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Sample records for address aging effects

  1. Addressing diversion effects.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2015-07-01

    Alan Wertheimer argues that those who promulgate principles of research ethics have a responsibility to take into account the diversion effects of those principles. In this commentary, I argue that Wertheimer's proposal that diversion effects should be considered when promulgating principles of research ethics makes sense, but it often may be best to deal with these effects once a principle has been accepted and implemented, rather than focusing on them at the outset.

  2. Addressing diversion effects

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Alan Wertheimer argues that those who promulgate principles of research ethics have a responsibility to take into account the diversion effects of those principles. In this commentary, I argue that Wertheimer's proposal that diversion effects should be considered when promulgating principles of research ethics makes sense, but it often may be best to deal with these effects once a principle has been accepted and implemented, rather than focusing on them at the outset. PMID:27774202

  3. NIH Research Addresses Aging Issues and Disparities in Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging NIH Research Addresses Aging Issues and Disparities in Oral Health Past Issues / ... What types of research is NIDCR conducting on aging and oral health? We’re currently funding basic ...

  4. Automated measurement of printer effective addressability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Brian E.; Eid, Ahmed H.; Rippetoe, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    When evaluating printer resolution, addressability is a key consideration. Addressability defines the maximum number of spots or samples within a given distance, independent of the size of the spots when printed. Effective addressability is the addressability demonstrated by the final, printed output. It is the minimum displacement possible between the centers of printed objects. In this paper, we present a measurement procedure for effective addressability that offers an automated way to experimentally determine the addressability of the printed output. It requires printing, scanning, and measuring a test target. The effective addressability test target contains two types of elements, repeated to fill the page: fiducial lines and line segments. The fiducial lines serve as a relative reference for the incremental displacements of the individual line segments, providing a way to tolerate larger-scale physical distortions in the printer. An ordinary reflection scanner captures the printed test target. By rotating the page on the scanner, it is possible to measure effective addressability well beyond the scanner's sampling resolution. The measurement algorithm computes the distribution of incremental displacements, forming either a unimodal or bimodal histogram. In the latter case, the mean of the second (non-zero) peak indicates the effective addressability. In the former case, the printer successfully rendered the target's resolution, requiring another iteration of the procedure after increasing the resolution of the test target. The algorithm automatically estimates whether the histogram is unimodal or bimodal and computes parameters describing the quality of the measured histogram. Several experiments have refined the test target and measurement procedure, including two round-robin evaluations by the ISO WG4 committee. Results include an analysis of approximately 150 printed samples. The effective addressability attribute and measurement procedure are included in

  5. Metformin in obesity, cancer and aging: addressing controversies

    PubMed Central

    Berstein, Lev M.

    2012-01-01

    Metformin, an oral anti-diabetic drug, is being considered increasingly for treatment and prevention of cancer, obesity as well as for the extension of healthy lifespan. Gradually accumulating discrepancies about its effect on cancer and obesity can be explained by the shortage of randomized clinical trials, differences between control groups (reference points), gender- and age-associated effects and pharmacogenetic factors. Studies of the potential antiaging effects of antidiabetic biguanides, such as metformin, are still experimental for obvious reasons and their results are currently ambiguous. Here we discuss whether the discrepancies in different studies are merely methodological or inherently related to individual differences in responsiveness to the drug. PMID:22589237

  6. Teaching Writing in a Digital Age: Addressing Issues of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrill, Brittany B.

    2010-01-01

    The way people write and communicate has changed both inside and outside the university, and because of this writing instructors are professionally responsible for addressing these changes in the classroom. Technologies have affected writing for thousands of years. From the invention of the printing press to the Internet, challenges to writing…

  7. Challenges in an Aging Society: Presidential Address to APPAM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The United States is at a critical crossroads in its history right now. The public policy problems that the people are facing are complex and interrelated, and the demographic changes that are about to significantly change their country are not well understood by large numbers of people. In this presidential address to the Association for Public…

  8. AGING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH PROGRAM: ADDRESSING THE CHALLENGE THROUGH INNOVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A driving force behind the Sustainable Water Infrastructure (SI) initiative and the Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) research program is the Clean Water and Drinking Water Infrastructure Gap Analysis. In this report, EPA estimated that if operation, maintenance, and capital inves...

  9. New VLT Observations Address the Age of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    First Detailed Spectra of White Dwarf Stars in a Globular Cluster Recent observations with the FORS1 instrument at the first 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescope (ANTU) by an international group of astronomers [1] have resulted in crucial new information about some small and faint stars within an old star cluster in the Milky Way. Thanks to the enormous light gathering power and, not least, the excellent optical quality of ANTU , it was possible for the first time to obtain detailed spectra of several very faint stars in the globular cluster NGC 6397 . Earlier images with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) hinted that they might be White Dwarf Stars (WDs) , i.e. Earth-size, hot and extremely dense stars that represent the end products of the evolution of stars like the Sun. The VLT spectra confirmed this classification and, even more important, have also permitted a first determination of the stellar spectral type, temperature and surface gravity, as well as the mass of four WDs in NGC 6397 . In particular, the astronomers learned that the brightest of the four observed WDs has a mass of about 0.35 solar masses, much lower than the mean mass of 0.55 - 0.65 solar masses that is typical for local white dwarfs. Distance and age determinations This means that the precise distance determination to a globular cluster, from a comparison of its WD stars to more nearby WDs with well-known masses and distances, will now be possible, provided the individual properties of the cluster WDs are well determined from such spectroscopic observations [2]. The mass strongly influences the brightness of a WD and comparing a low-mass globular cluster WD to a more massive local WD would underestimate the distance to the globular cluster. As these stars are very faint, the spectroscopic observations required for their analysis are very difficult and can only be done with large telescopes like the VLT. Accurate distances to the globular clusters allow to determine their age accurately. Milky Way

  10. Presidential address. Systemic effects of smoking.

    PubMed

    Read, R C

    1984-12-01

    Millions of people continue to smoke. Recent studies confirm the pioneering epidemiologic data that indicated that, despite the well-established effects on the lung, most of the hundreds of thousands of premature deaths annually result from extrapulmonary toxicity, particularly accelerated cardiac and vascular disease. As with lung cancer, abstention significantly reduces the risk, even after myocardial infarction or surgery for complications of vascular disease. Erythrocytosis, thrombocytosis, and leukocytosis, by increasing blood viscosity, aggravate ischemia. The neutrophils of smokers release excessive amounts of oxidants which damage tissue and antiproteases. Increased alveolar permeability enhances allergy. Lymphocytic suppressor cells increase, which leads to immunocompetence, increased infection, and cancer. Smokers lose weight and die at an earlier age, even after cancer chemotherapy and peptic ulcer surgery. Smoking prevents inhibition of gastric night acid secretion by histamine-blocking agents. Menopause occurs earlier and children are damaged in utero and after birth by passive smoking. Recent evidence indicates that nicotine releases endorphins, which account for the addiction. Surgeons need to do more to combat this menace. Many victims need professional assistance to stop the habit.

  11. The Arkansas Aging Initiative: An Innovative Approach for Addressing the Health of Older Rural Arkansans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beverly, Claudia J.; McAtee, Robin E.; Chernoff, Ronni; Davis, Gwynn V.; Jones, Susan K.; Lipschitz, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock is addressing one of the most pressing policy issues facing the United States: how to care for the burgeoning number of older adults. In 2001, the Institute created the Arkansas Aging Initiative, which established seven satellite centers on…

  12. Virtual reality applications for addressing the needs of those aging with disability.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Albert; Requejo, Phil; Winstein, Carolee J; Lange, Belinda; Ragusa, Gisele; Merians, Alma; Patton, James; Banerjee, Pat; Aisen, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    As persons with disabilities age, progressive declines in health and medical status can challenge the adaptive resources required to maintain functional independence and quality of life [1]. These challenges are further compounded by economic factors, medication side effects, loss of a spouse or caregiver, and psychosocial disorders [1-2]. With the gradual loss of functional independence and increased reliance on others for transportation, access to general medical and rehabilitation care can be jeopardized [2]. The combination of these factors when seen in the context of the average increase in lifespan in industrialized societies has lead to a growing crisis that is truly global in proportion. While research indicates that functional motor capacity can be improved, maintained, or recovered via consistent participation in a motor exercise and rehabilitation regimen [3], independent adherence to such preventative and/or rehabilitative programming outside the clinic setting is notoriously low [1]. This state of affairs has produced a compelling and ethical motivation to address the needs of individuals who are aging with disabilities by promoting home-based access to low-cost, interactive virtual reality (VR) systems designed to engage and motivate individuals to participate with "game"-driven physical activities and rehabilitation programming. The creation of such systems could serve to enhance, maintain and rehabilitate the sensorimotor processes that are needed to maximize independence and quality of life. This is the theme of the research to be presented at this MMVR workshop.

  13. Nutritional issues for older adults: addressing degenerative ageing with long-term studies.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Lisette C P G M

    2016-05-01

    The ageing process is influenced by a variety of factors, including extrinsic, malleable lifestyle variables. The present paper deals with the epidemiological evidence for the role of dietary patterns and key nutritional concerns in relation to survival and ageing-related disorders that present themselves in later life. Healthful dietary patterns appear to be most relevant in old age. Specific nutritional concerns are related to vitamin D, vitamin B12 and protein malnutrition. An important challenge to further expand the knowledge base is currently addressed by the NuAge project, acknowledging the complexity of the ageing process and integrating different dimensions of research into human healthy ageing. In the meantime, reversing poor adherence to existing guidelines for a healthy diet remains a first challenge in public health nutritional practices.

  14. Effect of Mailing Address Style on Survey Response Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookingham, Frank G.

    This study determined the effect of using mailing labels prepared by a letter-quality computer printer on survey response rate. D. A. Dillman's personalization approach to conducting mail surveys suggests that envelopes with addresses typed directly on them may produce a higher response rate than envelopes with addresses typed on self-adhesive…

  15. The Arkansas aging initiative: an innovative approach for addressing the health of older rural Arkansans.

    PubMed

    Beverly, Claudia J; McAtee, Robin E; Chernoff, Ronni; Davis, Gwynn V; Jones, Susan K; Lipschitz, David A

    2007-04-01

    The Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock is addressing one of the most pressing policy issues facing the United States: how to care for the burgeoning number of older adults. In 2001, the Institute created the Arkansas Aging Initiative, which established seven satellite centers on aging across the state using $1.3 to $2 million dollars annually from the state's portion of the Master Tobacco Settlement. These centers on aging assist the state's population of older adults, many of whom reside in rural areas, live in poverty, and suffer from poor health. The centers provide multiple avenues of education for the community, health care providers, families, and caregivers. The Arkansas Aging Initiative, in partnership with local hospitals, also makes geriatric primary and specialty care more accessible through senior health clinics established across rural Arkansas. In 2005, older adults made more than 36,000 visits to these clinics. All sites have attracted at least one physician who holds a Certificate of Added Qualifications in geriatrics and one advanced practice nurse. Other team members include geriatric medical social workers, pharmacists, nutritionists, and neuropsychologists. This initiative also addresses other policy issues, including engaging communities in building partnerships and programs crucial to maximizing their limited resources and identifying opportunities to change reimbursement mechanisms for care provided to the growing number of older adults. We believe this type of program has the potential to create a novel paradigm for nationwide implementation.

  16. Effective Organizational Structures and Processes: Addressing Issues of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes organizational structures and processes at the institutional and project levels for the development and support of distance learning initiatives. It addresses environmental and stakeholder issues and explores principles and strategies of effective leadership for change creation and management.

  17. Infusing Oral Health Care into Nursing Curriculum: Addressing Preventive Health in Aging and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Joan Earle; FitzGerald, Leah; Markham, Young Kee; Glassman, Paul; Guenther, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health module that was included and infused into a graduate nursing curriculum in a three-phase plan. Phase 1 includes evaluation of a lecture presented to eight gerontological nurse practitioner (GNP) students. Phase 2 includes evaluation of GNP students' perceptions of learning, skills, and confidence following a one-time 8-hour practicum infused into 80 required practicum hours. The evaluation data show promise in preparing nurse practitioner students to assess and address preventive oral health needs of persons aging with disabilities such that further infusion and inclusion in a course for nurse practitioners across five specialties will implemented and tested in Phase 3. PMID:22619708

  18. Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis to Address Health Equity Concerns.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Richard; Mirelman, Andrew J; Griffin, Susan; Asaria, Miqdad; Dawkins, Bryony; Norheim, Ole Frithjof; Verguet, Stéphane; J Culyer, Anthony

    2017-02-01

    This articles serves as a guide to using cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to address health equity concerns. We first introduce the "equity impact plane," a tool for considering trade-offs between improving total health-the objective underpinning conventional CEA-and equity objectives, such as reducing social inequality in health or prioritizing the severely ill. Improving total health may clash with reducing social inequality in health, for example, when effective delivery of services to disadvantaged communities requires additional costs. Who gains and who loses from a cost-increasing health program depends on differences among people in terms of health risks, uptake, quality, adherence, capacity to benefit, and-crucially-who bears the opportunity costs of diverting scarce resources from other uses. We describe two main ways of using CEA to address health equity concerns: 1) equity impact analysis, which quantifies the distribution of costs and effects by equity-relevant variables, such as socioeconomic status, location, ethnicity, sex, and severity of illness; and 2) equity trade-off analysis, which quantifies trade-offs between improving total health and other equity objectives. One way to analyze equity trade-offs is to count the cost of fairer but less cost-effective options in terms of health forgone. Another method is to explore how much concern for equity is required to choose fairer but less cost-effective options using equity weights or parameters. We hope this article will help the health technology assessment community navigate the practical options now available for conducting equity-informative CEA that gives policymakers a better understanding of equity impacts and trade-offs.

  19. Effect of aging on stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Sheng, Matilda HC; Wasnik, Samiksha; Baylink, David J; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the remarkable self-renewal ability and are capable of differentiating into multiple diverse cells. There is increasing evidence that the aging process can have adverse effects on stem cells. As stem cells age, their renewal ability deteriorates and their ability to differentiate into the various cell types is altered. Accordingly, it is suggested aging-induced deterioration of stem cell functions may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the various aging-associated disorders. Understanding the role of the aging process in deterioration of stem cell function is crucial, not only in understanding the pathophysiology of aging-associated disorders, but also in future development of novel effective stem cell-based therapies to treat aging-associated diseases. This review article first focuses on the basis of the various aging disease-related stem cell dysfunction. It then addresses the several concepts on the potential mechanism that causes aging-related stem cell dysfunction. It also briefly discusses the current potential therapies under development for aging-associated stem cell defects. PMID:28261550

  20. Effective maintenance practices to manage system aging

    SciTech Connect

    Chockie, A.; Bjorkelo, K.

    1992-01-01

    For a variety of economic and technical reasons, there has been a growing concern with the aging of complex systems and components and the role that maintenance can play in reducing this degradation. A study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was recently undertaken to identify effective maintenance practices that could be adapted by the nuclear industry in the United States to assist in managing the aging degradation of plant systems and components. Four organizations were examined to assess the influence that their maintenance programs have on their ability to address the systems and component aging degradation issues. An effective maintenance program was found to be essential to the management of system and component aging. The four key elements of an effective maintenance program that are important to an aging management program were identified. These are: the selection of critical systems and components; the development of an understanding of aging through the collection and analysis of equipment performance information; the development of appropriate preventive and predictive maintenance tasks to manage equipment and system aging degradation; the use of feedback mechanisms to continuously improve the management of aging systems and components. These elements were found to be common to all four organizations. In examining how the four organizations have structured their maintenance programs to include these key elements provides valuable lessons not only for the nuclear power industry, but also for any industrial organization that is concerned with the management of system and component aging degradation. This document provides detail, of these studies.

  1. Addressing the Need for School Age Child Care: A Guide for Philadelphia Elementary School Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintzer, Janet L.

    The Delaware Valley Child Care Council (DVCCC) developed this booklet to help Philadelphia school principals plan and develop privately run after-school centers in their schools. First, an executive summary documents the need for school-age day care nationwide and in the Philadelphia area. Section I offers guidance on planning a school-age child…

  2. Food fortification for addressing iron deficiency in Filipino children: benefits and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Detzel, Patrick; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most widespread nutritional disorders in both developing and industrialized countries, making it a global public health concern. Anemia, mainly due to iron deficiency, affects one third of the world's population and is concentrated in women and children below 5 years of age. Iron deficiency anemia has a profound impact on human health and productivity, and the effects of iron deficiency are especially pronounced in the first 1,000 days of life. This critical window of time sets the stage for an individual's future physiological and cognitive health, underscoring the importance of addressing iron deficiency in infants and young children. This review focuses on the use of fortified foods as a cost-effective tool for addressing iron deficiency in infants and young children in the Philippines.

  3. Effective Language Education Practices and Native Language Survival. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlebear, Dick

    The importance of Native languages to Native Americans and the effort needed to maintain them are discussed in this keynote address at the ninth Native American Language Issues Institute. It is noted that the current cultural transition has demeaned Native languages and cultures and that strategies must be devised by Native Americans to counter…

  4. Addressing gaps in the maturity of judgment literature: age differences and delinquency.

    PubMed

    Modecki, Kathryn Lynn

    2008-02-01

    Over the past decade, a majority of states have legislated to expand their capacity to try adolescents as adults [Griffin (2003). Trying and sentencing juveniles as adults: An analysis of state transfer and blended sentencing laws. Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice]. In response, researchers have investigated factors that may affect adolescent culpability [Steinberg and Scott (Am Psychol 58(12):1009-1018, 2003)]. Research on immature judgment posits that psychosocial influences on adolescent decision processes results in reduced criminal responsibility [Cauffman and Steinberg (Behav Sci Law 18(6):741-760, 2000); Scott, Reppucci, and Woolard (Law Hum Behav 19(3):221-244, 1995); Steinberg and Cauffman (Law Hum Behav 20(3):249-272, 1996)]. The current study utilizes hypothetical vignettes and standardized measures of maturity of judgment (responsibility, temperance, and perspective) to examine gaps in previous maturity of judgment findings (Cauffman and Steinberg 2000). This work suggests that adolescents (ages 14-17) display less responsibility and perspective relative to college students (ages 18-21), young-adults (ages 22-27), and adults (ages 28-40). Further, this research finds no maturity of judgment differences between delinquent and non-delinquent youth, but does find significant maturity of judgment differences between high and low delinquency male youth. Finally, results show that maturity of judgment predicts self-reported delinquency beyond the contributions of age, gender, race, education level, SES, and antisocial decision making. Implications for the juvenile justice system are discussed.

  5. Aging Effects in Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Chistos C.; McManus, Hugh L.

    1999-01-01

    Simulation of composites degradation due to aging are described. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. Aging effects at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are evaluated, to determine failure of any kind. The results obtained show substantial ply stress built up as a result of aging accompanied by comparable laminate strength degradation in matrix dominated composite strengths.

  6. School Nurses Can Address Existing Gaps in School-Age Sleep Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willgerodt, Mayumi A.; Kieckhefer, Gail M.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep has been linked to a host of physical, behavioral, and emotional outcomes, and research has documented that youth across the globe are experiencing inadequate sleep. Despite this knowledge, however, very little research has been conducted on school-age children; much of the extant research has focused on infants, toddlers, preschoolers,…

  7. The glia doctrine: addressing the role of glial cells in healthy brain ageing.

    PubMed

    Nagelhus, Erlend A; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Bergersen, Linda H; Bjaalie, Jan G; Eriksson, Jens; Gundersen, Vidar; Leergaard, Trygve B; Morth, J Preben; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Torp, Reidun; Walhovd, Kristine B; Tønjum, Tone

    2013-10-01

    Glial cells in their plurality pervade the human brain and impact on brain structure and function. A principal component of the emerging glial doctrine is the hypothesis that astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells, trigger major molecular processes leading to brain ageing. Astrocyte biology has been examined using molecular, biochemical and structural methods, as well as 3D brain imaging in live animals and humans. Exosomes are extracelluar membrane vesicles that facilitate communication between glia, and have significant potential for biomarker discovery and drug delivery. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may indirectly influence the structure and function of membrane proteins expressed in glial cells and predispose specific cell subgroups to degeneration. Physical exercise may reduce or retard age-related brain deterioration by a mechanism involving neuro-glial processes. It is most likely that additional information about the distribution, structure and function of glial cells will yield novel insight into human brain ageing. Systematic studies of glia and their functions are expected to eventually lead to earlier detection of ageing-related brain dysfunction and to interventions that could delay, reduce or prevent brain dysfunction.

  8. Innovative Approaches Address Aging and Mental Health Needs in LGBTQ Communities

    PubMed Central

    Hoy-Ellis, Charles P.; Ator, Michael; Kerr, Christopher; Milford, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    LGBTQ older adults have higher levels of psychological distress as compared to older adults in general. They also experience multiple barriers to accessing equitable, culturally competent mental health and aging services because of their distinct histories and particular social contexts. This article discusses this lack of access to services, and highlights an innovative way mental health services are being delivered in LGBTQ communities. PMID:28366982

  9. Genetic insights into age-related macular degeneration: controversies addressing risk, causality, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Michael B

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common condition among the elderly population that leads to the progressive central vision loss and serious compromise of quality of life for its sufferers. It is also one of the few disorders for whom the investigation of its genetics has yielded rich insights into its diversity and causality and holds the promise of enabling clinicians to provide better risk assessments for individuals as well as to develop and selectively deploy new therapeutics to either prevent or slow the development of disease and lessen the threat of vision loss. The genetics of AMD began initially with the appreciation of familial aggregation and increase risk and expanded with the initial association of APOE variants with the disease. The first major breakthroughs came with family-based linkage studies of affected (and discordant) sibs, which identified a number of genetic loci and led to the targeted search of the 1q31 and 10q26 loci for associated variants. Three of the initial four reports for the CFH variant, Y402H, were based on regional candidate searches, as were the two initial reports of the ARMS2/HTRA1 locus variants. Case-control association studies initially also played a role in discovering the major genetic variants for AMD, and the success of those early studies have been used to fuel enthusiasm for the methodology for a number of diseases. Until 2010, all of the subsequent genetic variants associated with AMD came from candidate gene testing based on the complement factor pathway. In 2010, several large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified genes that had not been previously identified. Much of this historical information is available in a number of recent reviews (Chen et al., 2010b; Deangelis et al., 2011; Fafowora and Gorin, 2012b; Francis and Klein, 2011; Kokotas et al., 2011). Large meta analysis of AMD GWAS has added new loci and variants to this collection (Chen et al., 2010a; Kopplin et al., 2010; Yu et

  10. Age Effects on Hypocotyl Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Weichold, Susann; Reinecke, Antje; Lisec, Jan; Döring, Anett; Neumetzler, Lutz; Burgert, Ingo; Eder, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies deal with composition and molecular processes involved in primary cell wall formation and alteration in Arabidopsis. However, it still remains difficult to assess the relation between physiological properties and mechanical function at the cell wall level. The thin and fragile structure of primary cell walls and their large biological variability, partly related to structural changes during growth, make mechanical experiments challenging. Since, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reliable data in the literature about how the properties of the fully elongated zone of hypocotyls change with age. We studied in a series of experiments on two different seed batches the tensile properties the region below the growth zone of 4 to 7 day old etiolated Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Additionally, we analysed geometrical parameters, hypocotyl density and cellulose content as individual traits and their relation to tissue mechanics. No significant differences of the mechanical parameters of the non-growing region between 5–7 day old plants could be found whereas in 4 day old plants both tensile stiffness and ultimate tensile stress were significantly lower than in the older plants. Furthermore hypocotyl diameters and densities remain almost the same for 5, 6 and 7 day old seedlings. Naturally, hypocotyl lengths increase with age. The evaluation whether the choice–age or length—influences the mechanical properties showed that both are equally applicable sampling parameters. Additionally, our detailed study allows for the estimation of biological variability, connections between mechanics and hypocotyl age could be established and complement the knowledge on biochemistry and genetics affecting primary plant cell wall growth. The application of two different micromechanical devices for testing living Arabidopsis hypocotyls allows for emphasizing and discussing experimental limitations and for presenting a wide range of possibilities to address current and

  11. The \\"Age\\" of Opportunity: European Efforts Seek to Address the Challenges of an Aging Population and Also Create Opportunities for Economic Growth and Innovation.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jim

    2017-01-01

    For the last ten years, Peter Wintlev-Jensen has been immersed in one of the greatest challenges the world will have to address in the decades ahead-the unprecedented aging of the population not only in Europe but also across the globe. This trend is reshaping consumer spending, challenging established economic models, driving the development of new industry and service sectors, and forcing a rethinking of key policy areas within health and social care. To quantify the challenge from a U.K. perspective, a recent report from the nonprofit organization Age UK showed that the country now has more people 60 or over than under 18 and more pensioners than children under 16. Just as striking, the number of people over 65 will rise almost 50% by 2030.

  12. Disease spread in age structured populations with maternal age effects.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jessica; Garbutt, Jennie S; McNally, Luke; Little, Tom J

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental ecological processes, such as extrinsic mortality, determine population age structure. This influences disease spread when individuals of different ages differ in susceptibility or when maternal age determines offspring susceptibility. We show that Daphnia magna offspring born to young mothers are more susceptible than those born to older mothers, and consider this alongside previous observations that susceptibility declines with age in this system. We used a susceptible-infected compartmental model to investigate how age-specific susceptibility and maternal age effects on offspring susceptibility interact with demographic factors affecting disease spread. Our results show a scenario where an increase in extrinsic mortality drives an increase in transmission potential. Thus, we identify a realistic context in which age effects and maternal effects produce conditions favouring disease transmission.

  13. Addressing intimate partner violence and sexual violence among adolescents: emerging evidence of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Rebecka; Amin, Avni

    2015-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV) are widespread among adolescents and place them on a lifelong trajectory of violence, either as victims or perpetrators. The aim of this review was to identify effective approaches to prevent adolescent IPV and SV and to identify critical knowledge gaps. The interventions reviewed in this article reflect the global focus on interventions addressing violence perpetrated by men against women in the context of heterosexual relationships. Interventions for girls and boys (10-19 years) were identified through electronic searches for peer-reviewed and gray literature such as reports and research briefs. Studies were excluded if they were published before 1990 or did not disaggregate participants and results by age. Programs were classified as "effective," "emerging," "ineffective," or "unclear" based on the strength of evidence, generalizability of results to developing country settings, and replication beyond the initial pilot. Programs were considered "effective" if they were evaluated with well-designed studies, which controlled for threats to validity through randomization of participants. A review of 142 articles and documents yielded 61 interventions, which aimed to prevent IPV and SV among adolescents. These were categorized as "parenting" (n = 8), "targeted interventions for children and adolescents subjected to maltreatment" (n = 3), "school based" (n = 31; including 10 interventions to prevent sexual assault among university students), "community based" (n = 16), and "economic empowerment" (n = 2). The rigor of the evaluations varies greatly. A good number have relatively weak research designs, short follow-up periods, and low or unreported retention rates. Overall, there is a lack of robust standardized measures for behavioral outcomes. Three promising approaches emerge. First, school-based dating violence interventions show considerable success. However, they have only been implemented in high

  14. Lens Aging: Effects of Crystallins

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, K. Krishna; Santhoshkumar, Puttur

    2009-01-01

    The primary function of the eye lens is to focus light on the retina. The major proteins in the lens—a, b, and g-crystallins—are constantly subjected to age-related changes such as oxidation, deamidation, truncation, glycation, and methylation. Such age-related modifications are cumulative and affect crystallin structure and function. With time, the modified crystallins aggregate, causing the lens to increasingly scatter light on the retina instead of focusing light on it and causing the lens to lose its transparency gradually and become opaque. Age-related lens opacity, or cataract, is the major cause of blindness worldwide. We review deamidation, and glycation that occur in the lenses during aging keeping in mind the structural and functional changes that these modifications bring about in the proteins. In addition, we review proteolysis and discuss recent observations on how crystallin fragments generated in vivo, through their anti-chaperone activity may cause crystallin aggregation in aging lenses. We also review hyperbaric oxygen treatment induced guinea pig and ‘humanized’ ascorbate transporting mouse models as suitable options for studies on age-related changes in lens proteins. PMID:19463898

  15. Effect of technology on aging perception.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Ma Rodrigo; González, Víctor M; Favela, Jesús

    2016-08-04

    Technology can assist older adults to maintain an active lifestyle. To better understand the effect that technology has on aging perception, we conducted two studies. In the first study, through supraliminal priming, we analyzed the effects of aging- and technology-related stimuli on age estimation. In the second study, we conducted a technological intervention with a group of elders who used four interactive devices and analyzed effects on perceived aging. Results showed that technology-related stimuli did not affect estimated age. From the second study, we generated a sociotechnical model that explains the processes connecting technology use with successful aging. We concluded that the use of technology affects aging perception, although it depends on whether the elder people have a proactive attitude toward their aging process a priori.

  16. Cross-Cultural Communication: A Program Addressing the Effect of Migration on South African Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potgieter, Christo; Bredenkamp, Esther

    2002-01-01

    Presents general background information on migration in South Africa and its effect on education. Described a cross-cultural communication program that addresses creatively the outcomes of migration, including its theoretical model, an application, program operation for learners and educators, and challenges. Reviews lessons learned by migrant…

  17. Evaluation of cost-effective aeration technology solutions to address total trihalomethane (TTHM) compliance

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate cost-effective aeration technology solutions to address TTHM compliance at a water treatment plant clearwell. The project team worked closely with EPA Region 6 and the EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) to identify a...

  18. Association between addressing antiseizure drug side effects and patient-reported medication adherence in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Carneiro, Thiago S; Cole, Andrew J; Hsu, John; Vickrey, Barbara G; Hoch, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Adherence to treatment is a critical component of epilepsy management. This study examines whether addressing antiepileptic drug (AED) side effects at every visit is associated with increased patient-reported medication adherence. Patients and methods This study identified 243 adults with epilepsy who were seen at two academic outpatient neurology settings and had at least two visits over a 3-year period. Demographic and clinical characteristics were abstracted. Evidence that AED side effects were addressed was measured through 1) phone interview (patient-reported) and 2) medical records abstraction (physician-documented). Medication adherence was assessed using the validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4. Complete adherence was determined as answering “no” to all questions. Results Sixty-two (25%) patients completed the interviews. Participants and nonparticipants were comparable with respect to demographic and clinical characteristics; however, a smaller proportion of participants had a history of drug-resistant epilepsy than nonparticipants (17.7% vs 30.9%, P=0.04). Among the participants, evidence that AED side effects were addressed was present in 48 (77%) medical records and reported by 51 (82%) patients. Twenty-eight (45%) patients reported complete medication adherence. The most common reason for incomplete adherence was missed medication due to forgetfulness (n=31, 91%). There was no association between addressing AED side effects (neither physician-documented nor patient-reported) and complete medication adherence (P=0.22 and 0.20). Discussion and conclusion Among patients with epilepsy, addressing medication side effects at every visit does not appear to increase patient-reported medication adherence. PMID:27826186

  19. Addressing RNA integrity to determine the impact of mitochondrial DNA mutations on brain mitochondrial function with age.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Scheffler, Katja; Esbensen, Ying; Strand, Janne M; Stewart, James B; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can result in mitochondrial dysfunction, but emerging experimental data question the fundamental role of mtDNA mutagenesis in age-associated mitochondrial impairment. The multicopy nature of mtDNA renders the impact of a given mtDNA mutation unpredictable. In this study, we compared mtDNA stability and mtRNA integrity during normal aging. Seven distinct sites in mouse brain mtDNA and corresponding mtRNA were analyzed. Accumulation of mtDNA mutations during aging was highly site-specific. The variation in mutation frequencies overrode the age-mediated increase by more than 100-fold and aging generally did not influence mtDNA mutagenesis. Errors introduced by mtRNA polymerase were also site-dependent and up to two hundred-fold more frequent than mtDNA mutations, and independent of mtDNA mutation frequency. We therefore conclude that mitochondrial transcription fidelity limits the impact of mtDNA mutations.

  20. Addressing RNA Integrity to Determine the Impact of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations on Brain Mitochondrial Function with Age

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Scheffler, Katja; Esbensen, Ying; Strand, Janne M.; Stewart, James B.; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can result in mitochondrial dysfunction, but emerging experimental data question the fundamental role of mtDNA mutagenesis in age-associated mitochondrial impairment. The multicopy nature of mtDNA renders the impact of a given mtDNA mutation unpredictable. In this study, we compared mtDNA stability and mtRNA integrity during normal aging. Seven distinct sites in mouse brain mtDNA and corresponding mtRNA were analyzed. Accumulation of mtDNA mutations during aging was highly site-specific. The variation in mutation frequencies overrode the age-mediated increase by more than 100-fold and aging generally did not influence mtDNA mutagenesis. Errors introduced by mtRNA polymerase were also site-dependent and up to two hundred-fold more frequent than mtDNA mutations, and independent of mtDNA mutation frequency. We therefore conclude that mitochondrial transcription fidelity limits the impact of mtDNA mutations. PMID:24819950

  1. Military Nutrition Research: Eight Tasks to Address Medical Factors Limiting Soldier Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    exercise time to fatigue . Following the assumption of Task leadership by Dr. Eric Ravussin (June, 2000), this task was refocused to address two major...branched chain amino acids may be more effective at delaying fatigue than carbohydrate alone. "o Branched chain amino acid ingestion seems to reduce...prolactin secretion during exercise. This is suggestive of reduced serotonergic activity indicating that if central fatigue (emanating from

  2. Effects of melatonin on nervous system aging: neurogenesis and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarlak, Golmaryam; Jenwitheesuk, Anorut; Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2013-09-20

    Neural aging as a progressive loss of function involves central and peripheral post-mitotic neurons and neural stem cells (NSCs). It promotes neurodegeneration, impairs neurogenesis, and can be considered a cause of cognitive impairment and sensory and motor deficits in the elderly. Age-related morphological atrophic changes and cellular alterations are addressed by neural aging mechanisms. Neurogenesis declines during aging through several mechanisms such as an increase in quiescence state, changes in lineage fate, telomerase dysfunction, the failure of the DNA repair system, increased apoptosis, and the impairment of self-renewal. The self-renewal transcriptional factor Sox2 has been correlated with retrotransposon L1 and certain cell-cycle- and epigenetic-related factors, which are sometimes considered age-related factors in NSC aging. As neurogenesis decreases, non-mitotic neurons undergo neurodegeneration by oxidative stress, sirtuin, insulin signaling and mTOR alteration, mitochondrial dysfunction, and protein misfolding and aggregation. As neurodegeneration and impaired neurogenesis promote the nervous system aging process, the identification of neuronal anti-aging is required to raise life expectancy. The role of melatonin in increasing neurogenesis and protecting against neurodegeneration has been investigated. Here, we review nervous system aging that is correlated with mechanisms of neurodegeneration and the impairment of neurogenesis and evaluate the effects of melatonin on these processes.

  3. Combining Temporal-Envelope Cues across Channels: Effects of Age and Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Pamela E.; Boike, Kumiko T.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the ability to combine temporal-envelope information across frequency channels. Three areas were addressed: (a) the effects of hearing loss, (b) the effects of age and (c) whether such effects increase with the number of frequency channels. Twenty adults aged 23-80 years with hearing loss ranging from mild to…

  4. Addressing Disruptive Behaviors in an after School Program Classroom: The Effects of the Daily Behavior Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCorvey, Zamecia J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to address behavior discipline problems in special and general education setting classrooms. Disruptive behaviors are a major concern as they create excessive stress and demands for classroom teachers and school administrators to address them. Effective interventions are needed to properly address them. Moreover, classroom…

  5. The Effects of Aging on Motor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Matthew

    A review of research on the effects of aging on motor performance provided evidence that age-induced changes within the central nervous system, particularly in the functioning of the non-dominant cortical hemisphere, result in diminished fluid abilities. The loss was most clearly manifested behaviorally as a decreased capacity to perform…

  6. The Effect of Age on Listening Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degeest, Sofie; Keppler, Hannah; Corthals, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of age on listening effort. Method: A dual-task paradigm was used to evaluate listening effort in different conditions of background noise. Sixty adults ranging in age from 20 to 77 years were included. A primary speech-recognition task and a secondary memory task were performed…

  7. Aging and Radiation Effects in Stockpile Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E.F.

    1999-03-25

    It is likely that aging is affecting the radiation hardness of stockpile electronics, and we have seen apparent examples of aging that affects the electronic radiation hardness. It is also possible that low-level intrinsic radiation that is inherent during stockpile life will damage or in a sense age electronic components. Both aging and low level radiation effects on radiation hardness and stockpile reliability need to be further investigated by using both test and modeling strategies that include appropriate testing of electronic components withdrawn from the stockpile.

  8. Effects of Aging on the Digestive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... here for the Professional Version Home Digestive Disorders Biology of the Digestive System Effects of Aging on ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of the Digestive System Overview of the Digestive ...

  9. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, L.W.; Chawla, M.K.; Swor, C.T.

    2014-01-15

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  10. When ageing meets the blues: Are current antidepressants effective in depressed aged patients?

    PubMed

    Felice, Daniela; O'Leary, Olivia F; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Gardier, Alain M; Sánchez, Connie; David, Denis J

    2015-08-01

    "I had to wait 110 years to become famous. I wanted to enjoy it as long as possible.", Jeanne Louise Calment (1875-1997). This review summarizes current knowledge of the effects of antidepressant drugs in elderly patients (double-blind placebo (n=27) or active comparator-controlled clinical trials (n=21) indexed in Pubmed in depressed patients aged ≥60) and in aged mice (≥9 months) and middle-aged rats (≥14 months) on depression-related symptoms and cognitive performances. Finally, other potential therapeutic targets for treating depression-related disorders in elderly patients are also addressed (neurogenesis, GABAB receptor, 5-HT4 receptor, mTOR signaling). Overall, the very few published preclinical studies (n=12 in total) in middle-aged and aged rodents seem to suggest that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be less effective than tricyclic antidepressant drugs (TCAs) in ameliorating depression-like behavior and cognitive functions. On the other hand, results from clinical trials suggest that there is not a marked difference in efficacy and safety profiles of current marketed classes of antidepressant drugs.

  11. Relative age effect in Japanese male athletes.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Kiwako

    2011-10-01

    The present study investigated the relative age effect, a biased distribution of elite athletes' birthdates, in Japanese male athletes. Japan applies a unique annual-age grouping for sport and education, which is from April 1 to March 31 of the following year. A total of 4,318 male athletes was evaluated from 12 sports: baseball, soccer, basketball, volleyball, handball, golf, horse racing, rugby, American football, sumo, Ekiden (track and field in long distance), and badminton. They played in the top level of Japanese leagues for each sport in 2010. The distribution of the birth dates was examined in each sport and showed significant relative age effect in baseball, soccer, volleyball, Ekiden, basketball, sumo, and horse racing, but not in all sports. The findings suggest that although the school year in Japan starts on April 1, significant relative age effects are observed in some sporting events.

  12. A model for meteoritic and lunar 40Ar/39Ar age spectra: Addressing the conundrum of multi-activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. Mark; Heizler, M. T.; Warren, P. H.

    2016-11-01

    Results of whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials have been used to constrain the timing of impacts in the inner solar system, solidification of the lunar magma ocean, and development of planetary magnetic fields. Despite the importance of understanding these events, the samples we have in hand are non-ideal due to mixed provenance, isotopic disturbances from potentially multiple heating episodes, and laboratory artifacts such as nuclear recoil. Although models to quantitatively assess multi-domain, diffusive 40Ar* loss have long been applied to terrestrial samples, their use on extra-terrestrial materials has been limited. Here we introduce a multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model and apply it to 40Ar/39Ar temperature-cycling, step-heating data for meteoritic and lunar samples. We show that age spectra of extra-terrestrial materials, the Jilin chondrite (K-4) and Apollo 16 lunar breccia (67514 , 43), yielding seemingly non-ideal behavior commonly interpreted as either laboratory artifacts or localized shock heating of pyroxene, are meaningful and can be understood in context of the presence of multi-diffusion domains containing multiple activation energies. Internally consistent results from both the meteoritic and lunar samples reveal high-temperature/short duration thermal episodes we interpret as due to moderate shock heating.

  13. Regularity effect in prospective memory during aging

    PubMed Central

    Blondelle, Geoffrey; Hainselin, Mathieu; Gounden, Yannick; Heurley, Laurent; Voisin, Hélène; Megalakaki, Olga; Bressous, Estelle; Quaglino, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Background Regularity effect can affect performance in prospective memory (PM), but little is known on the cognitive processes linked to this effect. Moreover, its impacts with regard to aging remain unknown. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine regularity effect in PM in a lifespan perspective, with a sample of young, intermediate, and older adults. Objective and design Our study examined the regularity effect in PM in three groups of participants: 28 young adults (18–30), 16 intermediate adults (40–55), and 25 older adults (65–80). The task, adapted from the Virtual Week, was designed to manipulate the regularity of the various activities of daily life that were to be recalled (regular repeated activities vs. irregular non-repeated activities). We examine the role of several cognitive functions including certain dimensions of executive functions (planning, inhibition, shifting, and binding), short-term memory, and retrospective episodic memory to identify those involved in PM, according to regularity and age. Results A mixed-design ANOVA showed a main effect of task regularity and an interaction between age and regularity: an age-related difference in PM performances was found for irregular activities (older < young), but not for regular activities. All participants recalled more regular activities than irregular ones with no age effect. It appeared that recalling of regular activities only involved planning for both intermediate and older adults, while recalling of irregular ones were linked to planning, inhibition, short-term memory, binding, and retrospective episodic memory. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that planning capacities seem to play a major role in remembering to perform intended actions with advancing age. Furthermore, the age-PM-paradox may be attenuated when the experimental design is adapted by implementing a familiar context through the use of activities of daily living. The clinical implications of regularity

  14. Effective target binarization method for linear timed address-event vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiangtao; Zou, Jiawei; Yan, Shi; Gao, Zhiyuan

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an effective target binarization method for a linear timed address-event (TAE) vision system. In the preprocessing phase, TAE data are processed by denoising, thinning, and edge connection methods sequentially to obtain the denoised- and clear-event contours. Then, the object region will be confirmed by an event-pair matching method. Finally, the image open and close operations of morphology methods are introduced to remove the artifacts generated by event-pair mismatching. Several degraded images were processed by our method and some traditional binarization methods, and the experimental results are provided. As compared with other methods, the proposed method performs efficiently on extracting the target region and gets satisfactory binarization results from object images with low-contrast and nonuniform illumination.

  15. ADDRESSING CONFOUNDING WHEN ESTIMATING THE EFFECTS OF LATENT CLASSES ON A DISTAL OUTCOME.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Megan S; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Stuart, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-01

    Confounding is widely recognized in settings where all variables are fully observed, yet recognition of and statistical methods to address confounding in the context of latent class regression are slowly emerging. In this study we focus on confounding when regressing a distal outcome on latent class; extending standard confounding methods is not straightforward when the treatment of interest is a latent variable. We describe a recent 1-step method, as well as two 3-step methods (modal and pseudoclass assignment) that incorporate propensity score weighting. Using simulated data, we compare the performance of these three adjusted methods to an unadjusted 1-step and unadjusted 3-step method. We also present an applied example regarding adolescent substance use treatment that examines the effect of treatment service class on subsequent substance use problems. Our simulations indicated that the adjusted 1-step method and both adjusted 3-step methods significantly reduced bias arising from confounding relative to the unadjusted 1-step and 3-step approaches. However, the adjusted 1-step method performed better than the adjusted 3-step methods with regard to bias and 95% CI coverage, particularly when class separation was poor. Our applied example also highlighted the importance of addressing confounding - both unadjusted methods indicated significant differences across treatment classes with respect to the outcome, yet these class differences were not significant when using any of the three adjusted methods. Potential confounding should be carefully considered when conducting latent class regression with a distal outcome; failure to do so may results in significantly biased effect estimates or incorrect inferences.

  16. Elements of Effective Interventions for Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Latina Women: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Carmen P.; Davidson, Patricia M.; Fleming, Christina; Glass, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence remains a global problem and is of particular concern in Latina diasporas. Aim To identify effective elements of interventions to address intimate partner violence in Latina women. Method The systematic review was undertaken according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We focused the search on intervention studies assessing intimate partner violence as an outcome measure and on publications in English and Spanish from the last 11 years (2004–2015). Results Despite the scope of the problem, from the 1,274 studies screened only four met the search criteria and only a single study included an exclusive Latino population. Of the four interventions, one was only as effective as the control treatment. Heterogeneity of study populations and designs prohibited meta-analytic methods. Conclusions Theoretically derived interventions that are gender specific, culturally appropriate, target mutual aid through group dynamics, and that are developed collaboratively with the target population are likely to be most effective. PMID:27504833

  17. Effectiveness of a parenting program in Bangladesh to address early childhood health, growth and development.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Frances E; Singla, Daisy R; Nahil, Md Imam; Borisova, Ivelina

    2013-11-01

    A stratified cluster design was used to evaluate a 10-month parenting program delivered to mothers of children in rural Bangladesh. Intervention mothers through a combination of group meetings and home visits received messages along with an illustrative card concerning hygiene, responsive feeding, play, communication, gentle discipline, and nutritious foods. Control mothers received the standard government care. Three months prior, 463 children between 4 and 14 months in a subdistrict of western Bangladesh were administered the cognitive, receptive language and expressive language Bayley III subtests, their length was taken and past week illness recorded. Gross motor milestones were reported by the mother and verified through observation. Mothers were interviewed concerning their practices: preventive health practices, dietary diversity, home stimulation, and knowledge about development milestones. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed as a measure of emotional availability. Family sociodemographic variables included maternal education, family assets, decision-making and mobility autonomy. One month after the end of the program, mothers and their children were again assessed. Comparisons were made between intervention and control children who were under-12 months vs. 12 months and older at the start of the program. This may be a critical age, when children begin to be upright and mobile enough to explore on their own and be less dependent on parenting stimulation. Analyses yielded strong intervention effects on the three Bayley subtests and on parenting practices related to stimulation and knowledge of development milestones. Age effects were found only for dietary diversity in that younger children in the program benefited more than older ones. However, all children became more stunted. Findings are discussed in terms of theories of behaviour change and parenting, critical ages for parenting programs, and implications for program delivery.

  18. The effects of a public address system on the off-task behavior of elementary physical education students.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Stu; Ormond, Tom; Imwold, Charles; Rotunda, Rob J

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of teacher feedback delivered via a public address system on the off-task behavior of elementary-school physical education students. A multiple baseline design across three classes was used in this investigation. Results indicated a consistent decline in off-task behavior when the public address feedback system was used. PMID:12365746

  19. Short-Term Effects of Traditional and Alternative Community Interventions to Address Food Insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Roncarolo, Federico; Bisset, Sherri; Potvin, Louise

    2016-01-01

    offer short term reprise from the effects of food insecurity, the question as to whether food banks are the most appropriate solution to food insecurity still needs to be addressed. PMID:26974826

  20. Convocation address.

    PubMed

    Kakodkar, A

    1999-07-01

    This convocation addressed by Dr. Anil Kakodkar focuses on the challenges faced by graduating students. In his speech, he emphasized the high level of excellence achieved by the industrial sector; however, he noted that there has been a loss of initiative in maximizing value addition, which was worsened by an increasing population pressure. In facing a stiff competition in the external and domestic markets, it is imperative to maximize value addition within the country in a competitive manner and capture the highest possible market share. To achieve this, high-quality human resources are central. Likewise, family planning programs should become more effective and direct available resources toward national advantage. To boost the domestic market, he suggests the need to search for strengths to achieve leadership position in those areas. First, an insight into the relationship between the lifestyles and the needs of our people and the natural resource endowment must be gained. Second, remodeling of the education system must be undertaken to prepare the people for adding the necessary innovative content in our value addition activities. Lastly, Dr. Kakodkar emphasizes the significance of developing a strong bond between parents and children to provide a sound foundation and allow the education system to grow upon it.

  1. Electrochemical aging effects in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    Leakage currents were experimentally measured in PV modules undergoing natural aging outdoors, and in PV modules undergoing accelerated aging in laboratory environmental chambers. The significant contributors to module leakage current were identified with a long range goal to develop techniques to reduce or stop module leakage currents. For outdoor aging in general, module leakage current is relatively insensitive to temperature fluctuations, but is very sensitive to moisture effects such as dew, precipitation, and fluctuations in relative humidity. Comparing ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and polyvinyl butyral (PVB), module leakage currents are much higher in PVB as compared to EVA for all environmental conditions investigated. Leakage currents proceed in series along two paths, bulk conduction followed by interfacial (surfaces) conduction.

  2. The Effects of Aging on Orientation Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Casco, Clara; Barollo, Michele; Contemori, Giulio; Battaglini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Visual perception relies on low-level encoding of local orientation. Recent studies show an age-dependent impairment in orientation discrimination of stimuli embedded in external noise, suggesting that encoding of orientation is inefficient in older adults. In the present study we ask whether aging also reduces decoding, i.e., selecting the neural representations of target orientation while discarding those conflicting with it. We compared younger and older participants capability (mean age 24 and 68 years respectively) in discriminating whether the orientation of a Gabor target was left or right from the vertical. We measured (d′), an index of discrimination sensitivity, for orientation offset ranging from 1° to 12°. In the isolated target condition, d′ was reduced by aging and, in the older group, did not increase with orientation offset, thus resulting in a larger group difference at large than small orientation offsets from the vertical. Moreover, oriented elements in the background impaired more discrimination in the older group. However, distractors reduced more d′ when target-background orientation offset was large than when target and flanker had similar orientation, indicating that the effect of the background was not local, i.e., due to target inhibition by similarly oriented flankers. Altogether, these results indicate that aging reduces the efficiency in discarding the response to orientations differing from the target. Our results suggest that neural decision-making mechanisms, involving not only signal enhancement but also non-signal inhibition, become inefficient with age. This suggestion is consistent with the neurophysiological evidence of inefficient visual cortical inhibition in aging. PMID:28303102

  3. Effect of cholecystokinin on experimental neuronal aging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Jiang; Lu, Qin-Chi; Cai, Yan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effect of cholecystokinin (CCK) on lipofusin value, neuronal dendrite and spine ultrastructure, and total cellular protein during the process of experimental neuronal aging. METHODS: Experimental neuronal aging study model was established by NBA2 cellular serum-free culture method. By using single intracellular lipofusin value from microspectrophotometry, morphology of neuronal dendrites and spines from the scanner electron microscopy, and total cellular protein as the indexes of experimental neuronal aging, we observed the effect of CCK8 on the process of experimental neuronal aging. RESULTS: Under the condition of serum-free culture, intracellular fluorescence value (%) increased with the extension of culture time (1 d 8.51±3.43; 5 d 10.12±3.03; 10 d 20.54±10.3; 15 d 36.88±10.49; bP<0.01). When CCK was added to serum-free culture medium, intracellular lipofusin value (%) decreased remarkably after consecutive CCK reaction for 10 and 15 d (control 36.88±10.49; 5 d 32.03±10.01; 10 d 14.37±5.55; 15 d 17.31±4.80; bP<0.01). As the time of serum-free culturing was prolonged, the number of neuronal dendrite and spine cells decreased. The later increased in number when CCK8 was added. CCK8 could improve the total cellular protein in the process of experimental neuronal aging. CONCLUSION: CCK8 may prolong the process of experimental neuronal aging by maintaining the structure and the number of neuronal dendrite and spine cells and changing the total cellular protein. PMID:15641144

  4. Lysosomal proteolysis: effects of aging and insulin.

    PubMed

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2003-07-01

    Age-related characteristics of the effect of insulin on the activity of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes were studied. The relationship between the insulin effect on protein degradation and insulin degradation was analyzed. The effect of insulin on the activities of lysosomal enzymes was opposite in young and old rats (inhibitory in 3-month-old and stimulatory in 24-month-old animals). The activities of proteolytic enzymes were regulated by insulin in a glucose-independent manner: similar hypoglycemic effects of insulin in animals of different ages were accompanied by opposite changes in the activities of lysosomal enzymes. The inhibition of lysosomal enzymes by insulin in 3-month-old rats is consistent with a notion on the inhibitory effect of insulin on protein degradation. An opposite insulin effect in 24-month-old rats (i.e., stimulation of proteolytic activity by insulin) may be partly associated with attenuation of the degradation of insulin, resulting in disturbances in signaling that mediates the regulatory effects of insulin on protein degradation.

  5. Aging effects on cobalt availability in soils.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Laura A; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    Aging processes in soils can significantly affect the potential biological availability of introduced metals via incorporation into crystal lattices, diffusion into micropores, or formation of metal precipitates on the surfaces of soil minerals. Over time, metals in contact with the soil solid phase are less freely exchangeable with the soil solution and, hence, less available to soil biota. In the present study, the effects of aging on the fate and behavior of added divalent cobalt (Co2+) in a range of soils with varying physicochemical characteristics was assessed using isotope-exchange techniques, chemical extraction, and plant growth. Following addition to soil, the Co2+ salt rapidly partitioned to the soil solid phase. Particularly in soils with neutral to alkaline pH, a large percentage of the surface-bound Co was fixed in forms no longer in equilibrium with soil solution cobalt through aging reactions. Using techniques commonly applied to estimate metal bioavailability in soil, the lability (E values), plant availability (L values), and extractability of added Co2+ salts with the mild chemical extractants calcium chloride (CaCl2) and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) were observed to markedly decrease with time, particularly in soils with high pH or those containing appreciable quantities of iron/ manganese oxyhydroxide minerals. Results indicated rapid partitioning of added Co2+ into isotopically nonexchangeable pools, with more than 60% of the aging occurring within 15 d in most soils. Soil pH was the primary factor controlling the rate of cobalt aging and extent of exchangeability in the soils examined. Understanding the influence of long-term aging on cobalt availability in soils is necessary to accurately assess the potential risk associated with cobalt contamination of soil environments.

  6. Characterizing mechanical effects of aging damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, T.D.; Chen, S.P.; Schoonover, J.R.; Trent, B.C.; Howe, P.M.; Hjelm, R.P.; Browning, R.V.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal was to develop and apply several different experimental and theoretical/computational tools to better understand physical and chemical aging phenomena in plastic-bonded high explosives, and to develop a methodology for predicting the likely effects of aging on the mechanical properties of the composite based on input from these fundamental studies. Initial comparisons were done for spectra of fresh and aged Esane, as well as PBX-9501, and the authors found differences in the carbonyl region of the spectrum, which possibly reflect differences in hydrogen bonding due to aging phenomena. The micromechanical model of composites was extended to study various volume fractions of HMX with binders. The results showed that, as the binder fraction increases, there is a decrease in the maximum stress that can be supported but an increase in the percent strain at final fracture. A more realistic microstructural model was obtained through the use of a phase field model. Using this model, the authors have studied the microstructural evolution as a function of the grain boundary energy vs. misorientation relationship. The initial results indicate that there are some changes in the grain growth rate when the grain-boundary energy dependence on the angle is not constant. They also find that solute tends to segregate at the grain boundary and slows the grain growth kinetics.

  7. Superficial white matter: effects of age, sex, and hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Owen R; Clark, Kristi A; Luders, Eileen; Azhir, Ramin; Joshi, Shantanu H; Woods, Roger P; Mazziotta, John C; Toga, Arthur W; Narr, Katherine L

    2013-01-01

    Structural and diffusion imaging studies demonstrate effects of age, sex, and asymmetry in many brain structures. However, few studies have addressed how individual differences might influence the structural integrity of the superficial white matter (SWM), comprised of short-range association (U-fibers), and intracortical axons. This study thus applied a sophisticated computational analysis approach to structural and diffusion imaging data obtained from healthy individuals selected from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping (ICBM) database across a wide adult age range (n=65, age: 18-74 years, all Caucasian). Fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD) were sampled and compared at thousands of spatially matched SWM locations and within regions-of-interest to examine global and local variations in SWM integrity across age, sex, and hemisphere. Results showed age-related reductions in FA that were more pronounced in the frontal SWM than in the posterior and ventral brain regions, whereas increases in RD and AD were observed across large areas of the SWM. FA was significantly greater in left temporoparietal regions in men and in the posterior callosum in women. Prominent leftward FA and rightward AD and RD asymmetries were observed in the temporal, parietal, and frontal regions. Results extend previous findings restricted to the deep white matter pathways to demonstrate regional changes in the SWM microstructure relating to processes of demyelination and/or to the number, coherence, or integrity of axons with increasing age. SWM fiber organization/coherence appears greater in the left hemisphere regions spanning language and other networks, while more localized sex effects could possibly reflect sex-specific advantages in information strategies.

  8. Superficial White Matter: Effects of Age, Sex, and Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Owen R.; Clark, Kristi A.; Luders, Eileen; Azhir, Ramin; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Woods, Roger P.; Mazziotta, John C.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Structural and diffusion imaging studies demonstrate effects of age, sex, and asymmetry in many brain structures. However, few studies have addressed how individual differences might influence the structural integrity of the superficial white matter (SWM), comprised of short-range association (U-fibers), and intracortical axons. This study thus applied a sophisticated computational analysis approach to structural and diffusion imaging data obtained from healthy individuals selected from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping (ICBM) database across a wide adult age range (n=65, age: 18–74 years, all Caucasian). Fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD) were sampled and compared at thousands of spatially matched SWM locations and within regions-of-interest to examine global and local variations in SWM integrity across age, sex, and hemisphere. Results showed age-related reductions in FA that were more pronounced in the frontal SWM than in the posterior and ventral brain regions, whereas increases in RD and AD were observed across large areas of the SWM. FA was significantly greater in left temporoparietal regions in men and in the posterior callosum in women. Prominent leftward FA and rightward AD and RD asymmetries were observed in the temporal, parietal, and frontal regions. Results extend previous findings restricted to the deep white matter pathways to demonstrate regional changes in the SWM microstructure relating to processes of demyelination and/or to the number, coherence, or integrity of axons with increasing age. SWM fiber organization/coherence appears greater in the left hemisphere regions spanning language and other networks, while more localized sex effects could possibly reflect sex-specific advantages in information strategies. PMID:23461767

  9. Tool to address green roof widespread implementation effect in flood characteristics for water management planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, R.; Lorenzini, F.; Allasia, D. G.

    2015-06-01

    In the last decades, new approaches were adopted to manage stormwater as close to its source as possible through technologies and devices that preserve and recreate natural landscape features. Green Roofs (GR) are examples of these devices that are also incentivized by city's stormwater management plans. Several studies show that GR decreases on-site runoff from impervious surfaces, however, the analysis of the effect of widespread implementation of GR in the flood characteristics at the urban basin scale in subtropical areas are little discussed, mainly because of the absence of data. Thereby, this paper shows results related to the monitoring of an extensive modular GR under subtropical weather conditions, the development of a rainfall-runoff model based on the modified Curve Number (CN) and SCS Triangular Unit Hydrograph (TUH) methods and the analysis of large-scale impact of GR by modelling different basins. The model was calibrated against observed data and showed that GR absorbed almost all the smaller storms and reduced runoff even during the most intense rainfall. The overall CN was estimated in 83 (consistent with available literature) with the shape of hydrographs well reproduced. Large-scale modelling (in basins ranging from 0.03 ha to several square kilometers) showed that the widespread use of GRs reduced peak flows (volumes) around 57% (48%) at source and 38% (32%) at the basin scale. Thus, this research validated a tool for the assessment of structural management measures (specifically GR) to address changes in flood characteristics in the city's water management planning. From the application of this model it was concluded that even if the efficiency of GR decreases as the basin scale increase they still provide a good option to cope with urbanization impact.

  10. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system.

  11. Estimating the Health Effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies: Addressing Parametric, Model, and Valuation Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Jeremy J.; Ebi, Kristie L.; Markandya, Anil; Balbus, John M.; Wilkinson, Paul; Haines, Andy; Chalabi, Zaid

    2014-01-01

    simultaneously improving health. Citation: Remais JV, Hess JJ, Ebi KL, Markandya A, Balbus JM, Wilkinson P, Haines A, Chalabi Z. 2014. Estimating the health effects of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies: addressing parametric, model, and valuation challenges. Environ Health Perspect 122:447–455; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306744 PMID:24583270

  12. Computational modeling of material aging effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.

    1996-07-01

    Progress is being made in our efforts to develop computational models for predicting material property changes in weapon components due to aging. The first version of a two-dimensional lattice code for modeling thermomechanical fatigue, such as has been observed in solder joints on electronic components removed from the stockpile, has been written and tested. The code does a good qualitative job of presenting intergranular and/or transgranular cracking in a polycrystalline material when under thermomechanical deformation. The current progress is an encouraging start for our long term effort to develop multi-level simulation capabilities, with the technology of high performance computing, for predicting age-related effects on the reliability of weapons.

  13. Every Child Left Behind -- Addressing One Important Effect of Multiple Deployments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-25

    As President Bush stated to the audience in Hamilton, Ohio, at the signing of the No Child Left Behind Act, “[i]t’s so much easier to move a child...different age groups of preschool , elementary, and adolescence, thus requiring different solutions to effectuate the problems each age group may be

  14. Evaluating the Effectiveness of IP Hopping via an Address Routing Gateway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    128-bit address, typically represented in hexadecimal and separated by colons , along the lines of fe80::baf6:b1ff:fe1b:b4a1. Regardless of which...supports NAH, it replies with its hopping pattern. The client sends its own hopping pattern, before reconnecting using the pattern the server just

  15. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  16. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  17. The effects of aging on orientation discrimination.

    PubMed

    Betts, Lisa R; Sekuler, Allison B; Bennett, Patrick J

    2007-06-01

    The current experiments measured orientation discrimination thresholds in younger (mean age approximately 23 years) and older (mean age approximately 66 years) subjects. In Experiment 1, the contrast needed to discriminate Gabor patterns (0.75, 1.5, and 3c/deg) that differed in orientation by 12deg was measured for different levels of external noise. At all three spatial frequencies, discrimination thresholds were significantly higher in older than younger subjects when external noise was low, but not when external noise was high. In Experiment 2, discrimination thresholds were measured as a function of stimulus contrast by varying orientation while contrast was fixed. The resulting threshold-vs-contrast curves had very similar shapes in the two age groups, although the curve obtained from older subjects was shifted to slightly higher contrasts. At contrasts greater than 0.05, thresholds in both older and younger subjects were approximately constant at 0.5deg. The results from Experiments 1 and 2 suggest that age differences in orientation discrimination are due solely to differences in equivalent input noise. Using the same methods as Experiment 1, Experiment 3 measured thresholds in 6 younger observers as a function of external noise and retinal illuminance. Although reducing retinal illumination increased equivalent input noise, the effect was much smaller than the age difference found in Experiment 1. Therefore, it is unlikely that differences in orientation discrimination were due solely to differences in retinal illumination. Our findings are consistent with recent physiological experiments that have found elevated spontaneous activity and reduced orientation tuning on visual cortical neurons in senescent cats (Hua, T., Li, X., He, L., Zhou, Y., Wang, Y., Leventhal, A. G. (206). Functional degradation of visual cortical cells in old cats. Neurobiology Aging, 27(1), 155-162) and monkeys (Yu, S., Wang, Y., Li, X., Zhou, Y. & Leventhal, A. G. (2006). Functional

  18. Gesture and Language in Narratives and Explanations: The Effects of Age and Communicative Activity on Late Multimodal Discourse Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alamillo, Asela Reig; Colletta, Jean-Marc; Guidetti, Michele

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the effect of communicative activity on the use of language and gesture by school-age children. The present study examined oral narratives and explanations produced by children aged six and ten years on the basis of several linguistic and gestural measures. Results showed that age affects both gestural and linguistic…

  19. Sociological effects on vocal aging: Age related F0 effects in two languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Kyoko

    2005-04-01

    Listeners can estimate the age of a speaker fairly accurately from their speech (Ptacek and Sander, 1966). It is generally considered that this perception is based on physiologically determined aspects of the speech. However, the degree to which it is due to conventional sociolinguistic aspects of speech is unknown. The current study examines the degree to which fundamental frequency (F0) changes due to advanced aging across two language groups of speakers. It also examines the degree to which the speakers associate these changes with aging in a voice disguising task. Thirty native speakers each of English and Japanese, taken from three age groups, read a target phrase embedded in a carrier sentence in their native language. Each speaker also read the sentence pretending to be 20-years younger or 20-years older than their own age. Preliminary analysis of eighteen Japanese speakers indicates that the mean and maximum F0 values increase when the speakers pretended to be younger than when they pretended to be older. Some previous studies on age perception, however, suggested that F0 has minor effects on listeners' age estimation. The acoustic results will also be discussed in conjunction with the results of the listeners' age estimation of the speakers.

  20. The Effect of Age-Correction on IQ Scores among School-Aged Children Born Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Rachel M.; George, Wing Man; Cole, Carolyn; Marshall, Peter; Ellison, Vanessa; Fabel, Helen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of age-correction on IQ scores among preterm school-aged children. Data from the Flinders Medical Centre Neonatal Unit Follow-up Program for 81 children aged five years and assessed with the WPPSI-III, and 177 children aged eight years and assessed with the WISC-IV, were analysed. Corrected IQ scores were…

  1. Posture and the circulation: the age effect.

    PubMed

    Smith, J J; Porth, C J

    1991-01-01

    The primary instigator of circulatory response to the upright posture is the rapid displacement of about 10% of blood volume from the thorax to the lower body. The resultant hemodynamic deficit induces postural intolerance, especially orthostatic hypotension, in elderly over 70 years of age and in some young subjects after exposure to weightlessness. In this review, our objectives have been: 1) to describe in the normal subject the hemodynamic consequences of the headup posture, as well as lower body negative pressure, the compensatory responses intended to cope with these stresses, and their mechanisms; 2) to outline the effect of age on the circulatory responses to these stresses; and (3) to analyze and compare the tests currently used to assess circulatory tolerance. Our ability to design effective countermeasures to orthostatic circulatory intolerance is severely handicapped by our inadequate knowledge of the basic hemodynamic events incident to normal and abnormal orthostatic tolerance. We believe that better understanding and standardization of the postural tests, better experimental design to include greater emphasis on inter and intra-individual variability, and wider application of currently available noninvasive circulatory techniques would greatly improve the prospects for success in this research area.

  2. Speciation Effect in the Penna Aging Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łaszkiewicz, A.; Szymczak, Sz.; Cebrat, S.

    We have simulated the evolution of diploid, sexually reproducing populations using the Penna model of aging. We have noted that diminishing the recombination frequency during the gamete production generates a specific diversity of genomes in the populations. When two populations independently evolving for some time were mixed in one environmental niche of the limited size and crossbreeding between them was allowed, the average lifespan of hybrids was significantly shorter than the lifespan of the individuals of parental lines. Another effect of higher hybrid mortality is the faster elimination of one parental line from the shared environment. The two populations living in one environment co-exist much longer if they are genetically separated — they compete as two species instead of crossbreeding. This effect can be considered as the first step to speciation — any barrier eliminating crossbreeding between these populations, leading to speciation, would favor the populations.

  3. Gravity effects on reproduction, development, and aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, Jaime; Souza, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of various levels of gravity force (obtained by rotation in clinostats or by centrifugation) and the near-weightlessness condition aboard orbiting spacecraft on the fertilization, embryonic development, maturation, and aging of animals are examined. Results obtained from the American and Soviet spaceborne biology experiments are presented including those on mammals, amphibians, fish, birds, invertebrates, and protozoa. Theoretical issues related to the effect of gravity on various physiological systems are discused together with the future research goals concerning human life in space. It is noted that life in space (after adaptation to near-weightlessness) might be significantly prolonged due to a reduction in metabolic rate and a concomitant decrease in oxygen radical reactions.

  4. Developing Effective Interuniversity Partnerships and Community-Based Research to Address Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Timothy S.; Howard, Daniel L.; Goldmon, Moses; Roberson, James T.; Godley, Paul A.; Ammerman, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Health disparities are an enormous challenge to American society. Addressing these disparities is a priority for U.S. society and especially for institutions of higher learning, with their threefold mission of education, service, and research. Collaboration across multiple intellectual disciplines will be critical as universities address health disparities. In addition, universities must collaborate with communities, with state partners, and with each other. Development of these collaborations must be sensitive to the history and unique characteristics of each academic institution and population. The authors describe the challenges of all three types of collaboration, but primarily focus on collaboration between research-intensive universities and historically black colleges and universities. The authors describe a four-year collaboration between Shaw University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH). These universities strategically developed multiple research initiatives to address health disparities, building on modest early success and personal relationships. These activities included participation by Shaw faculty in faculty development activities, multiple collaborative pilot studies, and joint participation in securing grants from the Agency for Health care Research and Quality of the federal Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institutes of Health, including a P-60 Project EXPORT center grant. These multiple activities were sometimes led by UNC-CH, sometimes by Shaw University. Open discussion of problems as they arose, realistic expectations, and mutual recognition of the strengths of each institution and its faculty have been critical in achieving successful collaboration to date. PMID:16249303

  5. Addressing the identification problem in age-period-cohort analysis: a tutorial on the use of partial least squares and principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yu-Kang; Krämer, Nicole; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2012-07-01

    In the analysis of trends in health outcomes, an ongoing issue is how to separate and estimate the effects of age, period, and cohort. As these 3 variables are perfectly collinear by definition, regression coefficients in a general linear model are not unique. In this tutorial, we review why identification is a problem, and how this problem may be tackled using partial least squares and principal components regression analyses. Both methods produce regression coefficients that fulfill the same collinearity constraint as the variables age, period, and cohort. We show that, because the constraint imposed by partial least squares and principal components regression is inherent in the mathematical relation among the 3 variables, this leads to more interpretable results. We use one dataset from a Taiwanese health-screening program to illustrate how to use partial least squares regression to analyze the trends in body heights with 3 continuous variables for age, period, and cohort. We then use another dataset of hepatocellular carcinoma mortality rates for Taiwanese men to illustrate how to use partial least squares regression to analyze tables with aggregated data. We use the second dataset to show the relation between the intrinsic estimator, a recently proposed method for the age-period-cohort analysis, and partial least squares regression. We also show that the inclusion of all indicator variables provides a more consistent approach. R code for our analyses is provided in the eAppendix.

  6. The effect of plant aging on equipment qualification and human performance issues related to license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, W.E.; Higgins, J.C. ); Aggarwal, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    The aging of nuclear power plants is one of the most important issues facing the nuclear industry worldwide. Aging encompasses as forms of degradation to nuclear power plant components, systems, and structures that result from exposure to environmental conditions or from operational stresses. Both the degradation from aging and actions taken to address the aging, such as increased maintenance and testing, can significantly impact human performance in the plant. Research into the causes and effects of aging as obtained through the assessment of operating experience and testing have raised questions regarding the adequacy of existing industry standards for addressing the concerns raised by this research. This paper discusses these issues, with particular emphasis in the area of equipment qualification and human performance.

  7. The effect of plant aging on equipment qualification and human performance issues related to license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, W.E.; Higgins, J.C.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    1991-12-31

    The aging of nuclear power plants is one of the most important issues facing the nuclear industry worldwide. Aging encompasses as forms of degradation to nuclear power plant components, systems, and structures that result from exposure to environmental conditions or from operational stresses. Both the degradation from aging and actions taken to address the aging, such as increased maintenance and testing, can significantly impact human performance in the plant. Research into the causes and effects of aging as obtained through the assessment of operating experience and testing have raised questions regarding the adequacy of existing industry standards for addressing the concerns raised by this research. This paper discusses these issues, with particular emphasis in the area of equipment qualification and human performance.

  8. 2014 Australian Association for Research in Education Presidential Address: Educational Research and the Tree of Knowledge in a Post Human Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Julianne

    2016-01-01

    The 2014, 41st Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) presidential address is both inspired and guided by the discursive genres of presidential addresses and the role of the president in a member association such as AARE. In the address, typically the president speaks to the members on an issue or issues that are to shape or…

  9. Effects of donor age and proliferative aging on the phenotype stability of rat aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Pardillos, Ana; Sorribas, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Age-related effects of the vascular wall have been associated with several hemodynamic dysfunctions, including medial vascular calcification. Vascular aging has been traditionally addressed using proliferative senescence of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in vitro, which induces osteoblastic transition and favors calcification in vitro. In this work, we have analyzed the relationship between organismal aging and proliferative senescence by comparing the proliferative aging of VSMC obtained from young, mature, and old rats (2-, 12-, and 24-month cell lines [CL], respectively). VSMC proliferated to more than 100 cumulative population doublings (CPD) without evidence of proliferative senescence, most likely as a consequence of telomerase induction. The apoptosis rate increased with CPD in all three CL, but the oxidation status of the cells was not modified. The magnitude of all gene expression changes caused by CPD was higher than the magnitude of the changes caused by donor age: the expressions of VSMC markers α-actin and SM22α decreased, while the expressions of transcription factors Msx2 and Runx2 and of bone morphogenetic protein-2 increased. Treatment of the cells with 2 mmol/L Pi revealed that the intensity of the effect of CPD on calcium deposition was greater than the effect of donor age. In conclusion, the proliferative lifespan of VSMC magnifies the effect of donor age on the osteoblastic transition of VSMC, therefore suggesting that in vivo vascular aging changes can be less dramatic than what is shown by in vitro aging. PMID:26603458

  10. Age-Related Effects of Advanced Glycation End Products (Ages) in Bone Matrix on Osteoclastic Resorption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Gandhi, Chintan; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Appleford, Mark; Sun, Lian-Wen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2015-12-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in bone extracellular matrix as people age. Previous studies have shown controversial results regarding the role of in situ AGEs accumulation in osteoclastic resorption. To address this issue, this study cultured human osteoclast cells directly on human cadaveric bone slices from different age groups (young and elderly) to warrant its relevance to in vivo conditions. The cell culture was terminated on the 3rd, 7th, and 10th day, respectively, to assess temporal changes in the number of differentiated osteoclasts, the number and size of osteoclastic resorption pits, the amount of bone resorbed, as well as the amount of matrix AGEs released in the medium by resorption. In addition, the in situ concentration of matrix AGEs at each resorption pit was also estimated based on its AGEs autofluorescent intensity. The results indicated that (1) osteoclastic resorption activities were significantly correlated with the donor age, showing larger but shallower resorption pits on the elderly bone substrates than on the younger ones; (2) osteoclast resorption activities were not significantly dependent on the in situ AGEs concentration in bone matrix, and (3) a correlation was observed between osteoclast activities and the concentration of AGEs released by the resorption. These results suggest that osteoclasts tend to migrate away from initial anchoring sites on elderly bone substrate during resorption compared to younger bone substrates. However, such behavior is not directly related to the in situ concentration of AGEs in bone matrix at the resorption sites.

  11. Effects of dry aging of bone-in and boneless strip loins using two aging processes for two aging times.

    PubMed

    Degeer, S L; Hunt, M C; Bratcher, C L; Crozier-Dodson, B A; Johnson, D E; Stika, J F

    2009-12-01

    This experiment investigated the combined effects of two dry-aging methods (unpackaged and in a bag), two loin-cut styles (bone-in shell loins and boneless strip loins), and two aging times (21 and 28days) on the physical, chemical, sensory, and microbial properties of dry-aged beef. Sections from shell and strip loin were assigned randomly to be aged unpackaged or aged packaged in a bag with high moisture permeability. Weight losses increased with aging time. Shell loins lost more (P<0.05) weight during aging compared with strip loins; dry aging in a bag had less (P<0.05) weight loss than unpackaged aging. There were no differences (P>0.05) in any of the sensory traits between shell and strip loins or dry aging using a traditional method or in a bag. Dry aging in a bag creates positive effects on yields, no negative effects on product quality, and adds flexibility and control of the aging environment.

  12. Addressing Disparities in Sudden Cardiac Arrest Care and the Under-Utilization of Effective Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Melissa H.; Peterson, Eric D.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Sanders, Gillian D.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Russo, Andrea M.; Curtis, Anne B.; Sears, Samuel F.; Thomas, Kevin L.; Campbell, Susan; Carlson, Mark D.; Chiames, Chris; Cook, Nakela L.; Hayes, David L.; LaRue, Michelle; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Lyons, Edward L.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.

    2010-01-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the most common cause of death in the Unites States. Despite its major impact on public health, significant challenges exist at the patient, provider, public, and policy levels with respect to raising more widespread awareness and understanding of SCA risks, identifying patients at risk for SCA, addressing barriers to SCA care, and eliminating disparities in SCA care and outcomes. To address many of these challenges, the Duke Center for the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death at the Duke Clinical Research Institute (Durham, NC) held a think tank meeting on December 7, 2009, convening experts on this issue from clinical cardiology, cardiac electrophysiology, health policy and economics, the US Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, and device and pharmaceutical manufacturers. The specific goals of the meeting were to examine existing educational tools on SCA for patients, health care providers and the public and explore ways to enhance and disseminate these tools, to propose a framework for improved identification of patients at risk of SCA, and to review the latest data on disparities in SCA care and explore ways to reduce these disparities. This paper summarizes the discussions that occurred at the meeting. PMID:20934553

  13. A Conceptual Framework to Address Stress-Associated Human Health Effects of Ecosystem Services Degraded by Disasters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic stress leads to a variety of mental and physiological disorders, and stress effects are the primary concern after traumatic injury and exposure to infectious diseases or toxic agents from disaster events. We developed a conceptual model to address the question of whether...

  14. Effects of Prenatal Care on Child Health at Age 5

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Kelly; Corman, Hope; Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The broad goal of contemporary prenatal care is to promote the health of the mother, child, and family through the pregnancy, delivery, and the child’s development. Although the vast majority of mothers giving birth in developed countries receive prenatal care, past research has not found compelling evidence that early or adequate prenatal care has favorable effects on birth outcomes. It is possible that prenatal care confers health benefits to the child that do not become apparent until after the perinatal period. Methods Using data from a national urban birth cohort study in the U.S., we estimate the effects of prenatal care on four markers of child health at age 5—maternal-reported health status, asthma diagnosis, overweight, and height. We implement a number of different strategies to address the issue of potential omitted variables bias as well as a large number of specification checks to validate the findings. Results and Conclusions Prenatal care, defined a number of different ways, does not appear to have any effect on the outcomes examined. The findings are robust and suggest that routine health care encounters during the prenatal period could potentially be used more effectively to enhance children’s health trajectories. However, future research is needed to explore the effects of prenatal care on additional child health and developmental outcomes as well as the effects of preconceptional and maternal lifetime helathcare on child health. PMID:22374319

  15. State - Level Regulation's Effectiveness in Addressing Global Climate Change and Promoting Solar Energy Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Carla Joy

    Paper 1, Local Solutions to Global Problems: Climate Change Policies and Regulatory Jurisdiction, considers the efficacy of various types of environmental regulations when they are applied locally to pollutants whose damages extend beyond the jurisdiction of the local regulators. Local regulations of a global pollutant may be ineffective if producers and consumers can avoid them by transacting outside the reach of the local regulator. In many cases, this may involve the physical relocation of the economic activity, a problem often referred to as "leakage." This paper highlights another way in which local policies can be circumvented: through the shuffling of who buys from whom. The paper maintains that the problems of reshuffling are exacerbated when the options for compliance with the regulations are more flexible. Numerical analyses is presented demonstrating that several proposed policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions from the California electricity sector may have very little effect on carbon emissions if they are applied only within that state. Paper 1 concludes that although local subsidies for energy efficiency, renewable electricity, and transportation biofuels constitute attempts to pick technology winners, they may be the only mechanisms that local jurisdictions, acting alone, have at their disposal to address climate change. Paper 2, Pass-Through of Solar PV Incentives to Consumers: The Early Years of California's Solar PV Incentives, examines the pass through of incentives to California solar PV system owners. The full post-subsidy price consumers pay for solar power is a key metric of the success of solar PV incentive programs and of overall PV market performance. This study examines the early years of California's most recent wave of distributed solar PV incentives (2000-2008) to determine the pass-through of incentives. Examination of this period is both intellectually and pragmatically important due to the high level of incentives provided and

  16. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  17. Effects of pulsed potential on address electrode in a surface-discharge alternating-current plasma display panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeong Chull; Shintani, Youichi; Tachibana, Kunihide; Sakai, Tetsuo; Kosugi, Naoki

    2003-06-01

    The influence of pulsed potential application onto the address electrode of an ac-type plasma display panel was investigated from the observation of front and side views of Xe atom densities in the metastable (1s5) and excited (2p) states in a unit discharge cell by using microscopic laser absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. It was seen that a predischarge occurs between the address electrode and one of the sustain electrode worked as a preceding anode, which is a similar effect found previously by applying a higher sustain voltage. The predischarge partially erases the surface charge accumulated in the preceding pulse, but it induces a faster main sustain discharge, bowing towards the address electrode, and enhances the production efficiency of Xe(1s5) atoms, if the applied potential is within an optimal range.

  18. Effectiveness of Primary Health Care Services in Addressing Mental Health Needs of Minority Refugee Population in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Shrestha-Ranjit, Jagamaya; Patterson, Elizabeth; Manias, Elizabeth; Payne, Deborah; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2017-04-01

    Many people are displaced from their country of origin and become refugees, mostly due to armed conflicts, political violence and human rights abuse. Refugees have complex mental, physical, and social health problems related to their traumatic background and the experiences they have endured during their refugee journey. The aim of this qualitative exploratory study was to examine the effectiveness of primary health care services in addressing mental health needs of Bhutanese refugee women resettled in New Zealand. This study included focus group discussion with Bhutanese women and men followed by interviews with health service providers. The findings of this study highlighted inadequacies and constraints in addressing Bhutanese refugee women's mental health needs in New Zealand and provided evidence for recommendations to address these inadequacies.

  19. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  20. Presidential address.

    PubMed

    Vohra, U

    1993-07-01

    The Secretary of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare serves as Chair of the Executive Council of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay. She addressed its 35th convocation in 1993. Global population stands at 5.43 billion and increases by about 90 million people each year. 84 million of these new people are born in developing countries. India contributes 17 million new people annually. The annual population growth rate in India is about 2%. Its population size will probably surpass 1 billion by the 2000. High population growth rates are a leading obstacle to socioeconomic development in developing countries. Governments of many developing countries recognize this problem and have expanded their family planning programs to stabilize population growth. Asian countries that have done so and have completed the fertility transition include China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Burma, Malaysia, North Korea, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam have not yet completed the transition. Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Nepal, and Pakistan are half-way through the transition. High population growth rates put pressure on land by fragmenting finite land resources, increasing the number of landless laborers and unemployment, and by causing considerable rural-urban migration. All these factors bring about social stress and burden civic services. India has reduced its total fertility rate from 5.2 to 3.9 between 1971 and 1991. Some Indian states have already achieved replacement fertility. Considerable disparity in socioeconomic development exists among states and districts. For example, the states of Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh have female literacy rates lower than 27%, while that for Kerala is 87%. Overall, infant mortality has fallen from 110 to 80 between 1981 and 1990. In Uttar Pradesh, it has fallen from 150 to 98, while it is at 17 in Kerala. India needs innovative approaches to increase contraceptive prevalence rates

  1. Age and Gender Effects on Coping in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Petra; Petermann, Franz

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate age and gender effects of children's and adolescents' coping with common stressors in 3 age groups (late childhood, early, and middle adolescence). Furthermore, age and developmental differences in situation-specific coping with 2 stress domains were examined. N = 1,123 participants (ages 8 to 13 years)…

  2. Gompertz law and aging as exclusion effects.

    PubMed

    Hallén, Anund

    2007-10-01

    The exponential increase with age in mortality rate, the Gompertz law, indicates that the decrease in vitality and viability linked to aging depends on phenomena with exponential or logarithmic dynamics. Gompertz slope (alpha) is assumed to be a measure of aging rate, provided the studied cohort is homogeneous and in a supporting environment. The law provides no clue about the cause of aging, but may be formally correlated with various physical or mathematical functions. A possible correlation between the Ogston-Laurent exclusion equation and human aging is examined. An increase with age of an inert cross-linked insoluble protein network is assumed to result in a logarithmic decrease in water volume available to colloidal macromolecules. In this model, alpha is assumed to be a measure of the rate of accumulation of the polypeptide network.

  3. Characterization of aging effects of LARC-160

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Sykes, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    Specimens of freshly prepared polyimide precursor resin LARC-160 and resin aged at room temperature up to 45 days were characterized by high-pressure liquid chromatography and several different thermal analyses. Graphite reinforced composites were then fabricated from fresh and aged resin and tested to determine if changes observed by these techniques were significant. It was found that resin aging resulted in greater flow during processing and poorer composite isothermal stability. However, aging did not affect the room-temperature flexural or short-beam-shear strengths of the composites.

  4. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  5. Masked Intervention Effects: Analytic Methods for Addressing Low Dosage of Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochman, John E.; Boxmeyer, Caroline; Powell, Nicole; Roth, David L.; Windle, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This chapter examines how a particular strategy for analyzing evaluation data, intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses, may underestimate the true effects of interventions. Such underestimation of intervention effects can profoundly influence policies for prevention and treatment of children's mental health problems, which can in turn lead to negative…

  6. Addressing Informatics Barriers to Conducting Observational Comparative Effectiveness Research: A Comparative Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Christopher P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The U.S. health care system has been under immense scrutiny for ever-increasing costs and poor health outcomes for its patients. Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) has emerged as a generally accepted practice by providers, policy makers, and scientists as an approach to identify the most clinical- and cost-effective interventions…

  7. Age of acquisition effects in vocabulary learning.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Shekeila D; Havelka, Jelena

    2010-11-01

    Two experiments examined whether the age of acquisition (AoA) of a concept influences the speed at which native English speakers are able to name pictures using a newly acquired second language (L2) vocabulary. In Experiment 1, participants were taught L2 words associated with pictures. In Experiment 2 a second group of participants were taught the same words associated with L1 translations. Following training both groups performed a picture naming task in which they were asked to name pictures using the newly acquired words. Significant AoA effects were observed only in Experiment 1, in that participants were faster at naming pictures representing early acquired relative to late acquired concepts. The results suggest that the AoA of a concept can exert influence over processing which is independent of the AoA of the word form. The results also indicate that different training methods may lead to qualitative differences in the nature of the links formed between words and concepts during the earliest stages of second language learning.

  8. Presidential Address 2014: The more-or-less interrupting effects of the startle response.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Terry D

    2015-11-01

    The startle response can be used to assess differences in a variety of ongoing processes across species, sensory modalities, ages, clinical conditions, and task conditions. Startle serves defensive functions, but it may also interrupt ongoing processes, allowing for a reorientation of resources to potential danger. A wealth of research suggests that prepulse inhibition of startle (PPI) is an indicator of the protection of the processing of the prepulse from interruption by the startle response. However, protection against interruption by suppressing the startle response may extend to many other ongoing processes, including the higher processing of the startle stimulus itself. Proof of protection would require measuring ongoing processing, which has very rarely been reported. The idea that PPI represents the protection of the earliest stages of prepulse processing can be challenged, since those earliest stages are completed by the time the startle response occurs, so they are not threatened by interruption and need not be protected. The conception of low PPI as indicative of a "gating deficit" in schizophrenia should be made with caution, since low PPI is seen in some, but not all studies of schizophrenia, but also in a range of other disorders and conditions. Finally, startle is often used to probe ongoing processes, but the response also modifies those processes, interrupting some processes but perhaps facilitating others. A deeper understanding of the function of startle and PPI might improve the precision of application of these measures in the investigation of a range of research topics.

  9. The Relative Age Effect among Female Brazilian Youth Volleyball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Fabio H. A.; Keller, Birgit; Fontana, Fabio E.; Gallagher, Jere D.

    2011-01-01

    In sports, the relative age effect (RAE) refers to performance disadvantages of children born late in the competition year compared to those with birthdays soon after the cutoff date. This effect is derived from age grouping, a strategy commonly used in youth sport programs. The purpose of age grouping is to decrease possible cognitive, physical,…

  10. Differential Effects of Aging on Processes Underlying Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Robert; Travers, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine the effects of aging on processes underlying task switching. The response time data revealed an age-related increase in mixing costs before controlling for general slowing and no effect of aging on switching costs. In the cue-locked epoch, the ERP data revealed little effect…

  11. Relative Age Effect in Masters Sports: Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medic, Nikola; Starkes, Janet L.; Weir, Patricia L.; Young, Bradley W.; Grove, J. Robert

    2009-01-01

    The relative age effect refers to the performance-related advantage of being born early in a cohort or selection year. Until recently it was unknown whether the relative age effect generalizes across the lifespan. Medic, Starkes, and Young (2007) reasoned that the 5-year age categories that are widely used in masters-level sports to organize…

  12. Presidential address. Endoscopic surgery, cost effectiveness, and the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hasson, H M

    1995-02-01

    One measure of mitigating escalating costs of health care is to create an economic market-based system that connects value to cost. Cost-effectiveness analysis compares treatments that produce different benefits and require different costs, and ranks them by the amount of net treatment benefit divided by cost. Evaluation of the impact of illness and treatment on the medical condition, quality of life, and productivity of individual patients is essential for capturing all dimensions of treatment outcome. When performed by efficient teams, laparoscopic surgery compared with conventional open surgery, adds value through reduced operative morbidity, earlier returns to work, and improved quality of life. These advantages have to be confirmed by cost-effectiveness analysis, however. Endoscopic surgery will be consistently more cost effective than conventional surgery only when performed by a dedicated team of surgeons, nurses, and technicians. The need for a specialized team arises from the fact that endoscopic surgery requires different skills, including the ability to develop a two-dimensional concept for tissue manipulation, perform major surgery through small incisions using a different type of hand-eye coordination, and operate and maintain highly sophisticated and sensitive equipment and instrumentation. Reusable instruments will contribute to lower costs.

  13. Cost effectiveness of antimicrobial catheters in the intensive care unit: addressing uncertainty in the decision

    PubMed Central

    Halton, Kate A; Cook, David A; Whitby, Michael; Paterson, David L; Graves, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Some types of antimicrobial-coated central venous catheters (A-CVC) have been shown to be cost effective in preventing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). However, not all types have been evaluated, and there are concerns over the quality and usefulness of these earlier studies. There is uncertainty amongst clinicians over which, if any, A-CVCs to use. We re-evaluated the cost effectiveness of all commercially available A-CVCs for prevention of CR-BSI in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Methods We used a Markov decision model to compare the cost effectiveness of A-CVCs relative to uncoated catheters. Four catheter types were evaluated: minocycline and rifampicin (MR)-coated catheters, silver, platinum and carbon (SPC)-impregnated catheters, and two chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine-coated catheters; one coated on the external surface (CH/SSD (ext)) and the other coated on both surfaces (CH/SSD (int/ext)). The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year gained and the expected net monetary benefits were estimated for each. Uncertainty arising from data estimates, data quality and heterogeneity was explored in sensitivity analyses. Results The baseline analysis, with no consideration of uncertainty, indicated all four types of A-CVC were cost-saving relative to uncoated catheters. MR-coated catheters prevented 15 infections per 1,000 catheters and generated the greatest health benefits, 1.6 quality-adjusted life years, and cost savings (AUD $130,289). After considering uncertainty in the current evidence, the MR-coated catheters returned the highest incremental monetary net benefits of AUD $948 per catheter; however there was a 62% probability of error in this conclusion. Although the MR-coated catheters had the highest monetary net benefits across multiple scenarios, the decision was always associated with high uncertainty. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that the cost effectiveness of using A-CVCs within the ICU is

  14. Rapamycin extends murine lifespan but has limited effects on aging

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Frauke; Flores-Dominguez, Diana; Ryan, Devon P.; Horsch, Marion; Schröder, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hans, Wolfgang; Hettich, Moritz M.; Holtmeier, Richard; Hölter, Sabine M.; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Naton, Beatrix; Ordemann, Rainer; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H.; Ehninger, Gerhard; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Stypmann, Jörg; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Ehninger, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for a large number of disorders and functional impairments. Therapeutic targeting of the aging process may therefore represent an innovative strategy in the quest for novel and broadly effective treatments against age-related diseases. The recent report of lifespan extension in mice treated with the FDA-approved mTOR inhibitor rapamycin represented the first demonstration of pharmacological extension of maximal lifespan in mammals. Longevity effects of rapamycin may, however, be due to rapamycin’s effects on specific life-limiting pathologies, such as cancers, and it remains unclear if this compound actually slows the rate of aging in mammals. Here, we present results from a comprehensive, large-scale assessment of a wide range of structural and functional aging phenotypes, which we performed to determine whether rapamycin slows the rate of aging in male C57BL/6J mice. While rapamycin did extend lifespan, it ameliorated few studied aging phenotypes. A subset of aging traits appeared to be rescued by rapamycin. Rapamycin, however, had similar effects on many of these traits in young animals, indicating that these effects were not due to a modulation of aging, but rather related to aging-independent drug effects. Therefore, our data largely dissociate rapamycin’s longevity effects from effects on aging itself. PMID:23863708

  15. Methodological challenges to control for immortal time bias in addressing drug effects in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi-Lin; Huo, Xiao-Xu; Chan, Juliana Cn

    2015-09-26

    There are multiple biases in using observational studies to examine treatment effects such as those from prevalent drug users, immortal time and drug indications. We used renin angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors and statins as reference drugs with proven efficacies in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and examined their effectiveness in the prospective Hong Kong Diabetes Registry using adjustment methods proposed in the literature. Using time-dependent exposures to drug treatments yielded greatly inflated hazard ratios (HR) regarding the treatment effects of these drugs for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 2 diabetes. These errors were probably due to changing indications to use these drugs during follow up periods, especially at the time of drug commencement making time-dependent analysis extremely problematic. Using time-fixed analysis with exclusion of immortal time and adjustment for confounders at baseline and/or during follow-up periods, the HR of RAS inhibitors for CVD was comparable to that in RCT. The result supported the use of the Registry for performing pharmacoepidemiological analysis which revealed an attenuated low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol related cancer risk with RAS inhibitors. On the other hand, time-fixed analysis with including immortal time and adjustment for confounders at baseline and/or during follow-up periods, the HR of statins for CVD was similar to that in the RCT. Our results highlight the complexity and difficulty in removing these biases. We call for validations of the methods to cope with immortal time and drug use indications before applying them to particular research questions, so to avoid making erroneous conclusions.

  16. Addressing Angular Single-Event Effects in the Estimation of On-Orbit Error Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, David S.; Swift, Gary M.; Wirthlin, Michael J.; ...

    2015-12-01

    Our study describes complications introduced by angular direct ionization events on space error rate predictions. In particular, prevalence of multiple-cell upsets and a breakdown in the application of effective linear energy transfer in modern-scale devices can skew error rates approximated from currently available estimation models. Moreover, this paper highlights the importance of angular testing and proposes a methodology to extend existing error estimation tools to properly consider angular strikes in modern-scale devices. Finally, these techniques are illustrated with test data provided from a modern 28 nm SRAM-based device.

  17. The effects of aging on the working memory processes of multimodal information.

    PubMed

    Solesio-Jofre, Elena; López-Frutos, José María; Cashdollar, Nathan; Aurtenetxe, Sara; de Ramón, Ignacio; Maestú, Fernando

    2017-05-01

    Normal aging is associated with deficits in working memory processes. However, the majority of research has focused on storage or inhibitory processes using unimodal paradigms, without addressing their relationships using different sensory modalities. Hence, we pursued two objectives. First, was to examine the effects of aging on storage and inhibitory processes. Second, was to evaluate aging effects on multisensory integration of visual and auditory stimuli. To this end, young and older participants performed a multimodal task for visual and auditory pairs of stimuli with increasing memory load at encoding and interference during retention. Our results showed an age-related increased vulnerability to interrupting and distracting interference reflecting inhibitory deficits related to the off-line reactivation and on-line suppression of relevant and irrelevant information, respectively. Storage capacity was impaired with increasing task demands in both age groups. Additionally, older adults showed a deficit in multisensory integration, with poorer performance for new visual compared to new auditory information.

  18. A Multi-scale Spatial Approach to Address Environmental Effects of Small Hydropower Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Samu, Nicole; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Hetrick, Shelaine C.

    2015-01-01

    Hydropower development continues to grow worldwide in developed and developing countries. While the ecological and physical responses to dam construction have been well documented, translating this information into planning for hydropower development is extremely difficult. Very few studies have conducted environmental assessments to guide site-specific or widespread hydropower development. Herein, we propose a spatial approach for estimating environmental effects of hydropower development at multiple scales, as opposed to individual site-by-site assessments (e.g., environmental impact assessment). Because the complex, process-driven effects of future hydropower development may be uncertain or, at best, limited by available information, we invested considerable effort in describing novel approaches to represent environmental concerns using spatial data and in developing the spatial footprint of hydropower infrastructure. We then use two case studies in the US, one at the scale of the conterminous US and another within two adjoining rivers basins, to examine how environmental concerns can be identified and related to areas of varying energy capacity. We use combinations of reserve-design planning and multi-metric ranking to visualize tradeoffs among environmental concerns and potential energy capacity. Spatial frameworks, like the one presented, are not meant to replace more in-depth environmental assessments, but to identify information gaps and measure the sustainability of multi-development scenarios as to inform policy decisions at the basin or national level. Most importantly, the approach should foster discussions among environmental scientists and stakeholders regarding solutions to optimize energy development and environmental sustainability.

  19. A multi-scale spatial approach to address environmental effects of small hydropower development.

    PubMed

    McManamay, Ryan A; Samu, Nicole; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Hetrick, Shelaine C

    2015-01-01

    Hydropower development continues to grow worldwide in developed and developing countries. While the ecological and physical responses to dam construction have been well documented, translating this information into planning for hydropower development is extremely difficult. Very few studies have conducted environmental assessments to guide site-specific or widespread hydropower development. Herein, we propose a spatial approach for estimating environmental effects of hydropower development at multiple scales, as opposed to individual site-by-site assessments (e.g., environmental impact assessment). Because the complex, process-driven effects of future hydropower development may be uncertain or, at best, limited by available information, we invested considerable effort in describing novel approaches to represent environmental concerns using spatial data and in developing the spatial footprint of hydropower infrastructure. We then use two case studies in the US, one at the scale of the conterminous US and another within two adjoining rivers basins, to examine how environmental concerns can be identified and related to areas of varying energy capacity. We use combinations of reserve-design planning and multi-metric ranking to visualize tradeoffs among environmental concerns and potential energy capacity. Spatial frameworks, like the one presented, are not meant to replace more in-depth environmental assessments, but to identify information gaps and measure the sustainability of multi-development scenarios as to inform policy decisions at the basin or national level. Most importantly, the approach should foster discussions among environmental scientists and stakeholders regarding solutions to optimize energy development and environmental sustainability.

  20. Effect of moisture on the aging behavior of asphalt binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tao; Huang, Xiao-Ming; Mahmoud, Enad; Garibaldy, Emil

    2011-08-01

    The moisture aging effect and mechanism of asphalt binder during the in-service life of pavement were investigated by laboratory simulating tests. Pressure aging vessel (PAV) test simulating the long-term aging of binder during the in-service life of pavement was modified to capture the long-term moisture aging effect of binder. Penetration grade tests including penetration test, soften point test, and ductility test as well as Superpave™ performance grade tests including viscosity test, dynamic shear rheometer test, and bending beam rheometer test were conducted to fully evaluate the moisture aging effect of binder. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy test and Gel-permeation chromatography test were applied to provide a fundamental understanding of the moisture aging mechanism of binder. The results indicate that moisture condition can accelerate the aging of asphalt binder and shorten the service life of asphalt binder. The modified PAV test with moisture condition can well characterize the moisture aging properties of asphalt binder.

  1. Effect of face familiarity on age decision.

    PubMed

    Bruyer, Raymond; Mejias, Sandrine; Doublet, Sophie

    2007-02-01

    The present experiment was planned to check whether the extraction of apparent age is affected by face identity (familiarity) or not. According to the traditional view, age estimation should be carried out independently of face identity, because it is one of the visually derived semantic codes (like gender and ethnicity). However, little is known about its underlying mechanisms. Moreover, some recent studies have cast doubt on the parallel thesis regarding facial expression, facial speech, ethnicity, and gender. Given the promising results of a pilot experiment (n=24), 16 Caucasian participants were enrolled in an "age decision" task on morphed faces derived from one old and one young source-face, in the proportion 70:30. The respondents had previously been familiarised with half the source faces by a learning procedure (associating the face, surname, occupation and city of residence of the person displayed), while the remaining half were unfamiliar. The results showed that age decision was affected by face familiarity, at least when the task was perceptually difficult enough. This adds support to the thesis that the identification of identity and the extraction of visually derived semantic codes are not made independently from each other. The status of age, within the visually derived semantic codes, is also discussed.

  2. Effects of age on metacognitive efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Emma C.; David, Anthony S.; Fleming, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a capacity to become aware of thoughts and behaviours known as metacognition. Metacognitive efficiency refers to the relationship between subjective reports and objective behaviour. Understanding how this efficiency changes as we age is important because poor metacognition can lead to negative consequences, such as believing one is a good driver despite a recent spate of accidents. We quantified metacognition in two cognitive domains, perception and memory, in healthy adults between 18 and 84 years old, employing measures that dissociate objective task performance from metacognitive efficiency. We identified a marked decrease in perceptual metacognitive efficiency with age and a non-significant decrease in memory metacognitive efficiency. No significant relationship was identified between executive function and metacognition in either domain. Annual decline in metacognitive efficiency after controlling for executive function was ∼0.6%. Decreases in metacognitive efficiency may explain why dissociations between behaviour and beliefs become more marked as we age. PMID:25064692

  3. Making USGS information effective in the electronic age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Debbie R.; Sanders, Rex; Faust, T.

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) held a workshop on 'Making USGS Information Effective in the Electronic Age' in Woods Hole, MA, on 6-8 February 2001. The workshop was designed to address broad issues of knowledge and communication, and to help develop the mission, vision, and goals of the National Knowledge Bank called for in the 1999 NRC review of the CMGP. Presentations led by historians and philosophers yield to a wide-ranging review and discussion of the role of USGS science in society: USGS science is important to government to understand certain complicated public policy issues (such as the environment), but we must participate in two-way public dialogs to increase our relevance and usefulness. Presentations led by USGS communications experts reviewed the principles of audience analysis and effective communications: this focused look at audiences, markets, and products provided an introduction to the behaviors, the tools, and the terminology that might be applied to public discourse. Presentations by several information technology experts showed the potential - and pitfalls - of current schemes for Web-based information access. Finally, several brainstorming sessions developed action items, vision, and characteristics of a knowledge bank. Based on the workshop discussions and results, the authors developed the National Knowledge Bank Mission, Vision, and Goals statements.

  4. Porphyrin-silicon hybrid field-effect transistor with individually addressable top-gate structure.

    PubMed

    Seol, Myeong-Lok; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Moon, Dong-Il; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2012-01-24

    A conductance-controllable hybrid device that utilizes the photoinduced charge transfer behavior of a porphyrin in a field-effect transistor (FET) with a nanogap is proposed and analyzed. A conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure is modified to form a nanogap in which the porphyrin can be embedded. The conductance of an inversion channel is controlled by the negatively charged, optically activated porphyrin molecules. The proposed nanogap-formed MOSFET structure solves the conventional dilemma that a top-gate cannot be used for an organic-inorganic hybrid device because the top-gate blocks an entire area of a channel where organic material should be immobilized. The top-gate structure has much practicality compared with the back-gate structure because each device can be controlled individually. Furthermore, the device is highly compatible with the chip-based integrated system because the fabrication process follows the standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The charge transfer mechanisms between silicon and porphyrin are analyzed using devices with different doping polarities and geometrical parameters. The results show that the influence of the negative charge of the porphyrin in the device is reversed when opposite doping polarities are used. The device characteristics can be comprehensively evaluated using the energy band diagram analysis and simulation. The possible application of the proposed device for nonvolatile memory is demonstrated using the optical charging and electrical discharging behavior of the porphyrins.

  5. Isothermal aging effects on PMR-15 resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1993-01-01

    Specimens of PMR-15 polyimide neat resin were aged in air at temperatures of 288, 316, and 343 C. Weight losses and dimensional changes were monitored during the course of the exposure time. Physical changes were also observed by optical and electron microscopy. It was found that polyimide polymer degradation occurred within a thin surface layer that developed and grew during thermal aging. The cores of the polymer specimens were protected from oxidative degradation, and they were relatively unchanged by the thermal treatment. Surface cracking was observed at 343 C and was probably due to an interaction between voids and stresses that developed in the surface layer.

  6. Isothermal aging effects on PMR-15 resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1992-01-01

    Specimens of PMR-15 polyimide neat resin were aged in air at temperatures of 288, 316, and 343 C. Weight losses and dimensional changes were monitored during the course of the exposure time. Physical changes were also observed by optical and electron microscopy. It was found that polyimide polymer degradation occurred within a thin surface layer that developed and grew during thermal aging. The cores of the polymer specimens were protected from oxidative degradation, and they were relatively unchanged by the thermal treatment. Surface cracking was observed at 343 C and was probably due to an interaction between voids and stresses that developed in the surface layer.

  7. Effects of nutritional components on aging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongyeop; Hwang, Wooseon; Artan, Murat; Jeong, Dae-Eun; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Nutrients including carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, and minerals regulate various physiological processes and are essential for the survival of organisms. Reduced overall caloric intake delays aging in various organisms. However, the role of each nutritional component in the regulation of lifespan is not well established. In this review, we describe recent studies focused on the regulatory role of each type of nutrient in aging. Moreover, we will discuss how the amount or composition of each nutritional component may influence longevity or health in humans. PMID:25339542

  8. What makes age diverse teams effective? Results from a six-year research program.

    PubMed

    Wegge, J; Jungmann, F; Liebermann, S; Shemla, M; Ries, B C; Diestel, S; Schmidt, K-H

    2012-01-01

    Based on a new model of productivity in age diverse tams, findings from a six-year research program are reported in which data from more than 745 natural teams with 8,848 employees in three different fields (car production, administrative work, financial services) were collected. Moreover, central assumptions of this model were tested with a representative survey of the German workforce (N = 2,000). Results support both significant advantages and disadvantages for age-mixed teams. Based on the findings, the following preconditions for the effectiveness of age diverse teams are identified: high task complexity, low salience and high appreciation of age diversity, a positive team climate, low age-discrimination, ergonomic design of work places, and the use of age differentiated leadership. Based on these insights, we developed a new training for supervisors, which addresses the aforementioned aspects and seeks to improve team performance and health of team members. It was found that the training reduces age stereotypes, team conflicts and enhances innovation. Thus, we can conclude that effective interventions for a successful integration of elderly employees in work groups are available and that combinations of measures that address ergonomic design issues, team composition and leadership are to be strongly recommended for practice.

  9. Effective recordkeeping technologies to manage aging

    SciTech Connect

    Dukelow, J.S.; Johnson, A.B. Jr. ); Vora, J.P. )

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has investigated the capability of current recordkeeping technology to support aging management. This paper discusses technical issues associated with potential enhancements of nuclear plant records systems--from the perspective of the lessons learned about equipment aging degradation mechanisms and associated surveillance and monitoring techniques during the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The paper considers both the specific types of technical data needed to ensure continued safe operation and the use of new technology to upgrade record systems. Specific topics discussed include: equipment reliability data needed to support the assessment of the impact of aging on the continued operation of the plant; operational history data to support the assessment of residual life of mechanical and structural components and piping; tools for the analysis and trending of equipment reliability data and operational history data; design and implementation of plant record systems that will provide a comprehensive and usable engineering design basis for the plant; proposed improvements in the data input process for the plant records system; computerization of plant records systems, including conversion of existing records into machine-readable forms.

  10. Effective recordkeeping technologies to manage aging

    SciTech Connect

    Dukelow, J.S.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Vora, J.P.

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has investigated the capability of current recordkeeping technology to support aging management. This paper discusses technical issues associated with potential enhancements of nuclear plant records systems--from the perspective of the lessons learned about equipment aging degradation mechanisms and associated surveillance and monitoring techniques during the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The paper considers both the specific types of technical data needed to ensure continued safe operation and the use of new technology to upgrade record systems. Specific topics discussed include: equipment reliability data needed to support the assessment of the impact of aging on the continued operation of the plant; operational history data to support the assessment of residual life of mechanical and structural components and piping; tools for the analysis and trending of equipment reliability data and operational history data; design and implementation of plant record systems that will provide a comprehensive and usable engineering design basis for the plant; proposed improvements in the data input process for the plant records system; computerization of plant records systems, including conversion of existing records into machine-readable forms.

  11. Effects of Intergenerational Interaction on Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Carmen Requena; Gonzalez, Marta Zubiaur

    2008-01-01

    The world population pyramid has changed shape. However, this does not mean that societies have changed their negative concept of old age. Our study proposes an intergenerational service-learning program with 179 university students and 101 slightly depressed elderly people. The results show that the elderly people who interacted improved in…

  12. Effects of Aging on the Respiratory System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Relates alterations in respiratory system functions occurring with aging to changes in respiratory system structure during the course of life. Main alterations noted include loss of alveolar elastic recoil, alteration in chest wall structure and decreased respiratory muscle strength, and loss of surface area and changes in pulmonary circulation.…

  13. Effects of age and gender on physical performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to assess the effects of age and gender on physical performance using one-hour swimming performance and participation in 2,173 man and 2,098 women, aged 19 – 91 years from a long distance (one-hour) national competition. Decline in performance with aging was found to be quadratic rat...

  14. Effects of Aging and Education on False Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the…

  15. Aging and the Picture Superiority Effect in Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winograd, Eugene; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Compared verbal and visual encoding using the picture superiority effect. One experiment found an interaction between age and type of material. In other experiments, the picture superiority effect was found in both age groups with no interaction. Performing a semantic-orienting task had no effect on recall. (Author/RC)

  16. Concerns of early career agricultural science teachers and the perceived effectiveness of educator preparation programs in addressing those concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Camilla E.

    Little is known about the concerns and needs of early career agricultural teachers associated with the various routes to certification and how these routes address those concerns. The purpose of this study is to determine how selected early career agriculture teachers perceive their teacher preparation program and how effective their programs were at addressing these concerns during their first year of teaching. The sample consisted of secondary agricultural teachers in Texas FFA Areas V and VI, who self-identified themselves as an early career agricultural teacher in their first 3 years of teaching. The first phase included a web-based survey administered to assess the concerns of early career agricultural teachers. Two Likert-type scales were used, and these were used to assess the perceived importance of problems faced by early career agricultural teachers and the frequency in which they encounter those problems. The second phase included a qualitative interview to better understand the perceived relationship between participants' undergraduate preparation, experiences in agriculture and related organizations, and other related activities in preparing them as agriculture science teachers. The teachers interviewed in this study indicated that overall, they were pleased with their preparation. Teacher educators from both programs should address the concerns presented from all teachers to further prepare them for issues faced by early career teachers because it is evident that these issues are not going away.

  17. Effects of Age and Ability on Self-Reported Memory Functioning and Knowledge of Memory Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Celinda M.; Cherry, Katie E.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of age and ability (as measured by education and verbal ability) on self-reported memory functioning in adulthood. In Study 1, the age and ability groups responded similarly to the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (D. E. Broadbent, P. F. Cooper, P. Fitzgerald, & K. R. Parkes, 1982), but differences emerged when the…

  18. The effects of resveratrol on aging vessels.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Miguel; Degens, Hans; Vanhees, Luc; Austin, Clare; Azzawi, May

    2016-12-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Despite a significant reduction in the mortality and morbidity rates over the last decade, the socio-economic burden of cardiovascular disease is still substantial. Consequently, there is a considerable need for alternative strategies, such as nutraceutical supplementation, that delay the functional vascular decline present in the elderly. Compromised autophagy and oxidative stress (OS) are considered major causes of the age-related endothelial dysfunction. OS reduces the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO), which has been associated with hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and a reduced vasodilatory response. High levels of free radicals and the low bioavailability of NO lead to a positive feedback loop of further OS, organelle damage, poor repair, and endothelial dysfunction. Here we draw attention to the relationship between OS and autophagy in the aged vasculature. We have reviewed the published literature and provided arguments that support that treatment with resveratrol stimulates autophagy and thereby has the potential to restore oxidative balance in the endothelium, which indicates that treatment with resveratrol might have therapeutic potential to restore endothelial function in the elderly.

  19. Role of antioxidants in the skin: anti-aging effects.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Intracellular and extracellular oxidative stress initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) advance skin aging, which is characterized by wrinkles and atypical pigmentation. Because UV enhances ROS generation in cells, skin aging is usually discussed in relation to UV exposure. The use of antioxidants is an effective approach to prevent symptoms related to photo-induced aging of the skin. In this review, the mechanisms of ROS generation and ROS elimination in the body are summarized. The effects of ROS generated in the skin and the roles of ROS in altering the skin are also discussed. In addition, the effects of representative antioxidants on the skin are summarized with a focus on skin aging.

  20. Effectiveness of the Vital Aging program to promote active aging in Mexican older adults

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Ruvalcaba, Neyda Ma; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aging is not only a population phenomenon but also an experience and an individual reality. Vital Aging® is a program that considers active aging as the lifelong adaptation process of maximizing health and independence, physical and cognitive functioning, positive affect regulation and control, and social engagement. Through its different versions and editions, it has demonstrated being an effective program to promote active aging. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the “face-to-face” and “combined” versions of the program to promote active aging in Mexican older adults trial. Methods Seventy-six older adults aged 60 years and over participated in a quasi-experimental study and were recruited in a senior center to participate in the two experimental conditions: Vital Aging face-to-face (VA-FF) (n=35) and Vital Aging combined (VA-C; multimedia/face-to-face) (n=15), and the remaining 26 adults were assigned to a control group. Pretest and posttest assessments were performed after the theoretical–practical intervention. Mean differences and size effects were calculated for estimating the effect of the program. Results At the end of the study, participants showed improvements in the active aging outcome measures. Positive effects were observed in the frequency of intellectual, cultural – artistic, and social activities, perceptions of aging, satisfaction with social relationships, and self-efficacy for aging. Additionally, those who participated in VA-FF showed better memory performance, meta-memory, and a trend to report less memory problems, while older persons in VA-C showed a trend to have better life satisfaction. No effects were observed in physical activity, frequency of social relationships, and subjective health. Conclusion Findings show that the Vital Aging program in face-to-face and combined versions encourages active aging in Mexican older persons. These results are in general similar to those found in

  1. The Flynn Effect and Population Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirbekk, Vegard; Stonawski, Marcin; Bonsang, Eric; Staudinger, Ursula M.

    2013-01-01

    Although lifespan changes in cognitive performance and Flynn effects have both been well documented, there has been little scientific focus to date on the net effect of these forces on cognition at the population level. Two major questions moving beyond this finding guided this study: (1) Does the Flynn effect indeed continue in the 2000s for…

  2. Aging display's effect on interpretation of digital pathology slide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Sawhney, Sameer; Pantanowitzc, Liron; Parwani, Anil V.; Xthona, Albert; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2015-03-01

    It is our conjecture that the variability of colors in a pathology image effects the interpretation of pathology cases, whether it is diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic confidence, or workflow efficiency. In this paper, digital pathology images are analyzed to quantify the perceived difference in color that occurs due to display aging, in particular a change in the maximum luminance, white point, and color gamut. The digital pathology images studied include diagnostically important features, such as the conspicuity of nuclei. Three different display aging models are applied to images: aging of luminance and chrominance, aging of chrominance only, and a stabilized luminance and chrominance (i.e., no aging). These display models and images are then used to compare conspicuity of nuclei using CIE ΔE2000, a perceptual color difference metric. The effect of display aging using these display models and images is further analyzed through a human reader study designed to quantify the effects from a clinical perspective. Results from our reader study indicate significant impact of aged displays on workflow as well as diagnosis. Comparing original (not aged) images to aged images, aged images were significantly more difficult to read (p-value of 0.0005) and took longer to score (p-value of 0.02). Moreover, luminance and chrominance aging significantly reduced inter-session percent agreement of diagnostic scores (p-value of 0.0418).

  3. Comparing Aging and Fitness Effects on Brain Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Mark A.; Low, Kathy A.; Boyd, Rachel; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Gordon, Brian A.; Tan, Chin H.; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Sutton, Bradley P.; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) mitigates the brain’s atrophy typically associated with aging, via a variety of beneficial mechanisms. One could argue that if CRF is generally counteracting the negative effects of aging, the same regions that display the greatest age-related volumetric loss should also show the largest beneficial effects of fitness. To test this hypothesis we examined structural MRI data from 54 healthy older adults (ages 55–87), to determine the overlap, across brain regions, of the profiles of age and fitness effects. Results showed that lower fitness and older age are associated with atrophy in several brain regions, replicating past studies. However, when the profiles of age and fitness effects were compared using a number of statistical approaches, the effects were not entirely overlapping. Interestingly, some of the regions that were most influenced by age were among those not influenced by fitness. Presumably, the age-related atrophy occurring in these regions is due to factors that are more impervious to the beneficial effects of fitness. Possible mechanisms supporting regional heterogeneity may include differential involvement in motor function, the presence of adult neurogenesis, and differential sensitivity to cerebrovascular, neurotrophic and metabolic factors. PMID:27445740

  4. Comparing Aging and Fitness Effects on Brain Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mark A; Low, Kathy A; Boyd, Rachel; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Gordon, Brian A; Tan, Chin H; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Sutton, Bradley P; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) mitigates the brain's atrophy typically associated with aging, via a variety of beneficial mechanisms. One could argue that if CRF is generally counteracting the negative effects of aging, the same regions that display the greatest age-related volumetric loss should also show the largest beneficial effects of fitness. To test this hypothesis we examined structural MRI data from 54 healthy older adults (ages 55-87), to determine the overlap, across brain regions, of the profiles of age and fitness effects. Results showed that lower fitness and older age are associated with atrophy in several brain regions, replicating past studies. However, when the profiles of age and fitness effects were compared using a number of statistical approaches, the effects were not entirely overlapping. Interestingly, some of the regions that were most influenced by age were among those not influenced by fitness. Presumably, the age-related atrophy occurring in these regions is due to factors that are more impervious to the beneficial effects of fitness. Possible mechanisms supporting regional heterogeneity may include differential involvement in motor function, the presence of adult neurogenesis, and differential sensitivity to cerebrovascular, neurotrophic and metabolic factors.

  5. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  6. Aging effect on dichotic listening of Cantonese.

    PubMed

    Kam, Anna Chi Shan; Keith, Robert W

    2010-09-01

    Cantonese dichotic digits recognition was evaluated in free-recall, directed-attention right, and directed-attention left response conditions. All participants were right-handed and included a group of young adults with normal hearing and a group of older adults with minimal sensorineural hearing loss. In all conditions, performance by the young adults was better than performance by the older adults. A right-ear advantage was observed for both groups. Due to a greater deficit in dichotic digits recognition performance in the left ear of older subjects their right-ear advantages were larger than those for the young adults. The results support an age-related disadvantage in recognition performance for dichotic stimuli presented to the left ear of older subjects that is not entirely accounted for by differences in hearing sensitivity between subject groups but may be related to a primary cognitive deficit.

  7. Pervasive Effects of Aging on Gene Expression in Wild Wolves.

    PubMed

    Charruau, Pauline; Johnston, Rachel A; Stahler, Daniel R; Lea, Amanda; Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Smith, Douglas W; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Cole, Steven W; Tung, Jenny; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-08-01

    Gene expression levels change as an individual ages and responds to environmental conditions. With the exception of humans, such patterns have principally been studied under controlled conditions, overlooking the array of developmental and environmental influences that organisms encounter under conditions in which natural selection operates. We used high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of whole blood to assess the relative impacts of social status, age, disease, and sex on gene expression levels in a natural population of gray wolves (Canis lupus). Our findings suggest that age is broadly associated with gene expression levels, whereas other examined factors have minimal effects on gene expression patterns. Further, our results reveal evolutionarily conserved signatures of senescence, such as immunosenescence and metabolic aging, between wolves and humans despite major differences in life history and environment. The effects of aging on gene expression levels in wolves exhibit conservation with humans, but the more rapid expression differences observed in aging wolves is evolutionarily appropriate given the species' high level of extrinsic mortality due to intraspecific aggression. Some expression changes that occur with age can facilitate physical age-related changes that may enhance fitness in older wolves. However, the expression of these ancestral patterns of aging in descendant modern dogs living in highly modified domestic environments may be maladaptive and cause disease. This work provides evolutionary insight into aging patterns observed in domestic dogs and demonstrates the applicability of studying natural populations to investigate the mechanisms of aging.

  8. Age effect on subcortical structures in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Goodro, Matt; Sameti, Mohammad; Patenaude, Brian; Fein, George

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sectional age effects in normal control volunteers were investigated in 8 subcortical structures: lateral ventricles, thalamus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens. Two hundred and twenty six control subjects, ranging in age from 19 to 85 years, were scanned on a 1.5T GE system (n = 184) or a 3.0T Siemens system (n = 42). Cranium-size adjusted subcortical structure volumes were estimated using FSL’s FIRST software, which is fully automated. Significant age effects were found for all volumes when the entire age range was analyzed, however the older subjects (60–85 years of age) showed a stronger correlation between age and structural volume for the ventricles, hippocampus, amygdala and accumbens than middle-aged (35–60 years of age) subjects. Middle-aged subjects were studied at both sites, and age effects in these groups were comparable, despite differences in magnet strength and acquisition systems. This agreement lends support to the validity of the image analysis tools and procedures used in the present study. PMID:22863654

  9. Relative Age Effects in Dutch Adolescents: Concurrent and Prospective Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Jeronimus, Bertus F.; Stavrakakis, Nikolaos; Veenstra, René; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2015-01-01

    The literature on relative age position effects is rather inconsistent. In this study we examined intra-classroom age position (or relative age) effects on Dutch adolescents’ school progress and performance (as rated by teachers), physical development, temperamental development (fear and frustration), and depressive symptoms, all adjusted for age at the time of measurement. Data were derived from three waves of Tracking Adolescents' Individuals Lives Survey (TRAILS) of 2230 Dutch adolescents (baseline mean age 11.1, SD = 0.6, 51% girls). Albeit relative age predicted school progress (grade retention ORs = 0.83 for each month, skipped grade OR = 1.47, both p<.001), our key observation is the absence of substantial developmental differences as a result of relative age position in Dutch adolescents with a normative school trajectory, in contrast to most literature. For adolescents who had repeated a grade inverse relative age effects were observed, in terms of physical development and school performance, as well as on depressive symptoms, favoring the relatively young. Cross-cultural differences in relative age effect may be partly explained by the decision threshold for grade retention. PMID:26076384

  10. Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it ... treated early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins ...

  11. Effects of aging and caloric restriction on dentate gyrus synapses and glutamate receptor subunits

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Isabel G.; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Linville, M. Constance; Pang, Hui; Tucker, Elizabeth M.; Riddle, David R.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2009-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates aging-related degenerative processes throughout the body. It is less clear, however, whether CR has a similar effect in the brain, particularly in the hippocampus, an area important for learning and memory processes that often are compromised in aging. In order to evaluate the effect of CR on synapses across lifespan, we quantified synapses stereologically in the middle molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) of young, middle aged, and old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a CR diet from 4 months of age. The results indicate that synapses are maintained across lifespan in both AL and CR rats. In light of this stability, we addressed whether aging and CR influence neurotransmitter receptor levels by measuring subunits of NMDA (NR1, NR2A, and NR2B) and AMPA (GluR1, GluR2) receptors in the DG of a second cohort of AL and CR rats across lifespan. The results reveal that the NR1 and GluR1 subunits decline with age in AL, but not CR rats. The absence of an aging-related decline in these subunits in CR rats, however, does not arise from increased levels in old CR rats. Instead, it is due to subunit decreases in young CR rats to levels that are sustained in CR rats throughout lifespan, but that are reached in AL rats only in old age. PMID:17433502

  12. Aging and the picture superiority effect in recall.

    PubMed

    Winograd, E; Smith, A D; Simon, E W

    1982-01-01

    One recurrent theme in the literature on aging and memory is that the decline of memory for nonverbal information is steeper than for verbal information. This research compares verbal and visual encoding using the picture superiority effect, the finding that pictures are remembered better than words. In the first experiment, an interaction was found between age and type of material; younger subjects recalled more pictures than words while older subjects did not. However, the overall effect was small and two further experiments were conducted. In both of these experiments, the picture superiority effect was found in both age groups with no interaction. In addition, performing a semantic orienting task had no effect on recall. The finding of a picture superiority effect in older subjects indicates that nonverbal codes can be effectively used by subjects in all age groups to facilitate memory performance.

  13. Effectiveness of knowledge translation tools addressing multiple high-burden chronic diseases affecting older adults: protocol for a systematic review alongside a realist review

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, Monika; Perrier, Laure; Hamid, Jemila; Tricco, Andrea C; Cardoso, Roberta; Ivers, Noah M; Liu, Barbara; Marr, Sharon; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Wong, Geoff; Graves, Lisa; Straus, Sharon E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The burden of chronic disease is a global phenomenon, particularly among people aged 65 years and older. More than half of older adults have more than one chronic disease and their care is not optimal. Chronic disease management (CDM) tools have the potential to meet this challenge but they are primarily focused on a single disease, which fails to address the growing number of seniors with multiple chronic conditions. Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review alongside a realist review to identify effective CDM tools that integrate one or more high-burden chronic diseases affecting older adults and to better understand for whom, under what circumstances, how and why they produce their outcomes. We will search MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AgeLine and the Cochrane Library for experimental, quasi-experimental, observational and qualitative studies in any language investigating CDM tools that facilitate optimal disease management in one or more high-burden chronic diseases affecting adults aged ≥65 years. Study selection will involve calibration of reviewers to ensure reliability of screening and duplicate assessment of articles. Data abstraction and risk of bias assessment will also be performed independently. Analysis will include descriptive summaries of study and appraisal characteristics, effectiveness of each CDM tool (meta-analysis if appropriate); and a realist programme theory will be developed and refined to explain the outcome patterns within the included studies. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required for this study. We anticipate that our findings, pertaining to gaps in care across high-burden chronic diseases affecting seniors and highlighting specific areas that may require more research, will be of interest to a wide range of knowledge users and stakeholders. We will publish and present our findings widely, and also plan more active dissemination strategies such as workshops with our key stakeholders

  14. Acceleration of dormant storage effects to address the reliability of silicon surface micromachined Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Candelaria, Sam A.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Duesterhaus, Michelle Ann; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Timpe, Shannon J.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Skousen, Troy J.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Parson, Ted Blair

    2006-06-01

    Qualification of microsystems for weapon applications is critically dependent on our ability to build confidence in their performance, by predicting the evolution of their behavior over time in the stockpile. The objective of this work was to accelerate aging mechanisms operative in surface micromachined silicon microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with contacting surfaces that are stored for many years prior to use, to determine the effects of aging on reliability, and relate those effects to changes in the behavior of interfaces. Hence the main focus was on 'dormant' storage effects on the reliability of devices having mechanical contacts, the first time they must move. A large number ({approx}1000) of modules containing prototype devices and diagnostic structures were packaged using the best available processes for simple electromechanical devices. The packaging processes evolved during the project to better protect surfaces from exposure to contaminants and water vapor. Packages were subjected to accelerated aging and stress tests to explore dormancy and operational environment effects on reliability and performance. Functional tests and quantitative measurements of adhesion and friction demonstrated that the main failure mechanism during dormant storage is change in adhesion and friction, precipitated by loss of the fluorinated monolayer applied after fabrication. The data indicate that damage to the monolayer can occur at water vapor concentrations as low as 500 ppm inside the package. The most common type of failure was attributed to surfaces that were in direct contact during aging. The application of quantitative methods for monolayer lubricant analysis showed that even though the coverage of vapor-deposited monolayers is generally very uniform, even on hidden surfaces, locations of intimate contact can be significantly depleted in initial concentration of lubricating molecules. These areas represent defects in the film prone to adsorption of water or

  15. Age effects on rotational hand action.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, S K M; Zhang, Wei; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    We investigated age-related differences in finger coordination during rotational hand actions. Two hypotheses based on earlier studies were tested: higher safety margins and lower synergy indices were expected in the elderly. Young and elderly subjects held a handle instrumented with five six-component force sensors and performed discrete accurate pronation and supination movements. The weight of the system was counterbalanced with another load. Indices of synergies stabilizing salient performance variables, such as total normal force, total tangential force, moments produced by these forces, and total moment of force were computed at two levels of a hypothetical control hierarchy, at the virtual finger-thumb level and at the individual finger level. At each level, synergy indices reflected the normalized difference between the sum of the variances of elemental variables and variance of their combined output, both computed at comparable phases over repetitive trials. The elderly group performed the task slower and showed lower safety margins for the thumb during the rotation phase. Overall, the synergy indices were not lower in the elderly group. In several cases, these indices were significantly higher in the elderly than in the younger participants. Hence, both main hypotheses have been falsified. We interpret the unexpectedly low safety margins in the elderly as resulting from several factors such as increased force variability, impaired feed-forward control, and the fact that there was no danger of dropping the object. Our results suggest that in some natural tasks, such as the one used in this study, healthy elderly persons show no impairment, as compared to younger persons, in their ability to organize digits into synergies stabilizing salient performance variables.

  16. Effect of aging time and temperature on the aging behavior in Sn containing AZ91 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Kyun; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Kang Cheol; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang

    2017-03-01

    Effects of aging temperature and time on the aging behavior in AZ91 alloy and Sn containing AZ91 alloy (AZT915) have been investigated in the present study. The mode of precipitation, i.e. discontinuous and continuous precipitation in both alloys is strongly affected by the aging temperature. At low aging temperature of 403 K, only discontinuous precipitation occurs at the grain boundaries, whereas at high aging temperatures of 573 and 623 K only continuous precipitation occurs inside the grains. At intermediate temperature range (443 or 498 K) both discontinuous and continuous precipitation reactions occur. In AZT915, the Mg2Sn particles at the grain boundary effectively reduce the available nucleation sites for discontinuous β precipitates, and slow down the movement of the grain boundary, resulting in suppression of discontinuous precipitation. In addition, increased local lattice strain by the presence of Sn in the α-Mg solid solution matrix accelerates the nucleation of the continuous precipitates at the early stage of aging treatment. Therefore, significantly higher peak hardness can be obtained within a shorter aging time in AZT915.

  17. Effect of aging time and temperature on the aging behavior in Sn containing AZ91 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Kyun; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Kang Cheol; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang

    2017-02-01

    Effects of aging temperature and time on the aging behavior in AZ91 alloy and Sn containing AZ91 alloy (AZT915) have been investigated in the present study. The mode of precipitation, i.e. discontinuous and continuous precipitation in both alloys is strongly affected by the aging temperature. At low aging temperature of 403 K, only discontinuous precipitation occurs at the grain boundaries, whereas at high aging temperatures of 573 and 623 K only continuous precipitation occurs inside the grains. At intermediate temperature range (443 or 498 K) both discontinuous and continuous precipitation reactions occur. In AZT915, the Mg2Sn particles at the grain boundary effectively reduce the available nucleation sites for discontinuous β precipitates, and slow down the movement of the grain boundary, resulting in suppression of discontinuous precipitation. In addition, increased local lattice strain by the presence of Sn in the α-Mg solid solution matrix accelerates the nucleation of the continuous precipitates at the early stage of aging treatment. Therefore, significantly higher peak hardness can be obtained within a shorter aging time in AZT915.

  18. Developing of a VS30 map for addressing site effects for Portugal: evaluation of the effectiveness of using VS30-proxies for stable continental regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilanova, Susana; Narciso, Joao; Carvalho, Joao; Pinto, Carlos; Lopes, Isabel; Nemser, Eliza; Borges, Jose; Oliveira, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The need to perform first-order estimates for site amplification in a regional sense has been strongly emphasized in recent years. The use site-amplification maps is of major importance for addressing both land-use planning (seismic-hazard maps) and emergency planning (instrumental intensity maps). Project SCENE, funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT), aimed at gathering and acquiring shear-wave velocity profiles in diverse lithological and geological formations in Portugal, in order to develop a regional site conditions map to be used for including first-order site-effects into seismic hazard assessment maps. Within the scope of project SCENE thirty sites where strong motion stations are installed were characterized using shear-wave seismic refraction. The project SCENE shear-wave database also includes a significant amount of shear-wave refraction data available from FCT project NEFITAG and from previously performed CAPSA and ERSTA campaigns. Few sites characterised by using other methods (multichannel analysis of surface waves and invasive profiles) were also included in the database. The shear-wave database currently includes 85 shear-wave depth sections or profiles from a variety of lithological/geological formations. In addition to the shear-wave profile database we compiled geotechnical and geological profiles in the vicinity of the sites analysed. We performed a careful evaluation of the geological conditions for each site in the database using the largest scale available (usually 1:50 000). A smaller scale map (1:500000) was also used in order to evaluate the bias introduced by the scale-dependent map accuracy. We grouped the sites into six generalized geological units: S1 - igneous and metamorphic rocks; S2 - old sedimentary rocks (Limestones, marly limestones, dolomites, conglomerates and sandstones); S3 - Sand, sandstones, clays and conglomerates of Miocene age; S4 - Sandstones, gravels, sands and clays of Pliocene age; S5

  19. The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients

    PubMed Central

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; MacPherson, Sarah E.; White, Mark; Woollett, Katherine; Turner, Martha; Robinson, Gail; Spanò, Barbara; Bozzali, Marco; Shallice, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Age is known to affect prefrontal brain structure and executive functioning in healthy older adults, patients with neurodegenerative conditions and TBI. Yet, no studies appear to have systematically investigated the effect of age on cognitive performance in patients with focal lesions. We investigated the effect of age on the cognitive performance of a large sample of tumour and stroke patients with focal unilateral, frontal (n=68), or non-frontal lesions (n=45) and healthy controls (n=52). We retrospectively reviewed their cross sectional cognitive and imaging data. In our frontal patients, age significantly predicted the magnitude of their impairment on two executive tests (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM and the Stroop test) but not on nominal (Graded Naming Test, GNT) or perceptual (Incomplete Letters) task. In our non-frontal patients, age did not predict the magnitude of their impairment on the RAPM and GNT. Furthermore, the exacerbated executive impairment observed in our frontal patients manifested itself from middle age. We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment. Lesions to specific frontal areas, or an increase in global brain atrophy or white matter abnormalities were not associated with this impairment. Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline. We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully. PMID:26102190

  20. Relative age effects in Japanese baseball: an historical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Kiwako

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the existence of the relative age effect, a biased distribution of birth dates, in Japanese professional baseball players born from 1911 to 1980. Japan applies a unique annual-age grouping for sport and education, which is from April 1 to March 31 of the following year. Thus, athletes were divided into four groups based on their month of birth; quarters Q1 (April-June), Q2 (July-September), Q3 (October-December), and Q4 (January-March of the following year). There were statistically biased distributions of birth dates among players born in the 1940s and subsequent decades (medium effects), and similar (but small) relative age effects were observed among players born in the 1910s, 1920s, and 1930s. The magnitude of the relative age effect changed with time, and socio-cultural factors such as international competition and media coverage may have contributed greatly to this effect.

  1. How Pervasive Are Relative Age Effects in Secondary School Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobley, Stephen; McKenna, Jim; Baker, Joeseph; Wattie, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Relative age effects (RAEs; R. H. Barnsley, A. H. Thompson, & P. E. Barnsley, 1985) convey school attainment (dis)advantages depending on whether one is relatively older or younger within annually age-grouped cohorts. In the present study, the authors examined the pervasiveness of RAEs by examining (a) attainment in 4 secondary school…

  2. Antidepressant Prescription and Suicide Rates: Effect of Age and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmar, Sandor; Szanto, Katalin; Rihmer, Zoltan; Mazumdar, Sati; Harrison, Katrin; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the effect of antidepressant exposure on suicide rate is modified by age and gender in Hungary, annual antidepressant prescription rates and suicide rates of about 10 million inhabitants between 1999-2005 were analyzed by age and gender groups. The suicide rate was inversely related to the increased use of antidepressants in…

  3. Effects of Antihistamine, Age, And Gender on Task Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    This investigation was designed to study the effects of the antihistamine, chlorpheniramine maleate, as well as the influence of age and gender...singly and in combination with chlorpheniramine maleate, on selected types of performance tasks. It was hypothesized that chiorpheniramine maleate would... chlorpheniramine maleate on any dependent measure for any performance task. However, several interactions of age and gender with chlorpheniramine maleate

  4. Effects of Aging on Arm Swing during Gait: The Role of Gait Speed and Dual Tasking.

    PubMed

    Mirelman, Anat; Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Nobel, Tomer; Thaler, Avner; Peruzzi, Agnese; Plotnik, Meir; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Healthy walking is characterized by pronounced arm swing and axial rotation. Aging effects on gait speed, stride length and stride time variability have been previously reported, however, less is known about aging effects on arm swing and axial rotation and their relationship to age-associated gait changes during usual walking and during more challenging conditions like dual tasking. Sixty healthy adults between the ages of 30-77 were included in this study designed to address this gap. Lightweight body fixed sensors were placed on each wrist and lower back. Participants walked under 3 walking conditions each of 1 minute: 1) comfortable speed, 2) walking while serially subtracting 3's (Dual Task), 3) walking at fast speed. Aging effects on arm swing amplitude, range, symmetry, jerk and axial rotation amplitude and jerk were compared between decades of age (30-40; 41-50; 51-60; 61-77 years). As expected, older adults walked slower (p = 0.03) and with increased stride variability (p = 0.02). Arm swing amplitude decreased with age under all conditions (p = 0.04). In the oldest group, arm swing decreased during dual task and increased during the fast walking condition (p<0.0001). Similarly, arm swing asymmetry increased during the dual task in the older groups (p<0.004), but not in the younger groups (p = 0.67). Significant differences between groups and within conditions were observed in arm swing jerk (p<0.02), axial rotation amplitude (p<0.02) and axial jerk (p<0.001). Gait speed, arm swing amplitude of the dominant arm, arm swing asymmetry and axial rotation jerk were all independent predictors of age in a multivariate model. These findings suggest that the effects of gait speed and dual tasking on arm swing and axial rotation during walking are altered among healthy older adults. Follow-up work is needed to examine if these effects contribute to reduced stability in aging.

  5. Aging effects on oxidative phosphorylation in rat adrenocortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L

    2014-06-01

    Does aging in itself lead to alteration in adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation? Mitochondria from Fischer 344 (F344) rats (6 and 24 months old), Brown Norway rats (6 and 32 months old) and F344-Brown Norway hybrid rats (6 and 30 months old) were compared. Mitochondria were isolated from extirpated adrenal cortex. The yields of mitochondria were quantitatively similar in all rat strains irrespective of age. In order to assess the activity of each mitochondrial complex, several different substrates were tested and the rate of oxidative phosphorylation measured. Aging does not affect mitochondrial activity except in the F344 rat adrenal cortex where the maximal ADP-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation decreased with age. We hypothesize that impaired synthesis of steroid hormones by the adrenal cortex with age in F344 rats might be due to decreased adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We conclude that aging results in adrenocortical mitochondria effects that are non-uniform across different rat strains.

  6. Age-related cognitive decline during normal aging: the complex effect of education.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Ostrosky-Solis, F; Rosselli, M; Gómez, C

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to further analyze the effects of education on cognitive decline during normal aging. An 806-subject sample was taken from five different Mexican regions. Participants ranged in age from 16 to 85 years. Subjects were grouped into four educational levels: illiterate, 1-4, 5-9, and 10 or more years of education, and four age ranges: 16-30, 31-50, 51-65, and 66-85 years. A brief neuropsychological test battery (NEUROPSI), standardized and normalized in Spanish, was administered. The NEUROPSI test battery includes assessment of orientation, attention, memory, language, visuoperceptual abilities, motor skills, and executive functions. In general, test scores were strongly associated with level of educational, and differences among age groups were smaller than differences among education groups. However, there was an interaction between age and education such as that among illiterate individuals scores of participants 31-50 years old were higher than scores of participants 16-30 years old for over 50% of the tests. Different patterns of interaction among educational groups were distinguished. It was concluded that: (a) The course of life-span changes in cognition are affected by education. Among individuals with a low level of education, best neuropsychological test performance is observed at an older age than among higher-educated subjects; and (b) there is not a single relationship between age-related cognitive decline and education, but different patterns may be found, depending upon the specific cognitive domain.

  7. Age effects on the perception of motion illusions.

    PubMed

    Billino, Jutta; Hamburger, Kai; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2009-01-01

    Anomalous motion illusions represent a popular class of illusions and several studies have made an effort to explain their perception. However, understanding is still inconsistent. Age-related differences in susceptibility to illusory motion may contribute to further clarification of the underlying processing mechanisms. We investigated the effect of age on the perception of four different anomalous motion illusions. The Enigma illusion, the Rotating-Snakes illusion, the Pinna illusion, and the Rotating-Tilted-Lines illusion were tested on a total of one hundred and thirty-nine participants covering an age range from 3 to 82 years. In comparison with young adults, children showed a lower likelihood of perceiving motion in all illusions with the exception of the Rotating-Tilted-Lines illusion. For adult subjects, we found significant age effects in the Rotating-Snakes illusion and the Rotating-Tilted-Lines illusion: occurrence of the illusory effect decreased with age. The other two illusions turned out to be unaffected by aging. Finally, intercorrelations between different motion illusions revealed that only the Pinna illusion and the Rotating-Tilted-Lines illusion correlated significantly with each other. The results confirm that anomalous motion illusions should not be considered as a homogeneous group. Possible links between perceptual data and neurophysiological changes related to age are discussed. Perceptual differences due to age provide the opportunity to improve our understanding of illusory motion and point to specific underlying mechanisms.

  8. Age effects in the human middle ear: Wideband acoustical measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, M. Patrick; Sanford, Chris A.

    2004-12-01

    Studies that have examined age effects in the human middle ear using either admittance measures at 220 or 660 Hz or multifrequency tympanometry from 200 to 2000 Hz have had conflicting results. Several studies have suggested an increase in admittance with age, while several others have suggested a decrease in admittance with age. A third group of studies found no significant age effect. This study examined 226 Hz tympanometry and wideband energy reflectance and impedance at ambient pressure in a group of 40 young adults and a group of 30 adults with age >=60 years. The groups did not differ in admittance measures of the middle ear at 226 Hz. However, significant age effects were found in wideband energy reflectance and impedance. In particular, in older adults there was a comparative decrease in reflectance from 800 to 2000 Hz but an increase near 4000 Hz. The results suggest a decrease in middle-ear stiffness with age. The findings of this study hold relevance for understanding the aging process in the auditory system, for the establishment of normative data for wideband energy reflectance, for the possibility of a conductive component to presbycusis, and for the interpretation of otoacoustic emission measurements. .

  9. The effect of aging on skeletal-muscle recovery from exercise: possible implications for aging athletes.

    PubMed

    Fell, James; Williams, Dafydd

    2008-01-01

    Recovery from exercise is integral to the physical training process. There is a perception among older athletes that aging negatively affects the recovery process. Plausible arguments for an impaired recovery with aging are a greater susceptibility of older muscle to exercise-induced skeletal-muscle damage and a slower repair and adaptation response. Differences in the physical activity level of the research participants are rarely considered, however. This makes it difficult to differentiate the respective roles of declining physical activity and aging on the recovery process. Furthermore, the type of exercise used to induce damage and monitor recovery is often not indicative of a normal training stimulus for athletes. This review discusses the effects of aging on skeletal-muscle damage and recovery processes and highlights the limitations of many of these studies with respect to older athletes. Future research should use an exercise intervention representative of a normal training stimulus and take the physical activity level of the participants into account.

  10. Effective Anti-aging Strategies in an Era of Super-aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Saerom; Yang, Min-Ji; Ha, So-Nyeong; Lee, Jeong-Sang

    2014-12-01

    The societies of the world in the 21(st) century have faced challenges arising from an aging population as the fertility rate has dropped dramatically and medical advances have extended the average human life span. The elderly aged 65 years or older make up at least 20% of the population in Korea, making the country a super-aging society as defined by the United Nations. The number of elderly women is higher than that of elderly men and women live longer than men. Based on the analysis of recent trends in previous studies, this study aimed to suggest practical strategies to utilize isoflavones, substances chemically similar to the female hormone estrogen, and to search for effective anti-aging strategies using this substance for women to be prepared to reach the elderly stage in good health.

  11. What a difference your e-mail makes: effects of informal e-mail addresses in online résumé screening.

    PubMed

    van Toorenburg, Marlies; Oostrom, Janneke K; Pollet, Thomas V

    2015-03-01

    Résumés are screened rapidly, with some reports stating that recruiters form their impressions within 10 seconds. Certain résumé characteristics can have a significant impact on the snap judgments these recruiters make. The main goal of the present study was to examine the effect of the e-mail address (formal vs. informal) used in a résumé on the hirability perceptions formed by professional recruiters (N=73). In addition, the effect of the e-mail address on hirability perceptions was compared to the effects of spelling errors and typeface. Participants assessed the cognitive ability, personality, and the hirability of six fictitious applicants for the job of an HR specialist. The hirability ratings for the résumés with informal e-mail addresses were significantly lower than the hirability ratings for résumés that featured a formal e-mail address. The effect of e-mail address was as strong as the effect of spelling errors and stronger than that of typeface. The effect of e-mail address on hirability was mediated by perceptions of conscientiousness and honesty-humility. This study among actual recruiters shows for the first time that the choice of the e-mail address used on a résumé might make a real difference.

  12. Age-related differences in arithmetic strategy sequential effects.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In this article, I review a series of new findings concerning how age-related changes in strategic variations are modulated by sequential effects. Sequential effects refer to how strategy selection and strategy execution on current problems are influenced by which strategy is used on immediately preceding problems. Two sequential effects during strategy selection (i.e., strategy revisions and strategy perseverations) and during strategy execution (i.e., strategy switch costs and modulations of poorer strategy effects) are presented. I also discuss how these effects change with age during adulthood. These phenomena are important, as they shed light on arithmetic processes and how these processes change with age during adulthood. In particular, they speak to the role of executive control while participants select and execute arithmetic strategies. Finally, I discuss the implications of sequential effects for theories of strategies and of arithmetic.

  13. Age-related associative deficits and the isolation effect.

    PubMed

    Badham, Stephen P; Maylor, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    If all but one of the items in a list are similar (e.g., all black except one red), memory for the different item is enhanced (the isolation effect). Older adults generally show similar or smaller isolation effects compared to young adults, which has been attributed to age-related deficits in associative memory whereby older adults are less able to associate an isolated stimulus to its isolating feature. Experiment 1 examined the isolation effect for isolation based on spatial position, modality and color; in Experiment 2, the criterion for isolation was the associative relation between stimuli. The results consistently showed no differences between young and older participants in the magnitude of the isolation effect. Whilst age deficits in associative memory may act to reduce the isolation effect in older adults, age deficits in self-initiated processing and inhibitory functionality may counteract this reduction by enhancing the isolation effect in older adults.

  14. The Age-related Positivity Effect and Tobacco Warning Labels

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Megan E.; Peters, Ellen; Ferketich, Amy K.; Klein, Elizabeth G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study tested whether age is a factor in viewing time for tobacco warning labels. The approach drew from previous work demonstrating an age-related positivity effect, whereby older adults show preferences toward positive and away from negative stimuli. Methods Participants were 295 daily smokers from Appalachian Ohio (age range: 21–68). All participants took part in an eye-tracking paradigm that captured the attention paid to elements of health warning labels in the context of magazine advertisements. Participants also reported on their past cessation attempts and their beliefs about the dangers of smoking. Results Consistent with theory on age-related positivity, older age predicted weaker beliefs about smoking risks, but only among those with no past-year quit attempts. In support of our primary hypothesis, older age was also related to a lower percentage of time spent viewing tobacco warning labels, both overall (text + image) and for the graphic image alone. These associations remained after controlling for cigarettes smoked per day. Conclusions Overall, findings suggest that age is an important consideration for the design of future graphic warning labels and other tobacco risk communications. For older adults, warning labels may need to be tailored to overcome the age-related positivity effect. PMID:27617273

  15. Marginal effect of increasing ageing drivers on injury crashes.

    PubMed

    Tay, Richard

    2008-11-01

    The safety effects of the ageing driving population have been a topic of research interests in health and transportation economics in recent years due to the ageing of the baby boomers. This study adds to the current knowledge by examining the marginal effects of changing the driver mix on injury crashes using data from the Canadian Province of Alberta between 1990 and 2004. Results from a Poisson regression model reveal that increasing the number of young and ageing drivers will result in an increase in the number of injury crashes whereas increasing the number of middle-aged drivers will result in a reduction. These results are in contrast to those obtained in a previous study on the marginal effects of changing the driver mix on fatal crashes in the Australian State of Queensland and some possible explanations for the differing results are provided.

  16. Sex and Age Effects of Functional Connectivity in Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Cahill, Nathan D; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R; White, Tonya; Baum, Stefi A; Michael, Andrew M

    2016-11-01

    Functional connectivity (FC) in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) is widely used to find coactivating regions in the human brain. Despite its widespread use, the effects of sex and age on resting FC are not well characterized, especially during early adulthood. Here we apply regression and graph theoretical analyses to explore the effects of sex and age on FC between the 116 AAL atlas parcellations (a total of 6670 FC measures). rs-fMRI data of 494 healthy subjects (203 males and 291 females; age range: 22-36 years) from the Human Connectome Project were analyzed. We report the following findings. (1) Males exhibited greater FC than females in 1352 FC measures (1025 survived Bonferroni correction; [Formula: see text]). In 641 FC measures, females exhibited greater FC than males but none survived Bonferroni correction. Significant FC differences were mainly present in frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes. Although the average FC values for males and females were significantly different, FC values of males and females exhibited large overlap. (2) Age effects were present only in 29 FC measures and all significant age effects showed higher FC in younger subjects. Age and sex differences of FC remained significant after controlling for cognitive measures. (3) Although sex [Formula: see text] age interaction did not survive multiple comparison correction, FC in females exhibited a faster cross-sectional decline with age. (4) Male brains were more locally clustered in all lobes but the cerebellum; female brains had a higher clustering coefficient at the whole-brain level. Our results indicate that although both male and female brains show small-world network characteristics, male brains were more segregated and female brains were more integrated. Findings of this study further our understanding of FC in early adulthood and provide evidence to support that age and sex should be controlled for in FC studies of young adults.

  17. Addressing the Antibiotic Resistance Problem with Probiotics: Reducing the Risk of Its Double-Edged Sword Effect

    PubMed Central

    Imperial, Ivan C. V. J.; Ibana, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global public health problem that requires our attention. Indiscriminate antibiotic use is a major contributor in the introduction of selective pressures in our natural environments that have significantly contributed in the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant microbial strains. The use of probiotics in lieu of antibiotic therapy to address certain health conditions in both animals and humans may alleviate these antibiotic-mediated selective pressures. Probiotic use is defined as the actual application of live beneficial microbes to obtain a desired outcome by preventing diseased state or improving general health. Multiple studies have confirmed the beneficial effects of probiotic use in the health of both livestock and humans. As such, probiotics consumption is gaining popularity worldwide. However, concerns have been raised in the use of some probiotics strains that carry antibiotic resistance genes themselves, as they have the potential to pass the antibiotic resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, with the current public health concern on antibiotic resistance globally, in this review, we underscore the need to screen probiotic strains that are used in both livestock and human applications to assure their safety and mitigate their potential in significantly contributing to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in our natural environments. PMID:28018315

  18. HIV and aging: effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, Silvia; Cherner, Mariana; Ellis, Ronald J

    2014-02-01

    With the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, many human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) individuals are reaching advanced age. The proportion of people living with HIV older than 50 years already exceeds 50% in many communities, and is expected to reach this level nationally by 2015. HIV and aging are independently associated with neuropathological changes, but their concurrence may have a more deleterious effect on the central nervous system (CNS). Published data about neurocognitive and neuroimaging markers of HIV and aging are reviewed. Putative factors contributing to neurocognitive impairment and neuroimaging changes in the aging HIV+ brain, such as metabolic disturbances, cardiovascular risk factors, immune senescence, and neuroinflammation, are described. The possible relationship between HIV and some markers of Alzheimer's disease is presented. Current research findings emphasize multiple mechanisms related to HIV and combination antiretroviral therapy that compromise CNS structure and function with advancing age.

  19. HIV and Aging: Effects on the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Cañizares, Silvia; Cherner, Mariana; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, many human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) individuals are reaching advanced age. The proportion of people living with HIV older than 50 years already exceeds 50% in many communities, and is expected to reach this level nationally by 2015. HIV and aging are independently associated with neuropathological changes, but their concurrence may have a more deleterious effect on the central nervous system (CNS). Published data about neurocognitive and neuroimaging markers of HIV and aging are reviewed. Putative factors contributing to neurocognitive impairment and neuroimaging changes in the aging HIV+ brain, such as metabolic disturbances, cardiovascular risk factors, immune senescence, and neuroinflammation, are described. The possible relationship between HIV and some markers of Alzheimer’s disease is presented. Current research findings emphasize multiple mechanisms related to HIV and combination antiretroviral therapy that compromise CNS structure and function with advancing age. PMID:24715486

  20. Beneficial effects of metformin and irbesartan on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-RAGE-induced proximal tubular cell injury.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis contributes to diabetic nephropathy. An oral hypoglycemic agent, metformin may have a potential effect on the inhibition of glycation reactions. Further, since a pathophysiological crosstalk between renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and AGEs-RAGE axis is involved in diabetic nephropathy, it is conceivable that metformin and irbesartan additively could protect against the AGEs-RAGE-induced tubular cell injury. In this study, we addressed the issues. Metformin dose-dependently inhibited the formation of AGEs modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Compared with AGEs-modified BSA prepared without metformin (AGEs-MF0), those prepared in the presence of 30 mM or 100 mM metformin (AGEs-MF30 or AGEs-MF100) significantly reduced RAGE mRNA level, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β mRNA level in tubular cells. Irbesartan further inhibited the harmful effects of AGEs-MF0 or AGEs-MF30 on tubular cells. Our present study suggests that combination therapy with metformin and irbesartan may have therapeutic potential in diabetic nephropathy; it could play a protective role against tubular injury in diabetes not only by inhibiting AGEs formation, but also by attenuating the deleterious effects of AGEs via down-regulating RAGE expression and subsequently suppressing ROS generation.

  1. Effects of sex and age on auditory spatial scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Lewald, Jörg; Hausmann, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that men outperform women in spatial analysis of complex auditory scenes (Zündorf et al., 2011). The present study investigated the relation between the effects of ageing and sex on the spatial segregation of concurrent sounds in younger and middle-aged adults. The experimental design allowed simultaneous presentation of target and distractor sound sources at different locations. The resulting spatial "pulling" effect (that is, the bias of target localization toward that of the distractor) was used as a measure of performance. The pulling effect was stronger in middle-aged than younger subjects, and female than male subjects. This indicates lower performance of the middle-aged women in the sensory and attentional mechanisms extracting spatial information about the acoustic event of interest from the auditory scene than both younger and male subjects. Moreover, age-specific differences were most prominent for conditions with targets in right hemispace and distractors in left hemispace, suggesting bilateral asymmetries underlying the effect of ageing.

  2. Effects of aging on the male reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Sezgin; Hekim, Gulgez Neslihan Taskurt; Arslan, Mehmet Alper; Asci, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to discuss the effects of aging on the male reproductive system. A systematic review was performed using PubMed from 1980 to 2014. Aging is a natural process comprising of irreversible changes due to a myriad of endogenous and environmental factors at the level of all organs and systems. In modern life, as more couples choose to postpone having a child due to various socioeconomic reasons, research for understanding the effects of aging on the reproductive system has gained an increased importance. Paternal aging also causes genetic and epigenetic changes in spermatozoa, which impair male reproductive functions through their adverse effects on sperm quality and count as, well as, on sexual organs and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Hormone production, spermatogenesis, and testes undergo changes as a man ages. These small changes lead to decrease in both the quality and quantity of spermatozoa. The offspring of older fathers show high prevalence of genetic abnormalities, childhood cancers, and several neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition, the latest advances in assisted reproductive techniques give older men a chance to have a child even with poor semen parameters. Further studies should investigate the onset of gonadal senesce and its effects on aging men.

  3. Potential effects of the introduction of the discrete address beacon system data link on air/ground information transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    This study of Aviation Safety Reporting System reports suggests that benefits should accure from implementation of discrete address beacon system data link. The phase enhanced terminal information system service is expected to provide better terminal information than present systems by improving currency and accuracy. In the exchange of air traffic control messages, discrete address insures that only the intended recipient receives and acts on a specific message. Visual displays and printer copy of messages should mitigate many of the reported problems associated with voice communications. The problems that remain unaffected include error in addressing the intended recipient and messages whose content is wrong but are otherwise correct as to format and reasonableness.

  4. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  5. Wind power: Addressing wildlife impacts, assessing effects on tourism, and examining the link between climate change perceptions and support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Meredith Blaydes

    As the world's most rapidly growing source of energy, wind power has vast potential for mitigating climate change and advancing global environmental sustainability. Yet, the challenges facing wind energy remain both complex and substantial. Two such challenges are: 1) wildlife impacts; and 2) perceived negative effects on tourism. This dissertation examines these challenges in a multi-paper format, and also investigates the role that climate change perceptions play in garnering public support for wind power. The first paper assesses optimal approaches for addressing wind power's wildlife impacts. Comparative analysis reveals that avian mortality from turbines ranks far behind avian mortality from a number of other anthropogenic sources. Additionally, although bats have recently emerged as more vulnerable to wind turbines than birds, they are generally less federally protected. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) protects over 800 bird species, regardless of their threatened or endangered status. Moreover, it criminalizes the incidental take of birds without a permit and simultaneously grants no permits for such incidental take, thereby creating a legal conundrum for the wind industry. An examination of the legislative and case history of the MBTA, however, reveals that wind operators are not likely to be prosecuted for incidental take if they cooperate with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) and take reasonable steps to reduce siting and operational impacts. Furthermore, this study's analysis reveals modest wildlife impacts from wind power, in comparison with numerous other energy sources. Scientific-research, legal, and policy recommendations are provided to update the present legal and regulatory regime under the MBTA and to minimize avian and bat impacts. For instance, FWS should: establish comprehensive federal guidelines for wind facility siting, permitting, monitoring, and mitigation; and promulgate regulations under the MBTA for the issuance of

  6. Attention enhancing effects of methylphenidate are age-dependent.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shevon E; Shumsky, Jed S; Waterhouse, Barry D

    2015-01-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin®) is used to treat a variety of cognitive disorders. MPH is also popular among healthy individuals, including the elderly, for its ability to focus attention and improve concentration, but these effects have not been shown to be comparable between aged and adult subjects. Thus, we tested whether MPH would improve performance in sustained attention in both adult and aged rats. In addition, we tested the impact of visual distraction on performance in this task and the ability of MPH to mitigate the effects of distraction. Adult (6-12 months) and aged (18-22 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats were given oral MPH, and their cognitive and motor abilities were tested. Results suggest that while MPH improves task performance in adults; there is no improvement in the aged animals. These outcomes suggest that the use of MPH for cognitive enhancement in elderly individuals may be ineffective.

  7. Effects of aging and education on false memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the recall and recognition of the studied word and nonstudied lures. A low education level had a negative effect on memory performance for both young and middle-aged adults. Older adults with a high level of education had a higher level of false memory than those with a lower education level. The results of this study are discussed in terms of the importance of education on false memory and mechanisms that create false memory of words in older adults.

  8. Erythrocyte cation transport and age: effects of digoxin and furosemide

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Copeland, S.; McDevitt, D.G.

    1983-08-01

    The uptake of rubidium 86 (/sup 86/Rb) by human erythrocytes was measured at various ages. Effects of digoxin and furosemide on this process were examined and, in the case of digoxin, related to its numbers of specific cellular binding sites. There were no significant effects of age on absolute cellular Rb uptake, digoxin-sensitive Rb uptake, or numbers of cellular binding sites for digoxin, but the ability of digoxin to inhibit digoxin-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake increased with age. The ability of furosemide to inhibit digoxin-insensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake did not change with age. Results suggest a dynamic contribution to altered sensitivity to digoxin in elderly persons.

  9. Age effects on atrophy rates of entorhinal cortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Chao, Linda L.; Kornak, John; Jagust, William J.; Kramer, Joel H.; Reed, Bruce R.; Miller, Bruce L.; Norman, David; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of age, subcortical vascular disease, apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 allele and hypertension on entorhinal cortex (ERC) and hippocampal atrophy rates were explored in a longitudinal MRI study with 42 cognitively normal (CN) elderly subjects from 58 to 87 years old. The volumes of the ERC, hippocampus, and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and the presence of lacunes were assessed on MR images. Age was significantly associated with increased atrophy rates of 0.04 ± 0.02% per year for ERC and 0.05 ± 0.02% per year for hippocampus. Atrophy rates of hippocampus, but not that of ERC increased with presence of lacunes, in addition to age. WMH, APOE ɛ4 and hypertension had no significant effect on atrophy rates. In conclusion, age and presence of lacunes should be taken into consideration in imaging studies of CN subjects and AD patients to predict AD progression and assess the response to treatment trials. PMID:15961190

  10. The effect of chrome adhesion layer on quartz resonator aging.

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony

    2011-03-01

    This SAND report documents a late start LDRD designed to determine the possible aging effects of a quartz resonator gold adhesion layer. Sandia uses quartz resonators for applications. These applications require a very stable frequency source with excellent aging (low drift) characteristics. These parts are manufactured by one of our qualified vendors outside Sandia Laboratories, Statek Corp. Over the years we, Sandia and the vendor, have seen aging variations that have not been completely explained by the typical mechanisms known in the industry. One theory was that the resonator metallization may be contributing to the resonator aging. This LDRD would allow us to test and analyze a group of resonators with known differentiating metallization and via accelerated aging determine if a chrome adhesion layer used to accept the final gold plating may contribute to poor aging. We worked with our main vendor to design and manufacture a set of quartz resonators with a wide range of metallization thickness ratios between the chrome and gold that will allow us determine the cause of this aging and which plating thickness ratios provide the best aging performance while not degrading other key characteristics.

  11. Is age really cruel to experts? Compensatory effects of activity.

    PubMed

    Vaci, Nemanja; Gula, Bartosz; Bilalić, Merim

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline may not be as pronounced in complex activities as it is in basic cognitive processes, but ability deterioration with age is difficult to deny. However, studies disagree on whether age is kinder to more able people than it is to their less able peers. In this article, we investigated the "age is kinder to the more able" hypothesis by using a chess database that contains activity records for both beginners and world-class players. The descriptive data suggested that the skill function across age captures the 3 phases as described in Simonton's model of career trajectories: initial rise to the peak of performance, postpeak decline, and eventual stabilization of decline. We therefore modeled the data with a linear mixed-effect model using the cubic function that captures 3 phases. The results show that age may be kind to the more able in a subtler manner than has previously been assumed. After reaching the peak at around 38 years, the more able players deteriorated more quickly. Their decline, however, started to slow down at around 52 years, earlier than for less able players (57 years). Both the decline and its stabilization were significantly influenced by activity. The more players engaged in playing tournaments, the less they declined and the earlier they started to stabilize. The best experts may not be immune to aging, but their previously acquired expertise and current activity enable them to maintain high levels of skill even at an advanced age.

  12. Aging Effects on Regional Brain Structural Changes in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nenadić, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Smesny, Stefan; Gaser, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although mostly conceptualized as a neurodevelopmental disorder, there is an increasing interest in progressive changes of cognitive deficits and brain structure and function in schizophrenia across the life span. Methods: In this study, we investigated age-related changes in regional gray matter using voxel-based morphometry in a sample of 99 patients (age range 18–65 years) with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV schizophrenia and 113 healthy controls (age range 19–59 years) using a cross-sectional design. Results: We found steeper age-related decline in gray matter in patients in a cluster comprising the left superior temporal cortex and adjacent inferior parietal lobule. We then divided the schizophrenia sample in 3 subgroups based on a 3-factor model of psychopathology ratings. Age-related changes were markedly different in each of the 3 subgroups (compared with healthy controls). While patients with predominantly paranoid symptoms showed stronger age-related progression in the left superior temporal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus, those of the disorganized subgroup had stronger gray matter loss in the left lateral cerebellum, while the predominantly negative subgroup showed minor effects in the left superior temporal gyrus. Conclusions: Our findings show that differences in brain structural changes associated with aging diverge between schizophrenia patients and healthy subjects and that different subgroups within a patient sample might be at higher risk of age-related regional gray matter loss. PMID:21296908

  13. Anti-aging effects of guanosine in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-12-01

    Guanosine, a guanine-based purine, has been shown to exert beneficial roles in in vitro and in vivo injury models of neural cells. Guanosine is released from astrocytes and modulates important astroglial functions, including glutamatergic metabolism, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Astrocytes are crucial for regulating the neurotransmitter system and synaptic information processes, ionic homeostasis, energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses, and the inflammatory response. Aging is a natural process that induces numerous changes in the astrocyte functionality. Thus, the search for molecules able to reduce the glial dysfunction associated with aging may represent an approach for avoiding the onset of age-related neurological diseases. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-aging effects of guanosine, using primary astrocyte cultures from newborn, adult, and aged Wistar rats. Concomitantly, we evaluated the role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in guanosine-mediated glioprotection. We observed age-dependent changes in glutamate uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, the glutathione (GSH) system, pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β)) release, and the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor kB (NFkB), which were prevented by guanosine in an HO-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest guanosine to be a promising therapeutic agent able to provide glioprotection during the aging process. Thus, this study contributes to the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of guanosine in the aging process.

  14. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Ageing Kidney.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cui-Lan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Sun, Chen; Huang, Yong; Jin, Sheng; Mu, Xue-Pan; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The study aimed to examine whether hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation changed in the kidney of the ageing mouse and its relationship with impaired kidney function. Results. H2S levels in the plasma, urine, and kidney decreased significantly in ageing mice. The expression of two known H2S-producing enzymes in kidney, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), decreased significantly during ageing. Chronic H2S donor (NaHS, 50 μmol/kg/day, 10 weeks) treatment could alleviate oxidative stress levels and renal tubular interstitial collagen deposition. These protective effects may relate to transcription factor Nrf2 activation and antioxidant proteins such as HO-1, SIRT1, SOD1, and SOD2 expression upregulation in the ageing kidney after NaHS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of H2S-producing enzymes changed with exogenous H2S administration and contributed to elevated H2S levels in the ageing kidney. Conclusions. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in the ageing kidney is insufficient. Exogenous H2S can partially rescue ageing-related kidney dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress, decreasing collagen deposition, and enhancing Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Recovery of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production may also contribute to the beneficial effects of NaHS treatment.

  15. Effects of long-term atorvastatin treatment on cardiac aging

    PubMed Central

    HAN, LEI; LI, MINGGAO; LIU, XIN

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that atorvastatin (AVT) may have an important role in the delay of cardiac aging. However, the mechanism by which AVT affects cardiac aging has not been established. In this study, a series of experiments were performed to investigate the effects of AVT treatment on the cardiovascular system and the associated mechanism. Wistar rats were administered AVT or saline for 4 months. Age-related changes in the hearts were measured at the end of the experiment. The results showed that compared with young rats, the aged rats had significant changes indicative of myocardial aging, including increased blood lipid 1evelss, increased body weight, cardiac hypertrophy, larger myocardial cells, irregular muscle fibers, fewer deeply stained nuclei, smaller intercellular spaces, a larger number of apoptotic cells and increased levels of lipofuscin in myocardial tissue. However, long-term AVT treatment was able to significantly delay or even reverse these aging-related changes. In addition, these effects showed a certain dose-dependence. In general, long-term AVT treatment reduces blood lipids, inhibits cardiac hypertrophy, suppresses cardiomyocyte apoptosis and lowers the level of oxidative stress to protect the heart from aging. PMID:24137254

  16. Differential effects of young maternal age on child growth

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Soo Hyun; Mason, John; Crum, Jennifer; Cappa, Claudia; Hotchkiss, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of early maternal birthing age with smaller children has been widely observed. However, it is unclear if this is due to confounding by factors such as socioeconomic status, or the age at which child growth restriction first occurs. Objective To examine the effect of early maternal birthing age on the first-born child's height-for-age in a sample of developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Design Cross-sectional data from Demographic Health Surveys from 18 countries were used, to select the first-born child of mothers aged 15–24 years and a range of potential confounding factors, including maternal height. Child length/height-for-age z-scores (HAZs) was estimated in age bands of 0–11, 12–23, 24–35, 36–47, and 48–59 months; HAZ was first compared between maternal age groups of 15–17, 18–19, and 20–24 years. Results 1) There were significant bivariate associations between low child HAZ and young maternal age (71 of 180 possible cases; at p<0.10), but the majority of these did not persist when controlling for confounders (41 cases, 23% of the 180). 2) For children <12 months, when controlling for confounders, three out of seven Asian countries showed a significant association between lower infant HAZ and low maternal age, as did six out of nine African countries (15–17 or 15–19 years vs. the older group). 3) The association (adjusted) continued after 24 months in 12 of the 18 countries, in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. 4) The stunting differences for children between maternal age groups were around 9 percentage points (ppts) in Asia, 14 ppts in Africa, and 10 ppts in Latin America. These data do not show whether this is due to, for example, socioeconomic factors that were not included, an emerging effect of intrauterine growth restriction, or the child feeding or caring behaviors of young mothers. The latter is considered to be the most likely. Conclusions The effect of low maternal age on child height

  17. Differential effects of young maternal age on child growth.

    PubMed

    Yu, Soo Hyun; Mason, John; Crum, Jennifer; Cappa, Claudia; Hotchkiss, David R

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of early maternal birthing age with smaller children has been widely observed. However, it is unclear if this is due to confounding by factors such as socioeconomic status, or the age at which child growth restriction first occurs. Objective To examine the effect of early maternal birthing age on the first-born child's height-for-age in a sample of developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Design Cross-sectional data from Demographic Health Surveys from 18 countries were used, to select the first-born child of mothers aged 15-24 years and a range of potential confounding factors, including maternal height. Child length/height-for-age z-scores (HAZs) was estimated in age bands of 0-11, 12-23, 24-35, 36-47, and 48-59 months; HAZ was first compared between maternal age groups of 15-17, 18-19, and 20-24 years. Results 1) There were significant bivariate associations between low child HAZ and young maternal age (71 of 180 possible cases; at p<0.10), but the majority of these did not persist when controlling for confounders (41 cases, 23% of the 180). 2) For children <12 months, when controlling for confounders, three out of seven Asian countries showed a significant association between lower infant HAZ and low maternal age, as did six out of nine African countries (15-17 or 15-19 years vs. the older group). 3) The association (adjusted) continued after 24 months in 12 of the 18 countries, in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. 4) The stunting differences for children between maternal age groups were around 9 percentage points (ppts) in Asia, 14 ppts in Africa, and 10 ppts in Latin America. These data do not show whether this is due to, for example, socioeconomic factors that were not included, an emerging effect of intrauterine growth restriction, or the child feeding or caring behaviors of young mothers. The latter is considered to be the most likely. Conclusions The effect of low maternal age on child height restriction from 0 to

  18. Anti-aging effects of anti-lipolytic drugs.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessio; Cavallini, Gabriella; Carresi, Cristiano; Gori, Zina; Parentini, Ilaria; Bergamini, Ettore

    2004-07-01

    Genetic disruption of insulin and insulin-like signaling pathways may extend lifespan. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance may accelerate aging. The hypothesis was tested that a once-a-week life-long inhibition of insulin secretion by the administration of anti-lipolytic drugs might have anti-aging effects. Groups of 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were (a) given standard laboratory food ad libitum (AL); (b) fed AL 6 days and fasted 1 day every week (FW); (c) fed AL every other day (EOD), (d) fed like FW and given Acipimox (50 mg/kg b.w.) on the day of fasting (FWA) by the gastric tube. The AL, FW and EOD groups received saline intragastrically. Treatment with ACIPIMOX transiently decreased plasma free fatty acids, glucose and insulin and increased valine plasma levels, and had no long-term effect on food consumption and body weight. By age 6, 12 and 24 months subgroups were taken and the age-related changes in liver dolichol and autophagic proteolysis--which are correlated with life-expectancy--were measured. Liver dolichol levels increased and autophagic proteolysis decreased in mature and older AL rats; EOD and FWA fully counteracted these changes; FW rats had significant but smaller beneficial effects. It is concluded that life-long weekly-repeated transient inhibition of insulin secretion by antilipolytic drugs may have an anti-aging effect, additive to the anti-aging effect of a milder caloric restriction. Speculation is that transiently lower plasma insulin levels might stimulate the anti-aging cell-repair mechanism autophagy, which has longer lasting effects on cell housekeeping.

  19. The Relative Age Effect in Elite Sport: The French Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delorme, Nicolas; Boiche, Julie; Raspaud, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) is considered a common phenomenon in elite sport. However, it has not been examined systematically in previous research, and the mechanisms likely to generate or to limit such an effect are little understood. This paper investigates the prevalence of the RAE in French professional championship-level players, taking…

  20. Factors buffering against the effects of job demands: how does age matter?

    PubMed

    Besen, Elyssa; Matz-Costa, Christina; James, Jacquelyn B; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie

    2015-02-01

    Given the increasing role that paid work is likely to play in older adulthood in the coming decades, the goal of this study was to understand the circumstances under which work is related to mental health for older adults and whether these circumstances differ by age. Using a multiworksite sample of 1,812 U.S. workers age 18 to 81, we use the life-span theory of control to hypothesize that older and younger workers may benefit differentially from job and personal control in the context of high job demands. Results suggest that for younger workers with high personal control, job control buffers the impact of job demands on mental health. For older workers, personal control alone buffers the impact of job demands on mental health. This study adds to previous research by addressing how the factors thought to buffer against the effects of job demands differ cross-sectionally by age.

  1. Evidence of aging effects on certain safety-related components

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Atwood, C.L.; MacDonald, P.E.; Edson, J.L.; Bramwell, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    In response to interest shown by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Principal Working Group I (PWG- 1) of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) conducted a generic study on the effects of aging of active components in nuclear power plants. (This focus on active components is consistent with PWG-l`s mandate; passive components are primarily within the mandate of PWG-3.) Representatives from France, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom participated in the study by submitting reports documenting aging studies performed in their countries. This report consists of summaries of those reports, along with a comparison of the various statistical analysis methods used in the studies. The studies indicate that with some exceptions, active components generally do not present a significant aging problem in nuclear power plants. Design criteria and effective preventative maintenance programs, including timely replacement of components, are effective in mitigating potential aging problems. However, aging studies (such as qualitative and statistical analyses of failure modes and maintenance data) are an important part of efforts to identify and solve potential aging problems. Solving these problems typically includes such strategies as replacing suspect components with improved components, and implementing improved maintenance programs.

  2. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and

  3. Effects of aging prior to freezing on poultry meat tenderness.

    PubMed

    Thielke, S; Lhafi, S K; Kühne, M

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of aging prior to deboning and deep-freezing on the tenderness of cooked broiler breast fillets. Broilers (Ross-208) that were 37 and 38 d old were slaughtered in a licensed poultry meat plant. After spray chilling, carcasses with BW between 1,080 and 1,300 g were selected for the study and transported to a chilling room (2 to 4 degrees C). The whole carcasses were aged for up to 24 h. During the aging process, continuous measurements were made of pH values, electric conductivity, and firmness of the raw fillets. After the aging process, the carcasses were deboned, and the breast fillets were immediately frozen to an internal temperature of -20 degrees C. Tenderness was measured both mechanically with a Warner-Bratzler shear force device and by sensory testing. The ultimate pH values in the fillets were reached during the first 5 h of aging. Electric conductivity increased during the whole aging period. During the first hours of aging, firmness increased significantly, corresponding with the onset of rigor mortis. After between 8 and 9 h of aging, firmness decreased significantly. Shear force values of aged fillets also changed significantly; the highest values were found at the beginning of aging, which then decreased from the sixth hour. The results of the instrumental tenderness measurements were confirmed by the sensory evaluations. Implementation of in-plant measurements of firmness, thus, seemed to be useful in predicting the sensory quality of poultry meat.

  4. Effects of aging on eye movements in the real world

    PubMed Central

    Dowiasch, Stefan; Marx, Svenja; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Bremmer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging on eye movements are well studied in the laboratory. Increased saccade latencies or decreased smooth-pursuit gain are well established findings. The question remains whether these findings are influenced by the rather untypical environment of a laboratory; that is, whether or not they transfer to the real world. We measured 34 healthy participants between the age of 25 and 85 during two everyday tasks in the real world: (I) walking down a hallway with free gaze, (II) visual tracking of an earth-fixed object while walking straight-ahead. Eye movements were recorded with a mobile light-weight eye tracker, the EyeSeeCam (ESC). We find that age significantly influences saccade parameters. With increasing age, saccade frequency, amplitude, peak velocity, and mean velocity are reduced and the velocity/amplitude distribution as well as the velocity profile become less skewed. In contrast to laboratory results on smooth pursuit, we did not find a significant effect of age on tracking eye-movements in the real world. Taken together, age-related eye-movement changes as measured in the laboratory only partly resemble those in the real world. It is well-conceivable that in the real world additional sensory cues, such as head-movement or vestibular signals, may partially compensate for age-related effects, which, according to this view, would be specific to early motion processing. In any case, our results highlight the importance of validity for natural situations when studying the impact of aging on real-life performance. PMID:25713524

  5. Effects of aging on eye movements in the real world.

    PubMed

    Dowiasch, Stefan; Marx, Svenja; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Bremmer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging on eye movements are well studied in the laboratory. Increased saccade latencies or decreased smooth-pursuit gain are well established findings. The question remains whether these findings are influenced by the rather untypical environment of a laboratory; that is, whether or not they transfer to the real world. We measured 34 healthy participants between the age of 25 and 85 during two everyday tasks in the real world: (I) walking down a hallway with free gaze, (II) visual tracking of an earth-fixed object while walking straight-ahead. Eye movements were recorded with a mobile light-weight eye tracker, the EyeSeeCam (ESC). We find that age significantly influences saccade parameters. With increasing age, saccade frequency, amplitude, peak velocity, and mean velocity are reduced and the velocity/amplitude distribution as well as the velocity profile become less skewed. In contrast to laboratory results on smooth pursuit, we did not find a significant effect of age on tracking eye-movements in the real world. Taken together, age-related eye-movement changes as measured in the laboratory only partly resemble those in the real world. It is well-conceivable that in the real world additional sensory cues, such as head-movement or vestibular signals, may partially compensate for age-related effects, which, according to this view, would be specific to early motion processing. In any case, our results highlight the importance of validity for natural situations when studying the impact of aging on real-life performance.

  6. No effect of testosterone on behavior in aged Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Borbélyová, Veronika; Domonkos, Emese; Bábíčková, Janka; Tóthová, Ľubomíra; Bosý, Martin; Hodosy, Július; Celec, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In men, aging is accompanied by a gradual decline in androgen secretion. Studies suggest beneficial effects of endogenous and exogenous testosterone on affective behavior and cognitive functions. The aim of this study was to describe behavioral and cognitive sex differences and to analyze the effects of long-term androgen deficiency in aged male rats. Thirty-months old rats divided into three groups (males, females and males gonadectomized as young adults) underwent a battery of behavioral tests assessing locomotor activity, anxiety, memory, anhedonia, sociability and depression-like behavior. No major effect of gonadectomy was found in any of the analyzed behavioral measures in male rats. The only consistent sex difference was confirmed in depression-like behavior with longer immobility time observed in males. In an interventional experiment, a single dose of testosterone had no effect on gonadectomized male and female rats in the forced swim test. In contrast to previous studies this comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of aged rats revealed no major role of endogenous testosterone. Based on our results long-term hypogonadism does not alter the behavior of aged male rats, neither does acute testosterone treatment. Whether these findings have any consequences on androgen replacement therapy in aged men remains to be elucidated. PMID:27852981

  7. Psychophysical estimation of speed discrimination. II. Aging effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuram, Aparna; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan; Khanna, Ritu

    2005-10-01

    We studied the effects of aging on a speed discrimination task using a pair of first-order drifting luminance gratings. Two reference speeds of 2 and 8 deg/s were presented at stimulus durations of 500 ms and 1000 ms. The choice of stimulus parameters, etc., was determined in preliminary experiments and described in Part I. Thresholds were estimated using a two-alternative-forced-choice staircase methodology. Data were collected from 16 younger subjects (mean age 24 years) and 17 older subjects (mean age 71 years). Results showed that thresholds for speed discrimination were higher for the older age group. This was especially true at stimulus duration of 500 ms for both slower and faster speeds. This could be attributed to differences in temporal integration of speed with age. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were not statistically observed to mediate age differences in the speed discrimination thresholds. Gender differences were observed in the older age group, with older women having higher thresholds.

  8. Psychophysical estimation of speed discrimination. II. Aging effects.

    PubMed

    Raghuram, Aparna; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan; Khanna, Ritu

    2005-10-01

    We studied the effects of aging on a speed discrimination task using a pair of first-order drifting luminance gratings. Two reference speeds of 2 and 8 deg/s were presented at stimulus durations of 500 ms and 1000 ms. The choice of stimulus parameters, etc., was determined in preliminary experiments and described in Part I. Thresholds were estimated using a two-alternative-forced-choice staircase methodology. Data were collected from 16 younger subjects (mean age 24 years) and 17 older subjects (mean age 71 years). Results showed that thresholds for speed discrimination were higher for the older age group. This was especially true at stimulus duration of 500 ms for both slower and faster speeds. This could be attributed to differences in temporal integration of speed with age. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were not statistically observed to mediate age differences in the speed discrimination thresholds. Gender differences were observed in the older age group, with older women having higher thresholds.

  9. Effect of NCAM on aged-related deterioration in vision.

    PubMed

    Luke, Margaret Po-Shan; LeVatte, Terry L; O'Reilly, Amanda M; Smith, Benjamin J; Tremblay, François; Brown, Richard E; Clarke, David B

    2016-05-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is involved in developmental processes and age-associated cognitive decline; however, little is known concerning the effects of NCAM in the visual system during aging. Using anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays, we analyzed age-related changes in visual function of NCAM deficient (-/-) and wild-type mice. Anatomical analyses indicated that aging NCAM -/- mice had fewer retinal ganglion cells, thinner retinas, and fewer photoreceptor cell layers than age-matched controls. Electroretinogram testing of retinal function in young adult NCAM -/- mice showed a 2-fold increase in a- and b-wave amplitude compared with wild-type mice, but the retinal activity dropped dramatically to control levels when the animals reached 10 months. In behavioral tasks, NCAM -/- mice had no visual pattern discrimination ability and showed premature loss of vision as they aged. Together, these findings demonstrate that NCAM plays significant roles in the adult visual system in establishing normal retinal anatomy, physiology and function, and in maintaining vision during aging.

  10. The Effects of Aging on Researchers' Publication and Citation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Yves; Larivière, Vincent; Macaluso, Benoît; Robitaille, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The average age at which U.S. researchers receive their first grant from NIH has increased from 34.3 in 1970, to 41.7 in 2004. These data raise the crucial question of the effects of aging on the scientific productivity and impact of researchers. Drawing on a sizeable sample of 6,388 university professors in Quebec who have published at least one paper between 2000 and 2007, our results identify two turning points in the professors' careers. A first turning point is visible at age 40 years, where researchers start to rely on older literature and where their productivity increases at a slower pace—after having increased sharply since the beginning of their career. A second turning point can be seen around age 50, when researchers are the most productive whereas their average scientific impact is at its lowest. Our results also show that older professors publish fewer first-authored papers and move closer to the end of the list of co-authors. Although average scientific impact per paper decreases linearly until about age 50, the average number of papers in highly cited journals and among highly cited papers rises continuously until retirement. Our results show clearly that productivity and impact are not a simple and declining function of age and that we must take into account the collaborative aspects of scientific research. Science is a collective endeavor and, as our data shows, researchers of all ages play a significant role in its dynamic. PMID:19112502

  11. The effect of aging on the cutaneous microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Bentov, Itay; Reed, May J

    2015-07-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive loss of function in all organs. Under normal conditions the physiologic compensation for age-related deficits is sufficient, but during times of stress the limitations of this reserve become evident. Explanations for this reduction in reserve include the changes in the microcirculation that occur during the normal aging process. The microcirculation is defined as the blood flow through arterioles, capillaries and venules, which are the smallest vessels in the vasculature and are embedded within organs and tissues. Optimal strategies to maintain the microvasculature following surgery and other stressors must use multifactorial approaches. Using skin as the model organ, we will review the anatomical and functional changes in the microcirculation with aging, and some of the available clinical strategies to potentially mitigate the effect of these changes on important clinical outcomes.

  12. Effect of Antioxidants Supplementation on Aging and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    If aging is due to or contributed by free radical reactions, as postulated by the free radical theory of aging, lifespan of organisms should be extended by administration of exogenous antioxidants. This paper reviews data on model organisms concerning the effects of exogenous antioxidants (antioxidant vitamins, lipoic acid, coenzyme Q, melatonin, resveratrol, curcumin, other polyphenols, and synthetic antioxidants including antioxidant nanoparticles) on the lifespan of model organisms. Mechanisms of effects of antioxidants, often due to indirect antioxidant action or to action not related to the antioxidant properties of the compounds administered, are discussed. The legitimacy of antioxidant supplementation in human is considered. PMID:24783202

  13. Aging effects in the nonequilibrium behavior of multilayer magnetic superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Purtov, A. N.; Mamonova, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    A numerical Monte Carlo study of the nonequilibrium behavior of multilayer magnetic superstructures consisting of alternating magnetic and nonmagnetic nanolayers is performed. The calculated two-time autocorrelation function and the staggered magnetization of the structure at its evolution starting from various initial states are analyzed. The analysis reveals aging effects characterized by a slowing down of the relaxation and correlation characteristics in the system with the waiting time. It is shown that, in contrast to bulk magnetic systems, the aging effects in magnetic superstructures arise not only near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature T c in the films but also within a wide temperature range at T ≤ T c.

  14. The effect of normal aging and age-related macular degeneration on perceptual learning

    PubMed Central

    Astle, Andrew T.; Blighe, Alan J.; Webb, Ben S.; McGraw, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether perceptual learning could be used to improve peripheral word identification speed. The relationship between the magnitude of learning and age was established in normal participants to determine whether perceptual learning effects are age invariant. We then investigated whether training could lead to improvements in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Twenty-eight participants with normal vision and five participants with AMD trained on a word identification task. They were required to identify three-letter words, presented 10° from fixation. To standardize crowding across each of the letters that made up the word, words were flanked laterally by randomly chosen letters. Word identification performance was measured psychophysically using a staircase procedure. Significant improvements in peripheral word identification speed were demonstrated following training (71% ± 18%). Initial task performance was correlated with age, with older participants having poorer performance. However, older adults learned more rapidly such that, following training, they reached the same level of performance as their younger counterparts. As a function of number of trials completed, patients with AMD learned at an equivalent rate as age-matched participants with normal vision. Improvements in word identification speed were maintained at least 6 months after training. We have demonstrated that temporal aspects of word recognition can be improved in peripheral vision with training across a range of ages and these learned improvements are relatively enduring. However, training targeted at other bottlenecks to peripheral reading ability, such as visual crowding, may need to be incorporated to optimize this approach. PMID:26605694

  15. Human Health and the Biological Effects of Tritium in Drinking Water: Prudent Policy Through Science - Addressing the ODWAC New Recommendation.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, S; Mills, C E; Phan, N; Taylor, K; Boreham, D R

    2011-02-22

    Tritium is a radioactive form of hydrogen and is a by-product of energy production in Canadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The release of this radioisotope into the environment is carefully managed at CANDU facilities in order to minimize radiation exposure to the public. However, under some circumstances, small accidental releases to the environment can occur. The radiation doses to humans and non-human biota from these releases are low and orders of magnitude less than doses received from naturally occurring radioisotopes or from manmade activities, such as medical imaging and air travel. There is however a renewed interest in the biological consequences of low dose tritium exposures and a new limit for tritium levels in Ontario drinking water has been proposed. The Ontario Drinking Water Advisory Council (ODWAC) issued a formal report in May 2009 in response to a request by the Minister of the Environment, concluding that the Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard for tritium should be revised from the current 7,000 Bq/L level to a new, lower 20 Bq/L level. In response to this recommendation, an international scientific symposium was held at McMaster University to address the issues surrounding this change in direction and the validity of a new policy. Scientists, regulators, government officials, and industrial stakeholders were present to discuss the potential health risks associated with low level radiation exposure from tritium. The regulatory, economic, and social implications of the new proposed limit were also considered.The new recommendation assumed a linear-no-threshold model to calculate carcinogenic risk associated with tritium exposure, and considered tritium as a non-threshold chemical carcinogen. Both of these assumptions are highly controversial given that recent research suggests that low dose exposures have thresholds below which there are no observable detrimental effects. Furthermore, mutagenic and carcinogenic risk calculated from

  16. Spatial Frequency Discrimination: Effects of Age, Reward, and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Judith Carolien

    2017-01-01

    Social interaction starts with perception of the world around you. This study investigated two fundamental issues regarding the development of discrimination of higher spatial frequencies, which are important building blocks of perception. Firstly, it mapped the typical developmental trajectory of higher spatial frequency discrimination. Secondly, it developed and validated a novel design that could be applied to improve atypically developed vision. Specifically, this study examined the effect of age and reward on task performance, practice effects, and motivation (i.e., number of trials completed) in a higher spatial frequency (reference frequency: 6 cycles per degree) discrimination task. We measured discrimination thresholds in children aged between 7 to 12 years and adults (N = 135). Reward was manipulated by presenting either positive reinforcement or punishment. Results showed a decrease in discrimination thresholds with age, thus revealing that higher spatial frequency discrimination continues to develop after 12 years of age. This development continues longer than previously shown for discrimination of lower spatial frequencies. Moreover, thresholds decreased during the run, indicating that discrimination abilities improved. Reward did not affect performance or improvement. However, in an additional group of 5–6 year-olds (N = 28) punishments resulted in the completion of fewer trials compared to reinforcements. In both reward conditions children aged 5–6 years completed only a fourth or half of the run (64 to 128 out of 254 trials) and were not motivated to continue. The design thus needs further adaptation before it can be applied to this age group. Children aged 7–12 years and adults completed the run, suggesting that the design is successful and motivating for children aged 7–12 years. This study thus presents developmental differences in higher spatial frequency discrimination thresholds. Furthermore, it presents a design that can be used in

  17. Spatial Frequency Discrimination: Effects of Age, Reward, and Practice.

    PubMed

    van den Boomen, Carlijn; Peters, Judith Carolien

    2017-01-01

    Social interaction starts with perception of the world around you. This study investigated two fundamental issues regarding the development of discrimination of higher spatial frequencies, which are important building blocks of perception. Firstly, it mapped the typical developmental trajectory of higher spatial frequency discrimination. Secondly, it developed and validated a novel design that could be applied to improve atypically developed vision. Specifically, this study examined the effect of age and reward on task performance, practice effects, and motivation (i.e., number of trials completed) in a higher spatial frequency (reference frequency: 6 cycles per degree) discrimination task. We measured discrimination thresholds in children aged between 7 to 12 years and adults (N = 135). Reward was manipulated by presenting either positive reinforcement or punishment. Results showed a decrease in discrimination thresholds with age, thus revealing that higher spatial frequency discrimination continues to develop after 12 years of age. This development continues longer than previously shown for discrimination of lower spatial frequencies. Moreover, thresholds decreased during the run, indicating that discrimination abilities improved. Reward did not affect performance or improvement. However, in an additional group of 5-6 year-olds (N = 28) punishments resulted in the completion of fewer trials compared to reinforcements. In both reward conditions children aged 5-6 years completed only a fourth or half of the run (64 to 128 out of 254 trials) and were not motivated to continue. The design thus needs further adaptation before it can be applied to this age group. Children aged 7-12 years and adults completed the run, suggesting that the design is successful and motivating for children aged 7-12 years. This study thus presents developmental differences in higher spatial frequency discrimination thresholds. Furthermore, it presents a design that can be used in future

  18. Analysis of Ageing Effect on Li-Polymer Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Barcellona, Simone; Brenna, Morris; Foiadelli, Federica; Longo, Michela; Piegari, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a key technology for current and future energy storage in mobile and stationary application. In particular, they play an important role in the electrification of mobility and therefore the battery lifetime prediction is a fundamental aspect for successful market introduction. Numerous studies developed ageing models capable of predicting battery life span. Most of the previous works compared the effect of the ageing factors to a battery's cycle life. These cycles are identical, which is not the case for electric vehicles applications. Indeed, most of the available information is based on results from laboratory testing, under very controlled environments, and using ageing protocols, which may not correctly reflect the actual utilization. For this reason, it is important to link the effect of duty cycles with the ageing of the batteries. This paper proposes a simple method to investigate the effect of the duty cycle on the batteries lifetime through tests performed on different cells for different kinds of cycle. In this way, a generic complex cycle can be seen as a composition of elemental cycles by means of Rainflow procedures. Consequently, the ageing due to any cycle can be estimated starting from the knowledge of simpler cycles. PMID:26236775

  19. Analysis of Ageing Effect on Li-Polymer Batteries.

    PubMed

    Barcellona, Simone; Brenna, Morris; Foiadelli, Federica; Longo, Michela; Piegari, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a key technology for current and future energy storage in mobile and stationary application. In particular, they play an important role in the electrification of mobility and therefore the battery lifetime prediction is a fundamental aspect for successful market introduction. Numerous studies developed ageing models capable of predicting battery life span. Most of the previous works compared the effect of the ageing factors to a battery's cycle life. These cycles are identical, which is not the case for electric vehicles applications. Indeed, most of the available information is based on results from laboratory testing, under very controlled environments, and using ageing protocols, which may not correctly reflect the actual utilization. For this reason, it is important to link the effect of duty cycles with the ageing of the batteries. This paper proposes a simple method to investigate the effect of the duty cycle on the batteries lifetime through tests performed on different cells for different kinds of cycle. In this way, a generic complex cycle can be seen as a composition of elemental cycles by means of Rainflow procedures. Consequently, the ageing due to any cycle can be estimated starting from the knowledge of simpler cycles.

  20. Effects of age and sex on olanzapine plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ulrike; Marksteiner, Josef; Kemmler, Georg; Saria, Alois; Aichhorn, Wolfgang

    2005-12-01

    Age and sex may influence both efficacy and side effects of second-generation antipsychotics. Women and elderly patients tend to have a higher prevalence for several side effects. Higher plasma levels in these groups of patients may be one reason. We studied the hypothesis that steady-state olanzapine plasma concentrations depend on age and sex. Sixty-seven inpatients on stable olanzapine dose were referred to routine therapeutic drug monitoring of olanzapine. Plasma levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Obtained data were then analyzed by analysis of covariance. Olanzapine plasma levels showed a marked sex difference with significantly higher mean concentrations in female patients (adjusted mean concentrations, 18.5 ng/mL for men and 31.7 ng/mL for women; P = 0.003). On average, the weight-corrected concentration/dose ratios shown by women were 33.5% higher than those shown by men, irrespective of age. Regarding the effect of age, weight-corrected concentration/dose ratios increased by an average of 9.4% per decade of life. All results were adjusted for smoking. Comedication did not significantly influence these results. In conclusion, age and sex are important variables to consider when prescribing olanzapine for women and in the elderly.

  1. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to address nonlinear kinetics and changes in rodent physiology and metabolism due to aging and adaptation in deriving reference values for propylene glycol methyl ether and propylene glycol methyl ether acetate.

    SciTech Connect

    Kirman, C R.; Sweeney, Lisa M.; Corley, Rick A.; Gargas, M L.

    2005-04-01

    Reference values, including an oral reference dose (RfD) and an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), were derived for propylene glycol methyl ether (PGME), and an oral RfD was derived for its acetate (PGMEA). These values were based upon transient sedation observed in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice during a two-year inhalation study. The dose-response relationship for sedation was characterized using internal dose measures as predicted by a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for PGME and its acetate. PBPK modeling was used to account for changes in rodent physiology and metabolism due to aging and adaptation, based on data collected during weeks 1, 2, 26, 52, and 78 of a chronic inhalation study. The peak concentration of PGME in richly perfused tissues was selected as the most appropriate internal dose measure based upon a consideration of the mode of action for sedation and similarities in tissue partitioning between brain and other richly perfused tissues. Internal doses (peak tissue concentrations of PGME) were designated as either no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) or lowest-observed-adverse-effect levels (LOAELs) based upon the presence or absence of sedation at each time-point, species, and sex in the two year study. Distributions of the NOAEL and LOAEL values expressed in terms of internal dose were characterized using an arithmetic mean and standard deviation, with the mean internal NOAEL serving as the basis for the reference values, which was then divided by appropriate uncertainty factors. Where data were permitting, chemical-specific adjustment factors were derived to replace default uncertainty factor values of ten. Nonlinear kinetics are were predicted by the model in all species at PGME concentrations exceeding 100 ppm, which complicates interspecies and low-dose extrapolations. To address this complication, reference values were derived using two approaches which differ with respect to the order in which these extrapolations

  2. Effects of aging and working memory demands on prospective memory.

    PubMed

    West, Robert; Bowry, Ritvij

    2005-11-01

    The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine the effects of aging, increasing the working memory demands of the ongoing activity, and a prospective memory load on the neural correlates of prospective remembering and target recognition. The behavioral data revealed that the success of prospective memory was sensitive to working memory load in younger, but not older, adults and that a prospective memory load had a greater effect on the performance of older adults than that of younger adults. The ERP data revealed age-related differences in the neural correlates of the detection of prospective cues, post-retrieval processes that support prospective memory, and target recognition. Our results support the hypothesis that there are age-related differences in the ability to recruit preparatory attentional processes that underlie prospective memory, and demonstrate that younger and older adults may recruit somewhat different neural generators to support prospective memory and working memory.

  3. Moving beyond "Those Kids": Addressing Teacher Beliefs Regarding the Role of Culture within Effective Science Pedagogy for Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carla C.; Bolshakova, Virginia L. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on intensive work within a large, urban, low-performing middle school in the southwest to address and transform teacher beliefs regarding the role of culture within their science pedagogy. Given the recent, rapid growth of numbers of students from Hispanic/Latino(a) backgrounds in the United States, it is critical that a…

  4. Sex and Age Effects of Functional Connectivity in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Cahill, Nathan D.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; White, Tonya; Baum, Stefi A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Functional connectivity (FC) in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) is widely used to find coactivating regions in the human brain. Despite its widespread use, the effects of sex and age on resting FC are not well characterized, especially during early adulthood. Here we apply regression and graph theoretical analyses to explore the effects of sex and age on FC between the 116 AAL atlas parcellations (a total of 6670 FC measures). rs-fMRI data of 494 healthy subjects (203 males and 291 females; age range: 22–36 years) from the Human Connectome Project were analyzed. We report the following findings. (1) Males exhibited greater FC than females in 1352 FC measures (1025 survived Bonferroni correction; \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland, xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath, amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document} $$p < 7.49{ \\rm{E}} - 6$$ \\end{document}). In 641 FC measures, females exhibited greater FC than males but none survived Bonferroni correction. Significant FC differences were mainly present in frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes. Although the average FC values for males and females were significantly different, FC values of males and females exhibited large overlap. (2) Age effects were present only in 29 FC measures and all significant age effects showed higher FC in younger subjects. Age and sex differences of FC remained significant after controlling for cognitive measures. (3) Although sex \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland, xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath, amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document} $$\\times

  5. Effect of component aging on PWR control rod drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1992-01-01

    An aging assessment of PWR control rod drive (CRD) systems has been completed as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the Babcock Wilcox (B W), Combustion Engineering (CE), and Westinghouse (W) systems were evaluated to determine the potential for degradation as each system ages. Operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. This, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and operating environment, demonstrate that each design is subject to degradation, which if left unchecked, could affect its safety function as the plant ages. An industry survey, conducted with the assistance of EPRI and NUMARC, identified current CRD system maintenance and inspection practices. The results of this survey indicate that some plants have performed system modifications, replaced components, or augmented existing preventive maintenance practices in response to system aging. The survey results also supported the operating experience data, which concluded that the timely replacement of degraded components, prior to failure, was not always possible using existing condition monitoring techniques. The recommendations presented in this study also include a discussion of more advanced monitoring techniques, which provide trendable results capable of detecting aging.

  6. Effect of component aging on PWR control rod drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1992-06-01

    An aging assessment of PWR control rod drive (CRD) systems has been completed as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the Babcock & Wilcox (B & W), Combustion Engineering (CE), and Westinghouse (W) systems were evaluated to determine the potential for degradation as each system ages. Operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. This, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and operating environment, demonstrate that each design is subject to degradation, which if left unchecked, could affect its safety function as the plant ages. An industry survey, conducted with the assistance of EPRI and NUMARC, identified current CRD system maintenance and inspection practices. The results of this survey indicate that some plants have performed system modifications, replaced components, or augmented existing preventive maintenance practices in response to system aging. The survey results also supported the operating experience data, which concluded that the timely replacement of degraded components, prior to failure, was not always possible using existing condition monitoring techniques. The recommendations presented in this study also include a discussion of more advanced monitoring techniques, which provide trendable results capable of detecting aging.

  7. Effect of Physical Aging on Mechanical Behavior of an Elastomeric Glass under Combined Pressure and Temperature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER Technical Report No. 7 C.- 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Effect of Physical Aging on...Mechanical Behavior of an Elastomeric Glass Under Combined Pressure and Temperature G. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) S . CONTRACT OR GRANT...NUMBER( s ) K. Vijayan and K. D. Pae NOOO14-82-K-0608 9. PERFORMING r" GANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK High PrE 3,ure

  8. The Effects of Organizational Culture on Mental Health Service Engagement of Transition Age Youth.

    PubMed

    Kim, HyunSoo; Tracy, Elizabeth M; Biegel, David E; Min, Meeyoung O; Munson, Michelle R

    2015-10-01

    Nationwide, there is a growing concern in understanding mental health service engagement among transition age youth. The ecological perspective suggests that there are multiple barriers to service engagement which exist on varying levels of the ecosystem. Based on the socio-technical theory and organizational culture theory, this study examined the impact of organization-level characteristics on perceived service engagement and the moderating role of organizational culture on practitioner-level characteristics affecting youth service engagement. A cross-sectional survey research design was used to address the research questions. The data were collected from 279 practitioners from 27 mental health service organizations representing three major metropolitan areas in Ohio. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to address a nested structure. Findings revealed that location of organization, service setting, and organizational culture had significant effects on the continuation of services. In addition, the relationship between service coordination and resource knowledge and service engagement was moderated by organizational culture.

  9. Differential Age Effects on Spatial and Visual Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterman, Joukje M.; Morel, Sascha; Meijer, Lisette; Buvens, Cleo; Kessels, Roy P. C.; Postma, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The present study was intended to compare age effects on visual and spatial working memory by using two versions of the same task that differed only in presentation mode. The working memory task contained both a simultaneous and a sequential presentation mode condition, reflecting, respectively, visual and spatial working memory processes. Young…

  10. Aging Effect on Visual and Spatial Components of Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beigneux, Katia; Plaie, Thierry; Isingrini, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aging on the storage of visual and spatial working memory according to Logie's model of working memory (1995). In a first experiment young, elderly, and very old subjects carried out two tasks usually used to measure visual span (Visual Patterns Test) and spatial span (Corsi Block Tapping test).…

  11. Age Differences in Recollection: Specificity Effects at Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Lin; Craik, Fergus I. M.

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to examine the effect of specificity at retrieval on the size of age differences in recollection. Participants encoded words in different contexts and were given recognition tests. Some of the test lists were constructed so that participants had to recollect specific aspects of the initial encoding events, whereas…

  12. Aging, Neighborhood Attachment, and Fear of Crime: Testing Reciprocal Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Sangmoon

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to examine the reciprocal effects between fear of crime and neighborhood attachment because aging is a critical factor in both discussions of fear of crime and neighborhood attachment (friendship, neighboring, social cohesion and trust, informal social control, and participation in neighborhood watch program). Using data from…

  13. Effects of Aging and IQ on Item and Associative Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger; Thapar, Anjali; McKoon, Gail

    2011-01-01

    The effects of aging and IQ on performance were examined in 4 memory tasks: item recognition, associative recognition, cued recall, and free recall. For item and associative recognition, accuracy and the response time (RT) distributions for correct and error responses were explained by Ratcliff's (1978) diffusion model at the level of individual…

  14. Professor Age Affects Student Ratings: Halo Effect for Younger Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Janie H.; Beyer, Denise; Monteiro, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching provide valued information about teaching effectiveness, and studies support the reliability and validity of such measures. However, research also illustrates potential moderation of student perceptions based on teacher gender, attractiveness, and even age, although the latter receives little research attention. In…

  15. AGING-RELATED CARBARYL EFFECTS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid increase in older adults in the population highlights the importance ofunderstanding the role of aging in susceptibility to environmental contaminants. Aspart of a larger research program on life-stage susceptibility, this experiment determined the effect of the carbama...

  16. Hypertext for the Aged: Effects of Text Topologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Dyi-Yih Michael

    2003-01-01

    Examined the effects of different text typologies on older users' (age 57-67) performance in hypertext perusal. Compared two text typologies, hierarchical and referential, that were constructed with HTML, and discusses hypertext navigation problems with older users related to human spatial orientation. (Author/LRW)

  17. Age-of-Acquisition Effects in Word and Picture Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhasz, Barbara J.

    2005-01-01

    Words and pictures with earlier learned labels are processed faster than words and pictures with later learned labels. This age-of-acquisition (AoA) effect has been extensively investigated in many different types of tasks. This article provides a review of these studies including picture naming, word naming, speeded word naming, word…

  18. The Effect of Kindergarten Entry Age on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buten, Nicole A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of kindergarten entry age on the scores of the eighth grade Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills (CTBS) math and reading scores, while controlling for the demographic variables of gender and socioeconomic status. The subjects included 1,197 students who participated in the randomized, long-term STAR (Student-Teacher…

  19. Age and practice effects on inter-manual performance asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Francis, Karen L; MacRae, Priscilla G; Spirduso, Waneen W; Eakin, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Manual dexterity declines with increasing age, however, the way in which inter-manual asymmetry responds to aging is unclear. Our purpose was to determine the effect of age and practice on inter-manual performance asymmetry in an isometric force pinch line tracing task that varied in difficulty within segments. Thirty right-handed participants, five males and five females in each of three age groups, young (Y20), young-old (O70), and old-old (O80), practiced an isometric force pinch task for 10 trials with each hand on each of five consecutive days. Inter-manual performance asymmetry of the right and left hands was analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) of asymmetry with age groups, practice, task difficulty, and hand as factors. The within-individual magnitude of asymmetry was also analyzed with a repeated measures ANOVA of manual asymmetry calculated as an asymmetry index (AI). Post hoc pair-wise comparisons were performed when significance was found. We observed no inter-manual performance asymmetry on this isometric tracing task among any of the age groups, either in the hand performance differences or in the magnitude of the AI. Age and practice interacted in terms of manual performance: the Y20 and O70 group improved accuracy and task time across the 5 days of practice but the O80 group did not. However, practice did not differentially affect the AI for accuracy or task time for any group. Accuracy of performance of the two hands was differentially affected by practice. All age groups exhibited poorer performance and larger AIs on the most difficult segments of the task (3 and 6) and this did not change with practice.

  20. Effects of age and gender on pharmacokinetics of cefepime.

    PubMed Central

    Barbhaiya, R H; Knupp, C A; Pittman, K A

    1992-01-01

    The effects of age and gender on the pharmacokinetics of cefepime were examined in 48 volunteers following administration of a single 1,000-mg intravenous dose. Male and female subjects were divided into four groups, each consisting of 12 subjects, according to their age and gender. The young subjects were between 20 and 40 years of age and elderly subjects were between 65 and 81 years of age. Serial blood and urine samples were collected from each subject and were analyzed for cefepime by validated high-pressure liquid chromatographic assays with UV detection. Key pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by noncompartmental methods. There were no gender-related differences in elimination half-life (t1/2) and weight-normalized total body clearance (CLT), renal clearance (CLR), and steady-state volume of distribution (Vss). Statistically significant age-related effects were found for t1/2, CLT, CLR, and Vss parameters. In different study groups, Vss ranged from 0.21 to 0.24 liter/kg. The values for Vss were significant greater for elderly subjects than they were for young subjects. The cefepime t1/2 was significantly longer in elderly subjects (about 3 h) than that observed in young subjects (about 2.2 h). The mean values for CLT and CLR in the four study groups ranged from 1.11 to 1.56 and 0.99 to 1.44 ml/min/kg, respectively. In elderly subjects, the estimates for CLT and CLR were significantly lower than those observed in young subjects. Linear regression revealed good correlations between clearance values of cefepime and creatinine. The magnitude of age-related changes in the pharmacokinetics of cefepime is not significant enough to recommend dosage adjustment in elderly patients with kidney functions normal for their age. PMID:1416818

  1. Trends in Triathlon Performance: Effects of Sex and Age.

    PubMed

    Lepers, Romuald; Knechtle, Beat; Stapley, Paul J

    2013-09-01

    The influences of sex and age upon endurance performance have previously been documented for both running and swimming. A number of recent studies have investigated how sex and age influence triathlon performance, a sport that combines three disciplines (swimming, cycling and running), with competitions commonly lasting between 2 (short distance: 1.5-km swim, 40-km cycle and 10-km run) and 8 h (Ironman distance: 3.8-km swim,180-km cycle and 42-km run) for elite triathletes. Age and sex influences upon performance have also been investigated for ultra-triathlons, with distances corresponding to several Ironman distances and lasting several days, and for off-road triathlons combining swimming, mountain biking and trail running. Triathlon represents an intriguing alternative model for analysing the effects of age and sex upon endurance and ultra-endurance ([6 h) performance because sex differences and age-related declines in performance can be analysed in the same individuals across the three separate disciplines. The relative participation of both females and masters athletes (age[40 years) in triathlon has increased consistently over the past 25 years. Sex differences in triathlon performance are also known to differ between the modes of locomotion adopted (swimming, cycling or running) for both elite and non-elite triathletes. Generally, time differences between sexes in swimming have been shown to be smaller on average than during cycling and running. Both physiological and morphological factors contribute to explaining these findings. Performance density (i.e. the time difference between the winner and tenth-placed competitor) has progressively improved (time differences have decreased) for international races over the past two decades for both males and females, with performance density now very similar for both sexes. For age-group triathletes, sex differences in total triathlon performance time increases with age. However,the possible difference in age

  2. Effect of age and gender on the pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C; Bramer, S L; Maroli, A

    1997-01-01

    The effects of age and gender on the pharmacokinetics of the oral fluoroquinolone grepafloxacin were examined in 48 healthy middle-aged and elderly individuals, of whom half were male and half were female. Participants were stratified into 4 groups (each with n = 12), aged 40 to 49 years, 50 to 59 years, 60 to 69 years, and > 70 years. All received oral grepafloxacin 600 mg once daily for 7 days, and pharmacokinetic parameters were measured on days 1 and 7. Mean plasma grepafloxacin concentrations were consistently higher in females than in males. Peak concentrations, area under the concentration-time curve, apparent volume of distribution and apparent total clearance (but not renal clearance) differed significantly in females and males. There were no significant gender differences in the elimination half-life values. Further analysis of the data suggests that the gender-related pharmacokinetic differences were primarily due to differences in bodyweight, in particular to differences in lean body mass. The only parameters that changed significantly with age were renal clearance and the proportion of the dose excreted unchanged in the urine, but no clear trend was observed, and there was no correlation with creatinine clearance. We conclude that age and gender have no clinically significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin. Dose adjustment on the basis of these factors does not therefore seem necessary.

  3. Anti-ageing and rejuvenating effects of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Kapeta, Suzanne; Chinou, Ioanna; Vassilatou, Katerina; Papassideri, Issidora; Gonos, Efstathios S

    2010-10-01

    Homeostasis is a key feature of the cellular lifespan. Its maintenance influences the rate of ageing and it is determined by several factors, including efficient proteolysis. The proteasome is the major cellular proteolytic machinery responsible for the degradation of both normal and damaged proteins. Alterations of proteasome function have been recorded in various biological phenomena including ageing and replicative senescence. Proteasome activities and function are decreased upon replicative senescence, whereas proteasome activation confers enhanced survival against oxidative stress, lifespan extension and maintenance of the young morphology longer in human primary fibroblasts. Several natural compounds possess anti-ageing/anti-oxidant properties. In this study, we have identified quercetin (QUER) and its derivative, namely quercetin caprylate (QU-CAP) as a proteasome activator with anti-oxidant properties that consequently influence cellular lifespan, survival and viability of HFL-1 primary human fibroblasts. Moreover, when these compounds are supplemented to already senescent fibroblasts, a rejuvenating effect is observed. Finally, we show that these compounds promote physiological alterations when applied to cells (i.e. whitening effect). In summary, these data demonstrate the existence of naturally occurring anti-ageing products that can be effectively used through topical application.

  4. Effect of aging on volatile compounds in cooked beef.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, A; Kamada, G; Imanari, M; Shiba, N; Yonai, M; Muramoto, T

    2015-09-01

    Volatiles in the headspace of beef cooked at 180 °C were analyzed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and the effects of aging were evaluated. Seventy volatile substances including non-aromatic, homocyclic, and heterocyclic compounds were identified. A significant positive regression model for storage could be adopted for toluene, benzeneacetaldehyde, 2-formylfuran, pyrazine, 2,6-dimethylpyrazine, 2,3-dimethylpyrazine, 2-acetylthiazole, and 2-formyl-3-methylthiophene. Increases in the quantity of these compounds, with the exception of toluene, suggest the importance of the Strecker and Maillard reactions in cooked meat previously aged under vacuum conditions. As such, the aging process may lead to an increase not only in the amount of compounds related to the taste of meat, but also in the quantity of odor-active compounds. The increased quantity of toluene during storage seemed to be influenced by lipid oxidation.

  5. [The effects of video games on cognitive aging].

    PubMed

    Maillot, Pauline; Perrot, Alexandra; Hartley, Alan

    2012-03-01

    Advancing age is associated with cognitive decline, which, however, remains a very heterogeneous phenomenon. Indeed, several extrinsic factors seem to modulate the effect of aging on cognition. Recently, several studies have provided evidence that the practice of video games could engender many benefits by favoring the maintenance of cognitive vitality in the elderly. This review of the literature aims to establish a precise inventory of the relations between the various types of video games and cognitive aging, including both sedentary video games (i.e., classics as well as brain training) and active video games (i.e., exergames). The largest benefits seem to be provided by exergames which combine game play with significant physical exercise. This article also tries to define the determinants of the training programs which could be responsible for the observed improvements.

  6. Multicohort analysis of the maternal age effect on recombination

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Hilary C.; Christ, Ryan; Hussin, Julie G.; O'Connell, Jared; Gordon, Scott; Mbarek, Hamdi; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; McAloney, Kerrie; Willemsen, Gonnecke; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Nicola; Montgomery, Grant W.; Navarro, Pau; Soranzo, Nicole; Toniolo, Daniela; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.; Marchini, Jonathan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Donnelly, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have reported that the number of crossovers increases with maternal age in humans, but others have found the opposite. Resolving the true effect has implications for understanding the maternal age effect on aneuploidies. Here, we revisit this question in the largest sample to date using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-chip data, comprising over 6,000 meioses from nine cohorts. We develop and fit a hierarchical model to allow for differences between cohorts and between mothers. We estimate that over 10 years, the expected number of maternal crossovers increases by 2.1% (95% credible interval (0.98%, 3.3%)). Our results are not consistent with the larger positive and negative effects previously reported in smaller cohorts. We see heterogeneity between cohorts that is likely due to chance effects in smaller samples, or possibly to confounders, emphasizing that care should be taken when interpreting results from any specific cohort about the effect of maternal age on recombination. PMID:26242864

  7. Interpreting chlorophyll fluorescence signals: the effects of leaf age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, L.; Vergeli, P.; Martins, G.; Saleska, S. R.; Huxman, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) promises robust estimation of carbon uptake across landscapes, as studies of plant physiology have shown that fluorescence emission is directly linked to photosynthesis at the leaf level. Yet most leaf-level studies demonstrating the link between chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis have studied leaves in their prime: leaves that recently finished expansion and have yet to senesce. By contrast, remote sensing of landscapes involves observing leaves of different ages. For example, broadleaf deciduous forests and annual plant communities in temperate regions have leaves that develop and then senesce over the course of a growing season. In this experiment, we explored how leaf age and moisture availability affect steady-state fluoresence (Fs) at the leaf level. We simultaneously measured net photosynthesis (Anet) and Fs for leaves of known ages on greenhouse-grown dwarf Helianthus Annuus (sunflowers) from two watering treatments. To monitor plant water status, we measured pre-dawn water potential, and, for a subset of leaves, osmotic potential. Fully expanded or near-fully expanded leaves (~8 to ~23 days old) had higher Anet at saturating light than young, expanding leaves (less than 8 days old) or old leaves nearing senescence (>23 days old). We found a positive relationship between Fs and Anet, suggesting that the link between fluorescence emission and photosynthesis is robust across leaves of different ages. However, leaf age had marked effects on the light response curve of photosynthesis and fluorescence metrics. These results suggest that leaf age distribution, and changes in leaf age distribution due to phenology, should be considered when interpreting SIF at the landscape level.

  8. Vestibulopathy and age effects on head stability during chair rise.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, C A; Krebs, D E; Scarborough, D M

    2001-01-01

    It is unknown how vestibular dysfunction and age differentially affect balance control during functional activities. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the effects of age and vestibulopathy on head control when rising from a chair. Head relative to trunk (head-on-trunk) sagittal plane angular and linear control strategies were studied in patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) and in healthy subjects aged 30-80 years. A two-way analysis of variance was used to compare head-on-trunk kinematics by age (young vs elderly) and diagnosis (healthy vs BVH) at the time of liftoff from the seat. Angular control strategies differed with age but not diagnosis: young (healthy and BVH) subjects stabilized head rotations in space while elderly (healthy and BVH) subjects stabilized head rotations on the trunk. In contrast, linear control strategies differed by diagnosis but not age: BVH subjects (young and old) allowed a greater rate of head-on-trunk translation while healthy subjects (young and old) inhibited such translations. Young BVH subjects stabilized head-in-space rotations (as did young healthy subjects) without a functioning vestibular system, suggesting cervicocollic reflex and/or other sensory compensation for vestibular loss. Elderly BVH subjects stabilized head rotation with respect to the trunk, as did healthy elders, but did not stabilize head-on-trunk translations, suggesting a reliance on passive mechanical responses of the neck to sense head movements. We conclude that compensation strategies used by patients with vestibulopathy are age-dependent and appear to be more tractable in the younger BVH patient.

  9. EFFECT OF AGE ON KAINATE-INDUCED SEIZURE SEVERITY AND CELL DEATH

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Meghan C.; Lorenzana, Ariana; Bloom, Christopher S.; Chancer, Zackary O.; Schauwecker, P. Elyse

    2008-01-01

    While the onset and extent of epilepsy increases in the aged population, the reasons for this increased incidence remain unexplored. The present study used two inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ) to address the genetic control of age-dependent neurodegeneration by building upon previous experiments that have identified phenotypic differences in susceptibility to hippocampal seizure-induced cell death. We determined if seizure induction and seizure-induced cell death are affected differentially in young adult, mature, and aged male C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ mice administered the excitotoxin, kainic acid. Dose response testing was performed in three-four groups of male mice from each strain. Following kainate injections, mice were scored for seizure activity and brains from mice in each age group were processed for light microscopic histopathologic evaluation seven days following kainate administration to evaluate the severity of seizure-induced brain damage. Irrespective of the dose of kainate administered or the age group examined, resistant strains of mice (C57BL/6J) continued to be resistant to seizure-induced cell death. In contrast, aged animals of the FVB/NJ strain were more vulnerable to the induction of behavioral seizures and associated neuropathology after systemic injection of kainic acid than young or middle-aged mice. Results from these studies suggest that the age-related increased susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of seizure induction and seizure-induced injury is regulated in a strain-dependent manner, similar to previous observations in young adult mice. PMID:18479826

  10. Comment: Distinguishing Cohort Effects from Age*Period Effects on Non-Marital Fertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In the article "Cohort Effects on Non-marital Fertility," in this issue of "Social Forces," Jean Stockard employs a novel strategy for disentangling cohort, period, and age effects on the non-marital fertility ratio. In a model with fixed-effect controls for age and for time period, the author documents evidence for three cohort-specific factors…

  11. Effects of post-mortem aging time and type of aging on palatability of low marbled beef loins.

    PubMed

    Lepper-Blilie, A N; Berg, E P; Buchanan, D S; Berg, P T

    2016-02-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the effect of post-mortem aging period (14 to 49days), dry vs. wet (D vs W) type of aging on the palatability of bone-in (BI) beef short loins (n=96) and boneless (BL) strip loins (n=96) possessing United States Department of Agriculture marbling scores between Slight and Small. Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) scores decreased linearly over time (P=0.0001). WBSF was not influenced by aging method or loin type. Aged flavor was higher for DBL than for DBI with WBL and WBI intermediate. Dry aging strip loins increase aged flavor yet did not improve beefy flavor compared to wet aging. Based on objective data and panelist's scores for tenderness, juiciness and aged flavor, a boneless, 28days wet aged strip steak, cooked to 71°C would provide the best combination of eating satisfaction and value.

  12. DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON AGING CONCRETE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.

    2010-01-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) is responsible for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities throughout the DOE Complex. Some of these facilities will be completely dismantled, while others will be partially dismantled and the remaining structure will be stabilized with cementitious fill materials. The latter is a process known as In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD). The ISD decision process requires a detailed understanding of the existing facility conditions, and operational history. System information and material properties are need for aged nuclear facilities. This literature review investigated the properties of aged concrete structures affected by radiation. In particular, this review addresses the Savannah River Site (SRS) isotope production nuclear reactors. The concrete in the reactors at SRS was not seriously damaged by the levels of radiation exposure. Loss of composite compressive strength was the most common effect of radiation induced damage documented at nuclear power plants.

  13. Effects of aging and idiopathic Parkinson's disease on tactile temporal order judgment.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Natsuko; Shimo, Yasushi; Wada, Makoto; Hattori, Nobutaka; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the basal ganglia play an important role in interval timing that requires the measurement of temporal durations. By contrast, it remains controversial whether the basal ganglia play an essential role in temporal order judgment (TOJ) of successive stimuli, a behavior that does not necessarily require the measurement of durations in time. To address this issue, we compared the effects of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) on the TOJ of two successive taps delivered to each hand, with the arms uncrossed in one condition and crossed in another. In addition to age-matched elderly participants without PD (non-PD), we examined young healthy participants so that the effect of aging could serve as a control for evaluating the effects of PD. There was no significant difference between PD and non-PD participants in any parameter of TOJ under either arm posture, although reaction time was significantly longer in PD compared with non-PD participants. By contrast, the effect of aging was apparent in both conditions. With their arms uncrossed, the temporal resolution (the interstimulus interval that yielded 84% correct responses) in elderly participants was significantly worse compared with young participants. With their arms crossed, elderly participants made more errors at longer intervals (~1 s) than young participants, although both age groups showed similar judgment reversal at moderately short intervals (~200 ms). These results indicate that the basal ganglia and dopaminergic systems do not play essential roles in tactile TOJ involving both hands and that the effect of aging on TOJ is mostly independent of the dopaminergic systems.

  14. Effects of aging on strategic-based visuomotor learning.

    PubMed

    Alfonso Uresti-Cabrera, Luis; Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Diaz, Rosalinda; Beltran-Parrazal, Luis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-08-27

    There are different kinds of visuomotor learnings. One of the most studied is error-based learning where the information about the sign and magnitude of the error is used to update the motor commands. However, there are other instances where subjects show visuomotor learning even if the use of error sign and magnitude information is precluded. In those instances subjects could be using strategic instead of procedural adaptation mechanisms. Here, we present the results of the effect of aging on visuomotor strategic learning under a reversed error feedback condition, and its contrast with procedural visuomotor learning within the same participants. A number of measures were obtained from a task consisting of throwing clay balls to a target before, during and after wearing lateral displacing or reversing prisms. The displacing prism results show an age dependent decrease on the learning rate that corroborates previous findings. The reversing prism results also show significant adaptation impairment in the aged population. However, decreased reversing learning in the older group was the result of an increase in the number of subjects that could not adapt to the reversing prism, and not on a reduction of the learning capacity of all the individuals of the group. These results suggest a significant deleterious effect of aging on visuomotor strategic learning implementation.

  15. Relative Age Effect in UEFA Championship Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    González-Víllora, Sixto; Pastor-Vicedo, Juan C.; Cordente, David

    2015-01-01

    Relative Age Effect (RAE) is the breakdown by both age grouping and dates of birth of athletes. In the past 20 years the existence of this effect has been shown with higher or smaller impact in multiple sports, including soccer. The purpose of this study was to identify the existence of RAE in European soccer players. The sample included 841 elite soccer players who were participants in the UEFA European Soccer Championship in different categories. The professional category (n = 368), U-19 (n = 144) and U-17 (n = 145) were in 2012, and U-21 was in 2011 (n = 184). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Levene test recommended the use of nonparametric statistics. The results obtained by the square test ( the Kruskal-Wallis test and Cohen’s effect sizes revealed the existence of RAE (χ2 = 17.829, p < 0.001; d = 0.30), with the size of their different effects depending on their category or qualifying round achieved by the national team and the existence of significance in the observed differences by category. Therefore, we could continue examining RAE which is present in elite soccer, and could be considered a factor that influences performance of the national teams tested. RAE was not evident in the professional teams analysed, however it was present in the three lower categories analysed (youth categories), with its influence being greater on younger age categories (U-17). PMID:26557207

  16. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) A healthy ... Aging email updates. Enter email address Submit Healthy Aging news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to ...

  17. The effects of ageing on cutaneous wound healing in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, G S; Horan, M A; Ferguson, M W

    1995-01-01

    The dogma that cutaneous wound healing is impaired as a function of age is largely unsubstantiated. This can be attributed to poor experimental design of human studies, the lack of subject characterisation with the exclusion of disease processes, and the study of inappropriate animal models. Structural and functional changes in skin with age have been reported, such as a decrease in dermal thickness, decline in collagen content, a subtle alteration in the glycosaminoglycan profile, and a loss of elasticity, but these reports are subject to the above criticisms in addition to the often-neglected requirement for site specificity. Wound repair can be thought of as a culmination of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation and remodelling. The inflammatory process has not been studied systematically with respect to age, and despite a reported decline in cellular function and number, there is a confounding increase in the production of specific cytokines involved in the process of repair. The proliferative phase is associated with a loss of cellular responsiveness to specific cytokines with a decline in motility and proliferation; however caution in interpreting these findings is important as, for example, the definition of 'ageing' is used rather loosely with the result that neonatal versus young adult cells are compared instead of young versus old adults. During remodelling, fibronectin and collagen production may increase with age, as may wound contraction; the deposition of elastin has not been assessed and the resulting mechanical properties of the scar are controversial, not least because human in vivo studies have been ignored. The absence of a critical review on the effects of advancing age on wound healing has conspired to permit the perpetuation of the belief that well defined tenets exist. This review aims to redress this imbalance and to highlight the need for well designed research into an increasingly important field. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2

  18. Ageing effects on plasmonic properties for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, S.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Green, M.

    2013-12-01

    Metal nanoparticles are known for their unique optical properties due to surface plasmon excitations. The far field and near field effects from these metal particles have been captured to enhance efficiency of thin film solar cells by way of light trapping. Our group has extensively studied the different design parameters for a plasmon enhanced solar cell like effect of metal size/shape, location, effect of dielectric layer thickness and also the effect of plasmons on the electrical properties like passivation of cells. Whilst identifying and minimising parasitic absorption losses in these metal particles are important and is attracting lot of attention, we choose to look at a more interesting issue of ageing effects. Plasmonics at the moment promises efficiency enhancements exceeding 30% including associated losses in metals. However as is needed for solar cells, the technologies incorporated have to stand the test of time. In this work we look at the age effects on the plasmon performance by analysing our cells over time. Our preliminary results show that plasmons supported by silver metal nanoparticles can degrade by upto 10% with time. Metal nanoparticles when exposed to air can get tarnished easily causing degradation of the plasmonic properties. This will result in weakening of the scattering and reduce light trapping effects. We also look at ways of minimizing the ageing losses by overcoating. MgF2 is used as the dielectric film to overcoat metal nanoparticles preventing degradation and also to isolate MNP layer from the back surface reflector of cells. Our results show that such a rear scheme brings an additional current enhancement over interested wavelength region improving over time.

  19. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this study, we examined age-related susceptibility to O3 using 1 mo (adolescent), 4 mo (young adult), 12 mo (adult) and 24 mo (senescent) male Brown Norway rats exposed to filtered air or O3 (0.25and 1.00 ppm), 6 h/day, two days/week for 1 week (acute) or 13 weeks (subchronic). Ventilatory function, assessed by whole-body plethysmography, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) biomarkers of injury and inflammation were used to examine O3-induced pulmonary effects.Relaxation time declined in all ages following the weekly exposures; however, this effect persisted only in the 24 mo rats following a five days recovery, demonstrating an inability to induce adaptation commonly seen with repeated O3 exposures. PenH was increased in all groups with an augmented response in the 4 mo rats following the subchronic O3 exposures. O3 led to increased breathing frequency and minute volume in the 1 and 4 mo animals. Markers ofpulmonary permeability were increased in all age groups. Elevations in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity and lung inflammation following an acute O3 exposure were noted in only the 1 and 4 mo rats, which likely received an increased effective O3 dose. These data demonstrate that ado

  20. A behavioural dynamic model of the relative age effect.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Kawika; Addona, Vittorio; Yates, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between date of birth and success in a variety of sports, including hockey, is well established. This phenomenon is known as the relative age effect (RAE). We model the RAE in Canadian youth hockey as a positive feedback loop where an initial age advantage is reinforced through additional training and playing opportunities based on perceived skill superiority. The same causal mechanism leads to a higher quit rate for relatively younger players. Our model effectively replicates the birth month distribution of Canadian National Hockey League players (R2 = 86.79%) when driven by Canadian birth distributions. We use this model to evaluate three policies that aim to lessen the RAE. All of the policies reduce the RAE with a significant delay. The most effective policy is a combination of providing additional support to age disadvantaged children and rotating the cut-off date for youth leagues between January 1st and July 1st annually. In equilibrium, this approach leads to a 96% reduction in the RAE compared to the base case.

  1. Effects of Normal Aging on Visuo-Motor Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roller, Carrie A.; Cohen, Helen S.; Kimball, Kay T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2001-01-01

    Normal aging is associated with declines in neurologic function. Uncompensated visual and vestibular problems may have dire consequences including dangerous falls. Visuomotor plasticity is a form of behavioral neural plasticity which is important in the process of adapting to visual or vestibular alteration, including those changes due to pathology, pharmacotherapy, surgery or even entry into a microgravity or underwater environment. In order to determine the effects of aging on visuomotor plasticity, we chose the simple and easily measured paradigm of visual-motor re-arrangement created by using visual displacement prisms while throwing small balls at a target. Subjects threw balls before, during and after wearing a set of prisms which displace the visual scene by twenty degrees to the right. Data obtained during adaptation were modeled using multilevel analyses for 73 subjects aged 20 to 80 years. We found no statistically significant difference in measures of visuomotor plasticity with advancing age. Further studies are underway examining variable practice training as a potential mechanism for enhancing this form of behavioral neural plasticity.

  2. Effects of normal aging on visuo-motor plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roller, Carrie A.; Cohen, Helen S.; Kimball, Kay T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2002-01-01

    Normal aging is associated with declines in neurologic function. Uncompensated visual and vestibular problems may have dire consequences including dangerous falls. Visuo-motor plasticity is a form of behavioral neural plasticity, which is important in the process of adapting to visual or vestibular alteration, including those changes due to pathology, pharmacotherapy, surgery or even entry into microgravity or an underwater environment. To determine the effects of aging on visuo-motor plasticity, we chose the simple and easily measured paradigm of visual-motor rearrangement created by using visual displacement prisms while throwing small balls at a target. Subjects threw balls before, during and after wearing a set of prisms which displace the visual scene by twenty degrees to the right. Data obtained during adaptation were modeled using multilevel modeling techniques for 73 subjects, aged 20 to 80 years. We found no statistically significant difference in measures of visuo-motor plasticity with advancing age. Further studies are underway examining variable practice training as a potential mechanism for enhancing this form of behavioral neural plasticity.

  3. Effects of metabolic syndrome on language functions in aging.

    PubMed

    Cahana-Amitay, Dalia; Spiro, Avron; Cohen, Jason A; Oveis, Abigail C; Ojo, Emmanuel A; Sayers, Jesse T; Obler, Loraine K; Albert, Martin L

    2015-02-01

    This study explored effects of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) on language in aging. MetS is a constellation of five vascular and metabolic risk factors associated with the development of chronic diseases and increased risk of mortality, as well as brain and cognitive impairments. We tested 281 English-speaking older adults aged 55-84, free of stroke and dementia. Presence of MetS was based on the harmonized criteria (Alberti et al., 2009). Language performance was assessed by measures of accuracy and reaction time on two tasks of lexical retrieval and two tasks of sentence processing. Regression analyses, adjusted for age, education, gender, diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease, demonstrated that participants with MetS had significantly lower accuracy on measures of lexical retrieval (action naming) and sentence processing (embedded sentences, both subject and object relative clauses). Reaction time was slightly faster on the test of embedded sentences among those with MetS. MetS adversely affects the language performance of older adults, impairing accuracy of both lexical retrieval and sentence processing. This finding reinforces and extends results of earlier research documenting the negative influence of potentially treatable medical conditions (diabetes, hypertension) on language performance in aging. The unanticipated finding that persons with MetS were faster in processing embedded sentences may represent an impairment of timing functions among older individuals with MetS.

  4. Effects of the Fataki campaign: addressing cross-generational sex in Tanzania by mobilizing communities to intervene.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Michelle R; Mooney, Alyssa; Kamala, Benjamin; Modarres, Najmeh; Karam, Robert; Ng'wanansabi, Deo

    2013-07-01

    The national multimedia "Fataki" campaign aired in Tanzania from 2008 to 2011 with the goal of addressing cross-generational sex (CGS) by mobilizing communities to intervene in CGS relationships. A cross-sectional household survey was used to evaluate the campaign. Logistic regression analysis found a dose-response relationship between campaign exposure and interpersonal communication about CGS, intervening in CGS relationships, and lower CGS engagement among women. No association was found between campaign exposure and current CGS involvement among men, though longer-term data collection may be needed to assess changes in relationship patterns. Findings indicated that engaging in interpersonal communication about CGS was associated with a higher likelihood of actually intervening. Strategies to generate further discussion surrounding CGS and increase impact, such as through community-based components to supplement campaigns, are discussed.

  5. Effect of sludge age on the bacterial diversity of bench scale sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Akarsubasi, Alper Tunga; Eyice, Ozge; Miskin, Ian; Head, Ian M; Curtis, Thomas P

    2009-04-15

    . Sludge age has a subtler and slower effect than we anticipated. However, we postulate that sludge age may be more evident in the taxa occurring below the detection limit of DGGE. New sequencing technology may help us address this hypothesis.

  6. Effects of Aging in Multisensory Integration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Dieuleveult, Alix L.; Siemonsma, Petra C.; van Erp, Jan B. F.; Brouwer, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Multisensory integration (MSI) is the integration by the brain of environmental information acquired through more than one sense. Accurate MSI has been shown to be a key component of successful aging and to be crucial for processes underlying activities of daily living (ADLs). Problems in MSI could prevent older adults (OA) to age in place and live independently. However, there is a need to know how to assess changes in MSI in individuals. This systematic review provides an overview of tests assessing the effect of age on MSI in the healthy elderly population (aged 60 years and older). A literature search was done in Scopus. Articles from the earliest records available to January 20, 2016, were eligible for inclusion if assessing effects of aging on MSI in the healthy elderly population compared to younger adults (YA). These articles were rated for risk of bias with the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment. Out of 307 identified research articles, 49 articles were included for final review, describing 69 tests. The review indicated that OA maximize the use of multiple sources of information in comparison to YA (20 studies). In tasks that require more cognitive function, or when participants need to adapt rapidly to a situation, or when a dual task is added to the experiment, OA have problems selecting and integrating information properly as compared to YA (19 studies). Additionally, irrelevant or wrong information (i.e., distractors) has a greater impact on OA than on YA (21 studies). OA failing to weigh sensory information properly, has not been described in previous reviews. Anatomical changes (i.e., reduction of brain volume and differences of brain areas’ recruitment) and information processing changes (i.e., general cognitive slowing, inverse effectiveness, larger time window of integration, deficits in attentional control and increased noise at baseline) can only partly explain the differences between OA and YA regarding MSI. Since we have an interest in

  7. Gesture and language in narratives and explanations: the effects of age and communicative activity on late multimodal discourse development.

    PubMed

    Alamillo, Asela Reig; Colletta, Jean-Marc; Guidetti, Michèle

    2013-06-01

    This article addresses the effect of communicative activity on the use of language and gesture by school-age children. The present study examined oral narratives and explanations produced by children aged six and ten years on the basis of several linguistic and gestural measures. Results showed that age affects both gestural and linguistic behaviour, supporting previous findings that multimodal discourse continues to develop during the school-age years. The task (narration vs. explanation) also had clear effects on the use of language and gesture: gestures and subordinate markers were more frequent in explanations than in narratives, whereas cohesion markers were more often used in narratives. Altogether, these results show partly distinctive developmental patterns between narrative monologic discourse behaviour and explanatory behaviour in the context of dialogue and question-answer exchanges.

  8. Aging 5 years in 5 minutes: the effect of taking a memory test on older adults' subjective age.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Matthew L; Geraci, Lisa; De Forrest, Ross L

    2013-12-01

    How old one feels-one's subjective age-has been shown to predict important psychological and health outcomes. The current studies examined the effect of taking a standard memory test on older adults' subjective age. Study 1 showed that older adults felt older after taking a standard neuropsychological screening test and participating in a free-recall experiment than they felt at baseline. Study 2 showed that the effect was selective to older adults: Younger adults' subjective age was not affected by participating in the memory experiment. Study 3 showed that the subjective-aging effect was specific to memory, as taking a vocabulary test for a similar amount of time did not affect older adults' subjective age. Finally, Study 4 showed that simply expecting to take a memory test subjectively aged older adults. The results indicate that being in a memory-testing context affects older adults' self-perception by making them feel older.

  9. Aging and the optimal viewing position effect in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingping; Liu, Danlu; Han, Buxin; Paterson, Kevin B

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that where readers fixate within a word affects the efficiency with which that word is recognized. Indeed, words in alphabetic languages (e.g., English, French) are recognized most efficiently when fixated at their optimal viewing position (OVP), which is near the word center. However, little is known about the effects of fixation location on word recognition in non-alphabetic languages, such as Chinese. Moreover, studies to date have not investigated if effects of fixation location vary across adult age-groups, although it is well-established that older readers experience greater difficulty recognizing words due to visual and cognitive declines. Accordingly, the present research examined OVP effects by young and older adult readers when recognizing Chinese words presented in isolation. Most words in Chinese are formed from two or more logograms called characters and so the present experiment investigated the influence of fixation location on the recognition of 2-, 3-, and 4-character words (and nonwords). The older adults experienced generally greater word recognition difficulty. But whereas the young adults recognized words most efficiently when initially fixating the first character of 2-character words and second character of 3- and 4-character words, the older adults recognized words most efficiently when initially fixating the first character for words of each length. The findings therefore reveal subtle but potentially important adult age differences in the effects of fixation location on Chinese word recognition. Moreover, the similarity in effects for words and nonwords implies a more general age-related change in oculomotor strategy when processing Chinese character-strings.

  10. Differential age effects on spatial and visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Joukje M; Morel, Sascha; Meijer, Lisette; Buvens, Cléo; Kessels, Roy P C; Postma, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The present study was intended to compare age effects on visual and spatial working memory by using two versions of the same task that differed only in presentation mode. The working memory task contained both a simultaneous and a sequential presentation mode condition, reflecting, respectively, visual and spatial working memory processes. Young and older participants had to remember the locations of five equal objects under three different conditions: a baseline (immediate recall), a maintenance (including a delay of 5 seconds), and a manipulation (e.g., relocate all objects one column to the right) condition. Only older adults performed worse on the sequential compared to the simultaneous baseline condition and only this group revealed lower performance on the sequential delay compared to the simultaneous delay condition. However, in both groups the manipulation condition affected performance on the simultaneous and sequential presentation modes to the same extent. The findings of this study therefore partially support an age-related differentiation between visual and spatial working memory, with a stronger age effect on spatial than on visual working memory.

  11. Aging worsens the effects of sleep deprivation on postural control.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Rébecca; Prince, François; Filipini, Daniel; Carrier, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Falls increase with age and cause significant injuries in the elderly. This study aimed to determine whether age modulates the interactions between sleep deprivation and postural control and to evaluate how attention influences these interactions in the elderly. Fifteen young (24±2.7 y.o.) and 15 older adults (64±3.2 y.o.) stood still on a force plate after a night of sleep and after total sleep deprivation. Center of pressure range and velocity were measured with eyes open and with eyes closed while participants performed an interference task, a control task, and no cognitive task. Sleep deprivation increased the antero-posterior range of center of pressure in both age groups and center of pressure speed in older participants only. In elderly participants, the destabilizing effects of sleep deprivation were more pronounced with eyes closed. The interference task did not alter postural control beyond the destabilization induced by sleep loss in older subjects. It was concluded that sleep loss has greater destabilizing effects on postural control in older than in younger participants, and may therefore increase the risk of falls in the elderly.

  12. Neural Plastic Effects of Cognitive Training on Aging Brain.

    PubMed

    Leung, Natalie T Y; Tam, Helena M K; Chu, Leung W; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Chan, Felix; Lam, Linda C W; Woo, Jean; Lee, Tatia M C

    2015-01-01

    Increasing research has evidenced that our brain retains a capacity to change in response to experience until late adulthood. This implies that cognitive training can possibly ameliorate age-associated cognitive decline by inducing training-specific neural plastic changes at both neural and behavioral levels. This longitudinal study examined the behavioral effects of a systematic thirteen-week cognitive training program on attention and working memory of older adults who were at risk of cognitive decline. These older adults were randomly assigned to the Cognitive Training Group (n = 109) and the Active Control Group (n = 100). Findings clearly indicated that training induced improvement in auditory and visual-spatial attention and working memory. The training effect was specific to the experience provided because no significant difference in verbal and visual-spatial memory between the two groups was observed. This pattern of findings is consistent with the prediction and the principle of experience-dependent neuroplasticity. Findings of our study provided further support to the notion that the neural plastic potential continues until older age. The baseline cognitive status did not correlate with pre- versus posttraining changes to any cognitive variables studied, suggesting that the initial cognitive status may not limit the neuroplastic potential of the brain at an old age.

  13. Development of liver fibrosis during aging: effects of caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Horrillo, D; Gallardo, N; Lauzurica, N; Barrus, M T; San Frutos, M G; Andres, A; Ros, M; Fernandez-Agullo, T

    2013-01-01

    Liver is the central metabolic organ of the body and diet is considered one of the main environmental factors that can impact on aging liver. In the elderly stage liver function is relatively well conserved although there are a variety of not well defined morphological changes related to liver fibrosis which is commonly associated with an inflammatory state. The aim of this paper is to study these alterations during the physiological process of aging in Wistar rats and also test if caloric restriction (CR) could ameliorate them. As fibrosis is associated to hepatic stellate cell (HSC) function we also analyzed these cells during aging. Livers from five groups of male Wistar rats (3-, 8-, 24-months old ad libitum and 8- and 24-months caloric restricted rats) were used in this study. Histological analysis, expression of genes implicated in liver fibrosis and the status of inflammatory step-pathways as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) isoforms, p50 and p65, in cytosolic and nuclear fractions were performed. During elderly, associated with morphological change of HSC, there is a progressive increase in collagen deposition due to an inhibition in collagen degradation. Higher expression of cytokines and the activation of inflammatory pathways are associated with aging. CR ameliorates these circumstances being more effective when it started in middle age. In conclusion elderly stage is associated to a mild fibrotic and inflammatory state in the liver which could be ameliorated after CR.

  14. Making It Work: How Effective Schools Address the Impact of Crime in the Community on School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safie, Omar.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable research on effective schools, but there is very little research on the impact community crime has on schools and the academic achievement of students. Within the framework of neighborhood effect theory and 90-90-90 schools, this study aimed to determine what adults in effective schools in low-income high minority schools in…

  15. Effect of Age and Exercise on the Viscoelastic Properties of Rat Tail Tendon

    PubMed Central

    LaCroix, Andrew S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Brickson, Stacey; Akins, Tiffany L.; Diffee, Gary; Aiken, Judd; Vanderby, Ray; Lakes, Roderic S.

    2013-01-01

    Tendon mechanical properties are thought to degrade during aging but improve with exercise. A remaining question is whether exercise in aged animals provides sufficient regenerative, systemic stimulus to restore younger mechanical behaviors. Herein we address that question with tail tendons from aged and exercised rats, which would be subject to systemic effects but not direct loading from the exercise regimen. Twenty-four month old rats underwent one of three treadmill exercise training protocols for 12 months: sedentary (walking at 0° incline for 5 min/day), moderate (running at 0° incline for 30 min/day), or high (running at 4° incline for 30 min/day). A group of 9 month old rats were used to provide an adult control, while a group of 3 month old rats provided a young control. Tendons were harvested at sacrifice and mechanically tested. Results show significant age-dependent differences in modulus, ultimate stress, relaxation rate, and percent relaxation. Relaxation rate was strain-dependent, consistent with nonlinear superposition or Schapery models but not with quasilinear viscoelasticity (QLV). Trends in exercise data suggest that with exercise, tendons assume the elastic character of younger rats (lower elastic modulus and ultimate stress). PMID:23549897

  16. Age and forgetfulness: the effect of implicit priming.

    PubMed

    Erber, J T; Caiola, M A; Williams, M; Prager, I G

    1997-01-01

    Participants (i.e., perceivers) unscrambled either memory-related phrases (experimental group) or memory-neutral phrases (control group). Then perceivers read a vignette about a forgetful young, middle-aged, or old target person, after which they rated (a) the target's forgetfulness and (b) how difficult each of 12 tasks (4 low, 4 medium, and 4 high in memory load) would be for the target. High-memory-load tasks were rated as more difficult by perceivers in the experimental group than by perceivers in the control group. Thus, implicit priming of a forgetfulness schema resulted in harsher judgments about how difficult high-memory-load tasks would be for forgetful targets. However, this priming effect was no stronger for old than for young or middle-aged targets.

  17. Effects of environmental ageing on HMS-polypropylene/Cloisite nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, L. G. H. Oliani, W. L. Ferreto, H. F. R. Lugao, A. B. Parra, D. F.

    2014-05-15

    High melt strength polypropylene Nanocomposites (NC-HMSPP) were obtained with concentrations of 0.1 and 5 wt% of Cloisite 20A. The melt intercalation, using twin screw extruder was done to homogenize the nanocomposite in presence of polypropylene graft maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) compatibilizer agent. In this work, the manufactured dumbbell samples were settled in device for natural ageing assay. The period of exposition was January to December of 2012. The effects of environmental ageing was determined by carbonyl index (FT-IR) and the results showed that nanocomposites were more stable than HMSPP. The mechanical properties (elongation and rupture strength) were evaluated and the thermal behavior was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X ray diffraction (DRX). The morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in which the nanocomposites showed intense cracks on the surface.

  18. Effects of Applied Strain on Rates of Ageing: Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campion, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the stated intents of this project has been to make some assessment of effects of strain on rates of ageing of project thermoplastics exposed to project fluids. To this end, certain straining jigs which apply in various modes - tensile, four-point bending and crack growth using compact tension samples - were designed and made for holding samples during fluid exposures. During testing, features of the thermoplastics have been observed which have tended to confuse apparent strain effects on the polymers' aged performance, but recent assessments of the topic and its data have led to considerable progress being made in identifying test procedures necessary for strain and related effects on chemical deterioration to manifest themselves. It is the intent of this report to provide a summary of what has been determined on strain and related effects thus far, and provide recommendations for clarifying them in Phase 2 by means of further test procedures which will increase and focus the severity of the conditions applying. The choice of flexible pipe rather than umbilicals service for assessing service strain conditions reflects the major interest of project members. However, Tefzel data are still provided.

  19. Discounting input from older adults: the role of age salience on partner age effects in the social contagion of memory.

    PubMed

    Meade, Michelle L; McNabb, Jaimie C; Lindeman, Meghan I H; Smith, Jessi L

    2017-05-01

    Three experiments examined the impact of partner age on the magnitude of socially suggested false memories. Young participants recalled household scenes in collaboration with an implied young or older adult partner who intentionally recalled false items. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with only the age of their partner (low age-salience context); in Experiment 2, participants were presented with the age of their partner along with a photograph and biographical information about their partner (high age-salience context); in Experiment 3, age salience was varied within the same experiment. Across experiments, participants in both the low age-salience and high age-salience contexts incorporated their partners' misleading suggestions into their own subsequent recall and recognition reports, thus demonstrating social contagion with implied partners. Importantly, the effect of partner age differed across conditions. Participants in the high age-salience context were less likely to incorporate misleading suggestions from older adult partners than from young adult partners, but participants in the low age-salience context were equally likely to incorporate suggestions from young and older adult partners. Participants discount the memory of older adult partners only when age is highly salient.

  20. The Relative Age Effect and Its Influence on Academic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Juan-José; García-Rubio, Javier; Olivares, Pedro R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Purpose The policy of school organisation for grouping students in the same academic year is based on date of birth. The differences in the experiences and maturation of older students involve a relatively better performance in academic settings, which is known as the relative age effect (RAE). This effect is more important the younger the student is. The goal of this study is to identify the connections of influence that RAE, socioeconomic status (SES), and type of institution have on academic performance in a school population of eighth graders. Methods The study is based on a population-based, representative sample of 15,234 8th graders (50.4% female; average age = 13.61 years) in the 2011 National System of Quality Assessment in Education Survey (SIMCE) from Chile. The SIMCE for global academic performance consists of 4 tests: reading, mathematics, social studies, and science. All tests consist of multiple-choice and closed questions. In addition, in order to have the information of general academic performance, an extra variable expressing the average score of each student was created. Also, the SIMCE includes additional variables for the evaluation process such as SES or type of school. Students were assigned to one of five age groups in terms of date of birth (G1, G2, G3, G4, and G5), in which students belonging to G1 are the oldest and students belonging to G5 are the youngest. Results The results achieved in the structural equation modelling indicate a good global fit. Individual relationships show significant effects of the three variables observed on academic performance, although SES received the highest values. The influence of RAE took place both in the full sample and sub-samples composed according to the SES and academic performance, showing higher values for students with lower scores. Although the influence of RAE decreases when SES is controlled, its effect is still significant and contributes to additionally explain the

  1. Analysis of tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation caused by accelerated artificial aging and the effects of microstructure in stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Thomas J.

    This investigation addresses the issue that yttria stabilized zirconia is being used as a dental biomaterial without substantial evidence of its long-term viability. Furthermore, stabilized zirconia (SZ) undergoes low temperature degradation (LTD), which can lead to roughening of the surface. A rougher exterior can lead to increased wear of the antagonist in the oral environment. Despite the LTD concerns, SZ is now widely used in restorative dentistry, including full contour crowns. A comparison of aging methods to determine the role of artificial aging on inducing the transformation has not been extensively studied. Therefore, simulations of the transformation process were investigated by comparing different methods of accelerated aging. The rejected null hypothesis is that the temperature of aging treatment will not affect the time required to cause measurable monoclinic transformation of yttria stabilized zirconia. The transformation of SZ starts at the surface and progresses inward; however, it is unclear whether the progression is constant for different aging conditions. This investigation analyzed the depth of transformation as a function of aging conditions for stabilized zirconia in the top 5-6 mum from the surface. The rejected null hypothesis is that the transformation amount is constant throughout the first six micrometers from the surface. The effects of grain size on the amount of monoclinic transformation were also investigated. This study aimed to determine if the grain size of partially stabilized zirconia affects the amount of monoclinic transformation, surface roughness, and property degradation due to aging. The rejected null hypothesis is that the grain size will not affect the amount of monoclinic transformation, thus have no effect on surface roughening or property degradation. The final part of this study addresses the wear of enamel when opposing zirconia by observing how grain size and aging affected the wear rate of an enamel antagonist

  2. Effects of Long-Term Mindfulness Meditation on Brain's White Matter Microstructure and its Aging

    PubMed Central

    Laneri, Davide; Schuster, Verena; Dietsche, Bruno; Jansen, Andreas; Ott, Ulrich; Sommer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Although research on the effects of mindfulness meditation (MM) is increasing, still very little has been done to address its influence on the white matter (WM) of the brain. We hypothesized that the practice of MM might affect the WM microstructure adjacent to five brain regions of interest associated with mindfulness. Diffusion tensor imaging was employed on samples of meditators and non-meditators (n = 64) in order to investigate the effects of MM on group difference and aging. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics was used to estimate the fractional anisotrophy of the WM connected to the thalamus, insula, amygdala, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. The subsequent generalized linear model analysis revealed group differences and a group-by-age interaction in all five selected regions. These data provide preliminary indications that the practice of MM might result in WM connectivity change and might provide evidence on its ability to help diminish age-related WM degeneration in key regions which participate in processes of mindfulness. PMID:26834624

  3. The Effects of Treadmill Running on Aging Laryngeal Muscle Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kletzien, Heidi; Russell, John A.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of Evidence NA (animal study) Objective Age-related changes in laryngeal muscle structure and function may contribute to deficits in voice and swallowing observed in elderly people. We hypothesized that treadmill running, an exercise that increases respiratory drive to upper airway muscles, would induce changes in thyroarytenoid muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms consistent with a fast-slow transformation in muscle fiber type. Study Design Randomized parallel group controlled trial. Methods Fifteen young adult and 14 old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats received either treadmill running or no exercise (5 days/week/8 weeks). Myosin heavy chain isoform composition in the thyroarytenoid muscle was examined at the end of 8 weeks. Results Significant age and treatment effects were found. The young adult group had the greatest proportion of superfast contracting MHCIIL. The treadmill running group had the lowest proportion of MHCIIL and the greatest proportion of MHCIIx. Conclusion Thyroarytenoid muscle structure was affected both by age and treadmill running in a fast-slow transition that is characteristic of exercise manipulations in other skeletal muscles. PMID:26256100

  4. Effect of aged waste package and basalt on radioelement release

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, M.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Bowers, D.L.; Gerding, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    Results of experiments are described that combine backfill, radioactive waste, and repository host rock in a single flowing groundwater stream in a manner analogous to a hydraulic breach of a waste repository. The experimental design is used to identify the chemical interactions that would occur if repository components were breached by flowing water. The results indicate that of three parameters studied, the alteration of the repository components as might occur upon aging had the most substantial influence on the migration of radioactive elements dissolved from the solid radioactive waste. The other two parameters, the metal alloy used in the apparatus and an ionizing radiation field imposed on the experimental apparatus, had little or no measurable effect on radioactive element transport by flowing water. Inasmuch as the alteration of the repository materials represent aging in an actual repository, it is concluded that changes with age may detrimentally affect the ability of a repository to isolate plutonium and neptunium, and possibly other radioactive elements in nuclear waste. 37 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  5. The effect of aging on anticipatory postural control

    PubMed Central

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the differences in anticipatory (APAs) postural adjustments between young and older adults and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Ten healthy older adults and thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations using the pendulum-impact paradigm. EMG activity of the trunk and leg muscles, the center of pressure (COP), and center of mass (COM) displacements in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction were recorded and analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory (CPAs) phases of postural control. The effect of aging was seen as delayed anticipatory muscle activity and larger compensatory muscle responses in older adults as compared to young adults. Moreover, in spite of such larger reactive responses, older adults were still more unstable, exhibiting larger COP and COM peak displacements after the perturbation than young adults when exposed to similar postural disturbances. Nonetheless, while APAs are impaired in older adults, the ability to recruit muscles anticipatorily is largely preserved, however, due to their smaller magnitudes and delayed onsets, it is likely that their effectiveness in reducing the magnitude of CPAs is smaller. The outcome of the study lends support towards investigating the ways of improving anticipatory postural control in people with balance impairments due to aging or neurological disorders. PMID:24449006

  6. The effect of aging on anticipatory postural control.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the differences in anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) between young and older adults and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Ten healthy older adults and thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations using the pendulum impact paradigm. Electromyographic activity of the trunk and leg muscles, the center of pressure (COP), and center of mass (COM) displacements in the anterior-posterior direction were recorded and analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs) phases of postural control. The effect of aging was seen as delayed anticipatory muscle activity and larger compensatory muscle responses in older adults as compared to young adults. Moreover, in spite of such larger reactive responses, older adults were still more unstable, exhibiting larger COP and COM peak displacements after the perturbation than young adults when exposed to similar postural disturbances. Nonetheless, while APAs are impaired in older adults, the ability to recruit muscles anticipatorily is largely preserved; however, due to their smaller magnitudes and delayed onsets, it is likely that their effectiveness in reducing the magnitude of CPAs is smaller. The outcome of the study lends support toward investigating the ways of improving anticipatory postural control in people with balance impairments due to aging or neurological disorders.

  7. Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we review the association between vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analyses have shown that eyes with neovascular AMD are twice as likely to have VMA as normal eyes. VMA in neovascular AMD may induce inflammation, macular traction, decrease in oxygenation, sequestering of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other cytokines or may directly stimulate VEGF production. VMA may also interfere with the treatment effects of anti-VEGF therapy, which is the standard treatment for neovascular AMD, and releasing VMA can improve the treatment response to anti-VEGF treatment in neovascular AMD. We also reviewed currently available methods of relieving VMA. PMID:26425354

  8. Effect of occlusion, directionality and age on horizontal localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alworth, Lynzee Nicole

    Localization acuity of a given listener is dependent upon the ability discriminate between interaural time and level disparities. Interaural time differences are encoded by low frequency information whereas interaural level differences are encoded by high frequency information. Much research has examined effects of hearing aid microphone technologies and occlusion separately and prior studies have not evaluated age as a factor in localization acuity. Open-fit hearing instruments provide new earmold technologies and varying microphone capabilities; however, these instruments have yet to be evaluated with regard to horizontal localization acuity. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of microphone configuration, type of dome in open-fit hearing instruments, and age on the horizontal localization ability of a given listener. Thirty adults participated in this study and were grouped based upon hearing sensitivity and age (young normal hearing, >50 years normal hearing, >50 hearing impaired). Each normal hearing participant completed one localization experiment (unaided/unamplified) where they listened to the stimulus "Baseball" and selected the point of origin. Hearing impaired listeners were fit with the same two receiver-in-the-ear hearing aids and same dome types, thus controlling for microphone technologies, type of dome, and fitting between trials. Hearing impaired listeners completed a total of 7 localization experiments (unaided/unamplified; open dome: omnidirectional, adaptive directional, fixed directional; micromold: omnidirectional, adaptive directional, fixed directional). Overall, results of this study indicate that age significantly affects horizontal localization ability as younger adult listeners with normal hearing made significantly fewer localization errors than older adult listeners with normal hearing. Also, results revealed a significant difference in performance between dome type; however, upon further examination was not

  9. Age effects on visual-perceptual processing and confrontation naming.

    PubMed

    Gutherie, Audrey H; Seely, Peter W; Beacham, Lauren A; Schuchard, Ronald A; De l'Aune, William A; Moore, Anna Bacon

    2010-03-01

    The impact of age-related changes in visual-perceptual processing on naming ability has not been reported. The present study investigated the effects of 6 levels of spatial frequency and 6 levels of contrast on accuracy and latency to name objects in 14 young and 13 older neurologically normal adults with intact lexical-semantic functioning. Spatial frequency and contrast manipulations were made independently. Consistent with the hypotheses, variations in these two visual parameters impact naming ability in young and older subjects differently. The results from the spatial frequency-manipulations revealed that, in general, young vs. older subjects are faster and more accurate to name. However, this age-related difference is dependent on the spatial frequency on the image; differences were only seen for images presented at low (e.g., 0.25-1 c/deg) or high (e.g., 8-16 c/deg) spatial frequencies. Contrary to predictions, the results from the contrast manipulations revealed that overall older vs. young adults are more accurate to name. Again, however, differences were only seen for images presented at the lower levels of contrast (i.e., 1.25%). Both age groups had shorter latencies on the second exposure of the contrast-manipulated images, but this possible advantage of exposure was not seen for spatial frequency. Category analyses conducted on the data from this study indicate that older vs. young adults exhibit a stronger nonliving-object advantage for naming spatial frequency-manipulated images. Moreover, the findings suggest that bottom-up visual-perceptual variables integrate with top-down category information in different ways. Potential implications on the aging and naming (and recognition) literature are discussed.

  10. Effects of aging on the induction of angiosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Groth, D H; Coate, W B; Ulland, B M; Hornung, R W

    1981-01-01

    Adult, Sprague-Dawley albino rats of four different ages (6, 18, 32 and 52 weeks) were exposed to 940 ppm vinyl chloride by inhalation for 24 weeks, 5 days/week, 7 hr/day. In each age group, there were 110 to 128 males and the same number of females. The similarly housed control group, which was not exposed to vinyl chloride, consisted of the same number of males and females in each age group. All animals that died spontaneously, or were sacrificed moribund, or were killed at scheduled times (3, 6 and 9 months after initial exposure) were autopsied. All organs were examined grossly, and several tissues from each animal were examined microscopically. The older the rats were when they were first exposed, the greater the incidence of angiosarcomas. The incidences of angiosarcomas in the four age groups (from youngest to oldest) in the exposed males in the nonscheduled sacrifice groups were: 0/37 (0%); 0/44 (0%); 3/45 (6.7%); and 13/55 (24%). Similarly, for the females, these incidences were: 2/38 (5.3%); 7/47 (15%); 23/49 (47%); and 11/54 (20%). Most of the angiosarcomas were highly anaplastic, primary tumors in the livers that metastasized to the lungs. Only one angiosarcoma was seen in all the control rats; that occurred in subcutaneous tissue. This study demonstrated that older adult animals and females are more susceptible to the angiosarcoma-inducing effects of vinyl chloride than young adult animals and males, respectively. PMID:7199429

  11. Effects of workplace, family and cultural influences on low back pain: what opportunities exist to address social factors in general consultations?

    PubMed

    Shaw, William S; Campbell, Paul; Nelson, Candace C; Main, Chris J; Linton, Steven J

    2013-10-01

    Social factors are widely acknowledged in behavioural models of pain and pain management, but incorporating these factors into general medical consultations for low back pain (LBP) can be challenging. While there is no compelling evidence that social factors contribute to LBP onset, these factors have been shown to influence functional limitation and disability, especially the effects of organisational support in the workplace, spousal support, family conflict and social disadvantage. A number of barriers exist to address such social factors in routine medical encounters for LBP, but there is emerging evidence that improving social and organisational support may be an effective strategy to reduce the negative lifestyle consequences of LBP. For clinicians to address these factors in LBP treatment requires a clearer psychosocial framework in assessment and screening, more individualised problem-solving efforts, more patient-centred interventions involving family, peers and workplace supports and a less biomechanical and diagnostic approach.

  12. Adapting to Climate Change on Western Public Lands: Addressing the Ecological Effects of Domestic, Wild, and Feral Ungulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beschta, Robert L.; Donahue, Debra L.; DellaSala, Dominick A.; Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Karr, James R.; O'Brien, Mary H.; Fleischner, Thomas L.; Deacon Williams, Cindy

    2013-02-01

    Climate change affects public land ecosystems and services throughout the American West and these effects are projected to intensify. Even if greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, adaptation strategies for public lands are needed to reduce anthropogenic stressors of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and to help native species and ecosystems survive in an altered environment. Historical and contemporary livestock production—the most widespread and long-running commercial use of public lands—can alter vegetation, soils, hydrology, and wildlife species composition and abundances in ways that exacerbate the effects of climate change on these resources. Excess abundance of native ungulates (e.g., deer or elk) and feral horses and burros add to these impacts. Although many of these consequences have been studied for decades, the ongoing and impending effects of ungulates in a changing climate require new management strategies for limiting their threats to the long-term supply of ecosystem services on public lands. Removing or reducing livestock across large areas of public land would alleviate a widely recognized and long-term stressor and make these lands less susceptible to the effects of climate change. Where livestock use continues, or where significant densities of wild or feral ungulates occur, management should carefully document the ecological, social, and economic consequences (both costs and benefits) to better ensure management that minimizes ungulate impacts to plant and animal communities, soils, and water resources. Reestablishing apex predators in large, contiguous areas of public land may help mitigate any adverse ecological effects of wild ungulates.

  13. Adapting to climate change on Western public lands: addressing the ecological effects of domestic, wild, and feral ungulates.

    PubMed

    Beschta, Robert L; Donahue, Debra L; DellaSala, Dominick A; Rhodes, Jonathan J; Karr, James R; O'Brien, Mary H; Fleischner, Thomas L; Deacon Williams, Cindy

    2013-02-01

    Climate change affects public land ecosystems and services throughout the American West and these effects are projected to intensify. Even if greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, adaptation strategies for public lands are needed to reduce anthropogenic stressors of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and to help native species and ecosystems survive in an altered environment. Historical and contemporary livestock production-the most widespread and long-running commercial use of public lands-can alter vegetation, soils, hydrology, and wildlife species composition and abundances in ways that exacerbate the effects of climate change on these resources. Excess abundance of native ungulates (e.g., deer or elk) and feral horses and burros add to these impacts. Although many of these consequences have been studied for decades, the ongoing and impending effects of ungulates in a changing climate require new management strategies for limiting their threats to the long-term supply of ecosystem services on public lands. Removing or reducing livestock across large areas of public land would alleviate a widely recognized and long-term stressor and make these lands less susceptible to the effects of climate change. Where livestock use continues, or where significant densities of wild or feral ungulates occur, management should carefully document the ecological, social, and economic consequences (both costs and benefits) to better ensure management that minimizes ungulate impacts to plant and animal communities, soils, and water resources. Reestablishing apex predators in large, contiguous areas of public land may help mitigate any adverse ecological effects of wild ungulates.

  14. Effect of Blade Tenderization, Aging Time and Aging Temperature on Tenderness of Beef Longissimus Lumborum and Gluteus Medius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of blade tenderization, aging time, and aging temperature on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) steaks. Beef strip loins (n = 300) and top sirloin butts (n = 300) were selected from a large beef processor and transported...

  15. Effects of prenatal care on child health at age 5.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kelly; Corman, Hope; Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-02-01

    The broad goal of contemporary prenatal care is to promote the health of the mother, child, and family through the pregnancy, delivery, and the child's development. Although the vast majority of mothers giving birth in developed countries receive prenatal care, past research has not found compelling evidence that early or adequate prenatal care has favorable effects on birth outcomes. It is possible that prenatal care confers health benefits to the child that do not become apparent until after the perinatal period. Using data from a national urban birth cohort study in the US, we estimate the effects of prenatal care on four markers of child health at age 5-maternal-reported health status, asthma diagnosis, overweight, and height. Prenatal care, defined a number of different ways, does not appear to have any effect on the outcomes examined. The findings are robust and suggest that routine health care encounters during the prenatal period could potentially be used more effectively to enhance children's health trajectories. However, future research is needed to explore the effects of prenatal care on additional child health and developmental outcomes as well as the effects of preconceptional and maternal lifetime healthcare on child health.

  16. Aging degradation of cast stainless steels: Effects on mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1987-06-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water operating conditions. Mechanical property data are presented from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 450, 400, 350, 320, and 290/sup 0/C. The results indicate that thermal aging increases the tensile strength and decreases the impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus of the steels. Also, the ductile-to-brittle transition curve shifts to higher temperatures. The fracture toughness results are consistent with the Charpy-impact data, i.e., the relative reduction in J/sub IC/ is similar to the relative decrease in impact energy. The ferrite content and concentration of C in the steel have a strong effect on the overall process of low-temperature embrittlement. The low-carbon CF-3 steels are the most resistant and Mo-containing CF-8M steels are most susceptible to embrittlement. Weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundaries by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the kinetics and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M steels, particularly after aging at temperatures greater than or equal to400/sup 0/C. The influence of N content and distribution of ferrite on loss of toughness are discussed. The data also indicate that existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 280 to 450/sup 0/C, i.e., extrapolation of high-temperature data to reactor temperatures may not be valid for some compositions of cast stainless steel.

  17. Effects of Age on Cognitive Control during Semantic Categorization

    PubMed Central

    Mudar, Raksha A.; Chiang, Hsueh-Sheng; Maguire, Mandy J.; Spence, Jeffrey S.; Eroh, Justin; Michael, A. Kraut; Hart, John

    2015-01-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to study age effects of perceptual (basic-level) vs. perceptual-semantic (superordinate-level) categorization on cognitive control using the go/nogo paradigm. Twenty-two younger (11 M; 21±2.2 years) and 22 older adults (9 M; 63±5.8 years) completed two visual go/nogo tasks. In the single car task (SiC) (basic), go/nogo responses were made based on single exemplars of a car (go) and a dog (nogo). In the object animal task (ObA) (superordinate), responses were based on multiple exemplars of objects (go) and animals (nogo). Each task consisted of 200 trials: 160 (80%) ‘go’ trials that required a response through button pressing and 40 (20%) ‘nogo’ trials that required inhibition/withholding of a response. ERP data revealed significantly reduced nogo-N2 and nogo-P3 amplitudes in older compared to younger adults, whereas go-N2 and go-P3 amplitudes were comparable in both groups during both categorization tasks. Although the effects of categorization levels on behavioral data and P3 measures were similar in both groups with longer response times, lower accuracy scores, longer P3 latencies, and lower P3 amplitudes in ObA compared to SiC, N2 latency revealed age group differences moderated by the task. Older adults had longer N2 latency for ObA compared to SiC, in contrast, younger adults showed no N2 latency difference between SiC and ObA. Overall, these findings suggest that age differentially affects neural processing related to cognitive control during semantic categorization. Furthermore, in older adults, unlike in younger adults, levels of categorization modulate neural processing related to cognitive control even at the early stages (N2). PMID:25823764

  18. The Relative Age Effect in Youth Soccer Players from Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez Diaz Del Campo, David; Pastor Vicedo, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez Villora, Sixto; Contreras Jordan, Onofre Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the existence of Relative Age Effect (RAE) at youth level in both elite and amateur Spanish soccer clubs, and also to carry out an analysis providing with information on how this effect has evolved in recent years. We have obtained information on the youth teams of the 20 clubs belonging to the Spanish Professional Football League (LFP) in two separate seasons (2005-2006 and 2008-2009) as well as data on five youth academies belonging to amateur clubs. The collected data revealed an over- representation of players born in the first months of the selection year in all groups of analysis (Elite 2005-2006, Elite 2008-2009 and Amateurs), although only the Elite groups showed significant variations in birth-date distribution in relation to the Spanish population. The results showed a reduction in RAE from the 2005-2006 season to the 2008-2009 season. The following variables - playing position, the number of years each player has spent in their specific age group and the category of the team at each club were shown not to have influence on the extent of RAE. Key points There was RAE in all groups analyzed, although only the Elite groups showed significant variations in birth-date distribution in relation to the general population. RAE is more evident in the Elite groups than in the Amateur probably because of the detection process, which is more thorough in the Elite groups. Playing position, number of years in their specific age group and category of the team did not have any influence on the extent of RAE. Any attempts to prevent RAE should be based on a stable sport policy and the implication of all the stakeholders in the system. All of them should think in the development of a player as a long-term project. PMID:24149685

  19. The Theory Behind the Age-Related Positivity Effect

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Andrew E.; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    The “positivity effect” refers to an age-related trend that favors positive over negative stimuli in cognitive processing. Relative to their younger counterparts, older people attend to and remember more positive than negative information. Since the effect was initially identified and the conceptual basis articulated (Mather and Carstensen, 2005) scores of independent replications and related findings have appeared in the literature. Over the same period, a number of investigations have failed to observe age differences in the cognitive processing of emotional material. When findings are considered in theoretical context, a reliable pattern of evidence emerges that helps to refine conceptual tenets. In this article we articulate the operational definition and theoretical foundations of the positivity effect and review the empirical evidence based on studies of visual attention, memory, decision making, and neural activation. We conclude with a discussion of future research directions with emphasis on the conditions where a focus on positive information may benefit and/or impair cognitive performance in older people. PMID:23060825

  20. Aging effects of US space nuclear systems in orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, B.W.; Huang, R.; Tammara, S.R.; Thielke, N.R.

    1982-05-14

    This report presents information and data in support of a cost-benefit analysis being performed by Fair child Industries (FI) on the feasibility of retrieving existing US space nuclear systems in earth orbit by the Space Shuttle. This report evaluates, for US space nuclear systems presently in orbit, the radioisotopic inventory and external radiation field as a function of time, the effect of aging on fuel containment materials over the projected lifetime of the system, and the possible radioactive source terms should reentry eventually occur. Although the radioisotopic inventories and radiation fields have been evaluated for all systems, Transit 4A and Transit Triad have been emphasized in the evaluation of the aging effects and reentry consequences because these spacecraft have the shortest projected orbital lifetimes (570 and 150 years, respectively). In addition to existing systems in orbit, the radioisotopic inventory, radiation field, and reentry source terms have been evaluated for a General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) in a parking orbit due to an aborted Galileo Mission or International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM).

  1. Toward Addressing the Issues of Site Selection in District Effectiveness Research: A Two-Level Hierarchical Linear Growth Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Alex J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: District effectiveness research (DER) is an emerging field concerned with identifying the organizational structures, administration, and leadership practices at the school district level that help districts find success with all of their students across the schools within the system. This work has mirrored much of the early school…

  2. Cultural Nuances, Assumptions, and the Butterfly Effect: Addressing the Unpredictability Caused by Unconscious Values Structures in Cross-Cultural Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remer, Rory

    2007-01-01

    Cultural values, cross-cultural interaction patterns that are produced by dynamical (chaotic) systems, have a significant impact on interaction, particularly among and between people from different cultures. The butterfly effect, which states that small differences in initial conditions may have severe consequences for patterns in the long run,…

  3. The biotic ligand model approach for addressing effects of exposure water chemistry on aquatic toxicity of metals: Genesis and challenges

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major uncertainty in many aquatic risk assessments for toxic chemicals is the aggregate effect of the physicochemical characteristics of exposure media on toxicity, and how this affects extrapolation of laboratory test results to natural systems. A notable example of this is h...

  4. Addressing the Effects of Reciprocal Teaching on the Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary of 1st-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Eliana; Osana, Helena P.; Venkatesh, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Adapted Reciprocal Teaching (ART) on the receptive and expressive flight-word vocabulary of 1st-grade students. During ART, classroom interactions produced narrative contexts within which students assumed responsibility for applying new flight words in personally meaningful ways. Students in the control group…

  5. Effect of aging on rheology of ball clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonthai, Tienchai

    2002-01-01

    The behaviors of clay-water suspensions such as deflocculation or rheological properties are not constant but change with time. Aging has been recognized for changing the rheological properties of clay suspensions. This work provided information about the effects of the moisture contents in ball clay lumps and clay air exposure time on their processability. Dynamic oscillatory rheometry using a vane-in-cup geometry was used to characterize the rheological behavior of ball clay suspensions in terms of elastic modulus, viscous modulus and yield stress as a function of aging time. A light scattering size analyzer was used to examine the agglomerate size distribution of ball clay suspensions which affected the rheological behavior. Soluble ion release (both cations and anions) in the filtrate of suspensions was measured by ion chromatography. Low and high lignitic ball clay suspensions were dispersed with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) or sodium polyacrylate at specific gravity 1.3 and 1.6 in two dispersion states: fully deflocculated (minimum viscosity) and under deflocculated. Suspensions prepared using freshly mined ball clays required more dispersant than suspensions prepared using dry ball clays to achieve minimum viscosity due to a difference in agglomerate size distribution. The agglomerate size distribution of suspensions prepared using dry clays was broader than that of suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays. In suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays, there were many uniformly small agglomerates having loose water inside, while in suspensions prepared using dry clays, the capillary effect and bonding between clay particles resulting from drying broke clay aggregates apart into agglomerate structures composed of a few to many clay particles. For suspensions prepared using dry clays after one day suspension aging, the elastic modulus and yield stress decreased due to the change in agglomerate size distribution of suspensions but increased for

  6. U.S. view of human problems to be addressed for long duration space flights. [physiological and psychological effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Russian and American space programs have consisted of several thousands of hours of exposure of man to the space environment. In spite of numerous biological phenomena of adaptation observed, the space travellers have displayed, after their return, no enduring pathological effect. Although the usable data remain too limited to reflect fully the effects of space flight, it is possible to sketch the biological responses in the absence of gravity and to define the work bases for the future. Beyond its basic physiological effects, weightlessness has operational consequences in the daily life of the astronauts. These consequences will be still more evident during missions of long duration. The conclusions drawn in flight as well as on the ground are reviewed, and future requirements concerning prolonged flights are outlined. The gaps in actual knowledge are discussed and solutions are suggested. The problems of habitability are considered, particularly those which remain at present without satisfactory solutions: psychological responses to a confined life, cleaning, hygiene, and used material.

  7. Effectiveness and Tradeoffs between Portfolios of Adaptation Strategies Addressing Future Climate and Socioeconomic Uncertainties in California's Central Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansey, M. K.; Van Lienden, B.; Das, T.; Munevar, A.; Young, C. A.; Flores-Lopez, F.; Huntington, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Central Valley of California is one of the major agricultural areas in the United States. The Central Valley Project (CVP) is operated by the Bureau of Reclamation to serve multiple purposes including generating approximately 4.3 million gigawatt hours of hydropower and providing, on average, 5 million acre-feet of water per year to irrigate approximately 3 million acres of land in the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Tulare Lake basins, 600,000 acre-feet per year of water for urban users, and 800,000 acre-feet of annual supplies for environmental purposes. The development of effective adaptation and mitigation strategies requires assessing multiple risks including potential climate changes as well as uncertainties in future socioeconomic conditions. In this study, a scenario-based analytical approach was employed by combining three potential 21st century socioeconomic futures with six representative climate and sea level change projections developed using a transient hybrid delta ensemble method from an archive of 112 bias corrected spatially downscaled CMIP3 global climate model simulations to form 18 future socioeconomic-climate scenarios. To better simulate the effects of climate changes on agricultural water demands, analyses of historical agricultural meteorological station records were employed to develop estimates of future changes in solar radiation and atmospheric humidity from the GCM simulated temperature and precipitation. Projected changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide were computed directly by weighting SRES emissions scenarios included in each representative climate projection. These results were used as inputs to a calibrated crop water use, growth and yield model to simulate the effects of climate changes on the evapotranspiration and yields of major crops grown in the Central Valley. Existing hydrologic, reservoir operations, water quality, hydropower, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and both urban and agricultural economic models were integrated

  8. Formulation of the Age-Education Index: Measuring Age and Education Effects in Neuropsychological Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Max; Eng, Goi Khia; Rapisarda, Attilio; Subramaniam, Mythily; Kraus, Michael; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Collinson, Simon Lowes

    2013-01-01

    The complex interplay of education, age, and cognitive performance on various neuropsychological tests is examined in the current study. New education indices were formulated and further investigated to reveal how age and education variances work together to account for performance on neuropsychological tests. Participants were 830…

  9. Skin aging and oxidative stress: Equol's anti-aging effects via biochemical and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lephart, Edwin D

    2016-11-01

    Oxygen in biology is essential for life. It comes at a cost during normal cellular function, where reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by oxidative metabolism. Human skin exposed to solar ultra-violet radiation (UVR) dramatically increases ROS production/oxidative stress. It is important to understand the characteristics of human skin and how chronological (intrinsic) aging and photo-aging (extrinsic aging) occur via the impact of ROS production by cascade signaling pathways. The goal is to oppose or neutralize ROS insults to maintain good dermal health. Botanicals, as active ingredients, represent one of the largest categories used in dermatology and cosmeceuticals to combat skin aging. An emerging botanical is equol, a polyphenolic/isoflavonoid molecule found in plants and food products and via gastrointestinal metabolism from precursor compounds. Introductory sections cover oxygen, free radicals (ROS), oxidative stress, antioxidants, human skin aging, cellular/molecular ROS events in skin, steroid enzymes/receptors/hormonal actions and genetic factors in aging skin. The main focus of this review covers the characteristics of equol (phytoestrogenic, antioxidant and enhancement of extracellular matrix properties) to reduce skin aging along with its anti-aging skin influences via reducing oxidative stress cascade events by a variety of biochemical/molecular actions and mechanisms to enhance human dermal health.

  10. JV Task 119 - Effects of Aging on Treated Activated Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin Olson; Lucinda Hamre; John Pavlish; Blaise Mibeck

    2009-03-25

    For both the United States and Canada, testing has been under way for electric utilities to find viable and economical mercury control strategies to meet pending future mercury emission limits. The technology that holds the most promise for mercury control in low-chlorine lignite to meet the needs of the Clean Air Act in the United States and the Canada-Wide Standards in Canada is injection of treated activated carbon (AC) into the flue gas stream. Most of the treated carbons are reported to be halogenated, often with bromine. Under a previous multiyear project headed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), testing was performed on a slipstream unit using actual lignite-derived flue gas to evaluate various sorbent technologies for their effectiveness, performance, and cost. Testing under this project showed that halogenated ACs performed very well, with mercury capture rates often {ge} 90%. However, differences were noted between treated ACs with respect to reactivity and capacity, possibly as a result of storage conditions. Under certain conditions (primarily storage in ambient air), notable performance degradation had occurred in mercury capture efficiency. Therefore, a small exploratory task within this project evaluated possible differences resulting from storage conditions and subsequent effects of aging that might somehow alter their chemical or physical properties. In order to further investigate this potential degradation of treated (halogenated) ACs, the EERC, together with DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), SaskPower, and Otter Tail Power Company, assessed the aging effects of brominated ACs for the effect that different storage durations, temperatures, and humidity conditions have on the mercury sorption capacity of treated ACs. No aging effects on initial capture activity were observed for any carbons or conditions in the investigation

  11. Effect of high-intensity exercise on aged mouse brain mitochondria, neurogenesis, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    E, Lezi; Burns, Jeffrey M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-11-01

    In aged mice, we assessed how intensive exercise affects brain bioenergetics, inflammation, and neurogenesis-relevant parameters. After 8 weeks of a supra-lactate threshold treadmill exercise intervention, 21-month-old C57BL/6 mice showed increased brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α protein, mammalian target of rapamycin and phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin protein, citrate synthase messenger RNA, and mitochondrial DNA copy number. Hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) gene expression trended higher, and a positive correlation between VEGF-A and PRC messenger RNA levels was observed. Brain doublecortin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and CCL11 gene expression, as well as plasma CCL11 protein levels, were unchanged. Despite these apparent negative findings, a negative correlation between plasma CCL11 protein levels and hippocampal doublecortin gene expression was observed; further analysis indicated exercise may mitigate this relationship. Overall, our data suggest supra-lactate threshold exercise activates a partial mitochondrial biogenesis in aged mice, and a gene (VEGF-A) known to support neurogenesis. Our data are consistent with another study that found systemic inflammation in general, and CCL11 protein specifically, suppresses hippocampal neurogenesis. Our study supports the view that intense exercise above the lactate threshold may benefit the aging brain; future studies to address the extent to which exercise-generated lactate mediates the observed effects are warranted.

  12. Effects of age and physical fitness on microcirculatory function.

    PubMed

    Franzoni, Ferdinando; Galetta, Fabio; Morizzo, Carmela; Lubrano, Valter; Palombo, Carlo; Santoro, Gino; Ferrannini, Eleuterio; Quiñones-Galvan, Alfredo

    2004-03-01

    Sedentary aging is associated with endothelial dysfunction and nitric oxide (NO) impairment. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of regular physical exercise on nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentrations and microcirculatory function in older men compared with young individuals. We measured NOx plasma concentrations and baseline and stimulated skin blood flow (SBF) by laser Doppler flowmetry in 39 male athletes [range, 22-72 years; maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), 60.0 +/- 4.7 ml.min(-1).kg of body weight(-1) (mean +/- S.D.)] and 45 age- and sex-matched sedentary controls (VO2max, 38.0 +/- 7.1 ml.min(-1).kg of body weight(-1)). NOx concentrations were higher in athletes than in controls (50.4 +/- 16.3 compared with 39.0 +/- 15.4 micromol/l; P<0.005), whereas baseline SBF was comparable. Hand SBF after heating and ischaemia and foot SBF after heating were higher in athletes (P<0.0001) than in controls. By comparing the lowest and the highest tertile of age, sedentary young subjects had higher NOx concentrations than sedentary older subjects (43.3 +/- 13.4 compared with 31.8 +/- 12.2 micromol/l respectively; P<0.05). Exercise abolished this difference (49.1 +/- 9.6 micromol/l for young subjects and 52.1 +/- 11.5 micromol/l for older subjects; not significant). Resting SBF was similar in all the subgroups, but stimulated SBFs were lower in both subgroups of untrained compared with trained subjects. NOx concentrations were positively correlated with VO2max (r=0.46, P<0.001). Stimulated SBFs were correlated with NOx (r>0.30, P<0.05). These findings show that chronic exercise may improve endothelial function in older (and young) men, probably by increasing NO availability.

  13. [Keynote address: Climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Forrister, D.

    1994-12-31

    Broadly speaking, the climate issue is moving from talk to action both in the United States and internationally. While few nations have adopted strict controls or stiff new taxes, a number of them are developing action plans that are making clear their intention to ramp up activity between now and the year 2000... and beyond. There are sensible, economically efficient strategies to be undertaken in the near term that offer the possibility, in many countries, to avoid more draconian measures. These strategies are by-and-large the same measures that the National Academy of Sciences recommended in a 1991 report called, Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. The author thinks the Academy`s most important policy contribution was how it recommended the nations act in the face of uncertain science and high risks--that cost effective measures are adopted as cheap insurance... just as nations insure against other high risk, low certainty possibilities, like catastrophic health insurance, auto insurance, and fire insurance. This insurance theme is still right. First, the author addresses how the international climate change negotiations are beginning to produce insurance measures. Next, the author will discuss some of the key issues to watch in those negotiations that relate to longer-term insurance. And finally, the author will report on progress in the United States on the climate insurance plan--The President`s Climate Action Plan.

  14. Annual age-grouping and athlete development: a meta-analytical review of relative age effects in sport.

    PubMed

    Cobley, Stephen; Baker, Joseph; Wattie, Nick; McKenna, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Annual age-grouping is a common organizational strategy in sport. However, such a strategy appears to promote relative age effects (RAEs). RAEs refer both to the immediate participation and long-term attainment constraints in sport, occurring as a result of chronological age and associated physical (e.g. height) differences as well as selection practices in annual age-grouped cohorts. This article represents the first meta-analytical review of RAEs, aimed to collectively determine (i) the overall prevalence and strength of RAEs across and within sports, and (ii) identify moderator variables. A total of 38 studies, spanning 1984-2007, containing 253 independent samples across 14 sports and 16 countries were re-examined and included in a single analysis using odds ratios and random effects procedures for combining study estimates. Overall results identified consistent prevalence of RAEs, but with small effect sizes. Effect size increased linearly with relative age differences. Follow-up analyses identified age category, skill level and sport context as moderators of RAE magnitude. Sports context involving adolescent (aged 15-18 years) males, at the representative (i.e. regional and national) level in highly popular sports appear most at risk to RAE inequalities. Researchers need to understand the mechanisms by which RAEs magnify and subside, as well as confirm whether RAEs exist in female and more culturally diverse contexts. To reduce and eliminate this social inequality from influencing athletes' experiences, especially within developmental periods, direct policy, organizational and practitioner intervention is required.

  15. Is There a Paradox of Aging: When the Negative Aging Stereotype Meets the Positivity Effect in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liqing; Lu, Jia; Chen, Guopeng; Dong, Li; Yao, Yujia

    2017-01-01

    Background/Study Context: Socioemotional selectivity theory (SST) states that the positivity effect is a result of older adults' emotion regulation and that older adults derive more emotional satisfaction from prioritizing positive information processing. The authors explored whether the positivity effect appeared when the negative aging stereotype was activated in older adults and also whether the effect differed between mixed and unmixed valence conditions.

  16. Age effects on discrimination of timing in auditory sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbons, Peter J.; Gordon-Salant, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The experiments examined age-related changes in temporal sensitivity to increments in the interonset intervals (IOI) of components in tonal sequences. Discrimination was examined using reference sequences consisting of five 50-ms tones separated by silent intervals; tone frequencies were either fixed at 4 kHz or varied within a 2-4-kHz range to produce spectrally complex patterns. The tonal IOIs within the reference sequences were either equal (200 or 600 ms) or varied individually with an average value of 200 or 600 ms to produce temporally complex patterns. The difference limen (DL) for increments of IOI was measured. Comparison sequences featured either equal increments in all tonal IOIs or increments in a single target IOI, with the sequential location of the target changing randomly across trials. Four groups of younger and older adults with and without sensorineural hearing loss participated. Results indicated that DLs for uniform changes of sequence rate were smaller than DLs for single target intervals, with the largest DLs observed for single targets embedded within temporally complex sequences. Older listeners performed more poorly than younger listeners in all conditions, but the largest age-related differences were observed for temporally complex stimulus conditions. No systematic effects of hearing loss were observed.

  17. ASC Supercomputers Predict Effects of Aging on Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, A; Reisman, D B; Wolfer, W G

    2005-08-25

    In an extensive molecular dynamics (MD) study of shock compression of aluminum containing such microscopic defects as found in aged plutonium, LLNL scientists have demonstrated that ASC supercomputers live up to their promise as powerful tools to predict aging phenomena in the nuclear stockpile. Although these MD investigations are carried out on material samples containing only about 10 to 40 million atoms, and being not much bigger than a virus particle, they have shown that reliable materials properties and relationships between them can be extracted for density, temperature, pressure, and dynamic strength. This was proven by comparing their predictions with experimental data of the Hugoniot, with dynamic strength inferred from gas-gun experiments, and with the temperatures behind the shock front as calculated with hydro-codes. The effects of microscopic helium bubbles and of radiation-induced dislocation loops and voids on the equation of state were also determined and found to be small and in agreement with earlier theoretical predictions and recent diamond-anvil-cell experiments. However, these microscopic defects play an essential role in correctly predicting the dynamic strength for these nano-crystalline samples. These simulations also prove that the physics involved in shock compression experiments remains the same for macroscopic specimens used in gas-gun experiments down to micrometer samples to be employed in future NIF experiments. Furthermore, a practical way was discovered to reduce plastic instabilities in NIF target materials by introducing finely dispersed defects.

  18. Health effects of digital textbooks on school-age children: a grounded theory approach.

    PubMed

    Seomun, Gyeongae; Lee, Jung-Ah; Kim, Eun-Young; Im, Meeyoung; Kim, Miran; Park, Sun-A; Lee, Youngjin

    2013-10-01

    This qualitative study used the grounded theory approach to analyze digital textbook-related health experiences of school-age children. In-depth interviews were held with 40 elementary school students who had used digital textbooks for at least a year. Data analysis revealed a total of 56 concepts, 20 subcategories, and 11 categories related to digital textbook health issues, the central phenomena being "health-related experiences." Students' health-related experiences were classified into "physical" and "psychological" symptoms. Adverse health effects related to digital textbook usage were addressed via both "student-led" and "instructor-led" coping strategies. Students' coping strategies were often inefficient, but instructor-led strategies seemed to prevent health problems. When health issues were well managed, students tended to accept digital textbooks as educational tools. Our findings suggest that students can form healthy computer habits if digital textbook usage is directed in a positive manner.

  19. Dietary wolfberry supplementation enhances the protective effect of flu vaccine against influenza challenge in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaogang; Wang, Junpeng; Niu, Xinli; Smith, Donald; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2014-02-01

    Current vaccines for influenza do not fully protect the aged against influenza infection. Although wolfberry (goji berry) has been shown to improve immune response, including enhanced antibody production, after vaccination in the aged, it is not known if this effect would translate to better protection after influenza infection, nor is its underlying mechanism well understood. To address these issues, we conducted a study using a 2 × 2 design in which aged male mice (20-22 mo) were fed a control or a 5% wolfberry diet for 30 d, then immunized with an influenza vaccine or saline (control) on days 31 and 52 of the dietary intervention, and finally challenged with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus. Mice fed wolfberry had higher influenza antibody titers and improved symptoms (less postinfection weight loss) compared with the mice treated by vaccine alone. Furthermore, an in vitro mechanistic study showed that wolfberry supplementation enhanced maturation and activity of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in aged mice, as indicated by phenotypic change in expression of DC activation markers major histocompatibility complex class II, cluster of differentiation (CD) 40, CD80, and CD86, and functional change in DC production of cytokines interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α as well as DC endocytosis. Also, adoptive transfer of wolfberry-treated bone marrow DCs (loaded with ovalbumin(323-339)-peptide) promoted antigen-specific T cell proliferation as well as interleukin-4 and interferon-γ production in CD4(+) T cells. In summary, our data indicate that dietary wolfberry enhances the efficacy of influenza vaccination, resulting in better host protection to prevent subsequent influenza infection; this effect may be partly attributed to improved DC function.

  20. Dietary and genetic effects on age-related loss of gene silencing reveal epigenetic plasticity of chromatin repression during aging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Du, Guyu; Tobias, Ethan; Wood, Jason G; Whitaker, Rachel; Neretti, Nicola; Helfand, Stephen L

    2013-11-01

    During aging, changes in chromatin state that alter gene transcription have been postulated to result in expression of genes that are normally silenced, leading to deleterious age-related effects on cellular physiology. Despite the prevalence of this hypothesis, it is primarily in yeast that loss of gene silencing with age has been well documented. We use a novel position effect variegation (PEV) reporter in Drosophila melanogaster to show that age-related loss of repressive heterochromatin is associated with loss of gene silencing in metazoans and is affected by Sir2, as it is in yeast. The life span-extending intervention, calorie restriction (CR), delays the age-related loss of gene silencing, indicating that loss of gene silencing is a component of normal aging. Diet switch experiments show that such flies undergo a rapid change in their level of gene silencing, demonstrating the epigenetic plasticity of chromatin during aging and highlighting the potential role of diet and metabolism in chromatin maintenance, Thus, diet and related interventions may be of therapeutic importance for age-related diseases, such as cancer.

  1. The effect of multisensory cues on attention in aging.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Jeannette R; Verghese, Joe; Dumas, Kristina; Wang, Cuiling; Holtzer, Roee

    2012-09-07

    The attention network test (ANT) assesses the effect of alerting and orienting cues on a visual flanker task measuring executive attention. Previous findings revealed that older adults demonstrate greater reaction times (RT) benefits when provided with visual orienting cues that offer both spatial and temporal information of an ensuing target. Given the overlap of neural substrates and networks involved in multisensory processing and cueing (i.e., alerting and orienting), an investigation of multisensory cueing effects on RT was warranted. The current study was designed to determine whether participants, both old and young, benefited from receiving multisensory alerting and orienting cues. Eighteen young (M=19.17 years; 45% female) and eighteen old (M=76.44 years; 61% female) individuals that were determined to be non-demented and without any medical or psychiatric conditions that would affect their performance were included. Results revealed main effects for the executive attention and orienting networks, but not for the alerting network. In terms of orienting, both old and young adults demonstrated significant orienting effects for auditory-somatosensory (AS), auditory-visual (AV), and visual-somatosensory (VS) cues. RT benefits of multisensory compared to unisensory orienting effects differed by cue type and age group; younger adults demonstrated greater RT benefits for AS orienting cues whereas older adults demonstrated greater RT benefits for AV orienting cues. Both groups, however, demonstrated significant RT benefits for multisensory VS orienting cues. These findings provide evidence for the facilitative effect of multisensory orienting cues, and not multisensory alerting cues, in old and young adults.

  2. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  3. Hydrogen effects on the age hardening behavior of 2024 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. A.; Louthan, M. R., Jr.; Sisson, R. D., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    It has been found that the fatigue crack growth rate in aluminum alloys increases significantly in the presence of moisture. This phenomenon along with a moisture effect observed in another context has been attributed to 'embrittlement' of the aluminum by absorbed hydrogen generated by the reaction of moisture with freshly exposed aluminum. A description is given of a number of age hardening experiments involving 2024 aluminum. These experiments show that a mechanism related to the segregation of absorbed hydrogen to the coherent theta-double-prime interfaces may account for the observed reduction in fatigue life. It is pointed out that this segregation promotes a loss of coherency in the hydrogen rich region at a fatigue crack tip. Subsequently, the loss of coherency causes local softening and reduces fatigue life.

  4. Psychotherapist countertransference in the nuclear age: Effects on therapeutic interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Oderberg, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, there has been considerable attention in the psychology literature to mental health problems related to living in a world threatened by nuclear destruction. Questionnaires were mailed to 630 psychotherapists from the Colorado Psychological Association, California Psychotherapists for Social Responsibility, California Psychologists for Social Responsibility, the US Army, and the APA Division of Military Psychology; 174 questionnaires were returned. It was hypothesized that liberalism, nuclear weapons opposition, nuclear concern, nuclear awareness, and anti-nuclear activism in psychotherapists would facilitate perception of, and openness to working with, a client's nuclear concerns and thus, would be positively correlated with intentions to discuss nuclear issues with clients in three different clinical vignettes. Results indicated that when controlling for subject group, psychotherapy orientation, age, sex, and income, all five independent variables were positively correlated with responses to all three clinical vignettes, with nuclear concern having the strongest unique effect in accounting for variance in responses to the vignettes.

  5. Compensatory Effect between Aortic Stiffening and Remodelling during Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Guala, Andrea; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The arterial tree exhibits a complex spatio-temporal wave pattern, whose healthy behaviour depends on a subtle balance between mechanical and geometrical properties. Several clinical studies demonstrated that such a balance progressively breaks down during ageing, when the aorta stiffens and remodels by increasing its diameter. These two degenerative processes however, have different impacts on the arterial wave pattern. They both tend to compensate for each other, thus reducing the detrimental effect they would have had if they had arisen individually. This remarkable compensatory mechanism is investigated by a validated multi-scale model, with the aim to elucidate how aortic stiffening and remodelling quantitatively impact the complex interplay between forward and reflected backward waves in the arterial network. We focus on the aorta and on the pressure at the ventricular-aortic interface, which epidemiological studies demonstrate to play a key role in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26426360

  6. Densified biomass can cost-effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and address energy security in thermal applications.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas O; McNeal, Frederick M; Spatari, Sabrina; G Abler, David; Adler, Paul R

    2012-01-17

    Regional supplies of biomass are currently being evaluated as feedstocks in energy applications to meet renewable portfolio (RPS) and low carbon fuel standards. We investigate the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and associated abatement costs resulting from using densified switchgrass for thermal and electrical energy. In contrast to the large and positive abatement costs for using biomass in electricity generation ($149/Mg CO(2)e) due to the low cost of coal and high feedstock and power plant operation costs, abatement costs for replacing fuel oil with biomass in thermal applications are large and negative (-$52 to -$92/Mg CO(2)e), resulting in cost savings. Replacing fuel oil with biomass in thermal applications results in least cost reductions compared to replacing coal in electricity generation, an alternative that has gained attention due to RPS legislation and the centralized production model most often considered in U.S. policy. Our estimates indicate a more than doubling of liquid fuel displacement when switchgrass is substituted for fuel oil as opposed to gasoline, suggesting that, in certain U.S. locations, such as the northeast, densified biomass would help to significantly decarbonize energy supply with regionally sourced feedstock, while also reducing imported oil. On the basis of supply projections from the recently released Billion Ton Report, there will be enough sustainably harvested biomass available in the northeast by 2022 to offset the entirety of heating oil demand in the same region. This will save NE consumers between $2.3 and $3.9 billion annually. Diverting the same resource to electricity generation would cost the region $7.7 billion per year. While there is great need for finding low carbon substitutes for coal power and liquid transportation fuels in the U.S., we argue that in certain regions it makes cost- (and GHG mitigation-) effective sense to phase out liquid heating fuels with locally produced biomass first.

  7. The Effect of Age on Attention Level: A Comparison of Two Age Groups.

    PubMed

    Lufi, Dubi; Segev, Shahar; Blum, Adi; Rosen, Tal; Haimov, Iris

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, a computerized test was used to compare the attention level of a group of healthy older participants aged 75 with that of a group of students aged 31. The second part of the study examined only the older participants and sought to discover how three measures of lifestyle were related to measures of attention. The results showed that the young group performed better on measures of attention. No differences between the two age groups were found on measures of impulsivity and on four measures of sustained attention. A discriminant function analysis found that reaction time and standard deviation of reaction time can explain 87.50% of the variance in both groups. The older participants' answers to the lifestyle questions showed that variables of attention correlated significantly with time spent watching television and reading. The results indicate that attention level declines with age; however, no decline was observed on measures of impulsivity and sustained attention.

  8. Exploring Ivorian perspectives on the effectiveness of the current Ivorian science curriculum in addressing issues related to HIV/AIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ado, Gustave Firmin

    School-based HIV/AIDS science education has the potential to impact students when integrated into the science curriculum. However, this mixed method study shows that school-based HIV/AIDS science education is often not infused into career subjects such as science education but integrated into civics education and taught by teachers who lack the skills, knowledge, and the training in the delivery of effective school HIV/AIDS education. Since science is where biological events take place, it is suggested that HIV/AIDS science merits being taught in the science education classroom. This study took place in nine public middle schools within two school districts in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, one major urban city in the southern region. The study utilized triangulation of multiple data sources---both qualitative and quantitative. To substantiate the claims made in this study, a range of qualitative methods such as field notes and individual interviews with 39 teachers, 63 sixth grade students, 8 school administrators, and 20 community elders were used. For the quantitative portion 140 teachers and 3510 sixth grade students were surveyed. The findings from the study prioritize science education that includes HIV/AIDS science education for all, with emphasis on HIV/AIDS prevention in Ivory Coast. The factors that influence the implementation of HIV/AIDS curricula within the Ivorian sixth grade classrooms are discussed. Interview and survey data from students, teachers, school administrators, and community elders indicate that in the Ivorian school setting, "gerontocratic" cultural influences, religious beliefs, personal cultural beliefs, and time spent toward the discourse on HIV/AIDS have led to HIV/AIDS education that is often insufficient to change either misconceptions about HIV/AIDS or risky practices. It was also found that approaches to teaching HIV/AIDS does not connect with youth cultures. By reframing and integrating current HIV/AIDS curricula into the science

  9. Formulation of the age-education index: measuring age and education effects in neuropsychological performance.

    PubMed

    Lam, Max; Eng, Goi Khia; Rapisarda, Attilio; Subramaniam, Mythily; Kraus, Michael; Keefe, Richard S E; Collinson, Simon Lowes

    2013-03-01

    The complex interplay of education, age, and cognitive performance on various neuropsychological tests is examined in the current study. New education indices were formulated and further investigated to reveal how age and education variances work together to account for performance on neuropsychological tests. Participants were 830 English-speaking ethnic Chinese. Neuropsychological measures such as Verbal Memory, Digit Sequencing, Token Motor Task, Semantic Fluency, Symbol Coding, Tower of London, Judgment of Line Orientation, and Matrix Reasoning of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale were administered. Education was measured by total years of education and adjusted years of education, as well as ratios of both measures with age. Age and education were associated with neuropsychological performance. Adjusted years of education was associated with fluency and higher cognitive processes, while the ratio between adjusted years of education and age was associated with tasks implicating working memory. Changes in education modalities implicated tasks requiring language abilities. Education and age represent key neurodevelopmental milestones. In light of our findings, special consideration should to be given when neuropsychological assessments are carried out in cross-cultural contexts and in societies where educational systems and pedagogy tend to be complex.

  10. Age effects on B cells and humoral immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2010-01-01

    Both humoral and cellular immune responses are impaired in aged individuals, leading to decreased vaccine responses. Although T cell defects occur, defects in B cells play a significant role in age-related humoral immune changes. The ability to undergo class switch recombination (CSR), the enzyme for CSR, AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase) and the transcription factor E47 are all decreased in aged stimulated B cells. We here present an overview of age-related changes in human B cell markers and functions, and also discuss some controversies in the field of B cell aging. PMID:20728581

  11. Effect of the woman's age on discontinuation of IVF treatment.

    PubMed

    Soullier, Noémie; Bouyer, Jean; Pouly, Jean-Luc; Guibert, Juliette; de La Rochebrochard, Elise

    2011-05-01

    Treatment discontinuations are an important issue in IVF programmes. In the French context, financial constraint does not intervene in discontinuation until older ages. This study examined treatment discontinuation in IVF programmes, according to the woman's age and when there is no financial burden for couples. Medical records were collected for 3037 women who began their IVF programme between 1998 and 2002 in two French IVF units. Up to four attempts were taken into consideration. Cumulative success (delivery) rates were calculated, as well as discontinuation rates. Multiple imputation was applied to estimate a theoretical cumulative success rate as if no woman discontinued treatment before the end of the IVF programme without delivering. Cumulative discontinuation rates at the end of the IVF programme increased with the woman's age (41% for age <35, 56% for age 35-39, 80% for age ⩾40). The benefit in terms of delivery rates of pursuing treatment would be smaller for older women (∼10% for age <35, 7% for age 35-39, 4% for age ⩾40). Even when treatment is reimbursed, the discontinuation rate is high for older women, suggesting that the strong decrease in success rate with age induces older women to discontinue. Treatment discontinuations are an important issue in IVF programmes. In the French context, financial constraint does not intervene in discontinuation until older ages. We aimed to examine treatment discontinuation in IVF programmes, according to the woman's age and when there is no financial burden for couples. Medical records were collected for 3037 women who began their IVF programme between 1998 and 2002 in two French IVF units. Up to four attempts were taken into consideration. Cumulative success (delivery) rates were calculated, as well as discontinuation rates. Multiple imputation was applied to estimate a theoretical cumulative success rate as if no woman discontinued treatment before the end of the IVF programme without delivering. Cumulative

  12. Age differences in the effect of framing on risky choice: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Best, Ryan; Charness, Neil

    2015-09-01

    The framing of decision scenarios in terms of potential gains versus losses has been shown to influence choice preferences between sure and risky options. Normative cognitive changes associated with aging have been known to affect decision making, which has led to a number of studies investigating the influence of aging on the effect of framing. Mata, Josef, Samanez-Larkin, and Hertwig (2011) systematically reviewed the available literature using a meta-analytic approach, but did not include tests of homogeneity or subsequent moderator variable analyses. The current review serves to extend the previous analysis to include such tests as well as update the pool of studies available for analysis. Results for both positively and negatively framed conditions were reviewed using 2 meta-analyses encompassing data collected from 3,232 subjects across 18 studies. Deviating from the previous results, the current analysis found a tendency for younger adults to choose the risky option more often than older adults for positively framed items. Moderator variable analyses found this effect likely to be driven by the specific decision scenario, showing a significant effect, with younger adults choosing the risky option more often in small-amount financial and large-amount mortality-based scenarios. For negatively framed items, the current review found no overall age difference in risky decision making, confirming the results from the prior meta-analysis. Moderator variable analyses conducted to address heterogeneity found younger adults to be more likely than older adults to choose the risky option for negatively framed high-amount mortality-based decision scenarios. Practical implications for older adults are discussed.

  13. Input and Long-Term Effects of Starting Age in Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the long-term effects of starting age and the effects of input in an instructed language learning setting. First, with respect to the effects of starting age, the findings suggest that in the long term and after similar amounts of input, starting age is not a predictor of language outcomes. Second, the study examines the…

  14. The Effects of Age on Second Language Grammar and Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Becky H.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the age of learning effect on second language (L2) acquisition. The research goals of the study were twofold: to test whether there is an independent age effect controlling for other potentially confounding variables, and to clarify the age effect across L2 grammar and speech production domains. The study included 118…

  15. Behavioral activating effects of adrafinil in aged canines.

    PubMed

    Siwak, C T; Gruet, P; Woehrlé, F; Schneider, M; Muggenburg, B A; Murphey, H L; Callahan, H; Milgram, N W

    2000-06-01

    Adrafinil, a vigilance enhancing pharmaceutical, was administered to aged dogs for 14 consecutive days at doses of 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/kg using a crossover design. The effects on spontaneous behavior in a 10-min canine open-field test were systematically recorded every fourth day, starting with day 1 of treatment. The open field tests were given 2 or 10 h following oral administration of capsules containing either adrafinil or lactose, the placebo control. Adrafinil caused an increase in locomotor activity at the three highest doses at both the 2- and 10-h intervals and during both the first (days 1 and 5) and second treatment week (days 9 and 13). Adrafinil also caused a transient increase in directed sniffing. At the highest dose level, adrafinil caused a decrease in urination frequency. The increased locomotion was generally unaccompanied by stereotypical behavior in the test session. There was some variability; a subpopulation of animals showed either no effect, or decreased locomotion. The individual differences were correlated with changes in serum levels of adrafinil 10 h following treatment.

  16. Effects of Aging Structures and Humidity on Fatigue Properties of Maraging Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kousuke; Nagano, Takanori; Moriyama, Michihiko; Wang, Xishu; Kawagoishi, Norio

    Effects of aging structures and humidity on fatigue properties of 350 grade 18% Ni maraging steel were investigated under rotating bending in relative humidity of 25% and 85%. Aging conditions tested were a conventional single aging and a double one which was aged at low temperature after the conventional aging. In each aging, under and peak aged steels were prepared. Tensile strength was increased by the double aging without reduction of the ductility. Proportional relation between fatigue limit and Vickers hardness held until 750HV in low humidity. However fatigue strength was largely decreased by high humidity, especially in the peak aged steel at the single aging. The decrease in fatigue strength by high humidity was mainly caused by the acceleration of a crack initiation due to the anodic dissolution. The acceleration of a crack initiation was larger in the steel peak aged at the single aging with larger precipitated particles.

  17. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  18. Effects of surface conditioning on repair bond strengths of non-aged and aged microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins.

    PubMed

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Özcan, Mutlu; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates effects of aging on repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins and characterizes the interacting surfaces after aging. Disk-shaped composite specimens were assigned to one of three aging conditions: (1) thermocycling (5,000 ×, 5-55 °C), (2) storage in water at 37 °C for 6 months, or (3) immersion in citric acid at 37 °C, pH 3 for 1 week; a non-aged group acted as the control. Two surface conditionings were selected: intermediate adhesive resin application (IAR-application) and chairside silica coating followed by silanization and its specific IAR-application (SC-application). Composite resins, of the same kind as their substrate, were adhered onto the substrates, and repair shear bond strengths were determined, followed by failure type evaluation. Filler particle exposure was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface roughness analyzed using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Surface roughness increased in all composite resins after aging, but filler particle exposure at the surface only increased after thermocycling and citric acid immersion. Composite resin type, surface conditioning, and aging method significantly influenced the repair bond strengths (p < 0.05, three-way analysis of variance) with the least severe effects of water storage. Repair bond strengths in aged composite resins after IAR-application were always lower in non-aged ones, while SC-application led to higher bond strengths than IAR-application after thermocycling and water storage. In addition, SC-application led to more cohesive failures than after IAR-application, regardless the aging method.

  19. Psychophysiological Effects of Aging - Developing a Functional Age Index for Pilots. II Taxonomy of Psychological Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    p.tnodoo Poory cdftt IIsec toodt Wtt" - ’t- r ~ ~ ~ rfe log. to I Iro feldferd- 0L 1 lzr.- ýdiskop lroprsot poocrvrtio.tSforr a nvfltspoto- r mijtwt...be affecto•d. The. skeietal-muscle mass decreases with increasing age. Reduced • horn~ei. production, a decrement of thyroid hormone output, and

  20. Age matters: The effect of onset age of video game play on task-switching abilities.

    PubMed

    Hartanto, Andree; Toh, Wei Xing; Yang, Hwajin

    2016-05-01

    Although prior research suggests that playing video games can improve cognitive abilities, recent empirical studies cast doubt on such findings (Unsworth et al., 2015). To reconcile these inconsistent findings, we focused on the link between video games and task switching. Furthermore, we conceptualized video-game expertise as the onset age of active video-game play rather than the frequency of recent gameplay, as it captures both how long a person has played video games and whether the individual began playing during periods of high cognitive plasticity. We found that the age of active onset better predicted switch and mixing costs than did frequency of recent gameplay; specifically, players who commenced playing video games at an earlier age reaped greater benefits in terms of task switching than did those who started at a later age. Moreover, improving switch costs required a more extensive period of video-game experience than did mixing costs; this finding suggests that certain cognitive abilities benefit from different amounts of video game experience.

  1. Compensation Age Theory: Effect of Chronological Age on Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifshitz-Vahav, Hefziba

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to discuss a new concept, the "Compensation Age Theory (CAT)", for individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The CAT is a holistic framework comprised of four dimensions: (a) the state of the art of the CAT; (b) the theoretical resources which are at the core of the CAT; (c) a series of empirical…

  2. The effects of aging on haptic 2D shape recognition.

    PubMed

    Overvliet, Krista E; Wagemans, J; Krampe, Ralf T

    2013-12-01

    We use the image-mediation model (Klatzky & Lederman, 1987) as a framework to investigate potential sources of adult age differences in the haptic recognition of two-dimensional (2D) shapes. This model states that the low-resolution, temporally sequential, haptic input is translated into a visual image, which is then reperceived through the visual processors, before it is matched against a long-term memory representation and named. In three experiments we tested groups of 12 older (mean age 73.11) and three groups of 12 young adults (mean age 22.80) each. In Experiment 1 we confirm age-related differences in haptic 2D shape recognition, and we show the typical age × complexity interaction. In Experiment 2 we show that if we facilitate the visual translation process, age differences become smaller, but only with simple shapes and not with the more complex everyday objects. In Experiment 3 we target the last step in the model (matching and naming) for complex stimuli. We found that age differences in exploration time were considerably reduced when this component process was facilitated by providing a category name. We conclude that the image-mediation model can explain adult-age differences in haptic recognition, particularly if the role of working memory in forming the transient visual image is considered. Our findings suggest that sensorimotor skills thought to rely on peripheral processes for the most part are critically constrained by age-related changes in central processing capacity in later adulthood.

  3. The effects of aging on Boiling Water Reactor core isolation cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bom Soon

    1994-06-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling system in commercial Boiling Water Reactors. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The failure data, from national databases, as well as plant specific data were reviewed and analyzed to understand the effects of aging on the RCIC system. This analysis identified important components that should receive the highest priority in terms of aging management. The aging characterization provided information on the effects of aging on component failure frequency, failure modes, and failure causes.

  4. Implementation pearls from a new guidebook on improving medication use and outcomes with clinical decision support. Effective CDS is essential for addressing healthcare performance improvement imperatives.

    PubMed

    Sirajuddin, Anwar M; Osheroff, Jerome A; Sittig, Dean F; Chuo, John; Velasco, Ferdinand; Collins, David A

    2009-01-01

    Effective clinical decision support (CDS) is essential for addressing healthcare performance improvement imperatives, but care delivery organizations (CDO) typically struggle with CDS deployment. Ensuring safe and effective medication delivery to patients is a central focus of CDO performance improvement efforts, and this article provides an overview of best-practice strategies for applying CDS to these goals. The strategies discussed are drawn from a new guidebook, co-published and co-sponsored by more than a dozen leading organizations. Developed by scores of CDS implementers and experts, the guidebook outlines key steps and success factors for applying CDS to medication management. A central thesis is that improving outcomes with CDS interventions requires that the CDS five rights be addressed successfully. That is, the interventions must deliver the right information, to the right person, in the right format, through the right channel, at the right point in workflow. This paper provides further details about these CDS five rights, and highlights other important strategies for successful CDS programs.

  5. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  6. Invitational Addresses, 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Arthur I.; And Others

    The full texts of invitational addresses given at the 1965 International Reading Association (IRA) Convention in Detroit, Michigan, by six recipients of IRA citation awards are presented. Gates suggests steps IRA should take to revive and redirect reading research. McCallister discusses the implications of the changing and expanding vocabulary of…

  7. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  8. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  9. Conditional grandmother effects on age at marriage, age at first birth, and completed fertility of daughters and daughters-in-law in historical Krummhörn.

    PubMed

    Johow, Johannes; Voland, Eckart

    2012-09-01

    Based on historical data pertaining to the Krummhörn population (eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Germany), we compared reproductive histories of mothers according to whether the maternal grandmother (MGM) or the paternal grandmother (PGM) or neither of them was resident in the parents' parish at the time of the mother's first birth. In contrast to effects of PGMs, we discovered conditional differences in the MGM's effects between landless people and wealthier, commercial farmers. Our data indicate that the presence of the MGM only lowers the woman's age at marriage (AAM) and her age at the birth of her first child (AFB) in the case of landless families. However, among commercial farmers, who can generally be characterized by a lower AAM and AFB, we found opposite tendencies for the MGM's effect leading to a relatively small delay in AAM and AFB. Moreover, we also analyzed differences in the completed fertility (i.e., children ever born: CEB). Results indicate that landless families in general do have fewer CEB compared with commercial farmers except for those families in which the MGM has been present. Emphasizing that the adaptiveness of investment decisions should depend on the interaction of genetic, lineage-specific (intrinsic) and ecologically imposed (extrinsic) constraints, we conclude that kin strategies consequently address different fitness components under different conditions.

  10. Effect of Aging on ERP Components of Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Kropotov, Juri; Ponomarev, Valery; Tereshchenko, Ekaterina P.; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    As people age, their performance on tasks requiring cognitive control often declines. Such a decline is frequently explained as either a general or specific decline in cognitive functioning with age. In the context of hypotheses suggesting a general decline, it is often proposed that processing speed generally declines with age. A further hypothesis is that an age-related compensation mechanism is associated with a specific cognitive decline. One prominent theory is the compensation hypothesis, which proposes that deteriorated functions are compensated for by higher performing functions. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) in the context of a GO/NOGO task to examine the age-related changes observed during cognitive control in a large group of healthy subjects aged between 18 and 84 years. The main question we attempted to answer was whether we could find neurophysiological support for either a general decline in processing speed or a compensation strategy. The subjects performed a relatively demanding cued GO/NOGO task with similar omissions and reaction times across the five age groups. The ERP waves of cognitive control, such as N2, P3cue and CNV, were decomposed into latent components by means of a blind source separation method. Based on this decomposition, it was possible to more precisely delineate the different neurophysiological and psychological processes involved in cognitive control. These data support the processing speed hypothesis because the latencies of all cognitive control ERP components increased with age, by 8 ms per decade for the early components (<200 ms) and by 20 ms per decade for the late components. At the same time, the compensatory hypothesis of aging was also supported, as the amplitudes of the components localized in posterior brain areas decreased with age, while those localized in the prefrontal cortical areas increased with age in order to maintain performance on this simple task at a relatively stable level

  11. Adaptive male effects on female ageing in seed beetles.

    PubMed

    Maklakov, Alexei A; Kremer, Natacha; Arnqvist, Göran

    2005-12-07

    Selection can favour the evolution of a high reproductive rate early in life even when this results in a subsequent increase in the rate of mortality, because selection is relatively weak late in life. However, the optimal reproductive schedule of a female may be suboptimal to any one of her mates, and males may thus be selected to modulate female reproductive rate. Owing to such sexual conflict, coevolution between males and females may contribute to the evolution of senescence. By using replicated beetle populations selected for reproduction at an early or late age, we show that males evolve to affect senescence in females in a manner consistent with the genetic interests of males. 'Late' males evolved to decelerate senescence and increase the lifespan of control females, relative to 'early' males. Our findings demonstrate that adaptive evolution in one sex may involve its effects on senescence in the other, showing that the evolution of optimal life histories in one sex may be either facilitated or constrained by genes expressed in the other.

  12. Effect of age on biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Cuneyt; Aktas, Binhan Kagan; Bulut, Suleyman; Erbay, Guven; Tagci, Suleyman; Gokkaya, Cevdet S; Baykam, Mehmet M; Memis, Ali

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between patient's age and biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). Data from RRP applied to 305 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were included in the study. Patients were divided into the three age groups, < 60 years, 60-70 years, and > 70 years. The groups were compared regarding adverse pathological findings on RRP specimen, BCR, and biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) rates. The rates of positive surgical margin, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node involvement, RRP specimens' Gleason score, and BCR were not significantly different among the three age groups. bRFS rates were not different either. Nonorgan-confined disease and extracapsular extension (ECE) rates were significantly higher in the group of 60-70 years group than in the other two age groups. Factors associated with BCR in multivariate Cox regression analysis were ECE, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margin, and RRP specimens' Gleason score of ≥ 4+3. Patient age and preoperative prostate specific antigen levels were not identified to be associated with BCR. Post-RRP nonorgan-confined disease and ECE are more frequently seen in patients of 60-70 years of age group than in other age groups. However, patient age is not an independent prognostic factor associated with bRFS.

  13. Age Effects on the Employability--Career Success Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; de Lange, Annet H.; Demerouti, Evangelia; Van der Heijde, Claudia M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the similarity of the factor structure for self-reported versus supervisor-rated employability for two age groups of workers, and then validated a career success enhancing model of employability across the two age groups. The results confirmed a two-factor model including self-reported and supervisor-rated employability as…

  14. Touch perception throughout working life: effects of age and expertise.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Eva-Maria; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Vieluf, Solveig; Godde, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Fine motor skills including precise tactile and haptic perception are essential to the manipulation of objects. With increasing age, one's perception decreases; however, little is known about the state of touch perception in middle-aged adults. This study investigated the extent to which the decline in touch perception affects adults throughout their working life. In addition, the influence of work-related expertise on tactile and haptic perception was examined in an attempt to determine whether expertise, in the form of the frequent use of the fingers, affects perception and counters age-related losses. The study was conducted with subjects from three age groups (18-25, 34-46, and 54-65 years) with two levels of expertise. Expertise was classified by the subjects' occupations. Five sensory tasks of touch perception were conducted. The results confirmed age-related changes in tactile perception over the span of one's working life. Older workers were proven to have lower tactile performance than younger adults. However, middle-aged workers were hardly affected by the perception losses and did not differ significantly from younger adults. Work-related expertise was not proven to either affect tactile and haptic perception or counteract age-related declines. We conclude that the age-related decline gets steeper in the late working life and that specific work-related expertise does not lead to generally improved touch perception that would result in lower thresholds and improved performance in non-expertise specific tasks.

  15. Effect of kenaf fiber age on PLLA composite properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The age of the kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) fiber dictates its pore architecture. The impact of increasing age of plant fiber on the corresponding composite can impact material selection for enhanced composite performance. Bast fibers stems of kenaf, a warm season tropical herbaceous annual plant ...

  16. Effect of alternative aging and accident simulations on polymer properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Alba, C.; Gaussens, G.; LeMeur, M.

    1984-01-01

    The response of eighteen US and French polymer materials to variations in aging and accident simulation techniques has been determined by this experimental program. This information will provide a partial data base by which to judge appropriate simulation practices. The overall research goal was to determine whether some aging and accident simulation techniques are better suited for qualification activities than other alternative simulation techniques.

  17. Berry effects on cognition and motor function in aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last century, the lifespan of humans has almost doubled. Consequently, the percent of the population that is over the age of 65 years has markedly increased, making age-related pathologies a growing concern. Research has demonstrated, in both human and animals, that psychomotor and cognitive...

  18. The effects of age on visual expertise for print.

    PubMed

    Curzietti, Maxime; Bonnefond, Anne; Staub, Bérengère; Vidailhet, Pierre; Doignon-Camus, Nadège

    2017-03-16

    Progressive visual processing decline is a known factor in aging. The present study investigates the evolution of visual expertise for printed stimuli with aging. Fifty-five participants of increasing age (20-30, 40-50, 60-70, 75-85years old) were recruited. Behavioral and EEG data were collected during a lexical decision task, in which words and symbol strings were presented. Analyses of EEG data focused mainly on three major points: visual expertise for print, automatization of the expertise and differences in attentional demand between the processing of words and symbols. Results indicated a preservation of visual expertise with age, with larger N170 amplitude for words than for symbols. Moreover, a decrease in stimulus processing speed was observed as a function of age. No difference in attentional demand as a function of stimulus was observed.

  19. Shared Genetic Effects Between Age at Menarche and Disordered Eating

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jessica H.; Thornton, Laura M.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose An early age at menarche is associated with disordered eating in women. However, it is unclear whether they share genetic factors. The goal of the current study is to delineate the genetic correlation between age at menarche and disordered eating. Methods Participants included 427 monozygotic and 329 dizygotic 16-17 year-old female twins from the Swedish Twin Study of Child and Adolescent Development. Disordered eating was assessed with the Eating Disorder Inventory-2. Age at menarche was assessed via self-report. A bivariate correlated factors model was used to delineate the genetic correlation between age at menarche and disordered eating. Results The analysis revealed a negative genetic correlation of −.18 in the best-fit model indicating that the genetic factors that influence younger age at menarche are associated with increased liability for disordered eating. Conclusion Future research should examine possible causes for this correlation such as the estrogen system and gene-environment interactions. PMID:23084171

  20. Individual differences in children's emotion understanding: effects of age and language.

    PubMed

    Pons, Francisco; Lawson, Joanne; Harris, Paul L; de Rosnay, Marc

    2003-09-01

    Over the last two decades, it has been established that children's emotion understanding changes as they develop. Recent studies have also begun to address individual differences in children's emotion understanding. The first goal of this study was to examine the development of these individual differences across a wide age range with a test assessing nine different components of emotion understanding. The second goal was to examine the relation between language ability and individual differences in emotion understanding. Eighty children ranging in age from 4 to 11 years were tested. Children displayed a clear improvement with age in both their emotion understanding and language ability. In each age group, there were clear individual differences in emotion understanding and language ability. Age and language ability together explained 72% of emotion understanding variance; 20% of this variance was explained by age alone and 27% by language ability alone. The results are discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical implications.

  1. Sadness prediction and response: effects of age and agreeableness.

    PubMed

    Pearman, Ann; Andreoletti, Carrie; Isaacowitz, Derek M

    2010-04-01

    Research has suggested that both age and personality play a role in emotional experience and regulation, but these variables have not been considered together to determine the relative contribution of each. This study simultaneously examined age and agreeableness differences in the experience of sad stimuli. Participants were 46 younger adults (age, M = 22.04 years, SD = 5.41 years) and 48 older adults (age, M = 74.23, SD = 7.82 years). Participants were asked to predict how sad stimuli (i.e., sad photos) would make them feel and were then measured on their actual reaction to the stimuli (reactivity) as well as on their emotional recovery. Agreeableness, but not age, was related to predicted levels of sadness, such that the more agreeable, the higher the predicted sadness (beta = 0.37). In contrast to expectations, prediction accuracy was not related to age or agreeableness. For emotional reactivity, agreeableness (beta = 0.16), but not age, was related to reactivity to sad stimuli (i.e., more agreeable, higher reactivity). Finally, age (beta = 0.14) was significantly related to emotional recovery such that the older adults reported lower levels of sadness at posttest than did the younger adults. Similarly, people who were more agreeable also reported better emotional recovery (beta = 0.15). These relationships were not affected by depression or pretest sadness ratings. Overall, these findings suggest distinct roles for age and agreeableness in predicting different components of the emotion regulation process. An individual with advanced age, high levels of agreeableness, or both may be well-positioned for resilience throughout the emotion regulation process.

  2. 29 CFR 570.5 - Certificates of age and their effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certificates of age and their effect. 570.5 Section 570.5... CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION Certificates of Age § 570.5 Certificates of age and their effect. (a) To protect an employer from unwitting violation of the minimum...

  3. 29 CFR 570.5 - Certificates of age and their effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certificates of age and their effect. 570.5 Section 570.5... CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION Certificates of Age § 570.5 Certificates of age and their effect. (a) To protect an employer from unwitting violation of the minimum...

  4. 29 CFR 570.5 - Certificates of age and their effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certificates of age and their effect. 570.5 Section 570.5... CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION Certificates of Age § 570.5 Certificates of age and their effect. (a) To protect an employer from unwitting violation of the minimum...

  5. 29 CFR 570.5 - Certificates of age and their effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certificates of age and their effect. 570.5 Section 570.5... CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION Certificates of Age § 570.5 Certificates of age and their effect. (a) To protect an employer from unwitting violation of the minimum...

  6. Age-Sensitive Effect of Adolescent Dating Experience on Delinquency and Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ryang Hui

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a developmental perspective and focuses on examining whether the impact of adolescent dating is age-sensitive. Dating at earlier ages is hypothesized to have a stronger effect on adolescent criminal behavior or substance use, but the effect would be weaker as one ages. The data obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of…

  7. Age and Gender's Interactive Effects on Learning Satisfaction among Senior University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Stephanie; Hsu, Wan-Chen; Chen, Hsueh-Chih

    2016-01-01

    With the growing number of older adults becoming a global concern, developed countries have focused on education as a means to promote successful aging. Previous research has focused on the effects of gender and age on learning satisfaction among senior students. Nevertheless, little attention has been paid to the interactive effects of age and…

  8. Age and Gender Effects on Wideband Absorbance in Adults with Normal Outer and Middle Ear Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazlan, Rafidah; Kei, Joseph; Ya, Cheng Li; Yusof, Wan Nur Hanim Mohd; Saim, Lokman; Zhao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of age and gender on wideband energy absorbance in adults with normal middle ear function. Method: Forty young adults (14 men, 26 women, aged 20-38 years), 31 middle-aged adults (16 men, 15 women, aged 42-64 years), and 30 older adults (20 men, 10 women, aged 65-82 years) were assessed. Energy absorbance…

  9. The Effect of Age on a Visual Learning Task in the American Cockroach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sheena; Strausfeld, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal modifications that accompany normal aging occur in brain neuropils and might share commonalties across phyla including the most successful group, the Insecta. This study addresses the kinds of neuronal modifications associated with loss of memory that occur in the hemimetabolous insect "Periplaneta americana." Among insects that display…

  10. Age effects shrink when motor learning is predominantly supported by nondeclarative, automatic memory processes: evidence from golf putting.

    PubMed

    Chauvel, Guillaume; Maquestiaux, François; Hartley, Alan A; Joubert, Sven; Didierjean, André; Masters, Rich S W

    2012-01-01

    Can motor learning be equivalent in younger and older adults? To address this question, 48 younger (M = 23.5 years) and 48 older (M = 65.0 years) participants learned to perform a golf-putting task in two different motor learning situations: one that resulted in infrequent errors or one that resulted in frequent errors. The results demonstrated that infrequent-error learning predominantly relied on nondeclarative, automatic memory processes whereas frequent-error learning predominantly relied on declarative, effortful memory processes: After learning, infrequent-error learners verbalized fewer strategies than frequent-error learners; at transfer, a concurrent, attention-demanding secondary task (tone counting) left motor performance of infrequent-error learners unaffected but impaired that of frequent-error learners. The results showed age-equivalent motor performance in infrequent-error learning but age deficits in frequent-error learning. Motor performance of frequent-error learners required more attention with age, as evidenced by an age deficit on the attention-demanding secondary task. The disappearance of age effects when nondeclarative, automatic memory processes predominated suggests that these processes are preserved with age and are available even early in motor learning.

  11. Content Addressable Memory Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    The Content Addressable M1-emory Project consists of the development of several experimental software systems on an AMT Distributed Array Processor...searching (database) compiler algorithms memory management other systems software) Linear C is an unlovely hybrid language which imports the CAM...memory from AMT’s operating system for the DAP; how- ever, other than this limitation, the memory management routines work exactly as their C counterparts

  12. Age Effects on Upper Limb Kinematics Assessed by the REAplan Robot in Healthy School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Gilliaux, Maxime; Dierckx, Floriane; Vanden Berghe, Lola; Lejeune, Thierry M; Sapin, Julien; Dehez, Bruno; Stoquart, Gaëtan; Detrembleur, Christine

    2015-05-01

    The use of kinematics is recommended to quantitatively evaluate upper limb movements. The aims of this study were to determine the age effects on upper limb kinematics and establish norms in healthy children. Ninety-three healthy children, aged 3-12 years, participated in this study. Twenty-eight kinematic indices were computed from four tasks. Each task was performed with the REAplan, a distal effector robotic device that allows upper limb displacements in the horizontal plane. Twenty-four of the 28 indices showed an improvement during childhood. Indeed, older children showed better upper limb movements. This study was the first to use a robotic device to show the age effects on upper limb kinematics and establish norms in healthy children.

  13. Using groundwater age distributions to estimate the effective parameters of Fickian and non-Fickian models of solute transport

    PubMed Central

    Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Ginn, Timothy R.; Fogg, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater age distributions are used to estimate the parameters of Fickian, and non-Fickian, effective models of solute transport. Based on the similarities between the transport and age equations, we develop a deconvolution based approach that describes transport between two monitoring wells. We show that the proposed method gives exact estimates of the travel time distribution between two wells when the domain is stationary and that the method still provides useful information on transport when the domain is non-stationary. The method is demonstrated using idealized uniform and layered 2-D aquifers. Homogeneous transport is determined exactly and non-Fickian transport in a layered aquifer was also approximated very well, even though this example problem is shown to be scale-dependent. This work introduces a method that addresses a significant limitation of tracer tests and non-Fickian transport modeling which is the difficulty in determining the effective parameters of the transport model. PMID:25821342

  14. Prioritizing "psychological" consequences for disaster preparedness and response: a framework for addressing the emotional, behavioral, and cognitive effects of patient surge in large-scale disasters.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Lisa S; Eisenman, David P; Tanielian, Terri; Taylor, Stephanie L; Basurto-Davila, Ricardo; Zazzali, James; Diamond, Dickson; Cienfuegos, Barbara; Shields, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    While information for the medical aspects of disaster surge is increasingly available, there is little guidance for health care facilities on how to manage the psychological aspects of large-scale disasters that might involve a surge of psychological casualties. In addition, no models are available to guide the development of training curricula to address these needs. This article describes 2 conceptual frameworks to guide hospitals and clinics in managing such consequences. One framework was developed to understand the antecedents of psychological effects or "psychological triggers" (restricted movement, limited resources, limited information, trauma exposure, and perceived personal or family risk) that cause the emotional, behavioral, and cognitive reactions following large-scale disasters. Another framework, adapted from the Donabedian quality of care model, was developed to guide appropriate disaster response by health care facilities in addressing the consequences of reactions to psychological triggers. This framework specifies structural components (internal organizational structure and chain of command, resources and infrastructure, and knowledge and skills) that should be in place before an event to minimize consequences. The framework also specifies process components (coordination with external organizations, risk assessment and monitoring, psychological support, and communication and information sharing) to support evidence-informed interventions.

  15. Neural circuitry of the bilingual mental lexicon: effect of age of second language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Isel, Frédéric; Baumgaertner, Annette; Thrän, Johannes; Meisel, Jürgen M; Büchel, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Numerous studies have proposed that changes of the human language faculty caused by neural maturation can explain the substantial differences in ultimate attainment of grammatical competences between first language (L1) acquirers and second language (L2) learners. However, little evidence on the effect of neural maturation on the attainment of lexical knowledge in L2 is available. The present functional magnetic resonance study addresses this question via a cross-linguistic neural adaptation paradigm. Age of acquisition (AoA) of L2 was systematically manipulated. Concrete nouns were repeated across language (e.g., French-German, valise(suitcase)-Koffer(suitcase)). Whereas early bilinguals (AoA of L2<3years) showed larger repetition enhancement (RE) effects in the left superior temporal gyrus, the bilateral superior frontal gyrus and the right posterior insula, late bilinguals (AoA of L2>10years) showed larger RE effects in the middle portion of the left insula and in the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG). We suggest that, as for grammatical knowledge, the attainment of lexical knowledge in L2 is affected by neural maturation. The present findings lend support to neurocognitive models of bilingual word recognition postulating that, for both early and late bilinguals, the two languages are interconnected at the conceptual level.

  16. Care Management by Oncology Nurses To Address Palliative Care Needs: A Pilot Trial To Assess Feasibility, Acceptability, and Perceived Effectiveness of the CONNECT Intervention

    PubMed Central

    White, Douglas; Rosenzweig, Margaret; Chu, Edward; Moore, Charity; Ellis, Peter; Nikolajski, Peggy; Ford, Colleen; Tiver, Greer; McCarthy, Lauren; Arnold, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Specialty palliative care is not accessible for many patients with advanced cancer. There is a need to find alternative palliative care strategies in oncology clinics. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of an oncology nurse-led care management approach to improve primary palliative care. Methods: The study design was a single-arm pilot trial of the Care Management by Oncology Nurses (CONNECT) intervention, in which registered oncology nurses receive specialized training and work closely with oncologists to (1) address symptom needs; (2) engage patients and caregivers in advance care planning; (3) provide emotional support; and (4) coordinate care. The subjects were 23 patients with advanced cancer, 19 caregivers, and 5 oncologists from a community oncology clinic in western Pennsylvania. Feasibility was assessed through enrollment rates, outcome assessment rates, and visit checklists. Patients, caregivers, and oncologists completed three-month assessments of acceptability and perceived effectiveness. Results: The consent-to-approach rate was 86% and enrolled-to-consent rate, 77%. CONNECT was implemented according to protocol for all participants. No participants withdrew after enrollment. Four patients died during the study; three-month outcome assessments were completed with all remaining participants (83%). Patients and caregivers reported high satisfaction with CONNECT and perceived the intervention as helpful in addressing symptoms (85%), coping (91%), and planning for the future (82%). Oncologists unanimously agreed that CONNECT improved the quality of care provided for patients with advanced cancer. Conclusion: An oncology nurse-led care management intervention is feasible, acceptable, and was perceived to be effective for improving provision of primary palliative care. A randomized trial of CONNECT is warranted. PMID:25517219

  17. Head Start at ages 3 and 4 versus Head Start followed by state pre-k: Which is more effective?

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jade Marcus; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J.; Burchinal, Margaret; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2016-01-01

    As policy-makers contemplate expanding preschool opportunities for low-income children, one possibility is to fund two, rather than one year of Head Start for children at ages 3 and 4. Another option is to offer one year of Head Start followed by one year of pre-k. We ask which of these options is more effective. We use data from the Oklahoma pre-k study to examine these two ‘pathways’ into kindergarten using regression discontinuity to estimate the effects of each age-4 program, and propensity score weighting to address selection. We find that children attending Head Start at age 3 develop stronger pre-reading skills in a high quality pre-kindergarten at age 4 compared with attending Head Start at age 4. Pre-k and Head Start were not differentially linked to improvements in children’s pre-writing skills or pre-math skills. This suggests that some impacts of early learning programs may be related to the sequencing of learning experiences to more academic programming. PMID:27076692

  18. Effect of shelf aging on O-ring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, T. E.; Stone, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    Commercial O-rings made from 13 different rubber compounds were tested for physical properties after 7 and 12 years of shelf aging. No gross changes were observed in tensile strength, elongation, or compression deflection characteristics.

  19. Effect of aging and dietary restriction on DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Weraarchakul, N.; Strong, R.; Wood, W.G.; Richardson, A.

    1989-03-01

    DNA repair was studied as a function of age in cells isolated from both the liver and the kidney of male Fischer F344 rats. DNA repair was measured by quantifying unscheduled DNA synthesis induced by UV irradiation. Unscheduled DNA synthesis decreased approximately 50% between the ages of 5 and 30 months in both hepatocytes and kidney cells. The age-related decline in unscheduled DNA synthesis in cells isolated from the liver and kidney was compared in rats fed ad libitum and rats fed a calorie-restricted diet; calorie restriction has been shown to increase the survival of rodents. The level of unscheduled DNA synthesis was significantly higher in hepatocytes and kidney cells isolated from the rats fed the restricted diet. Thus, calorie restriction appears to retard the age-related decline in DNA repair.

  20. Effect of age on EEG arousals in normal sleep.

    PubMed

    Boselli, M; Parrino, L; Smerieri, A; Terzano, M G

    1998-06-15

    EEG arousals were quantified in 40 nocturnal polysomnographic recordings belonging to four age groups (teenagers: 10 to 19 years; young adults: 20 to 39 years; middle-aged: 40 to 59 years; elderly: > or = 60 years). Ten subjects (five males and five females) participated in each group. The subjects were healthy and sound sleepers. All sleep recordings were preceded by an adaptation night which aimed at excluding the presence of sleep-related disorders. The recordings were carried out in a partially soundproof recording chamber and in a standard laboratory setting. Arousal indices (AI), defined as the number of arousals per hour of sleep, were calculated for total sleep time (AI/TST) and for all the sleep stages. AI/TST increased linearly with age (r = 0.852; p < 0.00001): teenagers (13.8), young adults (14.7), middle-aged (17.8), elderly (27.1). An age-related positive linear correlation was found also for the arousal indices referred to NREM sleep (r = 0.811; p < 0.00001) and to stages 1 and 2 (r = 0.712; p < 0.00001), while in stages 3 and 4 and in REM sleep, arousal indices showed stable values across the ages. Overall, arousals lasted 14.9 +/- 2.3 seconds, with arousal duration stable across the ages (range of means: 13.3-16.6 seconds) and no relevant differences between NREM sleep (14.6 +/- 2.5 seconds) and REM sleep (16.2 +/- 5 seconds). The paper discusses the impact of age on arousals, the similarities between arousals and the phases d'activation transitoire, and the consideration that arousals are physiological components of sleep.

  1. Age Effect on Autonomic Cardiovascular Control in Pilots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    Nantcheva**, M. Vukov*** *National Center of Hygiene, Medical Ecology and Nutrition 15 Dimitar Nestorov Blvd. 1431 Sofia, Bulgaria "**Military Medical...cardiovascular derived indices. Most sensitive to aging process from regulation, involve in part autonomic influences. time-domain HRV measures...completing of the mission tasks (15). A components, and baroreflex sensitivity with age (29). number of studies have investigated the impact of the

  2. Effect of Blade Tenderization, Aging Time, and Aging Temperature on Tenderness of Beef Longissimus Lumborum and Gluteus Medius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purveyors are concerned about the food safety risk of non-intact meat products and are seeking strategies to ensure adequate meat tenderness without blade tenderization. This study was conducted to determine the effects of blade tenderization and time and temperature of aging on beef longissimus lu...

  3. Effect of age on body sway assessed by computerized posturography.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takuo; Nakamura, Shoji; Ohue, Mutsumi; Fujii, Yoshio; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Takagi, Yasuyuki; Tsugeno, Hirofumi

    2005-01-01

    The swaying and postural instability frequently seen in elderly subjects had not been analyzed quantitatively in detail until the introduction of computerized posturography. In order to assess the changes of body sway with aging, we performed computerized posturography in 144 subjects (51 men and 93 women, between the ages of 22 and 88 years) without specific neurological or metabolic disorders. The total and timed track length of the center of gravity, reflecting the distance of sway, increased with advancing age, with a highly significant positive correlation, without marked sex differences. The total area covered by the track of the center of gravity (expressing the extent of sway) also showed a similar tendency. Track density per unit area, expressing the efficiency of postural control, in contrast, decreased with age, showing a significant negative correlation with age, but only when the subjects had their eyes open; this decrease did not occur when they had their eyes closed. The Romberg ratio, an index of exacerbation of sway on eye closure, showed little change with a tendency for slight alleviation of sway and improvement in the efficiency of its control. Computerized posturography appears to be a useful tool with which to analyze the mechanism of swaying associated with old age.

  4. Effects of Age-Related Macular Degeneration on Postural Sway

    PubMed Central

    Chatard, Hortense; Tepenier, Laure; Jankowski, Olivier; Aussems, Antoine; Allieta, Alain; Beydoun, Talal; Salah, Sawsen; Bucci, Maria P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the impact of unilateral vs. bilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on postural sway, and the influence of different visual conditions. The hypothesis of our study was that the impact of AMD will be different between unilateral and bilateral AMD subjects compared to age-matched healthy elderly. Methods: Postural stability was measured with a platform (TechnoConcept®) in 10 elderly unilateral AMD subjects (mean age: 71.1 ± 4.6 years), 10 elderly bilateral AMD subjects (mean age: 70.8 ± 6.1 years), and 10 healthy age-matched control subjects (mean age: 69.8 ± 6.3 years). Four visual conditions were tested: both eyes viewing condition (BEV), dominant eye viewing (DEV), non-dominant eye viewing (NDEV), and eyes closed (EC). We analyzed the surface area, the length, the mean speed, the anteroposterior (AP), and mediolateral (ML) displacement of the center of pressure (CoP). Results: Bilateral AMD subjects had a surface area (p < 0.05) and AP displacement of the CoP (p < 0.01) higher than healthy elderly. Unilateral AMD subjects had more AP displacement of the CoP (p < 0.05) than healthy elderly. Conclusions: We suggest that ADM subjects could have poor postural adaptive mechanisms leading to increase their postural instability. Further studies will aim to improve knowledge on such issue and to develop reeducation techniques in these patients.

  5. Age effects on associative memory for novel picture pairings.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Emma K; Kursawe, Anna-Lena; Bader, Regine; Tibon, Roni; Gronau, Nurit; Levy, Daniel A; Mecklinger, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Normal aging is usually accompanied by greater memory decline for associations than for single items. Though associative memory is generally supported by recollection, it has been suggested that familiarity can also contribute to associative memory when stimuli can be unitized and encoded as a single entity. Given that familiarity remains intact during healthy aging, this may be one route to reducing age-related associative deficits. The current study investigated age-related differences in associative memory under conditions that were expected to differentially promote unitization, in this case by manipulating the spatial arrangement of two semantically unrelated objects positioned relative to each other in either spatially implausible or plausible orientations. Event-related potential (ERP) correlates of item and associative memory were recorded whilst younger and older adults were required to discriminate between old, recombined and new pairs of objects. These ERP correlates of item and associative memory did not vary with plausibility, whereas behavioral measures revealed that both associative and item memory were greater for spatially plausible than implausible pair arrangements. Contrary to predictions, older adults were less able to take advantage of this memory benefit than younger participants. Potential reasons for this are considered, and these are informed by those lines of evidence which indicate older participants were less sensitive to the bottom-up spatial manipulation employed here. It is recommended that future strategies for redressing age-related associative deficits should take account of the aging brain's increasing reliance on pre-existing semantic associations.

  6. Urban groundwater age modeling under unconfined condition - Impact of underground structures on groundwater age: Evidence of a piston effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Guillaume; Rossier, Yvan; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, underground structures are shown to have a major influence on the groundwater mean age distribution described as a dispersive piston effect. Urban underground development does not occur without impacts on subsoil resources. In particular, groundwater resources can be vulnerable and generate disturbances when this space is exploited. Groundwater age spatial distribution data are fundamental for resource management as it can provide operational sustainability indicators. However, the application of groundwater age modeling is neglected regarding the potential effect of underground structures in urban areas. A three dimensional modeling approach was conducted to quantify the impact of two underground structures: (1) an impervious structure and (2) a draining structure. Both structures are shown to cause significant mixing processes occurring between shallow and deeper aquifers. The design technique used for draining structures is shown to have the greatest impact, generating a decrease in mean age of more than 80% under the structure. Groundwater age modeling is shown to be relevant for highlighting the role played by underground structures in advective-dispersive flows in urban areas.

  7. Renal interstitial sclerosis in aging: effects of enalapril and nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Inserra, F; Romano, L A; de Cavanagh, E M; Ercole, L; Ferder, L F; Gomez, R A

    1996-05-01

    The effects of nifedipine and enalapril on age-associated renal interstitial fibrosis were investigated in 60 CF1 female mice. Mice received 20 mg enalapril (ENAL) per L (N = 20), or 40 mg nifedipine (NIF) per L (N = 20) in their drinking water. Control (CONT) mice received tap water ad libitum. The percentages of both interstitial peritubular sclerosis (IPS) in cortex and interstitial medullary sclerosis (IMS) were determined. Kidney tissue was studied using immunological techniques and optical (OM) and electron microscopy (EM) to analyze the expression of renin. alpha-SM-actin and vimentine expression were also evaluated. The results showed that blood pressure levels in ENAL or NIF animals were not different from those of CONT. Renin expression was observed in arcuate vessels (AV) in ENAL animals, whereas no renin staining in AV was found in either NIF or CONT animals. Renin immunoreactivity in the juxtaglomerular apparatus was more intense in ENAL mice, as compared with NIF or CONT animals. Laboratory testing showed the following values: proteinuria (mg/mL): CONT 6.1 +/- 0.6, NIF 11.2 +/- 2.3, and ENAL 1.0 +/- 0.6 (P < 0.05); creatinine: CONT 1.37 +/- 0.24, NIF 0.87 +/- 0.16, and ENAL 0.63 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.01). The percentages of interstitial sclerosis were: %IPS: CONT 18.12 +/- 1.1, NIF 17.40 +/- 0.9, and ENAL 3.42 +/- 1.3 (P < 0.01); %IMS: CONT 23.41 +/- 1.5, NIF 21.80 +/- 1.9, and ENAL 6.12 +/- 1.2 (P < 0.01). Percentages of alpha-SM-actin expression were: CONT 13.10 +/- 1.9, NIF 13.80 +/- 0.2, and ENAL 1.00 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.01). Vimentine staining showed no differences among the groups. It was concluded that enalapril reduces the peritubular and medullar interstitial fibrosis, whereas nifedipine has no effect.

  8. 20 CFR 229.52 - Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is effective before DIB O/M.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is... Minimum Rate § 229.52 Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is effective before DIB O/M. If an employee received a reduced age O/M before the effective date of a DIB O/M, the PIA amount for the DIB O/M...

  9. Mille general practice governance (MilleGPG): an interactive tool to address an effective quality of care through the Italian general practice network.

    PubMed

    Cricelli, Iacopo; Lapi, Francesco; Montalbano, Carmelo; Medea, Gerardo; Cricelli, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    The General Practitioner (GP) is the "gate-keeper" in patients' treatment and management. Herein, the use of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) could represent an effective support for GPs. Software capable of managing EMRs are available and they can be functional in adopting treatment guidelines by means of computerized prompts and reminders systems. These tools can be also programmed to include clinical algorithms with which to measure the quality of care to make possible the identification of clinical issues, and to take actions for addressing them. Given that similar tools were not available in Italy, we developed MilleGPG, an interactive tool aimed to evaluate, and subsequently improve the quality of care among patients with comorbidities.

  10. Effects of aging on basal fat oxidation in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Thomas P J; Marchetti, Christine M; Krishnan, Raj K; Gonzalez, Frank; Kirwan, John P

    2008-08-01

    Basal fat oxidation decreases with age. In obesity, it is not known whether this age-related process occurs independently of changes in body composition and insulin sensitivity. Therefore, body composition, resting energy expenditure, basal substrate oxidation, and maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2)max) were measured in 10 older (age, 60 +/- 4 years; mean +/- SEM) and 10 younger (age, 35 +/- 4 years) body mass index-matched, obese, normal glucose-tolerant individuals. Fasting blood samples were also collected. Older subjects had slightly elevated fat mass (32.2 +/- 7.1 vs 36.5 +/- 6.7 kg, P = .16); however, waist circumference was not different between groups (104.3 +/- 10.3 vs 102.1 +/- 12.6 cm, P = .65). Basal fat oxidation was 22% lower (1.42 +/- 0.14 vs 1.17 +/- 0.22 mg/kg fat-free mass per minute, P = .03) in older subjects. The VO(2)max was also decreased in older individuals (44.6 +/- 7.1 vs 38.3 +/- 6.0 mL/kg fat-free mass per minute, P = .03); but insulin sensitivity, lipemia, and leptinemia were not different between groups (P > .05). Fat oxidation was most related to age (r = -0.61, P = .003) and VO(2)max (r = 0.52, P = .01). These data suggest that aging per se is responsible for reduced basal fat oxidation and maximal oxidative capacity in older obese individuals, independent of changes in insulin resistance, body mass, and abdominal fat. This indicates that age, in addition to obesity, is an independent risk factor for weight gain and for the metabolic complications of elevated body fat.

  11. Strengthening the Paediatricians Project 2: The effectiveness of a workshop to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders of adolescence in low-health related human resource countries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Paediatricians can be empowered to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders at primary care level. To evaluate the effectiveness of a collaborative workshop in enhancing the adolescent psychiatry knowledge among paediatricians. Methods A 3-day, 27-hours workshop was held for paediatricians from different regions of India under the auspices of the National Adolescent Paediatric Task Force of the Indian Academy of Paediatrics. A 5-item pretest-posttest questionnaire was developed and administered at the beginning and end of the workshop to evaluate the participants' knowledge acquisition in adolescent psychiatry. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed on an intention-to-participate basis. Results Forty-eight paediatricians completed the questionnaire. There was significant enhancement of the knowledge in understanding the phenomenology, identifying the psychopathology, diagnosing common mental disorder and selecting the psychotropic medication in the bivariate analysis. When the possible confounders of level of training in paediatrics and number of years spent as paediatrician were controlled, in addition to the above areas of adolescent psychiatry, the diagnostic ability involving multiple psychological concepts also gained significance. However, both in the bivariate and multivariate analyses, the ability to refer to appropriate psychotherapy remained unchanged after the workshop. Conclusions This workshop was effective in enhancing the adolescent psychiatry knowledge of paediatricians. Such workshops could strengthen paediatricians in addressing the priority mental health disorders at the primary-care level in countries with low-human resource for health as advocated by the World Health Organization. However, it remains to be seen if this acquisition of adolescent psychiatry knowledge results in enhancing their adolescent psychiatry practice. PMID:20167069

  12. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  13. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  14. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  15. Diazepam tolerance: effect of age, regular sedation, and alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P J; Flanagan, R; James, I M

    1984-01-01

    The dose of intravenous diazepam required for sedation was estimated in a series of 78 patients aged 17-85 years given the drug for dental and endoscopic procedures. Multiple regression analysis showed a significant correlation (r = 0.71; p less than 0.001) between dose and age, body weight, the taking of regular sedation, and the taking of more than 40 g alcohol daily, but there were no differences in the doses required between men and women, smokers and non-smokers, inpatients and outpatients, or dental and endoscopy patients. Patients aged 80 required an average dose of 10 mg and patients aged 20 an average dose of 30 mg, and the dose required was much higher in those receiving regular sedation or having a high alcohol intake. Plasma total and free diazepam concentrations were measured in the second half of the series of patients (n = 37). Plasma concentrations required for sedation fell twofold to threefold between the ages of 20 and 80 and were significantly higher in those taking regular sedation or alcohol. Differences in the acute response to diazepam appeared to be due to differences in the sensitivity of the central nervous system (pharmacodynamic tolerance) rather than to differences in pharmacokinetic factors. PMID:6432093

  16. Effects of Age on Thermal Sensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    King, C. D.; Morgan, D.; Carter, C. S.; Vierck, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Age-dependent changes in thermal sensitivity were evaluated with reflex- and operant-based assessment strategies in animals ranging in age from 8 to 32 months. The impact of inflammatory injury on thermal sensitivity was also determined in animals of different ages. The results showed that operant measures of escape behavior are needed to demonstrate significant changes in thermal sensitivity across the life span of female Long-Evans rats. Increased escape from both heat (44.5°C) and cold (1.5°C–15°C) was observed for older animals, with a greater relative increase in sensitivity to cold. Physical performance deficits were demonstrated with aging but were not associated with changes in escape responding. Reflex responding to cold stimulation was impaired in older animals but was also influenced by physical disabilities. Reflex responding to heat was not affected by increasing age. Inflammation induced by formalin injections in the dorsal hindpaw increased thermal sensitivity significantly more in older animals than in their younger counterparts. PMID:20185437

  17. Aging promotes neoplastic disease through effects on the tissue microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Doratiotto, Silvia; Sini, Marcella; Fanti, Maura; Cadoni, Erika; Serra, Monica; Laconi, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the complex relationship between aging and cancer will provide important tools for the prevention and treatment of neoplasia. In these studies, the hypothesis was tested that aging may fuel carcinogenesis via alterations imposed in the tissue microenvironment. Preneoplastic hepatocytes isolated from liver nodules were orthotopically injected into either young or old syngeneic rats and their fate was followed over time using the dipeptidyl-peptidase type IV (DPPIV) system to track donor-derived-cells. At 3 months post-Tx, the mean size of donor-derived clusters was 11±3 cells in young vs. 42±8 in old recipients. At 8 months post-Tx, no visible lesion were detected in any of 21 young recipients, while 17/18 animals transplanted at old age displayed hepatic nodules, including 7 large tumors. All tumors expressed the DPPIV marker enzyme, indicating that they originated from transplanted cells. Expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase was common in liver of 18-month old animals, while it was a rare finding in young controls. Finally, both mRNA and IL6 protein were found to be increased in the liver of aged rats compared to young controls. These results are interpreted to indicate that the microenvironment of the aged liver promotes the growth of pre-neoplastic hepatocytes. PMID:27929382

  18. Effects of age on thermal sensitivity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yezierski, R P; King, C D; Morgan, D; Carter, C S; Vierck, C J

    2010-04-01

    Age-dependent changes in thermal sensitivity were evaluated with reflex- and operant-based assessment strategies in animals ranging in age from 8 to 32 months. The impact of inflammatory injury on thermal sensitivity was also determined in animals of different ages. The results showed that operant measures of escape behavior are needed to demonstrate significant changes in thermal sensitivity across the life span of female Long-Evans rats. Increased escape from both heat (44.5 degrees C) and cold (1.5 degrees C-15 degrees C) was observed for older animals, with a greater relative increase in sensitivity to cold. Physical performance deficits were demonstrated with aging but were not associated with changes in escape responding. Reflex responding to cold stimulation was impaired in older animals but was also influenced by physical disabilities. Reflex responding to heat was not affected by increasing age. Inflammation induced by formalin injections in the dorsal hindpaw increased thermal sensitivity significantly more in older animals than in their younger counterparts.

  19. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), “Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities—Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015”, we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  20. Effect of aging and anti-aging caloric restriction on the endocrine regulation of rat liver autophagy.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessio; Recchia, Gianluca; Cavallini, Gabriella; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-06-01

    Autophagy is a process that sequesters and degrades altered organelles and macromolecular cytoplasmic constituents for cellular restructuring and repair, and as a source of nutrients for metabolic use in early starvation it may be involved in anti-aging mechanisms of caloric restriction. The effects of 40% daily dietary restriction (DR) and intermittent feeding (EOD) on the age-related changes in the endocrine regulation of autophagic proteolysis were studied by monitoring the rate of valine release from isolated rat liver cells. Results show that in ad libitum-fed rats sensitivity of autophagy to glucagon and insulin declines by one order of magnitude in older rats. Both DR and EOD maintain the sensitivity to glucagon at juvenile levels, whereas only EOD can fully maintain response to insulin. It is concluded that changes in the sensitivity to glucagon may have a role in the aging process.

  1. A sensory origin for color-word Stroop effects in aging: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Boaz M; Schneider, Bruce A

    2009-09-01

    An increase in Stroop effects with age is often interpreted as reflecting reductions in selective attention, or alternatively, cognitive slowing with age. In a cross-lab and a cross-sectional analysis, we linked sensory losses to Stroop declines. Specifically, we found that the latency difference, or dimensional imbalance, between reading and naming the font color of color-neutral words increased with age. A cross-sectional analysis revealed that this dimensional imbalance can both mediate the effects of age on Stroop effects, and contribute to Stroop after controlling for age effects. We conclude that age-related changes in color perception contribute to and may mediate age-related changes in Stroop.

  2. Effect of blade tenderization, aging time, and aging temperature on tenderness of beef longissimus lumborum and gluteus medius.

    PubMed

    King, D A; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Pfeiffer, K D; Nickelson, R; Koohmaraie, M

    2009-09-01

    Purveyors are concerned about the potential food safety risk of nonintact meat products and are seeking strategies to ensure adequate meat tenderness without blade tenderization. This study was conducted to determine the effects of blade tenderization and time and temperature of aging on beef longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) tenderness. Beef strip loins (n = 300) and top sirloin butts (n = 300) were assigned to storage at -0.5 or 3.3 degrees C for 12, 26, or 40 d. Cuts were blade tenderized (BT) or not blade tenderized (NBT) before steak cutting. One 2.54-cm steak from each subprimal was used for slice shear force determination and Western blotting of desmin. Desmin degradation was less (P < 0.05) in LL stored at -0.5 degrees C than LL stored at 3.3 degrees C (57 and 65%, respectively). Aging from 12 to 26 d increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis (50 to 65%) in LL. Regardless of aging time, BT reduced (P < 0.05) LL slice shear force values. Aging time did not affect (P > 0.05) slice shear force values of BT LL steaks (10.4, 9.9, and 9.4 kg for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively), but reduced (P < 0.05) NBT steak slice shear force values (15.1, 13.8, and 12.3 kg for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively). Greater temperature did not affect (P > 0.05) slice shear force values of BT LL steaks (10.2 and 9.6 kg for steaks aged at -0.5 and 3.3 degrees C, respectively), but improved (P < 0.05) slice shear force of NBT LL steaks (15.1 and 12.4, respectively). Aging at 3.3 degrees C increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis in GM steaks (43 and 54% for -0.5 and 3.3 degrees C, respectively). Longer aging times increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis (40, 46, and 60% for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively) in GM steaks. Blade-tenderized GM steaks had dramatically less (P < 0.05) slice shear force values than NBT steaks (13.7 and 19.9 kg, respectively). Raising aging temperature from -0.5 to 3.3 degrees C reduced (17.6 vs. 16.0 kg; P < 0.05) and increasing aging time from 12 d

  3. EFFECTS OF AGE, DIETARY AND BEHAVIORAL ENRICHMENT ON BRAIN MITOCHONDRIA IN A CANINE MODEL OF HUMAN AGING

    PubMed Central

    Head, E.; Nukala, V. N.; Fenoglio, K.A.; Muggenburg, B. A.; Cotman, C. W.; Sullivan, P. G.

    2009-01-01

    Dogs develop cognitive decline and a progressive accumulation of oxidative damage. In a previous longitudinal study, we demonstrated that aged dogs treated with either an antioxidant diet or with behavioral enrichment show cognitive improvement. The antioxidant diet included cellular antioxidants (Vitamins E, C, fruits and vegetables) and mitochondrial co-factors (lipoic acid and carnitine). Behavioral enrichment consisted of physical exercise, social enrichment and cognitive training. We hypothesized that the antioxidant treatment improved neuronal function through increased mitochondrial function. Thus, we measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and bioenergetics in mitochondria isolated from young, aged and treated aged animals. Aged canine brain mitochondria show significant increases in ROS production and a reduction in NADH-linked respiration. Mitochondrial function (ROS and NADH-linked respiration) was improved selectively in aged dogs treated with an antioxidant diet. In contrast behavioral enrichment had no effect on any mitochondrial parameters. These results suggest that an antioxidant diet improves cognition by maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis, which may be an independent molecular pathway not engaged by behavioral enrichment. PMID:19703441

  4. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the patent's age…

  5. Effect of alternative aging and accident simulations on polymer properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Alba, C.; Gaussens, G.; LeMeur, M.

    1985-05-01

    The influence of accident irradiation, steam, and chemical spray exposures on the behavior of twenty-three age-preconditioned polymer sample sets (twenty-one different materials) has been investigated. The test program varied the following conditions: (1) Accident simulations of irradiation and thermodynamic (steam and chemical spray) conditions were performed both sequentially and simultaneously. (2) Accident thermodynamic (steam and chemical spray) exposures were performed both with and without air present during the exposures. (3) Sequential accident irradiations were performed both at 28/sup 0/C and 70/sup 0/C. (4) Age preconditioning was performed both sequentially and simultaneously. (5) Sequential aging irradiations were performed both at 27/sup 0/C and 70/sup 0/C. (6) Sequential aging exposures were performed using two sequences: (1) thermal followed by irradiation and (2) irradiation followed by thermal. We report both general trends applicable to a majority of the tested materials as well as specific results for each polymer. Our data base consists of ultimate tensile properties at the completion of the accident exposure for three XLPO and XLPE, five EPR and EPDM, two CSPE (HYPALON), one CPE, one VAMAC, one polydiallylphtalate, and one PPS material. We also report bend test results at completion of the accident exposures for two TEFZEL materials and permanent set after compression results for three EPR, one VAMAC, one BUNA N, one SILICONE, and one VITON material.

  6. Effect of Age, Country, and Gender on Music Listening Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert; Jin, Young Chang; Stamou, Lelouda; McCrary, Jan

    1999-01-01

    Examines the music listening preferences of 2,042 students from Greece, South Korea, and the United States using a survey that listed selections from art music, traditional jazz, and rock music. Finds that age, gender, and country all exerted influence, but the variables did not perform the same way in each country. (CMK)

  7. Hygrothermal aging effects on buried molecular structures at epoxy interfaces.

    PubMed

    Myers, John N; Zhang, Chi; Lee, Kang-Wook; Williamson, Jaimal; Chen, Zhan

    2014-01-14

    Interfacial properties such as adhesion are determined by interfacial molecular structures. Adhesive interfaces in microelectronic packages that include organic polymers such as epoxy are susceptible to delamination during accelerated stress testing. Infrared-visible sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to study molecular structures at buried epoxy interfaces during hygrothermal aging to relate molecular structural changes at buried interfaces to decreases in macroscopic adhesion strength. SFG peaks associated with strongly hydrogen bonded water were detected at hydrophilic epoxy interfaces. Ordered interfacial water was also correlated to large decreases in interfacial adhesion strength that occurred as a result of hygrothermal aging, which suggests that water diffused to the interface and replaced original hydrogen bond networks. No water peaks were observed at hydrophobic epoxy interfaces, which was correlated with a much smaller decrease in adhesion strength from the same aging process. ATR-FTIR water signals observed in the epoxy bulk were mainly contributed by relatively weakly hydrogen bonded water molecules, which suggests that the bulk and interfacial water structure was different. Changes in interfacial methyl structures were observed regardless of the interfacial hydrophobicity which could be due to water acting as a plasticizer that restructured both the bulk and interfacial molecular structure. This research demonstrates that SFG studies of molecular structural changes at buried epoxy interfaces during hygrothermal aging can contribute to the understanding of moisture-induced failure mechanisms in electronic packages that contain organic adhesives.

  8. Spontaneous running activity in male rats - Effect of age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Dolkas, C. B.; Sims, C.; Reaven, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Variations in the intensity and the patterns of spontaneous running activity in wheel cages were studied in male rats aged 7 weeks to one year. Daily running records were obtained for periods of 12 mo, and 24-hour recordings were made for selected runners in order to study variations in running activity during the day. The data indicate that for rats running over two miles/day, the maximum running intensity can be divided into two groups: a group of high achievers running 8 miles/day; and a group of moderate achievers running 4.8 miles/day. For both groups spontaneous activity reached a maximum after 4-5 weeks. An hourly pattern of running activity during the day was identified in rats of increasing age who averaged 9.0, 4.5, 2.6, and 1.2 miles/day, respectively. Progressive losses were observed in both the speed and the duration of spontaneous running as the rats increased in age, with the intensity of exercise falling below 2 miles/day after 7-8 months of age.

  9. Effects of aging on mnemonic discrimination of emotional information.

    PubMed

    Leal, Stephanie L; Yassa, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Episodic memory loss is one of the hallmarks of age-related cognitive decline and a major symptom of Alzheimer's disease. The persistence and strength of memories is determined by modulatory factors such as emotional arousal. Whether emotional memories are preserved with age or if these memories are just as susceptible to loss and forgetting is not well understood. We have recently shown that emotion alters how similar memories are stored using nonoverlapping representations (i.e., pattern separation) in an emotional mnemonic discrimination task. Here, we extend this work to testing young and older adults at 2 time points (immediately after encoding and 24 hr later). Overall, older adults performed worse than young adults, a memory deficit that was not secondary to perceptual or attentional deficits. When tested immediately, older adults were impaired on neutral target recognition but intact on emotional target recognition. We also found that a pattern we previously reported in young adults (reduced emotional compared to neutral discrimination of similar items) was reversed in older adults. When tested after 24 hr, young adults exhibited less forgetting of emotional targets compared to neutral, while older adults exhibited more forgetting of emotional targets. Finally, discrimination of highly similar positive items was preserved in older adults. These results suggest that emotional modulation of memory interacts with age in a complex manner such that the emotion-induced memory trade-off reported in young adults is reversed in older adults. These findings shed light on how emotion and memory interact in the aging brain.

  10. [Neuroprotective effects of peptides bioregulators in people of various age].

    PubMed

    Umnov, R S; Lin'kova, N S; Khavinson, V Kh

    2013-01-01

    The review presents comparative characteristics of 2 peptide neuroprotective groups: polypeptide complexes (cortexin, cerebrolizin) and short peptides (semax, kortagen, pinealon). The data of clinical applying of peptides in elderly and old age people and cellular and molecular mechanisms of their neuroprotective activity is described.

  11. Heredity vs. Environment: The Effects of Genetic Variation with Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourlay, N.

    1978-01-01

    Major problems in the field are presented through a brief review of Burt's work and a critical account of the Hawaiian and British schools of biometrical genetics. The merits and demerits of Christopher Jencks' study are also discussed. There follows an account of the principle of genetic variation with age, a new concept to the…

  12. The Effects of Age on Perceptual Problem-Solving Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jo Ann; Pollack, Robert H.

    Witkin's Embedded Figures Test (EFT) was used to measure the changes with age in field dependence and problem-solving ability. Qualitative data concerning problem-solving strategies and quantitative data were collected. EFT was administered to 12 females in each of the following decades: 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s. All subjects were moderately…

  13. A Longitudinal Analysis of Age of Onset Effects on Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolan, Patrick H.; Thomas, Peter J.

    This study is a re-analysis of four waves of data from the National Youth Survey (NYS) begun in 1976 on 1,725 adolescents and comprising a representative national sample. A subset of 423 subjects were selected for this study. Subjects were categorized into three delinquency onset groups: early onset (onset at age 12 years or younger); late onset…

  14. Fetal Habituation Performance: Gestational Age and Sex Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCorry, Noleen K.; Hepper, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    Habituation is the decrement in response to repeated stimulation. Fetal habituation performance may reflect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS) prenatally. However, basic characteristics of the prenatal habituation phenomena remain unclear, such as the relationship with gestational age (GA) and fetal sex. The current study…

  15. Age effects on spectral electroencephalogram activity prior to dream recall.

    PubMed

    Chellappa, Sarah L; Münch, Mirjam; Knoblauch, Vera; Cajochen, Christian

    2012-06-01

    Ageing is associated with marked changes in sleep timing, structure and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Older people exhibit less slow-wave and spindle activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, together with attenuated levels of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as compared to young individuals. However, the extent to which these age-related changes in sleep impact on dream processing remains largely unknown. Here we investigated NREM and REM sleep EEG activity prior to dream recall and no recall in 17 young (20-31 years) and 15 older volunteers (57-74 years) during a 40 h multiple nap protocol. Dream recall was assessed immediately after each nap. During NREM sleep prior to dream recall, older participants displayed higher frontal EEG delta activity (1-3 Hz) and higher centro-parietal sigma activity (12-15 Hz) than the young volunteers. Conversely, before no recall, older participants had less frontal-central delta activity and less sigma activity in frontal, central and parietal derivations than the young participants. REM sleep was associated to age-related changes, such that older participants had less frontal-central alpha (10-12 Hz) and beta (16-19 Hz) activity, irrespective of dream recall and no recall. Our data indicate that age-related differences in dream recall seem to be directly coupled to specific frequency and topography EEG patterns, particularly during NREM sleep. Thus, the spectral correlates of dreaming can help to understand the cortical pathways of dreaming.

  16. Route repetition and route retracing: effects of cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Jan M; Kmecova, Hana; de Condappa, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Retracing a recently traveled route is a frequent navigation task when learning novel routes or exploring unfamiliar environments. In the present study we utilized virtual environments technology to investigate age-related differences in repeating and retracing a learned route. In the training phase of the experiment participants were guided along a route consisting of multiple intersections each featuring one unique landmark. In the subsequent test phase, they were guided along short sections of the route and asked to indicate overall travel direction (repetition or retracing), the direction required to continue along the route, and the next landmark they would encounter. Results demonstrate age-related deficits in all three tasks. More specifically, in contrast to younger participants, the older participants had greater problems during route retracing than during route repetition. While route repetition can be solved with egocentric response or route strategies, successfully retracing a route requires allocentric processing. The age-related deficits in route retracing are discussed in the context of impaired allocentric processing and shift from allocentric to egocentric navigation strategies as a consequence of age-related hippocampal degeneration.

  17. English Language Learners and Kindergarten Entry Age: Achievement and Social-Emotional Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Datar, Ashlesha

    2016-01-01

    In evaluating the role of kindergarten entry age, previous researchers have not examined the entry-age effects for English language learners (ELL). Additionally, little work has assessed the role of entry age on both achievement and social-emotional outcomes. This study is the first to do both simultaneously. The authors used data from a…

  18. Relative Age Effects in Women's Rugby Union from Developmental Leagues to World Cup Tournaments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemez, Srdjan; MacMahon, Clare; Weir, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Annual age cohort groupings promote relative age effects (RAEs), which often, inadvertently, create participation and attainment biases between relatively older and younger players within the same age cohort. In a globally evolving sport, women's rugby team selection practices may potentially bypass qualified players as a result of maturational…

  19. The Effects of Age, Gender, and 4-H Involvement on Life Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Bruce E.; Mincemoyer, Claudia C.; Perkins, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The study reported here examined the effects of age, gender, and 4-H involvement in clubs on life skill development of youth ages eight to 18 over a 12-month period. Regression analyses found age, gender, and 4-H involvement significantly influenced life skill development. Results found that females have higher levels of competencies in life…

  20. Effects of Endurance Jogging on Cardiovascular System and Body Composition in Middle-Aged Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooshi, Ali

    This study investigated the effects of 30 minutes of endurance jogging on pulse rates at rest, during exercise, and at recovery and eight skinfold fat measures in middle-aged women. Subjects were 15 middle-aged women between 30 and 58 years of age who had not been engaged in any exercise program at least for 1 year. Eight sedentary subjects were…

  1. [Effectiveness of magnetotherapy in elderly hypertensive patients aging at different rates].

    PubMed

    Abramovich, S G; Koriakina, A V; Brodach, L N; Akhmedzianov, Iu A; Makarychkin, S P

    2000-01-01

    Effectiveness of general magnetotherapy was studied in 84 patients with essential hypertension and 36 patients with isolated systolic arterial hypertension of old age. It is thought necessary to determine biological age of the cardiovascular system in hypertensive patients over 60 years of age to specify indications and contraindications to physiotherapy.

  2. Effects of aging and life-prolonging diet on thyroid regulation of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2004-03-01

    The effect of thyroxin on the intensity of protein synthesis in rats of different age was studied during natural aging and in rats maintained on a low-caloric diet inhibiting aging. The intensity of protein synthesis decreased and the reaction to hormonal stimulus was absent in animals fed life-prolonging diet.

  3. Effect of reproductive ageing on pregnant mouse uterus and cervix

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rima; Moffatt, James D.; Mourmoura, Evangelia; Demaison, Luc; Seed, Paul T.; Poston, Lucilla

    2017-01-01

    Key points Older pregnant women have a greater risk of operative delivery, still birth and post‐term induction.This suggests that maternal age can influence the timing of birth and processes of parturition.We have found that increasing maternal age in C57BL/6J mice is associated with prolongation of gestation and length of labour.Older pregnant mice also had delayed progesterone withdrawal and impaired myometrial function.Uterine ageing and labour dysfunction should be investigated further in older primigravid women. Abstract Advanced maternal age (≥35 years) is associated with increased rates of operative delivery, stillbirth and post‐term labour induction. The physiological causes remain uncertain, although impaired myometrial function has been implicated. To investigate the hypothesis that maternal age directly influences successful parturition, we assessed the timing of birth and fetal outcome in pregnant C57BL/6J mice at 3 months (young) and 5 months (intermediate) vs. 8 months (older) of age using infrared video recording. Serum progesterone profiles, myometrium and cervix function, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex enzymatic activities were also examined. Older pregnant mice had a longer mean gestation and labour duration (P < 0.001), as well as reduced litter size (P < 0.01) vs. 3‐month‐old mice. Older mice did not exhibit the same decline in serum progesterone concentrations as younger mice. Cervical tissues from older mice were more distensible than younger mice (P < 0.05). Oxytocin receptor and connexin‐43 mRNA expression were reduced in the myometrium from 8‐month‐old vs. 3‐month‐old mice (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 respectively) in tandem with more frequent but shorter duration spontaneous myometrial contractions (P < 0.05) and an attenuated contractile response to oxytocin. Myometrial mitochondrial copy number was reduced in older mice, although there were no age‐induced changes to the enzymatic

  4. Thinking about my generation: adaptive effects of a dual age identity in later adulthood.

    PubMed

    Weiss, David; Lang, Frieder R

    2009-09-01

    Growing old involves experiences of losses. Yet, it is not clear whether one's cohort group membership poses a resource in later adulthood. The authors examined the role of a dual age identity (age group vs. generation) across adulthood and possible adaptive effects on future time perspective and well-being. Findings suggest that when generation membership is salient, older (but not young and middle-aged) participants display a stronger identification with same-aged people than when age group membership is salient. Additionally, results demonstrate that the dual age identity represents a significant component of the self-concept and well-being in older adults.

  5. Effect of aging and oral tolerance on dendritic cell function.

    PubMed

    Simioni, P U; Fernandes, L G R; Gabriel, D L; Tamashiro, W M S C

    2010-01-01

    Oral tolerance can be induced in some mouse strains by gavage or spontaneous ingestion of dietary antigens. In the present study, we determined the influence of aging and oral tolerance on the secretion of co-stimulatory molecules by dendritic cells (DC), and on the ability of DC to induce proliferation and cytokine secretion by naive T cells from BALB/c and OVA transgenic (DO11.10) mice. We observed that oral tolerance could be induced in BALB/c mice (N = 5 in each group) of all ages (8, 20, 40, 60, and 80 weeks old), although a decline in specific antibody levels was observed in the sera of both tolerized and immunized mice with advancing age (40 to 80 weeks old). DC obtained from young, adult and middle-aged (8, 20, and 40 weeks old) tolerized mice were less efficient (65, 17 and 20%, respectively) than DC from immunized mice (P < 0.05) in inducing antigen-specific proliferation of naive T cells from both BALB/c and DO11.10 young mice, or in stimulating IFN-g, IL-4 and IL-10 production. However, TGF-beta levels were significantly elevated in co-cultures carried out with DC from tolerant mice (P < 0.05). DC from both immunized and tolerized old and very old (60 and 80 weeks old) mice were equally ineffective in inducing T cell proliferation and cytokine production (P < 0.05). A marked reduction in CD86+ marker expression was observed in DC isolated from both old and tolerized mice (75 and 50%, respectively). The results indicate that the aging process does not interfere with the establishment of oral tolerance in BALB/c mice, but reduces DC functions, probably due to the decline of the expression of the CD86 surface marker.

  6. Age and work environment characteristics in relation to sleep: Additive, interactive and curvilinear effects.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Katharine R

    2016-05-01

    Although additive combinations of age and work environment characteristics have been found to predict sleep impairment, possible age x work environment interactions have been largely disregarded. The present study examined linear and curvilinear interactions of age with work environment measures in relation to sleep quality and duration. Survey data were collected from offshore day-shift personnel (N = 901). Main effects and interactions of the age terms with work environment measures (job demand, control, and social support, physical environment and strenuous work) were evaluated. Sleep duration was predicted by a curvilinear interaction, age(2) x job demand (p < .005), and by the age x social support interaction (p < .002); sleep quality was predicted by age x job demand (p < .002). Job control and physical environment showed significant additive effects. At a time when older employees are encouraged to remain in the workforce, the findings serve to increase understanding of how ageing and work demands jointly contribute to sleep impairment.

  7. Age-related decline in olympic triathlon performance: effect of locomotion mode.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Thierry; Sultana, Frédéric; Lepers, Romuald; Hausswirth, Christophe; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the decline in performance with age during Olympic triathlon Age Groups World Championships among the different locomotion modes. Mean performance of top 10 performers were analyzed for each group of age using the exponential model proposed by Baker, Tang, and Turner (2003, Experimental Aging Research, 29, 47-65). Comparison in performance decline was done between locomotion modes. Decline in performance in triathlon as a function of age follows an exponential model. A significant interaction effect between age and locomotion mode was observed on performance values. In swimming, a significant decrease was observed close to 5% per year after 45 years. Decline in performance was less pronounced in cycling until 60 years. Analysis of the effect of age in the different locomotion modes of a triathlon could provide information for maintaining quality of life with aging.

  8. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  9. Effects of sleep deprivation and aging on long-term and remote memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a month after training, sleep-deprived and control aged animals performed similarly, primarily due to remote memory decay in the control aged animals. Gene expression analysis supported the finding that SD has similar effects on the hippocampus in young and aged mice. PMID:25776037

  10. The Anti-Aging Effect of Erythropoietin via the ERK/Nrf2-ARE Pathway in Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiqin; Zhao, Jiaxin; Chen, Mengyi; Wang, Huqing; Yao, Qingling; Fan, Jiaxin; Zhang, Meng

    2017-03-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has a neuroprotective effect and can resist aging, which most likely occur through EPO increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and scavenging free radicals. In this study, we verified the anti-aging function of EPO and discussed the mechanism occurring through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-ARE pathway. A rat model of aging was induced by the continuous subcutaneous injection of 5 % D-galactose for 6 weeks. At the beginning of the sixth week, physiological saline or EPO was administered twice per day through a lateral ventricle system for a total of 7 days. In one group, 2 μl PD98059 was administered 30 min before EPO. Learning and memory ability were analyzed with the Morris water maze system. HE staining was used to observe the morphological changes in the neurons in the hippocampus, and immunohistochemical staining as well as Western blots were carried out to detect the expression of ERK for each group of rats and the expression of phosphorylated-ERK (P-ERK), Nrf2, and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Real-Time PCR was carried out to detect the amount of Nrf2 mRNA and the KEAP1 mRNA expression. EPO can significantly improve learning and memory ability in aging rats and can provide protection against aging by improving the hippocampus morphology. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blots showed P-ERK, Nrf2, and Cu-Zn SOD decreases in aging rats compared to the normal group, while the expression for those proteins increased after EPO intervention. PD98059 inhibited the enhanced expression of P-ERK, Nrf2, and Cu-Zn SOD induced by EPO. Real-Time PCR results suggested that the trend of Nrf2mRNA expression was the same as that for the proteins, which confirmed that the enhancement occurred at the gene level. As such, EPO can significantly resist or delay aging and protect the brain by reducing oxidative stress. The most likely mechanism is that EPO can promote the ERK/Nrf2-ARE pathway in

  11. Effects of Age on Long Term Memory for Degraded Speech

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Christiane M.; Özyurt, Jale; Nogueira, Waldo; Puschmann, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Prior research suggests that acoustical degradation impacts encoding of items into memory, especially in elderly subjects. We here aimed to investigate whether acoustically degraded items that are initially encoded into memory are more prone to forgetting as a function of age. Young and old participants were tested with a vocoded and unvocoded serial list learning task involving immediate and delayed free recall. We found that degraded auditory input increased forgetting of previously encoded items, especially in older participants. We further found that working memory capacity predicted forgetting of degraded information in young participants. In old participants, verbal IQ was the most important predictor for forgetting acoustically degraded information. Our data provide evidence that acoustically degraded information, even if encoded, is especially vulnerable to forgetting in old age. PMID:27708570

  12. Transpiration in an oil palm landscape: effects of palm age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röll, A.; Niu, F.; Meijide, A.; Hardanto, A.; Hendrayanto; Knohl, A.; Hölscher, D.

    2015-10-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantations cover large and continuously increasing areas of humid tropical lowlands. Landscapes dominated by oil palms usually consist of a mosaic of mono-cultural, homogeneous stands of varying age, which may be heterogeneous in their water use characteristics. However, studies on the water use characteristics of oil palms are still at an early stage and there is a lack of knowledge on how oil palm expansion will affect the major components of the hydrological cycle. To provide first insights into hydrological landscape-level consequences of oil palm cultivation, we derived transpiration rates of oil palms in stands of varying age, estimated the contribution of palm transpiration to evapotranspiration, and analyzed the influence of fluctuations in environmental variables on oil palm water use. We studied 15 two- to 25-year old stands in the lowlands of Jambi, Indonesia. A sap flux technique with an oil palm specific calibration and sampling scheme was used to derive leaf-, palm- and stand-level water use rates in all stands under comparable environmental conditions. Additionally, in a two- and a 12-year old stand, eddy covariance measurements were conducted to derive evapotranspiration rates. Water use rates per leaf and palm increased 5-fold from an age of 2 years to a stand age of approx. 10 years and then remained relatively constant. A similar trend was visible, but less pronounced, for estimated stand transpiration rates of oil palms; they varied 12-fold, from 0.2 mm day-1 in a 2-year old to 2.5 mm day-1 in a 12-year old stand, showing particularly high variability in transpiration rates among medium-aged stands. Comparing sap flux and eddy-covariance derived water fluxes suggests that transpiration contributed 8 % to evapotranspiration in the 2-year old stand and 53 % in the 12-year old stand, indicating variable and substantial additional sources of evaporation, e.g., from the soil, the ground vegetation and from trunk

  13. Transpiration in an oil palm landscape: effects of palm age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röll, A.; Niu, F.; Meijide, A.; Hardanto, A.; Hendrayanto; Knohl, A.; Hölscher, D.

    2015-06-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantations cover large and continuously increasing areas of humid tropical lowlands. Landscapes dominated by oil palms usually consist of a mosaic of mono-cultural, homogeneous stands of varying age, which may be heterogeneous in their water use characteristics. However, studies on the water use characteristics of oil palms are still at an early stage and there is a lack of knowledge on how oil palm expansion will affect the major components of the hydrological cycle. To provide first insights into hydrological landscape-level consequences of oil palm cultivation, we derived transpiration rates of oil palms in stands of varying age, estimated the contribution of palm transpiration to evapotranspiration, and analyzed the influence of fluctuations in environmental variables on oil palm water use. We studied 15 two- to 25 year old stands in the lowlands of Jambi, Indonesia. A sap flux technique with an oil palm specific calibration and sampling scheme was used to derive leaf-, palm- and stand-level water use rates in all stands under comparable environmental conditions. Additionally, in a two- and a 12 year old stand, eddy covariance measurements were conducted to derive evapotranspiration rates. Water use rates per leaf and palm increased 5-fold from an age of two years to a stand age of approx. 10 years and then remained relatively constant. A similar trend was visible, but less pronounced, for estimated stand transpiration rates of oil palms; they varied 12-fold, from 0.2 mm day-1 in a 2 year old to 2.5 mm day-1 in a 12 year old stand, showing particularly high variability in transpiration rates among medium-aged stands. Confronting sap flux and eddy-covariance derived water fluxes suggests that transpiration contributed 8 % to evapotranspiration in the 2 year old stand and 53 % in the 12 year old stand, indicating variable and substantial additional sources of evaporation, e.g. from the soil, the ground vegetation and from trunk

  14. The effect of age on mitochondrial enzymes and respiration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P D; Hill, B T; Franks, L M

    1975-01-01

    There was no significant difference between the levels of cytochrome oxidase and malate dehydrogenase in whole liver homogenates or in mitochondria isolated from the livers of 6-month-old and 30-month-old C57/BL mice. Little change with age was found in the cytochemical localisation of either enzyme. There were no significant changes in endogenous, state III or state IV respiration of mitochondria isolated from the livers of young and old mice.

  15. An effective strategy to reduce blood pressure after forest walking in middle-aged and aged people

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Masahiro; Endo, Junko; Akatsuka, Shin; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Eriko; Uno, Tadashi; Kikuchi, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Forest walking may be effective for human health, but little information is available about effects of energy expenditure on blood pressure responses after forest walking. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the activity energy expenditure and changes in blood pressure in individuals after forest walking. [Subjects] The subjects were 54 middle-aged and elderly people. [Methods] All subjects walked in the forest for approximately 90 min. Blood pressure, salivary amylase, and the Profile of Mood States were evaluated before and after forest walking, and activity energy expenditure was monitored throughout forest walking. Subjects were divided into two groups according to mean arterial pressure changes: a responder group (>5% decreases) and a nonresponder group (<5%). [Results] Forest walking significantly reduced the mean arterial pressure and improved the Profile of Mood States in both groups. Activity energy expenditure was related to changes in mean arterial pressure in the responder group, while this relation was not observed in the nonresponder group. Differential activity energy expenditure did not strongly affect improvement of the Profile of Mood States. [Conclusion] Greater walking-related greater activity energy expenditure might be required to accentuate physiological beneficial effects on in middle-aged and aged people. Furthermore, the forest environment per se can attenuate psychological stress. PMID:26834337

  16. Conditional and indirect effects of age of first exposure on PTSD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Miller-Graff, Laura E; Scrafford, Kathryn; Rice, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Childhood violence exposure (CVE) in formative developmental years may have potent effects on severity and complexity of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in adulthood, yet little research has examined the role of age of first exposure in the context of polyvictimization or gone beyond an examination of direct effects. The current study examines the specific associations between age of first exposure, total CVE, and posttraumatic stress symptoms in adulthood. Further, the conditional and indirect effects of age of first exposure on posttraumatic stress symptoms were examined. We hypothesized that age of first exposure to violence would be associated with higher total violence exposure across childhood, thereby predicting current posttraumatic stress symptom severity (i.e., indirect effect). We also postulated that age of first exposure would affect the relationship between total violence exposure and posttraumatic stress symptoms such that earlier exposure would exacerbate the effects of violence exposure (i.e., conditional effect). Participants included 269 violence-exposed adults recruited through MTurk; the mean age of first CVE was 6 years (SD=3.29). Conditional process models indicated that age of first exposure was significantly associated with higher total childhood violence exposure, which in turn, was significantly associated with current posttraumatic stress symptoms in all domains. Further, a conditional effect of age of first exposure was present such that the relationship between total exposure to violence and symptoms of hyperarousal was stronger for those first exposed at earlier ages. Findings provide support suggesting the particular potency of early trauma on regulatory response systems.

  17. Anti-Aging Effect of Nigella Sativa Fixed Oil on D-Galactose-Induced Aging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shahroudi, Mahdieh Jafari; Mehri, Soghra; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Aging is an unconscious and gradual process that can lead to changes in biological systems. Induction of oxidative stress and apoptosis, hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity are involved in the aging process. Regarding the antioxidant property of black seed oil, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-aging effect of Nigella sativa (N. sativa) oil on d-galactose-induced aging in mice. Methods: For induction of aging, D-galactose (500 mg/kg, subcoutaneously SC) was administrated to male mice for 42 days. Animals were treated with D-galactose alone or with b lack seed oil (0.1, 0.2, 0.5 mL/kg, intraperitoneally (ip)). Additionally, vitamin E (200 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. At the end of treatment, the malondialdehyde (MDA) and the glutathione (GSH) contents in brain and liver tissues were measured. Also, enzymes in serum, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine amino transferase (ALT), were determined. The levels of the proteins Bax, Bcl2, caspase-3 (pro and cleaved) in brain and liver tissues were evaluated. Results: Administration of D-galactose (500 mg/kg, SC) for 42 days increased serum levels of ALT and AST, as well as the MDA content, in brain and liver tissues, but decreased the GSH content. Additionally, the levels of apoptotic proteins, including Bax, procaspase-3 and caspase-3 cleaved, were markedly increased. N. sativa oil (0.1 and 0.2 mL/kg) diminished the levels of the biochemical markers ALT and AST. Administration of black seed oil (0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mL/kg) reduced lipid peroxidation and at doses 0.1 and 0.2 mL/kg significantly recovered the GSH content. The oil decreased Bax/Bcl2 levels and at 0.1 mL/kg down-regulated the expressions of caspase-3 (pro and cleaved) proteins in brain and liver tissues. Conclusion: Through its antioxidant and anti-apoptosis properties, black seed oil exhibited an anti-aging effect in a model of aging induced with D-galactose. PMID:28392960

  18. The effect of paternal age on offspring intelligence and personality when controlling for paternal trait level.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Ruben C; Penke, Lars; Johnson, Wendy; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Paternal age at conception has been found to predict the number of new genetic mutations. We examined the effect of father's age at birth on offspring intelligence, head circumference and personality traits. Using the Minnesota Twin Family Study sample we tested paternal age effects while controlling for parents' trait levels measured with the same precision as offspring's. From evolutionary genetic considerations we predicted a negative effect of paternal age on offspring intelligence, but not on other traits. Controlling for parental intelligence (IQ) had the effect of turning an initially positive association non-significantly negative. We found paternal age effects on offspring IQ and Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire Absorption, but they were not robustly significant, nor replicable with additional covariates. No other noteworthy effects were found. Parents' intelligence and personality correlated with their ages at twin birth, which may have obscured a small negative effect of advanced paternal age (<1% of variance explained) on intelligence. We discuss future avenues for studies of paternal age effects and suggest that stronger research designs are needed to rule out confounding factors involving birth order and the Flynn effect.

  19. 20 CFR 229.52 - Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is effective before DIB O/M.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is effective before DIB O/M. 229.52 Section 229.52 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS... Minimum Rate § 229.52 Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is effective before DIB O/M. If an...

  20. 20 CFR 229.52 - Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is effective before DIB O/M.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is effective before DIB O/M. 229.52 Section 229.52 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS... Minimum Rate § 229.52 Age reduction when a reduced age O/M is effective before DIB O/M. If an...

  1. The Effects of the Parenting Styles on Social Skills of Children Aged 5-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kol, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of the parenting styles on social skills of children aged 5-6. The problem sentence of the research is; Do the parenting styles' have any effects on social skills of children aged 5-6?. The sub-problems of the research are in the form as; Does the social skills of children aged 5-6 differs from…

  2. Sexually dimorphic effect of aging on skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there appear to be no differences in muscle protein turnover in young and middle aged men and women, we have reported significant differences in the rate of muscle protein synthesis between older adult men and women. This suggests that aging may affect muscle protein turnover differently in men and women. Methods We measured the skeletal muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) by using stable isotope-labeled tracer methods during basal postabsorptive conditions and during a hyperaminoacidemic-hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in eight young men (25–45 y), ten young women (25–45 y), ten old men (65–85 y) and ten old women (65–85 y). Results The basal muscle protein FSR was not different in young and old men (0.040 ± 0.004 and 0.043 ± 0.005%·h-1, respectively) and combined insulin, glucose and amino acid infusion significantly increased the muscle protein FSR both in young (to 0.063 ± 0.006%·h-1) and old (to 0.051 ± 0.008%·h-1) men but the increase (0.023 ± 0.004 vs. 0.009 ± 0.004%·h-1, respectively) was ~60% less in the old men (P = 0.03). In contrast, the basal muscle protein FSR was ~30% greater in old than young women (0.060 ± 0.003 vs. 0.046 ± 0.004%·h-1, respectively; P < 0.05) and combined insulin, glucose and amino acid infusion significantly increased the muscle protein FSR in young (P < 0.01) but not in old women (P = 0.10) so that the FSR was not different between young and old women during the clamp (0.074 ± 0.006%·h-1 vs. 0.072 ± 0.006%·h-1, respectively). Conclusions There is sexual dimorphism in the age-related changes in muscle protein synthesis and thus the metabolic processes responsible for the age-related decline in muscle mass. PMID:22620287

  3. Freezing, thawing and aging effects on beef tenderness from Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle.

    PubMed

    Aroeira, Carolina N; Torres Filho, Robledo A; Fontes, Paulo Rogério; Gomide, Lúcio Alberto M; Ramos, Alcinéia L S; Ladeira, Márcio M; Ramos, Eduardo M

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of freezing prior to aging on the meat tenderness of young Nellore and Aberdeen Angus bulls. Samples of the longissimus thoracis muscle were submitted to two treatments: conventional aging and freezing (-20°C for 40 days) followed by thawing and aging periods. The meats were evaluated after 0, 7, 14 and 21 aging days (1°C). Freezing increased (P<0.05) purge, cooking loss and total exudate loss throughout aging. Nellore meats had greater total exudate loss and shorter sarcomere lengths (P<0.05). Freezing increased proteolysis during aging in the meats of both breeds, but reduced shear force was found (P<0.05) only in Aberdeen Angus meats and only at time zero. These results suggest that the meat tenderizing process by freezing prior to aging may contribute to meat tenderness in the first weeks of aging, but it is dependent on the animal breed.

  4. Age-Related Changes in Predictive Capacity Versus Internal Model Adaptability: Electrophysiological Evidence that Individual Differences Outweigh Effects of Age

    PubMed Central

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Philipp, Markus; Alday, Phillip M.; Kretzschmar, Franziska; Grewe, Tanja; Gumpert, Maike; Schumacher, Petra B.; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical predictive coding has been identified as a possible unifying principle of brain function, and recent work in cognitive neuroscience has examined how it may be affected by age–related changes. Using language comprehension as a test case, the present study aimed to dissociate age-related changes in prediction generation versus internal model adaptation following a prediction error. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured in a group of older adults (60–81 years; n = 40) as they read sentences of the form “The opposite of black is white/yellow/nice.” Replicating previous work in young adults, results showed a target-related P300 for the expected antonym (“white”; an effect assumed to reflect a prediction match), and a graded N400 effect for the two incongruous conditions (i.e. a larger N400 amplitude for the incongruous continuation not related to the expected antonym, “nice,” versus the incongruous associated condition, “yellow”). These effects were followed by a late positivity, again with a larger amplitude in the incongruous non-associated versus incongruous associated condition. Analyses using linear mixed-effects models showed that the target-related P300 effect and the N400 effect for the incongruous non-associated condition were both modulated by age, thus suggesting that age-related changes affect both prediction generation and model adaptation. However, effects of age were outweighed by the interindividual variability of ERP responses, as reflected in the high proportion of variance captured by the inclusion of by-condition random slopes for participants and items. We thus argue that – at both a neurophysiological and a functional level – the notion of general differences between language processing in young and older adults may only be of limited use, and that future research should seek to better understand the causes of interindividual variability in the ERP responses of older adults and its relation to

  5. Interactive Effects of Gender Ideology and Age at First Marriage on Women's Marital Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Shannon N.; Greenstein, Theodore N.

    2004-01-01

    A sample of ever-married women from the NLSY79 is analyzed to examine the effects of age at first marriage and gender ideology on the likelihood of experiencing marital disruption. The authors hypothesize that age at first marriage will have no effect on the likelihood of experiencing marital disruption for non-traditional women, but that there…

  6. Differential effects of blueberry polyphenols on age-associated neuroinflammation and cognition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammatory insults are thought to contribute to the decrements in cognitive performance seen in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various dark-colored berry fruits in reversing age-related de...

  7. Interactive effects of family socioeconomic status and body mass index on depression in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Gong; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Tung, Ho-Jui

    2012-01-01

    Depression is an important health problem in children and the onset of depression is occurring at a younger age than previously suggested. The associations of being overweight and low socioeconomic status in childhood depression have been well documented; nevertheless few studies have addressed the combined effects of socioeconomic status and body weight, with depression in school-age children. We intended to examine if the relationship between socioeconomic status and childhood depression could be modified by abnormal body weight. A cross-sectional study was performed with a total of 559 subjects from 29 elementary schools in Taiwan. A depression scale was used to determine the depression status. Children receiving governmental monetary assistance for after-school class were categorized as being in the lower socioeconomic group. Data for depression-related demographic characteristics, family and school variables were collected. Children in the lower socioeconomic status group have a higher prevalence of depression (23.5%) than those in higher socioeconomic status groups(16.4%). Being overweight demonstrates the opposite effect on depression risk in the different socioeconomic groups. In lower socioeconomic families, the risk of depression in overweight children is three times higher than that for normal weight children; whereas in higher socioeconomic families, overweight children have a lower risk for depression than normal weight children. We concluded that a qualitative interactive effect existed between being overweight and socioeconomic status with childhood depression. More attention should be paid to overweight children from lower socioeconomic status families to prevent depression in school-age children.

  8. Effect of Pre-aging on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Spray-formed 7075 Alloy in Retrogression and Re-aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rui-ming; Qu, Ying-dong; You, Jun-hua; de Li, Rong-

    2015-11-01

    The effects of pre-aging in retrogression and re-aging (RRA) treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of spray-formed 7075 aluminum alloy were investigated by tensile test, slow strain rate test, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the under aging (120 °C for 16 h) as the pre-aging in RRA treatment can vastly improve the mechanical properties and the SCC resistance of the alloy, compared with early aging (120 °C for 8 h), peak aging (120 °C for 24 h), and over aging (120 °C for 32 h) treatments, the ultimate tensile strength of the alloy is 782 MPa, which is higher than that for peak aging or conventional RRA treatment; and the SCC resistance of the alloy is also excellent after RRA with under aging as pre-aging.

  9. Water matrix and age effects on microorganism Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ashish; Jabbour, Rabih E.; Treado, Patrick J.; Nelson, Matthew P.; Snyder, A. Peter

    2010-04-01

    Raman microspectroscopy is used to probe the age and milieu parameters for suspensions of bacteria for their detection in water backgrounds. No studies have been reported on the fate of Raman signatures over time for biologicals stored in water matrices. A FALCON II Raman Chemical Imaging System (ChemImage, Pittsburgh, PA) and 532 nm laser excitation source acquired the Raman spectra. MATLAB principal components (PC) analysis software was employed for data reduction. Suspensions of Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and three strains of E. coli (EC) were prepared in distilled and recipe tap water. Aliquots at 5 min, 5 hr, and 1, 2, and 7 days at 25 C were dried on microscope slides in replicate. Adequate spectral differences were observed for all three organism species. Microscope analysis showed that freshly suspended Bacillus spores and EC vegetative cells, in both water matrices, remained as spores after seven days. Agar plate growth procedures showed that the bacteria were still viable even after seven days resting in both water matrices. All three bacterial species were separated based on PC analysis; however, the three EC strains coalesced. The water matrix parameter was inconsistent in its ability to separate the Raman spectra in PC plots of the five bacteria. Within each group, the time parameter poorly separated the bacterial resting suspensions as the aging proceeded. A Mahalanobis linkage distance analysis (dendrogram) for all three species and strains in both water matrices confirmed a random order for all five suspension times.

  10. Effect of dietary boron on the aging process.

    PubMed

    Massie, H R

    1994-11-01

    Total boron concentrations in Drosophila changed during development and aging. The highest concentration of boron was found during the egg stage, followed by a decline during the larval stages. Newly emerged flies contained 35.5 ppm boron. During the adult stage the boron concentration increased by 52% by 9 weeks of age. Adding excess dietary boron during the adult stage decreased the median life span by 69% at 0.01 M sodium borate and by 21% at 0.001 M sodium borate. Lower concentrations gave small but significant increases in life span. Supplementing a very low boron diet with 0.00025 M sodium borate improved life span by 9.5%. The boron contents of young and old mouse tissues were similar to those of Drosophila and human samples. Boron supplements of 4.3 and 21.6 ppm in the drinking water, however, did not significantly change the life span of old mice fed a diet containing 31.1 ppm boron.

  11. The effects of age and gender on lipreading abilities.

    PubMed

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Sommers, Mitchell S; Spehar, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Age-related declines for many sensory and cognitive abilities are greater for males than for females. The primary purpose of the present investigation was to consider whether age-related changes in lipreading abilities are similar for men and women by comparing the lipreading abilities of separate groups of younger and older adults. Older females, older males, younger females and younger males completed vision-only speech recognition tests of: (1) 13 consonants in a vocalic /i/-C-/i/ environment; (2) words in a carrier phrase; and (3) meaningful sentences. In addition to percent correct performance, consonant data were analyzed for performance within viseme categories. The results suggest that while older adults do not lipread as well as younger adults, the difference between older and younger participants was comparable across gender. We also found no differences in the lipreading abilities of males and females, regardless of stimulus type (i.e., consonants, words, sentences), a finding that differs from some reports by previous investigators (e.g., Dancer, Krain, Thompson, Davis, & Glenn, 1994).

  12. Differential Age Effects for Implicit and Explicit Conceptual Associative Memory

    PubMed Central

    Dew, Ilana T. Z.; Giovanello, Kelly S.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults show disproportionate declines in explicit memory for associative relative to item information. However, the source of these declines is still uncertain. One explanation is a generalized impairment in the processing of associative information. A second explanation is a more specialized impairment in the strategic, effortful recollection of associative information, leaving less effortful forms of associative retrieval preserved. Assessing implicit memory of new associations is a way to distinguish between these viewpoints. To date, mixed findings have emerged from studies of associative priming in aging. One factor that may account for the variability is whether the manipulations inadvertently involve strategic, explicit processes. In 2 experiments we present a novel paradigm of conceptual associative priming in which subjects make speeded associative judgments about unrelated objects. Using a size classification task, Experiment 1 showed equivalent associative priming between young and older adults. Experiment 2 generalized the results of Experiment 1 to an inside/outside classification task, while replicating the typical age-related impairment in associative but not item recognition. Taken together, the findings support the viewpoint that older adults can incidentally encode and retrieve new meaningful associations despite difficulty with the intentional recollection of the same information. PMID:21077717

  13. The effects of normal aging on humor appreciation.

    PubMed

    Shammi, Prathiba; Stuss, Donald T

    2003-09-01

    The importance of humor in healthy aging is being recognized. We compared elderly and young participants on their comprehension and appreciation of, and reaction to, verbal and nonverbal humor tests. Cognitive processes-working memory, cognitive flexibility, verbal abstraction, and visual scanning-were studied in relation to humor. Results indicated a relative deficit in the elderly in the cognitive comprehension of humor-selecting punch lines to jokes and in a cartoon array test. Measures of cognitive function correlated with humor comprehension. In contrast to this deficit in comprehension, the elderly showed intact affective appreciation and emotional reactiveness. Because of the hypothesis of frontal lobe degeneration as a basis for changes with aging, we compared the elderly to patients with focal frontal lesions. In this comparison, the elderly were significantly better than the patients in their comprehension of humor. They also displayed intact appreciation of humor compared to patients with frontal lesions. This preliminary study suggests that preserved affective responsiveness may underlie the success in using humor as a coping mechanism in the elderly.

  14. Age and nutritional state influence the effects of cholecystokinin on energy balance.

    PubMed

    Balaskó, M; Rostás, I; Füredi, N; Mikó, A; Tenk, J; Cséplő, P; Koncsecskó-Gáspár, M; Soós, S; Székely, M; Pétervári, E

    2013-11-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is anorexic, irrespective whether it is applied intraperitoneally (IP) or intracerebroventricularly (ICV) in male Wistar rats. The metabolic effects depend on the route of administration: by the IP route it elicits hypothermia (presumably by type-1 receptors, CCK1R-s), while ICV administration is followed by fever-like hypermetabolism and hyperthermia via activation of CCK2R-s, which latter response seems to be most important in the postprandial (compensatory) hypermetabolism. The efficacy of the IP injected CCK varies with age: it causes strong anorexia in young adult 4 and 6-months old and again in old rats (aged 18-24 months), but the middle-aged (12-month old) ones seem to be resistant to this effect. Such pattern of effects may contribute to the explanation of age-related obesity observed in middle-aged animals as well as to the aging anorexia and loss of body weight in old ones. Diet-induced obesity accelerates the appearance of CCK-resistance as well as the return of high sensitivity to CCK in further aging, while chronic calorie-restriction prevents the development of resistance, as if the speed of the age-related regulatory changes was altered by the nutritional state. The effects of ICV applied CCK also change with age: the characteristic anorexic and hypermetabolic/hyperthermic effects can be observed in young adult rats, but the effects gradually and monotonically decline with age and disappear by the old age of 24 months. These disparate age-related patterns of CCK efficacy upon peripheral or central administration routes may indicate that although both peripheral and central CCKR-s exert anorexic effects, they may have dissimilar roles in the regulation of overall energy balance.

  15. Effect of ageing on rheological properties of storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yu, Jianying; Wu, Shaopeng

    2010-10-15

    Oxidative ageing as an inevitable process in practical road paving has a great effect on the properties of polymer-modified asphalts (PMAs). In this article, the effect of short-term and long-term oxidative ageing on the rheological, physical properties and the morphology of the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS)- and storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts was studied, respectively. The analysis on the rheological and physical properties of the PMAs before and after ageing showed the two major effects of ageing. On one hand, ageing prompted the degradation of polymer and increased the viscous behaviour of the modified binders, on the other, ageing changed the asphalt compositions and improved the elastic behaviour of the modified binders. The final performance of the aged binders depended on the combined effect. After ageing, the storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts showed an obvious viscous behaviour compare with the SBS-modified asphalts and this led to an improved low-temperature creep property. The rutting resistance of the SBS-modified asphalts declined by the addition of sulfur due to the structural instability of the SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts. The rheological properties of the modified binders before and after ageing also depended strongly on the structural characteristics of SBS. The observation by using optical microscopy showed the compatibility between asphalt and SBS was improved with further ageing, especially for the storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts.

  16. Effects of aging on figure-ground perception: Convexity context effects and competition resolution.

    PubMed

    Lass, Jordan W; Bennett, Patrick J; Peterson, Mary A; Sekuler, Allison B

    2017-02-01

    We examined age-related differences in figure-ground perception by exploring the effect of age on Convexity Context Effects (CCE; Peterson & Salvagio, 2008). Experiment 1, using Peterson and Salvagio's procedure and black and white stimuli consisting of 2 to 8 alternating concave and convex regions, established that older adults exhibited reduced CCEs compared to younger adults. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrated that this age difference was found at various stimulus durations and sizes. Experiment 4 compared CCEs obtained with achromatic stimuli, in which the alternating convex and concave regions were each all black or all white, and chromatic stimuli in which the concave regions were homogeneous in color but the convex regions varied in color. We found that the difference between CCEs measured with achromatic and colored stimuli was larger in older than in younger adults. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the senescent visual system is less able to resolve the competition among various perceptual interpretations of the figure-ground relations among stimulus regions.

  17. Curcumin eliminates the effect of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) on the divergent regulation of gene expression of receptors of AGEs by interrupting leptin signaling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Youcai; Chen, Anping

    2014-05-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a major risk factor for hepatic fibrogenesis. NASH is often found in diabetic patients with hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia induces non-enzymatic glycation of proteins, yielding advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Effects of AGEs are mainly mediated by two categories of cytoplasmic membrane receptors. Receptor for AGEs (RAGE) is associated with increased oxidative stress and inflammation, whereas AGE receptor-1 (AGE-R1) is involved in detoxification and clearance of AGEs. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) is crucial to the development of hepatic fibrosis. We recently reported that AGEs stimulated HSC activation likely by inhibiting gene expression of AGE-R1 and inducing gene expression of RAGE in HSC, which were eliminated by the antioxidant curcumin. This study is to test our hypothesis that curcumin eliminates the effects of AGEs on the divergent regulation of the two receptors of AGEs in HSC by interrupting the AGE-caused activation of leptin signaling, leading to the inhibition of HSC activation. We observed herein that AGEs activated leptin signaling by inducing gene expression of leptin and its receptor in HSC. Like AGEs, leptin differentially regulated gene expression of RAGE and AGE-R1. Curcumin eliminated the effects of AGEs in HSC by interrupting leptin signaling and activating transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), leading to the elevation of cellular glutathione and the attenuation of oxidative stress. In conclusions, curcumin eliminated the effects of AGEs on the divergent regulation of gene expression of RAGE and AGE-R1 in HSC by interrupting the AGE-caused activation of leptin signaling, leading to the inhibition of HSC activation.

  18. Curcumin eliminates the effect of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) on the divergent regulation of gene expression of receptors of AGEs by interrupting leptin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Youcai; Chen, Anping

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a major risk factor for hepatic fibrogenesis. NASH is often found in diabetic patients with hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia induces non-enzymatic glycation of proteins, yielding advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Effects of AGEs are mainly mediated by two categories of cytoplasmic membrane receptors. Receptor for AGEs (RAGE) is associated with increased oxidative stress and inflammation, whereas AGE receptor-1 (AGE-R1) is involved in detoxification and clearance of AGEs. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) is crucial to the development of hepatic fibrosis. We recently reported that AGEs stimulated HSC activation likely by inhibiting gene expression of AGE-R1 and inducing gene expression of RAGE in HSC, which were eliminated by the antioxidant curcumin. This study is to test our hypothesis that curcumin eliminates the effects of AGEs on the divergent regulation of the two receptors of AGEs in HSC by interrupting the AGEs-caused activation of leptin signaling, leading to the inhibition of HSC activation. We observed herein that AGEs activated leptin signaling by inducing gene expression of leptin and its receptor in HSC. Like AGEs, leptin differentially regulated gene expression of RAGE and AGE-R1. Curcumin eliminated the effects of AGEs in HSC by interrupting leptin signaling and activating transcription factor Nrf2, leading to the elevation of cellular glutathione and the attenuation of oxidative stress. In conclusions, curcumin eliminated the effects of AGEs on the divergent regulation of gene expression of RAGE and AGE-R1 in HSC by interrupting the AGEs-caused activation of leptin signaling, leading to the inhibition of HSC activation. PMID:24614199

  19. Consumer preference and effect of correct or misleading information after ageing beef longissimus muscle using vacuum, dry ageing, or a dry ageing bag.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Helena; Li, Xin; Hunt, Melvin C; Lundström, Kerstin

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which ageing treatment of beef was sensorially preferred by consumers and how their preference changed when given information about the ageing treatment used. Longissimus thoracis et lumborum from four young bulls were randomly assigned three ageing treatments: dry ageing, vacuum ageing and ageing in a highly moisture permeable bag (bag dry-ageing); each was aged at 1.6 °C for another 13 days. A preference test (171 consumers) with questions about overall liking, tenderness, and juiciness was performed. Thereafter, a deceptive test (61 consumers) was performed with two taste samples, the first taste sample with correct information about ageing treatment and the second with false information. In the preference test, consumers preferred dry ageing and bag dry-ageing to vacuum ageing. In the deceptive test, dry ageing was preferred, but the information given influenced preference.

  20. Inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on AGE-induced HCAEC apoptosis by upregulating HSF-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Jiming; Cui, Li; Lai, Yan; Yao, Yian; Zhang, Yibo; Pang, Xiufeng; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xuebo

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluates effect and mechanism of atorvastatin on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) apoptosis. Results have shown that HCAEC apoptosis had increased with increasing concentration of AGEs. Atorvastatin may decrease HCAEC apoptosis, but the effect can be attenuated by PI3K inhibitor. Secretion of PI3K and P-Akt in HCAEC increased with increasing concentration of AGEs. Secretion of PI3K in HCAEC may be decreased by atorvastatin. The effect may be attenuated by PI3K inhibitor. HSF-1, HSP-70 mRNA expression level decreased with increasing concentration of AGEs. Atorvastatin may attenuate AGEs-induced HSF-1, HSP-70 mRNA expression in HCAEC, but the effect can be attenuated by PI3K inhibitor. It can be concluded that AGE can dose-dependently promote HCAEC apoptosis by the PI3K/AKT pathway. Atorvastatin may attenuate the effect possibly by upregulating HSF-1.

  1. The Influence of Age on the Effects of Lifestyle Modification and Metformin in Prevention of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Jill; Schade, David; Ma, Yong; Fujimoto, Wilfred Y.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Fowler, Sarah; Dagogo-Jack, Sam; Andres, Reubin

    2007-01-01

    Background The incidence of type 2 diabetes increases with age. It is unknown whether interventions to prevent diabetes are as effective in elderly persons as in younger adults. Methods The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) demonstrated that an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILS) or metformin could prevent or delay diabetes. A predefined secondary outcome of DPP was to determine if treatment effects varied by age. Results At baseline, participants aged 60–85 years were leaner and had the best insulin sensitivity and lowest insulin secretion compared to younger age groups. Diabetes incidence rates did not differ by age in the placebo group, but ILS was more effective with increasing age (6.3, 4.9, and 3.3 cases per 100 person-years, in the 25–44, 45–59, and 60–85 year age groups, respectively; ptrend = .007). Participants aged 60–85 years had the most weight loss and metabolic equivalent (MET)-hours of physical activity. The metformin group showed a trend toward higher diabetes incidence among older participants (6.7, 7.7, and 9.3 cases per 100 person-years in the 25–44, 45–59, and 60–85 year age groups, respectively; ptrend = .07); and diabetes risk increased with age (hazard ratio [age 60–85 vs 25–44] 1.63, p .02), after adjusting for the greater weight loss in the 60–85 year age group. Conclusions Lifestyle modification was exceptionally effective in preventing diabetes in older individuals; this finding was largely explained by greater weight loss and physical activity. The limited effectiveness of metformin in older persons may reflect age-related differences in insulin action and secretion. A lifestyle modification program can be recommended for older individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes. PMID:17077202

  2. Cross-age effect in recognition performance and memory monitoring for faces.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Margaret S; Dodson, Chad S

    2013-03-01

    The cross-age effect refers to the finding of better memory for own- than other-age faces. We examined 3 issues about this effect: (1) Does it extend to the ability to monitor the likely accuracy of memory judgments for young and old faces? (2) Does it apply to source information that is associated with young and old faces? And (3) what is a likely mechanism underlying the cross-age effect? In Experiment 1, young and older adults viewed young and old faces appearing in different contexts. Young adults exhibited a cross-age effect in their recognition of faces and in their memory-monitoring performance for these faces. Older adults, by contrast, showed no age-of-face effects. Experiment 2 examined whether young adults' cross-age effect depends on or is independent of encoding a mixture of young and old faces. Young adults encoded either a mixture of young and old faces, a set of all young faces, or a set of all old faces. In the mixed-list condition we replicated our finding of young adults' superior memory for own-age faces; in the pure-list conditions, however, there were absolutely no differences in performance between young and old faces. The fact that the pure-list design abolishes the cross-age effect supports social-cognitive theories of this phenomenon.

  3. The Effects of Age, Period, and Cohort on Mortality from Ischemic Heart Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jie; Li, Boyang; Li, Jingjing; Sun, Yang

    2017-01-01

    In contrast with most developed countries, mortality due to ischemic heart disease (IHD) continues to rise in China. We examined the effects of age, period, and cohort on IHD mortality in urban and rural populations from 1987 to 2013 to identify the drivers of this trend. Region-specific data on annual IHD mortality among adults aged 20 to 84 years and corresponding population statistics were collected. We then tested for age, period, and cohort effects using the Intrinsic Estimator approach. Our results indicated that IHD mortality in China increased significantly over the three decades studied. There was a log-linear increase in the age effect on IHD mortality as those aged 80–84 showed 277 and 161 times greater IHD mortality risk than those aged 20–24 in urban and rural populations, respectively. While there was an upward trend in the period effect in both populations, the influence of the cohort effect on mortality decreased over time for those born from 1904 to 1993. The age, period, and cohort effects on mortality in China were generally comparable between urban and rural populations. The results suggest that population aging is a major driver behind the rapid rise in IHD mortality. Increased exposure to air pollution may also have played a role in driving the period effect PMID:28067846

  4. Summary of Session 6: Aging Effects in RPC Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, Jaroslav

    2003-09-26

    Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors are a very important part of present and future large-scale experiments. The present B-factory experiments, Belle and BaBar, operate at much larger luminosity (>3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}) compared to their predecessors at LEP, where the RPC rates were not much higher than cosmic ray rates. Both Belle and BaBar RPC detectors operate in streamer mode. On the other hand, the LHC RPC detectors will operate in proportional mode, which is advantageous in terms of lower accumulated charge per track; however, it may be offset by considerably higher rates, assuming that the aging scales simply as total accumulated charge. The fear that the LHC RPC detectors may encounter similar difficulties as the B-factory RPCs prompted a very intensive R&D effort of rate-related deterioration.

  5. Alteration of lunar optical properties: age and composition effects.

    PubMed

    Adams, J B; McCord, T B

    1971-02-12

    A model for lunar surface processes is presented which explains the main albedo and color contrasts and the temporal changes in these optical properties. Evidence from Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 samples and telescopic spectral reflectivity measurements indicates that the maria are similar in mineralogy on a regional scale and that the highlands are consistent with an anorthositic-gabbro composition. Bright craters and rays in both regions expose materials that are relatively crystalline compared with their backgrounds, which are richer in dark glass. With age, bright craters and rays in the maria darken in place by meteorite impact-induced vitrification and mixing with the surrounding material. Highland bright craters and rays may, however, darken primarily through regional contamination by iron- and titanium-rich mare material.

  6. Glial dysfunction in parkin null mice: effects of aging.

    PubMed

    Solano, Rosa M; Casarejos, Maria J; Menéndez-Cuervo, Jamie; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose A; García de Yébenes, Justo; Mena, Maria A

    2008-01-16

    Parkin mutations in humans produce parkinsonism whose pathogenesis is related to impaired protein degradation, increased free radicals, and abnormal neurotransmitter release. The role of glia in parkin deficiency is little known. We cultured midbrain glia from wild-type (WT) and parkin knock-out (PK-KO) mice. After 18-20 d in vitro, PK-KO glial cultures had less astrocytes, more microglia, reduced proliferation, and increased proapoptotic protein expression. PK-KO glia had greater levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH), increased mRNA expression of the GSH-synthesizing enzyme gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and greater glutathione S-transferase and lower glutathione peroxidase activities than WT. The reverse happened in glia cultured in serum-free defined medium (EF12) or in old cultures. PK-KO glia was more susceptible than WT to transference to EF12 or neurotoxins (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, blockers of GSH synthesis or catalase, inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinases), aging of the culture, or combination of these insults. PK-KO glia was less susceptible than WT to Fe2+ plus H2O2 and less responsive to protection by deferoxamine. Old WT glia increased the expression of heat shock protein 70, but PK-KO did not. Glia conditioned medium (GCM) from PK-KO was less neuroprotective and had lower levels of GSH than WT. GCM from WT increased the levels of dopamine markers in midbrain neuronal cultures transferred to EF12 more efficiently than GCM from PK-KO, and the difference was corrected by supplementation with GSH. PK-KO-GCM was a less powerful suppressor of apoptosis and microglia in neuronal cultures. Our data prove that abnormal glial function is critical in parkin mutations, and its role increases with aging.

  7. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for Northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, T.; North, P. R. J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. Here, a method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from MODIS and AATSR. It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near Northern temperate and boreal forests, for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences in size distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types. Smallest fine mode median radius are attributed to plumes from cropland - natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grasslands (0.147 μm) fires. Evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller fine mode median radius (0.164 μm) than plumes from woody savannas (0.184 μm) and mixed forest (0.193 μm) fires. Smoke plumes are predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0.95 except the cropland emissions which have a SSA(440) value of 0.9. Overall fine mode volume median radius increase rate is 0.0095 μm per day for the first 4 days of ageing and 0.0084 μm per day for seven days of ageing. Changes in size were consistent with a decrease in Angstrom Exponent and increase in Asymmetry parameter. No significant changes in SSA(λ) with ageing were found. These estimates have implications for

  8. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for Northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, Tadas; North, Peter; Doerr, Stefan H.

    2015-04-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. A new method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from MODIS and AATSR. It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near Northern temperate and boreal forests, for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences insize distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types. Smallest fine mode median radius are attributed to plumes from cropland/natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grasslands (0.147 μm) fires. Evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller fine mode median radius (0.164 μm) than plumes from woody savannas (0.184 μm) and mixed forest (0.193 μm) fires. Smoke plumes are predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0.95 except the cropland emissions which have SSA(440) value of 0.9. Overall fine mode volume median radius increase rate is 0.0095μm per day for the first 4 days of ageing and 0.0084 μm per day for seven days of ageing. Changes in size were consistent with a decrease in Angstrom Exponent and increase in Asymmetry parameter. No significant changes in SSA(λ) with ageing were found. The implications of this work for improved modeling of aerosol radiative effects, which are relevant to both climate modelling and satellite

  9. Effect of Aging on Adipose Tissue Inflammation in the Knee Joints of F344BN Rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Huebner, Janet L; Kraus, Virginia B; Griffin, Timothy M

    2016-09-01

    The infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) secretes inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritic knees, but the effect of aging on IFP inflammation is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that aging increases basal and interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-stimulated IFP inflammation in 10-, 20-, and 30-month-old male F344BN F1-hybrid rats. IFPs were cultured ex vivo for 24 hours and treated ±1ng/mL IL-1β to simulate injury-induced inflammation. IFP inflammation was evaluated by measuring secreted cytokine concentrations and by quantitative expression of immunoregulatory and pro- and anti-adipogenic genes. With age, osteoarthritis pathology increased and IFP mass decreased. Although adipocyte size did not change with age, variation in adipocyte size was positively associated with synovial thickness independent of age whereas associations with cartilage damage were age dependent. In the absence of IL-1β, aging was associated with a significant increase in IFP secretion of tumor necrosis factor α by 67% and IL-13 by 35% and a reduction in the expression of immunoregulatory M2 macrophage genes. However, following an IL-1β challenge, adipogenesis markers decreased and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines increased independent of age. The lone exception was leptin, which decreased >70% with age. Thus, although aging promotes osteoarthritis risk by increasing basal inflammation, our findings also revealed a potentially protective effect of aging by decreasing IL-1β-stimulated leptin production.

  10. Aging-induced alterations in female rat colon smooth muscle: the protective effects of hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Pascua, P; Camello-Almaraz, C; Pozo, M J; Martin-Cano, F E; Vara, E; Fernández-Tresguerres, J A; Camello, P J

    2012-06-01

    Aging is associated to oxidative damage and alterations in inflammatory and apoptotic pathways. Aging impairs secretion of several hormones, including melatonin and estrogens. However, the mechanisms involved in aging of smooth muscle are poorly known. We have studied the changes induced by aging in the colonic smooth muscle layer of female rats and the protective effect of hormonal therapy. We used young, aged, and ovariectomized aged female rats. Two groups of ovariectomized rats (22 months old) were treated either with melatonin or with estrogen for 10 weeks before sacrifice. Aging induced oxidative imbalance, evidenced by H(2)O(2) accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and decreased catalase activity. The oxidative damage was enhanced by ovariectomy. In addition, aged colonic muscle showed enhanced expression of the pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase 2. Expression of the activated forms of caspases 3 and 9 was also enhanced in aged colon. Melatonin and estrogen treatment prevented the oxidative damage and the activation of caspases. In conclusion, aging of colonic smooth muscle induces oxidative imbalance and activation of apoptotic and pro-inflammatory pathways. Hormonal therapy has beneficial effects on the oxidative and apoptotic changes associated to aging in this model.

  11. The effects of stress and physical aging on the creep compliance of a polymeric composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas E.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated viscoelastic properties of IM7/8320, a high temperature fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite. Established creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers were adapted for testing of the composite material. The transverse and shear compliance for an orthotropic plate were found from creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-Tg temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be effected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of applied stress.

  12. Effects of increased paternal age on sperm quality, reproductive outcome and associated epigenetic risks to offspring.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashok; Rohra, Vikram K; Assidi, Mourad; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Turki, Rola F

    2015-04-19

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in average paternal age when the first child is conceived, either due to increased life expectancy, widespread use of contraception, late marriages and other factors. While the effect of maternal ageing on fertilization and reproduction is well known and several studies have shown that women over 35 years have a higher risk of infertility, pregnancy complications, spontaneous abortion, congenital anomalies, and perinatal complications. The effect of paternal age on semen quality and reproductive function is controversial for several reasons. First, there is no universal definition for advanced paternal ageing. Secondly, the literature is full of studies with conflicting results, especially for the most common parameters tested. Advancing paternal age also has been associated with increased risk of genetic disease. Our exhaustive literature review has demonstrated negative effects on sperm quality and testicular functions with increasing paternal age. Epigenetics changes, DNA mutations along with chromosomal aneuploidies have been associated with increasing paternal age. In addition to increased risk of male infertility, paternal age has also been demonstrated to impact reproductive and fertility outcomes including a decrease in IVF/ICSI success rate and increasing rate of preterm birth. Increasing paternal age has shown to increase the incidence of different types of disorders like autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, and childhood leukemia in the progeny. It is thereby essential to educate the infertile couples on the disturbing links between increased paternal age and rising disorders in their offspring, to better counsel them during their reproductive years.

  13. Addressing ketamine bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    The rise in ketamine misuse means more health professionals will need to diagnose, refer and treat ketamine bladder syndrome. Prevention and raising awareness of the problem among multidisciplinary teams will help limit damage to the bladder as well as making treatment and management more effective.

  14. Analysis of the effect of age on the prognosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cluze, C; Colonna, M; Remontet, L; Poncet, F; Sellier, E; Seigneurin, A; Delafosse, P; Bossard, N

    2009-09-01

    To explore the effect of age at diagnosis on relative survival from breast cancer at different cancer stages and grades, using appropriate statistical modeling of time-varying and non-linear effects of that prognostic covariate. Data on 4,791 female invasive breast cancers diagnosed between 1990 and 1997 were obtained from a French cancer registry. The effect of age on relative survival was studied using an approach based on excess rate modeling. Different models testing non-linear and non-proportional effects of age were explored for each grade and each stage. In the whole population, the effect of age was not linear and varied with the time elapsed since diagnosis. When analyzing the different sub-groups according to grade and stage, age did not have a significant effect on relative survival in grade 1 or stage 3 tumors. In grade 2 and stage 4 tumors, the excess mortality rate increased with age, in a linear way. In grade 3 tumors, age was a time-dependent factor: older women had higher excess rates than younger ones during the first year after diagnosis whereas the inverse phenomenon was observed 5 years after diagnosis. Our findings suggest that when taking into account grade and stage, the time-varying impact of young age at diagnosis is limited to grade 3 tumors, without evidence of worst prognosis at 5 years for the youngest women.

  15. Conference on Correlations of Aging and Space Effects on Biosystems, Oct. 30-Nov. 1, 1989, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprott, Richard L. (Editor); Combs, Carol A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This volume includes papers on correlations between aging effects and space effects on biosystems, with particular attention given to the effects on the cardiovascular system, bone, sleep, cellular systems, immunological system, and genetics. Papers are presented on NASA and NIA plans and opportunities, the age effect on the posture and circulation, the cardiovascular physiology in space flight, and age-related bone changes. Attention is given to research on sleep, circulation rhythms, and aging and its applications to manned spaceflight; sleep and circadian rhythms; altered cell function in microgravity; and the heterogeneity of changes in lymphoproliferative ability with increasing age. Also included is a review of cellular immunosenescence, a paper on the immune response during space flight, and a paper on Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system for space biology studies.

  16. The effects of age on nuclear power plant containment cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lofaro, R.; Subudhi, M.; Travis, R.; DiBiasio, A.; Azarm, A.; Davis, J.

    1994-04-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the performance and availability of containment cooling systems in US commercial nuclear power plants. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives of this program are to provide an understanding of the aging process and how it affects plant safety so that it can be properly managed. This is one of a number of studies performed under the NPAR program which provide a technical basis for the identification and evaluation of degradation caused by age. The effects of age were characterized for the containment cooling system by reviewing and analyzing failure data from national databases, as well as plant-specific data. The predominant failure causes and aging mechanisms were identified, along with the components that failed most frequently. Current inspection, surveillance, and monitoring practices were also examined. A containment cooling system unavailability analysis was performed to examine the potential effects of aging by increasing failure rates for selected components. A commonly found containment spray system design and a commonly found fan cooler system design were modeled. Parametric failure rates for those components in each system that could be subject to aging were accounted for in the model to simulate the time-dependent effects of aging degradation, assuming no provisions are made to properly manage it. System unavailability as a function of increasing component failure rates was then calculated.

  17. Effect of Age-Dependent Forest Characteristics on Acoustic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    One caveat here is that the forest edge effect has not been taken into account. This study assumes that the source and receiver are both within the...equation, so the in- fluence of a band of trees, for example, is not fully understood. Future work should include a detailed study of the forest edge ... effect and a set of generalized recommen- dations for use of forests to mitigate training and testing noise. ERDC/CERL TR-06-4 27 References American

  18. The effects of early grade retention: Effect modification by prior achievement and age.

    PubMed

    Vandecandelaere, Machteld; Vansteelandt, Stijn; De Fraine, Bieke; Van Damme, Jan

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the effects of early grade retention and different effects according to prior achievement and age. Within a population of children at risk of early retention, we compared the development throughout primary school in mathematics achievement after kindergarten retention, first-grade retention, and continuous promotion. Analyzing data from a large-scale longitudinal study using covariate balancing propensity score weighting, the findings revealed that early grade repeaters would score higher in mathematics if they were promoted each year instead. However, the effects diminished or even disappeared in the long term. Compared to kindergarten retention, first-grade retention was found to be more harmful for the mathematics development of younger children specifically.

  19. Public health approach to preventing frailty in the community and its effect on healthy aging in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Shoji; Yoshida, Hiroto; Taniguchi, Yu; Murayama, Hiroshi; Nishi, Mariko; Amano, Hidenori; Nofuji, Yu; Seino, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yoshinori

    2016-03-01

    Effective methods to prevent or delay the onset of frailty are urgently required in aging societies, such as Japan. As a public health approach, we carried out a 10-year community intervention for frailty prevention, and examined its impact on healthy aging among older adults. The target population was all residents aged 65 years or older in the town of Kusatsu, Gunma Prefecture, Japan. For community empowerment, we organized a community forum, and discussed how to address the frailty issue in the community. For primary prevention, we attempted to promote physical activity, nutrition and social participation by means of a health education program to motivate older residents. For secondary prevention, we added a comprehensive geriatric assessment to routine annual health check-ups, which helped older participants improve self-care ability of functional health. High-risk persons were screened and encouraged to participate in a frailty prevention class with a multicomponent program. The attendance rate at annual health check-ups has remained constant at 30-40% of the target population; however, over 80% of the population appeared at least once during the 10 year-period. For evaluation, we carried out biennial health monitoring surveys, and reviewed the records of the local Long-Term Care Insurance system. The functional health of older residents was significantly improved as a result of the interventions; the incidence rate of Long-Term Care Insurance system certification in the old-old population (age ≥75 years) was decreased by one second, and healthy life expectancy at age 70 years was extended by 1.2 years for women and 0.5 years for men. Such trends greatly contrasted with those in the reference area, and Japan as a whole. In summary, the present public health approach to frailty prevention appears to promote healthy aging among older adults.

  20. The cumulative semantic interference effect in normal and pathological ageing.

    PubMed

    Mulatti, Claudio; Calia, Clara; De Caro, Maria Fara; Della Sala, Sergio

    2014-12-01

    People affected by mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a precursor of Alzheimer's Disease, present with impairments in picture naming, a lexical/semantic task which rests on the activation of perceptual, semantic, and phonological representations. The poor performance of MCI individuals in picture naming has been accounted for in terms of deficits of either the perceptual, semantic, or phonological stages. To disentangle the source of this deficit we compared the cumulative semantic interference effect (Howard et al., 2006. Cognition. 100, 464-482.) and the repetition priming effect of a group of people with MCI to that of a group of healthy elderly participants and with a group of healthy young participants. The cumulative semantic interference effect defines a linear increase in the picture naming reaction times which is function of the already named pictures belonging to the same semantic category to which the named picture belongs. The repetition priming effect refers to an increase in performance for repeated items compared to unrepeated items. Results showed that whereas the cumulative semantic interference effect was present in the healthy elderly and young samples, it was absent in the MCI sample; instead, all groups showed comparable repetition priming effects. This pattern of results suggests that the impairment in picture naming exhibited by MCI individuals is due to an inefficient semantic access.

  1. SU-C-304-01: Investigation of Various Detector Response Functions and Their Geometry Dependence in a Novel Method to Address Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B; Lebron, S; Li, J; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel convolution-based approach has been proposed to address ion chamber (IC) volume averaging effect (VAE) for the commissioning of commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). We investigate the use of various convolution kernels and its impact on the accuracy of beam models. Methods: Our approach simulates the VAE by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with a detector response function (DRF) while optimizing the beam model. At convergence, the convolved profiles match the measured profiles, indicating the calculated profiles match the “true” beam profiles. To validate the approach, beam profiles of an Elekta LINAC were repeatedly collected with ICs of various volumes (CC04, CC13 and SNC 125) to obtain clinically acceptable beam models. The TPS-calculated profiles were convolved externally with the DRF of respective IC. The beam model parameters were reoptimized using Nelder-Mead method by forcing the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. We evaluated three types of DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic) and the impact of kernel dependence on field geometry (depth and field size). The profiles calculated with beam models were compared with SNC EDGE diode-measured profiles. Results: The method was successfully implemented with Pinnacle Scripting and Matlab. The reoptimization converged in ∼10 minutes. For all tested ICs and DRFs, penumbra widths of the TPS-calculated profiles and diode-measured profiles were within 1.0 mm. Gaussian function had the best performance with mean penumbra width difference within 0.5 mm. The use of geometry dependent DRFs showed marginal improvement, reducing the penumbra width differences to less than 0.3 mm. Significant increase in IMRT QA passing rates was achieved with the optimized beam model. Conclusion: The proposed approach significantly improved the accuracy of the TPS beam model. Gaussian functions as the convolution kernel performed consistently better than Lorentzian and

  2. Addressing the unequal geographic distribution of specialist doctors in indonesia: the role of the private sector and effectiveness of current regulations.

    PubMed

    Meliala, Andreasta; Hort, Krishna; Trisnantoro, Laksono

    2013-04-01

    As in many countries, the geographic distribution of the health workforce in Indonesia is unequal, with a concentration in urban and more developed areas, and a scarcity in rural and remote areas. There is less information on the distribution of specialist doctors, yet inequalities in their distribution could compromise efforts to achieve universal coverage by 2014. This paper uses data from 2007 and 2008 to describe the geographic distribution of specialist doctors in Indonesia, and to examine two key factors that influence the distribution and are targets of current policies: sources of income for specialist doctors, and specialist doctor engagement in private practice. The data demonstrates large differences in the ratio of specialist doctors to population among the provinces of Indonesia, with higher ratios on the provinces of the islands of Java, and much lower ratios on the more remote provinces in eastern Indonesia. Between 65% and 80% of specialist doctors' income derives from private practice in non-state hospitals or private clinics. Despite regulations limiting practice locations to three, most specialists studied in a provincial capital city were working in more than three locations, with some working in up to 7 locations, and spending only a few hours per week in their government hospital practice. Our study demonstrates that the current regulatory policies and financial incentives have not been effective in addressing the maldistribution of specialist doctors in a context of a growing private sector and predominance of doctors' income from private sources. A broader and more integrated policy approach, including more innovative service delivery strategies for rural and remote areas, is recommended.

  3. Public social monitoring reports and their effect on a policy programme aimed at addressing the social determinants of health to improve health equity in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Pega, Frank; Valentine, Nicole B; Matheson, Don; Rasanathan, Kumanan

    2014-01-01

    The important role that monitoring plays in advancing global health is well established. However, the role of social monitoring as a tool for addressing social determinants of health (SDH) and health equity-focused policies remains under-researched. This paper assesses the extent and ways in which New Zealand's (NZ) Social Reports (SRs) supported a SDH- and health equity-oriented policy programme nationally over the 2000-2008 period by documenting the SRs' history and assessing its impact on policies across sectors in government and civil society. We conducted key-informant interviews with five senior policy-makers and an e-mail survey with 24 government and civil society representatives on SRs' history and policy impact. We identified common themes across these data and classified them accordingly to assess the intensity of the reports' use and their impact on SDH- and health equity-focused policies. Bibliometric analyses of government publications and media items were undertaken to empirically assess SRs' impact on government and civil society. SRs in NZ arose out of the role played by government as the "benevolent social welfare planner" and an understanding of the necessity of economic and social security for "progress". The SRs were linked to establishing a government-wide programme aimed at reducing inequalities. They have been used moderately to highly in central and local government and in civil society, both within and outside the health sector, but have neither entered public treasury and economic development departments nor the commercial sector. The SRs have not reached the more universal status of economic indicators. However, they have had some success at raising awareness of, and have stimulated isolated action on, SDH. The NZ case suggests that national-level social monitoring provides a valuable tool for raising awareness of SDH across government and civil society. A number of strategies could improve social reports' effectiveness in stimulating

  4. Effect of genotype, gender and age on sheep meat quality and a case study illustrating integration of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, D L; Mortimer, S I

    2014-11-01

    Subtle breed differences exist for meat quality traits and the Merino does stand out, although many comparisons are confounded by production site or lack of processing intervention. Despite this, the Merino does seem to have a propensity to produce meat with a higher pH and reduced colour stability under extended ageing. Use of the Merino in a crossbreeding system not only provides benefits from hybrid vigour, but also overcomes the meat quality constraints of pure Merinos. Genetic evaluation for lamb production has enabled impressive genetic gains, but an overemphasis on lean meat production has had to be addressed to counter adverse effects on meat quality traits like eating quality. In this regard, the development of genomic selection has provided a methodology for accurate prediction of genetic merit and applying balanced breeding objectives. The potential for negative meat quality effects has stemmed adoption of non-castration approaches, but ensuring that lamb is young when slaughtered does provide brand integrity.

  5. Addressing hidden financial risk.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Jan; Kruger, Jan

    2014-02-01

    Managing low-dollar, high-volume claim denials associated with outpatient procedures is a challenge for many hospitals because of the expense involved in manually reviewing such denials. These denials often are the source of "hidden loss" for hospitals. For some hospitals, the most practical, cost-effective approach for managing low-dollar, high-volume claim denials will include the use of automated systems to monitor and highlight denials and expose trends.

  6. Effects of Age and Location in Chinese Relative Clauses Processing.

    PubMed

    He, Wenguang; Xu, Na; Ji, Runqing

    2017-02-24

    Three experiments investigated Chinese relative clause processing with children, youths and elders using sentence-picture matching and self-paced reading methods. In Experiment 1, we found that object-extracted clause were easier to comprehend than subject-extracted clause , and object-modified relative clause (i.e., object-modified subject-extracted clause[Formula: see text]object-modified object-extracted clause) were difficult to comprehend than subject modified relative clause (subject-modified subject-extracted clause[Formula: see text]subject-modified object-extracted clause). Importantly, this paper also found 5-6.5 ages may be critical for children to comprehend RCs in Chinese. Experiment 2 also showed that S-ORCs were easier to comprehend than S-SRCs for youths and elders. Further, elders have more difficulty comprehending RCs than youths. Experiment 3 indicated that there were no significant differences in difficulty between O-SRCs and O-ORCs, and no differences were found between youths and elders. In general, our findings gave support to predictions of working memory-based theory, and also indicated that RCs processing has an intricate course. Many factors such as syntactic, language specificity, experience, personality, must all be considered in sentence processing.

  7. Effects of Age on Temperature Responses During Exposure to Hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C.K.; Baer, L. A.; Moran, M. M.; Wang, T. J.; Yuan, F.; Daunton, N. G.; Corcoran, M. L.; Wade, C. E.; Dalfan, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rats subjected to centrifugation show a marked decrease in body temperature relating to gravity level. Several studies have indicated, that an initial response to centrifugation is followed by acclimation. To test for differences between young (Y; 2 months) and mature (M; 8 months) rats in their response in temperature, both groups were exposed to hypergravity induced by centrifugation. Thirty-six male rats were divided into four groups according to age and G-load (control (1.0G-Y and 1.0G-M), 2.0G-Y or 2.0G-M) and were housed in pairs in standard vivarium cages. During the 7-day period of centrifugation, temperature was measured every five minutes by surgically implanted telemeters. Body mass was measured daily. We found that initial body temperature in 2.0G-M was less than that of 2.0G-Y. Both hypergravity groups (2.0G-Y and 2.0G-M) showed a decrease in temperature at the onset of centrifugation, and the change in temperature (Delta = 0.5 C) remained the same between the groups. Significant differences persisted with 2.0G-Y recovering to control values in four days and 2.0G-M recovering in five days. These results indicate that the mature animals have a similar response as the younger animals, but take longer to acclimate.

  8. Bacteriology of Human Experimental Gingivitis: Effect of Plaque Age

    PubMed Central

    Syed, S. A.; Loesche, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five subjects with previously excellent hygiene and healthy gingiva developed heavy plaque accumulations and bleeding or nonbleeding gingivitis about certain papilla after 21 days of no oral hygiene. Gingival marginal plaque about a single papilla was collected at 0, 1, 2, and 3 weeks of no oral hygiene in each subject. The plaque was dispersed, serially diluted, and plated on MM10 sucrose agar in an oxygen-free atmosphere. From 50 to 100 colonies from a single high-dilution plate were characterized for each sample. Over 8,500 isolates were partially characterized and placed into one of 29 taxonomic species or groups. The flora was predominantly gram-positive at all time periods. Streptococcal species dominated in the 0- and 1-week-old plaques, i.e. 62 and 43% of the colonyforming units (CFU), but dropped to 26 to 32% of the CFU in the 2- and 3-week-old plaques. Actinomyces species dominated in the older plaques, i.e., 40 to 50% of the CFU. Actinomyces israelii was the most prominent species in the older plaques. Veillonella accounted for 15 to 20% of the CFU at all time periods. Although the other gram-negative species increased with time, collectively they averaged less than 5% of the CFU at week 3. The shift from a Streptococcus-dominated plaque to an Actinomyces-dominated plaque was the most striking microbial change observed as the plaque aged. PMID:711336

  9. Effect of age on the induction of autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Goidl, E A; Michelis, M A; Siskind, G W; Weksler, M E

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental models were used to compare the ease of inducing autoantibodies in young and old mice. Autoantibody to thyroglobulin (Tg) induced by immunization with cross-reactive xenogeneic Tg in Freund's complete adjuvant and autoerythrocyte antibody induced by the injection of xenogeneic erythrocytes were studied in C57Bl/6 and BALB/c male mice. In both strains, the anti-thyroglobulin antibody response to lower doses of xenogeneic Tg was significantly lower in old as compared with young animals. There were no detectable differences in incidence or strength of the direct Coombs' test following the administration of rat erythrocytes to old or young animals. In contrast, anti-mouse erythrocyte autoantibody-secreting spleen cells, generated in culture and assayed on bromelin-treated mouse erythrocytes, were more numerous in cultures of spleen cells from old as compared with young mice. These results suggest that the regulation of the autoantibody production which is stimulated by cross-reactive antigens is under different control from the spontaneous age-related increase in autoantibodies. PMID:7021024

  10. Foot clearance during stair descent: effects of age and illumination.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Kathryn A; Okita, Noriaki; Higginson, Jill S; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2005-02-01

    It is likely that many stair accidents result from a trip during stair negotiation, yet few studies have examined the exact nature of balance loss during falls on stairs. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential age-related differences in the minimum clearance of the foot during stair descent, and to explore whether the minimum foot clearance was affected by the available ambient lighting. Twelve young adults (24+/-3.3 years) and 10 older adults (73.7+/-1.9 years) participated in the study. The older adults had significantly greater within subject coefficients of variation compared to the young adults, and had a significantly larger number of minimum foot clearances which fell below 5 mm. While the young subjects increased their minimum clearance by 3.6 mm on average in response to a decrease in ambient lighting, the older adults maintained the same clearance over all stairs except one. These results suggest that the variability of minimum foot clearance, and lack of precautionary increases in foot clearance under reduced lighting may contribute to falls on stairs by the elderly.

  11. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, T.; North, P. R. J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2015-07-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground-based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. Here, a method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near northern temperate and boreal forests for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences in size distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types and plume age. Smallest fine mode median radius (Rfv) are attributed to plumes from cropland and/or natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grassland (0.157 μm) fires. North American evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller Rfv (0.164 μm) than plumes from Eurasian mixed forests (0.193 μm) and plumes attributed to the land cover types with sparse tree cover - open shrubland (0.185 μm) and woody savannas (0.184 μm). The differences in size distributions are related to inferred variability in plume concentrations between the land cover types. Significant differences are observed between day and night emissions, with daytime emissions showing larger particle sizes. Smoke is predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0

  12. Effects of aging temperature on microstructural evolution at dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Taeho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-07-01

    From the earlier study which characterized the region of a fusion boundary between a low-alloy steel (LAS) and a Ni-based weld metal of as-welded and aged samples at 450 °C for a 30-y-equivalent time, it was observed in the microstructure that the aging treatment induced the formation and growth of Cr precipitates in the fusion boundary region because of the thermodynamic driving force. Now, this research extends the text matrix and continues the previous study by compiling all the test data, with an additional aging heat treatment conducted at 400 °C for 15- and 30-y-equivalent times (6450 and 12,911 h, respectively). The results for the extended test matrix primarily represent the common features of and disparities in the effects of thermal aging on the aged samples at two different heat-treatment temperatures (400 and 450 °C). Although no difference was expected between the samples, because the heat treatment conditions simulate thermal aging effects during the same service time of 30 y, the sample aged at 450 °C exhibited slightly more severe effects of thermal aging than the sample aged at 400 °C. Nevertheless, the trends for these effects are similar and the simulation of thermal aging effects for a light-water reactor appears to be reliable. However, according to a simulation of the same degree of thermal aging effects, it appears that the activation energy for Cr diffusion should be larger than the numerical value used in this study.

  13. Selective effects of aging on brain white matter microstructure: a diffusion tensor imaging tractography study.

    PubMed

    Michielse, Stijn; Coupland, Nick; Camicioli, Richard; Carter, Rawle; Seres, Peter; Sabino, Jennifer; Malykhin, Nikolai

    2010-10-01

    We examined age-related changes in the cerebral white matter. Structural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and diffusion tensor images (DTIs) were acquired from 69 healthy subjects aged 22-84 years. Quantitative DTI tractography was performed for nine different white matter tracts to determine tract volume, fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial, and radial diffusivities. We used automated and manual segmentation to determine volumes of gray matter (GM), white mater (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and intracranial space. The results showed significant effects of aging on WM, GM, CSF volumes, and selective effects of aging on structural integrity of different white matter tracts. WM of the prefrontal region was the most vulnerable to aging, while temporal lobe connections, cingulum, and parieto-occipital commissural connections showed relative preservation with age. This study was cross-sectional, and therefore, additional longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  14. Effect of Paternal Age on Reproductive Outcomes of In Vitro Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yixuan; Kang, Xiangjin; Zheng, Haiyan; Liu, Haiying; Liu, Jianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Although the adverse effects of maternal aging on reproductive outcomes have been investigated widely, there is no consensus on the impact of paternal age. Therefore, we investigated the effect of paternal age on reproductive outcomes in a retrospective analysis of 9,991 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles performed at the Reproductive Medicine Center of the Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (China) between January 2007 and October 2013. Samples were grouped according to maternal age [<30 (3,327 cycles), 30-34 (4,587 cycles), and 35-38 (2,077 cycles)] and then subgrouped according to paternal age (<30, 30-32, 33-35, 36-38, 39-41, and ≥42). The groups did not differ in terms of fertilization rate, numbers of viable and high-quality embryos and miscarriage rate when controlling maternal age (P >0.05). Chi-squared analysis revealed that there were no differences in implantation and pregnancy rates among the different paternal age groups when maternal age was <30 and 35-38 years (P >0.05). However, implantation and pregnancy rates decreased with paternal age in the 31-34 y maternal age group (P <0.05). Our study indicates that paternal age has no impact on fertilization rate, embryo quality at the cleavage stage and miscarriage rate. For the 30-34 y maternal age group, the implantation rate decreased with increased paternal age, with the pregnancy rate in this group being significantly higher in the paternal <30 y and 30-32 y age groups, compared with those in the 36-38 y and 39-41 y groups.

  15. Effect of aging on brain respiration and carbohydrate metabolism of Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Fox, J H; Parmacek, M S; Patel-Mandlik, K

    1975-01-01

    Syrian hamsters were used to study the effect of aging on brain slice respiration and metabolism. Young animals (average age 8 months) and old animals (average age 18 months) were incubated under standard conditions with the following parameters being measured: oxygen uptake, 14CO2 production, glucose utilization, lactate and pyruvate formation. No differences were found in the two groups. It is still very likely that subtle differences exist but can only be documented under conditions of metabolic stress.

  16. Adrafinil: effects on behavior and cognition in aged canines.

    PubMed

    Siwak, C T; Callahan, H; Milgram, N W

    2000-07-01

    1. Adrafmil is a novel vigilance promoting agent developed in France by Louis Lafon Laboratories. 2. Adrafinil causes increased locomotion without producing stereotypical activity in canines tested in an open field. 3. The effectiveness of a single treatment is long-lasting, and the effectiveness persists over repeated treatments. 4. Acquisition of a size discrimination problem is enhanced by adrafinil. This may be linked to performance motivation. 5. Adrafinil causes a long-lasting increase in high frequency electroencephalographic activity recorded from cortical electrodes. 6. These results indicate that adrafinil is novel behavioral stimulant with cognitive enhancing potential. The underlying mechanisms of action are still unknown.

  17. Homeostatic regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in aging rats: long-term effects of early exercise

    PubMed Central

    Merkley, Christina M.; Jian, Charles; Mosa, Adam; Tan, Yao-Fang; Wojtowicz, J. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is highly responsive to environmental and physiological factors. The majority of studies to date have examined short-term consequences of enhancing or blocking neurogenesis but long-term changes remain less well understood. Current evidence for age-related declines in neurogenesis warrant further investigation into these long-term changes. In this report we address the hypothesis that early life experience, such as a period of voluntary running in juvenile rats, can alter properties of adult neurogenesis for the remainder of the animal's life. The results indicate that the number of proliferating and differentiating neuronal precursors is not altered in runners beyond the initial weeks post-running, suggesting homeostatic regulation of these processes. However, the rate of neuronal maturation and survival during a 4 week period after cell division was enhanced up to 11 months of age (the end of the study period). This study is the first to show that a transient period of physical activity at a young age promotes changes in neurogenesis that persist over the long-term, which is important for our understanding of the modulation of neurogenesis by exercise with age. Functional integration of adult-born neurons within the hippocampus that resist homeostatic regulation with aging, rather than the absolute number of adult-born neurons, may be an essential feature of adult neurogenesis that promotes the maintenance of neural plasticity in old age. PMID:25071426

  18. The effect of age on a visual learning task in the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sheena; Strausfeld, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Neuronal modifications that accompany normal aging occur in brain neuropils and might share commonalities across phyla including the most successful group, the Insecta. This study addresses the kinds of neuronal modifications associated with loss of memory that occur in the hemimetabolous insect Periplaneta americana. Among insects that display considerable longevity, the American cockroach lives up to 64 wk and reveals specific cellular alterations in its mushroom bodies, higher centers that have been shown to be associated with learning and memory. The present results describe a vision-based learning paradigm, based on a modified Barnes maze, that compares memory in young (10-wk old), middle-aged (30-wk old), and aged adults (50-wk old). We show that not only is the performance of this task during the 14 training trials significantly decremented in aged cockroaches, but that aged cockroaches show significant impairment in successfully completing a crucial test involving cue rotation. Light and electron microscopical examination of the brains of these different age groups reveal major changes in neuron morphology and synaptology in the mushroom body lobes, centers shown to underlie place memory in this taxon.

  19. Making the climate part of the human world: Why addressing beliefs and biases is necessary part of effective climate change education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, S. D.

    2009-12-01

    Efforts to raise public awareness and understanding of the social, cultural and economic consequences of climate change often encounter skepticism. The primary causes of this skepticism, whether in the form of a mild rejection of proposed policy responses or an outright rejection of the basic scientific findings, is often cited to be the poor framing of issues by the scientific community, the quality of science education or public science literacy, disinformation campaigns by representatives of the coal and gas industry, individual resistance to behavioral change, and the hyperactive nature of the modern information culture. However, the root cause may be that the weather and climate, and by association climate change, is viewed as independent of the sphere of human influence in ancient and modern societies. In this presentation, I will outline how long-standing human beliefs in the separation between the earth and the sky and the modern framing of climate change as an “environmental” issue are limiting efforts to education the public about the causes, effects and possible response to climate change. First, sociological research in the Pacific Islands (Fiji, Kiribati, Tuvalu) finds strong evidence that beliefs in divine control of the weather and climate limit public acceptance of human-induced climate change. Second, media analysis and polling data from North America supports the role of belief and provides further evidence that climate change is viewed as a threat to an “other” labeled “the environment”, rather than a threat to people or society. The consequences of these mental models of the climate can be an outright reject of scientific theory related to climate change, a milder distrust of climate change predictions, a lack of urgency about mitigation, and an underestimate of the effort required to adapt to climate change. In order to be effective, public education about climate change needs to directly address the two, critical beliefs held by

  20. Effect of age-based and environment-based cues on reproductive investment in Gambusia affinis

    PubMed Central

    Billman, Eric J; Belk, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    We examined the multivariate life-history trajectories of age 0 and age 1 female Gambusia affinis to determine relative effects of age-based and environment-based cues on reproductive investment. Age 0 females decreased reproductive investment prior to the onset of fall and winter months, while age 1 females increased reproductive investment as the summer progressed. The reproductive restraint and terminal investment patterns exhibited by age 0 and age 1 females, respectively, were consistent with the predictions from the cost of reproduction hypothesis. Age 0 females responded to environment-based cues, decreasing reproductive investment to increase the probability of overwinter survival and subsequent reproductive opportunities in the following summer. Age 1 females responded to age-based cues, or the proximity of death, increasing investment to current reproduction as future reproductive opportunities decreased late in life. Thus, individuals use multiple cues to determine the level of reproductive investment, and the response to each cue is dependent on the age of an individual. PMID:24967079