NMOG/NO x ratio. The ozone-forming potentials (OFPs) for the exhaust emissions based on the maximum incremental reactivities (MIRs) for various fuels are generally well correlated with model-calculated peak ozone levels at a low NMOG/NO x ratio. These OFPs can serve to separate out fuels with rather different reactivities, but not fuels with comparable reactivities. Model-calculated ozone levels for various fuels based on CB4 and LCC mechanisms are relatively well correlated at low NMOG/NO x ratios, but much less so at higher ratios. Fuels with a high aromatic content, including high-toluene fuels, tend to be ranked more favorably by CB4 than by LCC. On the other hand, M85 is ranked more favorably by LCC than by CB4. Fuels with a low 90% boiling point and a low content of aromatics and olefins are generally less reactive. M85 would be an attractive fuel if the formaldehyde emissions could be curtailed significantly.

  1. 40 CFR 80.78 - Controls and prohibitions on reformulated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... motor vehicles or racing boats that are used only in sanctioned racing events, provided that product transfer documents associated with such gasoline, and any pump stand from which such gasoline is dispensed... conventional gasoline that is restricted for use in racing motor vehicles or racing boats that are used only...

  2. Gasoline additive requirements for today's smaller engines

    SciTech Connect

    Udelhofen, J.H.; Zahalka, T.L

    1988-01-01

    The performance and driveability of today's smaller engines, particularly those with port fuel injectors, often are adversely affected by deposits at various places throughout the fuel induction system. These deposits can, however, be controlled by the use of optimal detergent additives, which are surface-active agents containing polar heads and hydrocarbon tails. For convenience in discussion, the gasoline detergents may be divided into two groups: low and high molecular weight. Low molecular weight detergents typically are more effective in forming protective films on metal surfaces, and high molecular weight detergents are more effective in dispersing deposit precursors.

  3. Decision-Making, Science and Gasoline Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. W.; Small, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    Methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to serve two major purposes. The first use was as an octane-enhancer to replace organic lead, beginning in 1979. The second use, which began about 1992, was as a oxygenated additive to meet requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Generally, the amount of MTBE used for octane enhancement was lower than that required to meet CAAA requirements. An unintended consequence of MTBE use has been widespread groundwater contamination. The decision to use certain amounts of MTBE or other chemcials as gasoline additives is the outcome of economic, regulatory, policy, political, and scientific considerations. Decision makers ask questions such as "How do ground water impacts change with changing MTBE content? How many wells would be impacted? and What are the associated costs?" These are best answered through scientific inquiry, but many different approaches could be developed. Decision criteria include time, money, comprehensiveness, and complexity of the approach. Because results must be communicated to a non-technical audience, there is a trade off between the complexity of the approach and the ability to convince economists, lawyers and policy makers that results make sense. The question on MTBE content posed above was investigated using transport models, a release scenario and gasoline composition. Because of the inability of transport models to predict future concentrations, an approach was chosen to base comparative assessment on a calibrated model. By taking this approach, "generic" modeling with arbitrarily selected parameters was avoided and the validity of the simulation results rests upon relatively small extrapolations from the original calibrated models. A set of simulations was performed that assumed 3% (octane enhancement) and 11% (CAAA) MTBE in gasoline. The results were that ground water concentrations would be reduced in proportion to the reduction of MTBE in the fuel

  4. Gasoline Composition Regulations Affecting LUST Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments in 1990 imposed requirements on gasoline composition in the United States. Impacts to ground water are affected by the provisions that required oxygenated additives and limited benzene concentration. Reformulated and oxygenated gasoline w...

  5. 40 CFR 80.46 - Measurement of reformulated gasoline fuel parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Chromatography, approved November 1, 2007. (ii) ASTM standard method D1319-03 e1 (“ASTM D1319”), Standard Test... Determination of Olefin Content of Gasolines by Supercritical-Fluid Chromatography, approved November 1, 2005..., ETBE, TAME, DIPE, tertiary-Amyl Alcohol and C1 to C4 Alcohols in Gasoline by Gas...

  6. 40 CFR 80.46 - Measurement of reformulated gasoline fuel parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Chromatography, approved November 1, 2007. (ii) ASTM standard method D1319-03 e1 (“ASTM D1319”), Standard Test... Determination of Olefin Content of Gasolines by Supercritical-Fluid Chromatography, approved November 1, 2005..., ETBE, TAME, DIPE, tertiary-Amyl Alcohol and C1 to C4 Alcohols in Gasoline by Gas...

  7. The EPA National Fuels Surveillance Network. I. Trace constituents in gasoline and commercial gasoline fuel additives.

    PubMed Central

    Jungers, R H; Lee, R E; von Lehmden, D J

    1975-01-01

    A National Fuels Surveillance Network has been established to collect gasoline and other fuels through the 10 regional offices of the Environmental Protection Agency. Physical, chemical, and trace element analytical determinations are made on the collected fuel samples to detect components which may present an air pollution hazard or poison exhaust catalytic control devices. A summary of trace elemental constituents in over 50 gasoline samples and 18 commercially marketed consumer purchased gasoline additives is presented. Quantities of Mn, Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu, Fe, Sb, B, Mg, Pb, and S were found in most regular and premium gasoline. Environmental implications of trace constituents in gasoline are discussed. PMID:1157783

  8. Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut

    EIA Publications

    2004-01-01

    In October 2003, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those states for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two states over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline.

  9. 75 FR 26653 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Reformulated Gasoline and Diesel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... 26653-26662] [FR Doc No: 2010-11005] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R09-OAR-2009..., 2009 (74 FR 33196), EPA proposed to approve revisions to the California regulations for reformulated..., 2009, as revisions to the California SIP. On July 21, 2009 (74 FR 35838), EPA issued a correction...

  10. 40 CFR 80.46 - Measurement of reformulated gasoline fuel parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Chromatography, approved November 1, 2007. (ii) ASTM standard method D1319-03 1 (“ASTM D1319”), Standard Test... Chromatography, approved November 1, 2004. (v) ASTM standard method D2622-05 (“ASTM D2622”), Standard Test Method... Gasoline by Gas Chromatography and Oxygen Selective Flame Ionization Detection, approved November 1,...

  11. 40 CFR 80.46 - Measurement of reformulated gasoline fuel parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Chromatography, approved November 1, 2007. (ii) ASTM standard method D1319-03 1 (“ASTM D1319”), Standard Test... Chromatography, approved November 1, 2004. (v) ASTM standard method D2622-05 (“ASTM D2622”), Standard Test Method... Gasoline by Gas Chromatography and Oxygen Selective Flame Ionization Detection, approved November 1,...

  12. Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

    1995-04-01

    To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

  13. 40 CFR 80.1613 - Standards and other requirements for gasoline additive manufacturers and blenders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline additive manufacturers and blenders. 80.1613 Section 80.1613 Protection of Environment... Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1613 Standards and other requirements for gasoline additive manufacturers and blenders. Gasoline additive manufacturers and blenders must meet the following requirements: (a) Gasoline...

  14. Impact of reformulated ethanol-gasoline blends on high-emitting vehicles.

    PubMed

    Schifter, I; Díaz, L; González, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    In-use vehicles which are high emitters (HEVs) make a large contribution to the emissions inventory. It is not known, however, whether HEVs share common emissions characteristics, and particularly the effect of ethanol blends. We study this by first examining laboratory measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions on ethanol blends containing 21%, 26% and 30% aromatics, and a reference fuel formulated with methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Switching from MTBE to ethanol fuels on HEVs shows no effect on the total emissions of regulated pollutants, but 1,3-butadiene emissions would increased substantially while the emissions of total carbonyls would not be affected except in the case of acetaldehyde, which would increase with EtOH. The ozone-forming potential of exhaust and evaporative emissions would be less using the EtOH blends and specific reactivity will not be incremented. Lowering the vapour pressure of the gasoline and increasing the proportions of alkylate and isomerate in the composition produces an ethanol-blended fuel with lower environmental impact both in normal vehicles and HEVs.

  15. EMISSIONS FROM TWO OUTBOARD ENGINES OPERATING ON REFORMULATED GASOLINE CONTAINING MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air and water pollutant emissions were measured from two 9.9 HP outboard engines: a two-stroke Evinrude and its four-stroke Honda counterpart. In addition to the measurement of regulated air pollutants, speciated organic pollutants and particulate matter emissions were determi...

  16. The usefulness of air quality monitoring and air quality impact studies before the introduction of reformulated gasolines in developing countries. Mexico City, a real case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, H. A.; Torres, R. J.

    Urban air pollution is a major environmental problem in several developing countries in the world. This phenomenon seems to be related to the growth of both the urban population in large cities and the number of old and poorly maintained car fleets. The expected rise of population in the next century in countries which suffer from lack of capital for air pollution control, means that there is a great potential for the worsening of the air quality. The worldwide promoted policy to phase out lead in gasolines has not proved to be an adequate option in improving the environmental quality. Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) represents a case in which the introduction of reformulated gasolines in an old car fleet has given as a result the reduction of the airborne lead levels but has worsened the ozone concentration of its urban atmosphere. This paper critically analyzes the chronological evolution of the ozone air pollution problem in MCMA after the successive occurrence of several changes in the formulation of low leaded and unleaded gasolines. It also presents evidences of the usefulness potential of air quality monitoring activities and air quality impact studies on the definition of realistic fuel reformulation policies of developing countries.

  17. Role of RIS/APC for manufacturing RFG/LSD. [Refinery Information Systems/Advanced Process Control, ReFormulated Gasoline/Low Sulfur Diesels

    SciTech Connect

    Latour, P.R. )

    1994-01-01

    Revolutionary changes in quality specifications (number, complexity, uncertainty, economic sensitivity) for reformulated gasolines (RFG) and low-sulfur diesels (LSD) are being addressed by powerful, new, computer-integrated manufacturing technology for Refinery Information Systems and Advanced Process Control (RIS/APC). This paper shows how the five active RIS/APC functions: performance measurement, optimization, scheduling, control and integration are used to manufacture new, clean fuels competitively. With current industry spending for this field averaging 2 to 3 cents/bbl crude, many refineries can capture 50 to 100 cents/bbl if the technology is properly employed and sustained throughout refining operations, organizations, and businesses.

  18. Assessment of Gasoline Additive Containing Ditert-butoxypropanol

    SciTech Connect

    West, Brian H.; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Samuel Arthur

    2016-04-01

    The Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center completed analysis and testing of the CPS Powershot gasoline additive under the auspices of the Department of Energy’s Technical Assistance for US Small Businesses in Vehicle Technologies. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify the makeup of the additive, finding a predominance of 2,3-Ditert-Butoxypropanol, also known as Glyceryl Di-Tert-Butyl Ether (GTBE). Blends of the additive at 2 and 4 volume percent were subjected to a number of standard ASTM tests, including Research Octane Number, Motor Octane Number, distillation, and vapor pressure. Results show a high boiling range and low vapor pressure for the additive, and a very modest octane boosting effect in gasoline with and without ethanol.

  19. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  20. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  1. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  2. 40 CFR 80.81 - Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline. 80.81 Section 80.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.81 Enforcement exemptions for California gasoline. (a)(1) The requirements of subparts D, E, F, and J of this part...

  3. Improving the environmental and performance characteristics of vehicles by introducing the surfactant additive into gasoline.

    PubMed

    Magaril, Elena; Magaril, Romen

    2016-09-01

    The operation of modern vehicles requires the introduction of package of fuel additives to ensure the required level of operating characteristics, some of which cannot be achieved by current oil refining methods. The use of additives allows flexibility of impact on the properties of the fuel at minimal cost, increasing the efficiency and environmental safety of vehicles. Among the wide assortment of additives available on the world market, many are surfactants. It has been shown that the introduction of some surfactants into gasoline concurrently reduces losses from gasoline evaporation, improves the mixture formation during injection of gasoline into the engine and improves detergent and anticorrosive properties. The surfactant gasoline additive that provides significant improvement in the quality of gasoline used and environmental and operating characteristics of vehicles has been developed and thoroughly investigated. The results of studies confirming the efficiency of the gasoline additive application are herein presented.

  4. 40 CFR 80.8 - Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels. 80.8 Section 80.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Provisions § 80.8 Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels. The..., blendstocks, fuel additives and renewable fuels for purposes of determining compliance with the...

  5. 76 FR 65382 - Regulation of Fuel and Fuel Additives: Alternative Test Method for Olefins in Gasoline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 RIN 2060-AP17 Regulation of Fuel and Fuel Additives: Alternative Test Method for... alternative test method for olefin content in gasoline. This final rule will provide flexibility to the... environmental benefits achieved from our fuels programs. ] DATES: This rule is effective November 21,...

  6. Evaluation of fuel additives for reduction of material imcompatibilities in methanol-gasoline blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, C. F.; Barbee, J. G.; Knutson, W. K.; Cuellar, J. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Screening tests determined the efficacy of six commercially available additives as modifiers of methanol's corrosivity toward metals and its weakening of tensile properties of nonmetals in automotive fuel systems. From the screening phase, three additives which seemed to protect some of the metals were tested in higher concentrations and binary combinations in search of optimal application conditions. Results indicate that two of the additives have protective properties and combining them increases the protection of the metals corroded by methanol-gasoline blends. Half of the metals in the tests were not corroded. Testing at recommended concentrations and then at higher concentrations and in combinations shows that the additives would have no protective or harmful effects on the nonmetals. Two additives emerged as candidates for application to the protection of metals in automotive methanol-gasoline fuel systems. The additives tested were assigned letter codes to protect their proprietary nature.

  7. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Foreign Refiners § 80.1363 What are the additional requirements under this... under § 80.2(i) for a foreign refinery. (3) Benzene-FRGAS means gasoline produced at a foreign refinery that has been assigned an individual refinery benzene baseline under § 80.1285, has been approved as...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Foreign Refiners § 80.1363 What are the additional requirements under this... under § 80.2(i) for a foreign refinery. (3) Benzene-FRGAS means gasoline produced at a foreign refinery that has been assigned an individual refinery benzene baseline under § 80.1285, has been approved as...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Foreign Refiners § 80.1363 What are the additional requirements under this... under § 80.2(i) for a foreign refinery. (3) Benzene-FRGAS means gasoline produced at a foreign refinery that has been assigned an individual refinery benzene baseline under § 80.1285, has been approved as...

  10. Effect of organometallic fuel additives on nanoparticle emissions from a gasoline passenger car.

    PubMed

    Gidney, Jeremy T; Twigg, Martyn V; Kittelson, David B

    2010-04-01

    Particle size measurements were performed on the exhaust of a car operating on a chassis dynamometer fueled with standard gasoline and gasoline containing low levels of Pb, Fe, and Mn organometallic additives. When additives were present there was a distinct nucleation mode consisting primarily of sub-10 nm nanoparticles. At equal molar dosing Mn and Fe gave similar nanoparticle concentrations at the tailpipe, whereas Pb gave a considerably lower concentration. A catalytic stripper was used to remove the organic component of these particles and revealed that they were mainly solid and, because of their association with inorganic additives, presumably inorganic. Solid nucleation mode nanoparticles of similar size and concentration to those observed here from a gasoline engine with Mn and Fe additives have also been observed from modern heavy-duty diesel engines without aftertreatment at idle, but these solid particles are a small fraction of the primarily volatile nucleation mode particles emitted. The solid nucleation mode particles emitted by the diesel engines are likely derived from metal compounds in the lubrication oil, although carbonaceous particles cannot be ruled out. Significantly, most of these solid nanoparticles emitted by both engine types fall below the 23 nm cutoff of the PMP number regulation.

  11. Influence of Temperature on Thermodynamic Properties of Methyl t-Butyl Ether (MTBE) + Gasoline Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Olmos, R.; Iglesias, M.; Goenaga, J. M.; Resa, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The densities and sound speeds of binary mixtures of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) + (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, isooctane, tert-butyl alcohol) have been measured at temperatures from 288.15 to 323.15 K and at atmospheric pressure over the complete concentration range. The experimental excess volumes and deviations of isentropic compressibility were calculated. The deviation of isentropic compressibility data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models; adequate agreement between the experimental and predicted values is obtained. The data from this study improve the data situation related to gasoline additives and help to understand the MTBE volumetric and acoustic behavior for various chemical systems.

  12. Modelling of flame propagation in the gasoline fuelled Wankel rotary engine with hydrogen additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyanov, E. A.; Zakharov, E. A.; Prikhodkov, K. V.; Levin, Y. V.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, hydrogen has been considered as an alternative fuel for a vehicles power unit. The Wankel engine is the most suitable to be adapted to hydrogen feeding. A hydrogen additive helps to decrease incompleteness of combustion in the volumes near the apex of the rotor. Results of theoretical researches of the hydrogen additives influence on the flame propagation in the combustion chamber of the Wankel rotary engine are presented. The theoretical research shows that the blend of 70% gasoline with 30% hydrogen could accomplish combustion near the T-apex in the stoichiometric mixture and in lean one. Maps of the flame front location versus the angle of rotor rotation and hydrogen fraction are obtained. Relations of a minimum required amount of hydrogen addition versus the engine speed are shown on the engine modes close to the average city driving cycle. The amount of hydrogen addition that could be injected by the nozzle with different flow sections is calculated in order to analyze the capacity of the feed system.

  13. Direct Final Rule Approving Relaxation of Summer Gasoline Volatility Standard for Grant Parish Area Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal Registers and fact sheets on EPA approving the State of Louisiana's request to relax the federal Reid Vapor Pressure standard applicable to gasoline introduced into commerce in Grant Parish, Louisiana during the summer ozone control season.

  14. Gasoline Composition in 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gasoline composition in the U.S is determined by factors related to crude oil source, refinery capacity, geography and regulatory factors. Major regulation derived from the Clean Air Act and its amendments determines the benzene and former oxygenate requirements for reformulated...

  15. Renewable Gasoline, Solvents, and Fuel Additives from 2,3-Butanediol.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Benjamin G; Merriman, Walter W; Quintana, Roxanne L

    2016-07-21

    2,3-Butanediol (2,3-BD) is a renewable alcohol that can be prepared in high yield from biomass sugars. 2,3-BD was selectively dehydrated in a solvent-free process to a complex mixture of 2-ethyl-2,4,5-trimethyl-1,3-dioxolanes and 4,5-dimethyl-2isopropyl dioxolanes with the heterogeneous acid catalyst Amberlyst-15. The purified dioxolane mixture exhibited an anti-knock index of 90.5, comparable to high octane gasoline, and a volumetric net heat of combustion 34 % higher than ethanol. The solubility of the dioxolane mixture in water was only 0.8 g per 100 mL, nearly an order of magnitude lower than the common gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether. The dioxolane mixture has potential applications as a sustainable gasoline blending component, diesel oxygenate, and industrial solvent.

  16. Processing, compliance options can reduce cost of producing new gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-11

    The price difference between US conventional and reformulated gasolines is expected to be 3.1[cents]/gal higher, less than the 4[cents]/gal difference indicated in May by the New York Mercantile Exchange. The difference will be set by the central Atlantic and New England areas, which Bonner Moore projects to be significantly short on reformulated gasoline and long on conventional gasoline. Bonner Moore consultants, in an unpublished report, say refiners in the central Atlantic will not be able to economically convert much more than 70% of their gasoline output to reformulated gasoline. As a result, gasoline movements through the pipeline system supplying Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) 1-the US East Coast-will have to increase to deliver reformulated gasoline produced on the Gulf Coast to New England and the Central Atlantic region. The paper discusses production costs, processing options, price differential, compliance, and benefits from averaging both oxygen and benzene parameters.

  17. Determination of detergent and dispensant additives in gasoline by ring-oven and near infrared hypespectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues e Brito, Lívia; da Silva, Michelle P F; Rohwedder, Jarbas J R; Pasquini, Celio; Honorato, Fernanda A; Pimentel, Maria Fernanda

    2015-03-10

    A method using the ring-oven technique for pre-concentration in filter paper discs and near infrared hyperspectral imaging is proposed to identify four detergent and dispersant additives, and to determine their concentration in gasoline. Different approaches were used to select the best image data processing in order to gather the relevant spectral information. This was attained by selecting the pixels of the region of interest (ROI), using a pre-calculated threshold value of the PCA scores arranged as histograms, to select the spectra set; summing up the selected spectra to achieve representativeness; and compensating for the superimposed filter paper spectral information, also supported by scores histograms for each individual sample. The best classification model was achieved using linear discriminant analysis and genetic algorithm (LDA/GA), whose correct classification rate in the external validation set was 92%. Previous classification of the type of additive present in the gasoline is necessary to define the PLS model required for its quantitative determination. Considering that two of the additives studied present high spectral similarity, a PLS regression model was constructed to predict their content in gasoline, while two additional models were used for the remaining additives. The results for the external validation of these regression models showed a mean percentage error of prediction varying from 5 to 15%.

  18. Gasoline: No end in sight

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, L.

    1995-05-01

    In early 1989, ARCO launched the world`s first reformulated gasoline: EC-1 Regular. The decisions made by the company prior to the production of EC-1 are reviewed. Gasoline is the primary transportation fuel in America. Nearly 98% of the 190 million vehicles in this country run on gasoline or diesel fuel. EC-1 Regular was designed for use in old cars without catalytic converters - the pre-1975 vehicles designed for using leaded fuel. EC-1 Regular cut pollution from those old cars in the Los Angeles Basin by 20%, equivalent to removing thousands of these cars from the road. The advantages of using EC-1 Regular gasoline are discussed.

  19. Production of aromatic green gasoline additives via catalytic pyrolysis of acidulated peanut oil soap stock.

    PubMed

    Hilten, R; Speir, R; Kastner, J; Das, K C

    2011-09-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis was used to generate gasoline-compatible fuel from peanut oil soap stock (PSS), a high free fatty acid feedstock, using a fixed-bed reactor at temperatures between 450 and 550°C with a zeolite catalyst (HZSM-5). PSS fed at 81 gh(-1) along with 100 mL min(-1) inert gas was passed across a 15 g catalyst bed (WHSV=5.4h(-1), gas phase residence time=34s). Results indicate that fuel properties of PSS including viscosity, heating value, and O:C ratio were improved significantly. For PSS processed at 500°C, viscosity was reduced from 59.6 to 0.9 mm(2)s(-1), heating value was increased from 35.8 to 39.3 MJL(-1), and the O:C ratio was reduced from 0.07 to 0.02. Aromatic gasoline components (e.g., BTEX), were formed in concentrations as high as 94% (v/v) in catalytically-cracked PSS with yields ranging from 22% to 35% (v/v of PSS feed).

  20. Diesel engines vs. spark ignition gasoline engines -- Which is ``greener``?

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbanks, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    Criteria emissions, i.e., NO{sub x}, PM, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}, from recently manufactured automobiles, compared on the basis of what actually comes out of the engines, the diesel engine is greener than spark ignition gasoline engines and this advantage for the diesel engine increases with time. SI gasoline engines tend to get out of tune more than diesel engines and 3-way catalytic converters and oxygen sensors degrade with use. Highway measurements of NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO revealed that for each model year, 10% of the vehicles produce 50% of the emissions and older model years emit more than recent model year vehicles. Since 1974, cars with SI gasoline engines have uncontrolled emission until the 3-way catalytic converter reaches operating temperature, which occurs after roughly 7 miles of driving. Honda reports a system to be introduced in 1998 that will alleviate this cold start problem by storing the emissions then sending them through the catalytic converter after it reaches operating temperature. Acceleration enrichment, wherein considerable excess fuel is introduced to keep temperatures down of SI gasoline engine in-cylinder components and catalytic converters so these parts meet warranty, results in 2,500 times more CO and 40 times more H{sub 2} being emitted. One cannot kill oneself, accidentally or otherwise, with CO from a diesel engine vehicle in a confined space. There are 2,850 deaths per year attributable to CO from SI gasoline engine cars. Diesel fuel has advantages compared with gasoline. Refinery emissions are lower as catalytic cracking isn`t necessary. The low volatility of diesel fuel results in a much lower probability of fires. Emissions could be improved by further reducing sulfur and aromatics and/or fuel additives. Reformulated fuel has become the term covering reducing the fuels contribution to emissions. Further PM reduction should be anticipated with reformulated diesel and gasoline fuels.

  1. Modification of Baselines for Gasoline Produced or Imported for Use in Hawaii, Alaska, and U.S. Territories Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This documents for modifications to fuel regulations to allow refiners and importers of conventional gasoline used in Hawaii, Alaska and U.S. Territories to petition EPA to change the way in which they calculate emissions from such gasoline.

  2. Reformulated diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-03-28

    Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

  3. Odour and flavour thresholds of gasoline additives (MTBE, ETBE and TAME) and their occurrence in Dutch drinking water collection areas.

    PubMed

    van Wezel, Annemarie; Puijker, Leo; Vink, Cees; Versteegh, Ans; de Voogt, Pim

    2009-07-01

    The use of ETBE (ethyl-tert-butylether) as gasoline additive has recently grown rapidly. Contamination of aquatic systems is well documented for MTBE (methyl-tert-butylether), but less for other gasoline additives. Due to their mobility they may easily reach drinking water collection areas. Odour and flavour thresholds of MTBE are known to be low, but for ETBE and TAME (methyl-tert-amylether) hardly information is available. The objective here is to determine these thresholds for MTBE, ETBE and TAME, and relate these to concentrations monitored in thousands of samples from Dutch drinking water collection areas. For ETBE odour and flavour thresholds are low with 1-2microgL(-1), for MTBE and TAME they range from 7 to 16microg L(-1). In most groundwater collection areas MTBE concentrations are below 0.1microg L(-1). In phreatic groundwaters in sandy soils not covered by a protective soil layer, occasionally MTBE occurs at higher concentrations. For surface water collection areas a minority of the locations is free of MTBE. For river bank and dune infiltrates, at a few locations the odour and flavour threshold is exceeded. For ETBE fewer monitoring data are available. ETBE was found in 2 out of 37 groundwater collection areas, in concentrations below 1microgL(-1). In the surface water collection areas monitored ETBE was found in concentrations near to the odour and flavour thresholds. The low odour and flavour thresholds combined with the high mobility and persistence of these compounds, their high production volumes and their increased use may yield problems with future production of drinking water.

  4. 76 FR 5319 - Regulation of Fuel and Fuel Additives: Alternative Test Method for Olefins in Gasoline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 RIN 2060-AP17 Regulation of Fuel and Fuel Additives: Alternative Test Method for... correlated to the fuel parameter's respective EPA designated test method. These alternative test methods are... sections 114(a) and 301(a) of the CAA. Regulation of Fuel and Fuel Additives: Alternative Test Method...

  5. Relaxation of Summer Gasoline Volatility Standard for Mecklenburg and Gaston counties, North Carolina Direct final action Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Supporting documents on EPA's final rule that relaxes the federal Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) standard applicable to gasoline sold in Mecklenburg and Gaston counties, North Carolina during the summer season (June 1st to September 15th) are provided.

  6. Multifunctional gasoline additives

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, M.E.

    1983-10-18

    The reaction products of epoxides, containing from about 6 to about 20 carbon atoms, with unsubstituted alkylenediamines, N-alkyl alkylenediamines, N-alkoxyalkyl alkylenediamines and poly (ethyleneamines) are effective carburetor detergents and reduce deposits on various components of internal combustion engines. Internal epoxides containing at least one branched alkyl group afford reaction products with particularly desirable properties.

  7. Multifunctional gasoline additives

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, M.E.

    1981-10-20

    The reaction products of glycidyl ethers, wherein the alkoxy portion contains from about 6 to about 20 carbon atoms, with alkylenediamines, n-alkyl alkylenediamines, and n-alkoxyalkyl alkylenediamines are effective carburetor detergents and reduce deposits on various components of internal combustion engines. An example is the reaction product of the glycidyl ether whose alkoxy group is a mixture of 12-14 carbon atom chains with n-tallow-1,3-propylenediamine.

  8. 40 CFR 80.1363 - What are the additional requirements under this subpart for gasoline produced at foreign refineries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... movement and storage of the Certified Benzene-FRGAS from the refinery to the load port, and from this... description of the gasoline's movement and storage between production at the source refinery and vessel... this subpart. (3) The forum for any civil or criminal enforcement action related to the provisions...

  9. 40 CFR 80.410 - What are the additional requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries having...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sample; (iii) Review original documents that reflect movement and storage of the certified Sulfur-FRGAS... as specified in paragraph (n)(1) of this section, and a description of the gasoline's movement and... the United States related to the requirements of this subpart H. (3) The forum for any civil...

  10. 40 CFR 80.410 - What are the additional requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries having...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sample; (iii) Review original documents that reflect movement and storage of the certified Sulfur-FRGAS... as specified in paragraph (n)(1) of this section, and a description of the gasoline's movement and... the United States related to the requirements of this subpart H. (3) The forum for any civil...

  11. 40 CFR 80.410 - What are the additional requirements for gasoline produced at foreign refineries having...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sample; (iii) Review original documents that reflect movement and storage of the certified Sulfur-FRGAS... as specified in paragraph (n)(1) of this section, and a description of the gasoline's movement and... the United States related to the requirements of this subpart H. (3) The forum for any civil...

  12. Influence of sulphide Cu (I) promoting additives concentration on acid and catalytic properties of high-silica zeolites in straight-run gasoline conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomyakov, I. S.; Erofeev, V. I.; Kuok Khan, Fan

    2016-09-01

    In present article the influence of Cu2S promoting additives concentration on acid and catalytic properties of high silica MFI-type zeolites is investigated in the process of conversion of straight-run gasoline fractions of gas condensate into high octane components of motor fuels. It was shown that zeolite modified with 1% of Cu2S nanoscaled powder possesses the highest acid centers concentration and highest catalytic activity.

  13. Eliminating MTBE in Gasoline in 2006

    EIA Publications

    2006-01-01

    A review of the market implications resulting from the rapid change from methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to ethanol-blended reformulated gasoline (RFG) on the East Coast and in Texas. Strains in ethanol supply and distribution will increase the potential for price volatility in these regions this summer.

  14. Nietzsche contra "Self-Reformulation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennell, J.

    2005-01-01

    Not only do the writings of Nietzsche--early and late--fail to support the pedagogy of self-reformulation, this doctrine embodies what for him is worst in man and would destroy that which is higher. The pedagogy of self-reformulation is also incoherent. In contrast, Nietzsche offers a fruitful and comprehensive theory of education that, while…

  15. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  16. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  17. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  18. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  19. 40 CFR 80.340 - What standards and requirements apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention... gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG)? (a) Any refiner who...

  20. The Effect of Ethanol Addition to Gasoline on Low- and Intermediate-Temperature Heat Release under Boosted Conditions in Kinetically Controlled Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuilleumier, David Malcolm

    The detailed study of chemical kinetics in engines has become required to further advance engine efficiency while simultaneously lowering engine emissions. This push for higher efficiency engines is not caused by a lack of oil, but by efforts to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, that cause global warming. To operate in more efficient manners while reducing traditional pollutant emissions, modern internal combustion piston engines are forced to operate in regimes in which combustion is no longer fully transport limited, and instead is at least partially governed by chemical kinetics of combusting mixtures. Kinetically-controlled combustion allows the operation of piston engines at high compression ratios, with partially-premixed dilute charges; these operating conditions simultaneously provide high thermodynamic efficiency and low pollutant formation. The investigations presented in this dissertation study the effect of ethanol addition on the low-temperature chemistry of gasoline type fuels in engines. These investigations are carried out both in a simplified, fundamental engine experiment, named Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, as well as in more applied engine systems, named Gasoline Compression Ignition engines and Partial Fuel Stratification engines. These experimental investigations, and the accompanying modeling work, show that ethanol is an effective scavenger of radicals at low temperatures, and this inhibits the low temperature pathways of gasoline oxidation. Further, the investigations measure the sensitivity of gasoline auto-ignition to system pressure at conditions that are relevant to modern engines. It is shown that at pressures above 40 bar and temperatures below 850 Kelvin, gasoline begins to exhibit Low-Temperature Heat Release. However, the addition of 20% ethanol raises the pressure requirement to 60 bar, while the temperature requirement remains unchanged. These findings have major implications for a range of modern engines

  1. Trends in auto emissions and gasoline composition.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R F

    1993-12-01

    The invention of the spark-ignited internal combustion engine provided a market for a petroleum middle distillate, gasoline, about 100 years ago. The internal combustion engine and gasoline have co-evolved until motor vehicles now annually consume about 110 billion gallons of gasoline in the United States. Continuing air pollution problems and resulting regulatory pressures are driving the need for further automotive emissions reductions. Engine and emissions control technology provided most earlier reductions. Changing the composition of gasoline will play a major role in the next round of reductions. The engineering and regulatory definition of a reformulated gasoline is proceeding rapidly, largely as the result of an auto and oil industry cooperative data generation program. It is likely that this new, reformulated gasoline will be introduced in high-ozone regions of the United States in the mid-1990s. Alternative clean fuels, primarily methane, methanol, and liquid petroleum gas, will become more widely used during this same period, probably first in fleet operations.

  2. Trends in auto emissions and gasoline composition.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R F

    1993-01-01

    The invention of the spark-ignited internal combustion engine provided a market for a petroleum middle distillate, gasoline, about 100 years ago. The internal combustion engine and gasoline have co-evolved until motor vehicles now annually consume about 110 billion gallons of gasoline in the United States. Continuing air pollution problems and resulting regulatory pressures are driving the need for further automotive emissions reductions. Engine and emissions control technology provided most earlier reductions. Changing the composition of gasoline will play a major role in the next round of reductions. The engineering and regulatory definition of a reformulated gasoline is proceeding rapidly, largely as the result of an auto and oil industry cooperative data generation program. It is likely that this new, reformulated gasoline will be introduced in high-ozone regions of the United States in the mid-1990s. Alternative clean fuels, primarily methane, methanol, and liquid petroleum gas, will become more widely used during this same period, probably first in fleet operations. PMID:7517353

  3. 40 CFR 80.1654 - California gasoline requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false California gasoline requirements. 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1654 California gasoline requirements. (a) California gasoline exemption. California gasoline that complies with all the requirements...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1652 - Reporting requirements for gasoline refiners, gasoline importers, oxygenate producers, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting requirements for gasoline refiners, gasoline importers, oxygenate producers, and oxygenate importers. 80.1652 Section 80.1652... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1652 Reporting requirements for gasoline...

  5. Gasoline poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... The poisonous ingredients in gasoline are chemicals called hydrocarbons, which are substances that contain only hydrogen and ... dangerous and is not advised. References Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  6. Impact of reformulated fuels on motor vehicle emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas

    Motor vehicles continue to be an important source of air pollution. Increased vehicle travel and degradation of emission control systems have offset some of the effects of increasingly stringent emission standards and use of control technologies. A relatively new air pollution control strategy is the reformulation of motor vehicle fuels, both gasoline and diesel, to make them cleaner- burning. Field experiments in a heavily traveled northern California roadway tunnel revealed that use of oxygenated gasoline reduced on-road emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) by 23 +/- 6% and 19 +/- 8%, respectively, while oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions were not significantly affected. The introduction of reformulated gasoline (RFG) in California led to large changes in gasoline composition including decreases in alkene, aromatic, benzene, and sulfur contents, and an increase in oxygen content. The combined effects of RFG and fleet turnover between summers 1994 and 1997 were decreases in on-road vehicle exhaust emissions of CO, non-methane VOC, and NOx by 31 +/- 5, 43 +/- 8, and 18 +/- 4%, respectively. Although it was difficult to separate the fleet turnover and RFG contributions to these changes, it was clear that the effect of RFG was greater for VOC than for NOx. The RFG effect on exhaust emissions of benzene was a 30-40% reduction. Use of RFG reduced the reactivity of liquid gasoline and gasoline headspace vapors by 23 and 19%, respectively. Increased use of methyl tert-butyl ether in gasoline led to increased concentrations of highly reactive formaldehyde and isobutene in vehicle exhaust. As a result, RFG reduced the reactivity of exhaust emissions by only about 5%. Per unit mass of fuel burned, heavy-duty diesel trucks emit about 25 times more fine particle mass and 15-20 times the number of fine particles compared to light-duty vehicles. Exhaust fine particle emissions from heavy-duty diesels contain more black carbon than particulate

  7. Test methods for evaluating reformulated fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Croudace, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced regulations in the 1989 Clean Air Act Amendment governing the reformulation of gasoline and diesel fuels to improve air quality. These statutes drove the need for a fast and accurate method for analyzing product composition, especially aromatic and oxygenate content. The current method, gas chromatography, is slow, expensive, non portable, and requires a trained chemist to perform the analysis. The new mid-infrared spectroscopic method uses light to identify and quantify the different components in fuels. Each individual fuel component absorbs a specific wavelength of light depending on the molecule`s unique chemical structure. The quantity of light absorbed is proportional to the concentration of that fuel component in the mixture. The mid-infrared instrument has significant advantages; it is easy to use, rugged, portable, fully automated and cost effective. It can be used to measure multiple oxygenate or aromatic components in unknown fuel mixtures. Regulatory agencies have begun using this method in field compliance testing; petroleum refiners and marketers use it to monitor compliance, product quality and blending accuracy.

  8. Query Reformulation for Clinical Decision Support Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Query Reformulation for Clinical Decision Support Search Luca Soldaini, Arman Cohan, Andrew Yates, Nazli Goharian, Ophir Frieder Information...work, we present a query reformulation approach that addresses the unique formulation of case reports, making them suitable to be used on a general... reformulation approach does not directly take into account the generic question type (diagnosis, test, treatment) provided with each approach. To ameliorate

  9. A Theory of Justified Reformulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    systems , intelligent or otherwise, are limited by the conceptualizations of the world given to them by their designers. This thesis explores issues in the...construction of adaptive systems that can incrementally reformulate their conceptualizations to achieve computational efficiency or descriptional...Present day systems , intelligent or otherwise, are limited by the conceptualizations of the world given to them by their designers. This thesis explores

  10. 40 CFR 80.1503 - What are the product transfer document requirements for gasoline-ethanol blends, gasolines, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline-ethanol blends, gasolines, and conventional blendstocks for oxygenate blending... Gasoline-Ethanol Blends § 80.1503 What are the product transfer document requirements for gasoline-ethanol... upstream of an ethanol blending facility. (1) In addition to any other product transfer...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1503 - What are the product transfer document requirements for gasoline-ethanol blends, gasolines, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline-ethanol blends, gasolines, and conventional blendstocks for oxygenate blending... Gasoline-Ethanol Blends § 80.1503 What are the product transfer document requirements for gasoline-ethanol... upstream of an ethanol blending facility. (1) In addition to any other product transfer...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1503 - What are the product transfer document requirements for gasoline-ethanol blends, gasolines, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline-ethanol blends, gasolines, and conventional blendstocks for oxygenate blending... Gasoline-Ethanol Blends § 80.1503 What are the product transfer document requirements for gasoline-ethanol... upstream of an ethanol blending facility. (1) In addition to any other product transfer...

  13. GENERIC VERIFICATION PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINATION OF EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS OBTAINED BY USE OF ALTERNATIVE OR REFORMULATED LIQUID FUELS, FUEL ADDITIVES, FUEL EMULSIONS AND LUBRICANTS FOR HIGHWAY AND NONROAD USE DISEL ENGINES AND LIGHT DUTY GASOLINE ENGINES AND VEHICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report sets standards by which the emissions reduction provided by fuel and lubricant technologies can be tested and be tested in a comparable way. It is a generic protocol under the Environmental Technology Verification program.

  14. TEST/QA PLAN FOR THE VERIFICATION TESTING OF ALTERNATIVES OR REFORMULATED LIQUID FUELS, FUEL ADDITIVES, FUEL EMULSONS, AND LUBRICANTS FOR HIGHWAY AND NONROAD USE HEAVY DUTY DIESEL ENGINES AND LIGHT DUTY GASOLINE ENGINES AND VEHICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established the Environmental Technology Verification Program to accelerate the development and commercialization of improved environmental technology through third party verification and reporting of product performance. Research Triangl...

  15. Customer exposure to gasoline vapors during refueling at service stations.

    PubMed

    Hakkola, M A; Saarinen, L H

    2000-09-01

    Gasoline is a volatile complex mixture of hydrocarbon compounds that is easily vaporized during handling under normal conditions. Modern reformulated gasoline also contains oxygenates to enhance octane number and reduce ambient pollution. This study measured the difference in the exposure of customers to gasoline and oxygenate vapors during refueling in service stations with and without vapor recovery systems. Field measurements were carried out at two self-service stations. One was equipped with Stage I and the other with Stage II vapor recovery systems. At Stage I stations there is vapor recovery only during delivery from road tanker, and at Stage II stations additional vapor recovery during refueling. The exposure of 20 customers was measured at both stations by collecting air samples from their breathing zone into charcoal tubes during refueling with 95-octane reformulated gasoline. Each sample represented two consecutive refuelings. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory by gas chromatography using mass-selective detection for vapor components. The Raid vapor pressure of gasoline was 70 kPa and an oxygen content 2 wt%. Oxygenated gasoline contained 7 percent methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) and 5 percent methyl tert-amyl ether (MtAE). The geometric mean concentrations of hydrocarbons (C3-C11) in the customers' breathing zone was 85 mg/m3 (range 2.5-531 mg/m3) at the Stage I service station and 18 mg/m3 (range < 0.2-129 mg/m3) at the Stage II service station. The geometric mean of the exposure of customers to MtBE during refueling at the Stage I service station was 15.3 mg/m3 (range 1.8-74 mg/m3), and at the Stage II service station 3.4 mg/m3 (range 0.2-16 mg/m3). The differences in exposure were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mean refueling times were 57 seconds (range 23-207) at the Stage I and 66 seconds (range 18-120) at the Stage II station. The measurements were done on consecutive days at the various service stations. The temperature ranged

  16. Degradation of a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives by Rhodococcus aetherivorans and Rhodococcus wratislaviensis.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Marc; Labbé, Diane; Thouand, Gérald; Greer, Charles W; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise

    2009-12-01

    Two strains, identified as Rhodococcus wratislaviensis IFP 2016 and Rhodococcus aetherivorans IFP 2017, were isolated from a microbial consortium that degraded 15 petroleum compounds or additives when provided in a mixture containing 16 compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, octane, hexadecane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane [isooctane], cyclohexane, cyclohexanol, naphthalene, methyl tert-butyl ether [MTBE], ethyl tert-butyl ether [ETBE], tert-butyl alcohol [TBA], and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate [2-EHN]). The strains had broad degradation capacities toward the compounds, including the more recalcitrant ones, MTBE, ETBE, isooctane, cyclohexane, and 2-EHN. R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 degraded and mineralized to different extents 11 of the compounds when provided individually, sometimes requiring 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN) as a cosolvent. R. aetherivorans IFP 2017 degraded a reduced spectrum of substrates. The coculture of the two strains degraded completely 13 compounds, isooctane and 2-EHN were partially degraded (30% and 73%, respectively), and only TBA was not degraded. Significant MTBE and ETBE degradation rates, 14.3 and 116.1 mumol of ether degraded h(-1) g(-1) (dry weight), respectively, were measured for R. aetherivorans IFP 2017. The presence of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEXs) had a detrimental effect on ETBE and MTBE biodegradation, whereas octane had a positive effect on the MTBE biodegradation by R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016. BTEXs had either beneficial or detrimental effects on their own degradation by R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016. Potential genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation in the two strains were identified and partially sequenced.

  17. Comparison of off-cycle and cold-start emissions from dedicated NGVS and gasoline vehicles. Final report, June 1995-August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C.S.; Chan, L.M.

    1997-02-11

    This program compared pollutant emissions from original equipment manufacturer (OEM) produced natural gas vehicles, under realistic driving conditions such as cold start and hard accelerations, to emissions from similar vehicles using gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). The vehicles tested were Ford Crown Victorias, Dodge Caravans, and Dodge Ram Vans. Test results showed that the OEM NGVs produce much lower emissions of non-methane organic gas (NMOG), and toxic air contaminants, and generally lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) than similar vehicles using either gasoline or reformulated gasoline.

  18. Specification Reformulation During Specification Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Kevin M.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the ARIES Simulation Component (ASC) is to uncover behavioral errors by 'running' a specification at the earliest possible points during the specification development process. The problems to be overcome are the obvious ones the specification may be large, incomplete, underconstrained, and/or uncompilable. This paper describes how specification reformulation is used to mitigate these problems. ASC begins by decomposing validation into specific validation questions. Next, the specification is reformulated to abstract out all those features unrelated to the identified validation question thus creating a new specialized specification. ASC relies on a precise statement of the validation question and a careful application of transformations so as to preserve the essential specification semantics in the resulting specialized specification. This technique is a win if the resulting specialized specification is small enough so the user my easily handle any remaining obstacles to execution. This paper will: (1) describe what a validation question is; (2) outline analysis techniques for identifying what concepts are and are not relevant to a validation question; and (3) identify and apply transformations which remove these less relevant concepts while preserving those which are relevant.

  19. On Reformulating Planning as Dynamic Constraint Satisfaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Jonsson, Ari K.; Morris, Paul; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have reformulated STRIPS planning problems as SAT problems or CSPs. In this paper, we discuss the Constraint-Based Interval Planning (CBIP) paradigm, which can represent planning problems incorporating interval time and resources. We describe how to reformulate mutual exclusion constraints for a CBIP-based system, the Extendible Uniform Remote Operations Planner Architecture (EUROPA). We show that reformulations involving dynamic variable domains restrict the algorithms which can be used to solve the resulting DCSP. We present an alternative formulation which does not employ dynamic domains, and describe the relative merits of the different reformulations.

  20. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  1. Dangerous and cancer-causing properties of products and chemicals in the oil-refining and petrochemical industry--Part XXII: Health hazards from exposure to gasoline containing methyl tertiary butyl ether: study of New Jersey residents.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, M A

    1996-01-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether has caused the following cancers in rats and mice: kidney, testicular, liver, lymphomas, and leukemias. Thus, in the absence of adequate data on humans, it is biologically plausible and prudent to regard methyl tertiary butyl ether-for which there is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals-as a probable human carcinogen. This means that some humans are at extreme risk of contracting cancers resulting from their exposure to oxygenated gasoline containing methyl tertiary butyl ether. Immediately after the introduction of methyl tertiary butyl ether into gasoline, many consumers of this product in New Jersey, New York, Alaska, Maine, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Arizona, Montana, Massachusetts, California, and other areas, experienced a variety of neurotoxic, allergic, and respiratory illnesses. These illnesses were similar to those suffered by refinery workers from the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers Union who mixed methyl tertiary butyl ether with gasoline. Additionally, these illnesses occurred following exposure to extremely low levels of methyl tertiary butyl ether in gasoline, particularly when compared to the adverse health effects that occurred only after exposure to very high levels of conventional gasoline. Thus, gasoline containing methyl tertiary butyl ether exhibited substantially more toxicity in humans than gasoline without this additive. A number of oil industry-sponsored or influenced reports alleged that these illnesses were either unrelated to exposure to reformulated gasoline or were characteristic of some yet-to-be-identified communicable disease. These studies further alleged that the widespread concern was not about illness, but was merely a reaction to the odor and the five cent increase in the price of gasoline. To clarify the significance of this issue, it is important to note that consumers have been using gasoline for many decades, with complaints only occurring following exposure to high

  2. 40 CFR 80.141 - Interim detergent gasoline program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interim detergent gasoline program. 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.141 Interim detergent gasoline... ultimate consumer; (ii) All additized post-refinery component (PRC); and (iii) All detergent additives...

  3. 40 CFR 80.141 - Interim detergent gasoline program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interim detergent gasoline program. 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.141 Interim detergent gasoline... ultimate consumer; (ii) All additized post-refinery component (PRC); and (iii) All detergent additives...

  4. How Do Children Reformulate Their Search Queries?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Sophie; Ford, Nigel; Clough, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This paper investigates techniques used by children in year 4 (age eight to nine) of a UK primary school to reformulate their queries, and how they use information retrieval systems to support query reformulation. Method: An in-depth study analysing the interactions of twelve children carrying out search tasks in a primary school…

  5. About Reformulation in Full-Text IRS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debili, Fathi; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Analyzes different kinds of reformulations used in information retrieval systems where full text databases are accessed through natural language queries. Tests of these reformulations on large full text databases managed by the Syntactic and Probabilistic Indexing and Retrieval of Information in Texts (SPIRIT) system are described, and an expert…

  6. All about gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated gasoline technology now makes gasoline more expensive to produce, but cheaper to buy, than in the early part of the century. Gasoline technology has kept pace with the sophistication of engines in the effort to find ways to produce gasoline of sufficient octane without using lead. Multi-port fuel injection engines caused problems for detergents in gasoline until Cononco installed mechanical injection systems to blend the detergent with gasoline at its terminals. Other problems will develop as computerized fuel controls and small, high horsepower engines enter the market, but the gasoline refiners will be working on their solutions.

  7. 40 CFR 79.32 - Motor vehicle gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor vehicle gasoline. 79.32 Section...) REGISTRATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.32 Motor vehicle gasoline. (a) The following fuels commonly or commercially known or sold as motor vehicle gasoline are...

  8. 40 CFR 79.32 - Motor vehicle gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor vehicle gasoline. 79.32 Section...) REGISTRATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.32 Motor vehicle gasoline. (a) The following fuels commonly or commercially known or sold as motor vehicle gasoline are...

  9. Simultaneous determination of methyl tert-butyl ether, its degradation products and other gasoline additives in soil samples by closed-system purge-and-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Mònica; Lacorte, Sílvia; Barceló, Damià

    2006-11-03

    A new protocol for the simultaneous determination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE); its main degradation products: tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and tert-butyl formate (TBF); other gasoline additives, oxygenate dialkyl ethers: ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE); aromatics: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) and other compounds causing odour events such as dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in soils has been developed. On the basis of US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) method 5035A, a fully automated closed-system purge-and-trap coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) was optimised and permitted to detect microg/kg concentrations in solid matrices avoiding losses of volatile compounds during operation processes. Parameters optimised were the sampling procedure, sample preservation and storage, purging temperature, matrix effects and quantification mode. Using 5 g of sample, detection limits were between 0.02 and 1.63 microg/kg and acceptable method precision and accuracy was obtained provided quantification was performed using adequate internal standards. Soil samples should be analysed as soon as possible after collection, stored under -15 degrees C for not longer than 7 days if degradation products have to be analysed. The non-preservative alternative (empty vial) provided good recoveries of the most analytes when freezing the samples up to 7 day holding time, however, if biologically active soil are analysed the preservation with trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate (Na(3)PO(4).12H(2)O or TSP) is strongly recommended more than sodium bisulphate (NaHSO(4)). The method was finally applied to provide threshold and background levels of several gasoline additives in a point source and in sites not influenced by gasoline spills. The proposed method provides the directions for the future application on real samples in current monitoring programs at gasoline

  10. Automobile gasoline -- quality fuel or commodity

    SciTech Connect

    France, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The commercial availability and use of good quality gasolines are essential for the operation of high-technology automobiles without adverse effects on driveability and emissions. Some current and future fuel requirements for GM vehicles are addressed with a focus on certain trends in fuel composition and properties which are of importance or concern at this time. Examples include the contribution of elevated gasoline volatility to increased evaporative emissions, the compatibility of GM engines with gasolines blended with certain alcohols, and the need for gasolines without contaminants and with sufficient additives, such as detergents to keep port fuel injection systems clean.

  11. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  12. 40 CFR 80.1640 - Standards and requirements that apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline (PCG). 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1640 Standards and requirements that apply to refiners producing gasoline by blending blendstocks into previously certified gasoline...

  13. Atmospheric chemistry studies of exhaust from vehicles operating with reformulated fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; Smith, D.F.; Black, F.M.; Tejada, S.B.

    1997-12-31

    In many areas of the US, ozone concentrations continue to be higher than that specified by the NAAQS. In spite of substantial improvements, automobile exhaust is still one of the major sources of ozone precursors, reactive organic gases and oxides of nitrogen. One strategy for dealing with this emission source is to use fuels that have lower reactivities than conventional gasoline. Thus, a wide range of fuels have been proposed to implement this approach, including reformulated gasoline, methanol and ethanol enhanced fuels, compressed natural gas, liquid propane fuel, among others. The degree of ozone reduction expected from these fuels has only been estimated using reactivity scales which are largely based on modeling results. Further truth testing of model performance is thus required. The present project is being conducted to help validate the predicted ozone forming potential of exhaust mixtures by experimental means and to evaluate the reaction products formed during the photochemical oxidations. In this work, exhaust from vehicles operating on reformulated fuels was generated using the Federal Test Procedure. Exhaust was collected during the first 124 seconds of the FTP and was then injected into a 9,000 L Teflon irradiation chamber. Irradiations were conducted at a reactive organic gas (ROG)/NO{sub x} ratio of 5.5 to accentuate differences in hydrocarbon composition. In cases where the initial ratio was less than the target ratio, an ROG exhaust surrogate was added. The results of irradiations of exhaust mixtures from a single vehicle operated with reformulated gasoline are presented along with time series profiles for the major photochemical reaction products including ozone, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), nitric acid, and tertiary-butyl formate. Mechanisms for forming these products from the major exhaust precursors are also considered.

  14. Reformulating Non-Monotonic Theories for Inference and Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosof, Benjamin N.

    1992-01-01

    We aim to help build programs that do large-scale, expressive non-monotonic reasoning (NMR): especially, 'learning agents' that store, and revise, a body of conclusions while continually acquiring new, possibly defeasible, premise beliefs. Currently available procedures for forward inference and belief revision are exhaustive, and thus impractical: they compute the entire non-monotonic theory, then re-compute from scratch upon updating with new axioms. These methods are thus badly intractable. In most theories of interest, even backward reasoning is combinatoric (at least NP-hard). Here, we give theoretical results for prioritized circumscription that show how to reformulate default theories so as to make forward inference be selective, as well as concurrent; and to restrict belief revision to a part of the theory. We elaborate a detailed divide-and-conquer strategy. We develop concepts of structure in NM theories, by showing how to reformulate them in a particular fashion: to be conjunctively decomposed into a collection of smaller 'part' theories. We identify two well-behaved special cases that are easily recognized in terms of syntactic properties: disjoint appearances of predicates, and disjoint appearances of individuals (terms). As part of this, we also definitionally reformulate the global axioms, one by one, in addition to applying decomposition. We identify a broad class of prioritized default theories, generalizing default inheritance, for which our results especially bear fruit. For this asocially monadic class, decomposition permits reasoning to be localized to individuals (ground terms), and reduced to propositional. Our reformulation methods are implementable in polynomial time, and apply to several other NM formalisms beyond circumscription.

  15. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1295 - How are gasoline benzene credits used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How are gasoline benzene credits used... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1295 How are gasoline benzene credits used? (a) Credit use. (1) Gasoline...

  20. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  1. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  2. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  3. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  4. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  5. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  6. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  7. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  8. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  9. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  10. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1)...

  11. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  12. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  13. 40 CFR 80.211 - What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as blendstock?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... imported gasoline as blendstock? 80.211 Section 80.211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.211 What are the requirements for treating imported gasoline as...

  14. 40 CFR 80.845 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.845 Section 80.845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.845 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of...

  15. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  16. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  17. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  18. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  19. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  20. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  1. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  2. Gasoline from alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, C. R.; Warner, J. P.; Yurchak, S.

    1981-03-01

    This paper discusses laboratory and vehicle performance test results obtained from gasoline produced by the Mobil methanol conversion process. Antiknock qualities, driveability performance, exhaust emission levels, plus other in-car and laboratory characterization tests show the gasoline to compare very favorably with conventional petroleum derived high-octane unleaded gasolines. The methanol conversion process, and its advantages relative to the blending of alcohol-containing fuels, also is discussed briefly.

  3. Rule Reformulation at the Advanced Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelly, Sharon L.

    1993-01-01

    An inductive and interactive classroom technique to help advanced French language students reformulate simplified schemata into more useful insights into French grammar is described. It is proposed that, by developing the ability to revise continually structural hypotheses, students can expand syntactic repertories and improve long-term language…

  4. Written Reformulation in a Modular Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flottum, Kjersti

    1996-01-01

    Examines the relationship between form and use of the reformulation sequence signalled by "c'est-a-dire" in written French and describes this sequence's various functions. The article attempts to show how a modular approach consisting of structural, semantic, pragmatic, and textual components contributes to a new and accurate description of…

  5. Reformulation and Reconstruction: Tasks That Promote "Noticing."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornbury, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Rehabilitates teaching techniques that exploit both the meaning-driven and form-focused potential of reformulation and reconstruction tasks in English-as-a-Second-Language classes. Argues that the potential for focusing learners' attention on form has received little attention in instruction models. (30 references) (Author/CK)

  6. Stylistic Reformulation: Theoretical Premises and Practical Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Jean Marie

    1994-01-01

    Various aspects of writing style are discussed to propose concrete methods for improving students' performance. Topics covered include the relationship between syntactic and cognitive complexity and classroom techniques and the reformulation technique as applied to student writing samples. (Contains 20 references.) (LB)

  7. FORTRAN Versions of Reformulated HFGMC Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Aboudi, Jacob; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    Several FORTRAN codes have been written to implement the reformulated version of the high-fidelity generalized method of cells (HFGMC). Various aspects of the HFGMC and its predecessors were described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most recent being HFGMC Enhancement of MAC/GMC (LEW-17818-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 3 (March 2006), page 34. The HFGMC is a mathematical model of micromechanics for simulating stress and strain responses of fiber/matrix and other composite materials. The HFGMC overcomes a major limitation of a prior version of the GMC by accounting for coupling of shear and normal stresses and thereby affords greater accuracy, albeit at a large computational cost. In the reformulation of the HFGMC, the issue of computational efficiency was addressed: as a result, codes that implement the reformulated HFGMC complete their calculations about 10 times as fast as do those that implement the HFGMC. The present FORTRAN implementations of the reformulated HFGMC were written to satisfy a need for compatibility with other FORTRAN programs used to analyze structures and composite materials. The FORTRAN implementations also afford capabilities, beyond those of the basic HFGMC, for modeling inelasticity, fiber/matrix debonding, and coupled thermal, mechanical, piezo, and electromagnetic effects.

  8. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40{degrees}C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54{degrees}C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  9. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40[degrees]C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54[degrees]C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  10. Reformulated diesel fuel and method

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-08-22

    A method for mathematically identifying at least one diesel fuel suitable for combustion in an automotive diesel engine with significantly reduced emissions and producible from known petroleum blendstocks using known refining processes, including the use of cetane additives (ignition improvers) and oxygenated compounds.

  11. Drug reformulations and repositioning in pharmaceutical industry and its impact on market access: reassessment of nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Murteira, Susana; Ghezaiel, Zied; Karray, Slim; Lamure, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background Medicinal products that have been developed and approved for one disease may be the object of additional clinical development in other disease areas or of additional pharmaceutical development for new and different formulations. The newly developed products can be named as repositioned or reformulated products, respectively. Market access of repositioned or reformulated products in Europe and the United States is an interesting object of study as it may provide clarity about which parameters are assessed and considered to bring added value, other than the molecule itself. As such, we aim to evaluate if the added value of repositioned or reformulated medicinal products can be systematically described, quantified, and predicted. As a first step toward investigating the impact of market access on drug research and development trends for repositioned and reformulated products, it is necessary to have consistency in the designations for the case studies evaluated in this project. In an attempt to achieve that consistency, the current study aims to propose harmonized definitions for the repositioning and reformulation strategies and to propose a taxonomy for the medicinal products derived thereof. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to collect information on existing cases of repositioning or reformulation. A search strategy was developed by defining the search objectives, targeted data sources, search keywords, and inclusion/exclusion criteria for the retrieved documents. Results A total of 505 publications were retrieved through a search of the main data sources. The screenings and the ad hoc search led to a total of 56 publications to be used for the case study data extraction. In total, 87 repositioning and/or reformulation cases were found described in the literature, 23 of which presented different definitions and/or classifications by different authors. Conclusion Given the disparity and inconsistency of terminologies and

  12. Adult Reformulations of Child Errors as Negative Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chouinard, Michelle M.; Clark, Eve V.

    2003-01-01

    Examined whether there was negative evidence in adult reformulations of erroneous child utterances, and if so, whether children made use of that evidence. Findings show that adults reformulate erroneous utterances often enough for learning to occur. Children can detect differences between their own utterance and the adult reformulation and make…

  13. Simulation: Gasoline Compression Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-13

    The Mira supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility helped Argonne researchers model what happens inside an engine when you use gasoline in a diesel engine. Engineers are exploring this type of combustion as a sustainable transportation option because it may be more efficient than traditional gasoline combustion engines but produce less soot than diesel.

  14. Reformulation of quasi-linear theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. N.

    1972-01-01

    Standard plasma quasi-linear theory is reformulated on the basis of a classical quantum derivation proceeding from the Vlasov equation and dealing only with frequency, wavenumber, and velocity. The wave amplitudes are assumed to be weakly time-dependent, and no distinction is made between growing and decaying waves. The proposed method leads to no negative diffusivity of 'fake' diffusion. By appropraite treatment of nonresonant interaction, expressions are obtained for wave energy and momentum.

  15. Adult reformulations of child errors as negative evidence.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Michelle M; Clark, Eve V

    2003-08-01

    Parents frequently check up on what their children mean. They often do this by reformulating with a side sequence or an embedded correction what they think their children said. These reformulations effectively provide children with the conventional form for that meaning. Since the child's utterance and the adult reformulation differ while the intended meanings are the same, children infer that adults are offering a correction. In this way, reformulations identify the locus of any error, and hence the error itself. Analyses of longitudinal data from five children between 2;0 and 4;0 (three acquiring English and two acquiring French) show that (a) adults reformulate their children's erroneous utterances and do so significantly more often than they replay or repeat error-free utterances; (b) their rates of reformulation are similar across error-types (phonological, morphological, lexical, and syntactic) in both languages; (c) they reformulate significantly more often to younger children, who make more errors. Evidence that children attend to reformulations comes from four measures: (a) their explicit repeats of corrected elements in their next turn; (b) their acknowledgements (yeah or uh-huh) as a preface to their next turn; (c) repeats of any new information included in the reformulation; and (d) their explicit rejections of reformulations where the adult has misunderstood. Adult reformulations, then, offer children an important source of information about how to correct errors in the course of acquisition.

  16. Gasoline immersion injury

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.A.; Cruse, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical burns and pulmonary complications are the most common problems encountered in the patient immersed in gasoline. Our patient demonstrated a 46-percent total-body-surface area, partial-thickness chemical burn. Although he did not develop bronchitis or pneumonitis, he did display persistent atelectasis, laryngeal edema, and subsequent upper airway obstruction. This had not previously been reported in gasoline inhalation injuries. Hydrocarbon hepatitis secondary to the vascular endothelial damage is apparently a reversible lesion with no reported long-term sequelae. Gasoline immersion injuries may be a series multisystem injury and require the burn surgeon to take a multisystem approach to its diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Monitoring of Internet Forums to Evaluate Reactions to the Introduction of Reformulated OxyContin to Deter Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Paul M; Black, Ryan A; Weber, Sarah E; Chilcoat, Howard D; Butler, Stephen F

    2014-01-01

    Background Reformulating opioid analgesics to deter abuse is one approach toward improving their benefit-risk balance. To assess sentiment and attempts to defeat these products among difficult-to-reach populations of prescription drug abusers, evaluation of posts on Internet forums regarding reformulated products may be useful. A reformulated version of OxyContin (extended-release oxycodone) with physicochemical properties to deter abuse presented an opportunity to evaluate posts about the reformulation in online discussions. Objective The objective of this study was to use messages on Internet forums to evaluate reactions to the introduction of reformulated OxyContin and to identify methods aimed to defeat the abuse-deterrent properties of the product. Methods Posts collected from 7 forums between January 1, 2008 and September 30, 2013 were evaluated before and after the introduction of reformulated OxyContin on August 9, 2010. A quantitative evaluation of discussion levels across the study period and a qualitative coding of post content for OxyContin and 2 comparators for the 26 month period before and after OxyContin reformulation were conducted. Product endorsement was estimated for each product before and after reformulation as the ratio of endorsing-to-discouraging posts (ERo). Post-to-preintroduction period changes in ERos (ie, ratio of ERos) for each product were also calculated. Additionally, post content related to recipes for defeating reformulated OxyContin were evaluated from August 9, 2010 through September 2013. Results Over the study period, 45,936 posts related to OxyContin, 18,685 to Vicodin (hydrocodone), and 23,863 to Dilaudid (hydromorphone) were identified. The proportion of OxyContin-related posts fluctuated between 6.35 and 8.25 posts per 1000 posts before the reformulation, increased to 10.76 in Q3 2010 when reformulated OxyContin was introduced, and decreased from 9.14 in Q4 2010 to 3.46 in Q3 2013 in the period following the reformulation

  18. Gasoline toxicology: overview of regulatory and product stewardship programs.

    PubMed

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    Significant efforts have been made to characterize the toxicological properties of gasoline. There have been both mandatory and voluntary toxicology testing programs to generate hazard characterization data for gasoline, the refinery process streams used to blend gasoline, and individual chemical constituents found in gasoline. The Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) is the primary tool for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate gasoline and this supplement presents the results of the Section 211(b) Alternative Tier 2 studies required for CAA Fuel and Fuel Additive registration. Gasoline blending streams have also been evaluated by EPA under the voluntary High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program through which the petroleum industry provide data on over 80 refinery streams used in gasoline. Product stewardship efforts by companies and associations such as the American Petroleum Institute (API), Conservation of Clean Air and Water Europe (CONCAWE), and the Petroleum Product Stewardship Council (PPSC) have contributed a significant amount of hazard characterization data on gasoline and related substances. The hazard of gasoline and anticipated exposure to gasoline vapor has been well characterized for risk assessment purposes.

  19. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1240 - How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? 80.1240 Section 80.1240... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1240 How is a refinery's or importer's compliance with the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart determined? (a) A...

  4. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  5. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1604 - Gasoline sulfur standards and requirements for parties downstream of refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1604 Gasoline sulfur standards and requirements for parties downstream of refiners and importers. (a) The sulfur standard for gasoline at any downstream location shall be...

  7. Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The final rules adopted by the President for a Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan are presented. The plan provides that eligibility for ration allotments will be determined primarily on the basis of motor vehicle registrations, taking into account historical differences in the use of gasoline among states. The regulations also provide authority for supplemental allotments to firms so that their allotment will equal a specified percentage of gasoline use during a base period. Priority classifications, i.e., agriculture, defense, etc., are established to assure adequate gasoline supplies for designated essential services. Ration rights must be provided by end-users to their suppliers for each gallon sold. DOE will regulate the distribution of gasoline at the wholesale level according to the transfer by suppliers of redeemed ration rights and the gasoline allocation regulations. Ration rights are transferable. A ration banking system is created to facilitate transfers of ration rights. Each state will be provided with a reserve of ration rights to provide for hardship needs and to alleviate inequities. (DC)

  8. 76 FR 9013 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Detergent Gasoline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Detergent Gasoline... this action are those who (1) Manufacture gasoline, post-refinery component, or detergent additives, (2) blend detergent additives into gasoline or post-refinery component, or (3) transport or receive...

  9. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  10. Relaxation of Summer Gasoline Volatility Standard for Florida and the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Area (Triangle Area) and the Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point Area (Triad Area) in North Carolina Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal Registers and fact sheets about EPA approving a request from Florida to relax the federal Reid Vapor Pressure standard applicable to gasoline introduced into commerce in the Miami, Tampa and Jacksonville areas.

  11. Phase Partitioning from Theanol Blend Gasolines

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, the use of ethanol and other alcohols as motor fuel additives has increased. Additionally, ethanol production has expanded due to the potential use of ethanol as a primary fuel source. Historical patterns of gasoline composition show strong dependency on regulato...

  12. Global gasoline prices: The need to raise gasoline taxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin Lawell, C.-Y. Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Gasoline taxes are considered to be a cost-effective policy instrument for reducing carbon emissions. A study finds that while gasoline taxes rose in 83 countries between 2003 and 2015, the global mean fell by 13.3% due to a shift in consumption towards countries that maintain gasoline subsidies or that have low taxes.

  13. Desulfurization of gasoline.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, J E

    1975-01-01

    Although gasoline blending streams exhibit widely varying sulfur concentrations, significant quantities of low-sulfur motor gasoline cannot be manufactured by reallocation of existing components without substantial sacrifices in the useful properties of the remaining fuels having normal sulfur levels. To meet the anticipated demand for low-sulfur unleaded gasoline which may be required for catalyst-equipped automobiles it will be necessary to install process equipment based on known hydrotreating technology. The effects which this construction program would exert on the activities, abilities and needs of one petroleum refiner are sketched for two degrees of sulfur removal. The impacts of installing the process facilities which would be necessary are discussed in terms of time requirements, capital needs, and added energy expenditures. PMID:1157782

  14. A Classroom Demonstration of Water-Induced Phase Separation of Alcohol-Gasoline Biofuel Blends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Sherry A.; Anderson, James E.; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    A significant issue associated with ethanol-gasoline blends is the phase separation that occurs with the addition of small volumes of water, producing an ethanol-deficient gasoline layer and an ethanol-rich aqueous layer. The gasoline layer may have a lower-than-desired octane rating due to the decrease in ethanol content, resulting in engine…

  15. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1360 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1360 Section 80.1360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1360 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline benzene program? (a) The...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1236 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What requirements apply to California gasoline? 80.1236 Section 80.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Gasoline Benzene...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1225 - Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1225 Section 80.1225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene General Information § 80.1225 Who must register with EPA under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Refiners...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1361 - What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1361 Section 80.1361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1361 What penalties apply under the gasoline benzene program? (a) Any person liable for...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1358 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline benzene program? 80.1358 Section 80.1358 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Violations and Penalties § 80.1358 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline benzene program? No person shall—...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  1. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1656 - Exemptions for gasoline used for research, development, or testing purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemptions for gasoline used for... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1656 Exemptions for gasoline used for research, development, or testing purposes. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  5. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1348 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1348 What gasoline sample retention...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  8. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  9. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  11. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.335 What gasoline...

  12. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.335 What gasoline...

  13. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.335 What gasoline...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  15. 40 CFR 80.810 - Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.810 Section 80.810 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics General Information § 80.810 Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Refiners and...

  16. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  20. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  1. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1348 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1348 What gasoline sample retention...

  3. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur... gasoline. The requirements of this section apply to any refiner approved for small refiner standards...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1631 - Gasoline, RBOB, and CBOB sample retention requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline, RBOB, and CBOB sample... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1631 Gasoline, RBOB, and CBOB sample retention requirements. (a) Sample retention requirements....

  5. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  6. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.335 What gasoline...

  8. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.335 What gasoline...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1015 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1015 Section 80.1015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1015 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Persons liable...

  10. 40 CFR 80.810 - Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.810 Section 80.810 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics General Information § 80.810 Who shall register with EPA under the gasoline toxics program? (a) Refiners and...

  11. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  12. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  13. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  14. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  15. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  16. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  17. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  18. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  19. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  20. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  1. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  2. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1603 - Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1603 Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers. (a) Sulfur standards—(1) Annual average standard....

  4. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  5. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  6. Efficient Conservative Reformulation Schemes for Lithium Intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Urisanga, PC; Rife, D; De, S; Subramanian, VR

    2015-02-18

    Porous electrode theory coupled with transport and reaction mechanisms is a widely used technique to model Li-ion batteries employing an appropriate discretization or approximation for solid phase diffusion with electrode particles. One of the major difficulties in simulating Li-ion battery models is the need to account for solid phase diffusion in a second radial dimension r, which increases the computation time/cost to a great extent. Various methods that reduce the computational cost have been introduced to treat this phenomenon, but most of them do not guarantee mass conservation. The aim of this paper is to introduce an inherently mass conserving yet computationally efficient method for solid phase diffusion based on Lobatto III A quadrature. This paper also presents coupling of the new solid phase reformulation scheme with a macro-homogeneous porous electrode theory based pseudo 20 model for Li-ion battery. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  7. Reformulation: A Technique for Providing Advanced Feedback in Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    The typical writing feedback situation in a language classroom is examined, followed by a discussion of reformulation as an alternative approach. An example is provided. Issues to be considered as well as benefits of the reformulation approach are described for both classroom and individual settings. (six references) (LB)

  8. Reformulation as a Measure of Student Expression in Classroom Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, James J.

    1995-01-01

    Investigates teacher reformulation of student talk in order to determine the manner in which teachers affect student meaning and expression. Findings indicate that reformulation is a device used by teachers to control classroom dialog and that teachers disproportionately perform the language functions most commonly associated with higher-order…

  9. Writing Like a Native: The Process of Reformulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew D.

    A procedure for providing feedback on compositions of advanced second language learners is described. Under this procedure, called reformulation, a native speaker rewrites second language learners' essays so that the ideas are preserved but presented in a native-like manner. A case study in reformulating Hebrew-as-a-second-language essay and a…

  10. Reformulation: A Verbal Display of Interlanguage Awareness in Instructional Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Shiao-Yun; Mi, Han-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Reformulation is mostly considered as an important verbal mechanism for coping with non-native speakers' speech production problem in second language acquisition. Drawing on interlanguage pragmatics and conversation analysis, the present study examines the specific ways in which reformulation is used to achieve mutual understanding in the…

  11. Price changes in the gasoline market: Are Midwestern gasoline prices downward sticky?

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    This report examines a recurring question about gasoline markets: why, especially in times of high price volatility, do retail gasoline prices seem to rise quickly but fall back more slowly? Do gasoline prices actually rise faster than they fall, or does this just appear to be the case because people tend to pay more attention to prices when they`re rising? This question is more complex than it might appear to be initially, and it has been addressed by numerous analysts in government, academia and industry. The question is very important, because perceived problems with retail gasoline pricing have been used in arguments for government regulation of prices. The phenomenon of prices at different market levels tending to move differently relative to each other depending on direction is known as price asymmetry. This report summarizes the previous work on gasoline price asymmetry and provides a method for testing for asymmetry in a wide variety of situations. The major finding of this paper is that there is some amount of asymmetry and pattern asymmetry, especially at the retail level, in the Midwestern states that are the focus of the analysis. Nevertheless, both the amount asymmetry and pattern asymmetry are relatively small. In addition, much of the pattern asymmetry detected in this and previous studies could be a statistical artifact caused by the time lags between price changes at different points in the gasoline distribution system. In other words, retail gasoline prices do sometimes rise faster than they fall, but this is largely a lagged market response to an upward shock in the underlying wholesale gasoline or crude oil prices, followed by a return toward the previous baseline. After consistent time lags are factored out, most apparent asymmetry disappears.

  12. Comparative performance study of spark ignition engines burning alcohols, gasoline, and alcohol-gasoline blends

    SciTech Connect

    Desoky, A.A.; Rabie, L.H.

    1983-12-01

    In recent years it has been clear that the reserves of oil, from which petrol is refined, are becoming limited. In order to conserve these stocks of oil, and to minimize motoring costs as the price of dwindling oil resources escalates, it's obviously desirable to improve the thermal efficiency of the spark ignition engine. There are also obvious benefits to be obtained from making spark ignition engines run efficiently on alternative fuel, (non-crude based fuel). It has been claimed that hydrogen is an ideal fuel for the internal combustion engine it certainly causes little pollution, but is difficult to store, high in price, and difficult to burn efficiently in the engine without it knocking and backfiring. These problems arise because of the very wide flammability limits and the very high flame velocity of hydrogen. Alcohols used an additive or substitute for gasoline could immediately help to solve both energy and pollution problems. An experimental tests were carried out at Mansoura University Laboratories using a small single cylinder SIE, fully instrumented to measure the engine performance. The engine was fueled with pure methonol, pure ethonol, gasoline methanol blends and gasaline ethanol blends. The results showed that in principle, from kechnological aspects it's possible to use alcohols as a gasoline extender or as alcohol's gasoline, blends for automobiles. With regard to energy consumptions alcohols and alcohols gasoline blends lead to interesting results. The fuel economy benefits of using alcohols gasoline blends was found to be interesting in the part throltle operation.

  13. Assessment of Summer 1997 motor gasoline price increase

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    Gasoline markets in 1996 and 1997 provided several spectacular examples of petroleum market dynamics. The first occurred in spring 1996, when tight markets, following a long winter of high demand, resulted in rising crude oil prices just when gasoline prices exhibit their normal spring rise ahead of the summer driving season. Rising crude oil prices again pushed gasoline prices up at the end of 1996, but a warm winter and growing supplies weakened world crude oil markets, pushing down crude oil and gasoline prices during spring 1997. The 1996 and 1997 spring markets provided good examples of how crude oil prices can move gasoline prices both up and down, regardless of the state of the gasoline market in the United States. Both of these spring events were covered in prior Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports. As the summer of 1997 was coming to a close, consumers experienced yet another surge in gasoline prices. Unlike the previous increase in spring 1996, crude oil was not a factor. The late summer 1997 price increase was brought about by the supply/demand fundamentals in the gasoline markets, rather than the crude oil markets. The nature of the summer 1997 gasoline price increase raised questions regarding production and imports. Given very strong demand in July and August, the seemingly limited supply response required examination. In addition, the price increase that occurred on the West Coast during late summer exhibited behavior different than the increase east of the Rocky Mountains. Thus, the Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) 5 region needed additional analysis (Appendix A). This report is a study of this late summer gasoline market and some of the important issues surrounding that event.

  14. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  15. Effect of oxygenates blending with gasoline to improve fuel properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazadeh Shayan, Soheil; Seyedpour, Seyed Morteza; Ommi, Fathollah

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of oxygenate additives into gasoline for the improvement of physicochemical properties of blends. Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE), Methanol, Tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA), and Tertiary amyl alcohol (TAA) blend into unleaded gasoline with various blended rates of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. Physicochemical properties of blends are analyzed by the standard American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) methods. Methanol, TBA, and TAA increase density of the mixtures, but MTBE decreases density. The addition of oxygenates lead to a distortion of the base gasoline's distillation curves. The Reid vapor pressure (RVP) of gasoline is found to increase with the addition of the oxygenated compounds. All oxygenates improve both motor and research octane numbers. Among these four additives, TBA shows the best fuel properties.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase: ethanol, gasoline and ethanol - gasoline predicted by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Neto, A F G; Lopes, F S; Carvalho, E V; Huda, M N; Neto, A M J C; Machado, N T

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study using density functional theory to calculate thermodynamics properties of major molecules compounds at gas phase of fuels like gasoline, ethanol, and gasoline-ethanol mixture in thermal equilibrium on temperature range up to 1500 K. We simulated a composition of gasoline mixture with ethanol for a thorough study of thermal energy, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, entropy, heat capacity at constant pressure with respect to temperature in order to study the influence caused by ethanol as an additive to gasoline. We used semi-empirical computational methods as well in order to know the efficiency of other methods to simulate fuels through this methodology. In addition, the ethanol influence through the changes in percentage fractions of chemical energy released in combustion reaction and the variations on thermal properties for autoignition temperatures of fuels was analyzed. We verified how ethanol reduces the chemical energy released by gasoline combustion and how at low temperatures the gas phase fuels in thermal equilibrium have similar thermodynamic behavior. Theoretical results were compared with experimental data, when available, and showed agreement. Graphical Abstract Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase.

  17. HF mitigation via the Texaco-UOP HF additive technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sheckler, J.C.; Hammershaimb, H.U. ); Ross, L.J. ); Comey, K.R. III . Research and Development)

    1994-01-01

    Alkylation is one of the key processes used by refiners to produce high-octane gasoline. In the alkylation process, light olefins and isobutane are converted to alkylate, a high-octane, low-vapor-pressure, paraffinic gasoline-blending component. Because of its clean burning characteristics and ability to contribute to lower emissions, alkylate is a highly valued component in premium and reformulated gasolines. Alkylation process technology using hydrogen fluoride (HF) as a catalyst has been widely used for many years. Since the mid-1980s, a primary concern has been the tendency of HF to form an aerosol when HF is released to the atmosphere. Much effort has gone into the development of measures to ensure the safe handling of HF in the refinery environment. Texaco and UOP have under development an HF additive technology. The key to this technology is the discovery of a class of additives that form a complex with HF to significantly reduce the aerosol-forming tendency of the catalyst system and still maintain acceptable catalytic performance and product quality. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the development status of the Texaco-UOP HF additive technology. Aerosol reduction has been demonstrated in small-scale laboratory release tests as well as in larger scale wind tunnel release tests. The catalytic performance of the HF additive has been demonstrated in laboratory alkylation facilities and in a short-term experimental trial in a full-scale refinery unit. On the basis of the positive results obtained in the test program, a project is under way to implement the HF additive technology on a continuous basis in an existing Texaco alkylation unit by the third quarter of 1994.

  18. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1035 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.1035 Section 80.1035... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Attest Engagements § 80.1035 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline toxics compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  3. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  4. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  5. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  6. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps... of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. (a) For oxygenated gasoline programs with a minimum... following shall apply: (1) Each gasoline pump stand from which oxygenated gasoline is dispensed at a...

  7. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps... of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. (a) For oxygenated gasoline programs with a minimum... following shall apply: (1) Each gasoline pump stand from which oxygenated gasoline is dispensed at a...

  8. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps... of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. (a) For oxygenated gasoline programs with a minimum... following shall apply: (1) Each gasoline pump stand from which oxygenated gasoline is dispensed at a...

  9. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps... of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. (a) For oxygenated gasoline programs with a minimum... following shall apply: (1) Each gasoline pump stand from which oxygenated gasoline is dispensed at a...

  10. 40 CFR 80.35 - Labeling of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling of retail gasoline pumps... of retail gasoline pumps; oxygenated gasoline. (a) For oxygenated gasoline programs with a minimum... following shall apply: (1) Each gasoline pump stand from which oxygenated gasoline is dispensed at a...

  11. 26 CFR 48.4081-4 - Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gasoline; special rules for gasoline..., Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4081-4 Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks... gasoline blendstocks. Generally, under prescribed conditions, tax is not imposed on gasoline...

  12. 26 CFR 48.4081-4 - Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gasoline; special rules for gasoline..., Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4081-4 Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks... gasoline blendstocks. Generally, under prescribed conditions, tax is not imposed on gasoline...

  13. 26 CFR 48.4081-4 - Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gasoline; special rules for gasoline..., Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4081-4 Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks... gasoline blendstocks. Generally, under prescribed conditions, tax is not imposed on gasoline...

  14. 26 CFR 48.4081-4 - Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks..., Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Taxable Fuel § 48.4081-4 Gasoline; special rules for gasoline blendstocks... gasoline blendstocks. Generally, under prescribed conditions, tax is not imposed on gasoline...

  15. Food and beverage product reformulation as a corporate political strategy.

    PubMed

    Scott, C; Hawkins, B; Knai, C

    2017-01-01

    Product reformulation- the process of altering a food or beverage product's recipe or composition to improve the product's health profile - is a prominent response to the obesity and noncommunicable disease epidemics in the U.S. To date, reformulation in the U.S. has been largely voluntary and initiated by actors within the food and beverage industry. Similar voluntary efforts by the tobacco and alcohol industry have been considered to be a mechanism of corporate political strategy to shape public health policies and decisions to suit commercial needs. We propose a taxonomy of food and beverage industry corporate political strategies that builds on the existing literature. We then analyzed the industry's responses to a 2014 U.S. government consultation on product reformulation, run as part of the process to define the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. We qualitatively coded the industry's responses for predominant narratives and framings around reformulation using a purposely-designed coding framework, and compared the results to the taxonomy. The food and beverage industry in the United States used a highly similar narrative around voluntary product reformulation in their consultation responses: that reformulation is "part of the solution" to obesity and NCDs, even though their products or industry are not large contributors to the problem, and that progress has been made despite reformulation posing significant technical challenges. This narrative and the frames used in the submissions illustrate the four categories of the taxonomy: participation in the policy process, influencing the framing of the nutrition policy debate, creating partnerships, and influencing the interpretation of evidence. These strategic uses of reformulation align with previous research on food and beverage corporate political strategy.

  16. Reformulating Aerosol Thermodynamics and Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling aerosol composition and cloud microphysics is rather complex due to the required thermodynamics, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that for deliquescent atmospheric aerosols thermodynamics can be considerably simplified, if we reformulate chemical equilibrium to include water purely based on thermodynamic principles. In chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium, the relative humidity (RH) fixes the molality of atmospheric aerosols. Although this fact is in theory well known, it has hardly been utilized in aerosol modeling nor has been the fact that for the same reason also the aerosol activity (including activity coefficients) and water content are fixed (by RH) for a given aerosol concentration and type. The only model that successfully utilizes this fact is the computationally very efficient EQuilibrium Simplified thermodynamic gas/Aerosol partitioning Model, EQSAM (Metzger et al., 2002a), EQSAM2 (Metzger et al., 2006). In both versions the entire gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning is solved analytically and hence non-iteratively a substantial advantage in aerosol composition modeling. Here we briefly present the theoretical framework of EQSAM2, which differs from EQSAM in a way that the calculation of the water activity of saturated binary or mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions of multi-component aerosols has been generalized by including the Kelvin-term, thus allowing for any solute activity above the deliquescence relative humidity, including supersaturation. With application of our new concept to a numerical whether prediction (NWP) model, we demonstrate its wide implications for the computation of various aerosol and cloud properties, as our new concept allows to consistently and efficiently link the modeling of aerosol thermodynamics and cloud microphysics through the aerosol water mass, which therefore deserves special attention in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, NWP and climate

  17. Evaluation of a Reformulated CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Brenner, Troy M.; Romagnoli, Mark; Baqui, A. A. M. A.; Merz, William G.; Falkler, William A.; Meiller, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a differential culture medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically important yeasts. Recently the medium was reformulated by Becton Dickinson. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of the new formula of CHROMagar against the original CHROMagar Candida for recovery, growth, and colony color with stock cultures and with direct plating of clinical specimens. A total of 90 stock yeast isolates representing nine yeast species, including Candida dubliniensis, as well as 522 clinical specimens were included in this study. No major differences were noted in growth rate or colony size between the two media for most of the species. However, all 10 Candida albicans isolates evaluated consistently gave a lighter shade of green on the new CHROMagar formulation. In contrast, all 26 C. dubliniensis isolates gave the same typical dark green color on both media. A total of 173 of the 522 clinical specimens were positive for yeast, with eight yeast species recovered. The recovery rates for each species were equivalent on both media, with no consistent species-associated differences in colony size or color. Although both media were comparable in performance, the lighter green colonies of C. albicans isolates on the new CHROMagar made it easier to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolates. In conclusion, the newly formulated Becton Dickinson CHROMagar Candida medium is as equally suited as a differential medium for the presumptive identification of yeast species and for the detection of multiple yeast species in clinical specimens as the original CHROMagar Candida medium. PMID:11326038

  18. Data on Ethanol in Gasoline

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gasoline composition varies for technical, market and regulatory reasons. Knowledge of any one of these is insufficient for understanding the chemical composition of gasoline at any specific location in the U.S. Historical data collected by the National Institute of Petroleum ...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.1336 Section 80.1336 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In extreme, unusual, and unforeseen...

  20. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by truck? 80.350 Section 80.350 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  1. 40 CFR 80.380 - What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? 80.380 Section 80...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.380 What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? Any person...

  2. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  3. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.1336 Section 80.1336 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In extreme, unusual, and unforeseen...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1349 - Alternative sampling and testing requirements for importers who import gasoline into the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for importers who import gasoline into the United States by truck. 80.1349 Section 80.1349... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1349 Alternative sampling and testing requirements for importers who import gasoline into the United States...

  6. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  7. 40 CFR 80.380 - What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? 80.380 Section 80...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.380 What are the requirements for obtaining an exemption for gasoline used for research, development or testing purposes? Any person...

  8. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  9. 40 CFR 80.216 - What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the GPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What standards apply to gasoline... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.216 What standards apply to gasoline produced or imported for use in the...

  10. Effect of Hydrologic and Geochemical Conditions on Oxygen-Enhanced Bioremediation in a Gasoline-Contaminated Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of pre-existing factors, e.g., hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological properties, on the results of oxygen addition to a reformulated gasoline-contaminated groundwater system was studied. Oxygen addition with an oxygen-release compound (a proprietary form of magnesium peroxide produced different results with respect to dissolved oxygen (DO) generation and contaminant decrease in the two locations. Oxygen-release compound injected at the former UST source area did not significantly change measured concentrations of DO, benzene, toluene, or MTBE. Conversely, oxygen-release compound injected 200 m downgradient of the former UST source area rapidly increased DO levels, and benzene, toluene, and MTBE concentrations decreased substantially. The different results could be related to differences in hydrologic and geochemical conditions that characterized the two locations prior to oxygen addition. The lack of recharge to ground water in the paved UST source area led to a much larger geochemical sink for DO compared to ground water in the unpaved area.

  11. Combustion behavior of gasoline and gasoline/ethanol blends in a modern direct-injection 4-cylinder engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Miers, S. A.

    2008-04-01

    Early in 2007 President Bush announced in his State of the Union Address a plan to off-set 20% of gasoline with alternative fuels in the next ten years. Ethanol, due to its excellent fuel properties for example, high octane number, renewable character, etc., appears to be a favorable alternative fuel from an engine perspective. Replacing gasoline with ethanol without any additional measures results in unacceptable disadvantages mainly in terms of vehicle range.

  12. Bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil using poultry litter

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G; Tao, J.

    1996-10-01

    Contaminated soil, excavated from around a leaking underground gasoline storage tank, is commonly subjected to thermal degradation to remove the gasoline. Bioremediation as an alternative treatment technology is now becoming popular. The important hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria include Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, and Flavobacterium. Poultry litter contains a large number of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas, as well as many inorganic nutrients and organic biomass that may assist in biodegrading gasoline in contaminated soil. During bioremediation of contaminated soil, microbial densities are known to increase by 2-3 orders of magnitude. However, bioremediation may result in a increase in the toxic characteristics of the soil due to the production of potentially toxic degradation intermediates. The objective of this research was to study the influence of the addition of poultry litter on the bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil by quantifying the changes in the densities of microorganisms and by monitoring the toxicity of the degradation products. 25 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Reformulated meat products protect against ischemia-induced cardiac damage.

    PubMed

    Asensio-Lopez, M C; Lax, A; Sanchez-Mas, J; Avellaneda, A; Planes, J; Pascual-Figal, D A

    2016-02-01

    The protective effects of the antioxidants present in food are of great relevance for cardiovascular health. This study evaluates whether the extracts from reformulated meat products with a reduction in fat and/or sodium content exert a cardioprotective effect against ischemia-induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes, compared with non-meat foods. Ischemic damage caused loss of cell viability, increased reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation and decreased the antioxidant activity. Pretreatment for 24 h with digested or non-digested extracts from reformulated meat products led to protection against ischemia-induced oxidative damage: increased cell viability, reduced oxidative stress and restored the antioxidant activity. Similar results were obtained using extracts from tuna fish, but not with the extracts of green peas, salad or white beans. These results suggest that reformulated meat products have a beneficial impact in protecting cardiac cells against ischemia, and they may represent a source of natural antioxidants with benefits for cardiovascular health.

  14. Reformulation of the Fourier-Bessel steady state mode solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    The Fourier-Bessel resonator state mode solver is reformulated using Maxwell's field coupled curl equations. The matrix generating expressions are greatly simplified as well as a reduction in the number of pre-computed tables making the technique simpler to implement on a desktop computer. The reformulation maintains the theoretical equivalence of the permittivity and permeability and as such structures containing both electric and magnetic properties can be examined. Computation examples are presented for a surface nanoscale axial photonic resonator and hybrid { ε , μ } quasi-crystal resonator.

  15. 75 FR 74044 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Gasoline Volatility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... ] ethanol, or who wish to obtain a testing exemption. Title: Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Gasoline Volatility, Reporting Requirements for Parties Which Produce of Import Gasoline Containing Ethanol... to a Federal standard of 7.8 psi or 9.0 psi, depending on location. The addition of ethanol...

  16. Comparison of immunotoxic effects induced by the extracts from methanol and gasoline engine exhausts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Che, Wangjun; Liu, Guiming; Qiu, Hong; Zhang, Hao; Ran, Yun; Zeng, Xianggui; Wen, Weihua; Shu, Ya

    2010-06-01

    Gasoline engine exhaust has been considered as a major source of air pollution in China. Due to lower cyto- and geno-toxicity effects of methanol engine exhaust, methanol is regarded as a potential substitute for gasoline. We have previously compared cyto- and geno-toxicities of gasoline engine exhaust with that of methanol engine exhaust in A549 cells (Zhang et al., 2007).To characterize the immunotoxic effects for gasoline and methanol engine exhausts in immune cell, in this study, we further compared effects of gasoline and methanol engine exhausts on immune function in RAW264.7 cell and rabbit alveolar macrophages. Results showed that both gasoline and methanol engine exhaust could evidently inhibit RAW264.7 cell proliferation, promote RAW264.7 cell apoptosis, decrease E-rosette formation rate and inhibit anti-tumor effects of alveolar macrophages, at the same time, these effects of gasoline engine exhaust were far stronger than those of methanol engine exhaust. In addition, gasoline engine exhaust could significantly inhibit activities of ADCC of alveolar macrophages, but methanol engine exhaust could not. These results suggested that both gasoline and methanol engine exhausts might be immunotoxic atmospheric pollutants, but some effects of gasoline engine exhaust on immunotoxicities may be far stronger than that of methanol engine exhaust.

  17. Measurement of emissions from air pollution sources. 5. C1-C32 organic compounds from gasoline-powered motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Schauer, James J; Kleeman, Michael J; Cass, Glen R; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2002-03-15

    Gas- and particle-phase organic compounds present in the tailpipe emissions from an in-use fleet of gasoline-powered automobiles and light-duty trucks were quantified using a two-stage dilution source sampling system. The vehicles were driven through the cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) urban driving cycle on a transient dynamometer. Emission rates of 66 volatile hydrocarbons, 96 semi-volatile and particle-phase organic compounds, 27 carbonyls, and fine particle mass and chemical composition were quantified. Six isoprenoids and two tricyclic terpanes, which are quantified using new source sampling techniques for semi-volatile organic compounds, have been identified as potential tracers for gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions. A composite of the commercially distributed California Phase II Reformulated Gasoline used in these tests was analyzed by several analytical methods to quantify the gasoline composition, including some organic compounds that are found in the atmosphere as semi-volatile and particle-phase organic compounds. These results allow a direct comparison of the semi-volatile and particle-phase organic compound emissions from gasoline-powered motor vehicles to the gasoline burned by these vehicles. The distribution of n-alkanes and isoprenoids emitted from the catalyst-equipped gasoline-powered vehicles is the same as the distribution of these compounds found in the gasoline used, whereas the distribution of these compounds in the emissions from the noncatalyst vehicles is very different from the distribution in the fuel. In contrast, the distribution of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their methylated homologues in the gasoline is significantly different from the distribution of the PAH in the tailpipe emissions from both types of vehicles.

  18. Economic and environmental benefits of higher-octane gasoline.

    PubMed

    Speth, Raymond L; Chow, Eric W; Malina, Robert; Barrett, Steven R H; Heywood, John B; Green, William H

    2014-06-17

    We quantify the economic and environmental benefits of designing U.S. light-duty vehicles (LDVs) to attain higher fuel economy by utilizing higher octane (98 RON) gasoline. We use engine simulations, a review of experimental data, and drive cycle simulations to estimate the reduction in fuel consumption associated with using higher-RON gasoline in individual vehicles. Lifecycle CO2 emissions and economic impacts for the U.S. LDV fleet are estimated based on a linear-programming refinery model, a historically calibrated fleet model, and a well-to-wheels emissions analysis. We find that greater use of high-RON gasoline in appropriately tuned vehicles could reduce annual gasoline consumption in the U.S. by 3.0-4.4%. Accounting for the increase in refinery emissions from production of additional high-RON gasoline, net CO2 emissions are reduced by 19-35 Mt/y in 2040 (2.5-4.7% of total direct LDV CO2 emissions). For the strategies studied, the annual direct economic benefit is estimated to be $0.4-6.4 billion in 2040, and the annual net societal benefit including the social cost of carbon is estimated to be $1.7-8.8 billion in 2040. Adoption of a RON standard in the U.S. in place of the current antiknock index (AKI) may enable refineries to produce larger quantities of high-RON gasoline.

  19. European Lean Gasoline Direct Injection Vehicle Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Chambon, Paul H; Huff, Shean P; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Norman, Kevin M; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Thomas, John F

    2011-01-01

    Lean Gasoline Direct Injection (LGDI) combustion is a promising technical path for achieving significant improvements in fuel efficiency while meeting future emissions requirements. Though Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct Injection (SGDI) technology is commercially available in a few vehicles on the American market, LGDI vehicles are not, but can be found in Europe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) obtained a European BMW 1-series fitted with a 2.0l LGDI engine. The vehicle was instrumented and commissioned on a chassis dynamometer. The engine and after-treatment performance and emissions were characterized over US drive cycles (Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), and US06 Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06)) and steady state mappings. The vehicle micro hybrid features (engine stop-start and intelligent alternator) were benchmarked as well during the course of that study. The data was analyzed to quantify the benefits and drawbacks of the lean gasoline direct injection and micro hybrid technologies from a fuel economy and emissions perspectives with respect to the US market. Additionally that data will be formatted to develop, substantiate, and exercise vehicle simulations with conventional and advanced powertrains.

  20. 21 CFR 106.120 - New formulations and reformulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false New formulations and reformulations. 106.120 Section 106.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES Notification...

  1. 21 CFR 106.120 - New formulations and reformulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false New formulations and reformulations. 106.120 Section 106.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES Notification...

  2. 21 CFR 106.120 - New formulations and reformulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false New formulations and reformulations. 106.120 Section 106.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES Notification...

  3. 21 CFR 106.120 - New formulations and reformulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false New formulations and reformulations. 106.120 Section 106.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES (Eff. until 7-10-14) Notification Requirements § 106.120 New...

  4. Addiction Motivation Reformulated: An Affective Processing Model of Negative Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Timothy B.; Piper, Megan E.; McCarthy, Danielle E.; Majeskie, Matthew R.; Fiore, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    This article offers a reformulation of the negative reinforcement model of drug addiction and proposes that the escape and avoidance of negative affect is the prepotent motive for addictive drug use. The authors posit that negative affect is the motivational core of the withdrawal syndrome and argue that, through repeated cycles of drug use and…

  5. The Use of Reformulation in Teaching Writing to FSL Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanaoui, Razika

    In the teaching of creative writing to students of French as a second language, the use of the reformulation technique has proved effective. The writing process is divided into stages: selection of a topic, discussion with peers, writing of a first draft, revision with peers, submission to the instructor, further revision, editing and…

  6. Talking It through: Two French Immersion Learners' Response to Reformulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Merrill; Lapkin, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    This article documents the importance of collaborative dialogue as part of the process of second language learning. The stimulus for the dialogue we discuss in this article was a reformulation of a story written collaboratively in French by Nina and Dara, two adolescent French immersion students. A sociocultural theoretical perspective informs the…

  7. Stereotyping in he Representation of Narrative Texts through Visual Reformulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Melina

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the process of stereotyping in the representation of the content of narrative texts through visual reformulations. Subjects were Argentine college students enrolled in an English course at a university in Argentina. Reveals students' inability to transcend heir cultural biases and points to an urgent need to address stereotypes in the…

  8. L2 Output, Reformulation, and Noticing: Implications for IL Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    Extends a study on the developmental effects of learners noticing differences between their own and native speaker output. Spanish learners were assigned to three groups: task repetition, noticing, and noticing + simulated recall. Learners noticed differences between their own essays and reformulated writing and that there were quantitative…

  9. Applying a Gloss: Exemplifying and Reformulating in Academic Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A great deal of research has now established that written texts embody interactions between writers and readers, but few studies have examined the ways that small acts of reformulation and exemplification help contribute to this. Abstraction, theorisation and interpretation need to be woven into a text which makes sense to a particular community…

  10. Creativity, Problem Solving, and Solution Set Sightedness: Radically Reformulating BVSR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2012-01-01

    Too often, psychological debates become polarized into dichotomous positions. Such polarization may have occurred with respect to Campbell's (1960) blind variation and selective retention (BVSR) theory of creativity. To resolve this unnecessary controversy, BVSR was radically reformulated with respect to creative problem solving. The reformulation…

  11. 21 CFR 106.120 - New formulations and reformulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New formulations and reformulations. 106.120 Section 106.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES Notification...

  12. Biofiltration of gasoline and ethanol-amended gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marlene; Woiciechowski, Adenise L; Kozliak, Evguenii I; Paca, Jan; Soccol, Carlos R

    2012-01-01

    Assuming the projected increase in use of ethanol as a biofuel, the current study was conducted to compare the biofiltration efficiencies for plain and 25% ethanol-containing gasoline. Two biofilters were operated in a downflow mode for 7 months, one of them being compost-based whereas the other using a synthetic packing material, granulated tire rubber, inoculated with gasoline-degrading microorganisms. Inlet concentrations measured as total hydrocarbon (TH) ranged from 1.9 to 5.8 g m(-3) at a constant empty bed retention time of 6.84 min. Contrary to the expectations based on microbiological considerations, ethanol-amended gasoline was more readily biodegraded than plain hydrocarbons, with the respective steady state elimination capacities of 26-43 and 14-18 gTH m(-3) h(-1) for the compost biofilter. The efficiency of both biofilters significantly declined upon the application of higher loads of plain gasoline, yet immediately recovering when switched back to ethanol-blended gasoline. The unexpected effect of ethanol in promoting gasoline biodegradation was explained by increasing hydrocarbon partitioning into the aqueous phase, with mass transfer being rate limiting for the bulk of components. The tire rubber biofilter, after a long acclimation, surpassed the compost biofilter in performance, presumably due to the 'buffering' effect of this packing material increasing the accessibility of gasoline hydrocarbons to the biofilm. With improved substrate mass transfer, biodegradable hydrocarbons were removed in the tire rubber biofilter's first reactor stage, with most of the remaining poorly degradable smaller-size hydrocarbons being degraded in the second stage.

  13. Effects of ethanol-blended gasoline on air pollutant emissions from motorcycle.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-09-15

    The effect of ethanol-gasoline blends on criteria air pollutant emissions was investigated in a four-stroke motorcycle. The ethanol was blended with unleaded gasoline in four percentages (3, 10, 15, and 20% v/v) and controlled at a constant research octane number, RON (95), to accurately represent commercial gasoline. CO, THC, and NOx emissions were evaluated using the Economic Commission for Europe cycle on the chassis dynamometers. The results of the ethanol-gasoline blends were compared to those of commercial unleaded gasoline with methyl tert-butyl ether as the oxygenated additive. In general, the exhaust CO and NOx emissions decreased with increasing oxygen content in fuels. In contrast, ethanol added in the gasoline did not reduce the THC emissions for a constant RON gasoline. The 15% ethanol blend had the highest emission reductions relative to the reference fuel. The high ethanol-gasoline blend ratio (20%) resulted in a less emission reduction than those of low ratio blends (<15%). This may be attributed to the changes in the combustion conditions in the carburetor engine with 20% ethanol addition. Furthermore, the influence of ethanol-gasoline blends on the reduction of exhaust emissions was observed at different driving modes, especially at 15km/h cruising speed for CO and THC and acceleration stages for NOx.

  14. Process for making anhydrous alcohol for mixing with gasoline to make gasohol motor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J.M.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a process for making an anhydrous fraction from a fermented feed material or beer. The process consists of contacting the fermented feed material or beer directly with steam vapor volatilizing the alcohol in the feed or beer and producing an alcohol free bottom. The alcohol vapor is conducted through a oneway flow mechanism into a column provided with trays located one above the other, refluxing the alcohol vapor over the trays and concentrating the alcohol vapor to high-proof alcohol. The reflux and vapor are utilized to concentrate additional alcohol from a dilute aqueous gasoline-containing recycle. The net total water bottoms are contacted from the concentration step with direct steam prior to discharge to sewer, feeding the concentrated alcohol with recovered gasoline from the recycle as contaminant along with additional gasoline. The gasoline is optimally heated to eliminate light ends, into a drying column, heating the alcohol gasoline feed with heat from a reboiler and vaporizing overhead the azeotropic fractions containing alcohol, gasoline and water. The azeotropic fractions are condensed and form two liquid phases. The gasoline phase returns as reflux to the drying column, recycling the water phase as initiator prior to the alcohol concentrating column, cooling and subcooling the anhydrous alcohol-gasoline bottoms. This process produces a final product which is completely denatured alcohol ready for removal from premises and containing the entire component of the originally added gasoline.

  15. Evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Katsuhiro; Hiramatsu, Muneyuki; Hino, Tomonori; Otake, Takuma; Okamoto, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroki; Honma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Norimichi

    2015-04-28

    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to global warming, production of gasoline blended with ethyl tert-buthyl ether (ETBE) is increasing annually. The flash point of ETBE is higher than that of gasoline, and blending ETBE into gasoline will change the flash point and the vapor pressure. Therefore, it is expected that the fire hazard caused by ETBE-blended gasoline would differ from that caused by normal gasoline. The aim of this study was to acquire the knowledge required for estimating the fire hazard of ETBE-blended gasoline. Supposing that ETBE-blended gasoline was a two-component mixture of gasoline and ETBE, we developed a prediction model that describes the vapor pressure and flash point of ETBE-blended gasoline in an arbitrary ETBE blending ratio. We chose 8-component hydrocarbon mixture as a model gasoline, and defined the relation between molar mass of gasoline and mass loss fraction. We measured the changes in the vapor pressure and flash point of gasoline by blending ETBE and evaporation, and compared the predicted values with the measured values in order to verify the prediction model. The calculated values of vapor pressures and flash points corresponded well to the measured values. Thus, we confirmed that the change in the evaporation characteristics of ETBE-blended gasoline by evaporation could be predicted by the proposed model. Furthermore, the vapor pressure constants of ETBE-blended gasoline were obtained by the model, and then the distillation curves were developed.

  16. Methanol as a gasoline extender: a critique.

    PubMed

    Wigg, E E

    1974-11-29

    The tests conducted with the three vehicles at different emission control levels suggest that, in the area of fuel economy and emissions, potential benefits with methanol blends are related to carburetion and are only significant in the case of the rich-operating cars built before emission control standards were imposed. Theoretical considerations related to methanol's leaning effect on carburetion support this conclusion. Potential advantages for methanol in these areas are therefore continuously diminishing as the older cars leave the roads. At present, these older cars use only about one-fourth of the totalc motor gasoline consumed and, before methanol could be used on a large scale, this fraction would be much smaller. The use of methanol in gasoline would almost certainly create severe product quality problems. Water contamination could lead to phase separation in the distribution system and possibly in the car tank as well, and this would require additional investment in fuel handling and blending equipment. Excess fuel volatility in hot weather may also have adverse effects on car performance if the methanol blends include typical concentrations of butanes and pentanes. Removal of these light hydrocarbon components would detract from methanol's role as a gasoline extender and if current fuel volatility specifications were maintained, its use could lead to a net loss in the total available energy for use in motor fuels. Car performance problems associated with excessively lean operation would also be expected in the case of a significant proportion of late-model cars which are adjusted to operate on lean fuel-air mixtures. If methanol does become available in large quantities, these factors suggest that it would be more practical to use it for purposes other than those related to the extending of motor gasoline, such as for gas turbines used for electric power generation. In this case, the "pure" methanol would act as a cleanburning fuel, having none of the

  17. Efficient Reformulation of HOTFGM: Heat Conduction with Variable Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Yi; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) have become one of the major research topics in the mechanics of materials community during the past fifteen years. FGMs are heterogeneous materials, characterized by spatially variable microstructure, and thus spatially variable macroscopic properties, introduced to enhance material or structural performance. The spatially variable material properties make FGMs challenging to analyze. The review of the various techniques employed to analyze the thermodynamical response of FGMs reveals two distinct and fundamentally different computational strategies, called uncoupled macromechanical and coupled micromechanical approaches by some investigators. The uncoupled macromechanical approaches ignore the effect of microstructural gradation by employing specific spatial variations of material properties, which are either assumed or obtained by local homogenization, thereby resulting in erroneous results under certain circumstances. In contrast, the coupled approaches explicitly account for the micro-macrostructural interaction, albeit at a significantly higher computational cost. The higher-order theory for functionally graded materials (HOTFGM) developed by Aboudi et al. is representative of the coupled approach. However, despite its demonstrated utility in applications where micro-macrostructural coupling effects are important, the theory's full potential is yet to be realized because the original formulation of HOTFGM is computationally intensive. This, in turn, limits the size of problems that can be solved due to the large number of equations required to mimic realistic material microstructures. Therefore, a basis for an efficient reformulation of HOTFGM, referred to as user-friendly formulation, is developed herein, and subsequently employed in the construction of the efficient reformulation using the local/global conductivity matrix approach. In order to extend HOTFGM's range of applicability, spatially variable thermal

  18. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.255 Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low...

  19. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.255 Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low...

  20. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.255 Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low...

  1. 40 CFR 80.255 - Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... commitment to produce low sulfur gasoline. 80.255 Section 80.255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.255 Compliance plans and demonstration of commitment to produce low...

  2. Dissolution of monoaromatic hydrocarbons into groundwater from gasoline-oxygenate mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, M.; Lemon, L.; Barker, J.F. )

    1992-12-01

    The effects of the [open quotes]oxygenate[close quotes] additives methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) on the aqueous solubility of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from gasoline were evaluated through equilibrium batch experiments. For a gasoline:water ratio of 1:10 (v/v), up to 15% MTBE or up to 85% methanol in gasoline produced no enhanced BTEX solubility. However, at higher gasoline:water ratios, aqueous methanol concentrations above 10% enhanced BTEX solubility. The initial methanol content of the gasoline and the equilibrating gasoline- to water-phase ratio controlled the aqueous methanol concentration. Partitioning theory and the experimental results were used to calculate aqueous benzene and methanol concentrations in successive batches of fresh groundwater equilibrating with the fuel and subsequent residuals. These successive batches simulated formation of a plume of contaminated groundwater. The front of the plume generated from high-methanol gasoline equilibrating with groundwater at a gasoline:water ratio of more than 1 had high methanol content and elevated BTEX concentrations. Thus, release of high-methanol fuels could have a more serious, initial impact on groundwater than do releases of methanol-free gasoline. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijuan; Yu, Weihua; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2014-03-01

    The emission of gasoline vapors is becoming a significant environmental problem especially for the population-dense area and also results in a significant economic loss. In this study, adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins at 308 K were investigated and compared with commercial activated carbon (NucharWV-A 1100). The results showed that the equilibrium and breakthrough adsorption capacities of virgin macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins were lower than virgin-activated carbon. Compared with origin adsorbents, however, the breakthrough adsorption capacities of the regenerated activated carbon for gasoline vapors decreased by 58.5 % and 61.3 % when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors were 700 and 1,400 mg/L, while those of macroporous and hypercrosslinked resins decreased by 17.4 % and 17.5 %, and 46.5 % and 45.5 %, respectively. Due to the specific bimodal property in the region of micropore (0.5-2.0 nm) and meso-macropore (30-70 nm), the regenerated hypercrosslinked polymeric resin exhibited the comparable breakthrough adsorption capacities with the regenerated activated carbon at the initial concentration of 700 mg/L, and even higher when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors was 1,400 mg/L. In addition, 90 % of relative humidity had ignorable effect on the adsorption of gasoline vapors on hypercrosslinked polymeric resin. Taken together, it is expected that hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent would be a promising adsorbent for the removal of gasoline vapors from gas streams.

  4. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE BLENDING OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most petroleum refineries are facing the challenge of producing gasoline, which contains the desirable properties and complies with the ever-increasing environmental regulations and health restrictions. The impact of gasoline on the environment is directly related to its composit...

  5. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE BLENDING OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A life cycle assessment has been done to compare the potential environmental impacts of various gasoline blends that meet octane and vapour pressure specifications. The main blending components of alkylate, cracked gasoline and reformate have different octane and vapour pressure...

  6. Ultra-Low Sulfur Gasoline Emissions Study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Understanding the effects of gasoline sulfur level on the in-use fleet is important for assessing emissions inventories and impacts of future policy decisions. Test fuels were two non-ethanol gasolines with properties typical of certification fuel.

  7. 40 CFR 80.1338 - What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1338 Section 80.1338... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1338 What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? (a) A...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1338 - What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1338 Section 80.1338... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1338 What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? (a) A...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1338 - What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1338 Section 80.1338... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1338 What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? (a) A...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1338 - What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1338 Section 80.1338... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1338 What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? (a) A...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1338 - What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1338 Section 80.1338... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1338 What criteria must be met to qualify as a small refiner for the gasoline benzene requirements of this subpart? (a) A...

  12. 40 CFR 80.382 - What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What requirements apply to gasoline...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.382 What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands? The...

  13. 40 CFR 80.374 - What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.374 Section 80.374... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.374 What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In appropriate extreme and...

  14. 40 CFR 80.374 - What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.374 Section 80.374... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.374 What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In appropriate extreme and...

  15. 40 CFR 80.374 - What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.374 Section 80.374... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.374 What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In appropriate extreme and...

  16. 40 CFR 80.382 - What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements apply to gasoline...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.382 What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands? The...

  17. 40 CFR 80.995 - What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? 80.995 Section 80.995... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Exemptions § 80.995 What if a refiner or importer is unable to produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this subpart? In appropriate extreme and...

  18. 40 CFR 80.382 - What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements apply to gasoline...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.382 What requirements apply to gasoline for use in American Samoa, Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands? The...

  19. Re-formulation and Validation of Cloud Microphysics Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Georgakakos, K. P.

    2007-12-01

    The research focuses on improving quantitative precipitation forecasts by removing significant uncertainties in current cloud microphysics schemes embedded in models such as WRF and MM5 and cloud-resolving models such as GCE. Reformulation of several production terms in these microphysics schemes was found necessary. When estimating four graupel production terms involved in the accretion between rain, snow and graupel, current microphysics schemes assumes that all raindrops and snow particles are falling at their appropriate mass-weighted mean terminal velocities and thus analytic solutions are able to be found for these production terms. Initial analysis and tests showed that these approximate analytic solutions give significant and systematic overestimates of these terms, and, thus, become one of major error sources of the graupel overproduction and associated extreme radar reflectivity in simulations. These results are corroborated by several reports. For example, the analytic solution overestimates the graupel production by collisions between raindrops and snow by up to 230%. The structure of "pure" snow (not rimed) and "pure graupel" (completely rimed) in current microphysics schemes excludes intermediate forms between "pure" snow and "pure" graupel and thus becomes a significant reason of graupel overproduction in hydrometeor simulations. In addition, the generation of the same density graupel by both the freezing of supercooled water and the riming of snow may cause underestimation of graupel production by freezing. A parameterization scheme of the riming degree of snow is proposed and then a dynamic fallspeed-diameter relationship and density- diameter relationship of rimed snow is assigned to graupel based on the diagnosed riming degree. To test if these new treatments can improve quantitative precipitation forecast, the Hurricane Katrina and a severe winter snowfall event in the Sierra Nevada Range are selected as case studies. A series of control

  20. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  1. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  2. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  3. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  4. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  5. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  6. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  7. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  8. 27 CFR 21.109 - Gasoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gasoline. 21.109 Section 21.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Gasoline. (a) Distillation range. When 100 ml of gasoline are distilled, none shall distill below 90...

  9. 27 CFR 21.110 - Gasoline, unleaded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gasoline, unleaded. 21.110....110 Gasoline, unleaded. Conforms to specifications as established by the American Society for Testing...-79. Any of the “seasonal and geographical” volatility classes for unleaded gasoline are...

  10. Cometabolic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a soil consortium: Effect of components present in gasoline.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Patrice M.; Auria, Richard

    2000-04-01

    A soil consortium was tested for its ability to degrade reformulated gasoline, containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Reformulated gasoline was rapidly degraded to completion. However, MTBE tested alone was not degraded. A screening was carried out to identify compounds in gasoline that participate in cometabolism with MTBE. Aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, xylenes) and compounds structurally similar to MTBE (tert-butanol, 2,2-dimethylbutane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane) were unable to cometabolize MTBE. Cyclohexane was resistant to degradation. However, all n-alkanes tested for cometabolic activity (pentane, hexane, heptane) did enable the biodegradation of MTBE. Among the alkanes tested, pentane was the most efficient (200 &mgr;g/day). Upon the depletion of pentane, the consortium stopped degrading MTBE. When the consortium was spiked with pentane, MTBE degradation continued. When the ratio of MTBE to pentane was increased, the amount of MTBE degraded by the consortium was higher. Finally, diethylether was tested for cometabolic degradation with MTBE. Both compounds were degraded, but the process differed from that observed with pentane.

  11. AVGAS/AUTOGAS (Aviation Gasoline/Automobile Gasoline) Comparison. Winter Grade Fuels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    simulated conditions found in a general aviation aircraft. In these tests, automobile gasoline was tested and compared with aviation gasoline. The tendency...Distribution Statement Aviation Gasoline (Avgas) Vapor Lock Document is available to the U.S. public Automobile Gasoline (Autogas) through the National... Automobile Gasolines Tested by Sun Refining 19 and Marketing Company. 5 Properties of Several Mixtures of Avgas in Regular Unleaded 28 Autogas vi LIST OF

  12. A differentiable reformulation for E-optimal design of experiments in nonlinear dynamic biosystems.

    PubMed

    Telen, Dries; Van Riet, Nick; Logist, Flip; Van Impe, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Informative experiments are highly valuable for estimating parameters in nonlinear dynamic bioprocesses. Techniques for optimal experiment design ensure the systematic design of such informative experiments. The E-criterion which can be used as objective function in optimal experiment design requires the maximization of the smallest eigenvalue of the Fisher information matrix. However, one problem with the minimal eigenvalue function is that it can be nondifferentiable. In addition, no closed form expression exists for the computation of eigenvalues of a matrix larger than a 4 by 4 one. As eigenvalues are normally computed with iterative methods, state-of-the-art optimal control solvers are not able to exploit automatic differentiation to compute the derivatives with respect to the decision variables. In the current paper a reformulation strategy from the field of convex optimization is suggested to circumvent these difficulties. This reformulation requires the inclusion of a matrix inequality constraint involving positive semidefiniteness. In this paper, this positive semidefiniteness constraint is imposed via Sylverster's criterion. As a result the maximization of the minimum eigenvalue function can be formulated in standard optimal control solvers through the addition of nonlinear constraints. The presented methodology is successfully illustrated with a case study from the field of predictive microbiology.

  13. Gasoline-aided production of alcohol and fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, E.R.

    1984-04-10

    Gasoline aids production of alcohol and fuel in a solvent extraction and recovery process. Alcohol/water mixtures, such as those produced by fermentation of biomass material, are separated by extraction of alcohol with a solvent especially suited to such extraction and to subsequent removal. Conventional distillation steps to concentrate alcohol and eliminate water are rendered unnecessary at a considerable reduction in heat energy requirement (usually met with fossil fuel). Addition of gasoline between the solvent extraction and solvent recovery steps not only aids the latter separation but produces alcohol already denatured for fuel use.

  14. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    PubMed

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  15. 40 CFR 80.141 - Interim detergent gasoline program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., or share common ownership with, the blender, and the modified detergent is not sold or transferred to... detergent flow in cold weather; and (C) Gasoline is the only diluting agent used; and (D) The diluted... contained in common; and (B) The minimum concentration recommended for the use of each such additive...

  16. 40 CFR 80.141 - Interim detergent gasoline program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., or share common ownership with, the blender, and the modified detergent is not sold or transferred to... detergent flow in cold weather; and (C) Gasoline is the only diluting agent used; and (D) The diluted... contained in common; and (B) The minimum concentration recommended for the use of each such additive...

  17. 40 CFR 80.141 - Interim detergent gasoline program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., or share common ownership with, the blender, and the modified detergent is not sold or transferred to... detergent flow in cold weather; and (C) Gasoline is the only diluting agent used; and (D) The diluted... contained in common; and (B) The minimum concentration recommended for the use of each such additive...

  18. Federal Gasoline Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act requires EPA to regulate fuels and fuel additives for use in mobile sources if such fuel, fuel additive or any emission products causes or contributes to air or water pollution that may endanger the public health or welfare.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exhaust emissions from different reformulated diesel fuels and engine operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, Esther; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A.; Vázquez, Monica; Zielinska, Barbara

    2009-12-01

    The study of light-duty diesel engine exhaust emissions is important due to their impact on atmospheric chemistry and air pollution. In this study, both the gas and the particulate phase of fuel exhaust were analyzed to investigate the effects of diesel reformulation and engine operating parameters. The research was focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds on particulate phase due to their high toxicity. These were analyzed using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methodology. Although PAH profiles changed for diesel fuels with low-sulfur content and different percentages of aromatic hydrocarbons (5-25%), no significant differences for total PAH concentrations were detected. However, rape oil methyl ester biodiesel showed a greater number of PAH compounds, but in lower concentrations (close to 50%) than the reformulated diesel fuels. In addition, four engine operating conditions were evaluated, and the results showed that, during cold start, higher concentrations were observed for high molecular weight PAHs than during idling cycle and that the acceleration cycles provided higher concentrations than the steady-state conditions. Correlations between particulate PAHs and gas phase products were also observed. The emission of PAH compounds from the incomplete combustion of diesel fuel depended greatly on the source of the fuel and the driving patterns.

  20. Increasing the octane number of gasoline using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Sara Safari; Rashidi, Alimorad; Aghabozorg, Hamid Reza; Moradi, Leila

    2010-03-01

    The octane number is one of the characteristics of spark-ignition fuels such as gasoline. Octane number of fuels can be improved by addition of oxygenates such as ethanol, MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether), TBF (tertiary butyl formate) and TBA (tertiary butyl alcohol) as well as their blends with gasoline that reduce the cost impact of fuels. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are as useful additives for increasing the octane number. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing amide groups have a high reactivity and can react with many chemicals. These compounds can be solubilized in gasoline to increase the octane number. In this study, using octadecylamine and dodecylamine, CNTs were amidated and the amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes were added to gasoline. Research octane number analysis showed that these additives increase octane number of the desired samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA) were used for characterization of the prepared functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  1. Detergent gasoline composition

    SciTech Connect

    Biasotti, J.B.; Dille, K.L.; Dorn, P.; Herbstman, S.

    1980-05-27

    A detergent motor fuel composition is provided comprising a primary aliphatic hydrocarbon amino alkylene-substituted asparagine and an N-alkyl-alkylene diamine component. The additive composition consists of from 30 to 70 weight percent of aspargine.

  2. Indirect conversion of coal to methanol and gasoline: product price vs product slate

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, R. M.; McCracken, D. J.; Forrester, III, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts process analysis and engineering evaluation studies for the Department of Energy to provide, on a consistent basis, technical and economic assessments of processes and systems for coal conversion and utilization. Such assessments permit better understanding of the relative technical and economic potential of these processes. The objective of the work described here was to provide an assessment of the technical feasibility, economic competitiveness, and environmental acceptability of selected indirect coal liquefaction processes on a uniform, consistent, and impartial basis. Particular emphasis is placed on production of methanol as a principal product or methanol production for conversion to gasoline. Potential uses for the methanol are combustion in peaking-type turbines or blending with gasoline to yield motor fuel. Conversion of methanol to gasoline is accomplished through the use of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Under the guidance of ORNL, Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Houston Division, prepared four conceptual process designs for indirect conversion of a Western subbituminous coal to either methanol or gasoline. The conceptual designs are based on the use of consistent technology for the core of the plant (gasification through methanol synthesis) with additional processing as necessary for production of different liquid products of interest. The bases for the conceptual designs are given. The case designations are: methanol production for turbine-grade fuel; methanol production for gasoline blending; gasoline production with coproduction of SNG; and gasoline production maximized.

  3. Gasoline risk management: a compendium of regulations, standards, and industry practices.

    PubMed

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    This paper is part of a special series of publications regarding gasoline toxicology testing and gasoline risk management; this article covers regulations, standards, and industry practices concerning gasoline risk management. Gasoline is one of the highest volume liquid fuel products produced globally. In the U.S., gasoline production in 2013 was the highest on record (API, 2013). Regulations such as those pursuant to the Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) and many others provide the U.S. federal government with extensive authority to regulate gasoline composition, manufacture, storage, transportation and distribution practices, worker and consumer exposure, product labeling, and emissions from engines and other sources designed to operate on this fuel. The entire gasoline lifecycle-from manufacture, through distribution, to end-use-is subject to detailed, complex, and overlapping regulatory schemes intended to protect human health, welfare, and the environment. In addition to these legal requirements, industry has implemented a broad array of voluntary standards and best management practices to ensure that risks from gasoline manufacturing, distribution, and use are minimized.

  4. An analysis of strategic price setting in retail gasoline markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaureguiberry, Florencia

    This dissertation studies price-setting behavior in the retail gasoline industry. The main questions addressed are: How important is a retail station's brand and proximity to competitors when retail stations set price? How do retailers adjust their pricing when they cater to consumers who are less aware of competing options or have less discretion over where they purchase gasoline? These questions are explored in two separate analyses using a unique datasets containing retail pricing behavior of stations in California and in 24 different metropolitan areas. The evidence suggests that brand and location generate local market power for gasoline stations. After controlling for market and station characteristics, the analysis finds a spread of 11 cents per gallon between the highest and the lowest priced retail gasoline brands. The analysis also indicates that when the nearest competitor is located over 2 miles away as opposed to next door, consumers will pay an additional 1 cent per gallon of gasoline. In order to quantify the significance of local market power, data for stations located near major airport rental car locations are utilized. The presumption here is that rental car users are less aware or less sensitive to fueling options near the rental car return location and are to some extent "captured consumers". Retailers located near rental car locations have incentives to adjust their pricing strategies to exploit this. The analysis of pricing near rental car locations indicates that retailers charge prices that are 4 cent per gallon higher than other stations in the same metropolitan area. This analysis is of interest to regulators who are concerned with issues of consolidation, market power, and pricing in the retail gasoline industry. This dissertation concludes with a discussion of the policy implications of the empirical analysis.

  5. Contribution of the gasoline distribution cycle to volatile organic compound emissions in the metropolitan area of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Schifter, I; Magdaleno, M; Díaz, L; Krüger, B; León, J; Palmerín, M E; Casas, R; Melgarejo, A; López-Salinas, E

    2002-05-01

    Gasoline distribution in the metropolitan area of Mexico City (MAMC) represents an area of opportunity for the abatement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. The gasoline distribution in this huge urban center encompasses several operations: (1) storage in bulk and distribution plants, (2) transportation to gasoline service stations, (3) unloading at service stations' underground tanks, and (4) gasoline dispensing. In this study, hydrocarbon (HC) emissions resulting from breathing losses in closed reservoirs, leakage, and spillage from the operations just listed were calculated using both field measurements and reported emission factors. The results show that the contribution of volatile HC emissions due to storage, distribution, and sales of gasoline is 6651 t/year, approximately 13 times higher than previously reported values. Tank truck transportation results in 53.9% of the gasoline emissions, and 31.5% of emissions are generated when loading the tank trucks. The high concentration of emissions in the gasoline transportation and loading operations by tank trucks has been ascribed to (1) highly frequent trips from distribution plant to gasoline stations, and vice versa, to cope with excessive gasoline sales per gasoline station; (2) low leakproofness of tank trucks; and (3) poor training of employees. In addition, the contribution to HC evaporative and exhaust emissions from the vehicles of the MAMC was also evaluated.

  6. A survey of the reformulation of Australian child-oriented food products

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is one of the most pressing public health challenges of the 21st century. Reformulating commonly eaten food products is a key emerging strategy to improve the food supply and help address rising rates of obesity and chronic disease. This study aimed to monitor reformulation of Australian child-oriented food products (products marketed specifically to children) from 2009–2011. Methods In 2009, all child-oriented food products in a large supermarket in metropolitan Adelaide were identified. These baseline products were followed up in 2011 to identify products still available for sale. Nutrient content data were collected from Nutrient Information Panels in 2009 and 2011. Absolute and percentage change in nutrient content were calculated for energy, total fat, saturated fat, sugars, sodium and fibre. Data were descriptively analysed to examine reformulation in individual products, in key nutrients, within product categories and across all products. Two methods were used to assess the extent of reformulation; the first involved assessing percentage change in single nutrients over time, while the second involved a set of nutrient criteria to assess changes in overall healthiness of products over time. Results Of 120 products, 40 remained unchanged in nutrient composition from 2009–2011 and 80 underwent change. The proportions of positively and negatively reformulated products were similar for most nutrients surveyed, with the exception of sodium. Eighteen products (15%) were simultaneously positively and negatively reformulated for different nutrients. Using percentage change in nutrient content to assess extent of reformulation, nearly half (n = 53) of all products were at least moderately reformulated and just over one third (n = 42) were substantially reformulated. The nutrient criteria method revealed 5 products (6%) that were positively reformulated and none that had undergone negative reformulation. Conclusion Positive and

  7. Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

  8. Application of Biologically-Based Lumping To Investigate the Toxicological Interactions of a Complex Gasoline Mixture

    EPA Science Inventory

    People are often exposed to complex mixtures of environmental chemicals such as gasoline, tobacco smoke, water contaminants, or food additives. However, investigators have often considered complex mixtures as one lumped entity. Valuable information can be obtained from these exp...

  9. Properties, performance and emissions of biofuels in blends with gasoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Farshad

    The emission performance of fuels and their blends in modern combustion systems have been studied with the purpose of reducing regulated and unregulated emissions, understanding of exhaust products of fuels such as gasoline, ethanol and 2,5-dimethylfuran and comparison of results. A quantitative analysis of individual hydrocarbon species from exhaust emissions of these three fuels were carried out with direct injects spark ignition (DISI) single cylinder engine. The analysis of hydrocarbon species were obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) connected on-line to SI engine. During this project, novel works have been done including the set up of on-line exhaust emission measurement device for detection and quantification of individual volatile hydrocarbons. Setting of a reliable gas chromatography mass spectrometry measurement system required definition and development of a precise method. Lubricity characteristics of biofuels and gasoline were investigated using High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR). Results showed great enhancing lubricity characteristics of biofuels when added to conventional gasoline. 2,5-dimenthylfuran was found to be the best among the fuels used, addition of this fuel to gasoline also showed better result compared with ethanol addition.

  10. Addressee co-operation and request reformulation in young children.

    PubMed

    Marcos, H; Bernicot, J

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to show that children under age 3;0 are capable of reformulating requests in different ways depending on how their addressee responds to the request. This adaptive ability is considered to be an indication of the use of both communicative and conversational skills. Children from French-speaking families were observed at two developmental thresholds: the end of the prelinguistic period (1;6) and the start of the linguistic period (2;6). The verbal and nonverbal outputs of the two groups of 12 children (1;6 and 2;6) were compared in three object request situations: the adult immediately complies with the request (satisfaction), the adult asks a clarification question (clarification), and the adult refuses to comply with the request (refusal). The ways in which the children adapted to each situation were found to be similar at the two ages considered. In the clarification situation, vocal productions and their repairs were more numerous, whereas in the refusal situation, non-reformulations and gazes to and from the requested object and addressee predominated. The discussion deals with the significance of these results in the development of communicative and conversational skills in children.

  11. Phrasal Paraphrase Based Question Reformulation for Archived Question Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Wei-Nan; Lu, Ke; Ji, Rongrong; Wang, Fanglin; Liu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Lexical gap in cQA search, resulted by the variability of languages, has been recognized as an important and widespread phenomenon. To address the problem, this paper presents a question reformulation scheme to enhance the question retrieval model by fully exploring the intelligence of paraphrase in phrase-level. It compensates for the existing paraphrasing research in a suitable granularity, which either falls into fine-grained lexical-level or coarse-grained sentence-level. Given a question in natural language, our scheme first detects the involved key-phrases by jointly integrating the corpus-dependent knowledge and question-aware cues. Next, it automatically extracts the paraphrases for each identified key-phrase utilizing multiple online translation engines, and then selects the most relevant reformulations from a large group of question rewrites, which is formed by full permutation and combination of the generated paraphrases. Extensive evaluations on a real world data set demonstrate that our model is able to characterize the complex questions and achieves promising performance as compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Phrasal Paraphrase Based Question Reformulation for Archived Question Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ke; Ji, Rongrong; Wang, Fanglin; Liu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Lexical gap in cQA search, resulted by the variability of languages, has been recognized as an important and widespread phenomenon. To address the problem, this paper presents a question reformulation scheme to enhance the question retrieval model by fully exploring the intelligence of paraphrase in phrase-level. It compensates for the existing paraphrasing research in a suitable granularity, which either falls into fine-grained lexical-level or coarse-grained sentence-level. Given a question in natural language, our scheme first detects the involved key-phrases by jointly integrating the corpus-dependent knowledge and question-aware cues. Next, it automatically extracts the paraphrases for each identified key-phrase utilizing multiple online translation engines, and then selects the most relevant reformulations from a large group of question rewrites, which is formed by full permutation and combination of the generated paraphrases. Extensive evaluations on a real world data set demonstrate that our model is able to characterize the complex questions and achieves promising performance as compared to the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:23805178

  13. Characterization of diesel particles: effects of fuel reformulation, exhaust aftertreatment, and engine operation on particle carbon composition and volatility.

    PubMed

    Alander, Timo J A; Leskinen, Ari P; Raunemaa, Taisto M; Rantanen, Leena

    2004-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles are the major constituent of urban carbonaceous aerosol being linked to a large range of adverse environmental and health effects. In this work, the effects of fuel reformulation, oxidation catalyst, engine type, and engine operation parameters on diesel particle emission characteristics were investigated. Particle emissions from an indirect injection (IDI) and a direct injection (DI) engine car operating under steady-state conditions with a reformulated low-sulfur, low-aromatic fuel and a standard-grade fuel were analyzed. Organic (OC) and elemental (EC) carbon fractions of the particles were quantified by a thermal-optical transmission analysis method and particle size distributions measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The particle volatility characteristics were studied with a configuration that consisted of a thermal desorption unit and an SMPS. In addition, the volatility of size-selected particles was determined with a tandem differential mobility analyzer technique. The reformulated fuel was found to produce 10-40% less particulate carbon mass compared to the standard fuel. On the basis of the carbon analysis, the organic carbon contributed 27-61% to the carbon mass of the IDI engine particle emissions, depending on the fuel and engine operation parameters. The fuel reformulation reduced the particulate organic carbon emissions by 10-55%. In the particles of the DI engine, the organic carbon contributed 14-26% to the total carbon emissions, the advanced engine technology, and the oxidation catalyst, thus reducing the OC/EC ratio of particles considerably. A relatively good consistency between the particulate organic fraction quantified with the thermal optical method and the volatile fraction measured with the thermal desorption unit and SMPS was found.

  14. Carcinogenicity of methyl-tertiary butyl ether in gasoline.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2002-12-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was added to gasoline on a nationwide scale in 1992 without prior testing of adverse, toxic, or carcinogenic effects. Since that time, numerous reports have appeared describing adverse health effects of individuals exposed to MTBE, both from inhalation of fumes in the workplace and while pumping gasoline. Leakage of MTBE, a highly water-soluble compound, from underground storage tanks has led to contamination of the water supply in many areas of the United States. Legislation has been passed by many states to prohibit the addition of MTBE to gasoline. The addition of MTBE to gasoline has not accomplished its stated goal of decreasing air pollution, and it has posed serious health risks to a large portion of the population, particularly the elderly and those with respiratory problems, asthma, and skin sensitivity. Reports of animal studies of carcinogenicity of MTBE began to appear in the 1990s, prior to the widespread introduction of MTBE into gasoline. These reports were largely ignored. In ensuing years, further studies have shown that MTBE causes various types of malignant tumors in mice and rats. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Board of Scientific Counselors' Report on Carcinogens Subcommittee met in December 1998 to consider listing MTBE as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen." In spite of recommendations from Dr. Bailer, the primary reviewer, and other scientists on the committee, the motion to list MTBE in the report was defeated by a six to five vote, with one abstention. On the basis of animal studies, it is widely accepted that if a chemical is carcinogenic in appropriate laboratory animal test systems, it must be treated as though it were carcinogenic in humans. In the face of compelling evidence, NTP Committee members who voted not to list MTBE as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" did a disservice to the general public; this action may cause needless exposure of many to health risks

  15. Evaluation of processes for producing gasoline from wood. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    Three processes for producing gasoline from wood by pyrolysis have been investigated. Technical and economic comparisons among the processes have been made, based on a hypothetical common plant size of 2000 tons per day green wood chip feedstock. In order to consider the entire fuel production process, the energy and cost inputs for producing and delivering the feedstock were included in the analysis. In addition, perspective has been provided by comparisons of the wood-to-gasoline technologies with other similar systems, including coal-to-methanol and various biomass-to-alcohol systems. Based on several assumptions that were required because of the candidate processes' information gaps, comparisons of energy efficiency were made. Several descriptors of energy efficiency were used, but all showed that methanol production from wood, with or without subsequent processing by the Mobil route to gasoline, appears most promising. It must be emphasized, however, that the critical wood-to-methanol system remains conceptual. Another observation was that the ethanol production systems appear inferior to the wood-to-gasoline processes. Each of the processes investigated requires further research and development to answer the questions about their potential contributions confidently. The processes each have so many unknowns that it appears unwise to pursue any one while abandoning the others.

  16. Utilization of Renewable Oxygenates as Gasoline Blending Components

    SciTech Connect

    Yanowitz, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.

    2011-08-01

    This report reviews the use of higher alcohols and several cellulose-derived oxygenates as blend components in gasoline. Material compatibility issues are expected to be less severe for neat higher alcohols than for fuel-grade ethanol. Very little data exist on how blending higher alcohols or other oxygenates with gasoline affects ASTM Standard D4814 properties. Under the Clean Air Act, fuels used in the United States must be 'substantially similar' to fuels used in certification of cars for emission compliance. Waivers for the addition of higher alcohols at concentrations up to 3.7 wt% oxygen have been granted. Limited emission testing on pre-Tier 1 vehicles and research engines suggests that higher alcohols will reduce emissions of CO and organics, while NOx emissions will stay the same or increase. Most oxygenates can be used as octane improvers for standard gasoline stocks. The properties of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, methyl pentanoate and ethyl pentanoate suggest that they may function well as low-concentration blends with gasoline in standard vehicles and in higher concentrations in flex fuel vehicles.

  17. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: neurotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, James P; Daughtrey, Wayne C; Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential neurotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/mg(3) and exposures were for 6h/day, 5days/week for 13weeks. The functional observation battery (FOB) with the addition of motor activity (MA) testing, hematoxylin and eosin staining of brain tissue sections, and brain regional analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to assess behavioral changes, traditional neuropathology and astrogliosis, respectively. FOB and MA data for all agents, except G/TBA, were negative. G/TBA behavioral effects resolved during recovery. Neuropathology was negative for all groups. Analyses of GFAP revealed increases in multiplebrain regions largely limited to males of the G/EtOH group, findings indicative of minor gliosis, most significantly in the cerebellum. Small changes (both increases and decreases) in GFAP were observed for other test agents but effects were not consistent across sex, brain region or exposure concentration.

  18. 40 CFR 80.553 - Under what conditions may the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards be extended for a small...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine... refiner gasoline sulfur standards be extended for a small refiner of motor vehicle diesel fuel? 80.553... small refiner gasoline sulfur standards be extended for a small refiner of motor vehicle diesel fuel?...

  19. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1641 - Alternative sulfur standards and requirements that apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1641 Alternative sulfur standards and requirements that apply to importers... gasoline under § 80.1630, and the annual sulfur average and per-gallon cap standards otherwise...

  1. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  2. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  3. Reformulating the Schroedinger equation as a Shabat-Zakharov system

    SciTech Connect

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2010-02-15

    We reformulate the second-order Schroedinger equation as a set of two coupled first-order differential equations, a so-called 'Shabat-Zakharov system' (sometimes called a 'Zakharov-Shabat' system). There is considerable flexibility in this approach, and we emphasize the utility of introducing an 'auxiliary condition' or 'gauge condition' that is used to cut down the degrees of freedom. Using this formalism, we derive the explicit (but formal) general solution to the Schroedinger equation. The general solution depends on three arbitrarily chosen functions, and a path-ordered exponential matrix. If one considers path ordering to be an 'elementary' process, then this represents complete quadrature, albeit formal, of the second-order linear ordinary differential equation.

  4. Gero-transcendence: a reformulation of the disengagement theory.

    PubMed

    Tornstam, L

    1989-09-01

    This article offers a meta-theoretical reformulation of the disengagement theory. It is argued that what social gerontologists describe in negative terms and label "disengagement" is in reality often a positive development towards gero-transcendence. This latter can be described as a shift in meta-perspective from a materialistic and rational view to a more cosmic and transcendent one, normally followed by an increase in life satisfaction. To understand the nature of gero-transcendence gerontologists have to make a meta-theoretical shift from a traditional positivist view to a view where disengagement is phenomenologically comprehended. As the article includes some criticism of interactionist-based social gerontology, it should be mentioned that the author himself has been and is working within this theoretical tradition. The article is as much self-criticism as anything else.

  5. Dialysis-dependency: the reformulated or remnant person.

    PubMed

    Martin-McDonald, Kristine

    Being dependent on dialysis is a potentially overwhelming experience where life as previously known is permanently altered. A dialysis-dependent individual may reformulate their identify or perceive that they are a remnant of their former self. This paper will explore and expand Morse and Penrod's (1999) model as a useful way to understand how a person might reconstruct their identify. Grounded in a narrative methodology, interviews of those on haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were thematically analysed. It was found that dialysis dependency brings an acknowledgment of a lost past, an inescapable present and an unknowable future, filtered through hope and despair. Nurses need to understand the suffering, wrought by such a struggle, to facilitate the positive re-envisioning of those who are dialysis dependent.

  6. Patients and doctors: reformulating the UK health policy community?

    PubMed

    Salter, Brian

    2003-09-01

    The rise of the active health care consumer in the United Kingdom requires a reformulation not only of the traditional relationship between patients and doctors, but also of the macro-politics of health which reflect and service that relationship. Market and democratic themes have supplied an ideological impetus to the pressures for change. The well-publicised problems of medical self-regulation have given them practical political expression. However, the response from the policy community still reflects the dominant partners within it, medicine and the state. What neither partner has recognised is that the functionality of the policy community has been undermined by the different and issue-based challenges to the traditional patient-doctor relationship. As a result, the state is likely to remain the lead player in an increasingly unstable politics of health where consumerist issues are on the policy agenda, but patient groups are still excluded from the policy community.

  7. Evaluation of Motor Gasoline Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    MINUTES 15271-G HC NAPHTHA >2490 D 873,8 HOUR. mg/i00rmL 15272-G REFORMATE >W015 S4*C,12 WEEK. mg/i00asL 15273-G HSR NAHH >53 (ESSENTIALLY THE SAME AS... Reformate - A reformed naphtha , which is upgraded in octane by means of catalytic reforming to convert cycloparaffins to aromatics. Residue...gasoline components, a pyrolysis naphtha was shown to be generally an order of magnitude less stable than all other streams, and coker naphtha was

  8. Reformulating Lead-Based Paint as a Problem in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Amélie

    2011-01-01

    Leaded gasoline was officially removed from the Canadian market in December 1990. The removal of a major lead source and the subsequent decline in children's blood lead levels marked an important transition point and sparked the emergence of new discourse on lead in Canada. Today, childhood lead poisoning is viewed as a problem of the past or a problem of the United States. Sparse Canadian surveillance data supported this view. Moreover, tensions among federal agencies evolved into a power struggle, with Health Canada ultimately becoming the dominant authority, thereby relegating important research initiatives to obscurity and also shaping a vastly weaker regulatory response to lead than occurred in the United States. PMID:21836119

  9. GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

    2003-08-24

    The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple

  10. Estimating the gasoline components and formulations toxicity to microalgae (Tetraselmis chuii) and oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae) embryos: An approach to minimize environmental pollution risk

    SciTech Connect

    Paixao, J.F.; Nascimento, I.A. . E-mail: iracema@ftc.br; Pereira, S.A.; Leite, M.B.L.; Carvalho, G.C.; Silveira, J.S.C.; Reboucas, M.; Matias, G.R.A.; Rodrigues, I.L.P.

    2007-03-15

    Even though petrochemical contamination frequently occurs in the form of oil spills, it is thought that a greater danger to coastal habitats is posed by chronic petrochemical toxicity associated with urban run-off, in which gasoline water-soluble-fraction (WSF) plays an important role. The hypothesis of the entrepreneurs, who were associated to the scientists uncharged of this research, was that recycled petrochemical waste may provide different gasoline formulations, having different toxic properties; the correlation between the gasoline formulations and their components' toxicological effects might contribute to the reformulation of the products, in such a way that the gasoline generated could be less toxic and less harmful to the environment. The aim of this research was to determine the toxic effects of 14 different types of gasoline (formulated, in accordance with National Petroleum Agency standards, from petrochemical waste), on Tetraselmis chuii (microalgae culture) and Crassostrea rhizophorae (embryos). Microalgae and oyster embryos were exposed to different gasoline formulations water-soluble fractions (WSF) at a range of concentrations (0%, 4.6%, 10.0%, 22.0%, 46.0%, and 100%), for 96 and 24 h, respectively. The tests were carried out under controlled conditions. End-points have been CI50-96h (concentration causing 50% growth inhibition in microalgae cultures) and EC50-24h (concentration causing abnormalities on 50% of the exposed embryos). Through these procedures, gasoline formulations, which represent the lowest environmental risk, were selected. Bioassays carried out on the 8 different gasoline components aimed to correlate gasoline toxicity with the toxic potential of its components. The analysis of principal components showed that the C9DI, a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons of 9 carbon atoms, had the highest level of toxic potential, followed by C9S (a mixture of aromatics with 9-11 carbon atoms) and heavy naphtha. The results showed gasoline

  11. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasolines and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  12. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasolines and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  13. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasoline and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  14. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. This section contains requirements for automated detergent blending facilities and hand-blending detergent facilities. All gasoline and all PRC intended for use in gasoline must...

  15. Historical Gasoline Composition Data 1976 - 2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gasoline composition varies for technical, market and regulatory reasons. Knowledge of any one of these is insufficient for understanding the chemical composition of gasoline at any specific location in the U.S. Historical data collected by the National Institute of Petroleum ...

  16. MAPPING GASOLINE REQUIREMENTS, APPLICABLE REGULATIONS AND BANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Federal and State regulations play an important role in understanding gasoline composition around the United States. Multiple sources of information on these programs were used to develop reliable, up-to-date maps showing gasoline requirements imposed by various regulations. Th...

  17. Gasoline Prices and Motor Vehicle Fatalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, David C.; Morrisey, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Fatal motor vehicle crashes per capita remained relatively stable over the 1990s, in spite of new traffic safety laws and vehicle innovations. One explanation for this stability is that the price of gasoline declined, which resulted in more vehicle miles traveled and potentially more fatalities. By using 1983-2000 monthly gasoline price and…

  18. What Drives U.S. Gasoline Prices?

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    This analysis provides context for considering the impact of rising domestic light crude oil production on the price that U.S. consumers pay for gasoline, and provides a framework to consider how changes to existing U.S. crude oil export restrictions might affect gasoline prices.

  19. Feasibility demonstration of a road vehicle fueled with hydrogen-enriched gasoline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.; Dowdy, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    Evaluation of the concept of using hydrogen-enriched gasoline in a modified internal combustion engine in order to make possible the burning of ultralean mixtures. The use of such an engine in a road vehicle demonstrated that the addition of small quantities of gaseous hydrogen to gasoline resulted in significant reductions in exhaust emissions of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides as well as in thermal efficiency improvements of the engine performance.

  20. Thermodynamics properties and combustion performance investigation of higher chain alcohol-RON 92 gasoline system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktavian, Rama; Darmawan, Rhezaldian Eka; Diarahmawati, Ayu; Kartiko, Intan Dyah; Rachmawati, Rizqi Tri

    2017-03-01

    The increasing consumption of fossil fuel in Indonesia is not followed by the rising on domestic oil production. This will lead to the depletion of fossil fuel reserves that will affect the availability of energy resources. Biofuel is considered as the critical solution to solve this problem in Indonesia. In recent years, alcohol produced from biomass has been used as an oxygenated compound in gasoline to increase the octane number and reduce pollutants resulting from motor vehicle exhaust emissions. However, the use of alcohol as an additive compounds is still limited to ethanol. In fact, the use of higher-chain alcohol such as 1-butanol offers more benefits over ethanol due to its higher calorific value. 1-butanol also has good characteristics for gasoline mixture such as less corrosive than ethanol, more resistant to water contamination, its low vapor pressure which leads to more safety application. This work investigated the effect of 1-butanol addition on the thermodynamic properties of gasoline-ethanol blend, in the form of density values, isobaric expansion coefficient, and the calorific value. The addition of 1-butanol up to 15% weight (80% RON 92-5% ethanol-15% 1-butanol) gives higher density to alcohol-gasoline blend up to 2% compared with pure RON 92 gasoline. Moreover, this addition produces the calorific value of gasoline blend of 11,313 cal/gr compared to pure RON 92 gasoline with the calorific value of 12,117 cal/gram. This blend can reduce the RON 92 gasoline consumption up to 15% from calorific value perspective.

  1. Post-mortem detection of gasoline residues in lung tissue and heart blood of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Pahor, Kevin; Olson, Greg; Forbes, Shari L

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether gasoline residues could be detected post-mortem in lung tissue and heart blood of fire victims. The lungs and heart blood were investigated to determine whether they were suitable samples for collection and could be collected without contamination during an autopsy. Three sets of test subjects (pig carcasses) were investigated under two different fire scenarios. Test subjects 1 were anaesthetized following animal ethics approval, inhaled gasoline vapours for a short period and then euthanized. The carcasses were clothed and placed in a house where additional gasoline was poured onto the carcass post-mortem in one fire, but not in the other. Test subjects 2 did not inhale gasoline, were clothed and placed in the house and had gasoline poured onto them in both fires. Test subjects 3 were clothed but had no exposure to gasoline either ante- or post-mortem. Following controlled burns and suppression with water, the carcasses were collected, and their lungs and heart blood were excised at a necropsy. The headspace from the samples was analysed using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Gasoline was identified in the lungs and heart blood from the subjects that were exposed to gasoline vapours prior to death (test subjects 1). All other samples were negative for gasoline residues. These results suggest that it is useful to analyse for volatile ignitable liquids in lung tissue and blood as it may help to determine whether a victim was alive and inhaling gases at the time of a fire.

  2. Techno-economic Analysis for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Gasoline via the Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) Process

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-05-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). With gasification technology, biomass can be converted to gasoline via methanol synthesis and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies. Producing a gasoline product that is infrastructure ready has much potential. Although the MTG technology has been commercially demonstrated with natural gas conversion, combining MTG with biomass gasification has not been shown. Therefore, a techno-economic evaluation for a biomass MTG process based on currently available technology was developed to provide information about benefits and risks of this technology. The economic assumptions used in this report are consistent with previous U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biomass Programs techno-economic assessments. The feedstock is assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two kinds of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. The gasoline selling prices (2008 USD) excluding taxes were estimated to be $3.20/gallon and $3.68/gallon for indirectly-heated gasified and directly-heated. This suggests that a process based on existing technology is economic only when crude prices are above $100/bbl. However, improvements in syngas cleanup combined with consolidated gasoline synthesis can potentially reduce the capital cost. In addition, improved synthesis catalysts and reactor design may allow increased yield.

  3. Induced cytotoxic damage by exposure to gasoline vapors: a study in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Soto, Fernanda Balderrama; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Meza, Enrique; Arroyo, Sandra Gómez; Martínez, Luis Daniel Ortega; Meraz, Eliakym Arambula; Caba, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Gasoline is a blend of organic compounds used in internal combustion engines. Gasoline-station attendants are exposed to gasoline vapors, which pose a potentially mutagenic risk. According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, exposure to gasoline and engine exhaust is possibly carcinogenic to humans. We determined the frequency of micronucleus and other nuclear abnormalities, such as pyknotic nuclei, chromatin condensation, cells with nuclear buds, karyolytic cells, karyorrhexis, and binucleated cells in buccal mucosal smears of 60 gasoline-station attendants and 60 unexposed controls. In addition, we explored if factors such as smoking habits, alcohol consumption, and worked years exert an additional synergistic cytotoxic effect. There were statistically significant higher frequencies (p < 0.05) of nuclear abnormalities among exposed attendants compared to the controls. No statistical significant (p > 0.05) additional effect of lifestyle habits such as smoking and alcohol consumption or worked years on the cytotoxicity was observed. The results showed that from the beginning exposure to gasoline vapors increased the frequency of nuclear abnormalities in buccal epithelial cells. Our results provide valuable information on cytotoxic damage for an early pre-symptomatic diagnosis.

  4. Gasoline Biodesulfurization DE-FC07-97ID13570 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Pienkos, Philip T.

    2002-01-15

    Nine strains were identified to grow with gasoline as sole sulfur source. Two different genes were cloned from Gordonia terrae KGB1 and tested for the ability to support gasoline BDS. The first of these, fmoA, was cloned by screening a KGB1 gene library for the ability to convert indole to indigo (a sulfur-regulated capability in KGB1). The fmoA gene was overexpressed in a gasoline tolerant strain of Pseudomonas putida PpG1 and the recombinant strain was shown to convert thiophene to a dimer of thiophene sulfoxide at rates nearly two orders of magnitude higher than KGB1 could catalyze the reaction. Despite this high activity the recombinant PpG1 was unable to demonstrate any activity against gasoline either in shake flask or in bench-scale gasoline BDS bioreactor. A second gene (toeA) was cloned from KGB1 and shown to support growth of Rhodococcus erythropolis JB55 on gasoline. The toeA gene was also identified in another gasoline strain T. wratislaviensis EMT4, and was identified as a homolog of dszA from R. erythropolis IGTS8. Expression of this gene in JB55 supported conversion of DBTO2 (the natural substrate for DszA) to HPBS, but activity against gasoline was low and BDS results were inconsistent. It appeared that activity was directed against C2- and C3-thiophenes. Efforts to increase gene expression by plasmid manipulation, by addition of flavin reductase genes, or by expression in PpG1 were unsuccessful. The DszC protein (DBT monooxygenase) from IGTS8 has very little activity against the sulfur compounds in gasoline, but a mutant enzyme with a substitution of phenylalanine for valine at position 261 was shown to have an altered substrate range. This alteration resulted in increased activity against gasoline, with activity towards mainly C3- and C4-thiophenes and benzothiophene. A mutant library of dszB was constructed by RACHITT (W. C. Coco et al., DNA shuffling method for generating highly recombined genes and evolved enzymes. 2001. Nature Biotech. 19

  5. Refractometric determination of content of aromatic hydrocarbons in AI-93 gasolines

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, L.M.; Ioffe, B.V.; Mikheeva, E.G.

    1982-11-01

    Investigates the possibility of extending the use of the dispersometric method to the control of aromatic hydrocarbon content in AI-93 gasolines. Uses 4 model blends with aromatics content of 20-40% by weight. Finds that the dispersometric method can be used in analyzing both unleaded and leaded AI-93 gasolines, since the addition of ethyl fluid and dye in formulating the leaded gasolines does not affect the accuracy in determining the aromatic hydrocarbon content. Concludes that the dispersometric method can be used to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon content in AI-93 gasolines to within + or - 1.0% by weight, both in the laboratory (IRF-23M refractometer) and under commercial conditions (in ''Nafta-74'' unit).

  6. Persulfate injection into a gasoline source zone.

    PubMed

    Sra, Kanwartej S; Thomson, Neil R; Barker, Jim F

    2013-07-01

    One pore volume of unactivated sodium persulfate was delivered into an emplaced gasoline residual source zone at CFB Borden. Concentrations of inorganic species (S2O8(2-), SO4(2-), Na(+), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)) and selected gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene) were monitored across a transect equipped with 90 multilevel sampling points for >10months post-injection. Mass loading (M˙) of compounds constructed from the transect data was used for assessment purposes. Breakthrough of inorganic species was observed when the injection slug crossed the monitoring transect. An increase in [Formula: see text] indicated persulfate consumption during oxidation of gasoline compounds or degradation due to the interaction with aquifer materials. M˙DIC increased by >100% suggesting some mineralization of gasoline compounds during treatment. Mass loading for all the monitored gasoline compounds reduced by 46 to 86% as the inorganic slug crossed the monitoring transect. The cumulative mass discharge across the monitoring transect was 19 to 58% lower than that expected without persulfate injection. After the inorganic injection slug was flushed from the source zone a partial rebound (40 to 80% of baseline levels) of mass discharge of the monitored gasoline compounds was observed. The ensemble of data collected provides insight into the fate and transport of the injected persulfate solution, and the accompanying treatment of a gasoline the source zone.

  7. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Test Methods Additional Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Supporting documents on the Direct Final Rule that allows refiners and laboratories to use more current and improved fuel testing procedures for twelve American Society for Testing and Materials analytical test methods.

  8. Reformulation and energy flow of the Cowling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Amm, O.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ieda, A.; Vanhamäki, H.

    2011-02-01

    The question to which extent the divergence of the Hall current can be connected to the Pedersen current or to the closure current in the magnetosphere through field-aligned currents (FACs), that is, the Cowling channel process in the polar region, has long been debated but not fully understood. The present study reformulates the Cowling channel by introducing a two-layer model consisting of Hall and Pedersen conductivity layers with channel boundaries not only in the direction perpendicular to the channel but also in the direction along it. This new model enables us to better and more physically understand the connection between the Hall current, Pedersen current, and FAC. In particular, the finiteness of the channel along its direction enables us to understand that the primary nonzero electric field along the channel and FACs at the channel boundaries that faced each other in the channel direction carries the necessary energy for the Hall current to set up the secondary electric field from the magnetosphere. A case for a possible connection between the Pedersen and Hall currents is shown based on a polar current system derived from the Kamide-Richmond-Matsushita method. A more comprehensive analysis based on data is presented in the companion paper.

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccccc... - Applicability Criteria and Management Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Practices for Gasoline Cargo Tanks Unloading at Gasoline Dispensing Facilities With Monthly Throughput of 100,000 Gallons of Gasoline or More 2 Table 2 to Subpart CCCCCC of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline Dispensing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. CCCCCC, Table 2 Table 2...

  14. Tested Demonstrations. Gasoline Vapor: An Invisible Pollutant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Edgar R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a demonstration concerning the air pollution aspects of gasoline vapor which provides an estimation of the vapor pressure of test fuel, the molecular weight of the vapor, and illustrates a method of controlling the pollution. (SL)

  15. Efficient simulation and model reformulation of two-dimensional electrochemical thermal behavior of lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Northrop, Paul W. C.; Pathak, Manan; Rife, Derek; ...

    2015-03-09

    Lithium-ion batteries are an important technology to facilitate efficient energy storage and enable a shift from petroleum based energy to more environmentally benign sources. Such systems can be utilized most efficiently if good understanding of performance can be achieved for a range of operating conditions. Mathematical models can be useful to predict battery behavior to allow for optimization of design and control. An analytical solution is ideally preferred to solve the equations of a mathematical model, as it eliminates the error that arises when using numerical techniques and is usually computationally cheap. An analytical solution provides insight into the behaviormore » of the system and also explicitly shows the effects of different parameters on the behavior. However, most engineering models, including the majority of battery models, cannot be solved analytically due to non-linearities in the equations and state dependent transport and kinetic parameters. The numerical method used to solve the system of equations describing a battery operation can have a significant impact on the computational cost of the simulation. In this paper, a model reformulation of the porous electrode pseudo three dimensional (P3D) which significantly reduces the computational cost of lithium ion battery simulation, while maintaining high accuracy, is discussed. This reformulation enables the use of the P3D model into applications that would otherwise be too computationally expensive to justify its use, such as online control, optimization, and parameter estimation. Furthermore, the P3D model has proven to be robust enough to allow for the inclusion of additional physical phenomena as understanding improves. In this study, the reformulated model is used to allow for more complicated physical phenomena to be considered for study, including thermal effects.« less

  16. Efficient simulation and model reformulation of two-dimensional electrochemical thermal behavior of lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Northrop, Paul W. C.; Pathak, Manan; Rife, Derek; De, Sumitava; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Subramanian, Venkat R.

    2015-03-09

    Lithium-ion batteries are an important technology to facilitate efficient energy storage and enable a shift from petroleum based energy to more environmentally benign sources. Such systems can be utilized most efficiently if good understanding of performance can be achieved for a range of operating conditions. Mathematical models can be useful to predict battery behavior to allow for optimization of design and control. An analytical solution is ideally preferred to solve the equations of a mathematical model, as it eliminates the error that arises when using numerical techniques and is usually computationally cheap. An analytical solution provides insight into the behavior of the system and also explicitly shows the effects of different parameters on the behavior. However, most engineering models, including the majority of battery models, cannot be solved analytically due to non-linearities in the equations and state dependent transport and kinetic parameters. The numerical method used to solve the system of equations describing a battery operation can have a significant impact on the computational cost of the simulation. In this paper, a model reformulation of the porous electrode pseudo three dimensional (P3D) which significantly reduces the computational cost of lithium ion battery simulation, while maintaining high accuracy, is discussed. This reformulation enables the use of the P3D model into applications that would otherwise be too computationally expensive to justify its use, such as online control, optimization, and parameter estimation. Furthermore, the P3D model has proven to be robust enough to allow for the inclusion of additional physical phenomena as understanding improves. In this study, the reformulated model is used to allow for more complicated physical phenomena to be considered for study, including thermal effects.

  17. Changes in the microbial community during bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Leal, Aline Jaime; Rodrigues, Edmo Montes; Leal, Patrícia Lopes; Júlio, Aline Daniela Lopes; Fernandes, Rita de Cássia Rocha; Borges, Arnaldo Chaer; Tótola, Marcos Rogério

    We aimed to verify the changes in the microbial community during bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil. Microbial inoculants were produced from successive additions of gasoline to municipal solid waste compost (MSWC) previously fertilized with nitrogen-phosphorous. To obtain Inoculant A, fertilized MSWC was amended with gasoline every 3 days during 18 days. Inoculant B received the same application, but at every 6 days. Inoculant C included MSWC fertilized with N-P, but no gasoline. The inoculants were applied to gasoline-contaminated soil at 10, 30, or 50g/kg. Mineralization of gasoline hydrocarbons in soil was evaluated by respirometric analysis. The viability of the inoculants was evaluated after 103 days of storage under refrigeration or room temperature. The relative proportions of microbial groups in the inoculants and soil were evaluated by FAME. The dose of 50g/kg of inoculants A and B led to the largest CO2 emission from soil. CO2 emissions in treatments with inoculant C were inversely proportional to the dose of inoculant. Heterotrophic bacterial counts were greater in soil treated with inoculants A and B. The application of inoculants decreased the proportion of actinobacteria and increased of Gram-negative bacteria. Decline in the density of heterotrophic bacteria in inoculants occurred after storage. This reduction was bigger in inoculants stored at room temperature. The application of stored inoculants in gasoline-contaminated soil resulted in a CO2 emission twice bigger than that observed in uninoculated soil. We concluded that MSWC is an effective material for the production of microbial inoculants for the bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated soil.

  18. Petroleum fingerprinting: Dating a gasoline release

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.D.; Morrison, R.D.

    1996-09-01

    Dating a gasoline releases is particularly important in situations involving a contaminated gasoline service station. Often the station begins under the control of a major oil company, and as it ages and deteriorates it may be operated by a series of smaller operators. When facing a claim for contamination, often operators blame former operators. Fingerprinting is one of several successful methods used to date petroleum releases on contaminated sites. The topics covered in this article are inventory reconciliation; reverse groundwater modeling; hydrocarbon fingerprinting.

  19. Infrared Analysis of Gasoline/Alcohol Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    in storage, routine handling and distribution. As a result, other oxygenates such as methanol , iso-propanol, t-butanoA, methyl -t- butyl ether, and...Table 1 lists TABLE 1. ALCOHOL ANALYTE BAND NUMBERS -1 Component Analytical Frequency, cm Gasoline 967 Methanol 1030 Ethanol 882 iso-propanol 952 t...of varying concen- trations of each alcohol in a gasoline were obtained, with Figure 4 showing a low and high standard for methanol . The net peak

  20. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce... care, EPA may permit a refinery or importer to exceed the allowable average benzene levels specified...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce... care, EPA may permit a refinery or importer to exceed the allowable average benzene levels specified...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1336 - What if a refiner or importer cannot produce gasoline conforming to the requirements of this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Hardship Provisions § 80.1336 What if a refiner or importer cannot produce... care, EPA may permit a refinery or importer to exceed the allowable average benzene levels specified...

  3. Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Bunting, Bruce G

    2006-09-01

    The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its

  4. Evaporative gasoline emissions and asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gordian, Mary Ellen; Stewart, Alistair W; Morris, Stephen S

    2010-08-01

    Attached garages are known to be associated with indoor air volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study looked at indoor exposure to VOCs presumably from evaporative emissions of gasoline. Alaskan gasoline contains 5% benzene making benzene a marker for gasoline exposure. A survey of randomly chosen houses with attached garages was done in Anchorage Alaska to determine the exposure and assess respiratory health. Householders were asked to complete a health survey for each person and a household survey. They monitored indoor air in their primary living space for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes for one week using passive organic vapor monitoring badges. Benzene levels in homes ranged from undetectable to 58 parts per billion. The median benzene level in 509 homes tested was 2.96 ppb. Elevated benzene levels in the home were strongly associated with small engines and gasoline stored in the garage. High concentrations of benzene in gasoline increase indoor air levels of benzene in residences with attached garages exposing people to benzene at levels above ATSDR's minimal risk level. Residents reported more severe symptoms of asthma in the homes with high gasoline exposure (16%) where benzene levels exceeded the 9 ppb.

  5. Evaporative Gasoline Emissions and Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gordian, Mary Ellen; Stewart, Alistair W; Morris, Stephen S

    2010-01-01

    Attached garages are known to be associated with indoor air volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study looked at indoor exposure to VOCs presumably from evaporative emissions of gasoline. Alaskan gasoline contains 5% benzene making benzene a marker for gasoline exposure. A survey of randomly chosen houses with attached garages was done in Anchorage Alaska to determine the exposure and assess respiratory health. Householders were asked to complete a health survey for each person and a household survey. They monitored indoor air in their primary living space for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes for one week using passive organic vapor monitoring badges. Benzene levels in homes ranged from undetectable to 58 parts per billion. The median benzene level in 509 homes tested was 2.96 ppb. Elevated benzene levels in the home were strongly associated with small engines and gasoline stored in the garage. High concentrations of benzene in gasoline increase indoor air levels of benzene in residences with attached garages exposing people to benzene at levels above ATSDR’s minimal risk level. Residents reported more severe symptoms of asthma in the homes with high gasoline exposure (16%) where benzene levels exceeded the 9 ppb. PMID:20948946

  6. Trends in motor gasolines: 1942-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, E M; Whisman, M L; Woodward, P W

    1982-06-01

    Trends in motor gasolines for the years of 1942 through 1981 have been evaluated based upon data contained in surveys that have been prepared and published by the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). These surveys have been published twice annually since 1935 describing the properties of motor gasolines from throughout the country. The surveys have been conducted in cooperation with the American Petroleum Institute (API) since 1948. Various companies from throughout the country obtain samples from retail outlets, analyze the samples by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) procedures, and report data to the Bartlesville center for compilation, tabulation, calculation, analysis and publication. A typical motor gasoline report covers 2400 samples from service stations throughout the country representing some 48 companies that manufacture and supply gasoline. The reports include trend charts, octane plots, and tables of test results from about a dozen different tests. From these data in 77 semiannual surveys, a summary report has thus been assembled that shows trends in motor gasolines throughout the entire era of winter 1942 to 1943 to the present. Trends of physical properties including octane numbers, antiknock ratings, distillation temperatures, Reid vapor pressure, sulfur and lead content are tabulated, plotted and discussed in the current report. Also included are trend effects of technological advances and the interactions of engine design, societal and political events and prices upon motor gasoline evolution during the 40 year period.

  7. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: Neurotoxicity evaluation

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, James P.; Daughtrey, Wayne C.; Clark, Charles R.; Schreiner, Ceinwen A.; White, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential neurotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from “baseline gasoline” (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000 mg/mg3 and exposures were for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 13 weeks. The functional observation battery (FOB) with the addition of motor activity (MA) testing, hematoxylin and eosin staining of brain tissue sections, and brain regional analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to assess behavioral changes, traditional neuropathology and astrogliosis, respectively. FOB and MA data for all agents, except G/TBA, were negative. G/TBA behavioral effects resolved during recovery. Neuropathology was negative for all groups. Analyses of GFAP revealed increases in multiple brain regions largely limited to males of the G/EtOH group, findings indicative of minor gliosis, most significantly in the cerebellum. Small changes (both increases and decreases) in GFAP were observed for other test agents but effects were not consistent across sex, brain region or exposure concentration. PMID:24879970

  8. [The significance of enviromental and biological monitoring in workers employed in service stations after the elimitation of tetraethyl lead from gasoline].

    PubMed

    Ghittori, S; Ferrari, M; Maestri, L; Negri, S; Zadra, P; Gremita, C; Imbriani, M

    2005-01-01

    The chemical risk in service stations may be due to toxic compounds present in fuel (particularly benzene and additives) and to the emission of exhausts and fine particulate from vehicles. Owing to the elimination of lead (Pb) from fuel and to the necessity of lowering CO emission, several oxygenated additives have been added to fuel, in particular methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE), whose toxic properties are at present under investigation. The introduction of reformulated gasoline (RFG) and the use of catalytic converters (with possible release of platinum (Pt) in the environment) may have modified the risks for workers employed in service stations. The paper shows data collected from 26 subjects (divided into three specific tasks, namely: fuel dispenser, "self-service" attendant and controller, and cashier) to estimate the actual chemical risk and to compare it with the previous data taken from literature. For this purpose, besides performing the usual medical surveillance, we measured the environmental concentrations of benzene, MTBE and formaldehyde, the urinary levels of benzene metabolites S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and t,t-muconic acid (MA) and of unmodified MTBE, and the blood concentrations of Pb and Pt for each subject. Mean values of these compounds were, respectively: 38.81 microg/m3; 174.04 microg/m3; 10.38 microg/m3; 2.36 microg/g creatinine; 96.57 microg/g creatinine; 1.41 microg/L; 7.00 microg/100 mL; 0.0738 ng/ml. The above values were much lower than the corresponding limit values reported by ACGIH and DFG. In particular, after the introduction of vapour recycle systems and the widespread use of "self-service" systems, airborne benzene concentration dropped from 300/400 microg/m3 to lower than 100 microg/m3, without noticeable increasing of exposure to formaldehyde. The disappearing of Pb from gasoline leads to a progressive lowering of its blood levels, while the possible risks due to the very low amounts of Pt released from catalytic

  9. Toxicological Assessments of Rats Exposed Prenatally to Inhaled Vapors of Gasoline and Gasoline-Ethanol Blends

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary alternative to petroleum-based fuels is ethanol, which is blended with gasoline in the United States at concentrations up to 15% for most automobiles. Efforts to increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline have prompted concerns about the potential toxicity of inhaled ...

  10. Development of detergent additives for automotive fuels in other countries

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharova, E.L.; Emel`yanov, V.E.; Deineko, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    With increasing demands on environmental protection and with the production of reformulated unleaded motor fuels, new and effective detergent additives are urgently needed. A number of monographs and scientific works have been devoted to problems involved in the development and application of such additives. Since the mid-1980s in the United States and certain other countries, a crisis has been noted in the application of detergent additives. It has been found that certain types of detergents not only fail to give the required cleaning effect, but even promote the formation of deposits. This situation can be attributed primarily to the development of automotive gasoline engines with direct fuel injection. In the United States in 1989, about 90% of all automotive vehicles were equipped with such engines, which have very definite advantages in fuel economy, less smoking, and a number of other areas. However, after a few thousand kilometers of travel, the characteristics of these engines deteriorate, and undesirable changes are observed, including excessive fuel consumption, a reduction of the vehicle speed, and increased contents of carbon monoxide in the exhaust. These changes occur because of deposit formation in the fuel intake system, particularly on the intake valves. As the deposits continue to accumulate, the engines gradually experience an increase in octane number demand for engine operation without knocking. This phenomenon, which is known in American publications as {open_quotes}octane requirement increase{close_quotes} or ORI (Russian initialism RTOCh, literal translation, {open_quotes}increase of requirements for octane number{close_quotes}), continues until a certain equilibrium octane number is reached. This equilibrium value may change, depending on the engine design and other factors. In all cases, however, the ORI of modern engines is significant, amount to 2-14 octane numbers.

  11. The potential for low petroleum gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.; Webb, G.M.; Clauson, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Energy Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to determine the feasibility of producing sufficient replacement fuels to replace at least 30 percent of the projected consumption of motor fuels by light duty vehicles in the year 2010. The Act also requires the Secretary to determine the greenhouse gas implications of the use of replacement fuels. A replacement fuel is a non-petroleum portion of gasoline, including certain alcohols, ethers, and other components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the cost and refinery impacts for production of {open_quotes}low petroleum{close_quotes} gasolines, which contain replacement fuels. The analysis suggests that high oxygenation is the key to meeting the replacement fuel target, and a major contributor to cost increase is investment in processes to produce and etherify light olefins. High oxygenation can also increase the costs of control of vapor pressure, distillation properties, and pollutant emissions of gasolines. Year-round low petroleum gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components might be produced with cost increases of 23 to 37 cents per gallon of gasoline, and with greenhouse gas emissions changes between a 3 percent increase and a 16 percent decrease. Crude oil reduction, with decreased dependence on foreign sources, is a major objective of the low petroleum gasoline program. For year-round gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components, crude oil use is reduced by 10 to 12 percent, at a cost $48 to $89 per barrel. Depending upon resolution of uncertainties about extrapolation of the Environmental Protection Agency Complex Model for pollutant emissions, availability of raw materials and other issues, costs could be lower or higher.

  12. Motor gasolines, winter 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, E M

    1982-07-01

    Analytical data for 905 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 30 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R+M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.4 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 88.9 for leaded below 93.0. Only one sample was reported as 93.0 for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above.

  13. Life cycle assessment of gasoline blending options.

    PubMed

    Mata, Teresa M; Smith, Raymond L; Young, Douglas M; Costa, Carlos A V

    2003-08-15

    A life cycle assessment has been done to compare the potential environmental impacts of various gasoline blends that meet octane and vapor pressure specifications. The main blending components of alkylate, cracked gasoline, and reformate have different octane and vapor pressure values as well as different potential environmental impacts. Because the octane and vapor pressure values are nonlinearly related to impacts, the results of this study show that some blends are better for the environment than others. To determine blending component compositions, simulations of a reformer were done at various operating conditions. The reformate products of these simulations had a wide range of octane values and potential environmental impacts. Results of the study indicate that for low-octane gasoline (95 Research Octane Number), lower reformer temperatures and pressures generally decrease the potential environmental impacts. However, different results are obtained for high-octane gasoline (98 RON), where increasing reformer temperatures and pressures increase the reformate octane values faster than the potential environmental impacts. The higher octane values for reformate allow blends to have less reformate, and therefore high-octane gasoline can have lower potential environmental impacts when the reformer is operated at higher temperatures and pressures. In the blends studied, reformate and cracked gasoline have the highest total impacts, of which photochemical ozone creation is the largest contributor (assuming all impact categories are equally weighted). Alkylate has a much lower total potential environmental impact but does have higher impact values for human toxicity by ingestion, aquatic toxicity, terrestrial toxicity, and acidification. Therefore, depending on environmental priorities, different gasoline blends and operating conditions should be chosen to meet octane and vapor pressure specifications.

  14. Gasoline marketing: Octane mislabeling in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The problem of octane mislabeling at gasoline stations in New York City has grown - from 46 or fewer citations in 1981 to 171 citations in 1986. No single source of octane mislabeling exists but the city has found both gasoline station operators and fuel distributors to blame. The problem does not seem to be unique to any one type of gasoline station but 57 percent of the 171 citations issued involved gasoline sold under the name of a major refiner; the rest involved unbranded gasoline. Octane cheating can be lucrative in New York City. A station intentionally mislabeling its gasoline could realize amounts many times the city's maximum $500 fine for cheating.

  15. Investigation of Knock limited Compression Ratio of Ethanol Gasoline Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Youngquist, Adam D; Wagner, Robert M; Moore, Wayne; Foster, Matthew; Confer, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol offers significant potential for increasing the compression ratio of SI engines resulting from its high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. A study was conducted to determine the knock limited compression ratio of ethanol gasoline blends to identify the potential for improved operating efficiency. To operate an SI engine in a flex fuel vehicle requires operating strategies that allow operation on a broad range of fuels from gasoline to E85. Since gasoline or low ethanol blend operation is inherently limited by knock at high loads, strategies must be identified which allow operation on these fuels with minimal fuel economy or power density tradeoffs. A single cylinder direct injection spark ignited engine with fully variable hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) is operated at WOT conditions to determine the knock limited compression ratio (CR) of ethanol fuel blends. The geometric compression ratio is varied by changing pistons, producing CR from 9.2 to 13.66. The effective CR is varied using an electro-hydraulic valvetrain that changed the effective trapped displacement using both Early Intake Valve Closing (EIVC) and Late Intake Valve Closing (LIVC). The EIVC and LIVC strategies result in effective CR being reduced while maintaining the geometric expansion ratio. It was found that at substantially similar engine conditions, increasing the ethanol content of the fuel results in higher engine efficiency and higher engine power. These can be partially attributed to a charge cooling effect and a higher heating valve of a stoichiometric mixture for ethanol blends (per unit mass of air). Additional thermodynamic effects on and a mole multiplier are also explored. It was also found that high CR can increase the efficiency of ethanol fuel blends, and as a result, the fuel economy penalty associated with the lower energy content of E85 can be reduced by about a third. Such operation necessitates that the engine be operated in a de-rated manner for

  16. The chemical origin of octane sensitivity in gasoline fuels containing nitroalkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Cracknell, R.F.; McAllister, L.J.; Norton, M.; Walmsley, H.L.; Andrae, J.C.G.

    2009-05-15

    Experimental octane measurements are presented for a standard gasoline to which has been added various quantities of nitromethane, nitroethane and 1-nitropropane. The addition of nitroalkanes was found to suppress the Motor Octane Number to a much greater extent than the Research Octane Number. In other words addition of nitroalkanes increases the octane sensitivity of gasoline. Density Functional Theory was used to model the equilibrium thermodynamics and the barrier heights for reactions leading to the break-up of nitroethane. These results were used to develop a chemical kinetic scheme for nitroalkanes combined with a surrogate gasoline (for which a mechanism has been developed previously). Finally the chemical kinetic simulations were combined with a quasi-dimensional engine model in order to predict autoignition in octane rating tests. Our results suggest that the chemical origin of octane sensitivity in gasoline/nitroalkane blends cannot be fully explained on the conventional basis of the extent to which NTC behaviour is absent. Instead we have shown that the contribution of the two pathways leading to autoignition in gasoline containing nitroalkanes becomes much more significant under the more severe conditions of the Motor Octane method than the Research Octane method. (author)

  17. Effects of different mixing ratios on emissions from passenger cars fueled with methanol/gasoline blends.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; Yin, Hang; Guo, Jiadong; Zhao, Wei; Dai, Peipei

    2011-01-01

    Regulated and unregulated emissions from four passenger cars fueled with methanol/gasoline blends at different mixing ratios (M15, M20, M30, M50, M85 and M100) were tested over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled by Tenax TA and analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (TD-GC/MS). Carbonyls were trapped on dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that total emissions of VOCs and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p, m, o-xylene) from all vehicles fueled with methanol/gasoline blends were lower than those from vehicles fueled with only gasoline. Compared to the baseline, the use of M85 decreased BTEX emissions by 97.4%, while the use of M15 decreased it by 19.7%. At low-to-middle mixing ratios (M15, M20, M30 and M50), formaldehyde emissions showed a slight increase while those of high mixing ratios (M85 and M100) were three times compared with the baseline gasoline only. When the vehicles were retrofitted with new three-way catalytic converters (TWC), emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbon (THC), and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) were decreased by 24%-50%, 10%-35%, and 24%-58% respectively, compared with the cars using the original equipment manufacture (OEM) TWC. Using the new TWC, emissions of formaldehyde and BTEX were decreased, while those of other carbonyl increased. It is necessary that vehicles fueled with methanol/gasoline blends be retrofitted with a new TWC. In addition, the specific reactivity of emissions of vehicles fueled with M15 and retrofitted with the new TWC was reduced from 4.51 to 4.08 compared to the baseline vehicle. This indicates that the use of methanol/gasoline blend at a low mixing ratio may have lower effect on environment than gasoline.

  18. Gasoline from Wood via Integrated Gasification, Synthesis, and Methanol-to-Gasoline Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S. D.; Tarud, J. K.; Biddy, M. J.; Dutta, A.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) assessment of the feasibility of making gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline route using syngas from a 2,000 dry metric tonne/day (2,205 U.S. ton/day) biomass-fed facility. A new technoeconomic model was developed in Aspen Plus for this study, based on the model developed for NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007). The necessary process changes were incorporated into a biomass-to-gasoline model using a methanol synthesis operation followed by conversion, upgrading, and finishing to gasoline. Using a methodology similar to that used in previous NREL design reports and a feedstock cost of $50.70/dry ton ($55.89/dry metric tonne), the estimated plant gate price is $16.60/MMBtu ($15.73/GJ) (U.S. $2007) for gasoline and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) produced from biomass via gasification of wood, methanol synthesis, and the methanol-to-gasoline process. The corresponding unit prices for gasoline and LPG are $1.95/gallon ($0.52/liter) and $1.53/gallon ($0.40/liter) with yields of 55.1 and 9.3 gallons per U.S. ton of dry biomass (229.9 and 38.8 liters per metric tonne of dry biomass), respectively.

  19. Motor Gasoline Market Spring 2007 and Implications for Spring 2008

    EIA Publications

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on the major factors that drove the widening difference between wholesale gasoline and crude oil prices in 2007 and explores how those factors might impact gasoline prices in 2008.

  20. 40 CFR 63.650 - Gasoline loading rack provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.650 Gasoline... or operator of a Group 1 gasoline loading rack classified under Standard Industrial...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Hazards from Small Gasoline Powered Engines

    MedlinePlus

    ... gasoline-powered tools such as high-pressure washers, concrete cutting saws (walk-behind/hand-held), power trowels, ... parking garage. A plumber used a gasoline-powered concrete saw in a basement with open doors and ...

  2. NAFTA and gasoline: Canada, U. S. , Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-31

    The North American Free Trade Agreement has become a hotly debated topic all over the world, but especially in the countries involved: Mexico, United States, and Canada. Comments made by high ranking officials imply there are differences to reconcile before the agreement is passed. Toward seeing these countries in trio, this issue compares gasoline markets and some energy perspectives. The purpose of this article is to contribute to understanding of the three countries through their petroleum industry structure. Gasoline consumption and retail delivery infrastructure are compared and contrasted to illustrate the differences among the NAFTA countries.

  3. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... such gasoline, and any pump stand from which such gasoline is dispensed, identify the gasoline either... racing motor vehicles or racing boats that are used only in sanctioned racing events; (2) The gasoline is... consumer; and (3) The gasoline is not made available for use as motor vehicle gasoline, or dispensed...

  4. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... such gasoline, and any pump stand from which such gasoline is dispensed, identify the gasoline either... racing motor vehicles or racing boats that are used only in sanctioned racing events; (2) The gasoline is... consumer; and (3) The gasoline is not made available for use as motor vehicle gasoline, or dispensed...

  5. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... such gasoline, and any pump stand from which such gasoline is dispensed, identify the gasoline either... racing motor vehicles or racing boats that are used only in sanctioned racing events; (2) The gasoline is... consumer; and (3) The gasoline is not made available for use as motor vehicle gasoline, or dispensed...

  6. 40 CFR 80.210 - What sulfur standards apply to gasoline downstream from refineries and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline downstream from refineries and importers? 80.210 Section 80.210 Protection of Environment... Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.210 What sulfur standards apply to gasoline downstream from refineries and importers? The sulfur standard for gasoline at any point in the gasoline distribution...

  7. Health effects of inhaled gasoline engine emissions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jacob D; Reed, Matthew D; Campen, Matthew J; Barrett, Edward G; Seagrave, JeanClare; Mauderly, Joe L

    2007-01-01

    Despite their prevalence in the environment, and the myriad studies that have shown associations between morbidity or mortality with proximity to roadways (proxy for motor vehicle exposures), relatively little is known about the toxicity of gasoline engine emissions (GEE). We review the studies conducted on GEE to date, and summarize the findings from each of these studies. While there have been several studies, most of the studies were conducted prior to 1980 and thus were not conducted with contemporary engines, fuels, and driving cycles. In addition, many of the biological assays conducted during those studies did not include many of the assays that are conducted on contemporary inhalation exposures to air pollutants, including cardiovascular responses and others. None of the exposures from these earlier studies were characterized at the level of detail that would be considered adequate today. A recent GEE study was conducted as part of the National Environmental Respiratory Center (www.nercenter.org). In this study several in-use mid-mileage General Motors (Chevrolet S-10) vehicles were purchased and utilized for inhalation exposures. An exposure protocol was developed where engines were operated with a repeating California Unified Driving Cycle with one cold start per day. Two separate engines were used to provide two cold starts over a 6-h inhalation period. The exposure atmospheres were characterized in detail, including detailed chemical and physical analysis of the gas, vapor, and particle phase. Multiple rodent biological models were studied, including general toxicity and inflammation (e.g., serum chemistry, lung lavage cell counts/differentials, cytokine/chemokine analysis, histopathology), asthma (adult and in utero exposures with pulmonary function and biochemical analysis), cardiovascular effects (biochemical and electrocardiograph changes in susceptible rodent models), and susceptibility to infection (Pseudomonas bacteria challenge). GEE resulted in

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF GASOLINE BLENDING COMPONENTS THROUGH THEIR LIFE CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study is to access the contribution of the three major gasoline blending components to the potential environmental impacts (PEI), which are the reformate, alkylate and cracked gasoline. This study accounts for losses of the gasoline blending components due to...

  9. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  10. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  11. 46 CFR 56.50-70 - Gasoline fuel systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gasoline fuel systems. 56.50-70 Section 56.50-70... APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-70 Gasoline fuel systems. (a) Material.... Outlets in fuel lines for drawing gasoline for any purpose are prohibited. Valved openings in the...

  12. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  13. 46 CFR 185.352 - Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces. 185.352... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Miscellaneous Operating Requirements § 185.352 Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces. The mechanical exhaust for the ventilation of a gasoline machinery space, required...

  14. 46 CFR 185.352 - Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces. 185.352... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Miscellaneous Operating Requirements § 185.352 Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces. The mechanical exhaust for the ventilation of a gasoline machinery space, required...

  15. 40 CFR 63.650 - Gasoline loading rack provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gasoline loading rack provisions. 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.650 Gasoline... or operator of a Group 1 gasoline loading rack classified under Standard Industrial...

  16. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  17. 46 CFR 185.352 - Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces. 185.352... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Miscellaneous Operating Requirements § 185.352 Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces. The mechanical exhaust for the ventilation of a gasoline machinery space, required...

  18. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  19. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  20. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  1. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  2. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  3. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  4. 46 CFR 169.613 - Gasoline fuel systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gasoline fuel systems. 169.613 Section 169.613 Shipping... Machinery and Electrical Fuel Systems § 169.613 Gasoline fuel systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) each gasoline fuel system must meet the requirements of § 56.50-70 of this chapter (b)...

  5. 40 CFR 63.650 - Gasoline loading rack provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline loading rack provisions. 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.650 Gasoline... or operator of a Group 1 gasoline loading rack classified under Standard Industrial...

  6. 40 CFR 63.650 - Gasoline loading rack provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gasoline loading rack provisions. 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.650 Gasoline... or operator of a Group 1 gasoline loading rack classified under Standard Industrial...

  7. 46 CFR 169.613 - Gasoline fuel systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gasoline fuel systems. 169.613 Section 169.613 Shipping... Machinery and Electrical Fuel Systems § 169.613 Gasoline fuel systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) each gasoline fuel system must meet the requirements of § 56.50-70 of this chapter (b)...

  8. 40 CFR 63.650 - Gasoline loading rack provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gasoline loading rack provisions. 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.650 Gasoline... or operator of a Group 1 gasoline loading rack classified under Standard Industrial...

  9. 46 CFR 169.613 - Gasoline fuel systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gasoline fuel systems. 169.613 Section 169.613 Shipping... Machinery and Electrical Fuel Systems § 169.613 Gasoline fuel systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) each gasoline fuel system must meet the requirements of § 56.50-70 of this chapter (b)...

  10. 46 CFR 169.613 - Gasoline fuel systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gasoline fuel systems. 169.613 Section 169.613 Shipping... Machinery and Electrical Fuel Systems § 169.613 Gasoline fuel systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) each gasoline fuel system must meet the requirements of § 56.50-70 of this chapter (b)...

  11. 46 CFR 169.613 - Gasoline fuel systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gasoline fuel systems. 169.613 Section 169.613 Shipping... Machinery and Electrical Fuel Systems § 169.613 Gasoline fuel systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) each gasoline fuel system must meet the requirements of § 56.50-70 of this chapter (b)...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON OF GASOLINE BLENDING OPTIONS USING LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A life cycle assessment has been done on various gasoline blends, The purpose of this study is to compare several gasoline blends of 95 and 98 octaine, that meet the vapour pressure upper limit requirement of 60 kPa. This study accounts for the gasoline losses due to evaporation ...

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF GASOLINE BLENDING COMPONENTS THROUGH THEIR LIFE CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study is to assess the contribution of the three major gasoline blending components to the potential environmental impacts (PEI), which are the reformate, alkylate and cracked gasoline. This study accounts for losses of the gasoline blending components due to ...

  14. The effects of low-lead and unleaded fuels on gasoline engines

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recently reduced the permissible concentration of lead in gasoline from 1.1 to 0.1 gram per gallon, and has proposed to eliminate lead entirely by 1988. In addition to its octane-enhancing properties, lead in gasoline protects exhaust valve seats in older engines from undue wear (''valve-seat recessione), and it and its scavengers have numerous other positive and negative effects. These include changes in octane requirements, hydrocarbon emissions, engine rusting, corrosive wear, oil thickening and degradation, spark-plug fouling, exhaust-valve burning, and exhaust system corrosion. This paper reviews the literature on the harmful and beneficial effects of lead and lead scavengers on engines, and examines some of the substantial body of operating experience that has been accumulated with unleaded gasoline in older engines. Based on this experience, it does not appear that valve-seat recession will be a major problem, even if all lead is eliminated from gasoline. Furthermore, the switch to unleaded gasoline should provide significant benefits in the form of reduced maintance costs and increased engine life.

  15. Replacing gasoline with corn ethanol results in significant environmental problem-shifting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Bae, Junghan; Kim, Junbeum; Suh, Sangwon

    2012-04-03

    Previous studies on the life-cycle environmental impacts of corn ethanol and gasoline focused almost exclusively on energy balance and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and largely overlooked the influence of regional differences in agricultural practices. This study compares the environmental impact of gasoline and E85 taking into consideration 12 different environmental impacts and regional differences among 19 corn-growing states. Results show that E85 does not outperform gasoline when a wide spectrum of impacts is considered. If the impacts are aggregated using weights developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), overall, E85 generates approximately 6% to 108% (23% on average) greater impact compared with gasoline, depending on where corn is produced, primarily because corn production induces significant eutrophication impacts and requires intensive irrigation. If GHG emissions from the indirect land use changes are considered, the differences increase to between 16% and 118% (33% on average). Our study indicates that replacing gasoline with corn ethanol may only result in shifting the net environmental impacts primarily toward increased eutrophication and greater water scarcity. These results suggest that the environmental criteria used in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) be re-evaluated to include additional categories of environmental impact beyond GHG emissions.

  16. Novel extraction induced by microemulsion breaking: a model study for Hg extraction from Brazilian gasoline.

    PubMed

    Vicentino, Priscila O; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the extraction of Hg from Brazilian gasoline samples: extraction induced by microemulsion breaking (EIMB). In this approach, a microemulsion is formed by mixing the sample with n-propanol and HCl. Afterwards, the microemulsion is destabilized by the addition of water and the two phases are separated: (i) the top phase, containing the residual gasoline and (ii) the bottom phase, containing the extracted analyte in a medium containing water, n-propanol and the ethanol originally present in the gasoline sample. The bottom phase is then collected and the Hg is measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). This model study used Brazilian gasoline samples spiked with Hg (organometallic compound) to optimize the process. Under the optimum extraction conditions, the microemulsion was prepared by mixing 8.7mL of sample with 1.2mL of n-propanol and 0.1mL of a 10molL(-1) HCl solution. Emulsion breaking was induced by adding 300µL of deionized water and the bottom phase was collected for the measurement of Hg. Six samples of Brazilian gasoline were spiked with Hg in the organometallic form and recovery percentages in the range of 88-109% were observed.

  17. Refining economics of U.S. gasoline: octane ratings and ethanol content.

    PubMed

    Hirshfeld, David S; Kolb, Jeffrey A; Anderson, James E; Studzinski, William; Frusti, James

    2014-10-07

    Increasing the octane rating of the U.S. gasoline pool (currently ∼ 93 Research Octane Number (RON)) would enable higher engine efficiency for light-duty vehicles (e.g., through higher compression ratio), facilitating compliance with federal fuel economy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards. The federal Renewable Fuels Standard calls for increased renewable fuel use in U.S. gasoline, primarily ethanol, a high-octane gasoline component. Linear programming modeling of the U.S. refining sector was used to assess the effects on refining economics, CO2 emissions, and crude oil use of increasing average octane rating by increasing (i) the octane rating of refinery-produced hydrocarbon blendstocks for oxygenate blending (BOBs) and (ii) the volume fraction (Exx) of ethanol in finished gasoline. The analysis indicated the refining sector could produce BOBs yielding finished E20 and E30 gasolines with higher octane ratings at modest additional refining cost, for example, ∼ 1¢/gal for 95-RON E20 or 97-RON E30, and 3-5¢/gal for 95-RON E10, 98-RON E20, or 100-RON E30. Reduced BOB volume (from displacement by ethanol) and lower BOB octane could (i) lower refinery CO2 emissions (e.g., ∼ 3% for 98-RON E20, ∼ 10% for 100-RON E30) and (ii) reduce crude oil use (e.g., ∼ 3% for 98-RON E20, ∼ 8% for 100-RON E30).

  18. Reformulations of the Yang-Mills theory toward quark confinement and mass gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi; Kato, Seikou; Shibata, Akihiro; Shinohara, Toru

    2016-01-01

    We propose the reformulations of the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory toward quark confinement and mass gap. In fact, we have given a new framework for reformulating the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory using new field variables. This includes the preceding works given by Cho, Faddeev and Niemi, as a special case called the maximal option in our reformulations. The advantage of our reformulations is that the original non-Abelian gauge field variables can be changed into the new field variables such that one of them called the restricted field gives the dominant contribution to quark confinement in the gauge-independent way. Our reformulations can be combined with the SU (N) extension of the Diakonov-Petrov version of the non-Abelian Stokes theorem for the Wilson loop operator to give a gauge-invariant definition for the magnetic monopole in the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory without the scalar field. In the so-called minimal option, especially, the restricted field is non-Abelian and involves the non-Abelian magnetic monopole with the stability group U (N- 1). This suggests the non-Abelian dual superconductivity picture for quark confinement. This should be compared with the maximal option: the restricted field is Abelian and involves only the Abelian magnetic monopoles with the stability group U(1)N-1, just like the Abelian projection. We give some applications of this reformulation, e.g., the stability for the homogeneous chromomagnetic condensation of the Savvidy type, the large N treatment for deriving the dimensional transmutation and understanding the mass gap, and also the numerical simulations on a lattice which are given by Dr. Shibata in a subsequent talk.

  19. Reformulations of the Yang-Mills theory toward quark confinement and mass gap

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi; Shinohara, Toru; Kato, Seikou; Shibata, Akihiro

    2016-01-22

    We propose the reformulations of the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory toward quark confinement and mass gap. In fact, we have given a new framework for reformulating the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory using new field variables. This includes the preceding works given by Cho, Faddeev and Niemi, as a special case called the maximal option in our reformulations. The advantage of our reformulations is that the original non-Abelian gauge field variables can be changed into the new field variables such that one of them called the restricted field gives the dominant contribution to quark confinement in the gauge-independent way. Our reformulations can be combined with the SU (N) extension of the Diakonov-Petrov version of the non-Abelian Stokes theorem for the Wilson loop operator to give a gauge-invariant definition for the magnetic monopole in the SU (N) Yang-Mills theory without the scalar field. In the so-called minimal option, especially, the restricted field is non-Abelian and involves the non-Abelian magnetic monopole with the stability group U (N− 1). This suggests the non-Abelian dual superconductivity picture for quark confinement. This should be compared with the maximal option: the restricted field is Abelian and involves only the Abelian magnetic monopoles with the stability group U(1){sup N−1}, just like the Abelian projection. We give some applications of this reformulation, e.g., the stability for the homogeneous chromomagnetic condensation of the Savvidy type, the large N treatment for deriving the dimensional transmutation and understanding the mass gap, and also the numerical simulations on a lattice which are given by Dr. Shibata in a subsequent talk.

  20. Modeled Dietary Impact of Pizza Reformulations in US Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Masset, Gabriel; Mathias, Kevin C.; Vlassopoulos, Antonis; Mölenberg, Famke; Lehmann, Undine; Gibney, Mike; Drewnowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Approximately 20% of US children and adolescents consume pizza on any given day; and pizza intake is associated with higher intakes of energy, sodium, and saturated fat. The reformulation of pizza products has yet to be evaluated as a viable option to improve diets of the US youth. This study modeled the effect on nutrient intakes of two potential pizza reformulation strategies based on the standards established by the Nestlé Nutritional Profiling System (NNPS). Methods Dietary intakes were retrieved from the first 24hr-recall of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–12, for 2655 participants aged 4–19 years. The composition of pizzas in the NHANES food database (n = 69) were compared against the NNPS standards for energy, total fat, saturated fat, sodium, added sugars, and protein. In a reformulation scenario, the nutrient content of pizzas was adjusted to the NNPS standards if these were not met. In a substitution scenario, pizzas that did not meet the standards were replaced by the closest pizza, based on nutrient content, that met all of the NNPS standards. Results Pizzas consistent with all the NNPS standards (29% of all pizzas) were significantly lower in energy, saturated fat and sodium than pizzas that were not. Among pizza consumers, modeled intakes in the reformulation and substitution scenarios were lower in energy (-14 and -45kcal, respectively), saturated fat (-1.2 and -2.7g), and sodium (-143 and -153mg) compared to baseline. Conclusions Potential industry wide reformulation of a single food category or intra-category food substitutions may positively impact dietary intakes of US children and adolescents. Further promotion and support of these complimentary strategies may facilitate the adoption and implementation of reformulation standards. PMID:27706221