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Sample records for address beacon system

  1. Potential effects of the introduction of the discrete address beacon system data link on air/ground information transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    This study of Aviation Safety Reporting System reports suggests that benefits should accure from implementation of discrete address beacon system data link. The phase enhanced terminal information system service is expected to provide better terminal information than present systems by improving currency and accuracy. In the exchange of air traffic control messages, discrete address insures that only the intended recipient receives and acts on a specific message. Visual displays and printer copy of messages should mitigate many of the reported problems associated with voice communications. The problems that remain unaffected include error in addressing the intended recipient and messages whose content is wrong but are otherwise correct as to format and reasonableness.

  2. The ANTARES optical beacon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Becherini, Y.; Beltramelli, J.; Bertin, V.; Bigi, A.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; de Botton, N.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bradbury, S. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Burgio, G. F.; Busto, J.; Cafagna, F.; Caillat, L.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castel, D.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Charvis, P.; Chauchot, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Colnard, C.; Compère, C.; Coniglione, R.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Cussatlegras, A.-S.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; de Bonis, G.; de Marzo, C.; de Vita, R.; Dekeyser, I.; Delagnes, E.; Denans, D.; Deschamps, A.; Destelle, J.-J.; Dinkespieler, B.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Drogou, J.-F.; Druillole, F.; Durand, D.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Falchini, E.; Favard, S.; Fehr, F.; Feinstein, F.; Ferry, S.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galeotti, S.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Girard, N.; Gojak, C.; Goret, Ph.; Graf, K.; Hallewell, G.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hoffman, C.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kok, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kruijer, A.; Kuch, S.; Kudryavstev, V. A.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lamanna, G.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laschinsky, H.; Lavalle, J.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le van Suu, A.; Lefèvre, D.; Legou, T.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazéas, F.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J. E.; Megna, R.; Melissas, M.; Migneco, E.; Milovanovic, A.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Naumann, C.; Niess, V.; Noble, T.; Olivetto, C.; Ostasch, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Payre, P.; Peek, H.; Perez, A.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pillet, R.; Pineau, J.-P.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Randazzo, N.; van Randwijk, J.; Real, D.; van Rens, B.; Réthoré, F.; Rewiersma, P.; Riccobene, G.; Rigaud, V.; Ripani, M.; Roca, V.; Roda, C.; Rolin, J. F.; Rose, H. J.; Rostovtsev, A.; Roux, J.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Rusydi, G.; Salesa, F.; Salomon, K.; Sapienza, P.; Schmitt, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Sokalski, I.; Spona, T.; Spurio, M.; van der Steenhoven, G.; Stolarczyk, T.; Streeb, K.; Sulak, L.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tao, C.; Terreni, G.; Thompson, L. F.; Urbano, F.; Valdy, P.; Valente, V.; Vallage, B.; Vaudaine, G.; Venekamp, G.; Verlaat, B.; Vernin, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; van Wijk, R.; Wijnker, G.; de Witt Huberts, P.; Wobbe, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yao, A.-F.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2007-08-01

    ANTARES is a neutrino telescope being deployed in the Mediterranean Sea. It consists of a three-dimensional array of photomultiplier tubes that can detect the Cherenkov light induced by charged particles produced in the interactions of neutrinos with the surrounding medium. High angular resolution can be achieved, in particular, when a muon is produced, provided that the Cherenkov photons are detected with sufficient timing precision. Considerations of the intrinsic time uncertainties stemming from the transit time spread in the photomultiplier tubes and the mechanism of transmission of light in sea water lead to the conclusion that a relative time accuracy of the order of 0.5 ns is desirable. Accordingly, different time calibration systems have been developed for the ANTARES telescope. In this article, a system based on Optical Beacons, a set of external and well-controlled pulsed light sources located throughout the detector, is described. This calibration system takes into account the optical properties of sea water, which is used as the detection volume of the ANTARES telescope. The design, tests, construction and first results of the two types of beacons, LED and laser-based, are presented.

  3. Omnidirectional beacon-localization using a catadioptric system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Thomas C; Drost, Robert J; Sadler, Brian M; Rzasa, John R; Davis, Christopher C

    2016-04-01

    We present a catadioptric beacon localization system that can provide mobile network nodes with omnidirectional situational awareness of neighboring nodes. In this system, a receiver composed of a hyperboloidal mirror and camera is used to estimate the azimuth, elevation, and range of an LED beacon. We provide a general framework for understanding the propagation of error in the angle-of-arrival estimation and then present an experimental realization of such a system. The situational awareness provided by the proposed system can enable the alignment of communication nodes in an optical wireless network, which may be particularly useful in addressing RF-denied environments. PMID:27136988

  4. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, D.G.; Black, B.D.

    1991-12-17

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed. 6 figures.

  5. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, David G.; Black, Billy D.

    1991-01-01

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed.

  6. Bootstrap beacon creation for overcoming the effects of beacon anisoplanatism in a laser beam projection system.

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, Aleksandr V; Piatrou, Piotr; Roggemann, Michael C

    2008-05-01

    We address the problem of using adaptive optics to deliver power from an airborne laser platform to a ground target through atmospheric turbulence under conditions of strong scintillation and anisoplanatism. We explore three options for creating a beacon for use in adaptive optics beam control: scattering laser energy from the target, using a single uncompensated Rayleigh beacon, and using a series of compensated Rayleigh beacons. We demonstrate that using a series of compensated Rayleigh beacons distributed along the path provides the best beam compensation. PMID:18449307

  7. BEACON: H. W. Wilson's Computerized Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarn, Davis B.; McCarn, Grace H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes ongoing project to automate production of 26 indexes and catalogs produced by H. W. Wilson Company through use of the BEACON system and its online screen-edit program, SCREED. System objectives, system architecture, specifications, components (data entry, validation, release, file generation, retrieval, publication, photocomposition,…

  8. Experience with the BEACON core monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.L. ); Icide, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The BEACON operational core support system was developed for use in pressurized water reactors to provide an integrated system to perform reactor core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. It is based on the very fast and accurate three-dimensional SPNOVA nodal program. The experience to date has shown the importance of an accurate integrated system. The benefits accrued are greater for the total system than the benefits that are possible separately.

  9. Portable-Beacon Landing System for Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Clary, George R.; Chisholm, John P.; Macdonald, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    Prototype beacon landing system (BLS) allows helicopters to make precise landings in all weather. BLS easily added to existing helicopter avionic equipment and readily deployed at remote sites. Small and light, system employs X-band radar and digital processing. Variety of beams pulsed sequentially by ground station after initial interrogation by weather radar of approaching helicopter. Airborne microprocessor processes pulses to determine glide slope, course deviation, and range.

  10. Scanning beacon locator system: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    If aircraft and ships are equipped with beacons capable of communicating with satellites, rescue efforts may speed up significantly. In event of disaster, beacons can transmit distress message to satellite which, in turn, will relay message to nearest rescue center, indicating distress location.

  11. Mode S beacon system terminal configuration performance test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimenti, Raymond J.

    1995-05-01

    This document reports the findings of the performance tests conducted on the terminal configuration of the Mode S Beacon System. The tests were conducted at the FAA Technical Center using the first article system from the Mode S production contract. The Mode S system under test was a fully configured dual channel system having all required external interfaces connected to actual NAS equipment. A combination of live aircraft and simulated targets were used in the test conduct and data collection. The tests were conducted in accordance with the Mode S Master Test Plan (DOTIFAA/CT-88128) and the Node S Performance Test Plan (DOTIFAA/CT-Th 90124). The test goals are to characterize the performance of the Mode S system in key areas and to establish a baseline from which to evaluate future changes.

  12. SILEX beacon equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepin, P. J.; Leblay, P.; Malaise, D.

    The design and breadboarding of the beacon of the SILEX experimental optical link between geosynchronous Earth orbit and low Earth orbit terminals are considered. The aim of the SILEX experiment is to establish an intersatellite optical telecommunication link. The beacon will provide a powerful continuous wave light beam to allow terminal telescope alignment during acquisition phase. The beacon consists of four parts: the beacon electronics, the beacon emission unit, the optical fiber harness, and the beacon head. The system is described, special attention being given to the optical features.

  13. Directional pattern measurement of the BRAMS beacon antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Picar, A.; Marqué, C.; Anciaux, M.; Lamy, H.

    2015-01-01

    The typical methods for measuring antenna characteristics are mostly based on the use of remote transmitters or receivers. For antennas used in radio communications, calibrations are usually done on an antenna test stand using transmitters with known power output. In order to minimize the ground effects while performing measurements, it is necessary to place the transmitter or receiver high above ground with the aid of aircrafts. It is, however, necessary to determine precisely the coordinates of the airborne devices as well as to maintain high stability. This used to be excessively difficult to carry out, but recent advances in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technologies have brought a feasible option. In this paper, the results of using a low-cost system for measuring the directional pattern of BRAMS beacon antenna system based on an UAV are presented.

  14. Preliminary performance analysis of an interplanetary navigation system using asteroid based beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, J. Rodney; Khatib, Ahmad R.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Williams, Bobby G.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A futuristic interplanetary navigation system using transmitters placed on selected asteroids is introduced. This network of space beacons is seen as a needed alternative to the overly burdened Deep Space Network. Covariance analyses on the potential performance of these space beacons located on a candidate constellation of eight real asteroids are initiated. Simplified analytic calculations are performed to determine limiting accuracies attainable with the network for geometric positioning. More sophisticated computer simulations are also performed to determine potential accuracies using long arcs of range and Doppler data from the beacons. The results from these computations show promise for this navigation system.

  15. Hybrid diagnostic system: beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions - Livingstone integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han G.; Cannon, Howard; Bajwa, Anupa; Mackey, Ryan; James, Mark; Maul, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the initial integration of a hybrid reasoning system utilizing a continuous domain feature-based detector, Beacon-based Exceptions Analysis for Multimissions (BEAM), and a discrete domain model-based reasoner, Livingstone.

  16. Wide field of view laser beacon system for three-dimensional aircraft position measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.; Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Wong, E. Y.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a new wide field of view laser beacon system for measurement, in three dimensions, of aircraft or other remote objects. The system is developed for aircraft collision hazard warning independent of ground-based hardware, as well as for flight research, helicopter-assisted construction and rescue, and robotic manipulation applications. Accurate information describing the relative range, elevation, and azimuth of the aircraft are generated by the sweep of a low-power fan-shaped rotating laser beacon past an array of optical detectors. The system achieves a wide angle of acceptance of laser beacon light through use of compound parabolic concentrators, which collimate the light for spectral filtering to minimize solar interference. An on-board microprocessor system converts the pulse sequence to aircraft position in real time. System reliability and performance are enhanced through narrow pass filtering of the pulse signals, digital logic design to mask spurious signals, and adaptive modulation of trigger threshold levels.

  17. Development of satellite position location system for aircraft and boat distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    An international satellite system for the detection and location of distress beacons carried on aircraft and vessels is in its technical checkout phase. User demonstration and evaluation (D&E) will start in early 1983 and continue for two years. The D&E phase and a subsequent transition period will form the basis for improved search and rescue operations for the 1980's and beyond. The system, called COSPAS/SARSAT, has international participation involving the U.S., Canada, and France as SARSAT members and joint participation with the Soviet Union's COSPAS Project. Norway and the U.K. have recently joined as investigators. Average position location error of the satellite aided processing is expected to be from 10-20KM for the existing 121.5/243 MHz distress beacons and from 2-5KM for experimental beacons transmitting in the 406 MHz band.

  18. Polarization Methods of Measuring the Roll Angle of an Object in Motion in Radio Beacon Navigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulko, V. L.; Mescheryakov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Polarization methods of measuring the roll angle of an object in motion with the help of radio beacon systems are considered. The polarization properties of the beacon signals received on board the object and amplitude-phase processing of their orthogonal polarized components are used to accomplish this goal.

  19. A digital beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransome, Peter D.

    1988-01-01

    A digital satellite beacon receiver is described which provides measurement information down to a carrier/noise density ratio approximately 15 dB below that required by a conventional (phase locked loop) design. When the beacon signal fades, accuracy degrades gracefully, and is restored immediately (without hysteresis) on signal recovery, even if the signal has faded into the noise. Benefits of the digital processing approach used include the minimization of operator adjustments, stability of the phase measuring circuits with time, repeatability between units, and compatibility with equipment not specifically designed for propagation measuring. The receiver has been developed for the European Olympus satellite which has continuous wave (CW) beacons at 12.5 and 29.7 GHz, and a switched polarization beacon at 19.8 GHz approximately, but the system can be reconfigured for CW and polarization-switched beacons at other frequencies.

  20. Conceptual development of a ground-based radio-beacon navigation system for use on the surface of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggins, Andrew J.; Canney, Lora M.; Dolezal, Anna Belle

    1988-01-01

    A spread-spectrum radio-beacon navigation system for use on the lunar surface is described. The subjects discussed are principle of operation and specifications to include power requirements, operating frequencies, weight, size, and range.

  1. Digital Controller For Emergency Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Prototype digital controller intended for use in 406-MHz emergency beacon. Undergoing development according to international specifications, 406-MHz emergency beacon system includes satellites providing worldwide monitoring of beacons, with Doppler tracking to locate each beacon within 5 km. Controller turns beacon on and off and generates binary codes identifying source (e.g., ship, aircraft, person, or vehicle on land). Codes transmitted by phase modulation. Knowing code, monitor attempts to communicate with user, monitor uses code information to dispatch rescue team appropriate to type and locations of carrier.

  2. Silex Beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaise, D.; Renard, M.

    1992-06-01

    A beacon developed and breadboarded by the SPACEBEL Instrumentation in the framework of the ESA Semiconducter Intersatellite Experiment (Silex) is described. The Silex Beacon is a powerful source aboard the GEO terminal, used by the LEO terminal to locate the latter. The paper describes the general architecture of the Silex Beacon and the flight model design and discusses the future developments. The far field pattern obtained by the breadboard is presented.

  3. A mobile indoor positioning system based on iBeacon technology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin-Yu; Ho, Te-Wei; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Yen, Zui-Shen; Yang, Bey-Jing; Lai, Feipei

    2015-01-01

    To increase the efficiency in the emergency room, the goal of this research is to implement a mobile-based indoor positioning system using mobile applications (APP) with the iBeacon solution based on the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology. We use the Received Signal Strength (RSS) based localization method to estimate the patients' locations. Our positioning algorithm achieves 97.22% (95% Confidence Interval = 95.90% - 98.55%) accuracy of classification. As the result, our mechanism is reliable enough to satisfy the need for medical staff to track the locations of their patients. PMID:26737407

  4. Implantable acoustic-beacon automatic fish-tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhue, R. J.; Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.; Richards, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A portable automatic fish tracking system was developed for monitoring the two dimensional movements of small fish within fixed areas of estuarine waters and lakes. By using the miniature pinger previously developed for this application, prototype tests of the system were conducted in the York River near the Virginia Institute of Marine Science with two underwater listening stations. Results from these tests showed that the tracking system could position the miniature pinger signals to within + or - 2.5 deg and + or - 135 m at ranges up to 2.5 km. The pingers were implanted in small fish and were successfully tracked at comparable ranges. No changes in either fish behavior or pinger performance were observed as a result of the implantation. Based on results from these prototype tests, it is concluded that the now commercially available system provides an effective approach to underwater tracking of small fish within a fixed area of interest.

  5. BEACON PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford Foundation, New York, NY.

    THE GREAT CITIES SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM AT LUDLOW SCHOOL, IN A PREDOMINANTLY PUERTO RICAN AND NEGRO NEIGHBORHOOD, HAS BEEN LABLED "BEACON" (BE A CITIZEN OF OUR NATION). IT ENDEAVORS TO ENRICH THE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF THE STUDENTS THEREBY DEVELOPING THEIR MAXIMUM POTENTIALS FOR ACHIEVEMENT, AND CONTRIBUTING TO THEIR USEFULNESS AS CITIZENS.…

  6. Personal Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The MicroPLB (personal locator beacon) is a search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (SARSAT) transmitter. When activated it emits a distress signal to a constellation of internationally operated satellites. The endangered person's identity and location anywhere on Earth is automatically forwarded to central monitoring stations around the world. It is accurate to within just a few meters. The user uses the device to download navigation data from a global positioning satellite receiver. After the download is complete, the MicroPLB functions as a self-locating beacon. Also, it is the only PLB to use a safe battery. In the past, other PLB devices have used batteries that have enough volatility to explode with extreme force. It was developed by Microwave Monolithic, Inc. through SBIR funding from Glenn Research Center and Goddard Space Flight Center.

  7. Laser addressed holographic memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, R. A.; Wagle, E. M.; Steinmetz, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Holographic recall and storage system uses red-lipid microcrystalline wax as storage medium. When laser beam strikes wax, its energy heats point of incidence enough to pass wax through transition temperature. Holograph image can then be written or erased in softened wax.

  8. Tester for Distress Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Distress beacons on aircraft and boats checked for proper operation with aid of onboard monitor. Monitor mounted in aircraft cockpit or at wheel of boat. Connected to beacon electronics by cable. Monitor used with interface circuitry in beacon, which acts as buffer so that operation of beacon is not adversely affected if monitor is removed or if connecting cable is accidentally short circuited.

  9. Beacon system based on light-emitting diode sources for runways lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Mario González; Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio A.; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2014-06-01

    New aeronautical ground lighting techniques are becoming increasingly important to ensure the safety and reduce the maintenance costs of the plane's tracks. Until recently, tracks had embedded lighting systems whose sources were based on incandescent lamps. But incandescent lamps have several disadvantages: high energy consumption and frequent breakdowns that result in high maintenance costs (lamp average life-time is ˜1500 operating hours) and the lamp's technology has a lack of new lighting functions, such as signal handling and modification. To solve these problems, the industry has developed systems based on light-emitting diode (LED) technology with improved features: (1) LED lighting consumes one tenth the power, (2) it improves preventive maintenance (an LED's lifetime range is between 25,000 and 100,000 hours), and (3) LED lighting technology can be controlled remotely according to the needs of the track configuration. LEDs have been in use for more than three decades, but only recently, around 2002, have they begun to be used as visual aids, representing the greatest potential change for airport lighting since their inception in the 1920s. Currently, embedded LED systems are not being broadly used due to the specific constraints of the rules and regulations of airports (beacon dimensions, power system technology, etc.). The fundamental requirements applied to embedded lighting systems are to be hosted on a volume where the dimensions are usually critical and also to integrate all the essential components for operation. An embedded architecture that meets the lighting regulations for airport runways is presented. The present work is divided into three main tasks: development of an optical system to optimize lighting according to International Civil Aviation Organization, manufacturing prototype, and model validation.

  10. Olympus beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostergaard, Jens

    1988-01-01

    A medium-size Beacon Receiving System for reception and processing of the B1 (20 GHz) and B2 (30 GHz) beacons from Olympus has been developed. Integration of B1 and B2 receiving equipment into one system using one antenna and a common computer for control and data processing provides the advantages of a compact configuration and synchronization of the two receiver chains. Range for co-polar signal attenuation meaurement is about 30 dB for both beacons, increasing to 40 dB for B2 if the receivers are synchronized to B1. The accuracy is better than 0.5 dB. Cross-polarization discriminations of the order of 10 to 30 dB may be determined with an accuracy of 1 to 2 dB. A number of radiometers for complementary measurements of atmospheric attenuation of 13 to 30 GHz has also been constructed. A small multi-frequency system for operation around 22 GHz and 31 GHz is presently under development.

  11. Public Address Systems. Specifications - Installation - Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Fred M.

    Provisions for public address in new construction of campus buildings (specifications, installations, and operation of public address systems), are discussed in non-technical terms. Consideration is given to microphones, amplifiers, loudspeakers and the placement and operation of various different combinations. (FS)

  12. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  13. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  14. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  15. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  16. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  17. Sensitive fiber optics-based system for real-time detection of PCR-amplified DNA using molecular beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Taylor A.; Cayouette, Michelle; Brown, Larry; Mousavi, Ali R.; Slaney, John; Moores, Jane

    1999-05-01

    Molecular Beacon hairpin shaped fluorescent oligonucleotide probes are powerful tools for quantifying specific nucleic acid sequences. Stratagene is developing a sensitive system, using these probes, for detecting and quantifying initial template copy number of nucleic acid sequences in real time during PCR amplification. The system allows parallel multiple fluorophore detection for many applications including allele discrimination and quantitative gene expression analysis. This instrument, combined with Stratagene's Sentinel Molecular Beacon kits, provides an effective system for molecular biology research. We report here the design and utility of an instrument that combines the capabilities of a microplate fluorescence reader with a PCR thermocycler into a low cost real time detection system. The instrument integrates a multiple fluorophore parallel fiber optic excitation and emission detection system, a precision X-Y translation stage, and a high performance thermoelectric temperature cycler with a computer controlled data collection and analysis system. The system uses standard PCR tubes, tube strips, and 96 well plates as the sample format. The result is a low cost, reliable, and easy to use system with premium performance for nucleic acid quantification in real time. 10

  18. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  19. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  20. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  1. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  2. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  3. Address Systems in "The Plum Plum Pickers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geuder, Patricia A.

    1975-01-01

    The address systems in Raymond Barrio's "The Plum Plum Pickers" imply sociolinguistic differences between the Chicano and the Anglo characters. The kinds of sociolinguistic situations, the number of dyadic patterns, and the quantity of the dyadic patterns strongly suggest the differences. (Author)

  4. SILEX Beacon equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepin, Pierre-Jean; Leblay, Pierrick; Haller, Regine; Tremillon, Isabelle; Sonon, Jean-Pierre

    1990-07-01

    The design of this equipment based on the use of nineteen 500 mW laser diodes is presented. The Beacon is a powerful and collimated optical source based upon semi-conductor lasers. This equipment is implemented in the SILEX GEO2 terminal and its function is to provide a continuous wave light beam towards the LEO or GEO1 satellites during the acquisition phases. The design was experimentally validated with a functional breadboard, and test results demonstrated the feasibility of every performance required by the SILEX system.

  5. Beacon Beware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    1999-01-01

    Addresses Edward Hopper's painting "Light at Two Lights" and the painting's real life subject, Cape Elizabeth Light (Maine). Discusses the fate of lighthouses; includes lessons in visual arts, mathematics and science, language arts, geography, and social studies; and lists internet sites for Edward Hopper and lighthouses. (CMK)

  6. Uncertainty evaluation in BEACON power distribution monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Goldstein, N.P. )

    1989-11-01

    BEACON is an advanced operational core support package that has a three-dimensional nodal code as its cornerstone. The three-dimensional calculation includes all necessary pressurized water reactor feedback effects. The generation of the measured power distribution from the core instrumentation is one of the primary functions of the core-monitoring software. The purpose of this paper is to discuss evaluation of the uncertainty in the measured assembly power from the BEACON system. The study covers not only the normal operating conditions, but off-normal situations to demonstrate BEACON's applicability for that condition.

  7. Laser Transmitter Aims At Laser Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Transmitter part of developmental optical communication system. Compact, lightweight, partially-self-aiming laser transmitter built to verify some capabilities of developmental free-space optical communication system. Design capable of providing 0.5 Mbps data return over range equal to Moon-Earth distance. Breadboard of transmitting terminal constructed and tested in laboratory. Prototype transmitter includes receiving circuitry that keeps it aimed at beacon, once brought into initial alignment within about 1.7 degrees of line of sight to beacon.

  8. Molecular Beacons in Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Fred Russell

    2012-01-01

    Recent technical advances have begun to realize the potential of molecular beacons to test for diverse infections in clinical diagnostic laboratories. These include the ability to test for, and quantify, multiple pathogens in the same clinical sample, and to detect antibiotic resistant strains within hours. The design principles of molecular beacons have also spawned a variety of allied technologies. PMID:22619695

  9. Beacon College Project Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Lynn, Ed.

    The American Association of Community Colleges' Beacon College Project (BCP) uses funds from the Kellogg Foundation to award two-year grants to "Beacon" community colleges to form consortia with at least five associate colleges, designed to improve a specific aspect of institutional life. A total of 26 projects, many involving community…

  10. Cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon: A novel efficient signal translator for sensitive fluorescence anisotropy bioassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pan; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-15

    Due to its unique features such as high sensitivity, homogeneous format, and independence on fluorescent intensity, fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay has become a hotspot of study in oligonucleotide-based bioassays. However, until now most FA probes require carefully customized structure designs, and thus are neither generalizable for different sensing systems nor effective to obtain sufficient signal response. To address this issue, a cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was successfully engineered for signal amplified FA bioassay, via combining the unique stable structure of molecular beacon and the large molecular mass of streptavidin. Compared with single DNA strand probe or conventional molecular beacon, the DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon exhibited a much higher FA value, which was potential to obtain high signal-background ratio in sensing process. As proof-of-principle, this novel DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was further applied for FA bioassay using DNAzyme-Pb(2+) as a model sensing system. This FA assay approach could selectively detect as low as 0.5nM Pb(2+) in buffer solution, and also be successful for real samples analysis with good recovery values. Compatible with most of oligonucleotide probes' designs and enzyme-based signal amplification strategies, the molecular beacon can serve as a novel signal translator to expand the application prospect of FA technology in various bioassays. PMID:26592607

  11. An automated airplane detection system for the safeguard against airplane illumination from the laser guide star beacons at the MMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Miguel; Lloyd-Hart, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Laser beams for guide star generation are a potential hazard for aircraft. At the MMT telescope located on Mt. Hopkins in Southern Arizona, a constellation of five Rayleigh guide stars is created with a total of 25 W of projected power at 532 nm wavelength. We report operational results from an automatic system deployed at the MMT that is designed to detect aircraft and shut down the lasers if a collision with the beams appears likely. The system, building on a previous prototype, uses a wide-angle CCD camera mounted with a minimally unobstructed view to the optical support structure at the top of the telescope. A computer program reads the camera once every two seconds and calculates the difference between adjacent image pairs. The anti-collision beacons required on all aircraft by the Federal Aviation Administration appear as streaks in the field. If an airplane is detected, it is located in the field relative to the laser beam and its path is projected. If aircraft are detected near or appear that they will approach the beam, the laser's safety shutter is closed and warning messages are sent to the laser operator. Failsafe operation is assured by a "heart beat" signal continuously sent from the detection system to the laser controller, and by the fact that the safety shutter must be energized to open. In the event of a power failure, the system must be manually reset by the Laser Safety Officer before the laser beam can again be propagated.

  12. Searching for cost-optimized interstellar beacons.

    PubMed

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses. PMID:20624057

  13. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arriarrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  14. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication, this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  15. Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

  16. Autonomous navigation using lunar beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, A. R.; Ellis, J.; French, J.; Null, G.; Yunck, T.; Wu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of using lunar beacon signal transmission for on-board navigation for earth satellites and near-earth spacecraft is described. The system would require powerful transmitters on the earth-side of the moon's surface and black box receivers with antennae and microprocessors placed on board spacecraft for autonomous navigation. Spacecraft navigation requires three position and three velocity elements to establish location coordinates. Two beacons could be soft-landed on the lunar surface at the limits of allowable separation and each would transmit a wide-beam signal with cones reaching GEO heights and be strong enough to be received by small antennae in near-earth orbit. The black box processor would perform on-board computation with one-way Doppler/range data and dynamical models. Alternatively, GEO satellites such as the GPS or TDRSS spacecraft can be used with interferometric techniques to provide decimeter-level accuracy for aircraft navigation.

  17. A comparison of mapped and measured total ionospheric electron content using global positioning system and beacon satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Gabor E.; Roth, Titus

    1988-01-01

    Total ionospheric electron contents (TEC) were measured by global positioning system (GPS) dual-frequency receivers developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The measurements included P-code (precise ranging code) and carrier phase data for six GPS satellites during multiple five-hour observing sessions. A set of these GPS TEC measurements were mapped from the GPS lines of sight to the line of sight of a Faraday beacon satellite by statistically fitting the TEC data to a simple model of the ionosphere. The mapped GPS TEC values were compared with the Faraday rotation measurements. Because GPS transmitter offsets are different for each satellite and because some GPS receiver offsets were uncalibrated, the sums of the satellite and receiver offsets were estimated simultaneously with the TEC in a least squares procedure. The accuracy of this estimation procedure is evaluated indicating that the error of the GPS-determined line of sight TEC can be at or below 1 x 10 to the 16th el/sq cm. Consequently, the current level of accuracy is comparable to the Faraday rotation technique; however, GPS provides superior sky coverage.

  18. Building and Strengthening Infrastructure for Data Exchange: Lessons from the Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Gretchen W.; Swietek, Karen; Ubri, Petry S.; Singer, Rachel F.; Lowell, Kristina H.; Miller, Wilhelmine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program supports interventions, including care-delivery innovations, provider performance measurement and feedback initiatives, and tools for providers and consumers to enhance care. Using a learning health system framework, we examine the Beacon Communities’ processes in building and strengthening health IT (HIT) infrastructures, specifically successes and challenges in sharing patient information to improve clinical care. Background: In 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) launched the three-year program, which provided $250 million to 17 Beacon Communities to invest in HIT and health information exchange (HIE) infrastructure. Beacon Communities used this funding to develop and disseminate HIT-enabled quality improvement practices found effective in particular community and practice environments. Methods: NORC conducted 7 site visits, November 2012–March 2013, selecting Communities to represent diverse program features. From August–October 2013, NORC held discussions with the remaining 10 Communities. Following each visit or discussion, NORC summarized the information gathered, including transcripts, team observations, and other documents the Community provided, to facilitate a within-Community analysis of context and stakeholders, intervention strategies, enabling factors, and challenges. Results: Although each Community designed and implemented data-sharing strategies in a unique environment, similar challenges and enabling factors emerged across the Beacons. From a learning health system perspective, their strategies to build and strengthen data-sharing infrastructures address the following crosscutting priorities: promoting technical advances and innovations by helping providers adapt EHRs for data exchange and performance measurement with customizable IT and offering technical support to smaller, independent providers; engaging key stakeholders; and

  19. Messaging with cost-optimized interstellar beacons.

    PubMed

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/m(2)) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, approximately 10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?" PMID:20624056

  20. Messaging with Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/sq m) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(exp 2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, -10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?"

  1. Addressing the Complexity of the Earth System

    SciTech Connect

    Nobre, Carlos; Brasseur, Guy P.; Shapiro, Melvyn; Lahsen, Myanna; Brunet, Gilbert; Busalacchi, Antonio; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Seitzinger, Sybil; Noone, Kevin; Ometto, Jean P.

    2010-10-01

    This paper highlights the role of the Earth-system biosphere and illustrates the complex: biosphere-atmosphere interactions in the Amazon Basin, changes in nitrogen cycling, ocean chemistry, and land use. It introduces three important requirements for accelerating the development and use of Earth system information. The first requirement is to develop Earth system analysis and prediction models that account for multi-scale physical, chemical and biological processes, including their interactions in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-land-ice system. The development of these models requires partnerships between academia, national research centers, and operational prediction facilities, and builds upon accomplishments in weather and climate predictions. They will highlight the regional aspects of global change, and include modules for water system, agriculture, forestry, energy, air quality, health, etc. The second requirement is to model the interactions between humans and the weather-climate-biogeochemical system. The third requirement is to introduce novel methodologies to account for societal drivers, impacts and feedbacks. This is a challenging endeavor requiring creative solutions and some compromising because human behavior cannot be fully represented within the framework of present-day physical prediction systems.

  2. A Beacon for Baltimore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    High on the mainmast of the clipper Pride of Baltimore, crew members have installed a NASA-developed satellite beacon which enables continual tracking of the ship as she roams the seas on goodwill tours. The simple 10-pound beacon affixed to Pride's mainmast allows Baltimore's Operational Sail to keep track of the ship on its voyages to distant places. Once every minute, the compact, battery powered unit sends a radio signal to NASA's Nimbus-6 research satellite where the frequency shift of successive signals provides information for computing the ship's latitude and longitude.

  3. Photosensitive biosensor array system using optical addressing without an addressing circuit on array biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Chang-Geun; Ah, Chil Seong; Kim, Tae-Youb; Park, Chan Woo; Yang, Jong-Heon; Kim, Ansoon; Sung, Gun Yong

    2010-09-01

    This paper introduces a photosensitive biosensor array system with a simple photodiode array that detects photocurrent changes caused by reactions between probe and target molecules. Using optical addressing, the addressing circuit on the array chip is removed for low-cost application, and real cell addressing is achieved using an externally located computer-controllable light-emitting diode array module. The fabricated biosensor array chip shows a good dynamic range of 1-100 ng/mL under prostate-specific antigen detection, with an on-chip resolution of roughly 1 ng/mL.

  4. Wide field of view laser beacon system for three dimensional aircraft range measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. Y.

    1982-01-01

    A system that measures accurately the distance from an aircraft to a helicoper for rotor noise flight testing was developed. The system measures the range and angles between two aircraft using laser optics. This system can be applied in collision avoidance, robotics and other measurement critical tasks.

  5. Addressing System Reconfiguration and Incremental Integration within IMA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, F.; Rodríques, A. I.

    2009-05-01

    Recently space industry is paying special attention to Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) systems due to the benefits that modular concepts could bring to the development of space applications, especially in terms of interoperability, flexibility and software reuse. Two important IMA goals to be highlighted are system reconfiguration, and incremental integration of new functionalities into a pre-existing system. The purpose of this paper is to show how system reconfiguration is conducted based on Allied Standard Avionics Architecture Council (ASAAC) concepts for IMA Systems. Besides, it aims to provide a proposal for addressing the incremental integration concept supported by our experience gained during European Technology Acquisition Program (ETAP) TDP1.7 programme. All these topics will be discussed taking into account safety issues and showing the blueprint as an appropriate technique to support these concepts.

  6. Determining Locations by Use of Networks of Passive Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Gray, Andrew; Jennings, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Networks of passive radio beacons spanning moderate-sized terrain areas have been proposed to aid navigation of small robotic aircraft that would be used to explore Saturn s moon Titan. Such networks could also be used on Earth to aid navigation of robotic aircraft, land vehicles, or vessels engaged in exploration or reconnaissance in situations or locations (e.g., underwater locations) in which Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are unreliable or unavailable. Prior to use, it would be necessary to pre-position the beacons at known locations that would be determined by use of one or more precise independent global navigation system(s). Thereafter, while navigating over the area spanned by a given network of passive beacons, an exploratory robot would use the beacons to determine its position precisely relative to the known beacon positions (see figure). If it were necessary for the robot to explore multiple, separated terrain areas spanned by different networks of beacons, the robot could use a long-haul, relatively coarse global navigation system for the lower-precision position determination needed during transit between such areas. The proposed method of precise determination of position of an exploratory robot relative to the positions of passive radio beacons is based partly on the principles of radar and partly on the principles of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. The robot would transmit radar-like signals that would be modified and reflected by the passive beacons. The distance to each beacon would be determined from the roundtrip propagation time and/or round-trip phase shift of the signal returning from that beacon. Signals returned from different beacons could be distinguished by means of their RFID characteristics. Alternatively or in addition, the antenna of each beacon could be designed to radiate in a unique pattern that could be identified by the navigation system. Also, alternatively or in addition, sets of identical beacons could

  7. 46 CFR 184.610 - Public address systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public address systems. 184.610 Section 184.610 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS....610 Public address systems. (a) Except as noted in paragraphs (d) and (e) below, each vessel must...

  8. Molecular Beacon-Based MicroRNA Imaging During Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence monitoring system for examining endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity in cellular level provides crucial information on not only understanding a critical role of miRNA involving a variety of biological processes, but also evaluating miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this protocol, we report the details of a new procedure for a molecular beacon-based miRNA monitoring system, which includes the illustration scheme for miRNA detection strategy, exogenous miRNA detection, and measurement of endogenous miRNA expression level during neurogenesis. The fluorescence signal of miR-124a beacon quenched by BHQ2 was gradually recovered as increasing concentration of the miR-124a in tube. The functional work of miR-124a beacon was examined in intracellular environment, allowing for the internalization of the miR-124a beacon by lipofectamine, which resulted in activated fluorescent signals of the miR-124a beacon in the HeLa cells after the addition of synthetic miR-124a. The endogenous miR-124a expression level was detected by miR-124a beacon system during neurogenesis, showing brighter fluorescence intensity in cytoplasmic area of P19 cells after induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. The molecular beacon based-miRNA detection technique could be applicable to the simultaneous visualization of a variety of miRNA expression patterns using different fluorescence dyes. For the study of examining endogenous miRNA expression level using miRNA-beacon system, if cellular differentiation step is already prepared, transfection step of miR-124a beacon into P19 cells, and acquisition of activated fluorescence signal measured by confocal microscope can be conducted approximately within 6 h. PMID:26530921

  9. Building a million beacon map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julier, Simon J.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2001-10-01

    Many future missions for mobile robots demand multi-robot systems which are capable of operating in large environments for long periods of time. A critical capability is that each robot must be able to localize itself. However, GPS cannot be used in many environments (such as within city streets, under water, indoors, beneath foliage or extra-terrestrial robotic missions) where mobile robots are likely to become commonplace. A widely researched alternative is Simultaneous Localization and Map Building (SLAM): the vehicle constructs a map and, concurrently, estimates its own position. In this paper we consider the problem of building and maintaining an extremely large map (of one million beacons). We describe a fully distributed, highly scaleable SLAM algorithm which is based on distributed data fusion systems. A central map is maintained in global coordinates using the Split Covariance Intersection (SCI) algorithm. Relative and local maps are run independently of the central map and their estimates are periodically fused with the central map.

  10. How a Beacon Community Program in New Orleans Helped Create a Better Health Care System By Building Relationships Before Technology

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Anjum; Brown, Lisanne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, much of New Orleans’ healthcare infrastructure was destroyed. Initial federal funding after the storm expanded primary care services and helped set up medical homes for New Orleans’ large uninsured and underinsured population. Following that, the Beacon Community in New Orleans, charged with improving health care through the use of technology, decided the best way to accomplish those goals was to build community partnerships and introduce technology improvements based on their input and on their terms. The purpose of this paper is to describe how those partnerships were wrought, including the innovative use of a conceptual framework, and how they are being sustained; how different technologies were and are being introduced; and what the results have been so far. Methods: Past successful community experiences, as well as a proven conceptual framework, were used to help establish community partnerships and governance structures, as well as to demonstrate their linkages. This paper represents a compilation of reports and information from key Beacon leaders, staff and providers and their firsthand experiences in setting up those structures, as well as their conclusions. Results: The community partnerships proved extremely successful in not only devising successful ways to introduce new technology into healthcare settings, but in sustaining those changes by creating a governance structure that has enough fluidity to adapt to changing circumstances. Conclusions: Building and developing community partnerships takes time and effort; however, these relationships are necessary and essential to introducing and sustaining new technologies in a healthcare setting and should be a first step for any organization looking to accomplish such goals. PMID:25848613

  11. Development of a high-throughput detection system for HIV-1 using real-time NASBA based on molecular beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beuningen, Rinie; Marras, Salvatore A.; Kramer, Fred R.; Oosterlaken, Tom; Weusten, Jos; Borst, G.; van de Wiel, Paul

    2001-04-01

    HIV-1 viral load assays require accuracy and sensitivity at low RNA levels with the capability to detect all subtypes. Furthermore, the assay should be easy to perform and fast to be useful for routine diagnostics. In order to meet these demands we have combined isothermal NASBA amplification with molecular beacon probes for real-time detection and quantitation of HIV-1 RNA. Quantitation is based on co-amplification of the HIV-1 RNA in the clinical sample and a synthetic calibrator RNA which is amplified by the same primer set but detected with a differently labeled molecular beacon. The entire procedure is simple and analysis of 48 samples requires less than 1» hours with minimal hands-on time. A fluorescent plate reader is used for real-time detection and isothermal amplification. The linearity and precision of the assay was determined with the VQC HIV-1 type B standard of the Central Laboratory of the Dutch Red Cross Blood Banks, The Netherlands. Sensitivity was shown to be 50 copies per ml (cps/ml). The average assay precision was 0,19 log10 over a range of 100-300,000 cps/ml tested at nine concentrations. The linearity of dilution series of 15 cultured HIV-1 gag clades A-H was shown. The specificity was 100% on non HIV-1 samples HIV-2, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. The assay robustness in terms of valid results was 99%. In conclusion, the new real-time NASBA assay meets state-of-the-art HIV-1 viral load performance requirements combined with a high level of user convenience.

  12. SATCOM general purpose modem DSCS 3 SCT beacon telemetry display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, James D.

    1992-12-01

    This thesis documents the design and implementation of a DSCS 3 Single Channel Transponder (SCT) beacon telemetry display. The system is a personal computer based design which interfaces to three SCT beacon receiver/demodulators. The software was designed to decode and display both the DSCS 3 A and DSCS HI B satellite beacons. Recordings of the SCT beacon display can be made on paper and/or magnetic media when triggered by the user, a watchdog timer, or the SCT command accept telemetry bit. In addition, the system can be configured with an IRIG B Universal Time Coordinates (UTC) card which enables the software to determine the difference between the decoded SCT clock time and the local IRIG time source. Remoting the SCT configuration display is also possible using Hayes-compatible modems over a telephone link.

  13. Indoor location estimation using radio beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Uzair; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Sungyoug; Park, Chongkug

    2007-12-01

    We present a simple location estimation method for developing radio beacon based location system in the indoor environments. It employs an online learning approach for making large scale location systems in a short time collaboratively. The salient features of our method are low memory requirements and simple computations which make it suitable for both distributed location-aware applications based on client-server model as well as privacy sensitive applications residing on stand alone devices.

  14. Optical telecommunications: performance of the qualification model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Gollier, Jacques; Heinrichs, Theo; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1995-04-01

    The Beacon is a powerful non-coherent CW infra-red laser source which is developed under the Semi-conductor Inter-satellite Link Experiment (SILEX). It will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The Beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode Mixing Fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level during unit life using an Optical Monitoring System and a Beacon output Tele-Command. The Engineering Qualification Model is now complete and overall performance with respect to the SILEX requirements is presented.

  15. Optical telecommunications: performance of the protoflight model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Grodent, C.; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1996-04-01

    The beacon is a powerful non-coherent cw infra-red laser source which will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode mixing fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level (nominally 8 KW/Sr) during unit life using an optical monitoring system and a beacon output tele-command. Following successful environmental testing, the proto-flight model (PFM) has recently been delivered ready for integration onto the SILEX terminal. This paper describes the overall performance of the PFM beacon with respect to SILEX requirements. An improved beacon using 1.2 W laser diodes which will be capable of delivering up to 17 KW/Sr is currently under construction. An analysis of the design aspects to be considered when using high power laser diodes in this type of application is presented. Finally, a brief summary is given of SPACEBEL activities associated with high power and more compact optical communication units for future missions.

  16. Selective Attention in Multi-Chip Address-Event Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2009-01-01

    Selective attention is the strategy used by biological systems to cope with the inherent limits in their available computational resources, in order to efficiently process sensory information. The same strategy can be used in artificial systems that have to process vast amounts of sensory data with limited resources. In this paper we present a neuromorphic VLSI device, the “Selective Attention Chip” (SAC), which can be used to implement these models in multi-chip address-event systems. We also describe a real-time sensory-motor system, which integrates the SAC with a dynamic vision sensor and a robotic actuator. We present experimental results from each component in the system, and demonstrate how the complete system implements a real-time stimulus-driven selective attention model. PMID:22346689

  17. Validation of the Calypso Surface Beacon Transponder.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Maxwell; Saleh, Ziad; Volpe, Tom; Margiasso, Rich; Li, Xiang; Chan, Maria; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Calypso L-shaped Surface Beacon transponder has recently become available for clinical applications. We herein conduct studies to validate the Surface Beacon transponder in terms of stability, reproducibility, orientation sensitivity, cycle rate dependence, and respiratory waveform tracking accuracy. The Surface Beacon was placed on a Quasar respiratory phantom and positioned at the isocenter with its two arms aligned with the lasers. Breathing waveforms were simulated, and the motion of the transponder was tracked. Stability and drift analysis: sinusoidal waveforms (200 cycles) were produced, and the amplitudes of phases 0% (inhale) and 50% (exhale) were recorded at each breathing cycle. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the amplitudes were calculated. Linear least-squares fitting was performed to access the possible amplitude drift over the breathing cycles. Reproducibility: similar setting to stability and drift analysis, and the phantom generated 100 cycles of the sinusoidal waveform per run. The Calypso system's was re-setup for each run. Recorded amplitude and SD of 0% and 50% phase were compared between runs to assess contribution of Calypso electromagnetic array setup variation. Beacon orientation sensitivity: the Calypso tracks sinusoidal phantom motion with a defined angular offset of the beacon to assess its effect on SD and peak-to-peak amplitude. Rate dependence: sinusoidal motion was generated at cycle rates of 1 Hz, .33 Hz, and .2 Hz. Peak-to-peak displacement and SDs were assessed. Respiratory waveform tracking accuracy: the phantom reproduced recorded breathing cycles (by volunteers and patients) were tracked by the Calypso system. Deviation in tracking position from produced waveform was used to calculate SD throughout entire breathing cycle. Stability and drift analysis: Mean amplitude ± SD of phase 0% or 50% were 20.01 ± 0.04 mm and -19.65 ± 0.08 mm, respectively. No clinically significant drift was detected with drift measured as 5.1

  18. Improving governance to improve oral health: addressing care delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The evolving role of the state in the provision of health care has seen the adoption of new management philosophies to ensure that goals set for the system are reached. In particular, the term New Public Management (NPM) has tended to dominate reforms to help address perceived shortcomings in public sector services. NPM is based on the use of freemarket type arrangements as a mechanism to solve problems, the control of which provides new challenges. One particular challenge that has arisen from the combination of NPM with the large number of agencies involved in care provision is that of addressing the issues arising from the improved understanding of the determinants of health. This has led to the evolution of differing care arrangements across differing sectors at all levels. If resources are to be used as intended, the control of delivery systems to oversee their use must exist. The overarching term for such activity is â governance. This paper provides an overview of the issues that arise for addressing governance of oral health care and the subsequent challenges that face those responsible for ensuring compliance. PMID:22976573

  19. The importance of systems thinking to address obesity.

    PubMed

    Finegood, Diane T

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is clearly a complex problem for both the individual and for society. Complex or 'wicked' problems have common characteristics such as heterogeneity, nonlinearity, interdependence, and self-organization. As such they require solutions appropriate for complex problems, rather than a reductionist search for the causes. 'Systems thinking' provides new ways to consider how to collectively address complex societal problems like obesity, where biology interacts with social, cultural and built environmental factors in infinite permutations and combinations. The systems that give rise to the obesity epidemic function at multiple levels, and there are important interactions between these levels. At any given level, individual actors and organizations matter and system function is optimized when individual and organizational capacity to respond is well matched to the complexity of individual tasks. Providing system supports to help networks of individuals become 'communities of practice' and 'systems of influence' may also help to accelerate the pace of effective action against obesity. Research efforts need to move away from the relentless search for the specific isolated causes of obesity and focus on solutions that have been shown to work in addressing other 'wicked' problems. PMID:23128771

  20. Address-event-based platform for bioinspired spiking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Fernández, A.; Luján, C. D.; Linares-Barranco, A.; Gómez-Rodríguez, F.; Rivas, M.; Jiménez, G.; Civit, A.

    2007-05-01

    Address Event Representation (AER) is an emergent neuromorphic interchip communication protocol that allows a real-time virtual massive connectivity between huge number neurons, located on different chips. By exploiting high speed digital communication circuits (with nano-seconds timings), synaptic neural connections can be time multiplexed, while neural activity signals (with mili-seconds timings) are sampled at low frequencies. Also, neurons generate "events" according to their activity levels. More active neurons generate more events per unit time, and access the interchip communication channel more frequently, while neurons with low activity consume less communication bandwidth. When building multi-chip muti-layered AER systems, it is absolutely necessary to have a computer interface that allows (a) reading AER interchip traffic into the computer and visualizing it on the screen, and (b) converting conventional frame-based video stream in the computer into AER and injecting it at some point of the AER structure. This is necessary for test and debugging of complex AER systems. In the other hand, the use of a commercial personal computer implies to depend on software tools and operating systems that can make the system slower and un-robust. This paper addresses the problem of communicating several AER based chips to compose a powerful processing system. The problem was discussed in the Neuromorphic Engineering Workshop of 2006. The platform is based basically on an embedded computer, a powerful FPGA and serial links, to make the system faster and be stand alone (independent from a PC). A new platform is presented that allow to connect up to eight AER based chips to a Spartan 3 4000 FPGA. The FPGA is responsible of the network communication based in Address-Event and, at the same time, to map and transform the address space of the traffic to implement a pre-processing. A MMU microprocessor (Intel XScale 400MHz Gumstix Connex computer) is also connected to the FPGA

  1. Indoor Navigation using Direction Sensor and Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel; Jeganathan, Muthu

    2004-01-01

    A system for indoor navigation of a mobile robot includes (1) modulated infrared beacons at known positions on the walls and ceiling of a room and (2) a cameralike sensor, comprising a wide-angle lens with a position-sensitive photodetector at the focal plane, mounted in a known position and orientation on the robot. The system also includes a computer running special-purpose software that processes the sensor readings to obtain the position and orientation of the robot in all six degrees of freedom in a coordinate system embedded in the room.

  2. Wireless address event representation system for biological sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folowosele, Fopefolu; Tapson, Jonathan; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2007-05-01

    We describe wireless networking systems for close proximity biological sensors, as would be encountered in artificial skin. The sensors communicate to a "base station" that interprets the data and decodes its origin. Using a large bundle of ultra thin metal wires from the sensors to the "base station" introduces significant technological hurdles for both the construction and maintenance of the system. Fortunately, the Address Event Representation (AER) protocol provides an elegant and biomorphic method for transmitting many impulses (i.e. neural spikes) down a single wire/channel. However, AER does not communicate any sensory information within each spike, other that the address of the origination of the spike. Therefore, each sensor must provide a number of spikes to communicate its data, typically in the form of the inter-spike intervals or spike rate. Furthermore, complex circuitry is required to arbitrate access to the channel when multiple sensors communicate simultaneously, which results in spike delay. This error is exacerbated as the number of sensors per channel increases, mandating more channels and more wires. We contend that despite the effectiveness of the wire-based AER protocol, its natural evolution will be the wireless AER protocol. A wireless AER system: (1) does not require arbitration to handle multiple simultaneous access of the channel, (2) uses cross-correlation delay to encode sensor data in every spike (eliminating the error due to arbitration delay), and (3) can be reorganized and expanded with little consequence to the network. The system uses spread spectrum communications principles, implemented with a low-power integrate-and-fire neurons. This paper discusses the design, operation and capabilities of such a system. We show that integrate-and-fire neurons can be used to both decode the origination of each spike and extract the data contained within in. We also show that there are many technical obstacles to overcome before this version

  3. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, Technician Plus, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon....

  4. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of...

  5. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of...

  6. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of...

  7. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of...

  8. A System for Addressing Incidental Findings in Neuroimaging Research

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Steven C.; Wu, Jennifer; Hanson, Joseph A.; Nouri, Sarvenaz; Karnani, Diraj; Chuang, Tony M.; Le, Vu

    2011-01-01

    When healthy subjects undergo brain imaging, incidental findings are not rare. The optimal response to such findings has been the focus of considerable discussion. The current report describes the operations and results of a system that provides review of incidental findings by an appropriate medical professional. A web-based system was created whereby investigators performing brain MRI scans on healthy subjects could refer images with suspected concerns to a board certified radiologist who had a Certificate of Added Qualification in Neuroradiology. The specific details of this system are described. Among 27 scans suspected by an investigator of having a significant finding, all but one were referred by a researcher with a PhD. The most common concerns described by these investigators were for the possible presence of a cyst or of enlarged ventricles. The most common findings reported by the radiologist were Virchow-Robin spaces and cysts. Findings were generally of low clinical significance, with 1 major exception. Identifying the optimal response to incidental findings in neuroimaging research remains a challenge. The current report describes a system for providing expert assistance and so addresses these issues in the setting of suspected incidental findings. To our knowledge the current system is the first to provide a specific means for evaluation of incidental findings in neuroimaging research. PMID:21224007

  9. Connectivity and complex systems in geomorphology: addressing some key challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöppl, Ronald; Turnbull-Lloyd, Laura; Parsons, Anthony; Bracken, Louise; Keesstra, Saskia; Masselink, Rens

    2016-04-01

    "Connectivity thinking" and related concepts have a long history in geomorphology. Since the beginning of the 21st century connectivity research experienced a huge boom in geomorphology as geomorphologists started to develop new concepts on connectivity to better understand the complexity of geomorphic systems and system response to change. However, progress in the field of connectivity in geomorphology has mostly been developing in a parallel manner, resulting in a multiplicity of definitions, concepts and methodological approaches. Nevertheless, a set of common key challenges amongst the different connectivity concepts and approaches used to understand complex geomorphic systems are also evident. In the course of a theory think tank of the COST Action ES1306 (CONNECTEUR - Connecting European Connectivity Research) the following five different key challenges were detected (Turnbull et al., in prep.): (i) defining the fundamental unit, (ii) distinguishing between structural and functional boundaries, (iii) emergent behavior, (iv) memory effects, (v) measuring connectivity. In this presentation we will a) discuss how these key challenges are addressed and approached in connectivity research in geomorphology, b) evaluate ways in which cross-disciplinary advances may be made by exploring potential for a common toolbox approach to the study of connectivity.

  10. Weak beacon detection for air-to-ground optical wireless link establishment.

    PubMed

    Han, Yaoqiang; Dang, Anhong; Tang, Junxiong; Guo, Hong

    2010-02-01

    In an air-to-ground free-space optical communication system, strong background interference seriously affects the beacon detection, which makes it difficult to establish the optical link. In this paper, we propose a correlation beacon detection scheme under strong background interference conditions. As opposed to traditional beacon detection schemes, the beacon is modulated by an m-sequence at the transmitting terminal with a digital differential matched filter (DDMF) array introduced at the receiving end to detect the modulated beacon. This scheme is capable of suppressing both strong interference and noise by correlation reception of the received image sequence. In addition, the DDMF array enables each pixel of the image sensor to have its own DDMF of the same structure to process its received image sequence in parallel, thus it makes fast beacon detection possible. Theoretical analysis and an outdoor experiment have been demonstrated and show that the proposed scheme can realize fast and effective beacon detection under strong background interference conditions. Consequently, the required beacon transmission power can also be reduced dramatically. PMID:20174012

  11. EMI sensor positioning using a beacon approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhomme, Nicolas; Barrowes, Benjamin E.; George, David C.

    2011-06-01

    Discrimination of buried exploded ordnance by inversion of electromagnetic data requires accurate sensor positioning. There are many contaminated areas were dense forest or significant topographic variation reduces accuracy or precludes use of standard geo-location methods, such as satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) and laser tracking systems (e.g., Robotic Total Station, RTS), as these rely on line of sight. We propose an alternative positioning system that is based on a beacon principle. The system was developed to survey with the Man-Portable Vector (MPV) EMI sensor. The magnetic moment of the MPV transmitter can be detected at a relatively large distance. The primary field is measured from a portable base station comprised of two vector receivers rigidly attached to either ends of a 1.5 meter horizontal boom. Control tests showed that relative location and orientation could be recovered with centimeter positional and one degree angular accuracy within a 3-4-meter range and 60-degree aperture (relative to boom transverse direction), which is more than sufficient to cover any UXO anomaly. This accuracy level satisfies commonly accepted positional requirement for discrimination. The beacon positioning system can facilitate classification of munitions in any man-trafficable area and was successfully deployed at a field demonstration.

  12. Strengthening health information systems to address health equity challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Nolen, Lexi Bambas; Braveman, Paula; Dachs, J. Norberto W.; Delgado, Iris; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Moser, Kath; Rolfe, Liz; Vega, Jeanette; Zarowsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Special studies and isolated initiatives over the past several decades in low-, middle- and high-income countries have consistently shown inequalities in health among socioeconomic groups and by gender, race or ethnicity, geographical area and other measures associated with social advantage. Significant health inequalities linked to social (dis)advantage rather than to inherent biological differences are generally considered unfair or inequitable. Such health inequities are the main object of health development efforts, including global targets such as the Millennium Development Goals, which require monitoring to evaluate progress. However, most national health information systems (HIS) lack key information needed to assess and address health inequities, namely, reliable, longitudinal and representative data linking measures of health with measures of social status or advantage at the individual or small-area level. Without empirical documentation and monitoring of such inequities, as well as country-level capacity to use this information for effective planning and monitoring of progress in response to interventions, movement towards equity is unlikely to occur. This paper reviews core information requirements and potential databases and proposes short-term and longer term strategies for strengthening the capabilities of HIS for the analysis of health equity and discusses HIS-related entry points for supporting a culture of equity-oriented decision-making and policy development. PMID:16184279

  13. Near Infrared Imaging of Molecular Beacons in Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    2001-03-01

    The recent demonstrations of the efficacy of the tumor to background contrast in breast cancer using the tricarbo-cyanine near infrared (NIR) agent with time domain 2-D imaging presages the greater efficacy of site-directed optical contrast agents for early detection of cancers which show contrast (tissue to background) of over 20 fold. Further increases of contrast are obtained with structures that quench the fluorescence until the agent is delivered, recognized, and opened by specific enzymatic activity of the tumor. These are termed ``Molecular Beacons". In order to image the localization of the Beacons, we employ light pen (< 40μ) scanning of the freeze trapped tumor in order to immobilize the tissue, to increase the fluorescence quantum yield and to limit the penetration of the excitation to a thin superficial layer (< 20μ). Precision milling of layers (> 20μ) in LN2 gives the desired 3D high resolution image of the location of the Beacon within in the cancer cell. Since cancer prevention is linked to early detection, the high signal to background obtainable with Molecular Beacons enables the detection of very early subsurface cancers, especially breast and prostate (NIH, UIP). Thus the fluorescent Beacon excites and emits in the NIR window and signals from several cm deep in breast are detected by diffusive wave optical tomography (DWOT). Detection of objects (< 1 mm) is achieved by phased array optical system using 0^O, 180^O 50 MHz modulation of pairs of laser diodes (780 nm) and fluorescence detection (> 800 nm) affording 0.2 mm object detection of even low Beacon concentrations. One, two, and 3-D localization is made possible by one, two, and three orthogonal phase array null planes.

  14. 14 CFR 25.1423 - Public address system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... intelligible at all passenger seats, lavatories, and flight attendant seats and work stations. (d) Be designed... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Safety Equipment § 25.1423 Public address...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1423 - Public address system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... intelligible at all passenger seats, lavatories, and flight attendant seats and work stations. (d) Be designed... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Safety Equipment § 25.1423 Public address...

  16. 78 FR 75392 - American Beacon Funds, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... COMMISSION American Beacon Funds, et al.; Notice of Application December 5, 2013. AGENCY: Securities and... (Jun. 25, 1996) (order). Applicants: American Beacon Funds and American Beacon Select Funds (collectively, the ``Trusts'') and American Beacon Advisors, Inc. (``American Beacon'' and...

  17. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. During the quarter both SOHIO and TRW worked on catalysts which would suppress methane formation during steaming thus increasing the amount of hydrogen formed. At SOHIO a C77-K2 catalyst promoted with a Class II compound showed promise in laboratory tests for suppressing methane. At TRW a K-1 unsupported catalyst promoted with 10% of Additive F maintained methane suppression over 30 cycles in laboratory scale tests. Shakedown of the Tandem Reactor Apparatus was completed and testing was initiated under quasi-continuous transfer of solids between reactors. Nine short term tests were performed with K-1 based BEACON solids. The data from these tests indicate that the Tandem Reactor concept is valid and BEACON solids can be transferred efficiently in the fluidized state between the deposition and gasification reactors. A preliminary analysis of the potential of a BEACON combined cycle/hydrogen system with a hydrogen fuel cell has been performed. The BEACON process can be used to coproduce hydrogen and electric power, and the efficiency of the overall system is quite high when the electricity is produced by a combined cycle power system. If fuel cells are used to convert the hydrogen to electricity then a system for making only electricity results, and such a system gives an overall efficiency of 54%. 7 figures, 14 tables.

  18. Cospas-Sarsat - A beacon for those in distress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Brendan

    1989-06-01

    The joint operation of Search and Rescuse Satellite-Aided Tracking system (Sarsat) and its companion system, Cospass, is discussed. The components of the combined Sarsat-Cospass system are described, including the system's spacecraft, aircraft-borne emergency locator transmitters, ship-borne emergency position-indicating radio beacons, earth stations, local user terminals, mission control centers, and rescue coordination centers. Case histories are presented to demonstrate the use of the system in rescue operations.

  19. Adaptive-optics compensation by distributed beacons for non-kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Rao, C; Jiang, W; Ling, N

    2001-07-20

    In optical propagation through atmospheric turbulence, the performance of compensation with adaptive optics depends on a beacon's spatial distribution. With distributed beacons, the inefficiency of the modal correction, which is defined as the ratio of the anisoplanatic error of the jth mode and the Zernike-coefficient variance, is derived by use of the wave-front expansion on the Zernike polynomials for non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Numerical results are presented for laser beam propagation through constant turbulence with an offset point beacon and an on-axis uniform circular beacon. The results show that compensation for an on-axis uniform circular beacon is much more effective than that for an offset point beacon. The low-order modes are much more correlated than the higher-order modes. The larger the power-law exponent of the refractive-index power spectrum beta, the smaller the propagation path length L and the larger the diameter D of the telescope aperture, the more effective the compensation is. For a specific extended degree of beacon for which there are a maximum number of modes N(max) to be corrected, only low-order-correction systems are useful. PMID:18360369

  20. Integrated Formulation of Beacon-Based Exception Analysis for Multimissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan; James, Mark; Park, Han; Zak, Mickail

    2003-01-01

    Further work on beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions (BEAM), a method of real-time, automated diagnosis of a complex electromechanical systems, has greatly expanded its capability and suitability of application. This expanded formulation, which fully integrates physical models and symbolic analysis, is described. The new formulation of BEAM expands upon previous advanced techniques for analysis of signal data, utilizing mathematical modeling of the system physics, and expert-system reasoning,

  1. Developing Cohesive Leadership Means Addressing All Parts of the System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Troyce

    2010-01-01

    In her role with the School Administrators of Iowa leading Iowa's leadership grant from The Wallace Foundation, the author works with a coalition of individuals and groups striving to implement a cohesive leadership system for school leaders. Efforts to create a cohesive leadership system in Iowa for the past nine years have resulted in many…

  2. The Future of Systems Aeronomy in Addressing New Science Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Paxton, L. J.; Ridley, A.

    2005-12-01

    The future will see a new era in our ability to characterize the state of the sun-Earth system using the SEC Great Observatory, new electronic data handling and data mining technologies, high-performance sun-to-Earth models, new techniques for assimilation of sparse data, and the development of innovative worldwide research tools through integration of ground-based observing sites. The time has come to pull these developing capabilities together into an investigation that seeks to understand aeronomy at a higher level than has previously been possible. Systems Aeronomy is a study of this global system behavior but, more than that, it investigates the large-scale systems-level features that result from elemental processes, like ion-neutral coupling, plasma drifts or radiative cooling. Currently the TIMED mission is making important contributions in identifying and characterizing the "building block" processes that change, evolve and combine to form the system response. Systems Aeronomy must have observational, theoretical and computational components to succeed. One of the key requirements is the ability to capture global data sets and integrate them into a coherent picture of the ITM system and its relationship to geospace. Success requires enhanced coordination between operating satellites throughout the sun-Earth system, new techniques for creating global maps from networks of ground-based and satellite-based sensors, and a new level of international cooperation leveraging off IPY2007, IHY2007, eGY2007, CAWSES, ICESTAR, and other planned worldwide programs. Twenty years down the road, Systems Aeronomy will provide the foundation for understanding planetary atmospheres, significantly extend the range of useful space weather prediction, and provide an important approach for investigating the impacts of anthropogenic and climatological changes in the ITM and on the geospace system as a whole.

  3. NASA's Systems Engineering Approaches for Addressing Public Health Surveillance Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vann, Timi

    2003-01-01

    NASA's systems engineering has its heritage in space mission analysis and design, including the end-to-end approach to managing every facet of the extreme engineering required for successful space missions. NASA sensor technology, understanding of remote sensing, and knowledge of Earth system science, can be powerful new tools for improved disease surveillance and environmental public health tracking. NASA's systems engineering framework facilitates the match between facilitates the match between partner needs and decision support requirements in the areas of 1) Science/Data; 2) Technology; 3) Integration. Partnerships between NASA and other Federal agencies are diagrammed in this viewgraph presentation. NASA's role in these partnerships is to provide systemic and sustainable solutions that contribute to the measurable enhancement of a partner agency's disease surveillance efforts.

  4. Marine and Human Systems: Addressing Multiple Scales and Multiple Stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, E. E.; Bundy, A.; Chuenpagdee, R.; Maddison, L.; Svendsen, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research (IMBER) project aims to develop a comprehensive understanding of, and predictive capacity of ocean responses to accelerating global change and the consequent effects on the Earth System and human society. Understanding the changing ecology and biogeochemistry of marine ecosystems and their sensitivity and resilience to multiple drivers, pressures and stressors is critical to developing responses that will help reduce the vulnerability of marine-dependent human communities. The cumulative pressure of anthropogenic activities on marine systems is already apparent and is projected to increase in the next decades. Policy- and decision-makers need assessments of the status and trends of marine habitats, species, and ecosystems to promote sustainable human activities in the marine environment, particularly in light of global environmental change and changing social systems and human pressures. The IMBER community recently undertook a synthesis and evaluation of approaches for ecosystem-based marine governance, integrated modeling of marine social-ecological systems, and the social and ecological consequences of changing marine ecosystems. The outcomes of this activity provide assessments of current understanding, indicate approaches needed to predict the effects of multiple stressors, at multiple scales, on marine ecosystems and dependent human populations, and highlight approaches for developing innovative societal responses to changing marine ecosystems.

  5. An early status report on the Beacon Communities' plans for transformation via health information technology.

    PubMed

    McKethan, Aaron; Brammer, Craig; Fatemi, Parastou; Kim, Minyoung; Kirtane, Janhavi; Kunzman, Jason; Rao, Shaline; Jain, Sachin H

    2011-04-01

    The Beacon Community Program is part of a federal strategy for using health information technology as a foundation to improve the nation's health care system. In particular, Beacon Communities seek to increase the quality and efficiency of health care, improve the health of individuals and communities, and inform similar initiatives in other parts of the country. Each Beacon Community has set quality, efficiency, and health-related goals, and each is deploying multiple technology-enabled interventions to achieve them. Yet achieving large-scale and sustainable health care improvement also requires an implementation framework that can foster innovation and continuous learning from results. Based on the early experiences of the seventeen diverse Beacon Communities, this paper describes program design features that characterize how these initiatives are organized. PMID:21471501

  6. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    PubMed Central

    Seheult, J. N.; Pazderska, A.; Gaffney, P.; Fogarty, J.; Sherlock, M.; Gibney, J.; Boran, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose. PMID:26290664

  7. Workshop Builds Strategies to Address Global Positioning System Vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Genene

    2011-01-01

    When we examine the impacts of space weather on society, do we really understand the risks? Can past experiences reliably predict what will happen in the future? As the complexity of technology increases, there is the potential for it to become more fragile, allowing for a single point of failure to bring down the entire system. Take the Global Positioning System (GPS) as an example. GPS positioning, navigation, and timing have become an integral part of daily life, supporting transportation and communications systems vital to the aviation, merchant marine, cargo, cellular phone, surveying, and oil exploration industries. Everyday activities such as banking, mobile phone operations, and even the control of power grids are facilitated by the accurate timing provided by GPS. Understanding the risks of space weather to GPS and the many economic sectors reliant upon it, as well as how to build resilience, was the focus of a policy workshop organized by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and held on 13-14 October 2010 in Washington, D. C. The workshop brought together a select group of policy makers, space weather scientists, and GPS experts and users.

  8. Integrated wireless systems: The future has arrived (Keynote Address)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoir, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    It is believed that we are just at the beginning with wireless, and that a new age is dawning for this breakthrough technology. Thanks to several years of industrial manufacturing in mass-market applications such as cellular phones, wireless technology has nowadays reached a level of maturity that, combined with other achievements arising from different fields, such as information technology, artificial intelligence, pervasive computing, science of new materials, and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), will enable the realization of a networked stream-flow of real-time information, that will accompany us in our daily life, in a total seamless, transparent fashion. As almost any application scenario will require the deployment of complex, miniaturized, almost "invisible" systems, operating with different wireless standards, hard technological challenges will have to be faced for designing and fabricating ultra-low-cost, reconfigurable, and multi-mode heterogeneous smart micro-devices. But ongoing, unending progresses on wireless technology keeps the promise of helping to solve important societal problems in the health-care, safety, security, industry, environment sectors, and in general opening the possibility for an improved quality of life at work, on travel, at home, practically "everywhere, anytime".

  9. In vitro selection of molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Manjula; Ellington, Andrew D

    2003-10-01

    While molecular beacons are primarily known as biosensors for the detection of nucleic acids, it has proven possible to adapt other nucleic acid binding species (aptamers) to function in a manner similar to molecular beacons, yielding fluorescent signals only in the presence of a cognate ligand. Unfortunately, engineering aptamer beacons requires a detailed knowledge of aptamer sequence and structure. In order to develop a general method for the direct selection of aptamer beacons we have first developed a selection method for molecular beacons. A pool of random sequence DNA molecules were immobilized via a capture oligonucleotide on an affinity column, and those variants that could be released from the column by a target oligonucleotide were amplified. After nine rounds of selection and amplification the elution characteristics of the population were greatly improved. A fluorescent reporter in the selected beacons was located adjacent to a DABCYL moiety in the capture oligonucleotide; addition of the target oligonucleotide led to release of the capture oligonucleotide and up to a 17-fold increase in fluorescence. Signaling was specific for the target oligonucleotide, and occurred via a novel mechanism, relative to designed molecular beacons. When the target oligonucleotide is bound it can form a stacked helical junction with an intramolecular hairpin in the selected beacon; formation of the intramolecular hairpin in turn leads to release of the capture oligonucleotide. The ability to select molecular beacons may prove useful for identifying available sites on complex targets, such as mRNAs, while the method for selection can be easily generalized to other, non-nucleic acid target classes. PMID:14500834

  10. Data Governance and Data Sharing Agreements for Community-Wide Health Information Exchange: Lessons from the Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Claudia; Des Jardins, Terrisca R.; Heider, Arvela; Lyman, Kristin A.; McWilliams, Lee; Rein, Alison L.; Schachter, Abigail A.; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Topper, Joan; Turske, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Unprecedented efforts are underway across the United States to electronically capture and exchange health information to improve health care and population health, and reduce costs. This increased collection and sharing of electronic patient data raises several governance issues, including privacy, security, liability, and market competition. Those engaged in such efforts have had to develop data sharing agreements (DSAs) among entities involved in information exchange, many of whom are “nontraditional” health care entities and/or new partners. This paper shares lessons learned based on the experiences of six federally funded communities participating in the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program, and offers guidance for navigating data governance issues and developing DSAs to facilitate community-wide health information exchange. Innovation: While all entities involved in electronic data sharing must address governance issues and create DSAs accordingly, until recently little formal guidance existed for doing so – particularly for community-based initiatives. Despite this lack of guidance, together the Beacon Communities’ experiences highlight promising strategies for navigating complex governance issues, which may be useful to other entities or communities initiating information exchange efforts to support delivery system transformation. Credibility: For the past three years, AcademyHealth has provided technical assistance to most of the 17 Beacon Communities, 6 of whom contributed to this collaborative writing effort. Though these communities varied widely in terms of their demographics, resources, and Beacon-driven priorities, common themes emerged as they described their approaches to data governance and DSA development. Conclusions: The 6 Beacon Communities confirmed that DSAs are necessary to satisfy legal and market-based concerns, and they identified several specific issues, many of which have been noted by others involved in

  11. Addressing Human System Risks to Future Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.; Francisco, D. R.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is contemplating future human exploration missions to destinations beyond low Earth orbit, including the Moon, deep-space asteroids, and Mars. While we have learned much about protecting crew health and performance during orbital space flight over the past half-century, the challenges of these future missions far exceed those within our current experience base. To ensure success in these missions, we have developed a Human System Risk Board (HSRB) to identify, quantify, and develop mitigation plans for the extraordinary risks associated with each potential mission scenario. The HSRB comprises research, technology, and operations experts in medicine, physiology, psychology, human factors, radiation, toxicology, microbiology, pharmacology, and food sciences. Methods: Owing to the wide range of potential mission characteristics, we first identified the hazards to human health and performance common to all exploration missions: altered gravity, isolation/confinement, increased radiation, distance from Earth, and hostile/closed environment. Each hazard leads to a set of risks to crew health and/or performance. For example the radiation hazard leads to risks of acute radiation syndrome, central nervous system dysfunction, soft tissue degeneration, and carcinogenesis. Some of these risks (e.g., acute radiation syndrome) could affect crew health or performance during the mission, while others (e.g., carcinogenesis) would more likely affect the crewmember well after the mission ends. We next defined a set of design reference missions (DRM) that would span the range of exploration missions currently under consideration. In addition to standard (6-month) and long-duration (1-year) missions in low Earth orbit (LEO), these DRM include deep space sortie missions of 1 month duration, lunar orbital and landing missions of 1 year duration, deep space journey and asteroid landing missions of 1 year duration, and Mars orbital and landing missions of 3 years duration. We then

  12. A model for addressing navigation limitations and metacognitive constraints in hypermedia training systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Glenn B.

    1990-01-01

    A model for addressing navigation limitations and metacognitive constraints in hypermedia training systems is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: samples of software and people problems; system design; and hypermedia training system.

  13. Inside Beacon Hill: Bertrand Russell as Schoolmaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jespersen, Shirley

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the life and theories of Bertrand Russell, founder of Beacon Hill School. Russell's educational theories centered on the personal autonomy of the student and democratization of the learning process. (CH)

  14. PLACES Quick-look report for beacon and aircraft experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Lehman, J.; Elston, G.; Solbrig, W.

    1981-03-01

    During December 1980 the Position Location and Communication Effects Simulations (PLACES) Experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of structured ionospheric plasmas on satellite communications and navigation systems. A structured plasma environment was created by a 48 kgm barium release from a rocket launched from Eglin AFB, FL. Measurements of propagation effects on signals from the LES-8 satellite over the Pacific Ocean to a KC 135/662 aircraft operating in the Florida area were conducted (Aircraft Experiment) as well as measurements of the time-of-arrival spread of energy on a phase coded spread spectrum signal emanating from a rocket launched behind the barium cloud and received at specially constructed ground receiving sites in northern Florida (Beacon Experiment). This report presents a quick-look at the data measurements obtained from the aircraft and beacon experiments.

  15. Optical bidirectional beacon based visible light communications.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Samrat Vikramaditya; Sewaiwar, Atul; Chung, Yeon Ho

    2015-10-01

    In an indoor bidirectional visible light communications (VLC), a line-of-sight (LOS) transmission plays a major role in obtaining adequate performance of a VLC system. Signals are often obstructed in the LOS transmission path, causing an effect called optical shadowing. In the absence of LOS, the performance of the VLC system degrades significantly and, in particular, at uplink transmission this degradation becomes severe due to design constraints and limited power at uplink devices. In this paper, a novel concept and design of an optical bidirectional beacon (OBB) is presented as an efficient model to counter the performance degradation in a non-line-of-sight (NLOS) VLC system. OBB is an independent operating bidirectional transceiver unit installed on walls, composed of red, green, and blue (RGB) light emitting diodes (LEDs), photodetectors (PDs) and color filters. OBB improves the coverage area in the form of providing additional or alternate paths for transmission and enhances the performance of the VLC system in terms of bit error rate (BER). To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, simulations were carried out under optical shadowing conditions at various locations in an indoor environment. The simulation results and analysis show that the implementation of OBB improves the performance of the VLC system significantly, especially when the LOS bidirectional transmission paths are completely or partially obstructed. PMID:26480168

  16. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Process conditions favoring the production of hydrogen were explored this quarter. Excess steam was found to suppress methane formation, and reduction of catalyst methanation activity was demonstrated. The effect of carbon loading on the physical stability of catalyst C77-K2 and the effect of trace sulfur levels on the chemical stability of the catalyst were examined. The carbon loading tests did not show the catalyst breakup that was expected. Tests of chemical stability of the catalyst in the presence of sulfur-containing gases showed a decline in performance even at levels as low as 4 ppM. Experiments conducted using a Paraho-type oil shale retort offgas as a feedstock showed that acceptable performance could be obtained by removing carbon dioxide from the feedgas. Design of the tandem two reactor system is continuing, along with cold flow testing of the proposed solids transfer system. A simplified thermodynamic analysis of the BEACON process shows that BEACON's increased efficiency over competing processes results from more hot gas going to the turbine with less power required to compress the air for combustion. 16 figures, 13 tables.

  17. Beacon City: An Urban Land Use Simulation. Teacher's Guide. Preparing for Tomorrow's World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iozzi, Louis A.; And Others

    "Preparing for Tomorrow's World" (PTW) is an interdisciplinary, future-oriented program incorporating information from the sciences/social sciences and addressing societal concerns which interface science/technology/society. "Beacon City," one of a series of program modules, is an urban land use simulation. Land use planning techniques patterned…

  18. Leveraging Health IT to Reduce Disparities in Three Underserved Beacon Communities.

    PubMed

    Des Jardins, Terrisca; Drone, Shenetta A; Hashisaka, Susan; Hazzard, Jobyna; Hunt, Susan B; Massey, Kimberly; Rein, Alison; Schachter, Abigail; Turske, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Using health information technology (IT) can potentially address health disparities by increasing access to care, delivering higher-quality care, improving patient-provider communication, and enhancing patient safety. It describes challenges encountered by three underserved Beacon Communities that implemented health IT interventions, including inadequate connectivity infrastructure, technical support, expertise, and financial resources; provider shortages and staff turnover; and equipment theft. PMID:27180682

  19. The Beacon Project: Challenges, Solutions, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, R. Glenn

    2014-03-01

    With physical limitations imposing increasingly significant performance limitations on future generations of computing hardware, computer architects are turning to increased parallelism and specialized hardware to accelerate key applications and workloads. As a result, emerging high-performance computing (HPC) systems are much more heterogeneous than their predecessors, leading to both operational challenges and application challenges that must be overcome to effectively utilize the associated architectures. With support from the National Science Foundation, the Application Acceleration Center of Excellence (AACE) at the University of Tennessee is currently exploring the impact of the Intel® Xeon Phi™ coprocessor on computational science and engineering through the Beacon Project, an ongoing research project that encompasses the deployment and operation of an energy-efficient supercomputer and the coordination of an associated research program allowing project teams across the country to explore the applicability of the associated architecture to a variety of scientific codes and libraries. This talk presents an overview of encountered challenges along with associated solutions, highlights some of the current results of the application project teams, and summarizes many of the lessons learned through the Beacon Project to date. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1137097 and by the University of Tennessee through the Beacon Project.

  20. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  1. Chemical imaging sensor and laser beacon.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H

    2003-05-20

    Design and functional aspects of PANSPEC, a panoramic-imaging chemical vapor sensor (PANSPEC is an abbreviation for infrared panoramic-viewing spectroradiometer), were advanced and its optical system reoptimized accordingly. The PANSPEC model unites camera and fused solid-state interferometer and photopolarimeter subsystems. The camera is an eye of the open atmosphere that collects, collimates, and images ambient infrared radiance from a panoramic field of view (FOV). The passive interferometer rapidly measures an infrared-absorbing (or infrared-emitting) chemical cloud traversing the FOV by means of molecular vibrational spectroscopy. The active photopolarimeter system provides a laser beam beacon. This beam carries identification (feature spectra measured by the interferometer) and heading (detector pixels disclosing these feature spectra) information on the hazardous cloud through a binary encryption of Mueller matrix elements. Interferometer and photopolarimeter share a common configuration of photoelastic modulation optics. PANSPEC was optimized for minimum aberrations and maximum resolution of image. The optimized design was evaluated for tolerances in the shaping and mounting of the optical system, stray light, and ghost images at the focal plane given a modulation transfer function metric. PMID:12777015

  2. A Digitally Addressable Random-Access Image Selector and Random-Access Audio System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitzer, Donald L.; And Others

    The requirements of PLATO IV, a computer based education system at the University of Illinois, have led to the development of an improved, digitally addressable, random access image selector and a digitally addressable, random access audio device. Both devices utilize pneumatically controlled mechanical binary adders to position the mecahnical…

  3. BEACON/MOD: a computer program for thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor containments - user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Broadus, C.R.; Doyle, R.J.; James, S.W.; Lime, J.F.; Mings, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    The BEACON code is a best-estimate, advanced containment code designed to perform a best-estimate analysis of the flow of a mixture of air, water, and steam in a nuclear reactor containment system under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The code can simulate two-component, two-phase fluid flow in complex geometries using a combination of two-dimensional, one-dimensional, and lumped-parameter representations for the various parts of the system. The current version of BEACON, which is designated BEACON/MOD3, contains mass and heat transfer models for wall film and wall conduction. It is suitable for the evaluation of short-term transients in dry-containment systems. This manual describes the models employed in BEACON/MOD3 and specifies code implementation requirements. It provides application information for input data preparation and for output data interpretation.

  4. The dependence of the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam on the beacon distribution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1992-02-07

    There are several applications for lasers where the effect of atmospheric turbulence is strong enough to require wavefront compensation, and the compensation can be made by an adaptive optics (AO) system which processes light returned from the target itself. The distribution of the target return light produces limitations to the performance of the AO system. The primary intent of this documentation is to present the new results of an analysis of the anisoplanatic effects arising from target return beacon geometries. It will also lay out the assumptions and steps in the analysis, so that the results can be validated or extended. The intent is to provide a self-consistent notation, simple physical interpretations of the mathematical formulations, and enough detail to reduce the investment of time required to become acquainted or reacquainted with the physics of laser propagation through turbulence, at a level needed to analyze anisoplanatic effects. A general formulation has been developed to calculate the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam for any beacon distribution and turbulence profile. Numerical calculations are also shown for several beacon geometries and turbulence profiles. The key result is that the spread of the beacon distribution has a much less deleterious effect than does the offset of the beacon centroid from the aimpoint.

  5. The dependence of the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam on the beacon distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1992-02-07

    There are several applications for lasers where the effect of atmospheric turbulence is strong enough to require wavefront compensation, and the compensation can be made by an adaptive optics (AO) system which processes light returned from the target itself. The distribution of the target return light produces limitations to the performance of the AO system. The primary intent of this documentation is to present the new results of an analysis of the anisoplanatic effects arising from target return beacon geometries. It will also lay out the assumptions and steps in the analysis, so that the results can be validated or extended. The intent is to provide a self-consistent notation, simple physical interpretations of the mathematical formulations, and enough detail to reduce the investment of time required to become acquainted or reacquainted with the physics of laser propagation through turbulence, at a level needed to analyze anisoplanatic effects. A general formulation has been developed to calculate the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam for any beacon distribution and turbulence profile. Numerical calculations are also shown for several beacon geometries and turbulence profiles. The key result is that the spread of the beacon distribution has a much less deleterious effect than does the offset of the beacon centroid from the aimpoint.

  6. The Los Alamos beacon receiver array

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Massey, R.S. )

    1994-07-01

    The authors are interested in studying both the natural background of acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves, for which the sources are not generally known, as well as waves produced by known sources such as large explosions and launches of large rockets. The authors describe radio receivers that monitor transmissions from beacons on geosynchronous satellites. The receivers can detect perturbations of a 300--3,000 s period in the electron density integrated from beacon to receiver, for amplitudes as low as (1--2) [times] 10[sup 13] m[sup [minus]2]. Data are used in studies of atmospheric acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves.

  7. Increasing the sensitivity and single-base mismatch selectivity of the molecular beacon using graphene oxide as the "nanoquencher".

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Hua; Li, Juan; Liu, Jing-Jing; Yang, Huang-Hao; Chen, Xi; Chen, Guo-Nan

    2010-04-26

    Here, we report a novel, highly sensitive, selective and economical molecular beacon using graphene oxide as the "nanoquencher". This novel molecular beacon system contains a hairpin-structured fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide and a graphene oxide sheet. The strong interaction between hairpin-structured oligonucleotide and graphene oxide keep them in close proximity, facilitating the fluorescence quenching of the fluorophore by graphene oxide. In the presence of a complementary target DNA, the binding between hairpin-structured oligonucleotide and target DNA will disturb the interaction between hairpin-structured oligonucleotide and graphene oxide, and release the oligonucleotide from graphene oxide, resulting in restoration of fluorophore fluorescence. In the present study, we show that this novel graphene oxide quenched molecular beacon can be used to detect target DNA with higher sensitivity and single-base mismatch selectivity compared to the conventional molecular beacon. PMID:20301144

  8. Addressing two-level systems variably coupled to an oscillating field.

    PubMed

    Navon, Nir; Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Almog, Ido; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-08-16

    We propose a simple method to spectrally resolve an array of identical two-level systems coupled to an inhomogeneous oscillating field. The addressing protocol uses a dressing field with a spatially dependent coupling to the atoms. We validate this scheme experimentally by realizing single-spin addressing of a linear chain of trapped ions that are separated by ~3 μm, dressed by a laser field that is resonant with the micromotion sideband of a narrow optical transition. PMID:23992060

  9. Addressing Two-Level Systems Variably Coupled to an Oscillating Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navon, Nir; Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Almog, Ido; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-08-01

    We propose a simple method to spectrally resolve an array of identical two-level systems coupled to an inhomogeneous oscillating field. The addressing protocol uses a dressing field with a spatially dependent coupling to the atoms. We validate this scheme experimentally by realizing single-spin addressing of a linear chain of trapped ions that are separated by ˜3μm, dressed by a laser field that is resonant with the micromotion sideband of a narrow optical transition.

  10. Evaluation of Skylab earth laser beacon imagery. [spaceborne photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piech, K. R.; Schott, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    During the Skylab 3 and 4 missions the Skylab spacecraft was illuminated by a low power argon ion and dye laser. The earth laser beacon was studied visually by the astronauts. In addition, they collected 35 mm hand-held color photographs of the beacons. Photographs are shown that were obtained on Skylab 3 and Skylab 4. The imagery collected during the Skylab mission was analyzed to evaluate the utility of beacon lasers as terrestial 'artificial stars' for space navigation. The analyses of the imagery revealed two unusual features of the earth laser beacon: (1) The beacon, even though of a low power (approximately 1 watt), is considerably brighter than any other terrain feature and is readily visible on imagery at a distance in excess of 1500 km (900 miles). (2) Another feature of the beacon is its large size. The typical beacon extends over about 5 resolution areas with a characteristic dimension of about 200 m.

  11. Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Public Address System Review Findings

    SciTech Connect

    HUMPHRYS, K.L.

    1999-11-03

    Public address system operation at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility was reviewed. The review was based on an Operational Readiness Review finding that public address performance was not adequate in parts of the WRAP facility. Several improvements were made to the WRAP Public Address (PA) system to correct the deficiencies noted. Speaker gain and position was optimized. A speech processor was installed to boost intelligibility in high noise areas. Additional speakers were added to improve coverage in the work areas. The results of this evaluation indicate that further PA system enhancements are not warranted. Additional speakers cannot compensate for the high background sound and high reverberation levels found in the work areas. Recommendations to improve PA system intelligibility include minor speaker adjustments, enhanced PA announcement techniques, and the use of sound reduction and abatement techniques where economically feasible.

  12. Power sources for search and rescue 406 MHz beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Alan I.; Perrone, David E.

    The results of a study directed at the selection of a commercially available, safe, low cost, light weight and long storage life battery for search and rescue (Sarsat) 406 MHz emergency beacons are presented. In the course of this work, five electrochemical systems (lithium-manganese dioxide, lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-silver vanadium oxide, alkaline cells, and cadmium-mercuric oxide) were selected for limited experimental studies to determine their suitability for this application. Two safe, commercially available batteries (lithium-manganese dioxide and lithium-carbon monofluoride) which meet the near term requirements and several alternatives for the long term were identified.

  13. Simple, inexpensive optical beacon for use on small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayhurst, T. L.; Osibov, M. N.; Russell, R. W.; Maulfair, R. J.; Fleeter, R.

    1991-02-01

    A standard photography flash unit modified for automatic repetitive flashing and presetable pulse duration was tested for its utility as an aid for optically acquiring a target in low earth orbit. The relative visibility of the flash with respect to repetition rate and pulse duration was measured with two types of low-light-level TV camera systems over a range of effective distances. Optimal operating parameters for the flash were determined for its application as an optical beacon on the small satellites used in the Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiments, part of the Infrared Backgrounds and Signatures Survey (IBSS) Space Shuttle mission.

  14. Power sources for search and rescue 406 MHz beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attia, Alan I.; Perrone, David E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study directed at the selection of a commercially available, safe, low cost, light weight and long storage life battery for search and rescue (Sarsat) 406 MHz emergency beacons are presented. In the course of this work, five electrochemical systems (lithium-manganese dioxide, lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-silver vanadium oxide, alkaline cells, and cadmium-mercuric oxide) were selected for limited experimental studies to determine their suitability for this application. Two safe, commercially available batteries (lithium-manganese dioxide and lithium-carbon monofluoride) which meet the near term requirements and several alternatives for the long term were identified.

  15. Beacon Spacecraft Operations: Lessons in Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, R.; Schlutsmeyer, A.; Sue, M.; Szijjarto, J.; Wyatt, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to mission operations has been flight validated on NASA's Deep Space One (DS1) mission that launched in October 1998. The beacon monitor operations technology is aimed at decreasing the total volume of downlinked engineering telemetry by reducing the frequency of downlink and the volume of data received per pass.

  16. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  17. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility.

    PubMed

    Bullough, John D; Rea, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  18. Distribution of beacon immunoreactivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Tian, De-Run; Tian, Nan; Chen, Hui; Shi, Yu-Shun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Lan; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Beacon is a novel peptide isolated from the hypothalamus of Israeli sand rat. In the present study, we determined the distribution of beacon in the rat brain using immunohistochemical approach with a polyclonal antiserum directed against the synthetic C-terminal peptide fragment (47-73). The hypothalamus represented the major site of beacon-immunoreactive (IR) cell bodies that were concentrated in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Additional immunostained cells were found in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, subfornical organ and subcommissural organ. Beacon-IR fibers were seen with high density in the internal layer of the median eminence and low to moderate density in the external layer. Significant beacon-IR fibers were also seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and lateral reticular formation. The beacon neurons found in the PVN were further characterized by double label immunohistochemistry. Several beacon-IR neurons that resided in the medial PVN were shown to coexpress corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and most labeled beacon fibers in the external layer of median eminence coexist with CRH. The topographical distribution of beacon-IR in the brain suggests multiple biological activities for beacon in addition to its proposed roles in modulating feeding behaviors and pituitary hormone release. PMID:16157417

  19. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, R.Q.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory`s Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 {mu}m, the author has achieved Strehl ratios of {approximately}0.50 using laser beacons and {approximately}0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of {approximately}8{sup th} magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  20. How California's Postsecondary Education Systems Address Workforce Development. Commission Report 07-21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report on the nexus between postsecondary education and workforce development discusses the question of how California's colleges and universities address the state's need for a highly educated and skilled workforce. It includes a detailed review of the systems and their roles, and considers issues regarding how those roles are being carried…

  1. Classrooms for Children with Developmental Disabilities: Sound-Field and Public Address Amplification Systems Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Stanley W. H.; McPherson, Bradley

    2006-01-01

    Background noise poses adverse effects on speech sounds and affects student learning, especially for children with developmental disabilities. Sound-field and public address amplification systems can help to solve this problem by amplifying speech sounds relative to background noise. This study surveyed school classrooms for children with special…

  2. Localization with a mobile beacon in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Kiseon

    2012-01-01

    Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB). The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node's location and then the node's location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals. PMID:22778597

  3. Privacy Risks from Genomic Data-Sharing Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash S.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2015-01-01

    The human genetics community needs robust protocols that enable secure sharing of genomic data from participants in genetic research. Beacons are web servers that answer allele-presence queries—such as “Do you have a genome that has a specific nucleotide (e.g., A) at a specific genomic position (e.g., position 11,272 on chromosome 1)?”—with either “yes” or “no.” Here, we show that individuals in a beacon are susceptible to re-identification even if the only data shared include presence or absence information about alleles in a beacon. Specifically, we propose a likelihood-ratio test of whether a given individual is present in a given genetic beacon. Our test is not dependent on allele frequencies and is the most powerful test for a specified false-positive rate. Through simulations, we showed that in a beacon with 1,000 individuals, re-identification is possible with just 5,000 queries. Relatives can also be identified in the beacon. Re-identification is possible even in the presence of sequencing errors and variant-calling differences. In a beacon constructed with 65 European individuals from the 1000 Genomes Project, we demonstrated that it is possible to detect membership in the beacon with just 250 SNPs. With just 1,000 SNP queries, we were able to detect the presence of an individual genome from the Personal Genome Project in an existing beacon. Our results show that beacons can disclose membership and implied phenotypic information about participants and do not protect privacy a priori. We discuss risk mitigation through policies and standards such as not allowing anonymous pings of genetic beacons and requiring minimum beacon sizes. PMID:26522470

  4. Development of a Universal RNA Beacon for Exogenous Gene Detection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanjian; Lu, Zhongju; Cohen, Ira Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy requires a nontoxic and high-throughput method to achieve a pure cell population to prevent teratomas that can occur if even one cell in the implant has not been transformed. A promising method to detect and separate cells expressing a particular gene is RNA beacon technology. However, developing a successful, specific beacon to a particular transfected gene can take months to develop and in some cases is impossible. Here, we report on an off-the-shelf universal beacon that decreases the time and cost of applying beacon technology to select any living cell population transfected with an exogenous gene. PMID:25769653

  5. Standard and AEGIS nicking molecular beacons detect amplicons from the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Yaren, Ozlem; Glushakova, Lyudmyla G; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Benner, Steven A

    2016-10-01

    This paper combines two advances to detect MERS-CoV, the causative agent of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, that have emerged over the past few years from the new field of "synthetic biology". Both are based on an older concept, where molecular beacons are used as the downstream detection of viral RNA in biological mixtures followed by reverse transcription PCR amplification. The first advance exploits the artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS). AEGIS adds nucleotides to the four found in standard DNA and RNA (xNA); AEGIS nucleotides pair orthogonally to the A:T and G:C pairs. Placing AEGIS components in the stems of molecular beacons is shown to lower noise by preventing unwanted stem invasion by adventitious natural xNA. This should improve the signal-to-noise ratio of molecular beacons operating in complex biological mixtures. The second advance introduces a nicking enzyme that allows a single target molecule to activate more than one beacon, allowing "signal amplification". Combining these technologies in primers with components of a self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS), we detect 50 copies of MERS-CoV RNA in a multiplexed respiratory virus panel by generating fluorescence signal visible to human eye and/or camera. PMID:27421627

  6. MEMS-based beam steering system for individual addressing of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Knoernschild, Caleb; Mount, Emily; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Gaultney, Daniel; van Rynbach, Andre; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2011-05-01

    One of the important components to implement large-scale trapped ion quantum information processing is a scalable technology to manipulate individual ions in a long linear chain of ions. So far, individual addressing has been demonstrated by steering a focused laser beam on individual ions with acousto-optic and electro-optic deflectors, by utilizing the Zeeman shift due to a magnetic field gradient, and by separating a single ion from the rest of the chain for individual exposure to laser light. Micro-mirrors based on microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology can be used to design an alternative beam steering system which can handle multiple beams with different wavelengths and address locations in multiple dimensions. We will report our progress in integrating a MEMS beam steering system with an Yb ion trap experiment. Our MEMS system is designed to steer an ultraviolet beam with a waist of ~1.5 μm across a 20 μm range. To demonstrate the individual addressing capability, we plan to measure the Ramsey interference of the differential AC Stark shift induced by an individually-focused, far-detuned laser beam.

  7. Low cost high efficiency GaAs monolithic RF module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, W. C.; Siu, D. P.; Cook, H. F.

    1991-12-01

    Low cost high performance (5 Watts output) 406 MHz beacons are urgently needed to realize the maximum utilization of the Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system spearheaded in the U.S. by NASA. Although current technology can produce beacons meeting the output power requirement, power consumption is high due to the low efficiency of available transmitters. Field performance is currently unsatisfactory due to the lack of safe and reliable high density batteries capable of operation at -40 C. Low cost production is also a crucial but elusive requirement for the ultimate wide scale utilization of this system. Microwave Monolithics Incorporated (MMInc.) has proposed to make both the technical and cost goals for the SARSAT beacon attainable by developing a monolithic GaAs chip set for the RF module. This chip set consists of a high efficiency power amplifier and a bi-phase modulator. In addition to implementing the RF module in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) form to minimize ultimate production costs, the power amplifier has a power-added efficiency nearly twice that attained with current commercial technology. A distress beacon built using this RF module chip set will be significantly smaller in size and lighter in weight due to a smaller battery requirement, since the 406 MHz signal source and the digital controller have far lower power consumption compared to the 5 watt power amplifier. All the program tasks have been successfully completed. The GaAs MMIC RF module chip set has been designed to be compatible with the present 406 MHz signal source and digital controller. A complete high performance low cost SARSAT beacon can be realized with only additional minor iteration and systems integration.

  8. Low cost high efficiency GaAs monolithic RF module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, W. C.; Siu, D. P.; Cook, H. F.

    1991-01-01

    Low cost high performance (5 Watts output) 406 MHz beacons are urgently needed to realize the maximum utilization of the Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system spearheaded in the U.S. by NASA. Although current technology can produce beacons meeting the output power requirement, power consumption is high due to the low efficiency of available transmitters. Field performance is currently unsatisfactory due to the lack of safe and reliable high density batteries capable of operation at -40 C. Low cost production is also a crucial but elusive requirement for the ultimate wide scale utilization of this system. Microwave Monolithics Incorporated (MMInc.) has proposed to make both the technical and cost goals for the SARSAT beacon attainable by developing a monolithic GaAs chip set for the RF module. This chip set consists of a high efficiency power amplifier and a bi-phase modulator. In addition to implementing the RF module in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) form to minimize ultimate production costs, the power amplifier has a power-added efficiency nearly twice that attained with current commercial technology. A distress beacon built using this RF module chip set will be significantly smaller in size and lighter in weight due to a smaller battery requirement, since the 406 MHz signal source and the digital controller have far lower power consumption compared to the 5 watt power amplifier. All the program tasks have been successfully completed. The GaAs MMIC RF module chip set has been designed to be compatible with the present 406 MHz signal source and digital controller. A complete high performance low cost SARSAT beacon can be realized with only additional minor iteration and systems integration.

  9. Continental-Scale Stable Isotope Measurements at NEON to Address Ecological Processes Across Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Goodman, K. J.; Hinckley, E. S.; West, J. B.; Williams, D. G.; Bowen, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a national-scale research platform. The overarching goal of NEON is to enable understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology (such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, ecohydrology, etc.). NEON focuses explicitly on questions that relate to grand challenges in environmental science, are relevant to large regions, and would otherwise be very difficult to address with traditional ecological approaches. The use of stable isotope approaches in ecological research has grown steadily during the last two decades. Stable isotopes at natural abundances in the environment trace and integrate the interaction between abiotic and biotic components across temporal and spatial scales. In this poster, we will present the NEON data products that incorporate stable isotope measurements in atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic ecosystems in North America. We further outline current questions in the natural sciences community and how these data products can be used to address continental-scale ecological questions, such as the ecological impacts of climate change, terrestrial-aquatic system linkages, land-atmosphere exchange, landscape ecohydrological processes, and linking biogeochemical cycles across systems. Specifically, we focus on the use of stable isotopes to evaluate water availability and residence times in terrestrial systems, as well as nutrient sources to terrestrial systems, and cycling across ecosystem boundaries.

  10. Collaborating To Help High-Risk Students Succeed. Beacon Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemeketa Community Coll., Salem, OR.

    The goal of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges' Beacon Colleges Initiative is to disseminate information about exemplary collaborative programs and services. In Oregon, Chemeketa Community College is the Beacon College which has been working in association with five other community colleges in the state to build community…

  11. Enzymatic signal amplification of molecular beacons for sensitive DNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianwei Jeffery; Chu, Yizhuo; Lee, Benjamin Yi-Hung; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2008-01-01

    Molecular beacons represent a new family of fluorescent probes for nucleic acids, and have found broad applications in recent years due to their unique advantages over traditional probes. Detection of nucleic acids using molecular beacons has been based on hybridization between target molecules and molecular beacons in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio. The stoichiometric hybridization, however, puts an intrinsic limitation on detection sensitivity, because one target molecule converts only one beacon molecule to its fluorescent form. To increase the detection sensitivity, a conventional strategy has been target amplification through polymerase chain reaction. Instead of target amplification, here we introduce a scheme of signal amplification, nicking enzyme signal amplification, to increase the detection sensitivity of molecular beacons. The mechanism of the signal amplification lies in target-dependent cleavage of molecular beacons by a DNA nicking enzyme, through which one target DNA can open many beacon molecules, giving rise to amplification of fluorescent signal. Our results indicate that one target DNA leads to cleavage of hundreds of beacon molecules, increasing detection sensitivity by nearly three orders of magnitude. We designed two versions of signal amplification. The basic version, though simple, requires that nicking enzyme recognition sequence be present in the target DNA. The extended version allows detection of target of any sequence by incorporating rolling circle amplification. Moreover, the extended version provides one additional level of signal amplification, bringing the detection limit down to tens of femtomolar, nearly five orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional hybridization assay. PMID:18304948

  12. A search for optical beacons: implications of null results.

    PubMed

    Blair, David G; Zadnik, Marjan G

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years a series of searches for interstellar radio beacons have taken place using the Parkes radio telescope. Here we report hitherto unpublished results from a search for optical beacons from 60 solar-type stars using the Perth-Lowell telescope. We discuss the significance of the null results from these searches, all of which were based on the interstellar contact channel hypothesis. While the null results of all searches to date can be explained simply by the nonexistence of electromagnetically communicating life elsewhere in the Milky Way, four other possible explanations that do not preclude its existence are proposed: (1) Extraterrestrial civilizations desiring to make contact through the use of electromagnetic beacons have a very low density in the Milky Way. (2) The interstellar contact channel hypothesis is incorrect, and beacons exist at frequencies that have not yet been searched. (3) The search has been incomplete in terms of sensitivity and/or target directions: Beacons exist, but more sensitive equipment and/or more searching is needed to achieve success. (4) The search has occurred before beacon signals can be expected to have arrived at the Earth, and beacon signals may be expected in the future. Based on consideration of the technology required for extraterrestrial civilizations to identify target planets, we argue that the fourth possibility is likely to be valid and that powerful, easily detectable beacons could be received in coming centuries. PMID:12530240

  13. Beacons In Brief. P/PV In Brief. Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Susan; Farley, Chelsea

    2004-01-01

    This second issue in P/PV's "In Brief" series focuses on the San Francisco Beacon Initiative and P/PV's recently released evaluation results. The Beacon Initiative established after-school programs in eight public schools in low-income San Francisco neighborhoods. P/PV's 36-month evaluation examined key developmental and academic outcomes.…

  14. Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Phase I Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Brown, Prudence; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    This report presents findings from Phase 1 of an evaluation of the New York City Beacons initiative, a school-community-family partnership model initiated in 1991. Beacons are community centers within public schools that offer activities and services to people of all ages before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Research included…

  15. 54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET (LEFT) AND ASSOCIATED GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS (RIGHT). ELAPSED TIME COUNTER SITS ATOP AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. The LED Beacon prototype system for the on-shore time calibration of the KM3NeT-IT Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, Giulia; Ameli, Fabrizio; Nicolau, Carlo A.; Simeone, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The first implementation of the KM3NeT-IT neutrino telescope consists in the installation of 24 Strings and 8 Towers. Focusing on the Towers, the idea behind this work is to exploit the LED sources mounted in the OMs to develop a complementary system, on shore and before the deployment, for the determination of time delays, aiming at the characterizations of the time response of the different elements of the detector. During the assembling of the first tower, a set of measurements has been carried out; the test set-up and the measurement procedure are described, together with preliminary results of the calibration system. Lesson learnt is quite encouraging: uncertainties of the order of 400 ps are reached with very few cautions taken during the short calibration session, and with large room for improvement, making this system feasible and effective for the KM3NeT-IT experiment.

  17. First Results for the TBB/CERTO Beacon Experiment on FORMOSAT- 3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Garner, T. W.; Gaussiran, T. L.; Secan, J.; Smith, F.; Groves, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) instrument is a Tri-Band Beacon (TBB) that radiates unmodulated radio frequency carriers at 150.012, 400.032, and 1066.752 MHz. As part of the FORMOSAT-3 program, the six Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) satellites were launched in April 2006 with the TBB instrument along with a GPS occultation receiver (GOX) and a Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP). Each of these instruments is capable of measuring integrated plasma density parameters for the F-region. The COSMIC satellites were initially deployed into 520 km orbits with 72 degrees inclination all in the same orbit plane. Each satellite will be boosted up to 800 km altitude with month-long time delays to allow separation of the orbits into six planes. Ground based receivers in Alaska, Virginia, Peru, and Kwajalein have recorded the radio beacon signals from the COSMIC CERTO beacons to determine the signal and antenna pattern specifications and to provide preliminary measurements of ionosphere TEC and radio scintillations. Because of power limitations and radio interference, TBB/CERTO frequency operations must be scheduled for passes over ground receivers. The ionospheric radio beacon data has been primarily obtained using the VHF and UHF CERTO frequencies. These data are complementary to ground based incoherent scatter radar (ISR) and ionosonde measurements as well as the GOX and TIP sensors on the satellites. Both tomography and inverse diffraction algorithms have been used to convert the radio beacon measurements into estimates of ionospheric electron density structures.

  18. Double-hairpin molecular-beacon-based amplification detection for gene diagnosis linked to cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rongbo; Li, Feng; Zhou, Yingying; Peng, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Shen, Zhifa

    2016-09-01

    A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related KRAS gene detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. During target DNA detection, DHMB can execute signal transduction even if no any exogenous element is involved. Unlike the conventional molecular beacon based on the one-to-one interaction, one target DNA not only hybridizes with one DHMB and opens its hairpin but also promotes the interaction between two DHMBs, causing the separation of two fluorophores from quenchers. This leads to an enhanced fluorescence signal. As a result, the target KRAS gene is able to be detected within a wide dynamic range from 0.05 to 200 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. Moreover, the point mutations existing in target DNAs can be easily screened. The potential application for target species in real samples was indicated by the analysis of PCR amplicons of DNAs from the DNA extracted from SW620 cell. Besides becoming a promising candidate probe for molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis of genetic diseases, the DHMB is expected to provide a significant insight into the design of DNA probe-based homogenous sensing systems. Graphical Abstract A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related gene KRAS detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. Without the help of any exogenous probe, the point mutation is easily screened, and the target DNA can be quantified down to 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. PMID:27422649

  19. Practices Changes in the Child Protection System to Address the Needs of Parents With Cognitive Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Sandra T.; Maggi, Mirella C.; Proctor, Stephon Nathanial

    2016-01-01

    Parents with cognitive disabilities (PCD) are over-represented in the child protection system. However, the current state of the child protection system is not well prepared for working with them. Biases that exist against their parenting, the need for accommodations in assessment and intervention practices, and specific training in staff and cross systems barriers need to be addressed. This paper argues for changes that will ensure such parents are more effectively served and that child protection staff and contract providers are better equipped to work with them. Specific changes are discussed in assessment and intervention practices. These changes will require human capacity building and organizational restructuring. Although empirically based behavioral approaches with PCD will be emphasized, recent empirical work suggests that social information processing and neurocognitive problems occur in PCD. Approaches to working with such problems are emerging and must also be considered and integrated into a blueprint for change.

  20. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system. PMID:23487896

  1. Identification of manganese as a toxicant in a groundwater treatment system: Addressing naturally occurring toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfellow, W. Jr.; Sohn, V.; Richey, M.; Yost, J.

    1995-12-31

    Effluent from a groundwater remediation system at a bulk oil storage and distribution terminal has been chronically toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The remediation system was designed in response to a hydrocarbon plume in the area of the terminal. The remediation system consists of a series of groundwater recovery wells and groundwater intercept trench systems with groundwater treatment and phased-separated hydrocarbon recovery systems. The groundwater treatment and petroleum recovery systems consist of oil/water separators, product recovery tanks, air strippers, filters, and carbon adsorption units. The characteristics of this effluent are low total suspended solids, total dissolved solids, and hardness concentrations as well as meeting stringent NPDES permit requirements for lead, copper, zinc, mercury, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and BTEX. Additional priority pollutant evaluations revealed no compounds of concern. Performance of a Toxicity identification Evaluation (TIE) indicated that manganese was the principle toxicant in the effluent. Manganese is a naturally occurring constituent in this groundwater source and is not added to the treatment system. This paper will present the results of the TIE with a discussion of treatability/control options for manganese control at this facility. Recommendations for addressing naturally occurring toxicants that are not a result of the facility`s operations will also be presented.

  2. An OR logic gate based on two molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Yang, Renqiang

    2012-03-01

    Design of elementary molecular logic gates is the key and the fundamental of performing complicated Boolean calculations. Herein, we report a strategy for constructing a DNA-based OR gate by using the mechanism of sequence recognition and the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this system, the gate is entirely composed of a single strand of DNA (A, B and C) and the inputs are the molecular beacon probes (MB1 and MB2). Changes in fluorescence intensity confirm the realization of the OR logic operation and electrophoresis experiments verify these results. Our successful application of DNA to perform the binary operation represents that DNA can serve as an efficient biomaterial for designing molecular logic gates and devices. PMID:22278176

  3. BEACON: An application of nodal methods for operational support

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, W.A.; Nguyen, T.Q. )

    1992-01-01

    A practical application of nodal methods is on-line plant operational support. However, to enable plant personnel to take full advantage of a nodal model to support plant operations, (a) a core nodal model must always be up to date with the current core history and conditions, (b) the nodal methods must be fast enough to allow numerous core calculations to be performed in minutes to support engineering decisions, and (c) the system must be easily accessible to engineering personnel at the reactor, their offices, or any other location considered appropriate. A core operational support package developed by Westinghouse called BEACON (best estimate analysis of core operations - nuclear) has been installed at several plants. Results from these plants and numerous in-core flux maps analyzed have demonstrated the accuracy of the model and the effectiveness of the methodology

  4. An approach to addressing governance from a health system framework perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    As countries strive to strengthen their health systems in resource constrained contexts, policy makers need to know how best to improve the performance of their health systems. To aid these decisions, health system stewards should have a good understanding of how health systems operate in order to govern them appropriately. While a number of frameworks for assessing governance in the health sector have been proposed, their application is often hindered by unrealistic indicators or they are overly complex resulting in limited empirical work on governance in health systems. This paper reviews contemporary health sector frameworks which have focused on defining and developing indicators to assess governance in the health sector. Based on these, we propose a simplified approach to look at governance within a common health system framework which encourages stewards to take a systematic perspective when assessing governance. Although systems thinking is not unique to health, examples of its application within health systems has been limited. We also provide an example of how this approach could be applied to illuminate areas of governance weaknesses which are potentially addressable by targeted interventions and policies. This approach is built largely on prior literature, but is original in that it is problem-driven and promotes an outward application taking into consideration the major health system building blocks at various levels in order to ensure a more complete assessment of a governance issue rather than a simple input-output approach. Based on an assessment of contemporary literature we propose a practical approach which we believe will facilitate a more comprehensive assessment of governance in health systems leading to the development of governance interventions to strengthen system performance and improve health as a basic human right. PMID:22136318

  5. Nuclear decontamination technology evaluation to address contamination of a municipal water system

    SciTech Connect

    McFee, J.; Langsted, J.; Young, M.; Porcon, J.; Day, E.

    2007-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) are considering the impact and recovery from contamination of municipal water systems, including intentional contamination of those systems. Industrial chemicals, biological agents, drugs, pesticides, chemical warfare agents, and radionuclides all could be introduced into a municipal water system to create detrimental health effects and disrupt a community. Although unintentional, the 1993 cryptosporidium contamination of the Milwaukee WS water system resulted in 100 fatalities and disrupted the city for weeks. Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure Inc, (Shaw), as a subcontractor on a DHS contract with Michael Baker Jr., Inc., was responsible for evaluation of the impact and recovery from radionuclide contamination in a municipal water system distribution system. Shaw was tasked to develop a matrix of nuclear industry decontamination technologies and evaluate applicability to municipal water systems. Shaw expanded the evaluation to include decontamination methods commonly used in the drinking water supply. The matrix compared all technologies for implementability, effectiveness, and cost. To address the very broad range of contaminants and contamination scenarios, Shaw bounded the problem by identification of specific contaminant release scenario(s) for specific water system architecture(s). A decontamination technology matrix was developed containing fifty-nine decontamination technologies potentially applicable to the water distribution system piping, pumps, tanks, associated equipment, and/or contaminated water. Qualitatively, the majority of the nuclear industry decontamination technologies were eliminated from consideration due to implementability concerns. However, inclusion of the municipal water system technologies supported recommendations that combined the most effective approaches in both industries. (authors)

  6. An Elegant Biosensor Molecular Beacon Probe: Challenges and Recent Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular beacon (MB) probes are fluorophore- and quencher-labeled short synthetic DNAs folded in a stem-loop shape. Since the first report by Tyagi and Kramer, it has become a widely accepted tool for nucleic acid analysis and triggered a cascade of related developments in the field of molecular sensing. The unprecedented success of MB probes stems from their ability to detect specific DNA or RNA sequences immediately after hybridization with no need to wash out the unbound probe (instantaneous format). Importantly, the hairpin structure of the probe is responsible for both the low fluorescent background and improved selectivity. Furthermore, the signal is generated in a reversible manner; thus, if the analyte is removed, the signal is reduced to the background. This paper highlights the advantages of MB probes and discusses the approaches that address the challenges in MB probe design. Variations of MB-based assays tackle the problem of stem invasion, improve SNP genotyping and signal-to-noise ratio, as well as address the challenges of detecting folded RNA and DNA. PMID:24278758

  7. Innovative Tools and Systems Addressing Space Weather Needs Developed By the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has always been a pioneer in utilizing and developing innovative systems and tools in addressing the needs of the space weather community. This paper intends to introduce some of our cutting edge systems and tools that are available to everyone in the community. An important objective of the CCMC is to prototype, validate, and compare various methods for CME arrival predictions. As such, CCMC has developed three web based CME specific tools with the goal of facilitating advanced analysis and collaboration within the space weather community. The three tools we highlight in this abstract are: Stereoscopic CME Analysis Tool (StereoCAT), WSA-ENLIL+Cone Fast Track, and Space Weather Scoreboard. These three tools allow making CME measurements, executing space weather simulations in near real-time, and providing a systematic way for the scientific community to record and compare predictions both prior to, and after CME arrivals at near Earth. In order to address the space weather needs of NASA missions and encourage collaboration between various groups, CCMC has developed a web based system called the Space Weather Database Of Notifications, Knowledge, Information (SW DONKI). SW DONKI serves as an archive of all space weather activities including: flares, CMEs (including simulations), SEPs, and geomagnetic storms. An innovative feature of the system is the ability to generate, modify, and store complex linkages between activities - creating a comprehensive network of relationships between activities, and identifying potential cause-and-effect paradigms for each space weather "event". SW DONKI also provides public access to all human generated event analysis and other notifications produced by the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) forecasting team.

  8. Diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Using Molecular Beacon

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Sonkar, Subash Chandra; Kumari, Indu; Saluja, Daman

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an important sexually transmitted diseases (STD) causing pathogen worldwide. Due to absence of an affordable diagnostic assay, routine screening of gonococcal infection becomes impossible in developing countries where infection rates are maximum. Treatment is given on the basis of symptoms alone which leads to spread of infection. Thus, development of a rapid, sensitive, specific, and PCR based visual diagnostic assay suitable for developing countries, required for better disease management, is aimed at in present study. Endocervical swabs were collected from patients visiting gynecology department of various hospitals in Delhi. In-house PCR based assay was developed and modified to visual assay using molecular beacon for end-point detection. It was evaluated against Roche AMPLICOR NG kit and rmp gene. Specificity of beacon was confirmed by competition experiments. Diagnostic test was 98.21% specific and 99.59% sensitive whereas negative and positive predicted value were 99.40% and 98.78%, respectively. We also observed that twice the concentration (2X) of premix was stable at 4°C for 4 months and dry swab samples gave concordant results with that of wet swabs. These features make the test best suitable for routine diagnosis of genital infections in developing countries. PMID:25802857

  9. Large system change challenges: addressing complex critical issues in linked physical and social domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddell, Steve; Cornell, Sarah; Hsueh, Joe; Ozer, Ceren; McLachlan, Milla; Birney, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Most action to address contemporary complex challenges, including the urgent issues of global sustainability, occurs piecemeal and without meaningful guidance from leading complex change knowledge and methods. The potential benefit of using such knowledge is greater efficacy of effort and investment. However, this knowledge and its associated tools and methods are under-utilized because understanding about them is low, fragmented between diverse knowledge traditions, and often requires shifts in mindsets and skills from expert-led to participant-based action. We have been engaged in diverse action-oriented research efforts in Large System Change for sustainability. For us, "large" systems can be characterized as large-scale systems - up to global - with many components, of many kinds (physical, biological, institutional, cultural/conceptual), operating at multiple levels, driven by multiple forces, and presenting major challenges for people involved. We see change of such systems as complex challenges, in contrast with simple or complicated problems, or chaotic situations. In other words, issues and sub-systems have unclear boundaries, interact with each other, and are often contradictory; dynamics are non-linear; issues are not "controllable", and "solutions" are "emergent" and often paradoxical. Since choices are opportunity-, power- and value-driven, these social, institutional and cultural factors need to be made explicit in any actionable theory of change. Our emerging network is sharing and building a knowledge base of experience, heuristics, and theories of change from multiple disciplines and practice domains. We will present our views on focal issues for the development of the field of large system change, which include processes of goal-setting and alignment; leverage of systemic transitions and transformation; and the role of choice in influencing critical change processes, when only some sub-systems or levels of the system behave in purposeful ways

  10. 76 FR 2369 - Priorities for Addressing Risks to the Reliability of the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Priorities for Addressing Risks to the Reliability of the Bulk- Power System... related to reliability of the Bulk-Power System, including priorities for addressing risks to reliability.... The conference will be Webcast. Anyone with Internet access who desires to listen to this event can...

  11. Automated Internet-Based Control of Spacecraft Groundstations: Beacon-Based Health Monitoring Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian; Twiggs, Robert; Swartwout, Michael

    1997-01-01

    This report serves as an update about the activities of Stanford University's Space Systems Development Laboratory (SSDL) in their beacon-based health monitoring experiment. Section 1 describes the goals of the project and the organization of the team. Section 2 provides an overview of the major components of the system, describing the general approach of automated health monitoring and the beacon signal relay. It also provides background about the SAPPHIRE spacecraft and ASSET operations system, which will be used for the experiment. Specific details about implementation and status of each element of the experiment are found in Section 3. Section 4 describes the experiment and future work, and references are contained in Section 5.

  12. Addressing Impacts of Geomagnetic Disturbances on the North American Bulk Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollison, Eric; Moura, John; Lauby, Mark

    2011-08-01

    In a joint report issued in June 2010, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identified geomagnetic disturbances as a high-impact, low-frequency (HILF) event risk to bulk power system reliability. The potential impact of geomagnetic disturbance events has gained renewed attention as recent studies have suggested that solar storms may be more severe and reach lower geographic latitudes than formerly expected and can affect bulk power system reliability. The most well known power system experience with geomagnetic disturbances in North America was the 13-14 March 1989 storm, which led to the collapse of the Hydro-Québec system in the early morning hours of 13 March 1989, lasting approximately 9 hours. NERC is actively addressing a range of HILF event risks to bulk power system reliability through the efforts of four of its task forces: Geomagnetic Disturbance, Spare Equipment Database, Cyber and Physical Attack, and Severe Impact Resilience. These task forces operate under the direction of three NERC committees: Planning, Operating, and Critical Infrastructure Protection. The NERC Geomagnetic Disturbance Task Force (GMDTF), which was established in September 2010, is charged with investigating the implications of geomagnetic disturbances to the reliability of bulk power systems and developing solutions to help mitigate these risks. The objective of these efforts is to develop models to better understand the nature and effects of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the vulnerabilities of equipment, bulk power system design considerations, our ability to reduce the operational and real-time impacts of geomagnetic disturbances on the bulk power system, and restoration methods, as well as to inventory long-lead-time equipment. For more information on the current activities of the GMDTF, please visit: www.nerc.com/filez/gmdtf.html

  13. Addressing Neuroplastic Changes in Distributed Areas of the Nervous System Associated With Chronic Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, René; Higgins, Johanne; Bourbonnais, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Present interventions utilized in musculoskeletal rehabilitation are guided, in large part, by a biomedical model where peripheral structural injury is believed to be the sole driver of the disorder. There are, however, neurophysiological changes across different areas of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including peripheral receptors, dorsal horn of the spinal cord, brain stem, sensorimotor cortical areas, and the mesolimbic and prefrontal areas associated with chronic musculoskeletal disorders, including chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, and tendon injuries. These neurophysiological changes appear not only to be a consequence of peripheral structural injury but also to play a part in the pathophysiology of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Neurophysiological changes are consistent with a biopsychosocial formulation reflecting the underlying mechanisms associated with sensory and motor findings, psychological traits, and perceptual changes associated with chronic musculoskeletal conditions. These changes, therefore, have important implications in the clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, and treatment of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal rehabilitation professionals have at their disposal tools to address these neuroplastic changes, including top-down cognitive-based interventions (eg, education, cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness meditation, motor imagery) and bottom-up physical interventions (eg, motor learning, peripheral sensory stimulation, manual therapy) that induce neuroplastic changes across distributed areas of the nervous system and affect outcomes in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Furthermore, novel approaches such as the use of transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be utilized to help renormalize neurological function. Comprehensive treatment addressing peripheral structural injury as well as neurophysiological changes occurring across

  14. Remote tracking of a magnetic receiver using low frequency beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinker, Arie; Ginzburg, Boris; Salomonski, Nizan; Frumkis, Lev; Kaplan, Ben-Zion

    2014-10-01

    Low frequency magnetic fields feature high penetration ability, which allows communication, localization, and tracking in environments where radio or acoustic waves are blocked or distorted by multipath interferences. In the present work, we propose a method for tracking a magnetic receiver using beacons of low frequency magnetic field, where the receiver includes a tri-axial search-coil magnetometer. Measuring the beacons’ magnetic fields and calculating the total-field signals enables localization without restrictions on magnetometer orientation, allowing on-the-move tracking. The total-field signals are used by a global search method, e.g., simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, to localize the receiver. The magnetic field produced by each beacon has a dipole structure and is governed by the beacon’s position and magnetic moment. We have investigated two different methods for estimating beacons’ magnetic moments prior to localization. The first method requires directional measurements, whereas for the second method the total-field signal is used. Effectiveness of these methods has been proved in numerous field tests. In the present work, we introduce a method for tracking a moving receiver by successive localizations. Using previous localization as a starting point of the search method for the next localization can reduce execution time and chances for divergence. The proposed method has been tested using numerous computer simulations. Successful system operation has been verified in field conditions. The good tracking capability together with simple implementation makes the proposed method attractive for real-time, low power field applications, such as mobile robots navigation.

  15. 406 MHz COSPAS/SARSAT distress beacon signals relayed by geosynchronous satellites - Present status and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Patrick

    1988-10-01

    To introduce a major new feature (near instant alerting) in the COSPAS/SARSAT system, NASA has initiated an experiment in relaying distress signals via geosynchronous spacecraft. Various tests have been conducted with beacon simulators and standard COSPAS/SARSAT 406 MHz beacons. The obtained results show that comfortable margins are reached in the main part of the satellite field coverage. The post GOES-7 period is already fixed up, and 6 new geosynchronous satellites will provide an extended and more efficient world coverage.

  16. Reliability of content-addressable data search in a defocused volume holographic data storage system.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhargab; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2010-02-10

    We investigate for suitable methods that enable reliable content-addressable data search in a defocused volume holographic data storage system. Two techniques have been introduced and are shown to overcome the shortcomings of the known methods used to perform content searching in defocused holographic recording geometry. In effect, we remove the deterministic errors that result because of the presence of nonmatching database records, producing almost the same correlation scores as the true targeted correlation scores. Such deterministic errors give rise to erroneous search outcomes and reduce the speed advantage of the parallel holographic data search. We present experimental results and discuss the improvements offered by the two introduced methods in terms of storage density and measured correlation scores. Both the methods of modified-balanced and 25% sparse modulation coded data pages are found to produce good results, negating the undesired correlation characteristics. PMID:20154744

  17. High efficiency low cost monolithic module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Wendell C.; Siu, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    The program objectives were to develop a highly efficient, low cost RF module for SARSAT beacons; achieve significantly lower battery current drain, amount of heat generated, and size of battery required; utilize MMIC technology to improve efficiency, reliability, packaging, and cost; and provide a technology database for GaAs based UHF RF circuit architectures. Presented in viewgraph form are functional block diagrams of the SARSAT distress beacon and beacon RF module as well as performance goals, schematic diagrams, predicted performances, and measured performances for the phase modulator and power amplifier.

  18. A Telomerase-Specific Doxorubicin-Releasing Molecular Beacon for Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Wang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Min; Han, Zhihao; Chen, Dan; Zhu, Qiuyun; Gao, Weidong; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    A molecular beacon-based drug delivery system was designed for both detection of telomerase activity in living cells and telomerase-triggered drug release for precise cancer treatment. This system is composed of a gold nanoparticle core densely packed with FITC-labeled hairpin DNA sequences hybridized with telomerase primers. Molecules of the anticancer drug doxorubicin were intercalated into the stem region of the DNA sequence. The presence of telomerase will elongate the primers, leading to inner chain substitution followed by the release of the FITC fluorescence and the trapped doxorubicin. This molecular beacon could specifically distinguish tumor cells and normal cells based on telomerase activity, precisely release doxorubicin in response to telomerase activity in the tumor cells, and prevent toxicity to normal organs. PMID:26848056

  19. Design of a K/Q-Band Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat TDP#5 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a coherent KQ-band (2040 GHz) beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed at the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) for use in the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload 5 (TDP5) beacon experiment. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation at 40 GHz to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models in the Q-band. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation. The receiver system has been characterized in the lab and demonstrates a system dynamic range performance of better than 58 dB at 1 Hz and better than 48 dB at 10 Hz rates.

  20. Design of a K/Q-band Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat TDP#5 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a coherent K/Q-band (20/40GHz) beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed at the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) for use in the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload #5 (TDP#5) beacon experiment. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation at 40GHz to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models in the Q-band. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation. The receiver system has been characterized in the lab and demonstrates a system dynamic range performance of better than 58dB at 1Hz and better than 48dB at 10Hz rates.

  1. Molecular Engineering of DNA: Molecular Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhiwen; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kim, Youngmi; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Wei; Wu, Yanrong; Medley, Colin D.; Cao, Zehui; Li, Jun; Colon, Patrick; Lin, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are specifically designed DNA hairpin structures that are widely used as fluorescent probes. Applications of MBs range from genetic screening, biosensor development, biochip construction, and the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to mRNA monitoring in living cells. The inherent signal-transduction mechanism of MBs enables the analysis of target oligonucleotides without the separation of unbound probes. The MB stem–loop structure holds the fluorescence-donor and fluorescence-acceptor moieties in close proximity to one another, which results in resonant energy transfer. A spontaneous conformation change occurs upon hybridization to separate the two moieties and restore the fluorescence of the donor. Recent research has focused on the improvement of probe composition, intracellular gene quantitation, protein–DNA interaction studies, and protein recognition. PMID:19065690

  2. Optical telecommunications: expected performance of the beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Gollier, Jacques; Dobie, Paul J.; Heinrichs, Theo; Sobeczko, Andre

    1994-09-01

    The beacon is a powerful non-coherent CW laser source which is developed in the frame of the Semi-conductor Inter-satellite Link Experiment (SILEX). Its functionality is to provide a high divergence beam during the first tracking sequence. It is made up of 19 laser diodes coupled into one multi-mode fiber, the exit face of that fiber being integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. A breadboarding phase has been conducted at the beginning of the phase C/D in order to demonstrate that the requirement of 8 KW/Sr within a divergence of 11.75 mRd will be achieved. That phase is now completed and the overall breadboard performance is discussed in this paper with respect to the SILEX requirements.

  3. GaAs monolithic RF modules for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauley, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs UHF components for use in SARSAT Emergency Distress beacons are under development by Microwave Monolithics, Inc., Simi Valley, CA. The components include a bi-phase modulator, driver amplifier, and a 5 watt power amplifier.

  4. Southeast (front) elevation Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast (front) elevation - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  5. 6. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST FRONT, SECOND STAGE Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST FRONT, SECOND STAGE - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  6. 2. VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTHEAST FRONT Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTHEAST FRONT - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  7. 4. DETAIL, CASTIRON BASE, SOUTH CORNER Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL, CAST-IRON BASE, SOUTH CORNER - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  8. STEREO Space Weather and the Space Weather Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Webb, D F.; SaintCyr, O. C.

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) is first and foremost a solar and interplanetary research mission, with one of the natural applications being in the area of space weather. The obvious potential for space weather applications is so great that NOAA has worked to incorporate the real-time data into their forecast center as much as possible. A subset of the STEREO data will be continuously downlinked in a real-time broadcast mode, called the Space Weather Beacon. Within the research community there has been considerable interest in conducting space weather related research with STEREO. Some of this research is geared towards making an immediate impact while other work is still very much in the research domain. There are many areas where STEREO might contribute and we cannot predict where all the successes will come. Here we discuss how STEREO will contribute to space weather and many of the specific research projects proposed to address STEREO space weather issues. We also discuss some specific uses of the STEREO data in the NOAA Space Environment Center.

  9. Analysis of space shuttle main engine data using Beacon-based exception analysis for multi-missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Mackey, R.; James, M.; Zak, M.; Kynard, M.; Sebghati, J.; Greene, W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) sensor data using Beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions (BEAM), a new technology developed for sensor analysis and diagnostics in autonomous space systems by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  10. Lessons Learned During Implementation and Early Operations of the DS1 Beacon Monitor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Rob; Wyatt, Jay; Hotz, Henry; Schlutsmeyer, Alan; Sue, Miles

    1998-01-01

    A new approach to mission operations will be flight validated on NASA's New Millennium Program Deep Space One (DS1) mission which launched in October 1998. The Beacon Monitor Operations Technology is aimed at decreasing the total volume of downlinked engineering telemetry by reducing the frequency of downlink and the volume of data received per pass. Cost savings are achieved by reducing the amount of routine telemetry processing and analysis performed by ground staff. The technology is required for upcoming NASA missions to Pluto, Europa, and possibly some other missions. With beacon monitoring, the spacecraft will assess its own health and will transmit one of four beacon messages each representing a unique frequency tone to inform the ground how urgent it is to track the spacecraft for telemetry. If all conditions are nominal, the tone provides periodic assurance to ground personnel that the mission is proceeding as planned without having to receive and analyze downlinked telemetry. If there is a problem, the tone will indicate that tracking is required and the resulting telemetry will contain a concise summary of what has occurred since the last telemetry pass. The primary components of the technology are a tone monitoring technology, AI-based software for onboard engineering data summarization, and a ground response system. In addition, there is a ground visualization system for telemetry summaries. This paper includes a description of the Beacon monitor concept, the trade-offs with adapting that concept as a technology experiment, the current state of the resulting implementation on DS1, and our lessons learned during the initial checkout phase of the mission. Applicability to future missions is also included.

  11. An efficient fluorescent sensing platform for biomolecules based on fenton reaction triggered molecular beacon cleavage strategy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Liu, Ya-Ru; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2013-03-15

    A universal sensing platform for fluorescence turn-on detection of biomolecules is developed based on Fenton reaction triggered molecular beacon cleavage. Due to its high quenching efficiency, molecular beacons (MBs)-based sensing systems usually show low background fluorescence and large signal-to-background ratio. Glucose is chosen as a model biomolecule for constructing an MB-based fluorescence sensing system. In the presence of glucose, the glucose oxidase will bind with it and catalyze the oxidation to generate H(2)O(2), which is further decomposed to produce (·)OH through the Fe(2+)-catalyzed Fenton reaction. Then, in-situ-generated OH can trigger the cleavage of the MB, and its fluorescence intensity will be dramatically increased because of the complete separation of the fluorophore from the quencher. By employing molecular beacon as both recognition and reporter probes to low background signal, the proposed biosensors showed high sensitivity to targets. It also exhibited high selectivity owing to the high specificity of the enzymatic oxidation, which make it valuable for the detection of target biomolecule in complex biological samples. PMID:23062552

  12. A Multi-Systemic School-Based Approach for Addressing Childhood Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runions, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    School-based approaches to addressing aggression in the early grades have focused on explicit curriculum addressing social and emotional processes. The current study reviews research on the distinct modes of aggression, the status of current research on social and emotional processing relevant to problems of aggression amongst young children, as…

  13. Addressing security, collaboration, and usability with tactical edge mobile devices and strategic cloud-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Christopher J.

    2012-05-01

    Success in the future battle space is increasingly dependent on rapid access to the right information. Faced with a shrinking budget, the Government has a mandate to improve intelligence productivity, quality, and reliability. To achieve increased ISR effectiveness, leverage of tactical edge mobile devices via integration with strategic cloud-based infrastructure is the single, most likely candidate area for dramatic near-term impact. This paper discusses security, collaboration, and usability components of this evolving space. These three paramount tenets outlined below, embody how mission information is exchanged securely, efficiently, with social media cooperativeness. Tenet 1: Complete security, privacy, and data integrity, must be ensured within the net-centric battle space. This paper discusses data security on a mobile device, data at rest on a cloud-based system, authorization and access control, and securing data transport between entities. Tenet 2: Lack of collaborative information sharing and content reliability jeopardizes mission objectives and limits the end user capability. This paper discusses cooperative pairing of mobile devices and cloud systems, enabling social media style interaction via tagging, meta-data refinement, and sharing of pertinent data. Tenet 3: Fielded mobile solutions must address usability and complexity. Simplicity is a powerful paradigm on mobile platforms, where complex applications are not utilized, and simple, yet powerful, applications flourish. This paper discusses strategies for ensuring mobile applications are streamlined and usable at the tactical edge through focused features sets, leveraging the power of the back-end cloud, minimization of differing HMI concepts, and directed end-user feedback.teInput=

  14. Dynamic omni-directional vision localization using a beacon tracker based on particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zuoliang; Liu, Shiyu

    2007-09-01

    Omni-directional vision navigation for AGVs appears definite significant since its advantage of panoramic sight with a single compact visual scene. This unique guidance technique involves target recognition, vision tracking, object positioning, path programming. An algorithm for omni-vision based global localization which utilizes two overhead features as beacon pattern is proposed in this paper. An approach for geometric restoration of omni-vision images has to be considered since an inherent distortion exists. The mapping between image coordinates and physical space parameters of the targets can be obtained by means of the imaging principle on the fisheye lens. The localization of the robot can be achieved by geometric computation. Dynamic localization employs a beacon tracker to follow the landmarks in real time during the arbitrary movement of the vehicle. The coordinate transformation is devised for path programming based on time sequence images analysis. The beacon recognition and tracking are a key procedure for an omni-vision guided mobile unit. The conventional image processing such as shape decomposition, description, matching and other usually employed technique are not directly applicable in omni-vision. Particle filter (PF) has been shown to be successful for several nonlinear estimation problems. A beacon tracker based on Particle Filter which offers a probabilistic framework for dynamic state estimation in visual tracking has been developed. We independently use two Particle Filters to track double landmarks but a composite algorithm on multiple objects tracking conducts for vehicle localization. We have implemented the tracking and localization system and demonstrated the relevant of the algorithm.

  15. Addressing Value and Belief Systems on Climate Literacy in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    The southeast (SEUS; AL, AR, GA, FL, KY, LA, NC, SC, TN, E. TX) faces the greatest impacts as a result of climate change of any region in the U.S. which presents considerable and costly adaptation challenges. Paradoxically, people in the SEUS hold attitudes and perceptions that are more dismissive of climate change than those of any other region. An additional mismatch exists between the manner in which climate science is generally communicated and the underlying core values and beliefs held by a large segment of people in the SEUS. As a result, people frequently misinterpret and/or distrust information sources, inhibiting efforts to productively discuss and consider climate change and related impacts on human and environmental systems, and possible solutions and outcomes. The Climate Literacy Partnership in the Southeast (CLiPSE) project includes an extensive network of partners throughout the SEUS from faith, agriculture, culturally diverse, leisure, and K-20 educator communities that aim to address this educational need through a shared vision. CLiPSE has conducted a Climate Stewardship Survey (CSS) to determine the knowledge and perceptions of individuals in and beyond the CLiPSE network. The descriptive results of the CSS indicate that religion, predominantly Protestantism, plays a minor role in climate knowledge and perceptions. Likewise, political affiliation plays a minimal role in climate knowledge and perceptions between religions. However, when Protestants were broken out by political affiliation, statistically significant differences (t(30)=2.44, p=0.02) in knowledge related to the causes of climate change exist. Those Protestants affiliated with the Democratic Party (n=206) tended to maintain a statistically significant stronger knowledge of the causes of global climate change than their Republican counterparts. When SEUS educator (n=277) group was only considered, similar trends were evidenced, indicating that strongly held beliefs potentially

  16. Addressing Special Education Inequity through Systemic Change: Contributions of Ecologically Based Organizational Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Amanda L.; Artiles, Alfredo J.; Hernandez-Saca, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Since the inception of special education, scholars and practitioners have been concerned about the disproportionate representation of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds among students identified with disabilities. Professional efforts to address this disproportionality have encompassed a range of targets, but scholars…

  17. Development of Beacon technology. Quarterly report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of carbon from a gas stream containing carbon monoxide, and subsequent exposure of this carbon to a gas stream containing hydrogen or steam at elevated temperature and pressure to produce methane. The steam gasification route currently is receiving the most attention. Multiple-cycle tests with K1 and K2 catalysts showed sustained activity and stable performance through thirty of the planned forty cycles. The tests will be completed next quarter. Steaming temperature screening tests on K2-based BEACON carbon supported the conclusion based on earlier testing with K1-based BEACON carbon that steam gasification at two temperature levels has significant advantages over steam gasification at a single temperature in terms of gasification rates and methane yields. Multiple-cycle testing of K2-based BEACON carbon was started in the 4-inch bench-scale fluid bed reactor. Catalyst C77 continued to have problems during multiple-cycle testing - loss of catalytic activity, possibly due to overheating, and poor fluidizability. Further modifications of the C77 catalyst preparation technique were tested. Catalyst C77-K2 showed no change in performance, and results with catalyst C77-K1 were generally disappointing. Laboratory experiments continued with catalyst C78. A variable differential pressure concept which does not require gas/solids separtion is now being considered for the transfer of BEACON solids between carbon deposition and carbon gasification reactors.

  18. Polar motion and earth tides from Beacon Explorer C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, D. E.; Smith, D. E.; Dunn, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Seventeen months of laser tracking of the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft by a Goddard Space Flight Center laser system were analyzed. The amplitude and phase of the solid-earth and ocean-tide perturbations of the orbit and the variation in latitude of the tracking station were determined. From an analysis of the orbital inclination obtained from 6 hour data spans the tidal perturbations of the orbit were found to have a magnitude equivalent to a second degree Love number, k sub 2, of 0.245 with a phase lag of about 3.2 degrees. These numbers are in complete agreement with values obtained previously from a much shorter data span, although k sub 2, is lower than the value derived from seismic data. This discrepancy is probably due to the influence of the oceans on the satellite result. After removing the tidal perturbations the residuals in inclination were of order 0.04 arcseconds. This implies that the variation in latitude of the station was being determined during the 17 months period with an rms deviation of about 1.4 meters with respect to the smoothed Bureau International de l'Heure values.

  19. Detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using allosteric molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiting; Zu, Xiaolong; Song, Yanling; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-01-21

    Abnormal DNA methylation patterns caused by altered DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity are closely associated with cancer. Herein, using DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase (Dam MTase) as a model analyte, we designed an allosteric molecular beacon (aMB) for sensitive detection of Dam MTase activity. When the specific site in an aMB is methylated by Dam MTase, the probe can be cut by the restriction nuclease DpnI to release a fluorophore labeled aptamer specific for streptavidin (SA) which will bind to SA beads to generate highly fluorescent beads for easy signal readout by a microscope or flow cytometer. However, aMBs maintain a hairpin structure without the binding ability to SA beads in the absence of Dam MTase, leading to weakly fluorescent SA beads. Unlike the existing signal amplified assays, our method is simpler and more convenient. The high performance of the aptamer and the easy bead separation process make this probe superior to other methods for the detection of MTase in complex biological systems. Overall, the proposed method with a detection limit of 0.57 U mL(-1) for Dam MTase shows great potential for further applications in the detection of other MTases, screening of MTase inhibitors, and early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:26478921

  20. PNA HyBeacons for analysis of human mutations related to statin-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Nittaya; Kocalka, Petr; Mardle, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Aminoalkyl and alkyne-tagged PNA HyBeacons have been synthesized, labeled with fluorescein via conventional amide bond or triazole formation (click chemistry) and used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) implicated in statin-induced myopathy. The PNA HyBeacons gave much better mismatch/mutant discrimination than conventional DNA HyBeacons but smaller fluorescence changes on melting. PMID:22567191

  1. 76 FR 17625 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Emergency Beacon Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... Beacon Registrations AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... ships, aircraft, or individuals in distress if they are equipped with an emergency radio beacon. Persons purchasing a digital distress beacon, operating in the frequency range of 406.000 to 406.100 MHz,...

  2. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  3. A Place To Grow: Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Feist, Michelle; Nevarez, Nancy

    This study examined six Beacon centers, which are community centers located in public school buildings that offer a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Individual Beacons are managed by community-based organizations. The study examined how the Beacons provided…

  4. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  5. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  6. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  7. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  8. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  9. 76 FR 65216 - Beacon Medical Services, LLC, Aurora, CO; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... (76 FR 40401). The workers of Beacon Medical Services are engaged in activities related ] to the... Employment and Training Administration Beacon Medical Services, LLC, Aurora, CO; Notice of Negative... apply for Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of Beacon...

  10. A Place to Grow: Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Feist, Michelle; Nevarez, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This study examined six Beacon centers, which are community centers located in public school buildings that offer a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Individual Beacons are managed by community-based organizations. The study examined how the Beacons provided…

  11. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  12. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  13. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  14. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  15. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  16. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  17. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  18. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  19. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  20. Comparison of BEACON and COMPARE reactor cavity subcompartment analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, M.W.; Idar, E.S.; Gido, R.G.; Lime, J.F.; Koestel, A.

    1984-04-01

    In this study, a more advanced best-estimate containment code, BEACON-MOD3A, was ued to calculate force and moment loads resulting from a high-energy blowdown for two reactor cavity geometries previously analyzed with the licensing computer code COMPARE-MOD1A. The BEACON force and moment loads were compared with the COMPARE results to determine the safety margins provided by the COMPARE code. The forces and moments calculated by the codes were found to be different, although not in any consistent manner, for the two reactor cavity geometries studied. Therefore, generic summary statements regarding margins cannot be made because of the effects of the detailed physical configuration. However, differences in the BEACON and COMPARE calculated forces and moments can be attributed to differences in the modeling assumptions used in the codes and the analyses.

  1. Frequency Estimator Performance for a Software-Based Beacon Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix

    2014-01-01

    As propagation terminals have evolved, their design has trended more toward a software-based approach that facilitates convenient adjustment and customization of the receiver algorithms. One potential improvement is the implementation of a frequency estimation algorithm, through which the primary frequency component of the received signal can be estimated with a much greater resolution than with a simple peak search of the FFT spectrum. To select an estimator for usage in a QV-band beacon receiver, analysis of six frequency estimators was conducted to characterize their effectiveness as they relate to beacon receiver design.

  2. Frequency Estimator Performance for a Software-Based Beacon Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    As propagation terminals have evolved, their design has trended more toward a software-based approach that facilitates convenient adjustment and customization of the receiver algorithms. One potential improvement is the implementation of a frequency estimation algorithm, through which the primary frequency component of the received signal can be estimated with a much greater resolution than with a simple peak search of the FFT spectrum. To select an estimator for usage in a Q/V-band beacon receiver, analysis of six frequency estimators was conducted to characterize their effectiveness as they relate to beacon receiver design.

  3. Assessing the Use of School Public Address Systems to Deliver Nutrition Messages to Children: Shape Up Somerville--Audio Adventures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folta, Sara C.; Goldberg, Jeanne P.; Economos, Christina; Bell, Rick; Landers, Stewart; Hyatt, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Given the current childhood obesity epidemic, it is especially important to find effective ways to promote healthful foods to children. School public address (PA) systems represent an inexpensive and a replicable way of reaching children with health messages. To test the effectiveness of this channel, messages were created to promote 2 dried bean…

  4. Media Literacy Education from Kindergarten to College: A Comparison of How Media Literacy Is Addressed across the Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans C.

    2013-01-01

    This study of media literacy education at all levels of the educational system considered faculty perceptions of student media literacy competencies, the extent to which media literacy is addressed in class, and the extent to which faculty members consider media literacy education to be important. Data suggest that despite the research and policy…

  5. Evolution of stratospheric chemistry in the Saturn storm beacon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Armstrong, Eleanor S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Friedson, A. James; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Sinclair, James A.; Hesman, Brigette E.

    2015-11-01

    The giant northern-hemisphere storm that erupted on Saturn in December 2010 triggered significant changes in stratospheric temperatures and species abundances that persisted for more than a year after the original outburst. The stratospheric regions affected by the storm have been nicknamed "beacons" due to their prominent infrared-emission signatures (Fletcher, L.N. et al. [2011]. Science 332, 1413). The two beacon regions that were present initially merged in April 2011 to form a single, large, anticyclonic vortex (Fletcher, L.N. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 560). We model the expected photochemical evolution of the stratospheric constituents in the beacons from the initial storm onset through the merger and on out to March 2012. The results are compared with longitudinally resolved Cassini/CIRS spectra from May 2011. If we ignore potential changes due to vertical winds within the beacon, we find that C2H2, C2H6, and C3H8 remain unaffected by the increased stratospheric temperatures in the beacon, the abundance of the shorter-lived CH3C2H decreases, and the abundance of C2H4 increases significantly due to the elevated temperatures, the latter most notably in a secondary mixing-ratio peak located near mbar pressures. The C4H2 abundance in the model decreases by a factor of a few in the 0.01-10 mbar region but has a significant increase in the 10-30 mbar region due to evaporation of the previously condensed phase. The column abundances of C6H6 and H2O above ∼30 mbar also increase due to aerosol evaporation. Model-data comparisons show that models that consider temperature changes alone underpredict the abundance of C2Hx species by a factor of 2-7 in the beacon core in May 2011, suggesting that other processes not considered by the models, such as downwelling winds in the vortex, are affecting the species profiles. Additional calculations indicate that downwelling winds of order - 10 cm s-1 near ∼0.1 mbar need to be included in the photochemical models in order to

  6. A Multimedia Adaptive Tutoring System for Mathematics That Addresses Cognition, Metacognition and Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arroyo, Ivon; Woolf, Beverly Park; Burelson, Winslow; Muldner, Kasia; Rai, Dovan; Tai, Minghui

    2014-01-01

    This article describes research results based on multiple years of experimentation and real-world experience with an adaptive tutoring system named Wayang Outpost. The system represents a novel adaptive learning technology that has shown successful outcomes with thousands of students, and provided teachers with valuable information about…

  7. Design and tests of simple, inexpensive optical beacon for use on small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayhurst, Thomas L.; Osibov, Marcus N.; Russell, Ray W.; Maulfair, Robert J.; Fleeter, Rick

    1989-08-01

    A standard photography flash unit modified for automatic repetitive flashing and presetable pulse duration was tested for its utility as an aid for optically acquiring a target in low earth orbit. The relative visibility of the flash with respect to repetition rate and pulse duration was measured with two types of low-light-level TV camera systems over a range of effective distances. Optimal operating parameters for the flash were determined for its application as an optical beacon on the small satellites used in the Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiments, part of the Infrared Backgrounds and Signatures Survey (IBSS) Space Shuttle mission.

  8. Flight Validation of On-Demand Operations: The Deep Space One Beacon Monitor Operations Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Jay; Sherwood, Rob; Sue, Miles; Szijjarto, John

    2000-01-01

    After a brief overview of the operational concept, this paper will provide a detailed description of the _as-flown_ flight software components, the DS1 experiment plan, and experiment results to date. Special emphasis will be given to experiment results and lessons learned since the basic system design has been previously reported. Mission scenarios where beacon operations is highly applicable will be described. Detailed cost savings estimates for a sample science mission will be provided as will cumulative savings that are possible over the next fifteen years of NASA missions.

  9. COSPAS/SARSAT 406-MHz emergency beacon digital controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1988-07-01

    The digital control portion of a low-cost 406-MHz COSPAS/SARSAT emergency beacon has been designed and breadboarded at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This report discusses the requirements and design tradeoffs of the digital controller and describes the hardware and software design, which is available only to United States citizens and companies.

  10. Standing on lightpost and day beacon, haer architect Christopher Marston ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Standing on lightpost and day beacon, haer architect Christopher Marston points to stone retaining wall at site of old monongahela navigation company lock & dam no. 7. - Monongahela Navigation Company Lock & Dam No. 7, River Mile No. 82.5, Greensboro, Greene County, PA

  11. The morpholino molecular beacon for specific RNA visualization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbin; Wu, Jikui; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-02-21

    A non-invasive fluorescent probe, morpholino molecular beacon (MO-MB), was designed for RNA visualization in vivo. Featuring negligible toxicity, stability, and high target specificity in living embryos, MO-MB is superior to conventional probes and has the potential for specific RNA visualization in basic biological and clinical research. PMID:26810703

  12. Promoting Health in Hospitals: The Role of Beacon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelaw, Sandy; Watson, Jonathan; Hennessy, Sue

    2004-01-01

    "Best practice" is currently being used to enable modernisation within the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. One element of this is the Beacon programme where examples of hospitals that exemplify local "best practice" are supported to develop and disseminate learning across the wider NHS. The aims of this research were to map…

  13. Radiometer calibration procedure and beacon attenuation estimation reference level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objectives are to compare radiometer attenuation with beacon attenuation and to compare sky temperature estimates with calculations using simultaneous meteorological data. Secondary objectives are: (1) noise diode and reference load measurements and (2) to adjust for outside temperature and component temperature changes.

  14. Epilithic lichens in the Beacon sandstone formation, Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, M. E.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The epilithic lichen flora on the Beacon sandstone formation in Victoria Land consists of seven species: Acarospora gwynnii Dodge & Rudolph, Buellia grisea Dodge & Baker, B. pallida Dodge & Baker, Carbonea capsulata (Dodge & Baker) Hale comb. nov., Lecanora fuscobrunnea Dodge & Baker, Lecidea cancriformis Dodge & Baker, and L. siplei Dodge & Baker. The typification of the species is given along with descriptions and distribution in Antarctica.

  15. Reflecting on Pedagogy: Outcomes from a Beacon School Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Kate; Muschamp, Yolande

    2004-01-01

    This article arises from an initiative set up by four Beacon Schools to enhance the professional development of teachers and hence raise pupil attainment in all schools in the local education authority. The initiative provided opportunities for teachers to work in cross-institutional interest groups, with the aim of sharing good practice and…

  16. COSPAS/SARSAT 406-MHz emergency beacon digital controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The digital control portion of a low-cost 406-MHz COSPAS/SARSAT emergency beacon has been designed and breadboarded at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This report discusses the requirements and design tradeoffs of the digital controller and describes the hardware and software design, which is available only to United States citizens and companies.

  17. Design of a hybrid receiver for the OLYMPUS spacecraft beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, D. G.; Mckeeman, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The theory and design of a hybrid analogue/digital receiver which acquires and monitors the OLYMPUS satellite beacons is presented. The analogue portion of this receiver uses a frequency locked loop for signal tracking. A digital sampling detector operating at IF is used to obtain the I and Q outputs.

  18. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of carbon from a gas stream containing carbon monoxide, and subsequent exposure of this carbon to a gas stream containing hydrogen or steam at elevated temperature and pressure to produce methane. The steam gasification route currently is receiving the most attention. Testing of steam gasification of BEACON carbon over a range of temperatures and pressures in bench-scale equipment has led to the conclusion that steam gasification at two temperature levels has significant advantages over steam gasification at a single temperature in terms of gasification rates and methane yields. Laboratory experiments with catalyst C77 investigated the effects of process variables, catalyst composition modifications, and feed gas compositions on carbon deposition and gasification rates, carbon monoxide and steam utilization, and cycle efficiency. Laboratory experiments to find materials that will promote the carbon deposition rate of BEACON catalysts were highly successful. Promoted catalysts showed significantly higher carbon deposition rates and carbon monoxide utilization than unpromoted catalysts. Multiple-cycle performance of BEACON catalysts also is reported.

  19. Addressing fundamental architectural challenges of an activity-based intelligence and advanced analytics (ABIAA) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, Kevin; Albert, Thomas; Brower, Bernard V.; Pellechia, Matthew F.

    2015-06-01

    The domain of Geospatial Intelligence Analysis is rapidly shifting toward a new paradigm of Activity Based Intelligence (ABI) and information-based Tipping and Cueing. General requirements for an advanced ABIAA system present significant challenges in architectural design, computing resources, data volumes, workflow efficiency, data mining and analysis algorithms, and database structures. These sophisticated ABI software systems must include advanced algorithms that automatically flag activities of interest in less time and within larger data volumes than can be processed by human analysts. In doing this, they must also maintain the geospatial accuracy necessary for cross-correlation of multi-intelligence data sources. Historically, serial architectural workflows have been employed in ABIAA system design for tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination. These simpler architectures may produce implementations that solve short term requirements; however, they have serious limitations that preclude them from being used effectively in an automated ABIAA system with multiple data sources. This paper discusses modern ABIAA architectural considerations providing an overview of an advanced ABIAA system and comparisons to legacy systems. It concludes with a recommended strategy and incremental approach to the research, development, and construction of a fully automated ABIAA system.

  20. Water Information System Platforms Addressing Critical Societal Needs in the Mena Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Kfouri, Claire; Peters, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The MENA region includes 18 countries, the occupied Palestinian territories and Western Sahara. However, the region of interest for this study has a strategic interest in countries adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea, which includes, Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon and Jordan. The 90% of the water in the MENA region is used for the agriculture use. By the end of this century. this region is projected to experience an increase of 3 C to 5 C in mean temperatures and a 20% decline in precipitation (lPCC, 2007). Due to lower precipitation, water run-off is projected to drop by 20% to 30% in most of MENA by 2050 Reduced stream flow and groundwater recharge might lead to a reduction in water supply of 10% or greater by 2050. Therefore, per IPCC projections in temperature rise and precipitation decline in the region, the scarcity of water will become more acute with population growth, and rising demand of food in the region. Additionally, the trans boundary water issues will continue to plague the region in terms of sharing data for better management of water resources. Such pressing issues have brought The World Bank, USAID and NASA to jointly collaborate for establishing integrated, modern, up to date NASA developed capabilities for countries in the MENA region for addressing water resource issues and adapting to climate change impacts for improved decision making and societal benefit. This initiative was launched in October 2011 and is schedule to be completed by the end of2015.

  1. Addressing the crush of sampling. [technology programs for space information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olstad, W. B.; Holcomb, L. B.; Rubin, B.

    1980-01-01

    An overall space information system involves sensing, processing, analyzing, and distributing space-acquired information. These systems may be partitioned into the spacecraft segment, the wideband space-to-ground communication segment, and the ground-based data analysis and distribution segment. The paper discusses NASA's advanced technology programs aimed at providing improved sensors and on-board data systems. Advances in charge-transfer devices, lasers, and microwave technologies will be responsible for major improvements in NASA's sensing and detection capabilities for future missions. These improvements will result in a future data crush that will amplify the data management problem.

  2. Preliminary Results of the NASA Beacon Receiver for Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP5 Propagation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Morse, Jacquelynne; Zemba, Michael; Riva, Carlo; Luini, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have initiated a joint propagation campaign within the framework of the Alphasat propagation experiment to characterize rain attenuation, scintillation, and gaseous absorption effects of the atmosphere in the 40 GHz band. NASA GRC has developed and installed a K/Q-band (20/40 GHz) beacon receiver at the POLIMI campus in Milan, Italy, which receives the 20/40 GHz signals broadcast from the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP#5 beacon payload. The primary goal of these measurements is to develop a physical model to improve predictions of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we describe the design and preliminary performance of the NASA propagation terminal, which has been installed and operating in Milan since May 2014. The receiver is based upon a validated Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) I/Q digital design approach utilized in other operational NASA propagation terminals, but has been modified to employ power measurement via a frequency estimation technique and to coherently track and measure the amplitude of the 20/40 GHz beacon signals. The system consists of a 1.2-m K-band and a 0.6-m Qband Cassegrain reflector employing synchronous open-loop tracking to track the inclined orbit of the Alphasat satellite. An 8 Hz sampling rate is implemented to characterize scintillation effects, with a 1-Hz measurement bandwidth dynamic range of 45 dB. A weather station with an optical disdrometer is also installed to characterize rain drop size distribution for correlation with physical based models.

  3. Performance of the NASA Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP5 Propagation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Morse, Jacquelynne; Zemba, Michael; Riva, Carlo; Luini, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have initiated a joint propagation campaign within the framework of the Alphasat propagation experiment to characterize rain attenuation, scintillation, and gaseous absorption effects of the atmosphere in the 40 gigahertz band. NASA GRC has developed and installed a K/Q-band (20/40 gigahertz) beacon receiver at the POLIMI campus in Milan, Italy, which receives the 20/40 gigahertz signals broadcast from the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni Technology Demonstration Payload (TDP) no. 5 beacon payload. The primary goal of these measurements is to develop a physical model to improve predictions of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we describe the design and preliminary performance of the NASA propagation terminal, which has been installed and operating in Milan since June 2014. The receiver is based upon a validated Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) I/Q digital design approach utilized in other operational NASA propagation terminals, but has been modified to employ power measurement via a frequency estimation technique and to coherently track and measure the amplitude of the 20/40 gigahertz beacon signals. The system consists of a 1.2-meter K-band and a 0.6-meter Q-band Cassegrain reflector employing synchronous open-loop tracking to track the inclined orbit of the Alphasat satellite. An 8 hertz sampling rate is implemented to characterize scintillation effects, with a 1-hertz measurement bandwidth dynamic range of 45 decibels. A weather station with an optical disdrometer is also installed to characterize rain drop size distribution for correlation with physical based models.

  4. Smartphone-Based Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Yang, Jun; Li, You; Qi, Longning; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Indoor wireless localization using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons has attracted considerable attention after the release of the BLE protocol. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses the combination of channel-separate polynomial regression model (PRM), channel-separate fingerprinting (FP), outlier detection and extended Kalman filtering (EKF) for smartphone-based indoor localization with BLE beacons. The proposed algorithm uses FP and PRM to estimate the target’s location and the distances between the target and BLE beacons respectively. We compare the performance of distance estimation that uses separate PRM for three advertisement channels (i.e., the separate strategy) with that use an aggregate PRM generated through the combination of information from all channels (i.e., the aggregate strategy). The performance of FP-based location estimation results of the separate strategy and the aggregate strategy are also compared. It was found that the separate strategy can provide higher accuracy; thus, it is preferred to adopt PRM and FP for each BLE advertisement channel separately. Furthermore, to enhance the robustness of the algorithm, a two-level outlier detection mechanism is designed. Distance and location estimates obtained from PRM and FP are passed to the first outlier detection to generate improved distance estimates for the EKF. After the EKF process, the second outlier detection algorithm based on statistical testing is further performed to remove the outliers. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by various field experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieved the accuracy of <2.56 m at 90% of the time with dense deployment of BLE beacons (1 beacon per 9 m), which performs 35.82% better than <3.99 m from the Propagation Model (PM) + EKF algorithm and 15.77% more accurate than <3.04 m from the FP + EKF algorithm. With sparse deployment (1 beacon per 18 m), the proposed algorithm achieves the accuracies of <3.88 m at 90% of the

  5. Smartphone-Based Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Yang, Jun; Li, You; Qi, Longning; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Indoor wireless localization using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons has attracted considerable attention after the release of the BLE protocol. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses the combination of channel-separate polynomial regression model (PRM), channel-separate fingerprinting (FP), outlier detection and extended Kalman filtering (EKF) for smartphone-based indoor localization with BLE beacons. The proposed algorithm uses FP and PRM to estimate the target's location and the distances between the target and BLE beacons respectively. We compare the performance of distance estimation that uses separate PRM for three advertisement channels (i.e., the separate strategy) with that use an aggregate PRM generated through the combination of information from all channels (i.e., the aggregate strategy). The performance of FP-based location estimation results of the separate strategy and the aggregate strategy are also compared. It was found that the separate strategy can provide higher accuracy; thus, it is preferred to adopt PRM and FP for each BLE advertisement channel separately. Furthermore, to enhance the robustness of the algorithm, a two-level outlier detection mechanism is designed. Distance and location estimates obtained from PRM and FP are passed to the first outlier detection to generate improved distance estimates for the EKF. After the EKF process, the second outlier detection algorithm based on statistical testing is further performed to remove the outliers. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by various field experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieved the accuracy of <2.56 m at 90% of the time with dense deployment of BLE beacons (1 beacon per 9 m), which performs 35.82% better than <3.99 m from the Propagation Model (PM) + EKF algorithm and 15.77% more accurate than <3.04 m from the FP + EKF algorithm. With sparse deployment (1 beacon per 18 m), the proposed algorithm achieves the accuracies of <3.88 m at 90% of the

  6. A Possible Approach for Addressing Neglected Human Factors Issues of Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Holloway, C. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The increasing complexity of safety-critical applications has led to the introduction of decision support tools in the transportation and process industries. Automation has also been introduced to support operator intervention in safety-critical applications. These innovations help reduce overall operator workload, and filter application data to maximize the finite cognitive and perceptual resources of system operators. However, these benefits do not come without a cost. Increased computational support for the end-users of safety-critical applications leads to increased reliance on engineers to monitor and maintain automated systems and decision support tools. This paper argues that by focussing on the end-users of complex applications, previous research has tended to neglect the demands that are being placed on systems engineers. The argument is illustrated through discussing three recent accidents. The paper concludes by presenting a possible strategy for building and using highly automated systems based on increased attention by management and regulators, improvements in competency and training for technical staff, sustained support for engineering team resource management, and the development of incident reporting systems for infrastructure failures. This paper represents preliminary work, about which we seek comments and suggestions.

  7. Design of a K/Q-Band Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload (TDP) #5 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a coherent KQ-band (2040 GHz) beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed at the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) for use in the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload 5 (TDP5) beacon experiment. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation at 40 GHz to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models in the Q-band. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation. The receiver system has been characterized in the lab and demonstrates a system dynamic range performance of better than 58 dB at 1 Hz and better than 48 dB at 10 Hz rates.

  8. Addressing model error through atmospheric stochastic physical parametrizations: impact on the coupled ECMWF seasonal forecasting system.

    PubMed

    Weisheimer, Antje; Corti, Susanna; Palmer, Tim; Vitart, Frederic

    2014-06-28

    The finite resolution of general circulation models of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and the effects of sub-grid-scale variability present a major source of uncertainty in model simulations on all time scales. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts has been at the forefront of developing new approaches to account for these uncertainties. In particular, the stochastically perturbed physical tendency scheme and the stochastically perturbed backscatter algorithm for the atmosphere are now used routinely for global numerical weather prediction. The European Centre also performs long-range predictions of the coupled atmosphere-ocean climate system in operational forecast mode, and the latest seasonal forecasting system--System 4--has the stochastically perturbed tendency and backscatter schemes implemented in a similar way to that for the medium-range weather forecasts. Here, we present results of the impact of these schemes in System 4 by contrasting the operational performance on seasonal time scales during the retrospective forecast period 1981-2010 with comparable simulations that do not account for the representation of model uncertainty. We find that the stochastic tendency perturbation schemes helped to reduce excessively strong convective activity especially over the Maritime Continent and the tropical Western Pacific, leading to reduced biases of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), cloud cover, precipitation and near-surface winds. Positive impact was also found for the statistics of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), showing an increase in the frequencies and amplitudes of MJO events. Further, the errors of El Niño southern oscillation forecasts become smaller, whereas increases in ensemble spread lead to a better calibrated system if the stochastic tendency is activated. The backscatter scheme has overall neutral impact. Finally, evidence for noise-activated regime transitions has been found in a cluster analysis of mid

  9. Collaborative Group Learning and Knowledge Building to Address Information Systems Project Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelo, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Approximately half of the information systems (IS) projects implemented each year are considered failures. These failed projects cost billions of dollars annually. Failures can be due to projects being delivered late, over-budget, abandoned after significant time and resource investment, or failing to achieve desired results. More often than not,…

  10. Moving Forward? Addressing the Needs of Young At-Risk Students in the Dutch Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Aalsvoort, Geerdina M.

    2007-01-01

    Inclusive education in the Dutch education system has achieved new meaning in the last decade or so. Until 1998, the Netherlands recognized 19 types of special education. Then, two Educational Acts were passed, in 1998 and 2003, that decreased the types of special education by including measures to enhance inclusion of students with special…

  11. Probing the biology of dry biological systems to address the basis of seed longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drying cells reduces molecular mobility and slows chemical and physical reactions. As a result, dry biological systems deteriorate slowly. The time course of deterioration in a population of living cells often follows a sigmoidal pattern in which aging is occurring but no changes to viability are ...

  12. Addressing Indigenous (ICT) Approaches in South-East Asian Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a structural overview about indigenous approaches to learning in South East Asian countries, with a particular reference to education initiatives that have been operating in this region; and especially to investigate information and communication technologies (ICT) systems, in combination with…

  13. Addressing Substance Abuse Treatment Needs of Parents Involved with the Child Welfare System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveros, Arazais; Kaufman, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to synthesize available data to help guide policy and programmatic initiatives for families with substance abuse problems who are involved with the child welfare system, and identify gaps in the research base preventing further refinement of practices in this area. To date, Family Treatment Drug Court and newly developed…

  14. Addressing model error through atmospheric stochastic physical parametrizations: impact on the coupled ECMWF seasonal forecasting system

    PubMed Central

    Weisheimer, Antje; Corti, Susanna; Palmer, Tim; Vitart, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The finite resolution of general circulation models of the coupled atmosphere–ocean system and the effects of sub-grid-scale variability present a major source of uncertainty in model simulations on all time scales. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts has been at the forefront of developing new approaches to account for these uncertainties. In particular, the stochastically perturbed physical tendency scheme and the stochastically perturbed backscatter algorithm for the atmosphere are now used routinely for global numerical weather prediction. The European Centre also performs long-range predictions of the coupled atmosphere–ocean climate system in operational forecast mode, and the latest seasonal forecasting system—System 4—has the stochastically perturbed tendency and backscatter schemes implemented in a similar way to that for the medium-range weather forecasts. Here, we present results of the impact of these schemes in System 4 by contrasting the operational performance on seasonal time scales during the retrospective forecast period 1981–2010 with comparable simulations that do not account for the representation of model uncertainty. We find that the stochastic tendency perturbation schemes helped to reduce excessively strong convective activity especially over the Maritime Continent and the tropical Western Pacific, leading to reduced biases of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), cloud cover, precipitation and near-surface winds. Positive impact was also found for the statistics of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), showing an increase in the frequencies and amplitudes of MJO events. Further, the errors of El Niño southern oscillation forecasts become smaller, whereas increases in ensemble spread lead to a better calibrated system if the stochastic tendency is activated. The backscatter scheme has overall neutral impact. Finally, evidence for noise-activated regime transitions has been found in a cluster analysis of mid

  15. Aquatics Systems Branch: transdisciplinary research to address water-related environmental problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dong, Quan; Walters, Katie D.

    2015-01-01

    The Aquatic Systems Branch at the Fort Collins Science Center is a group of scientists dedicated to advancing interdisciplinary science and providing science support to solve water-related environmental issues. Natural resource managers have an increasing need for scientific information and stakeholders face enormous challenges of increasing and competing demands for water. Our scientists are leaders in ecological flows, riparian ecology, hydroscape ecology, ecosystem management, and contaminant biology. The Aquatic Systems Branch employs and develops state-of-the-science approaches in field investigations, laboratory experiments, remote sensing, simulation and predictive modeling, and decision support tools. We use the aquatic experimental laboratory, the greenhouse, the botanical garden and other advanced facilities to conduct unique research. Our scientists pursue research on the ground, in the rivers, and in the skies, generating and testing hypotheses and collecting quantitative information to support planning and design in natural resource management and aquatic restoration.

  16. Series-connected shaded modules to address partial shading conditions in SPV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Smita; Dahiya, Ratna

    2016-03-01

    With the progress of technology and reduced cost of PV cells, the PV systems are being installed in many countries, including India. Even though this method of power generation has sufficient potential but its effective utilization is still lacking. This is because the output power of PV cells depends on many factors like insolation, temperature, climate conditions prevailing nearby, aging, using modules from different technologies/manufacturers or partial shading conditions. Among these factors, partial shading causes major reduction in output power despite the size of PV systems. As a result, the produced power is lower than the expected value. The connection of modules to each other has great impact on output power if they are prone to partial shading conditions. In this paper, PV arrays are investigated under partial shading conditions. The results show that partial shading losses can be minimized by connecting shaded modules in series rather than in parallel.

  17. Identifying and Addressing Stakeholder Interests in Design Science Research: An Analysis Using Critical Systems Heuristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venable, John R.

    This paper utilises the Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH) framework developed by Werner Ulrich to critically consider the stakeholders and design goals that should be considered as relevant by researchers conducing Design Science Research (DSR). CSH provides a philosophically and theoretically grounded framework and means for critical consideration of the choices of stakeholders considered to be relevant to any system under design consideration. The paper recommends that legitimately undertaken DSR should include witnesses to represent the interests of the future consumers of the outcomes of DSR, i.e., the future clients, decision makers, professionals, and other non-included stakeholders in the future use of the solution technologies to be invented in DSR. The paper further discusses options for how witnesses might be included, who should be witnessed for and obstacles to implementing the recommendations.

  18. A manual for addressing ineffectiveness within a Corrective Action System and driving on-time dispositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallari, Lawrence Anthony Castro

    This project proposes a manual specifically for remedying an ineffective Corrective Action Request System for Company ABC by providing dispositions within the company's quality procedure. A Corrective Action Request System is a corrective action tool that provides a means for employees to engage in the process improvement, problem elimination cycle. At Company ABC, Corrective Action Recommendations (CARs) are not provided with timely dispositions; CARs are being ignored due to a lack of training and awareness of Company ABC's personnel and quality procedures. In this project, Company ABC's quality management software database is scrutinized to identify the number of delinquent, non-dispositioned CARs in 2014. These CARs are correlated with the number of nonconformances generated for the same issue while the CAR is still open. Using secondary data, the primary investigator finds that nonconformances are being remediated at the operational level. However, at the administrative level, CARS are being ignored and forgotten.

  19. Addressing the Challenges of Anomaly Detection for Cyber Physical Energy Grid Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A; Melin, Alexander M; Czejdo, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of cyber communications networks and physical control systems within the energy smart grid introduces a number of new risks. Unfortunately, these risks are largely unknown and poorly understood, yet include very high impact losses from attack and component failures. One important aspect of risk management is the detection of anomalies and changes. However, anomaly detection within cyber security remains a difficult, open problem, with special challenges in dealing with false alert rates and heterogeneous data. Furthermore, the integration of cyber and physical dynamics is often intractable. And, because of their broad scope, energy grid cyber-physical systems must be analyzed at multiple scales, from individual components, up to network level dynamics. We describe an improved approach to anomaly detection that combines three important aspects. First, system dynamics are modeled using a reduced order model for greater computational tractability. Second, a probabilistic and principled approach to anomaly detection is adopted that allows for regulation of false alerts and comparison of anomalies across heterogeneous data sources. Third, a hierarchy of aggregations are constructed to support interactive and automated analyses of anomalies at multiple scales.

  20. Application of fuzzy system theory in addressing the presence of uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Yusmye, A. Y. N.; Goh, B. Y.; Adnan, N. F.; Ariffin, A. K.

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, the combinations of fuzzy system theory with the finite element methods are present and discuss to deal with the uncertainties. The present of uncertainties is needed to avoid for prevent the failure of the material in engineering. There are three types of uncertainties, which are stochastic, epistemic and error uncertainties. In this paper, the epistemic uncertainties have been considered. For the epistemic uncertainty, it exists as a result of incomplete information and lack of knowledge or data. Fuzzy system theory is a non-probabilistic method, and this method is most appropriate to interpret the uncertainty compared to statistical approach when the deal with the lack of data. Fuzzy system theory contains a number of processes started from converting the crisp input to fuzzy input through fuzzification process and followed by the main process known as mapping process. The term mapping here means that the logical relationship between two or more entities. In this study, the fuzzy inputs are numerically integrated based on extension principle method. In the final stage, the defuzzification process is implemented. Defuzzification is an important process to allow the conversion of the fuzzy output to crisp outputs. Several illustrative examples are given and from the simulation, the result showed that propose the method produces more conservative results comparing with the conventional finite element method.

  1. Content-addressable holographic data storage system for invariant pattern recognition of gray-scale images.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Joby; Bhagatji, Alpana; Singh, Kehar

    2010-01-20

    Conventionally a holographic data storage system uses binary digital data as the input pages. We propose and demonstrate the use of a holographic data storage system for the purpose of invariant pattern recognition of gray-scale images. To improve the correlation accuracy for gray-scale images, we present a coding technique, phase Fourier transform (phase-FT) coding, to code a gray-scale image into a random and balanced digital binary image. In addition to the fact that a digital data page is obtained for incorporation into a holographic data storage system, this phase-FT coded image produces dc-free homogenized Fourier spectrum. This coded image can also be treated as an image for further processing, such as synthesis of distortion-invariant filters for invariant pattern recognition. A space-domain synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filter has been synthesized using these phase-FT coded images for rotation-invariant pattern recognition. Both simulation and experimental results are presented. The results show good correlation accuracy in comparison to correlation results obtained for SDF filter synthesized using the original gray-scale images themselves. PMID:20090813

  2. Application of fuzzy system theory in addressing the presence of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusmye, A. Y. N.; Goh, B. Y.; Adnan, N. F.; Ariffin, A. K.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the combinations of fuzzy system theory with the finite element methods are present and discuss to deal with the uncertainties. The present of uncertainties is needed to avoid for prevent the failure of the material in engineering. There are three types of uncertainties, which are stochastic, epistemic and error uncertainties. In this paper, the epistemic uncertainties have been considered. For the epistemic uncertainty, it exists as a result of incomplete information and lack of knowledge or data. Fuzzy system theory is a non-probabilistic method, and this method is most appropriate to interpret the uncertainty compared to statistical approach when the deal with the lack of data. Fuzzy system theory contains a number of processes started from converting the crisp input to fuzzy input through fuzzification process and followed by the main process known as mapping process. The term mapping here means that the logical relationship between two or more entities. In this study, the fuzzy inputs are numerically integrated based on extension principle method. In the final stage, the defuzzification process is implemented. Defuzzification is an important process to allow the conversion of the fuzzy output to crisp outputs. Several illustrative examples are given and from the simulation, the result showed that propose the method produces more conservative results comparing with the conventional finite element method.

  3. Socio-Ecohydrologic Agents And Services: Integrating Human And Natural Components To Address Coupled System Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavao-zuckerman, M.; Pope, A.; Chan, D.; Curl, K.; Gimblett, H. R.; Hough, M.; House-Peters, L.; Lee, R.; Scott, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Riparian corridors in arid regions are highly valued for their relative scarcity, and because healthy riparian systems support high levels of biodiversity, can meet human demand for water and water-related resources and functions. Our team is taking a transdiciplinary social-ecological systems approach to assessing riparian corridor resilience in two watersheds (the San Pedro River in USA and Mexico, and the Rio San Miguel in Mexico) through a project funded by the NSF CNH program ("Strengthening Resilience of Arid Region Riparian Corridors"). Multiple perspectives are integrated in the project, including hydrology, ecology, institutional dynamics, and decision making (at the level of both policy and individual choice), as well as the perspectives of various stakeholder groups and individuals in the watersheds. Here we discuss initial findings that center around linking changes in ecohydrology and livelihoods related to decisions in response to climatic, ecological, and social change. The research team is implementing two approaches to integrate the disparate disciplines participating in the research (and the varied perspectives among the stakeholders in this binational riparian context): (1) ecosystem service assessment, and (2) agent based model simulation. We are developing an ecosystem service perspective that provides a bridge between ecological dynamics in the landscape and varied stakeholder perspectives on the implications of ecohydrology for well-being (economic, cultural, ecological). Services are linked on one hand to the spatial patterns of traits of individuals within species (allowing a more predictive application of ecosystem services as they vary with community change in time), and to stakeholder perspectives (facilitating integration of ecosystem services into our understanding of decision making processes) in a case study in the San Pedro River National Conservation Area. The agent- based model (ABM) approach incorporates the influence of human

  4. Whole Neuraxis Irradiation to Address Central Nervous System Relapse in High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Croog, Victoria J.; Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Souweidane, Mark M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2010-11-01

    Background: As systemic control of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) has improved, relapse in the central nervous system (CNS) is an increasingly recognized entity that carries a grim prognosis. This study describes the use of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for CNS relapse and compares outcomes to patients who received focal radiotherapy (RT). Methods: A retrospective query identified 29 children with NB treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center since 1987 who received RT for CNS relapse. At CNS relapse, 16 patients received CSI (median dose, 2160cGy), and 13 received focal RT. Of those who underwent CSI, 14 (88%) received intra-Ommaya (IO) radioimmunotherapy (RIT); one patient in the non-CSI cohort received IO-RIT. Results: Patient characteristics were similar between the groups. Time to CNS relapse was 20 and 17 months for the CSI and non-CSI cohorts, respectively. At a median follow-up of 28 months, 12 patients (75%) in the CSI group are alive without CNS disease, including two patients with isolated skeletal relapse. Another patient is alive without disease after a brain relapse was retreated with RT. Three patients died-one with no NB at autopsy, one of CNS disease, and one of systemic disease. The two patients who died of NB did not receive IO-RIT. All 13 patients in the non-CSI cohort died at a median of 8.8 months. Conclusions: Low-dose CSI together with IO-RIT provides durable CNS remissions and improved survival compared with focal RT and conventional therapies. Further evaluation of long-term NB survivors after CSI is warranted to determine the treatment consequences for this cohort.

  5. Hydrodynamic guiding for addressing subsets of immobilized cells and molecules in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Brevig, Thomas; Krühne, Ulrich; Kahn, Rachel A; Ahl, Thomas; Beyer, Michael; Pedersen, Lars H

    2003-01-01

    Background The interest in microfluidics and surface patterning is increasing as the use of these technologies in diverse biomedical applications is substantiated. Controlled molecular and cellular surface patterning is a costly and time-consuming process. Methods for keeping multiple separate experimental conditions on a patterned area are, therefore, needed to amplify the amount of biological information that can be retrieved from a patterned surface area. We describe, in three examples of biomedical applications, how this can be achieved in an open microfluidic system, by hydrodynamically guiding sample fluid over biological molecules and living cells immobilized on a surface. Results A microfluidic format of a standard assay for cell-membrane integrity showed a fast and dose-dependent toxicity of saponin on mammalian cells. A model of the interactions of human mononuclear leukocytes and endothelial cells was established. By contrast to static adhesion assays, cell-cell adhesion in this dynamic model depended on cytokine-mediated activation of both endothelial and blood cells. The microfluidic system allowed the use of unprocessed blood as sample material, and a specific and fast immunoassay for measuring the concentration of C-reactive protein in whole blood was demonstrated. Conclusion The use of hydrodynamic guiding made multiple and dynamic experimental conditions on a small surface area possible. The ability to change the direction of flow and produce two-dimensional grids can increase the number of reactions per surface area even further. The described microfluidic system is widely applicable, and can take advantage of surfaces produced by current and future techniques for patterning in the micro- and nanometer scale. PMID:12875662

  6. Fluorescence monitoring of riboswitch transcription regulation using a dual molecular beacon assay

    PubMed Central

    Chinnappan, Raja; Dubé, Audrey; Lemay, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are mRNA elements that specifically bind cellular metabolites and control gene expression by modifying their structure. As riboswitches often control essential genes in pathogenic bacteria, riboswitches have been proposed as new targets for antibiotics. High-throughput screening provides a powerful approach to identify riboswitch ligand analogs that could act as powerful antibacterial drugs. Biochemical assays have already been used to find riboswitch-binding analogs, but those methods do take into account the transcriptional context for riboswitch regulation. As the importance of co-transcriptional ligand binding has been shown for several riboswitches, it is vital to develop an assay that screens riboswitch-binding analogs during the transcriptional process. Here, we describe the development of a dual molecular beacon system monitoring the transcriptional regulation activity of the Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch. This system relies on two molecular beacons that enable the monitoring of transcription efficiency, as well as the regulatory activity of the riboswitch. Different analogs were tested using our system, and a good correlation was observed between riboswitch activity and reported metabolite affinities. This method is specific, reliable and could be applied at the high-throughput level for the identification of new potential antibiotics targeting any riboswitch-regulating gene expression at the mRNA level. PMID:23525464

  7. Organizational structure for addressing the attributes of the ideal healthcare delivery system.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Mark; Halasyamani, Lakshmi K; McMurtrie, Daniel; Hoffman, Denise; Polley, Theodore; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) report Crossing the Quality Chasm described the aims, characteristics, and components of the ideal healthcare system but did not provide the templates of organizational structures needed to achieve this vision. In this article, we review three principles of effective organizations to inform the design of a facilitative clinical care structure: a focus on the patient and caregiving team, the use of information, and connectivity with executive and operational leadership. These concepts can be realized in an organizational chart that is inverted to place patients and their care providers on top, flat with few degrees of separation between patients and executive leadership, and webbed to reflect connections to the professional and ancillary departments. An example of a recently implemented clinical care infrastructure follows this discussion. This model divides the patient population into nonexclusive subgroups, each with an interdisciplinary collaborative practice team that oversees and advocates the subgroup's clinical care activities. The organization's interdisciplinary practice council, in conjunction with its physician and nursing practice councils, backs these teams, providing a second layer of support. The council layer is connected to the health system board through the clinical oversight group, whose core membership consists of council chairs, the chief executive officer, and the chief medical and nursing officers. Clinical information for planning and evaluation is available at all levels. This model provides a framework for identifying the individuals and processes necessary to achieve IOM's vision. PMID:19070335

  8. Health care policies addressing transgender inmates in prison systems in the United States.

    PubMed

    Brown, George R; McDuffie, Everett

    2009-10-01

    Inmates with gender identity disorders (GID) pose special challenges to policy makers in U.S. prison systems. Transgender persons are likely overrepresented in prisons; a reasonable estimate is that at least 750 transgender prisoners were in custody in 2007. Using the Freedom of Information Act, requests were mailed to each state, the District of Columbia, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons in 2007. The requests were for copies of policies, directives, memos, or other documents concerning placement and health care access of transgender inmates. By April 2008, 46 responses were received; 6 states did not reply. Information was qualitatively analyzed and summarized. There was substantial disparity in transgender health care for inmates with GID or related conditions. Most systems allowed for diagnostic evaluations. There was wide variability in access to cross-sex hormones, with some allowing for continuation of treatment and others allowing for both continuation and de novo initiation of treatment. There was uniformity in denial of surgical treatments for GID. PMID:19635927

  9. Addressing geometric nonlinearities with cantilever microelectromechanical systems: Beyond the Duffing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, E.; Bunkov, Yu. M.; Godfrin, H.

    2010-12-01

    We report on low-temperature measurements performed on microelectromechanical systems driven deeply into the nonlinear regime. The materials are kept in their elastic domain while the observed nonlinearity is purely of geometrical origin. Two techniques are used, harmonic drive and free decay. For each case, we present an analytic theory fitting the data. The harmonic drive is fit with a modified Lorentzian line shape obtained from an extended version of Landau and Lifshitz’s nonlinear theory. The evolution in the time domain is fit with an amplitude-dependent frequency decaying function derived from the Lindstedt-Poincaré theory of nonlinear differential equations. The technique is perfectly generic and can be straightforwardly adapted to any mechanical device made of ideally elastic constituents, and which can be reduced to a single degree of freedom, for an experimental definition of its nonlinear dynamics equation.

  10. How Do Integrated Health Care Systems Address Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Colon Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, Kim F.; Patel, Manali I.; Ma, Yifei; Schmidt, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) disparities have persisted over the last two decades. CRC is a complex disease requiring multidisciplinary care from specialists who may be geographically separated. Few studies have assessed the association between integrated health care system (IHS) CRC care quality, survival, and disparities. The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to an IHS positively affects quality of care, risk of mortality, and disparities. Patients and Methods This retrospective secondary-data analysis study, using the California Cancer Registry linked to state discharge abstracts of patients treated for colon cancer (2001 to 2006), compared the rates of National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline–based care, the hazard of mortality, and racial/ethnic disparities in an IHS versus other settings. Results More than 30,000 patient records were evaluated. The IHS had overall higher rates of adherence to NCCN guidelines. Propensity score–matched Cox models showed an independent and protective association between care in the IHS and survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% CI, 0.85 to 0.90). This advantage persisted across stage groups. Black race was associated with increased hazard of mortality in all other settings (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.27); however, there was no disparity within the IHS for any minority group (P > .11 for all groups) when compared with white race. Conclusion The IHS delivered higher rates of evidence-based care and was associated with lower 5-year mortality. Racial/ethnic disparities in survival were absent in the IHS. Integrated systems may serve as the cornerstone for developing accountable care organizations poised to improve cancer outcomes and eliminate disparities under health care reform. PMID:25624437

  11. Permit compliance system (PCS) facility address and permit information file national listing of major facilities (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Permit Compliance System (PCS) is an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) national computerized management information system that records water-discharge permit data on more than 64,000 wastewater treatment facilities nationwide. This system automates entry, updating, and retrieval of National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) data and tracks permit issuance, permit limits, monitoring data, and other data pertaining to facilities regulated under NPDES. The Permit Compliance System (PCS) Facility Address and Permit Information File contains primary mailing address information as well as permit number, facility type, and cognizant official for all active NPDES permitted facilities, general facility and permit events (e.g., issuance and expiration dates, types of ownership code, SIC code, and location including longitude and latitude) for all active NPDES permitted facilities for the most recent year. There are approximately 49,000 industrial facilities and 15,000 municipal facilities regulated by NPDES. This data is updated twice a year. The diskette contains only major facilities which are facilities having a design or actual flow of one million gallons per day or greater, a service population of 10,000 or greater, or a significant impact on water quality, i.e., with a potential for toxic discharge, located close to a drinking water intake, discharging into stressed receiving waters, or requiring advanced treatment. Approximately 7100 permits are issued to major facilities. Municipal and non-municipal facilities not meeting the above requirements are categorized as minor.

  12. Simple, rapid detection of influenza A (H1N1) viruses using a highly sensitive peptide-based molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Guk, Kyeonghye; Kim, Hyeran; Chung, Bong-Hyun; Jung, Juyeon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide-based molecular beacon (PEP-MB) was prepared for the simple, rapid, and specific detection of H1N1 viruses using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system. The PEP-MB exhibited minimal fluorescence in its "closed" hairpin structure. However, in the presence of H1N1 viruses, the specific recognition of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of H1 strains by the PEP-MB causes the beacon to assume an "open" structure that emits strong fluorescence. The PEP-MB could detect H1N1 viruses within 15 min or even 5 min and can exhibit strong fluorescence even at low viral concentrations, with a detection limit of 4 copies. PMID:26509476

  13. Considerations for Community-Based mHealth Initiatives: Insights From Three Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) is gaining widespread attention for its potential to engage patients in their health and health care in their daily lives. Emerging evidence suggests that mHealth interventions can be used effectively to support behavior change, but numerous challenges remain when implementing these programs at the community level. This paper provides an overview of considerations when implementing community-based mHealth initiatives, based on the experiences of three Beacon Communities across the United States that have launched text messaging (short message service, SMS) pilot programs aimed at diabetes risk reduction and disease management. The paper addresses lessons learned and suggests strategies to overcome challenges related to developing text message content, conducting marketing and outreach, enrolling participants, engaging providers, evaluating program effectiveness, and sustaining and scaling the programs. PMID:24128406

  14. Moonrise: Sampling the South Pole-Aitken Basin to Address Problems of Solar System Significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.; Shearer, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    A mission to land in the giant South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin on the Moon's southern farside and return a sample to Earth for analysis is a high priority for Solar System Science. Such a sample would be used to determine the age of the SPA impact; the chronology of the basin, including the ages of basins and large impacts within SPA, with implications for early Solar System dynamics and the magmatic history of the Moon; the age and composition of volcanic rocks within SPA; the origin of the thorium signature of SPA with implications for the origin of exposed materials and thermal evolution of the Moon; and possibly the magnetization that forms a strong anomaly especially evident in the northern parts of the SPA basin. It is well known from studies of the Apollo regolith that rock fragments found in the regolith form a representative collection of many different rock types delivered to the site by the impact process (Fig. 1). Such samples are well documented to contain a broad suite of materials that reflect both the local major rock formations, as well as some exotic materials from far distant sources. Within the SPA basin, modeling of the impact ejection process indicates that regolith would be dominated by SPA substrate, formed at the time of the SPA basin-forming impact and for the most part moved around by subsequent impacts. Consistent with GRAIL data, the SPA impact likely formed a vast melt body tens of km thick that took perhaps several million years to cool, but that nonetheless represents barely an instant in geologic time that should be readily apparent through integrated geochronologic studies involving multiple chronometers. It is anticipated that a statistically significant number of age determinations would yield not only the age of SPA but also the age of several prominent nearby basins and large craters within SPA. This chronology would provide a contrast to the Imbrium-dominated chronology of the nearside Apollo samples and an independent test of

  15. MoonRise: A US Robotic Sample-Return Mission to Address Solar System Wide Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, Bradley; Warren, P. H.; Shearer, C. K.; Alkalai, L.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Huertas, A.; MoonRise Team

    2010-10-01

    The MoonRise lunar sample-return mission is currently funded to perform a Phase A Concept Study as part of NASA's New Frontiers Program. Exploration of the great (d = 2500 km) South Pole-Aitken basin has been assigned high priority in several NRC reports. MoonRise would be the first US robotic sample-return mission from another planetary surface. Key strengths of the MoonRise mission include: 1. Most importantly, MoonRise will sample the SPA basin's interior on the Moon's southern far side, instead of the same small region near the center of the near side as all previous (Apollo and Luna) sampling missions. Science objectives for the SPA sample-return mission fall into three main categories: (1) testing the impact cataclysm hypothesis, with its profound implications for the evolution of the Solar System and for life on the Earth at 3.9 Ga; (2) constraining basin-scale impact processes; and (3) constraining how the Moon's interior varies laterally on a global scale, and with depth on a scale of many tens of kilometers; and thus how the lunar crust formed and evolved. 2. MoonRise will greatly enhance scientific return by using a sieving mechanism to concentrate small rock fragments. As an example, for rocks ɳ mm in size (minimum dimension) and a target regolith of approximately average grain-size distribution, the acquisition yield will be improved by a factor of 50. 3. MoonRise will obtain a total of at least one kilogram of lunar material, including 100 g of bulk, unsieved soil for comparison with remote sensing data. 4. MoonRise will exploit data from LRO, Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, and other recent remote-sensing missions, in particular LRO's Narrow Angle Camera (NAC), to ensure a safe landing by avoidance of areas with abundant boulders, potentially hazardous craters, and/or high slopes mapped from high resolution stereo images.

  16. Potential enhancements to addressing programmatic risk in the tank waste remediation system (TWRS) program

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, A.; Fassbender, L.; Bilyard, G.; Levine, L.

    1996-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Risk Management methodology development task. The objective of this task was to develop risk management methodology focused on (1) the use of programmatic risk information in making TWRS architecture selection decisions and (2) the identification/evaluation/selection of TWRS risk-handling actions. Methods for incorporating programmatic risk/uncertainty estimates into trade studies are provided for engineers/analysts. Methods for identifying, evaluating, and selecting risk-handling actions are provided for managers. The guidance provided in this report is designed to help decision-makers make difficult judgments. Current approaches to architecture selection decisions and identification/evaluation/selection of risk-handling actions are summarized. Three categories of sources of programmatic risk (parametric, external, and organizational) are examined. Multiple analytical approaches are presented to enhance the current alternative generation and analysis (AGA) and risk-handling procedures. Appendix A describes some commercially available risk management software tools and Appendix B provides a brief introduction to quantification of risk attitudes. The report provides three levels of analysis for enhancing the AGA Procedure: (1) qualitative discussion coupled with estimated uncertainty ranges for scores in the alternatives-by-criteria matrix; (2) formal elicitation of probability distributions for the alternative scores; and (3) a formal, more structured, comprehensive risk analysis. A framework is also presented for using the AGA programmatic risk analysis results in making better decisions. The report also presents two levels of analysis for evaluation and selection of risk-handling actions: (1) qualitative analysis and judgmental rankings of alternative actions, and (2) Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART).

  17. Lameness detection challenges in automated milking systems addressed with partial least squares discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E; Klaas, I; Amigo, J M; Bro, R; Enevoldsen, C

    2014-12-01

    Lameness causes decreased animal welfare and leads to higher production costs. This study explored data from an automatic milking system (AMS) to model on-farm gait scoring from a commercial farm. A total of 88 cows were gait scored once per week, for 2 5-wk periods. Eighty variables retrieved from AMS were summarized week-wise and used to predict 2 defined classes: nonlame and clinically lame cows. Variables were represented with 2 transformations of the week summarized variables, using 2-wk data blocks before gait scoring, totaling 320 variables (2 × 2 × 80). The reference gait scoring error was estimated in the first week of the study and was, on average, 15%. Two partial least squares discriminant analysis models were fitted to parity 1 and parity 2 groups, respectively, to assign the lameness class according to the predicted probability of being lame (score 3 or 4/4) or not lame (score 1/4). Both models achieved sensitivity and specificity values around 80%, both in calibration and cross-validation. At the optimum values in the receiver operating characteristic curve, the false-positive rate was 28% in the parity 1 model, whereas in the parity 2 model it was about half (16%), which makes it more suitable for practical application; the model error rates were, 23 and 19%, respectively. Based on data registered automatically from one AMS farm, we were able to discriminate nonlame and lame cows, where partial least squares discriminant analysis achieved similar performance to the reference method. PMID:25282423

  18. Ultrasonic Localization of Mobile Robot Using Active Beacons and Code Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peca, Marek

    Ultrasonic localization system for planar mobile robot inside of a restricted field is presented. System is based on stationary active beacons and measurement of distances between beacons and robot, using cross-correlation of pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBSes). Due to high demand of dynamic reserve imposed by range ratio in our specific task, both code- as well as frequency-divided media access has been utilized. For the same reason, 1-bit signal quantization has been abandoned in favor of higher resolution in receiver analog-to-digital conversion. Finally, dynamic estimation of the position is recommended over analytic calculation. The final solution uses the extended Kalman filter (EKF), equipped with erroneous measurement detection, initial state computation, and recovery from being lost. EKF also performs data-fusion with odometry measurement. Unlike the approach in majority of works on mobile robot localization, a model, actuated solely by additive process noise, is presented for the data-fusion. It offers estimation of heading angle, and remains locally observable. Simplistic double integrator model of motion dynamics is described, and the importance of clock dynamics is emphasized.

  19. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  20. Opening addresses.

    PubMed

    Chukudebelu, W O; Lucas, A O; Ransome-kuti, O; Akinla, O; Obayi, G U

    1988-01-01

    The theme of the 3rd International Conference of the Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria (SOGON) held October 26, 1986 in Enugu was maternal morbidity and mortality in Africa. The opening addresses emphasize the high maternal mortality rate in Africa and SOGON's dedication to promoting women's health and welfare. In order to reduce maternal mortality, the scope of this problem must be made evident by gathering accurate mortality rates through maternity care monitoring and auditing. Governments, health professionals, educators, behavioral scientists, and communication specialists have a responsibility to improve maternal health services in this country. By making the population aware of this problem through education, measures can be taken to reduce the presently high maternal mortality rates. Nigerian women are physically unprepared for childbirth; therefore, balanced diets and disease prevention should be promoted. Since about 40% of deliveries are unmanaged, training for traditional birth attendants should be provided. Furthermore, family planning programs should discourage teenage pregnancies, encourage birth spacing and small families, and promote the use of family planning techniques among men. The problem of child bearing and rearing accompanied by hard work should also be investigated. For practices to change so that maternal mortality rates can be reduced, attitudes must be changed such that the current rates are viewed as unacceptable. PMID:12179275

  1. Reliability analysis of a multiple-laser-diode beacon for intersatellite links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauroschat, Andreas

    1991-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate and evaluate different design options for the SILEX acquisition beacon. A minimum specification for the quality of the optical coupling between the laser diodes and the beacon output for which the beacon meets its power specification with the required reliability is established. An improved reliability is demonstrated for beacon designs with an optimized thermal design including the control of the thermal wall temperature and the conductive coupling between the beacon emission unit and the terminal radiator. Such an optimized thermal design also offers the possibility of mass savings of the optical terminal, since only a very light thermal wall is needed for the beacon. The total power control of the laser diodes is demonstrated to be the best mode of operation.

  2. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  3. Presidential address.

    PubMed

    Vohra, U

    1993-07-01

    The Secretary of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare serves as Chair of the Executive Council of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay. She addressed its 35th convocation in 1993. Global population stands at 5.43 billion and increases by about 90 million people each year. 84 million of these new people are born in developing countries. India contributes 17 million new people annually. The annual population growth rate in India is about 2%. Its population size will probably surpass 1 billion by the 2000. High population growth rates are a leading obstacle to socioeconomic development in developing countries. Governments of many developing countries recognize this problem and have expanded their family planning programs to stabilize population growth. Asian countries that have done so and have completed the fertility transition include China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Burma, Malaysia, North Korea, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam have not yet completed the transition. Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Nepal, and Pakistan are half-way through the transition. High population growth rates put pressure on land by fragmenting finite land resources, increasing the number of landless laborers and unemployment, and by causing considerable rural-urban migration. All these factors bring about social stress and burden civic services. India has reduced its total fertility rate from 5.2 to 3.9 between 1971 and 1991. Some Indian states have already achieved replacement fertility. Considerable disparity in socioeconomic development exists among states and districts. For example, the states of Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh have female literacy rates lower than 27%, while that for Kerala is 87%. Overall, infant mortality has fallen from 110 to 80 between 1981 and 1990. In Uttar Pradesh, it has fallen from 150 to 98, while it is at 17 in Kerala. India needs innovative approaches to increase contraceptive prevalence rates

  4. Secondary Education Systemic Issues: Addressing Possible Contributors to a Leak in the Science Education Pipeline and Potential Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Hollie

    2005-06-01

    To maintain the legacy of cutting edge scientific innovation in the United States our country must address the many pressing issues facing science education today. One of the most important issues relating to science education is the under-representation of African Americans and Hispanics in the science, technology, and engineering workforce. Foreshadowing such under-representation in the workforce are the disproportionately low rates of African American and Hispanic students attaining college degrees in science and related fields. Evidence suggests disparate systemic factors in secondary science education are contributing to disproportionately low numbers of African American and Hispanic students in the science education pipeline. The present paper embarks on a critical analysis of the issue by elucidating some of the systemic factors within secondary education that contribute to the leak in the science education pipeline. In addition, this review offers a synthesis and explication of some of the policies and programs being implemented to address disparate systemic factors in secondary schools. Finally, recommendations are offered regarding potential mechanisms by which disparities may be alleviated.

  5. Addressing the epidemiologic transition in the former Soviet Union: strategies for health system and public health reform in Russia.

    PubMed Central

    Tulchinsky, T H; Varavikova, E A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This paper reviews Russia's health crisis, financing, and organization and public health reform needs. METHODS. The structure, policy, supply of services, and health status indicators of Russia's health system are examined. RESULTS. Longevity is declining; mortality rates from cardiovascular diseases and trauma are high and rising; maternal and infant mortality are high. Vaccine-preventable diseases have reappeared in epidemic form. Nutrition status is problematic. CONCLUSIONS. The crisis relates to Russia's economic transition, but it also goes deep into the former Soviet health system. The epidemiologic transition from a predominance of infectious to noninfectious diseases was addressed by increasing the quantity of services. The health system lacked mechanisms for epidemiologic or economic analysis and accountability to the public. Policy and funding favored hospitals over ambulatory care and individual routine checkups over community-oriented preventive approaches. Reform since 1991 has centered on national health insurance and decentralized management of services. A national health strategy to address fundamental public health problems is recommended. PMID:8604754

  6. Q-Band (37-41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37-41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cut-paraboloidal reflector.

  7. Q-Band (37 to 41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37 to 41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cutparaboloidal reflector.

  8. SU-E-J-257: Image Artifacts Caused by Implanted Calypso Beacons in MRI Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of Calypso Beacon-transponders in patients can cause artifacts during MRI imaging studies. This could be a problem for post-treatment follow up of cancer patients using MRI studies to evaluate metastasis and for functional imaging studies.This work assesses (1) the volume immediately surrounding the transponders that will not be visualized by the MRI due to the beacons, and (2) the dependence of the non-visualized volume on beacon orientation, and scanning techniques. Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study (1) water filled box, (2) and a 2300 cc block of pork meat. Calypso beacons were implanted in the phantoms both in parallel and perpendicular orientations with respect to the MR scanner magnetic field. MR image series of the phantom were obtained with on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM with multiple pulse sequences, for example, T1-weighted fast field echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo. Results: On average, a no-signal region with 2 cm radius and 3 cm length was measured. Image artifacts are more significant when beacons are placed parallel to scanner magnetic field; the no-signal area around the beacon was about 0.5 cm larger in orthogonal orientation. The no-signal region surrounding the beacons slightly varies in dimension for the different pulse sequences. Conclusion: The use of Calypso beacons can prohibit the use of MRI studies in post-treatment assessments, especially in the immediate region surrounding the implanted beacon. A characterization of the MR scanner by identifying the no-signal regions due to implanted beacons is essential. This may render the use of Calypso beacons useful for some cases and give the treating physician a chance to identify those patients prior to beacon implantation.

  9. Molecular Beacons in Biomedical Detection and Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmi; Sohn, DoSung; Tan, Weihong

    2008-01-01

    Among the diverse nucleic acid probes, molecular beacons (MBs) have shown their excellent potential in a variety of basic researches and practical applications. Their excellent selectivity, sensitivity, and detection without separation have led them to be particularly useful in real-time intracellular monitoring of gene expression, development of biosensors, and clinical diagnostics. This paper will focus on the properties of various MBs and discuss their potential applications. PMID:18784800

  10. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Experiments were continued this quarter with the objective of improving the carbon deposition efficiency using a Paraho retort off-gas mixture. Analysis has shown that the use of the Paraho off-gas to make hydrogen would be attractive if the ratio of the heat content of the feedgas to the heat content of the hydrogen produced is less than 3. Experimental conditions to achieve this ratio have been established. Recent work had shown that the volume of a BEACON supported catalyst bed increased with an increase in carbon loading level. Four series of experiments were performed where sieve analyses were made after one or more BEACON process cycles. These tests showed that the volume expansion is due to an increase in the number and size of the larger catalyst particles. The bench-scale testing of unsupported catalysts concentrated in two areas: (a) the completion of batch testing in the 4-inch reactor, and (b) the construction of the Tandem Reactor Unit which will permit the transfer of solids between the carbon deposition and steam gasification reactors during testing. It was found that a second stage of steaming enhanced the methane yield. Approximately 80% of the construction and instrumentation of the Tandem Reactor Unit was completed during the quarter. A conceptual design was completed for an Integrated Test Facility (ITF) which would permit research on the BEACON process at a scale sufficient for scale-up. 17 figures, 14 tables.

  11. Preliminary Statistics from the NASA Alphasat Beacon Receiver in Milan, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Nessel, James A.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have initiated a joint propagation campaign within the framework of the Alphasat propagation experiment to characterize rain attenuation, scintillation, and gaseous absorption effects of the atmosphere in the 40 GHz band. NASA GRC has developed and installed a KQ-band (20-40 GHz) beacon receiver at the POLIMI campus in Milan, Italy, which receives the 20-40 GHz signals broadcast from the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP5 beacon payload. The primary goal of these measurements is to develop a physical model to improve predictions of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we provide an overview of the design and data calibration procedure, and present 6 months of preliminary statistics of the NASA propagation terminal, which has been installed and operating in Milan since May 2014. The Q-band receiver has demonstrated a dynamic range of 40 dB at an 8-Hz sampling rate. A weather station with an optical disdrometer is also installed to characterize rain drop size distribution for correlation with physical based models

  12. Preliminary Statistics from the NASA Alphasat Beacon Receiver in Milan, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Morse, Jacquelynne; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have initiated a joint propagation campaign within the framework of the Alphasat propagation experiment to characterize rain attenuation, scintillation, and gaseous absorption effects of the atmosphere in the 40 gigahertz band. NASA GRC has developed and installed a K/Q-band (20/40 gigahertz) beacon receiver at the POLIMI campus in Milan, Italy, which receives the 20/40 gigahertz signals broadcast from the Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP no. 5 beacon payload. The primary goal of these measurements is to develop a physical model to improve predictions of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we provide an overview of the design and data calibration procedure, and present 6 months of preliminary statistics of the NASA propagation terminal, which has been installed and operating in Milan since May 2014. The Q-band receiver has demonstrated a dynamic range of 40 decibels at an 8-hertz sampling rate. A weather station with an optical disdrometer is also installed to characterize rain drop size distribution for correlation with physical based models.

  13. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  14. Beacon recognition and tracking based on omni-vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baofeng; Liu, Yuli; Cao, Zuoliang

    2008-12-01

    Omnidirectional vision (Omni-vision) has the feature that an extremely wide view can be achieved simultaneously. The omni-image brings a highly unavoidable inherent distortion while it provides hemispherical field of views. In this paper, a method called Spherical Perspective Projection is used for correction of such distorted image. Omni-vision target recognition and tracking with fisheye lens for AGVs appears definite significant since its advantage of acquiring all vision information of the three-dimensional space once. A novel Beacon Model and Omni-vision tracker for mobile robots is described. At present, the research of target model has many different problems, such as outdoor illumination, target veiling, target losing. Specially, outdoor illumination and beacon veiling are the key problems which need an effective method to solve. The new beacon model which features particular topology shape can be recognized in the outdoors with part veiled of the object. In this paper an improved omni-vision object tracking method based on mean shift algorithm is proposed. The mean shift algorithm which is a powerful technique for tracking objects in image sequences with complex background has been proved to be successful for the fast computation and effective tracking problems. The recognition and tracking functions have been demonstrated on experimental platform.

  15. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A λ=3  mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds. PMID:25607971

  16. Health assessment for Beacon Heights Landfill site, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD072122062. Addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-20

    The Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's to 1979, municipal and industrial wastes were disposed of at the landfill. Leachate from the landfill has migrated into the local groundwater aquifers. Two residential wells to the northwest of the site have been contaminated with site-related contaminants. This site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. As noted in Human Exposure Pathways Section below, human exposure to benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethane, and methylene chloride may have occurred via ingestion, inhalation, and direct dermal contact with contaminated groundwater. No health study follow-up is indicated at this time.

  17. Policy Options for Addressing Health System and Human Resources for Health Crisis in Liberia Post-Ebola Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Budy, Fidel C.T.

    2015-01-01

    Qualified healthcare workers within an effective health system are critical in promoting and achieving greater health outcomes such as those espoused in the Millennium Development Goals. Liberia is currently struggling with the effects of a brutal 14-year long civil war that devastated health infrastructures and caused most qualified health workers to flee and settle in foreign countries. The current output of locally trained health workers is not adequate for the tasks at hand. The recent Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) exposed the failings of the Liberian healthcare system. There is limited evidence of policies that could be replicated in Liberia to encourage qualified diaspora Liberian health workers to return and contribute to managing the phenomenon. This paper reviews the historical context for the human resources for health crisis in Liberia; it critically examines two context-specific health policy options to address the crisis, and recommends reverse brain drain as a policy option to address the immediate and critical crisis facing the health care sector in Liberia.

  18. Expression of the beacon gene in the rat adrenal gland: direct inhibitory effect of beacon[47-73] on aldosterone secretion from dispersed adrenal zona glomerulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Rucinski, Marcin; Neri, Giuliano; Di Liddo, Rosa; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2004-02-01

    Beacon gene was recently identified in the rat hypothalamus, and there is evidence that beacon may be involved in the functional regulation of neuroendocrine axes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry showed the expression of beacon mRNA and protein in the rat adrenal gland, especially in the cortex. Beacon[47-73], at a concentration over 10(-7) M decreased basal aldosterone secretion from dispersed rat zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells, without affecting the ACTH-stimulated one. Basal and agonist-stimulated corticosterone secretion from dispersed zona fasciculata-reticularis cells and catecholamine release from adrenomedullary slices were unaffected by beacon[47-73]. The suppressive effect of beacon[47-73] on aldosterone secretion from ZG cells was abolished by either H-89 or calphostin-C, which are inhibitors of protein kinase A and C signaling cascades. Taken together, these findings allow us to suggest that beacon can be included in the group of regulatory peptides involved in the fine tuning of ZG secretory activity. PMID:14719126

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Beacon Heights Landfill, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-23

    The Beacon Heights Landfill site is located two miles east of the intersection of Connecticut Routes 8 and 42 in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's until 1970 the site was known as Betkoski's Dump and consisted of approximately six acres on which active dumping occurred. According to records at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP), waste accepted at the dump included municipal refuse, rubber, plastics, and industrial chemicals and sludges. Landfill operations consisted primarily of open burning along with burial of noncombustibles. In 1970, the Betkoski property and adjacent properties totaling 83 acres were purchased by the Murtha Trucking Company, and the name was changed to Beacon Heights, Inc. Landfill. At this time, the landfill area was expanded to approximately 30 acres. Records of the CT DEP, including a 1973 report by the landfill engineer, listed rubber, plastics, oils, hydrocarbons, chemical liquids and sludges, and solvents as being disposed of at the landfill by the trucking company. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

  20. Logic nanoparticle beacon triggered by the binding-induced effect of multiple inputs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Dong, Chen; Dong, Yafei; Liu, Shi; Pan, Linqiang; Zhang, Cheng

    2014-08-27

    Recently, the toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement reaction has been widely used in detecting molecular signals. However, traditional strand displacement, without cooperative signaling among DNA inputs, is insufficient for the design of more complicated nanodevices. In this work, a logic computing system is established using the cooperative "binding-induced" mechanism, based on the AuNP-based beacons, in which five kinds of multiple-input logic gates have been constructed. This system can recognize DNA and protein streptavidin simultaneously. Finally, the manipulations of the logic system are also demonstrated by controlling programmed conjugate DNA/AuNP clusters. This study provides the possibility of detecting multiple input signals and designing complex nanodevices that can be potentially applied to the detection of multiple molecular targets and the construction of large-scale DNA-based computation. PMID:25089841

  1. President's Address

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John

    1928-01-01

    The paper recalls how matters veterinary were regarded forty-six years ago, what has been achieved since, and future progress is reflected. The paper is divided into parts relating respectively to: (a) medicine; (b) surgery (c) teaching and research; (d) administration. Formerly, glanders and farcy, and rabies, though acknowledged as contagious and specific, were also believed to be of spontaneous origin. Experiences with regard to these two diseases, and the mallein test for glanders, are related. The discovery of the Bacillus anthracis led to the development of veterinary research, but for some time confusion existed. Tuberculosis was believed to be endogenous and the result of the absorption of caseous products of a previous inflammation. Treatment of “milk fever” in cows by udder inflation and biochemistry in relation to that disease are considered. The advance in veterinary surgery stands out most prominently; in canine practice, operations are now attempted which were never thought possible in the early days. Allusion is made to the recent formidable operations for the cure of “windsucking” in horses, and for traumatic pericarditis in bovines. The powers of observance of the old practitioners in diagnosing lameness, and some of the old methods of treatment for lameness, are supported. The great progress in veterinary research is referred to, also its advantages from an imperial point of view. The causative agents of those diseases which are at present ultravisible, particularly foot-and-mouth disease, will probably be found, and better methods of prevention result. In training, thorough instruction in animal physiology, animal nutrition and biochemistry is advocated, also affiliation of veterinary colleges to universities, the individuality of such colleges, and the one-portal system of qualification being maintained. PMID:19986709

  2. Addressing System Integration Issues Required for the Developmente of Distributed Wind-Hydrogen Energy Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D; Salehfar, H.; Harrison, K.W.; Dale, N.; Biaku, C.; Peters, A.J.; Hernandez-Pacheco: E.

    2008-04-01

    Wind generated electricity is a variable resource. Hydrogen can be generated as an energy storage media, but is costly. Advancements in power electronics and system integration are needed to make a viable system. Therefore, the long-term goal of the efforts at the University of North Dakota is to merge wind energy, hydrogen production, and fuel cells to bring emission-free and reliable power to commercial viability. The primary goals include 1) expand system models as a tool to investigate integration and control issues, 2) examine long-term effects of wind-electrolysis performance from a systematic perspective, and 3) collaborate with NREL and industrial partners to design, integrate, and quantify system improvements by implementing a single power electronics package to interface wild AC to PEM stack DC requirements. This report summarizes the accomplishments made during this project.

  3. New and improved proteomics technologies for understanding complex biological systems: Addressing a grand challenge in the life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Leroy E.; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Moritz, Robert L.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Yamamoto, Keith R.; Amos, Michael; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Locascio, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    This White Paper sets out a Life Sciences Grand Challenge for Proteomics Technologies to enhance our understanding of complex biological systems, link genomes with phenotypes, and bring broad benefits to the biosciences and the US economy. The paper is based on a workshop hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD, 14–15 February 2011, with participants from many federal R&D agencies and research communities, under the aegis of the US National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). Opportunities are identified for a coordinated R&D effort to achieve major technology-based goals and address societal challenges in health, agriculture, nutrition, energy, environment, national security, and economic development. PMID:22807061

  4. Individual addressing of trapped {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ion qubits using a microelectromechanical systems-based beam steering system

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, S.; Mount, E.; Baek, S.; Kim, J.

    2014-11-03

    The ability to individually manipulate the increasing number of qubits is one of the many challenges towards scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Using micro-mirrors fabricated with micro-electromechanical systems technology, we focus laser beams on individual ions in a linear chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. We demonstrate sequential single qubit gates on multiple {sup 171}Yb{sup +} qubits and characterize the gate performance using quantum state tomography. Our system features negligible crosstalk to neighboring ions (<3×10{sup −4}), and switching speed comparable to typical single qubit gate times (<2 μs)

  5. Analysis of a Four-Station Doppler Tracking Method Using a Simple CW Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, Clifford L.; Watkins, Carl W. L.

    1961-01-01

    A Doppler tracking method is presented in which a very small, simple CW beacon transmitter is used with four Doppler receiving stations to obtain the position and velocity of a space research vehicle. The exact transmitter frequency need not be known, but an initial position is required, and Doppler frequencies must be measured with extreme accuracy. The errors in the system are analyzed and general formulas are derived for position and velocity errors. The proper location of receiving stations is discussed, a rule for avoiding infinite errors is given, and error charts for ideal station configurations are presented. The effect of the index of refraction is also investigated. The system is capable of determining transmitter position within 1,000 feet at a range of 200 miles.

  6. Development of BEACON technology. Topical report: engineering analysis of SELOX process

    SciTech Connect

    1984-10-01

    Catalysts developed for the BEACON reactions were also found to be highly effective for a reverse type of reaction, conversion of methane to synthesis gas. At thermodynamically favorable conditions, methane can be partially oxidized to form hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the ratio of 2/1. This is the preferred ratio for the production of methanol. A preliminary engineering analysis of this process, called SELOX, when used in conjunction with conventional methanol synthesis, results in a 25% reduction in the capital cost of the total system. This reduction is relative to a conventional steam reformer source of synthesis gas. There does not appear to be a significant difference in capital cost for SELOX reactor pressures in the range of 150 to 500 psia. Optimization of the methanol synthesis by adjusting for the unique synthesis gas available from the SELOX unit could further improve the system design. 8 figs. 8 tabs.

  7. Development of BEACON technology. Volume I. Final report, April 1980-April 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-08-01

    The BEACON process is based on the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive carbon from low heating value gases, primarily by the carbon monoxide disproportionation reaction. This carbon is subsequently reacted with steam to produce predominantly methane or hydrogen, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Commercial application envisions an air-blown coal gasification combined-cycle power plant with a coproduct of either methane or hydrogen. Significant cost reductions are anticipated relative to corresponding oxygen-blown coal gasification systems. Excellent fluid bed catalysts have been developed which have retained initial activity for over 400 hours of steady state operation. This stability was demonstrated in a tandem reactor system which provides for semi-continuous catalyst circulation between the carbon deposition and steam gasification fluid bed reactors.

  8. The Development of Landmark and Beacon Use in Young Children: Evidence from a Touchscreen Search Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.

    2006-01-01

    Children ages 2, 3 and 4 years participated in a novel hide-and-seek search task presented on a touchscreen monitor. On beacon trials, the target hiding place could be located using a beacon cue, but on landmark trials, searching required the use of a nearby landmark cue. In Experiment 1, 2-year-olds performed less accurately than older children…

  9. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  10. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  11. An Oasis in This Desert: Parents Talk about the New York City Beacons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevarez, Nancy

    This report presents the findings of focus groups convened to determine what the parents of youth participants in the New York City Beacons think about the program. The Beacons initiative is a comprehensive model of school-community-family partnerships undertaken by New York City in 1991. The initiative originally enabled 10 community-based…

  12. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  13. What Happened to the Beacon Schools? Policy Reform and Educational Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the impact of the Beacon schools initiative on the social and academic characteristics of secondary schools in England. The Beacon schools programme ran from 1998 to 2004 and epitomised the (then) Labour government's focus on school improvement through diversity, collaboration and partnership. This paper looks at variation in…

  14. 77 FR 41271 - Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register CFR Code of Federal Regulations NPRM... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson... Newburgh, NY for the annual Newburgh Beacon Swim event. This temporary safety zone is necessary to...

  15. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  16. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  17. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  18. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  19. Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Summary of Phase I Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia

    This report presents findings from Phase 1 of an evaluation of the New York City Beacons initiative, a model of school-community-family partnerships initiated in 1991. Beacons are community centers located in public schools, offering a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on…

  20. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  1. The First Year of Beacon School Status: Maintaining Excellence and Sharing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Neil; Brundrett, Mark

    2000-01-01

    During summer 1998, the British government's Department for Education and Employment recognized 74 schools as model "beacons of excellence." A recent survey reveals that effective communication, coupled with a clear sense of purpose and vision, has enabled Beacon schools to maintain educational excellence while facilitating other schools'…

  2. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  3. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  4. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  5. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  6. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  7. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  8. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  9. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  10. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  11. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  12. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  13. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  14. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  15. Shuttle orbiter C-band beacon antenna location study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A recommendation for the location of the Space Shuttle C-Band Beacon Antenna(s) to be used during Approach and Landing Tests was made. The study has included an Orbiter-to-ground radar look angle evaluation, a vehicle shadowing evaluation and extensive 1/10-scale antenna pattern measurements. Locations were limited to the cutouts for the S-Band Quads and Hemis to minimize skin perturbation. The results show that a single C-Band Antenna located in the lower Hemi cutout will provide optimum coverage and eliminate the need for switching and the undesirable interferometer effects of two antennas.

  16. Deep sea AUV navigation using multiple acoustic beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Da-xiong; Song, Wei; Zhao, Hong-yu; Liu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Navigation is a critical requirement for the operation of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). To estimate the vehicle position, we present an algorithm using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to integrate dead-reckoning position with acoustic ranges from multiple beacons pre-deployed in the operating environment. Owing to high latency, variable sound speed multipath transmissions and unreliability in acoustic measurements, outlier recognition techniques are proposed as well. The navigation algorithm has been tested by the recorded data of deep sea AUV during field operations in a variety of environments. Our results show the improved performance over prior techniques based on position computation.

  17. Molecular Beacon CNT-based Detection of SNPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Y Fedotenkova, L.

    2015-11-01

    An fluorescence quenching effect due to few-walled carbon nanotubes chemically modified by carboxyl groups has been utilized to discriminate Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP). It was shown that the complex obtained from these nanotube and singlestranded primer DNA is formed due to stacking interactions between the hexagons of the nanotubes and aromatic rings of nucleotide bases as well as due to establishing of hydrogen bonds between acceptor amine groups of nucleotide bases and donor carboxyl groups of the nanotubes. It has been demonstrated that these complexes may be used to make highly effective DNA biosensors detecting SNPs which operate as molecular beacons.

  18. Analysis of measured photon returns from sodium beacons

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.; Fugate, R.Q.; Telle, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    We describe an approach to the computation of photon returns from mesospheric sodium beacons excited by laser pulse trains and discuss as specific examples the required numbers of photons for adaptive-optical compensation of atmospheric turbulence. Computed photon return signals are compared with reported measurements for pulses that are long, short, or comparable to the D{sub 2} radiative lifetime (16 ns). Analytical approximations in good agreement with the numerical computations are derived. The results are consistent with experimental data for the different pulse durations. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  19. Terrain-Relative and Beacon-Relative Navigation for Lunar Powered Descent and Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, D.; Geller, D.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA prepares to return humans to the Moon and establish a long-term presence on the surface, technologies must be developed to access previously unvisited terrain regardless of the condition. Among these technologies is a guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system capable of safely and precisely delivering a spacecraft, whether manned or robotic, to a predetermined landing area. This article presents a detailed study of both terrain-relative navigation using a terrain-scanning instrument and radiometric navigation using beacons in lunar orbit or on the surface of the Moon. The models for these sensors are developed along with a baseline sensor suite that includes an IMU, star-camera, altimeter, and velocimeter. Linear covariance analysis is used to rapidly perform the trade studies relevant to this problem and to provide the navigation performance data necessary to determine how each navigation method can be used to support a 100 m 3-σ navigation requirement on landing.

  20. System for routing messages in a vertex symmetric network by using addresses formed from permutations of the transmission line indicees

    DOEpatents

    Faber, Vance; Moore, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A network of interconnected processors is formed from a vertex symmetric graph selected from graphs .GAMMA..sub.d (k) with degree d, diameter k, and (d+1)!/(d-k+1)! processors for each d.gtoreq.k and .GAMMA..sub.d (k,-1) with degree 3-1, diameter k+1, and (d+1)!/(d-k+1)! processors for each d.gtoreq.k.gtoreq.4. Each processor has an address formed by one of the permutations from a predetermined sequence of letters chosen a selected number of letters at a time, and an extended address formed by appending to the address the remaining ones of the predetermined sequence of letters. A plurality of transmission channels is provided from each of the processors, where each processor has one less channel than the selected number of letters forming the sequence. Where a network .GAMMA..sub.d (k,-1) is provided, no processor has a channel connected to form an edge in a direction .delta..sub.1. Each of the channels has an identification number selected from the sequence of letters and connected from a first processor having a first extended address to a second processor having a second address formed from a second extended address defined by moving to the front of the first extended address the letter found in the position within the first extended address defined by the channel identification number. The second address is then formed by selecting the first elements of the second extended address corresponding to the selected number used to form the address permutations.

  1. Biomaterial constructs for delivery of multiple therapeutic genes: a spatiotemporal evaluation of efficacy using molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jennifer C; Browne, Shane; Pandit, Abhay; Rochev, Yury

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is emerging as a potential therapeutic approach for cardiovascular pathogenesis. An appropriate therapy may require multiple genes to enhance therapeutic outcome by modulating inflammatory response and angiogenesis in a controlled and time-dependent manner. Thus, the aim of this research was to assess the spatiotemporal efficacy of a dual-gene therapy model based on 3D collagen scaffolds loaded with the therapeutic genes interleukin 10 (IL-10), a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), a promoter of angiogenesis. A collagen-based scaffold loaded with plasmid IL-10 polyplexes and plasmid eNOS polyplexes encapsulated into microspheres was used to transfect HUVECs and HMSCs cells.The therapeutic efficacy of the system was monitored at 2, 7 and 14 days for eNOS and IL-10 mRNA expression using RT-PCR and live cell imaging molecular beacon technology. The dual gene releasing collagen-based scaffold provided both sustained and delayed release of functional polyplexes in vitro over a 14 day period which was corroborated with variation in expression levels seen using RT-PCR and MB imaging. Maximum fold increases in IL-10 mRNA and eNOS mRNA expression levels occurred at day 7 in HMSCs and HUVECs. However, IL-10 mRNA expression levels seemed dependent on frequency of media changes and/or ease of transfection of the cell type. It was demonstrated that molecular beacons are able to monitor changes in mRNA levels at various time points, in the presence of a 3D scaffolding gene carrier system and the results complemented those of RT-PCR. PMID:23755278

  2. Future prospects for prophylactic immune stimulation in crustacean aquaculture - the need for improved metadata to address immune system complexity.

    PubMed

    Hauton, Chris; Hudspith, Meggie; Gunton, Laetitia

    2015-02-01

    Future expansion of the crustacean aquaculture industry will be required to ensure global food security. However, this expansion must ensure: (a) that natural resources (including habitat use and fish meal) are sustainably exploited, (b) that the socio-economic development of producing nations is safeguarded, and (c) that the challenge presented by crustacean diseases is adequately met. Conventionally, the problem of disease in crustacean aquaculture has been addressed through prophylactic administration of stimulants, additives or probiotics. However, these approaches have been questioned both experimentally and philosophically. In this review, we argue that real progress in the field of crustacean immune stimulants has now slowed, with only incremental advances now being made. We further contend that an overt focus on the immune effector response has been misguided. In light of the wealth of new data reporting immune system complexity, a more refined approach is necessary - one that must consider the important role played by pattern recognition proteins. In support of this more refined approach, there is now a much greater requirement for the reporting of essential metadata. We propose a broad series of recommendations regarding the 'Minimum Information required to support a Stimulant Assessment experiment' (MISA guidelines) to foster new progression within the field. PMID:24796867

  3. Holographic content addressable storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas; Reyes, George

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a Holographic Content Addressable Storage (HCAS) architecture. The HCAS systems consists of a DMD (Digital Micromirror Array) as the input Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), a CMOS (Complementary Metal-oxide Semiconductor) sensor as the output photodetector and a photorefractive crystal as the recording media. The HCAS system is capable of performing optical correlation of an input image/feature against massive reference data set stored in the holographic memory. Detailed system analysis will be reported in this paper.

  4. Recent results from satellite beacon measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques are reviewed for measuring ionospheric electron content, the most important parameter in the study of transionospheric propagation. Data collected since 1964 have yielded a synoptic description of the behavior of the electron content in midlatitudes. Empirical relationships between the level of solar activity and the electron content were developed permitting the prognostication of the electron content values. Construction of such prognostication schemes was stimulated by current efforts to create accurate satellite borne navigation systems. Gravity waves propagating in the thermosphere leave a signature in the electron content records. Studies of such records have allowed the identification of the position of the gravity wave source, and its radiation pattern. A one-to-one relationship between these waves and polar substorms was revealed. Electron content measurements were used to monitor the protonosphere with good time resolution. Protonospheric storms were observed with this technique. Slab thickness data obtained from content measurements were used to determine the neutral air temperature in the thermosphere.

  5. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    PubMed

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-01

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance. PMID:21062084

  6. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  7. ATS6-satellite radio beacon measurements at Ootacamund, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, K.; Donnelly, R. F.; Grubb, R. N.; Rama Rao, P. V. S.; Rastogi, R. G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.

    1978-01-01

    In August 1975 the ATS6 was repositioned at 35 deg E. Radio beacon measurements of time delay, Faraday rotation and signal amplitude, made at Ootacamund, India in October 1975, are discussed with emphasis on the problem of determining the Faraday content under essentially transverse propagation conditions. It is shown that at the low geomagnetic latitude of Ootacamund the use of a fixed conversion coefficient gives an unreliable Faraday content. It is shown also that corrections to the measured Faraday rotation are important because of pitch and yaw of the satellite, particularly at night when the rotation on 140 MHz can be of the order of 10 to 20 deg. The shape factor shows a low predawn minimum indicating the nearly complete erosion of the F2 layer peak. Amplitude scintillation usually decreases with increase of radio frequency but exceptions are discussed.

  8. Theory of continuous-wave excitation of the sodium beacon

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.; Fearn, H.; Telle, J.M.; Fugate, R.Q.

    1999-10-01

    We extend our previous analysis of the sodium beacon [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A {bold 15}, 217 (1998)] to the case of continuous-wave excitation. Various effects that could be ignored in the case of pulsed excitation, such as the geomagnetic field, the recoil of the sodium atoms upon absorption and emission, and collisions of the sodium atoms with other mesospheric species, are included. Spin-relaxation collisions are among the most important of these effects for the cases considered. Analytical approximations to numerical results are presented, and using a semi-empirical estimate for Na-O{sub 2} spin relaxation, we compute photon returns in good agreement with recently reported measurements at the Steward Observatory. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  9. A Concept Space Approach to Addressing the Vocabulary Problem in Scientific Information Retrieval: An Experiment on the Worm Community System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Ng, Tobun D.; Martinez, Joanne; Schatz, Bruce R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an algorithmic approach to addressing the vocabulary problem in scientific information retrieval and information sharing, using the molecular biology domain as an example. A cognitive study and a follow-up document retrieval study were conducted using first a conjoined fly-worm thesaurus and then an actual worm database and the conjoined…

  10. 76 FR 7187 - Priorities for Addressing Risks to the Reliability of the Bulk-Power System; Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Trent Franks, U.S. House of Representatives. 10:35 a.m. Introductions; Commissioner Cheryl LaFleur... protecting against sophisticated and fast-moving threats? What role do you expect Smart Grid to play in the... grid reliability under Smart Grid applications? If not, how should NERC address these issues? c....

  11. Experimental study on return signals detection of pulsed sodium laser beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenchao; Chen, Tianjiang; Lu, Yanhua; Yun, Yu; Tian, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Dequan

    2015-02-01

    Using pulsed Sodium laser beacon,the exploration experiment of the return light measurement is carried out. The wavefront of Sodium laser beacon of one pulse and the wavefront of natural star of the same direction are measured using two Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors simultaneously. The results of experimental data analysis show that the return photons numbers received of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor's one subaperture are more than 200, and the intensity of Sodium laser beacon's return light is even and steady. The signal-to-noise ratio of light spot distribution is about 3~5. The statistical variance of each order Zernike coefficient of Sodium laser beacon's wavefront and natural star's wavefront is consistent in the gross, and the pertinency of each order Zernike coefficient is well.

  12. GaAs monolithic R.F. modules for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauley, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs UHF components for use in SARSAT Emergency Distress beacons are under development by Microwave Monolithics, Inc., Simi Valley, CA. The components include a bi-phase modulator, driver amplifier, and a 5 watt power amplifier.

  13. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Cohen, Bruce E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Milliron, Delia J.; Prendergast, David; Helms, Brett A.

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons is readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.

  14. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; et al

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons ismore » readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.« less

  15. Locate and rescue system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Two types of search and rescue systems not involving satellites are studied; one using a network radio communications link and the other a characteristic beacon signal. Line of slight limitation of VHF radio and beacon signals limit the range (approximately 25 miles) between the origin of the distress signal and the mobile rescue unit.

  16. GPS-Like Phasing Control of the Space Solar Power System Transmission Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of phasing of the Space Solar Power System's transmission array has been addressed by developing a GPS-like radio navigation system. The goal of this system is to provide power transmission phasing control for each node of the array that causes the power signals to add constructively at the ground reception station. The phasing control system operates in a distributed manner, which makes it practical to implement. A leader node and two radio navigation beacons are used to control the power transmission phasing of multiple follower nodes. The necessary one-way communications to the follower nodes are implemented using the RF beacon signals. The phasing control system uses differential carrier phase relative navigation/timing techniques. A special feature of the system is an integer ambiguity resolution procedure that periodically resolves carrier phase cycle count ambiguities via encoding of pseudo-random number codes on the power transmission signals. The system is capable of achieving phasing accuracies on the order of 3 mm down to 0.4 mm depending on whether the radio navigation beacons operate in the L or C bands.

  17. An Adaptive Scheme for Robot Localization and Mapping with Dynamically Configurable Inter-Beacon Range Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption. PMID:24776938

  18. An adaptive scheme for robot localization and mapping with dynamically configurable inter-beacon range measurements.

    PubMed

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption. PMID:24776938

  19. Visual detection of multidrug resistance gene in living cell using the molecular beacon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Detection of effective prognostic biomarkers and targets are of crucial importance to the management of individualized therapies. However, quantitative analysis of the drug resistance gene had been difficult because of technical limitations. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which served as a beacon for detecting human drug resistance indicater. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5'end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The hDAuNP beacons could be taken up by living cells with low inherent cytotoxicity and higher stability. hDAuNP beacon imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect the resistance gene expression. The detected fluorescence in MCF7and MCF7/ADR cells correlates with the specific drug resistance gene expression, which is consistent with the result from Q-PCR. Thus, this approach overcame many of the challenges of previous techniques by creating highly sensitive and effective intracellular probes for monitoring gene expression.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Beacon Heights Landfill site, Beacon Falls, CT. (First remedial action), September 1990. (Supplemental). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 34-acre Beacon Heights Landfill site is on the northwest corner of an 82-acre property in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. The ROD supplements the 1985 ROD by resolving those determinations left open in the 1985 ROD, including the manner and locations of leachate treatment/disposal; cleanup levels for soil deemed impracticable to cap in areas contiguous to the landfill; and the need for air pollution controls on the landfill gas vents. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, ground water, surface water, and air are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylene.

  1. Optical Fiber Nanotips Coated with Molecular Beacons for DNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    Giannetti, Ambra; Barucci, Andrea; Cosi, Franco; Pelli, Stefano; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Baldini, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors, thanks to their compactness, fast response and real-time measurements, have a large impact in the fields of life science research, drug discovery and medical diagnostics. In recent years, advances in nanotechnology have resulted in the development of nanotools, capable of entering the single cell, resulting in new nanobiosensors useful for the detection of biomolecules inside living cells. In this paper, we provide an application of a nanotip coupled with molecular beacons (MBs) for the detection of DNA. The MBs were characterized by hybridization studies with a complementary target to prove their functionality both free in solution and immobilized onto a solid support. The solid support chosen as substrate for the immobilization of the MBs was a 30 nm tapered tip of an optical fiber, fabricated by chemical etching. With this set-up promising results were obtained and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.57 nM was reached, opening up the possibility of using the proposed nanotip to detect mRNAs inside the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25919369

  2. Experimental validation of tilt measurement technique with a laser beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen'kii, Mikhail S.; Karis, Stephen J.; Brown, James M.; Fugate, Robert Q.

    1999-09-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a method for sensing wavefront tilt with a laser guide star (LGS). The tilt components of wavefronts were measured synchronously from the LGS using a telescope with 0.75 m effective aperture and from Polaris using a 1.5 m telescope. The Rayleigh guide star was formed at the altitude of 6 km and at a corresponding range of 10.5 km by projecting a focused beam at Polaris from the full aperture at the 1.5 m telescope. Both telescope mounts were unpowered and bottled down in place allowing us to substantially reduce the telescope vibration. The maximum value of the measured cross-correlation coefficient between the tilt for Polaris and the LGS is 0.71. The variations of the measured cross- correlation coefficient in the range from 0.22 to 0.71 are caused by turbulence at altitudes above 6 km, which was not sampled by the laser beacon, but affected the tilt for Polaris. It is also caused by the cone effect for turbulence below 6 km, residual mount jitter of the telescopes, and variations of the S/N. The experimental results support our concept of sensing atmospheric tilt by observing a LGS with an auxiliary telescope and indicate that this method is a possible solution for the tip-tilt problem.

  3. Detection of toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Sun, Bo; Zheng, Guo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a microscopic parasite that may infect humans, so there is an increasing concern on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. We currently report a rapid and sensitive method for Toxoplasma gondii based on molecular beacon (MB) probe. The probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with a stem-loop DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (energy donor) at 5' end and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) at 3' end, respectively. The probe was synthesized in PBS buffer at pH 8.2, room temperature for 24 h. Then target DNA was injected under the condition of 37°C, hybridization for 2 h, in Tris-HCl buffer. The data from fluorescence spectrum (FS) showed that ca 65% of emitted fluorescence was quenched, and about 50% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed after adding target DNA, which indicated that the target DNA was successfully detected by MB probe. The detecting limitation was determined as ca 5 nM. Moreover, specificity of the probe was investigated by adding target DNA with one-base-pair mismatch, the low fluorescence recovery indicated the high specificity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  4. Learning from Health Information Exchange Technical Architecture and Implementation in Seven Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Douglas B.; Propp, Karen; Cohen, Alexander; Sabharwal, Raj; Schachter, Abigail A.; Rein, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    As health care providers adopt and make “meaningful use” of health information technology (health IT), communities and delivery systems must set up the infrastructure to facilitate health information exchange (HIE) between providers and numerous other stakeholders who have a role in supporting health and care. By facilitating better communication and coordination between providers, HIE has the potential to improve clinical decision-making and continuity of care, while reducing unnecessary use of services. When implemented as part of a broader strategy for health care delivery system and payment reform, HIE capability also can enable the use of analytic tools needed for population health management, patient engagement in care, and continuous learning and improvement. The diverse experiences of seven communities that participated in the three-year federal Beacon Community Program offer practical insight into factors influencing the technical architecture of exchange infrastructure and its role in supporting improved care, reduced cost, and a healthier population. The case studies also document challenges faced by the communities, such as significant time and resources required to harmonize variations in the interpretation of data standards. Findings indicate that their progress developing community-based HIE strategies, while driven by local needs and objectives, is also influenced by broader legal, policy, and market conditions. PMID:25848591

  5. Learning from health information exchange technical architecture and implementation in seven beacon communities.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Douglas B; Propp, Karen; Cohen, Alexander; Sabharwal, Raj; Schachter, Abigail A; Rein, Alison L

    2014-01-01

    As health care providers adopt and make "meaningful use" of health information technology (health IT), communities and delivery systems must set up the infrastructure to facilitate health information exchange (HIE) between providers and numerous other stakeholders who have a role in supporting health and care. By facilitating better communication and coordination between providers, HIE has the potential to improve clinical decision-making and continuity of care, while reducing unnecessary use of services. When implemented as part of a broader strategy for health care delivery system and payment reform, HIE capability also can enable the use of analytic tools needed for population health management, patient engagement in care, and continuous learning and improvement. The diverse experiences of seven communities that participated in the three-year federal Beacon Community Program offer practical insight into factors influencing the technical architecture of exchange infrastructure and its role in supporting improved care, reduced cost, and a healthier population. The case studies also document challenges faced by the communities, such as significant time and resources required to harmonize variations in the interpretation of data standards. Findings indicate that their progress developing community-based HIE strategies, while driven by local needs and objectives, is also influenced by broader legal, policy, and market conditions. PMID:25848591

  6. Real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Wang, Chenguang; Zhu, Pengyu; Guo, Tianxiao; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-04-21

    Techniques of isothermal amplification have recently made great strides, and have generated significant interest in the field of point-of-care detection. Nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification (NEMA) is an example of simple isothermal technology. In this paper, a real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons (SMB-NEMA) of improved specificity and sensitivity is described. First, we optimized the prohibition of de novo synthesis by choosing Nt·BstNBI endonuclease. Second, the whole genome was successfully amplified with Nt·BstNBI (6 U), betaine (1 M) and trehalose (60 mM) for the first time. Third, we achieved 10 pg sensitivity for the first time after adding a small molecular beacon that spontaneously undergoes a conformational change when hybridizing to target, and the practical test validated the assay's application. The small molecular beacon has a similar melting temperature to the reaction temperature, but is approximately 10 bp shorter than the length of a traditional molecular beacon. A new threshold regulation was also established for isothermal conditions. Finally, we established a thermodynamic model for designing small molecular beacons. This multistate model is more correct than the traditional algorithm. This theoretical and practical basis will help us to monitor SMB-NEMA in a quantitative way. In summary, our SMB-NEMA method allows the simple, specific and sensitive assessment of isothermal DNA quantification. PMID:27027375

  7. Comparison of COMPARE and BEACON subcompartment analyses of Battelle-Frankfurt containment tests. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, E.S.; Lime, J.F.; Gido, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of computations performed with the COMPARE/MOD1 and BEACON/MOD3 computer codes for selected Battelle-Frankfurt loss-of-coolant accident experiments. COMPARE is used widely to perform nuclear power plant containment subcompartment analyses, and BEACON is an advanced multiphase, multidimensional best-estimate code. The objective of this study was to evaluate the margins of COMPARE calculations by comparing them with BEACON calculations and test data. The calculations were performed for the Battelle-Frankfurt D3, D6, and C9 tests. Descriptions of the two codes and the Battelle-Frankfurt experiments are included. Comparisons of the codes' calculations and experimental data for absolute pressure, differential pressure, and temperature are presented for margin evaluation. Evaluations of the sensitivity of BEACON calculations to variations in model noding, form loss, and vent area modeling are prsesented. Conclusions summarizing the results of the COMPARE margin evaluation and BEACON sensitivity studies are given as well.

  8. Real-time earthquake alert system for the greater San Francisco Bay Area: a prototype design to address operational issues

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.E.; Jarpe, S.; Hunter, S.

    1996-12-10

    The purpose of the earthquake alert system (EAS) is to outrun the seismic energy released in a large earthquake using a geographically distributed network of strong motion sensors that telemeter data to a rapid CPU-processing station, which then issues an area-wide warning to a region before strong motion will occur. The warning times involved are short, from 0 to 30 seconds or so; consequently, most responses must be automated. The San Francisco Bay Area is particularly well suited for an EAS because (1) large earthquakes have relatively shallow hypocenters (10- to 20-kilometer depth), giving favorable ray-path geometries for larger warning times than deeper from earthquakes, and (2) the active faults are few in number and well characterized, which means far fewer geographically distributed strong motion sensors are (about 50 in this region). An EAS prototype is being implemented in the San Francisco Bay Area. The system consists of four distinct subsystems: (1) a distributed strong motion seismic network, (2) a central processing station, (3) a warning communications system and (4) user receiver and response systems. We have designed a simple, reliable, and inexpensive strong motion monitoring station that consists of a three-component Analog Devices ADXLO5 accelerometer sensing unit, a vertical component weak motion sensor for system testing, a 16-bit digitizer with multiplexing, and communication output ports for RS232 modem or radio telemetry. The unit is battery-powered and will be sited in fire stations. The prototype central computer analysis system consists of a PC dam-acquisition platform that pipes the incoming strong motion data via Ethernet to Unix-based workstations for dam processing. Simple real-time algorithms, particularly for magnitude estimation, are implemented to give estimates of the time since the earthquake`s onset its hypocenter location, its magnitude, and the reliability of the estimate. These parameters are calculated and transmitted

  9. Awards and Addresses Summary

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Each year at the annual ASHG meeting, addresses are given in honor of the society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these addresses is given below. On the next pages, we have printed the Presidential Address and the addresses for the William Allan Award. The other addresses, accompanied by pictures of the speakers, can be found at www.ashg.org.

  10. A Domain Analysis Model for eIRB Systems: Addressing the Weak Link in Clinical Research Informatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Shan; Narus, Scott P.; Facelli, Julio C.; Lau, Lee Min; Botkin, Jefferey R.; Hurdle, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are a critical component of clinical research and can become a significant bottleneck due to the dramatic increase, in both volume and complexity of clinical research. Despite the interest in developing clinical research informatics (CRI) systems and supporting data standards to increase clinical research efficiency and interoperability, informatics research in the IRB domain has not attracted much attention in the scientific community. The lack of standardized and structured application forms across different IRBs causes inefficient and inconsistent proposal reviews and cumbersome workflows. These issues are even more prominent in multi-institutional clinical research that is rapidly becoming the norm. This paper proposes and evaluates a domain analysis model for electronic IRB (eIRB) systems, paving the way for streamlined clinical research workflow via integration with other CRI systems and improved IRB application throughput via computer-assisted decision support. PMID:24929181

  11. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Y. F

    2015-01-05

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  12. Understanding Community Schools as Collaboratives for System Building to Address Barriers and Promote Well-Being. A Center Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief reviews different agenda for establishing school-community connections in general and community schools specifically. A Comprehensive Community School is discussed as an entity that emerges from system building by school-family-community collaboratives. Establishing effective collaboratives requires policy that supports shared…

  13. A Systems Thinking Framework for Assessing and Addressing Malaria Locally: An Alternative to the Globalization of Anti-Malaria Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Derek W.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes a decision system that was used in the early 1900s in the Federated Malay States (FMS) by Malcolm Watson in order to make anti-malaria program recommendations to decision makers in a wide range of ecological settings. Watson's recommendations to decision makers throughout the FMS led to a dramatic suppression of malaria…

  14. Addressing the Needs of Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System: The Current Status of Evidence-Based Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Daniel P.; Aron, Laudan; Bernstein, Jenny

    This report summarizes the state of knowledge about children and youth with disabilities at risk of delinquency or already involved with the juvenile justice system. It reviews the existing research as well as perspectives of service providers, administrators, policy makers, and advocates. Following an executive summary and introductory chapter,…

  15. Enzymatic Amplification of DNA/RNA Hybrid Molecular Beacon Signaling in Nucleic Acid Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jacroux, Thomas; Rieck, Daniel C.; Cui, Rong; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2012-01-01

    A rapid assay operable under isothermal or non-isothermal conditions is described wherein the sensitivity of a typical molecular beacon (MB) system is improved by utilizing thermostable RNase H to enzymatically cleave an MB comprised of a DNA stem and RNA loop (R/D-MB). Upon hybridization of the R/D-MB to target DNA, there was a modest increase in fluorescence intensity (~5.7x above background) due to an opening of the probe and concomitant reduction in the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency. Addition of thermostable RNase H resulted in the cleavage of the RNA loop which eliminated energy transfer. The cleavage step also released bound target DNA, enabling it to bind to another R/D-MB probe and rendering the approach a cyclic amplification scheme. Full processing of R/D-MBs maximized the fluorescence signal to the fullest extent possible (12.9x above background), resulting in a ~2–2.8 fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed isothermally at 50 °C following the addition of RNase H. The probe was also used to monitor real-time PCR reactions by measuring enhancement of donor fluorescence upon R/D-MB binding to amplified pUC19 template dilutions. Hence, the R/D-MB-RNase H scheme can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid amplification methods. PMID:23000602

  16. Enzymatic amplification of DNA/RNA hybrid molecular beacon signaling in nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Jacroux, Thomas; Rieck, Daniel C; Cui, Rong; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2013-01-15

    A rapid assay operable under isothermal or nonisothermal conditions is described, where the sensitivity of a typical molecular beacon (MB) system is improved by using thermostable RNase H to enzymatically cleave an MB composed of a DNA stem and an RNA loop (R/D-MB). On hybridization of the R/D-MB to target DNA, there was a modest increase in fluorescence intensity (~5.7× above background) due to an opening of the probe and a concomitant reduction in the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency. The addition of thermostable RNase H resulted in the cleavage of the RNA loop, which eliminated energy transfer. The cleavage step also released bound target DNA, enabling it to bind to another R/D-MB probe and rendering the approach a cyclic amplification scheme. Full processing of R/D-MBs maximized the fluorescence signal to the fullest extent possible (12.9× above background), resulting in an approximately 2- to 2.8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed isothermally at 50 °C following the addition of RNase H. The probe was also used to monitor real-time polymerase chain reactions by measuring enhancement of donor fluorescence on R/D-MB binding to amplified pUC19 template dilutions. Hence, the R/D-MB-RNase H scheme can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid amplification methods. PMID:23000602

  17. Detection of ochratoxin A using molecular beacons and real-time PCR thermal cycler.

    PubMed

    Sanzani, Simona Marianna; Reverberi, Massimo; Fanelli, Corrado; Ippolito, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    We developed a simple and cheap assay for quantitatively detecting ochratoxin A (OTA) in wine. A DNA aptamer available in literature was used as recognition probe in its molecular beacon form, i.e., with a fluorescence-quenching pair at the stem ends. Our aptabeacon could adopt a conformation allowing OTA binding, causing a fluorescence rise due to the increased distance between fluorophore and quencher. We used real-time PCR equipment for capturing the signal. With this assay, under optimized conditions, the entire process can be completed within 1 h. In addition, the proposed system exhibited a good selectivity for OTA against other mycotoxins (ochratoxin B and aflatoxin M1) and limited interference from aflatoxin B1 and patulin. A wide linear detection range (0.2-2000 µM) was achieved, with LOD = 13 nM, r = 0.9952, and R2 = 0.9904. The aptabeacon was also applied to detect OTA in red wine spiked with the same dilution series. A linear correlation with a LOD = 19 nM, r = 0.9843, and R2 = 0.9708 was observed, with recoveries in the range 63%-105%. Intra- and inter-day assays confirmed its reproducibility. The proposed biosensor, although still being finalized, might significantly facilitate the quantitative detection of OTA in wine samples, thus improving their quality control from a food safety perspective. PMID:25760080

  18. Improving realtime predictions of magnetospheric activities using STEREO Space Weather Beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, R.; Reiff, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Rice neural network models of geomagnetic activity indices Kp, Dst and AE (available from \\url{http://mms.rice.edu/realtime/forecast.html}), driven by the ACE solar wind data, have been actively running in near-realtime mode to provide short-term predictions of magnetospheric activities; subscribers to our ``spacalrt" system receive email alerts and notices of space weather based on key discriminator levels. Active structures that are likely to erupt on the sun and resulting in solar flares and/or Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are now being well imaged by instruments aboard STEREO, which also provides multipoint, realtime and continuous information of the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particles through its Space Weather Beacon IMPACT and PLASTIC. The spacecraft lagging Earth (STEREO-B) and being ahead in the Parker spiral, is well suited to provide longer lead times to predictions of any common measures of geoeffectiveness resulting from solar wind-magnetospheric interactions such as Kp, Dst and AE indices. As our models are constantly evolving, our desire to drive them by indulging these advanced instruments is to provide longer lead times. Furthermore, this paper also investigates the geoeffectiveness of predicting CME-driven storms.

  19. Building Partnerships with Agencies & Employers To Help High Risk Students Succeed. The AACJC/Kellogg Beacon Colleges Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The American Association of Community and Junior Colleges' (AACJC's) Beacon College Project requires a Beacon College to form a consortium with five to ten associate community colleges (CCs) for the purpose of furthering the recommendations of the AACJC Futures Commission report regarding the building of communities. In Oregon, Chemeketa Community…

  20. A molecular beacon-based DNA switch for reversible pH sensing in vesicles and live cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Nair, Raji R; Suseela, Y V; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Govindaraju, T

    2016-07-01

    In this Communication, a molecular beacon-based DNA switch (LMB) is developed as an efficient and reversible pH sensing probe. Remarkably, LMB exhibited reversible structural transition between the closed (molecular beacon) and open (A-motif) states very efficiently in synthetic vesicles and live cells without the need for any transfection agents. PMID:27338808

  1. 75 FR 20364 - Public Buildings Service; Key Largo Beacon Annex Site; Key Largo, FL; Transfer of Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Public Buildings Service; Key Largo Beacon Annex Site; Key Largo, FL; Transfer of Property..., identified as Key Largo Beacon Annex Site, Key Largo, FL to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department...

  2. A Beacon Interval Shifting Scheme for Interference Mitigation in Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungku; Kim, Seokhwan; Kim, Jin-Woo; Eom, Doo-Seop

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the issue of interference avoidance in body area networks (BANs). IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 presented several schemes to reduce such interference, but these schemes are still not proper solutions for BANs. We present a novel distributed TDMA-based beacon interval shifting scheme that reduces interference in the BANs. A design goal of the scheme is to avoid the wakeup period of each BAN coinciding with other networks by employing carrier sensing before a beacon transmission. We analyze the beacon interval shifting scheme and investigate the proper back-off length when the channel is busy. We compare the performance of the proposed scheme with the schemes presented in IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 using an OMNeT++ simulation. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme has a lower packet loss, energy consumption, and delivery-latency than the schemes of IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6. PMID:23112639

  3. Visual detection of Akt mRNA in living cell using gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi; Tian, Caiping; Li, Siwen; Wang, Zhaohui; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    PI3K-Akt signaling pathway plays the key role in cell apoptosis and survival, and the components of PI3K /Akt signaling pathway are often abnormally expressed in human tumors. Therefore, determination of the Akt (protein kinase B, PKB) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression is significantly important in understanding the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) functionalized with gold nanoparticles and fluorescein isothiocyanate(FITC) as a beacon for detecting human Akt mRNA. Spectrofluorometer was used to detect the fluorescence quenching and recovery of the beacons, and laser confocal scanning microscopy was adopted to image Akt mRNA in cells. The results showed that this beacon could sensitively and quantitatively measure the Akt mRNA in living cells . This strategy is potentially useful for the cellular imaging of RNA or protein expression in living cells.

  4. Opportunity, risk, and success recognizing, addressing, and balancing multiple factors crucial to the success of a project management system deployed to support multi-lateral decommissioning programs

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Greg; Longsworth, Paul

    2007-07-01

    This paper addresses the factors involved in effectively implementing a world-class program/project management information system funded by multiple nations. Along with many other benefits, investing in and utilizing such systems improves delivery and drive accountability for major expenditures. However, there are an equally large number of impediments to developing and using such systems. To be successful, the process requires a dynamic combining of elements and strategic sequencing of initiatives. While program/project-management systems involve information technologies, software and hardware, they represent only one element of the overall system.. Technology, process, people and knowledge must all be integrated and working in concert with one another to assure a fully capable system. Major system implementations occur infrequently, and frequently miss established targets in relatively small organizations (with the risk increasing with greater complexity). The European Bank of Reconstruction (EBRD) is midway through just such an implementation. The EBRD is using funds from numerous donor countries to sponsor development of an overarching program management system. The system will provide the Russian Federation with the tools to effectively manage prioritizing, planning, and physically decommissioning assets{sub i}n northwest Russia to mitigate risks associated the Soviet era nuclear submarine program. Project-management delivery using world-class techniques supported by aligned systems has been proven to increase the probability of delivering on-time and on-budget, assuring those funding such programs optimum value for money. However, systems deployed to manage multi-laterally funded projects must be developed with appropriate levels of consideration given to unique aspects such as: accommodation of existing project management methods, consideration for differences is management structures and organizational behaviors, incorporation of unique strengths, and

  5. A complementary palette of NanoCluster Beacons.

    PubMed

    Obliosca, Judy M; Babin, Mark C; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Batson, Robert A; Ganguly, Mainak; Petty, Jeffrey T; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2014-10-28

    NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), which use few-atom DNA-templated silver clusters as reporters, are a type of activatable molecular probes that are low-cost and easy to prepare. While NCBs provide a high fluorescence enhancement ratio upon activation, their activation colors are currently limited. Here we report a simple method to design NCBs with complementary emission colors, creating a set of multicolor probes for homogeneous, separation-free detection. By systematically altering the position and the number of cytosines in the cluster-nucleation sequence, we have tuned the activation colors of NCBs to green (C8-8, 460 nm/555 nm); yellow (C5-5, 525 nm/585 nm); red (C3-4, 580 nm/635 nm); and near-infrared (C3-3, 645 nm/695 nm). At the same NCB concentration, the activated yellow NCB (C5-5) was found to be 1.3 times brighter than the traditional red NCB (C3-4). Three of the four colors (green, yellow, and red) were relatively spectrally pure. We also found that subtle changes in the linker sequence (down to the single-nucleotide level) could significantly alter the emission spectrum pattern of an NCB. When the length of linker sequences was increased, the emission peaks were found to migrate in a periodic fashion, suggesting short-range interactions between silver clusters and nucleobases. Size exclusion chromatography results indicated that the activated NCBs are more compact than their native duplex forms. Our findings demonstrate the unique photophysical properties and environmental sensitivities of few-atom DNA-templated silver clusters, which are not seen before in common organic dyes or luminescent crystals. PMID:25299363

  6. Remotely Triggered Earthquakes in Stable Continental Regions: Beacons of Stress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, S. E.; Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J. G.

    2002-12-01

    Remotely triggered earthquakes appear to occur relatively commonly following large (Mw>7) mainshocks in stable continental regions (SCRs). Such events are important for several reasons: 1) they can give rise to locally high ground motions that can be mistaken for mainshock shaking, and thereby inflate isoseismal contours, 2) they can be potentially damaging events in their own right, and 3) they prove that remotely triggered earthquakes occur in diverse tectonic and mechanical settings. We present examples from several large SCR earthquakes including the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence and the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake. We explore the possibility that in low strain-rate regions, remotely triggered earthquakes reflect a prevalence of faults that are close to failure rather than the presence of weak faults or geothermal/hydrothermal fluids. We further illustrate how, in a low strain-rate environment, permanent, non-elastic deformation might account for this prevalence, playing a larger role in stress accumulation than in high strain-rate regions. Using a simple model incorporating both elastic and anelastic strain release, we show that, for realistic parameter values, faults in intraplate crust might remain close to their failure stress for a longer part of the earthquake cycle than faults in high strain-rate regions. Our results furthermore reveal that remotely triggered earthquakes occur preferentially in regions of recent and/or future seismic activity, which suggests that faults tend to be at a critical stress state in only some areas. It is not surprising that triggered earthquakes would serve as beacons that identify regions that are approaching a critical stress state. Their occurrence in regions that have experienced large earthquakes in the recent past (a few hundred years) provides evidence that, once developed, a critically stressed region of intraplate crust will persist for hundreds if not thousands of years and give rise to prolonged

  7. Using Models to Address Misconceptions in Size and Scale Related to the Earth, Moon, Solar System, and Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; Lebofsky, N. R.; McCarthy, D. W.; Higgins, M. L.; Salthouse, K.; Canizo, T. L.

    2012-10-01

    Many children and adults have misconceptions about space-related concepts such as size and distance: Earth-Moon size and distance, distances between the planets, distances to the stars (including the Sun), etc. Unfortunately, when images are used to illustrate common phenomena, such as Moon phases and seasons, they may do a good job of explaining the phenomenon, but may reinforce other misconceptions. For topics such as phases and seasons, scale (size and distance) can easily lead to confusion and reinforce misconceptions. For example, when showing Moon phases, the Moon is usually represented as large relative to the Earth and the true relative distance cannot be easily shown. Similarly, when showing the tilt of the Earth’s axis as the reason for the seasons, the Earth is usually almost as large as the Sun and the distance between them is usually only a few times Earth’s diameter.What lessons have we learned? It is critical with any model to engage the participants: if at all possible, everyone should participate. A critical part of any modeling needs to be a discussion, involving the participants, of the limitations of the model: what is modeled accurately and what is not? This helps to identify and rectify misconceptions and helps to avoid creating new ones. The activities highlighted on our poster represent programs and collaborations that date back more than two decades: The University of Arizona, Tucson Unified School District, Science Center of Inquiry, Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona, and the Planetary Science Institute. Examples of activities that we will present on our poster include: •Earth/Moon size and distance •Macramé model of the Solar System •Human orrery and tabletop orrery •3-D nature of the constellations •Comparing our Solar System to other planetary systems •Origin of the Universe: scale of time and distance

  8. Preliminary Hazards Assessments for Space Nuclear Electric Propulsion Systems Mechanisms to Quantitatively Ascertain and Address Launch and Operational Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenard, R.

    2002-01-01

    Architectures are analyzed based on several figures of merit, including mass transported to Mars and samples transported from Mars to Earth, potential to reduce Earth contamination, sites on MArs visited, trip time and potential cost trades.A technological variant of a commercial vehicle for near-Earth missions is used as the nuclear electric propulsion system baseline. Several types of Mars landing and ascent vehicles are proposed and assessed.Technology approaches are assessed and analyzed to compare risk to a conventionally fueled Mars Sample Return concept. Also compared are solar electric propelled missions to ascertain cost saving or advantages. Various mission departure dates will be proposed and analyzed.

  9. Time-Resolved Nucleic Acid Hybridization Beacons Utilizing Unimolecular and Toehold-Mediated Strand Displacement Designs.

    PubMed

    Massey, Melissa; Ancona, Mario G; Medintz, Igor L; Algar, W Russ

    2015-12-01

    Nucleic acid hybridization probes are sought after for numerous assay and imaging applications. These probes are often limited by the properties of fluorescent dyes, prompting the development of new probes where dyes are paired with novel or nontraditional luminescent materials. Luminescent terbium complexes are an example of such a material, and these complexes offer several unique spectroscopic advantages. Here, we demonstrate two nonstem-loop designs for light-up nucleic acid hybridization beacons that utilize time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) between a luminescent Lumi4-Tb cryptate (Tb) donor and a fluorescent reporter dye, where time-resolved emission from the dye provides an analytical signal. Both designs are based on probe oligonucleotides that are labeled at their opposite termini with Tb and a fluorescent reporter dye. In one design, a probe is partially blocked with a quencher dye-labeled oligonucleotide, and target hybridization is signaled through toehold-mediated strand displacement and loss of a competitive FRET pathway. In the other design, the intrinsic folding properties of an unblocked probe are utilized in combination with a temporal mechanism for signaling target hybridization. This temporal mechanism is based on a recently elucidated "sweet spot" for TR-FRET measurements and exploits distance control over FRET efficiencies to shift the Tb lifetime within or outside the time-gated detection window for measurements. Both the blocked and unblocked beacons offer nanomolar (femtomole) detection limits, response times on the order of minutes, multiplexing through the use of different reporter dyes, and detection in complex matrices such as serum and blood. The blocked beacons offer better mismatch selectivity, whereas the unblocked beacons are simpler in design. The temporal mechanism of signaling utilized with the unblocked beacons also plays a significant role with the blocked beacons and represents a new and effective

  10. Results from the northern New Mexico satellite-beacon radio interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.; Jacobson, A.; Massey, R.; Wu, G.

    1994-09-01

    An interferometer described in the Boston, 1992, meeting of the Beacon Satellite Symposium has been in full operation for over a year now. It consists of four autonomous stations; three are in a triangle 70 km on a side and one is in the center. The stations receive the VHF beacons from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES-2 and ATS-3. The phases of the beacons are tracked at each station by referring them to an extremely stable rubidium oscillator. The studies of the two satellites are virtually separate experiments. The received phase of the beacon is retarded by the increased Total-Electron-Content of the dense regions of waves in the ionosphere. By comparing the phase history at four spatially separated stations, the authors can determine the two-dimensional propagation vector of the waves. This array is optimal for wavelengths of 70--300 km (periods of 300--3,000 seconds). Since the measurement is of the phase of the signal rather than the difference between the O-mode and X-mode phases, and since the beacons are in the VHF rather than in the L-band of GPS beacons, the array is very sensitive. It has a noise level of 10{sup 13} electrons/m{sup 2}, or 10{sup {minus}4} of the normal daytime TEC. This has been verified by operating two stations in the same location, so that they saw the same ionosphere. The first interesting results from a year`s study is that the authors do not see the same TID`s when looking at the two satellites. One conclusion they draw is that they do not see evidence of ionospheric winds.

  11. A perfusion bioreactor system efficiently generates cell-loaded bone substitute materials for addressing critical size bone defects.

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, Claudia; Mohan, Ramkumar Ramani; Vacun, Gabriele; Schwarz, Thomas; Haller, Barbara; Sun, Yang; Kahlig, Alexander; Kluger, Petra; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Walles, Heike; Hansmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Critical size bone defects and non-union fractions are still challenging to treat. Cell-loaded bone substitutes have shown improved bone ingrowth and bone formation. However, a lack of methods for homogenously colonizing scaffolds limits the maximum volume of bone grafts. Additionally, therapy robustness is impaired by heterogeneous cell populations after graft generation. Our aim was to establish a technology for generating grafts with a size of 10.5 mm in diameter and 25 mm of height, and thus for grafts suited for treatment of critical size bone defects. Therefore, a novel tailor-made bioreactor system was developed, allowing standardized flow conditions in a porous poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone) material. Scaffolds were seeded with primary human mesenchymal stem cells derived from four different donors. In contrast to static experimental conditions, homogenous cell distributions were accomplished under dynamic culture. Additionally, culture in the bioreactor system allowed the induction of osteogenic lineage commitment after one week of culture without addition of soluble factors. This was demonstrated by quantitative analysis of calcification and gene expression markers related to osteogenic lineage. In conclusion, the novel bioreactor technology allows efficient and standardized conditions for generating bone substitutes that are suitable for the treatment of critical size defects in humans. PMID:26011163

  12. A perfusion bioreactor system efficiently generates cell‐loaded bone substitute materials for addressing critical size bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhans, Claudia; Mohan, Ramkumar Ramani; Vacun, Gabriele; Schwarz, Thomas; Haller, Barbara; Sun, Yang; Kahlig, Alexander; Kluger, Petra; Finne‐Wistrand, Anna; Walles, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Critical size bone defects and non‐union fractions are still challenging to treat. Cell‐loaded bone substitutes have shown improved bone ingrowth and bone formation. However, a lack of methods for homogenously colonizing scaffolds limits the maximum volume of bone grafts. Additionally, therapy robustness is impaired by heterogeneous cell populations after graft generation. Our aim was to establish a technology for generating grafts with a size of 10.5 mm in diameter and 25 mm of height, and thus for grafts suited for treatment of critical size bone defects. Therefore, a novel tailor‐made bioreactor system was developed, allowing standardized flow conditions in a porous poly(L‐lactide‐co‐caprolactone) material. Scaffolds were seeded with primary human mesenchymal stem cells derived from four different donors. In contrast to static experimental conditions, homogenous cell distributions were accomplished under dynamic culture. Additionally, culture in the bioreactor system allowed the induction of osteogenic lineage commitment after one week of culture without addition of soluble factors. This was demonstrated by quantitative analysis of calcification and gene expression markers related to osteogenic lineage. In conclusion, the novel bioreactor technology allows efficient and standardized conditions for generating bone substitutes that are suitable for the treatment of critical size defects in humans. PMID:26011163

  13. Testing a discrete choice experiment including duration to value health states for large descriptive systems: Addressing design and sampling issues

    PubMed Central

    Bansback, Nick; Hole, Arne Risa; Mulhern, Brendan; Tsuchiya, Aki

    2014-01-01

    There is interest in the use of discrete choice experiments that include a duration attribute (DCETTO) to generate health utility values, but questions remain on its feasibility in large health state descriptive systems. This study examines the stability of DCETTO to estimate health utility values from the five-level EQ-5D, an instrument with depicts 3125 different health states. Between January and March 2011, we administered 120 DCETTO tasks based on the five-level EQ-5D to a total of 1799 respondents in the UK (each completed 15 DCETTO tasks on-line). We compared models across different sample sizes and different total numbers of observations. We found the DCETTO coefficients were generally consistent, with high agreement between individual ordinal preferences and aggregate cardinal values. Keeping the DCE design and the total number of observations fixed, subsamples consisting of 10 tasks per respondent with an intermediate sized sample, and 15 tasks with a smaller sample provide similar results in comparison to the whole sample model. In conclusion, we find that the DCETTO is a feasible method for developing values for larger descriptive systems such as EQ-5D-5L, and find evidence supporting important design features for future valuation studies that use the DCETTO. PMID:24908173

  14. Unmanned Aerial Systems as Part of a Multi-Component Assessment Strategy to Address Climate Change and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Manfred; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Sciare, Jean; Argyrides, Marios; Ioannou, Stelios; Keleshis, Christos

    2015-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have been established as versatile tools for different applications, providing data and observations for atmospheric and Earth-Systems research. They offer an urgently needed link between in-situ ground based measurements and satellite remote sensing observations and are distinguished by significant versatility, flexibility and moderate operational costs. UAS have the proven potential to contribute to a multi-component assessment strategy that combines remote-sensing, numerical modelling and surface measurements in order to elucidate important atmospheric processes. This includes physical and chemical transformations related to ongoing climate change as well as issues linked to aerosol-cloud interactions and air quality. The distinct advantages offered by UAS comprise, to name but a few: (i) their ability to operate from altitudes of a few meters to up to a few kilometers; (ii) their capability to perform autonomously controlled missions, which provides for repeat-measurements to be carried out at precisely defined locations; (iii) their relative ease of operation, which enables flexible employment at short-term notice and (iv) the employment of more than one platform in stacked formation, which allows for unique, quasi-3D-observations of atmospheric properties and processes. These advantages are brought to bear in combining in-situ ground based observations and numerical modeling with UAS-based remote sensing in elucidating specific research questions that require both horizontally and vertically resolved measurements at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Employing numerical atmospheric modelling, UAS can provide survey information over spatially and temporally localized, focused areas of evolving atmospheric phenomena, as they become identified by the numerical models. Conversely, UAS observations offer urgently needed data for model verification and provide boundary conditions for numerical models. In this presentation, we will

  15. Addressing the Challenges of Diverse Knowledge Systems through Landscape Analysis: A Case Study in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, A. H.; Griggs, D.; Joachim, L.; Heider, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Barmah-Millewa region of the Murray-Darling Basin is the heart of the Traditional Lands of the Yorta Yorta people. Management of water and ecosystem services in the region is governed by a wide array of sometimes inconsistent legislation and policies with differing rules, management focus and plans, and permitting and allocation procedures. Geographic information systems are a common framework for the integration of Indigenous knowledge and insights into natural resources management. But only with appropriate collection, management and database design protocols in place can geodatabase development and analysis support the effective and respectful participation of the Yorta Yorta community in management of this ecologically, economically and culturally important region. Here we describe the knowledge collection and protection protocols that were applied to develop the integrated geodatabase. We present approaches to generating meaningful guidance for water managers on the cultural implications of water allocation decisions.

  16. Recommendations for Implementing Policy, Systems, and Environmental Improvements to Address Chronic Diseases in Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders

    PubMed Central

    Tepporn, Ed; Kwon, Simona; Rideout, Catlin; Patel, Shilpa; Chung, Marianne; Bautista, Roxanna; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Ko-Chin, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Emphasis has increased recently on disseminating high-impact, population-wide strategies for the prevention of chronic diseases. However, such strategies are typically not effective at reaching Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, or other underserved communities. The objectives of this article were to 1) present the methods of the Strategies to Reach and Implement the Vision of Health Equity program in which 15 community-based organizations in the United States and the Pacific region implemented evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental improvements in their local communities and 2) provide recommendations for using these tailored approaches in other communities and geographic locations. Further support is needed for organizations in tailoring these types of population-wide strategies. Implementing population health improvements should be adapted to maximize effectiveness to decrease chronic diseases in these populations and ultimately eliminate racial/ethnic health disparities. PMID:25412025

  17. Recommendations for implementing policy, systems, and environmental improvements to address chronic diseases in Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

    PubMed

    Arista, Pedro; Tepporn, Ed; Kwon, Simona; Rideout, Catlin; Patel, Shilpa; Chung, Marianne; Bautista, Roxanna; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Ko-Chin, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Emphasis has increased recently on disseminating high-impact, population-wide strategies for the prevention of chronic diseases. However, such strategies are typically not effective at reaching Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, or other underserved communities. The objectives of this article were to 1) present the methods of the Strategies to Reach and Implement the Vision of Health Equity program in which 15 community-based organizations in the United States and the Pacific region implemented evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental improvements in their local communities and 2) provide recommendations for using these tailored approaches in other communities and geographic locations. Further support is needed for organizations in tailoring these types of population-wide strategies. Implementing population health improvements should be adapted to maximize effectiveness to decrease chronic diseases in these populations and ultimately eliminate racial/ethnic health disparities. PMID:25412025

  18. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui

    1992-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  19. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui.

    1992-01-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  20. How much detail and accuracy is required in plant growth sub-models to address questions about optimal management strategies in agricultural systems?

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Simulations that integrate sub-models of important biological processes can be used to ask questions about optimal management strategies in agricultural and ecological systems. Building sub-models with more detail and aiming for greater accuracy and realism may seem attractive, but is likely to be more expensive and time-consuming and result in more complicated models that lack transparency. This paper illustrates a general integrated approach for constructing models of agricultural and ecological systems that is based on the principle of starting simple and then directly testing for the need to add additional detail and complexity. Methodology The approach is demonstrated using LUSO (Land Use Sequence Optimizer), an agricultural system analysis framework based on simulation and optimization. A simple sensitivity analysis and functional perturbation analysis is used to test to what extent LUSO's crop–weed competition sub-model affects the answers to a number of questions at the scale of the whole farming system regarding optimal land-use sequencing strategies and resulting profitability. Principal results The need for accuracy in the crop–weed competition sub-model within LUSO depended to a small extent on the parameter being varied, but more importantly and interestingly on the type of question being addressed with the model. Only a small part of the crop–weed competition model actually affects the answers to these questions. Conclusions This study illustrates an example application of the proposed integrated approach for constructing models of agricultural and ecological systems based on testing whether complexity needs to be added to address particular questions of interest. We conclude that this example clearly demonstrates the potential value of the general approach. Advantages of this approach include minimizing costs and resources required for model construction, keeping models transparent and easy to analyse, and ensuring the model

  1. "Molecular beacon"-hosted thioflavin T: Applications for label-free fluorescent detection of iodide and logic operations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Ling-Fei; Zhang, Min; Shi, Guoyue

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we presented a simple, label-free and rapid-responsive fluorescence assay for iodide (I(-)) detection based on "molecular beacon (MB)"-hosted thioflavin T (ThT), achieving a limit of detection as low as 158 nM. The proposed method exhibited very good selectivity to I(-) ions over other anions interference due to the strong binding force between I(-) ions with Hg(2+). Upon the addition of I(-) ions, it would capture Hg(2+) from a T-Hg(2+)-T complex belonging to the MB-like DNA hairpin structure, which eventually quenched the initial fluorescence as output. In addition, it was successfully applied for operation of an integrated DNA logic gate system and to the determination of I(-) in real samples such as human urine. PMID:26838450

  2. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  3. Health assessment for Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD001145671. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-26

    The Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's to 1979, municipal and industrial wastes were disposed of at the landfill. Leachate from the landfill has migrated into the local groundwater aquifers. Two residential wells to the northwest of the site have been contaminated with site-related contaminants. This site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethane, and methylene chloride may have occurred via ingestion, inhalation, and direct dermal contact with contaminated groundwater. No health study follow-up is indicated at this time.

  4. Acceleration of dormant storage effects to address the reliability of silicon surface micromachined Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Candelaria, Sam A.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Duesterhaus, Michelle Ann; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Timpe, Shannon J.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Skousen, Troy J.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Parson, Ted Blair

    2006-06-01

    Qualification of microsystems for weapon applications is critically dependent on our ability to build confidence in their performance, by predicting the evolution of their behavior over time in the stockpile. The objective of this work was to accelerate aging mechanisms operative in surface micromachined silicon microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with contacting surfaces that are stored for many years prior to use, to determine the effects of aging on reliability, and relate those effects to changes in the behavior of interfaces. Hence the main focus was on 'dormant' storage effects on the reliability of devices having mechanical contacts, the first time they must move. A large number ({approx}1000) of modules containing prototype devices and diagnostic structures were packaged using the best available processes for simple electromechanical devices. The packaging processes evolved during the project to better protect surfaces from exposure to contaminants and water vapor. Packages were subjected to accelerated aging and stress tests to explore dormancy and operational environment effects on reliability and performance. Functional tests and quantitative measurements of adhesion and friction demonstrated that the main failure mechanism during dormant storage is change in adhesion and friction, precipitated by loss of the fluorinated monolayer applied after fabrication. The data indicate that damage to the monolayer can occur at water vapor concentrations as low as 500 ppm inside the package. The most common type of failure was attributed to surfaces that were in direct contact during aging. The application of quantitative methods for monolayer lubricant analysis showed that even though the coverage of vapor-deposited monolayers is generally very uniform, even on hidden surfaces, locations of intimate contact can be significantly depleted in initial concentration of lubricating molecules. These areas represent defects in the film prone to adsorption of water or

  5. Rationally designed molecular beacons for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Yang, Ronghua; Shi, Muling; Wu, Cuichen; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Yinhui; Li, Jishan; Tan, Weihong

    2015-05-21

    Nucleic acids hold promise as biomolecules for future applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. Their well-defined structures and compositions afford unique chemical properties and biological functions. Moreover, the specificity of hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick interactions allows the construction of nucleic acid sequences with multiple functions. In particular, the development of nucleic acid probes as essential molecular engineering tools will make a significant contribution to advancements in biosensing, bioimaging and therapy. The molecular beacon (MB), first conceptualized by Tyagi and Kramer in 1996, is an excellent example of a double-stranded nucleic acid (dsDNA) probe. Although inactive in the absence of a target, dsDNA probes can report the presence of a specific target through hybridization or a specific recognition-triggered change in conformation. MB probes are typically fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides that range from 25 to 35 nucleotides (nt) in length, and their structure can be divided into three components: stem, loop and reporter. The intrinsic merit of MBs depends on predictable design, reproducibility of synthesis, simplicity of modification, and built-in signal transduction. Using resonance energy transfer (RET) for signal transduction, MBs are further endowed with increased sensitivity, rapid response and universality, making them ideal for chemical sensing, environmental monitoring and biological imaging, in contrast to other nucleic acid probes. Furthermore, integrating MBs with targeting ligands or molecular drugs can substantially support their in vivo applications in theranositics. In this review, we survey advances in bioanalytical and biomedical applications of rationally designed MBs, as they have evolved through the collaborative efforts of many researchers. We first discuss improvements to the three components of MBs: stem, loop and reporter. The current applications of MBs in biosensing, bioimaging and therapy will then

  6. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  7. Fusing Range Measurements from Ultrasonic Beacons and a Laser Range Finder for Localization of a Mobile Robot

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Nak Yong; Kuc, Tae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for mobile robot localization in a partially unknown indoor environment. The method fuses two types of range measurements: the range from the robot to the beacons measured by ultrasonic sensors and the range from the robot to the walls surrounding the robot measured by a laser range finder (LRF). For the fusion, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is utilized. Because finding the Jacobian matrix is not feasible for range measurement using an LRF, UKF has an advantage in this situation over the extended KF. The locations of the beacons and range data from the beacons are available, whereas the correspondence of the range data to the beacon is not given. Therefore, the proposed method also deals with the problem of data association to determine which beacon corresponds to the given range data. The proposed approach is evaluated using different sets of design parameter values and is compared with the method that uses only an LRF or ultrasonic beacons. Comparative analysis shows that even though ultrasonic beacons are sparsely populated, have a large error and have a slow update rate, they improve the localization performance when fused with the LRF measurement. In addition, proper adjustment of the UKF design parameters is crucial for full utilization of the UKF approach for sensor fusion. This study contributes to the derivation of a UKF-based design methodology to fuse two exteroceptive measurements that are complementary to each other in localization. PMID:25970259

  8. Fusing range measurements from ultrasonic beacons and a laser range finder for localization of a mobile robot.

    PubMed

    Ko, Nak Yong; Kuc, Tae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for mobile robot localization in a partially unknown indoor environment. The method fuses two types of range measurements: the range from the robot to the beacons measured by ultrasonic sensors and the range from the robot to the walls surrounding the robot measured by a laser range finder (LRF). For the fusion, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is utilized. Because finding the Jacobian matrix is not feasible for range measurement using an LRF, UKF has an advantage in this situation over the extended KF. The locations of the beacons and range data from the beacons are available, whereas the correspondence of the range data to the beacon is not given. Therefore, the proposed method also deals with the problem of data association to determine which beacon corresponds to the given range data. The proposed approach is evaluated using different sets of design parameter values and is compared with the method that uses only an LRF or ultrasonic beacons. Comparative analysis shows that even though ultrasonic beacons are sparsely populated, have a large error and have a slow update rate, they improve the localization performance when fused with the LRF measurement. In addition, proper adjustment of the UKF design parameters is crucial for full utilization of the UKF approach for sensor fusion. This study contributes to the derivation of a UKF-based design methodology to fuse two exteroceptive measurements that are complementary to each other in localization. PMID:25970259

  9. Locked nucleic acid based beacons for surface interaction studies and biosensor development

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Karen; Estevez, M.-Carmen; Wu, Yanrong; Phillips, Joseph A.; Medley, Colin D.; Tan, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    DNA sensors and microarrays permit fast, simple and real-time detection of nucleic acids through the design and use of increasingly sensitive, selective and robust molecular probes. Specifically, molecular beacons (MBs) have been employed for this purpose; however, their potential in the development of solid-surface-based biosensors has not been fully realized. This is mainly a consequence of the beacon’s poor stability due to the hairpin structure once immobilized onto a solid surface, commonly resulting in a low signal enhancement. Here, we report the design of a new MB that overcomes some of the limitations of MBs for surface immobilization. Essentially, this new design adds locked nucleic acid bases (LNAs) to the beacon structure, resulting in a LNA molecular beacon (LMB) with robust stability after surface immobilization. To test the efficacy of LMBs against that of regular molecular beacons (RMBs), the properties of selectivity, sensitivity, thermal stability, hybridization kinetics and robustness for the detection of target sequences were compared and evaluated. A 25-fold enhancement was achieved for the LMB on surface with detection limits reaching the low nanomolar range. In addition, the LMB-based biosensor was shown to possess better stability, reproducibility, selectivity and robustness when compared to the RMB. Therefore, as an alternative to conventional DNA and as a prospective tool for use in both DNA microarrays and biosensors, these results demonstrate the potential of the locked nucleic acid bases for nucleic acid design for surface immobilization. PMID:19351140

  10. Sequential strand displacement beacon for detection of DNA coverage on functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paliwoda, Rebecca E; Li, Feng; Reid, Michael S; Lin, Yanwen; Le, X Chris

    2014-06-17

    Functionalizing nanomaterials for diverse analytical, biomedical, and therapeutic applications requires determination of surface coverage (or density) of DNA on nanomaterials. We describe a sequential strand displacement beacon assay that is able to quantify specific DNA sequences conjugated or coconjugated onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Unlike the conventional fluorescence assay that requires the target DNA to be fluorescently labeled, the sequential strand displacement beacon method is able to quantify multiple unlabeled DNA oligonucleotides using a single (universal) strand displacement beacon. This unique feature is achieved by introducing two short unlabeled DNA probes for each specific DNA sequence and by performing sequential DNA strand displacement reactions. Varying the relative amounts of the specific DNA sequences and spacing DNA sequences during their coconjugation onto AuNPs results in different densities of the specific DNA on AuNP, ranging from 90 to 230 DNA molecules per AuNP. Results obtained from our sequential strand displacement beacon assay are consistent with those obtained from the conventional fluorescence assays. However, labeling of DNA with some fluorescent dyes, e.g., tetramethylrhodamine, alters DNA density on AuNP. The strand displacement strategy overcomes this problem by obviating direct labeling of the target DNA. This method has broad potential to facilitate more efficient design and characterization of novel multifunctional materials for diverse applications. PMID:24848126

  11. The Roles of Beaconing and Dead Reckoning in Human Virtual Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodily, Kent D.; Daniel, Thomas A.; Sturz, Bradley R.

    2012-01-01

    Beaconing is a process in which the distance between a visual landmark and current position is reduced in order to return to a location. In contrast, dead reckoning is a process in which vestibular, kinesthetic and/or optic flow cues are utilized to update speed of movement, elapsed time of movement, and direction of movement to return to a…

  12. A nanocluster beacon based on the template transformation of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ye; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Shan; Zhu, Jinbo; Wang, Erkang

    2016-01-28

    In this work, we developed a novel light-up nanocluster beacon (NCB) based on shuttling dark silver nanoclusters (NCs) to a bright scaffold through hybridization. The fluorescence enhancement was as high as 70-fold when the two templates were on the opposite sides of the duplexes, enabling sensitive and selective detection of DNA. PMID:26666564

  13. Time reversal ultrasound focusing to a point away from the beacon location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; Sutin, Alexander; Gandhi, Gaurav; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2012-10-01

    In percutaneous procedures there is often a need to focus therapeutic ultrasound to a predefined area without affecting surrounding tissues. Focusing based on Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) principles constitutes a promising approach for generating high intensity ultrasound field tailored to the shape of the predefined area. Conventional TRA technique enables ultrasound focusing only at a site, where there is an ultrasound beacon, e.g. piezo-transducer mounted at the tip of a catheter. We developed a method of steering the focus away from the beacon location. The method is based on the measurements of impulse response (IR) in several reference points and calculating virtual IRs for the points outside the reference beacon location. The IR for the point away from the beacon is constructed based on mathematical extrapolation of the measured reference IRs frequency spectra, particularly phases. The effectiveness of extrapolated TRA focusing is explored experimentally and by computer simulation. Potential applications include ultrasounda-ssisted drug delivery, artery recanalization and tumor ablation.

  14. Stem-loop oligonucleotide beacons as switches for amplifying-fluorescent-polymer-based biological warfare sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D.; Ramachandran, Akhilesh; Malayer, Jerry R.; Moon, Joong Ho; Hancock, Lawrence F.

    2003-09-01

    Sensors that are exceptionally sensitive with real-time outputs and minimal consumption of reagents are needed to continuously monitor air and water against bioterrorist incidents. Amplifying fluorescent polymers (AFP) provide exceptionally sensitive real-time reagentless sensor platforms as applied to detection of nitroaromatic explosives. This platform technology has the potential to be adapted to detect biological warfare (BW) agents by covalently attaching the 5" end of stem-loop molecular beacons to AFP as DNA hybridization signal transduction switches. Molecular beacons with loop sequences specific for sequence signatures of a target BW agent are configured with a quencher on the end of the 3" arm of the stem-loop. The AFP is quenched in the absence of target DNA, but upon hybridization with target the stem is melted, the duplex loop extended, and the AFP dequenched. This signal transduction is reversible upon removal of the target sequence with the molecular beacon reforming the stem-loop conformation. Proof-of-concept research has demonstrated that molecular beacons for signature sequences of Francisella tularensis result in correct identification of the presence of this agent in samples, but no false positives were seen with Escherichia coli.

  15. Ag nanocluster-based label-free catalytic and molecular beacons for amplified biosensing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liang; Kuai, Hailan; Ren, Songlei; Zhao, Xu-Hua; Huan, Shuang-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-08-01

    By employing DNAzyme as a recognition group and amplifier, and DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) as signal reporters, we reported for the first time a label-free catalytic and molecular beacon as an amplified biosensing platform for highly selective detection of cofactors such as Pb(2+) and L-histidine. PMID:26120805

  16. A Beacon Transmission Power Control Algorithm Based on Wireless Channel Load Forecasting in VANETs

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yuanfu; Yu, Dexin; Song, Jun; Zheng, Kun; Guo, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    In a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET), the periodic exchange of single-hop status information broadcasts (beacon frames) produces channel loading, which causes channel congestion and induces information conflict problems. To guarantee fairness in beacon transmissions from each node and maximum network connectivity, adjustment of the beacon transmission power is an effective method for reducing and preventing channel congestion. In this study, the primary factors that influence wireless channel loading are selected to construct the KF-BCLF, which is a channel load forecasting algorithm based on a recursive Kalman filter and employs multiple regression equation. By pre-adjusting the transmission power based on the forecasted channel load, the channel load was kept within a predefined range; therefore, channel congestion was prevented. Based on this method, the CLF-BTPC, which is a transmission power control algorithm, is proposed. To verify KF-BCLF algorithm, a traffic survey method that involved the collection of floating car data along a major traffic road in Changchun City is employed. By comparing this forecast with the measured channel loads, the proposed KF-BCLF algorithm was proven to be effective. In addition, the CLF-BTPC algorithm is verified by simulating a section of eight-lane highway and a signal-controlled urban intersection. The results of the two verification process indicate that this distributed CLF-BTPC algorithm can effectively control channel load, prevent channel congestion, and enhance the stability and robustness of wireless beacon transmission in a vehicular network. PMID:26571042

  17. The New York City Beacons: Rebuilding Communities of Support in Urban Neighborhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinbard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The first ten New York City Beacons began operation in 1991 as a result of the recommendation of a commission appointed by then-mayor David N. Dinkins. Richard Murphy, commissioner of youth services, led the development and implementation. Michele Cahill served as a consultant in the design and created the Youth Development Institute (YDI) as part…

  18. The Effects of a Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacon on Vehicle Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWagner, Michelle; Van Houten, Ron; Betts, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, nearly 31% of vehicle fatalities were related to failure to adhere to safe vehicle speeds (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA], 2009). The current study evaluated the effect of a rectangular rapid-flashing beacon (RRFB) triggered by excessive speed on vehicle speed using a combined alternating treatments and reversal…

  19. After-School Pursuits: An Examination of Outcomes in the San Francisco Beacon Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The San Francisco Beacon Initiative (SFBI) has been in effect in the San Francisco Unified School District since 1996. A collaboration of public and private funders, SFBI operates comprehensive after-school programs in six middle schools, one elementary school and one high school. Public/Private Ventures' (P/PV's) evaluation found that SFBI…

  20. X/X/Ka-band prime focus feed antenna for the Mars Observer beacon spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P.; Reilly, H.; Esquivel, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an X/X/Ka-band feed design concept demonstration are presented. The purpose is to show the feasibility of adding a Ka-band beacon to the Mars Observer spacecraft. Scale model radiation patterns were made and analyzed.

  1. Working Together To Build Beacon Centers in San Francisco: Evaluation Findings from 1998-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy J. A.

    The Beacons Initiative aimed to transform eight public schools (five middle schools and three high schools) into youth and family centers in low-income neighborhoods in San Francisco, California. Using a coalition of local partners and funding from public agencies and foundations, the centers served 7,500 youth and adults between July 1, 1999, and…

  2. Beacon of Hope: The Promise of Early Head Start for America's Youngest Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Joan, Ed.; Bogle, Mary M., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2004, Early Head Start (EHS) grew from 68 to more than 700 programs nationwide, serving more than 62,000 children and securing the program's reputation as a beacon of hope for the nation's low-income families with infants and toddlers. According to a comprehensive 5-year national evaluation of EHS, children who participated in…

  3. A Beacon Transmission Power Control Algorithm Based on Wireless Channel Load Forecasting in VANETs.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yuanfu; Yu, Dexin; Song, Jun; Zheng, Kun; Guo, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    In a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET), the periodic exchange of single-hop status information broadcasts (beacon frames) produces channel loading, which causes channel congestion and induces information conflict problems. To guarantee fairness in beacon transmissions from each node and maximum network connectivity, adjustment of the beacon transmission power is an effective method for reducing and preventing channel congestion. In this study, the primary factors that influence wireless channel loading are selected to construct the KF-BCLF, which is a channel load forecasting algorithm based on a recursive Kalman filter and employs multiple regression equation. By pre-adjusting the transmission power based on the forecasted channel load, the channel load was kept within a predefined range; therefore, channel congestion was prevented. Based on this method, the CLF-BTPC, which is a transmission power control algorithm, is proposed. To verify KF-BCLF algorithm, a traffic survey method that involved the collection of floating car data along a major traffic road in Changchun City is employed. By comparing this forecast with the measured channel loads, the proposed KF-BCLF algorithm was proven to be effective. In addition, the CLF-BTPC algorithm is verified by simulating a section of eight-lane highway and a signal-controlled urban intersection. The results of the two verification process indicate that this distributed CLF-BTPC algorithm can effectively control channel load, prevent channel congestion, and enhance the stability and robustness of wireless beacon transmission in a vehicular network. PMID:26571042

  4. Visual detection of STAT5B gene expression in living cell using the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacon.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianpeng; Shan, Lingling; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Yang; Zhu, Hongyan; Deng, Dawei; Qian, Zhiyu; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) is an important protein in JAK-STAT signaling pathway that is responsible for the metastasis and proliferation of tumor cells. Determination of the STAT5B messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) relating to the STAT5B expression provides insight into the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for human STAT5B mRNA to functionalize gold nanoparticles, which served as a beacon for detecting human STAT5B expression. Up to 90% quenching efficiency was achieved. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5' end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The stability of hDAuNP beacons against degradation by DNase I and GSH indicated that the prepared beacon is stable inside cells. The detected fluorescence in MCF-7 cancer cells correlates with the specific STAT5B mRNA expression, which is consistent with the result from PCR measurement. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the hDAuNP beacons internalized in cells without using transfection agents, with intracellular distribution in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus. The results demonstrated that this beacon could directly provide quantitative measurement of the intracellular STAT5B mRNA in living cells. Compared to the previous approaches, this beacon has advantages of higher target to background ratio of detection and an increased resistance to nuclease degradation. The strategy reported in this study is a promising approach for the intracellular measurement of RNA or protein expression in living cells, and has great potential in the study of drug screening and discovery. PMID:23122230

  5. A Biofunctional Molecular Beacon for Detecting Single Base Mutations in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haiyan; Ma, Ji; Wang, Jie; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Sinko, Patrick J; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The development of a convenient and sensitive biosensing system to detect specific DNA sequences is an important issue in the field of genetic disease therapy. As a classic DNA detection technique, molecular beacon (MB) is often used in the biosensing system. However, it has intrinsic drawbacks, including high assay cost, complicated chemical modification, and operational complexity. In this study, we developed a simple and cost-effective label-free multifunctional MB (LMMB) by integrating elements of polymerization primer, template, target recognition, and G-quadruplex into one entity to detect target DNA. The core technique was accomplished by introducing a G-hairpin that features fragments of both G-quadruplex and target DNA recognition in the G-hairpin stem. Hybridization between LMMB and target DNA triggered conformational change between the G-hairpin and the common C-hairpin, resulting in significant SYBR-green signal amplification. The hybridization continues to the isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization and accumulation of the double-stranded fragments, causing the uninterrupted extension of the LMMB without a need of chemical modification and other assistant DNA sequences. The novel and programmable LMMB could detect target DNA with sensitivity at 250 pmol/l with a linear range from 2 to 100 nmol/l and the relative standard deviation of 7.98%. The LMMB could sense a single base mutation from the normal DNA, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons of the mutant-type cell line from the wild-type one. The total time required for preparation and assaying was only 25 minutes. Apparently, the LMMB shows great potential for detecting DNA and its mutations in biosamples, and therefore it opens up a new prospect for genetic disease therapy. PMID:27045206

  6. University Engagement: Ivory Tower of Beacon of Hope?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Ray

    2004-01-01

    In this keynote address presentation, Ray Suarez, senior correspondent for public television's "The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer," makes a compelling case for saving America's urban neighborhoods from decline. Suarez discusses the role that higher education must play in this effort. [Keynote Address presented at the Outreach Scholarship 2003…

  7. Addressing core challenges for the next generation of type 2 translation research and systems: the translation science to population impact (TSci Impact) framework.

    PubMed

    Spoth, Richard; Rohrbach, Louise A; Greenberg, Mark; Leaf, Philip; Brown, C Hendricks; Fagan, Abigail; Catalano, Richard F; Pentz, Mary Ann; Sloboda, Zili; Hawkins, J David

    2013-08-01

    Evidence-based preventive interventions developed over the past two decades represent great potential for enhancing public health and well-being. Research confirming the limited extent to which these interventions have been broadly and effectively implemented, however, indicates much progress is needed to achieve population-level impact. In part, progress requires Type 2 translation research that investigates the complex processes and systems through which evidence-based interventions are adopted, implemented, and sustained on a large scale, with a strong orientation toward devising empirically-driven strategies for increasing their population impact. In this article, we address two core challenges to the advancement of T2 translation research: (1) building infrastructure and capacity to support systems-oriented scaling up of evidence-based interventions, with well-integrated practice-oriented T2 research, and (2) developing an agenda and improving research methods for advancing T2 translation science. We also summarize a heuristic "Translation Science to Population Impact (TSci Impact) Framework." It articulates key considerations in addressing the core challenges, with three components that represent: (1) four phases of translation functions to be investigated (pre-adoption, adoption, implementation, and sustainability); (2) the multiple contexts in which translation occurs, ranging from community to national levels; and (3) necessary practice and research infrastructure supports. Discussion of the framework addresses the critical roles of practitioner-scientist partnerships and networks, governmental agencies and policies at all levels, plus financing partnerships and structures, all required for both infrastructure development and advances in the science. The article concludes with two sets of recommended action steps that could provide impetus for advancing the next generation of T2 translation science and, in turn, potentially enhance the health and well

  8. 77 FR 13350 - Certain Automotive GPS Navigation Systems, Components Thereof, and Products Containing Same...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... complaint filed by Beacon Navigation GmbH of Zug, Switzerland (``Beacon''). 76 FR 72443 (Nov. 23, 2011). The... COMMISSION Certain Automotive GPS Navigation Systems, Components Thereof, and Products Containing Same... importation of certain automotive GPS navigation systems, components thereof, and products containing the...

  9. G-Quadruplex DNAzyme Molecular Beacon for Amplified Colorimetric Biosensing of Pseudostellaria heterophylla

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhenzhu; Han, Jing; Pang, Wensheng; Hu, Juan

    2013-01-01

    With an internal transcribed spacer of 18 S, 5.8 S and 26 S nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA ITS) as DNA marker, we report a colorimetric approach for authentication of Pseudostellaria heterophylla (PH) and its counterfeit species based on the differentiation of the nrDNA ITS sequence. The assay possesses an unlabelled G-quadruplex DNAzyme molecular beacon (MB) probe, employing complementary sequence as biorecognition element and 1:1:1:1 split G-quadruplex halves as reporter. In the absence of target DNA (T-DNA), the probe can shape intermolecular G-quadruplex structures capable of binding hemin to form G-quadruplex-hemin DNAzyme and catalyze the oxidation of ABTS2− to blue-green ABTS•− by H2O2. In the presence of T-DNA, T-DNA can hybridize with the complementary sequence to form a duplex structure, hindering the formation of the G-quadruplex structure and resulting in the loss of the catalytic activity. Consequently, a UV-Vis absorption signal decrease is observed in the ABTS2−-H2O2 system. The “turn-off” assay allows the detection of T-DNA from 1.0 × 10−9 to 3.0 × 10−7 mol·L−1 (R2 = 0.9906), with a low detection limit of 3.1 × 10−10 mol·L−1. The present study provides a sensitive and selective method and may serve as a foundation of utilizing the DNAzyme MB sensor for identifying traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:23325167

  10. Strategy for molecular beacon binding readout: separating molecular recognition element and signal reporter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Jin, Jianyu; Wang, Hao; Tang, Hongxing; Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Kemin

    2009-12-01

    A new strategy for molecular beacon binding readout is proposed by using separation of the molecular recognition element and signal reporter. The signal transduction of the target binding event is based on displacing interaction between the target DNA and a competitor, the signal transducer. The target-free capture DNA is first interacted with the competitor, forming an assembled complex. In the presence of a target DNA that the affinity is stronger than that of the competitor, hybridization between capture DNA and the target disassembles the assembled complex and releases the free competitor to change the readout of the signal reporter. To demonstrate the feasibility of the design, a thymine-rich oligonucleotide was examined as a model system. Hg2+ was selected as the competitor, and mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots served as the fluorescent reporter. Selective binding of Hg2+ between the two thymine bases of the capture DNA forms a hairpin-structure. Hybridization between the capture DNA and target DNA destroys the hairpin-structure, releasing Hg2+ ions to quench the quantum dots fluorescence. Under the optimal conditions, fluorescence intensity of the quantum dots against the concentration of perfect cDNA was linear over the concentration range of 0.1-1.6 microM, with a limit of detection of 25 nM. This new assay method is simple in design, avoiding any oligonucleotide labeling. Furthermore, this strategy is generalizable since any target binding can in principle release the signal transducer and be detected with separated signal reporter. PMID:19899746

  11. Ultra-Stable Beacon Source for Laboratory Testing of Optical Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aso, Yoichi; Marka, Szabolcs; Kovalik, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The ultra-stable beacon source (USBS) provides a laser-beam output with a very low angular jitter and can be used as an absolute angular reference to simulate a beacon in the laboratory. The laser is mounted on the top of a very short (approximately equal to 1 m) inverted pendulum (IP) with its optical axis parallel to the carbon fiber pendulum leg. The 85-cm, carbon fiber rods making up the leg are very lightweight and rigid, and are supported by a flex-joint at the bottom (see figure). The gimbal-mounted laser is a weight-adjustable load of about 1.5 kg with its center of rotation co-located with the center of percussion of the inverted pendulum. This reduces the coupling of transverse motion at the base of the pendulum to angular motion of the laser at the top. The inverted pendulum is mounted on a gimbal with its center of rotation coinciding with the pivot position of the inverted pendulum flexure joint. This reduces coupling of ground tilt at the inverted pendulum base to motion of the laser mounted at the top. The mass of the top gimbal is adjusted to give the pendulum a very low resonant frequency (approximately equal to 10 mHz) that filters transverse seismic disturbances from the ground where the base is attached. The motion of the IP is monitored by an optical-lever sensor. The laser light is reflected by the mirror on the IP, and then is detected by a quadrant photo-detector (QPD). The position of the beam spot on the QPD corresponds to the tilt of the IP. Damping of this motion is provided by two coil and magnet pairs. The bottom gimbal mount consists of two plates. The IP is mounted on the second plate. The first plate is supported by two posts through needles and can be rotated about the axis connecting the tips of the needles. The second plate hangs from the first plate and can be rotated about the axis perpendicular to the first plate. As a result, the second plate acts as a two-axis rotation stage. Its center of rotation is located at the

  12. Addressing the social determinants of health through health system strengthening and inter-sectoral convergence: the case of the Indian National Rural Health Mission

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Amit Mohan; Chakraborty, Gautam; Yadav, Sajjan Singh; Bhatia, Salima

    2013-01-01

    Background At the turn of the 21st century, India was plagued by significant rural–urban, inter-state and inter-district inequities in health. For example, in 2004, the infant mortality rate (IMR) was 24 points higher in rural areas compared to urban areas. To address these inequities, to strengthen the rural health system (a major determinant of health in itself) and to facilitate action on other determinants of health, India launched the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in April 2005. Methods Under the NRHM, Rs. 666 billion (US$12.1 billion) was invested in rural areas from April 2005 to March 2012. There was also a substantially higher allocation for 18 high-focus states and 264 high-focus districts, identified on the basis of poor health and demographic indicators. Other determinants of health, especially nutrition and decentralized action, were addressed through mechanisms like State/District Health Missions, Village Health, Sanitation and Nutrition Committees, and Village Health and Nutrition Days. Results Consequently, in bigger high-focus states, rural IMR fell by 15.6 points between 2004 and 2011, as compared to 9 points in urban areas. Similarly, the maternal mortality rate in high-focus states declined by 17.9% between 2004–2006 and 2007–2009 compared to 14.6% in other states. Conclusion The article, on the basis of the above approaches employed under NRHM, proposes the NRHM model to ‘reduce health inequities and initiate action on SDH’. PMID:23458089

  13. The Utah Beacon Experience: Integrating Quality Improvement, Health Information Technology, and Practice Facilitation to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Small Health Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Tennison, Janet; Rajeev, Deepthi; Woolsey, Sarah; Black, Jeff; Oostema, Steven J.; North, Christie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Utah Improving Care through Connectivity and Collaboration (IC3) Beacon community (2010–2013) was spearheaded by HealthInsight, a nonprofit, community-based organization. One of the main objectives of IC3 was to improve health care provided to patients with diabetes in three Utah counties, collaborating with 21 independent smaller clinics and two large health care enterprises. This paper will focus on the use of health information technology (HIT) and practice facilitation to develop and implement new care processes to improve clinic workflow and ultimately improve patients’ diabetes outcomes at 21 participating smaller, independent clinics. Innovation: Early in the project, we learned that most of the 21 clinics did not have the resources needed to successfully implement quality improvement (QI) initiatives. IC3 helped clinics effectively use data generated from their electronic health records (EHRs) to design and implement interventions to improve patients’ diabetes outcomes. This close coupling of HIT, expert practice facilitation, and Learning Collaboratives was found to be especially valuable in clinics with limited resources. Findings: Through this process we learned that (1) an extensive readiness assessment improved clinic retention, (2) clinic champions were important for a successful collaboration, and (3) current EHR systems have limited functionality to assist in QI initiatives. In general, smaller, independent clinics lack knowledge and experience with QI and have limited HIT experience to improve patient care using electronic clinical data. Additionally, future projects like IC3 Beacon will be instrumental in changing clinic culture so that QI is integrated into routine workflow. Conclusion and Discussion: Our efforts led to significant changes in how practice staff optimized their EHRs to manage and improve diabetes care, while establishing the framework for sustainability. Some of the IC3 Beacon practices are currently smoothly

  14. Triplex molecular beacons for sensitive recognition of melamine based on abasic-site-containing DNA and fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Sun, Qianqian; Zhu, Linling; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Fengyang; Lu, Linlin; Yu, Haijun; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2015-05-01

    A melamine aptamer derived from an abasic-site-containing triplex molecular beacon (tMB) was designed and developed for sensitive recognition of melamine by integrating tMBs and fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). PMID:25865656

  15. Improving the detectability of oxygen saturation level targets for preterm neonates: A laboratory test of tremolo and beacon sonifications.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Marie-Lys; Sanderson, Penelope; Hinckfuss, Kelly; Browning, Caitlin; Loeb, Robert G; Liley, Helen; Liu, David

    2016-09-01

    Recent guidelines recommend oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels of 90%-95% for preterm neonates on supplemental oxygen but it is difficult to discern such levels with current pulse oximetry sonifications. We tested (1) whether adding levels of tremolo to a conventional log-linear pulse oximetry sonification would improve identification of SpO2 ranges, and (2) whether adding a beacon reference tone to conventional pulse oximetry confuses listeners about the direction of change. Participants using the Tremolo (94%) or Beacon (81%) sonifications identified SpO2 range significantly more accurately than participants using the LogLinear sonification (52%). The Beacon sonification did not confuse participants about direction of change. The Tremolo sonification may have advantages over the Beacon sonification for monitoring SpO2 of preterm neonates, but both must be further tested with clinicians in clinically representative scenarios, and with different levels of ambient noise and distractions. PMID:27184324

  16. An address geocoding solution for Chinese cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehu; Ma, Haoming; Li, Qi

    2006-10-01

    We introduce the challenges of address geocoding for Chinese cities and present a potential solution along with a prototype system that deal with these challenges by combining and extending current geocoding solutions developed for United States and Japan. The proposed solution starts by separating city addresses into "standard" addresses which meet a predefined address model and non-standard ones. The standard addresses are stored in a structured relational database in their normalized forms, while a selected portion of the non-standard addresses are stored as aliases to the standard addresses. An in-memory address index is then constructed from the address database and serves as the basis for real-time address matching. Test results were obtained from two trials conducted in the city Beijing. On average 80% matching rate were achieved. Possible improvements to the current design are also discussed.

  17. Observing the Great Plains Low-Level Jet Using the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS): A Comparison with Boundary Layer Profiler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, P. S.; Basu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Wind resources derived from the nocturnal low-level jet of the Great Plains of the United States are a driving factor in the proliferation of wind energy facilities across the region. Accurate diagnosis and forecasting of the low-level jet is important to not only assess the wind resource but to estimate the potential for shear-induced stress generation on turbine rotors. This study will examine the utility of Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS) observations in diagnosing low-level jet events across the Texas Panhandle. ACARS observations from Lubbock International Airport (KLBB) will be compared to observations from a 915 MHZ Doppler radar vertical boundary-layer profiler with 60m vertical resolution located at the field experiment site of Texas Tech University. The ability of ACARS data to adequately observe low-level jet events during the spring and summer of 2009 will be assessed and presented.

  18. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  19. Regional Arctic System Model (RASM): A Tool to Address the U.S. Priorities and Advance Capabilities for Arctic Climate Modeling and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowski, W.; Roberts, A.; Cassano, J. J.; Gutowski, W. J., Jr.; Nijssen, B.; Osinski, R.; Zeng, X.; Brunke, M.; Duvivier, A.; Hamman, J.; Hossainzadeh, S.; Hughes, M.; Seefeldt, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic is undergoing some of the most coordinated rapid climatic changes currently occurring anywhere on Earth, including the retreat of the perennial sea ice cover, which integrates forcing by, exchanges with and feedbacks between atmosphere, ocean and land. While historical reconstructions from Earth System Models (ESMs) are in broad agreement with these changes, the rate of change in ESMs generally remains outpaced by observations. Reasons for that relate to a combination of coarse resolution, inadequate parameterizations, under-represented processes and a limited knowledge of physical interactions. We demonstrate the capability of the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) in addressing some of the ESM limitations in simulating observed variability and trends in arctic surface climate. RASM is a high resolution, pan-Arctic coupled climate model with the sea ice and ocean model components configured at an eddy-permitting resolution of 1/12o and the atmosphere and land hydrology model components at 50 km resolution, which are all coupled at 20-minute intervals. RASM is an example of limited-area, process-resolving, fully coupled ESM, which due to the constraints from boundary conditions facilitates detailed comparisons with observational statistics that are not possible with ESMs. The overall goal of RASM is to address key requirements published in the Navy Arctic Roadmap: 2014-2030 and in the Implementation Plan for the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, regarding the need for advanced modeling capabilities for operational forecasting and strategic climate predictions through 2030. The main science objectives of RASM are to advance understanding and model representation of critical physical processes and feedbacks of importance to sea ice thickness and area distribution. RASM results are presented to quantify relative contributions by (i) resolved processes and feedbacks as well as (ii) sensitivity to space dependent sub-grid parameterizations to better

  20. The ESA Nanosatellite Beacons for Space Weather Monitoring Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapgood, M.; Eckersley, S.; Lundin, R.; Kluge, M.

    2008-09-01

    This paper will present final results from this ESA-funded study that has investigated how current and emerging concepts for nanosats may be used to monitor space weather conditions and provide improved access to data needed for space weather services. The study has reviewed requirements developed in previous ESA space weather studies to establish a set of service and measurements requirements appropriate to nanosat solutions. The output is conveniently represented as a set of five distinct classes of nanosat constellations, each in different orbit locations and which can address a specific group of measurement requirements. One example driving requirement for several of the constellations was the need for real-time data reception. Given this background, the study then iterated a set of instrument and spacecraft solutions to address each of the nanosat constellations from the requirements. Indeed, iteration has proved to be a critical aspect of the study. The instrument solutions have driven a refinement of requirements through assessment of whether or not the physical parameters to be measured dictate instrument components too large for a nanosat. In addition, the study has also reviewed miniaturization trends for instruments relevant to space weather monitoring by nanosats, looking at the near, mid and far-term timescales. Within the spacecraft solutions the study reviewed key technology trends relevant to space weather monitoring by nanosats: (a) micro and nano-technology devices for spacecraft communications, navigation, propulsion and power, and (b) development and flight experience with nanosats for science and for engineering demonstration. These requirements and solutions were then subject to an iterative system and mission analysis including key mission design issues (e.g. launch/transfer, mission geometry, instrument accommodation, numbers of spacecraft, communications architectures, de-orbit, nanosat reliability and constellation robustness) and the

  1. The Chemistry of Ethene in the Storm Beacon Region on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Eleanor S.; Moses, Julianne I.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, Patrick G.; Hesman, Brigette E.; Romani , Paul N.

    2014-11-01

    The immense tropospheric storm that erupted in Saturn’s northern spring hemisphere was first observed on 5th December 2010 (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 2011, Nature 475, 71), and displayed typical storm signatures such as lightning activity and clouds (e.g., Fischer et al. 2011, Nature 475, 75). However, Cassini/CIRS also observed an unexpected stratospheric response consisting of elevated temperatures and molecular abundances, which has come to be known as the ‘beacon’ region (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332, 1413). Most significantly the abundance of ethene (C2H4; also called ethylene) was observed to have increased by a factor of ~100 in the stratospheric beacon region in May 2011, compared with photochemical models and observations from the same latitude before the storm (Hesman et al. 2012, ApJ. 760, 24). Our project seeks to replicate the abundances of C2H4 and other hydrocarbons observed in the Cassini/CIRS beacon data through photochemical modeling. The KINETICS code (Allen et al. 1981, JGR 86, 3617) has been used to solve the 1-D continuity equations for stratospheric hydrocarbon and oxygen species, assuming the "Model C" chemical reaction list of Moses et al. (2005; JGR 110, E08001), and time-variable beacon temperatures, retrieved from the Cassini/CIRS data by Fletcher et al. (2012; Icarus 221, 560). The models predict a greatly increased C2H4 abundance in the high-temperature beacon regions, with a distinct mixing-ratio peak near 1 mbar. This increase is the result of a highly temperature-dependent reaction that produces C2H4. No such increases were seen in the model for other major hydrocarbons such as C2H2 and C2H6. The predicted C2H4 emission from our models still falls short of reproducing the observed beacon emission for May 2011, but the multiplicative factor required to scale the model profile to reproduce the CIRS emission has been reduced to a factor of ~5 from the previous factor of ~100. The important chemical production and loss mechanisms

  2. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    The design and test results of a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler for a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source are presented. The coupler separates the second harmonic power from the fundamental output power of a traveling-wave tube amplifier. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37 to 42 GHz) and VW-band (71 to 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  3. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source, based on the second harmonic from a traveling-wave tube amplifier and utilizes a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37-42 GHz) and V/W-band (71- 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  4. The 406 MHz ELT/EPIRBs. [Emergency Locator Transmitters/Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (ELT/EPIRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatow, F. S.; Gal, C.; Hayes, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Specifications for the COSPAS/SARSAT beacons are presented and related design considerations are discussed. Critical design aspects having significant impact on cost and performance are highlighted. Among these is the oscillator, whose frequency drift specifications require stabilization by ovens or digital control. Design options are presented and their impact on cost and performance assessed. Beacon designs developed to meet COSPAS/SARSAT specifications are shown.

  5. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source, based on the second harmonic from a traveling-wave tube amplifier and utilizes a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37 to 42 GHz) and V/W-band (71 to 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  6. Beacons and surface features differentially influence human reliance on global and local geometric cues when reorienting in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Bodily, Kent D; Kilday, Zachary A; Eastman, Caroline K; Gaskin, Katherine A; Graves, April A; Roberts, Jonathan E; Sturz, Bradley R

    2013-02-01

    In the reorientation literature, non-geometric cues include discrete objects (e.g., beacons) and surface-based features (e.g., colors, textures, and odors). To date, these types of non-geometric cues have been considered functionally similar, and it remains unknown whether beacons and surface features differentially influence the extent to which organisms reorient via global and local geometric cues. In the present experiment, we trained human participants to approach a location in a trapezoid-shaped enclosure uniquely specified by global and local geometric cues. We explored the role of beacons on the use of geometric cues by training participants in the presence or absence of uniquely-colored beacons. We explored the role of surface features on the use of geometric cues by recoloring two adjacent walls at the correct location and/or adding a line on the floor which corresponded to the major principal axis of the enclosure. All groups were then tested in novel-shaped enclosures in the absence of unique beacons and surface features to assess the relative use of global and local geometric cues. Results suggested that beacons facilitated the use of global geometric cues, whereas surface features either facilitated or hindered the use of geometric cues, depending on the feature. PMID:23089385

  7. Star Death Beacon at the Edge of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. This discovery not only sets a new astronomical record, it is also fundamental to the understanding of the very young Universe. Being such powerful emitters, these Gamma Ray Bursts serve as useful beacons, enabling the study of the physical conditions that prevailed in the early Universe. Indeed, since GRBs are so luminous, they have the potential to outshine the most distant known galaxies and may thus probe the Universe at higher redshifts than currently known. And because Gamma-ray Burst are thought to be associated with the catastrophic death of very massive stars that collapse into black holes, the existence of such objects so early in the life of the Universe provide astronomers with important information to better understand its evolution. The Gamma-Ray Burst GRB050904 was first detected on September 4, 2005, by the NASA/ASI/PPARC Swift satellite, which is dedicated to the discovery of these powerful explosions. Immediately after this detection, astronomers in observatories worldwide tried to identify the source by searching for the afterglow in the visible and/or near-infrared, and study it. First observations by American astronomers with the Palomar Robotic 60-inch Telescope failed to find the source. This sets a very stringent limit: in the visible, the afterglow should thus be at least a million times fainter than the faintest object that can be seen with the unaided eye (magnitude 21). But observations by another team of American astronomers detected the source in the near-infrared J-band with a magnitude 17.5, i.e. at least 25 times brighter than in the visible. This was indicative of the fact

  8. Letter Report to Address Comments on the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, March 2008

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-03-17

    The Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224, Decon Pad and Septic Systems, was approved by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on November 01, 2007. The approval letter contained the following two comments: Comment 1--For 06-05-01, 06-17-04, 06-23-01 provide evidence that the 6 inch VCP pipe originating from building CP-2 is no longer active and sealed to prevent possible future contamination. Comment 2--For the area that includes 06-03-01, provide evidence that active lines are no longer feeding the North and South lagoons and have been sealed to prevent possible future contamination. To address these comments, closure documentation was reviewed, and site visits were conducted to locate and document the areas of concern. Additional fieldwork was conducted in March 2008 to seal the lines and openings described in the two comments. Photographs were taken of the closed drains and lines to document that the NDEP comments were adequately addressed and potential inadvertent discharge to the environment has been eliminated. Investigation and closure documentation was reviewed to identify the locations of potential drains, lines, and other features that could receive and/or transmit liquid. Based on the investigation findings and subsequent closure activities, no openings, distribution boxes, or other features (excluding known floor drains at CP-2) that could receive liquid were found at the CP-2 location (Figure 1), and potential manholes for the north and south sewage lagoons were identified for Corrective Action Site (CAS) 06-03-01 (Figure 2). The distribution box identified in Figure 1 was not located during the investigation and was assumed to have been previously removed.

  9. Method and apparatus for a multibeam beacon laser assembly for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Abhijit (Inventor); Sanji, Babak (Inventor); Wright, Malcolm W. (Inventor); Page, Norman Alan (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical beacon is comprised of a telescope having a primary focal plane or Coud? focal plane, a plurality of fiber coupled laser sources for generating a plurality of beams, a collimator for collimating the plurality of beams, and optics for combining and focusing the plurality of collimated beams onto the primary or Coud? focal plane of the telescope. The telescope propagates the optical beacon, which is arranged into a ring of incoherent plurality of collimated beams. The apparatus further comprises fiber splitters coupled to each laser source to provide at least eight beams from at least four laser sources. The optics comprises a prism assembly, a combiner lens, a focusing lens and a field lens for focusing the plurality of collimated beams onto the primary focal plane or Coud? focal plane of the telescope.

  10. Mars approach navigation using Doppler and range measurements to surface beacons and orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Sam W.; Estefan, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Approximate analytical models are developed and used to construct an error covariance analysis for investigating the range of orbit determination accuracies which might be achieved for typical Mars approach trajectories. The sensitivity or orbit determination accuracy to beacon/orbiter position errors and to small spacecraft force modeling errors is also investigated. The results indicate that the orbit determination performance obtained from both Doppler and range data is a strong function of the inclination of the approach trajectory to the Martian equator, for surface beacons, and for orbiters, the inclination relative to the orbital plane. Large variations in performance were also observed for different approach velocity magnitudes; Doppler data in particular were found to perform poorly in determining the downtrack (along the direction of flight) component of spacecraft position. In addition, it was found that small spacecraft acceleration modeling errors can induce large errors in the Doppler-derived downtrack position estimate.

  11. Multi-Band Multi-Tone Tunable Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer For Satellite Beacon Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone tunable millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a satellite beacon transmitter for radio wave propagation studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). In addition, the architecture for a compact beacon transmitter, which includes the multi-tone synthesizer, polarizer, horn antenna, and power/control electronics, has been investigated for a notional space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment payload on a small satellite. The above studies would enable the design of robust high throughput multi-Gbps data rate future space-to-ground satellite communication links.

  12. Steranes and triterpanes in the Beacon Supergroup samples from southern Victoria Land in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Genki I.; Watanuki, Kunihiko ); Machihara, Tsutomu ); Suzuki, Noriyuki ); Funaki, Minoru )

    1987-10-01

    Steranes and triterpanes in Beacon Supergroup samples (sedimentary rock and silicified wood) from Allan Hills and Carapace Nunatak of southern Victoria Land in Antarctica were studied to elucidate sources of organic materials, sedimentary paleoenvironment and thermal history after deposition. Relative abundances of C{sub 27}, C{sub 28} and C{sub 29} steranes and visual kerogen results of Beacon Supergroup samples from Allan Hills imply that organic materials in the sedimentary paleoenvironments are contributed mainly by vascular plants with some influence of microorganisms, while those of the Carapace Nunatak sample may be largely due to fern spores. The pristane/phytane and pristane/heptadecane ratios of the samples were generally close to unity and between 0.50 and 0.99, respectively, suggesting that the sedimentary paleoenvironment was shallow lacustrine with alternating oxic and anoxic conditions.

  13. Detection of salmonella using a real-time PCR based on molecular beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wilfred; Martinez, Grisselle; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2000-03-01

    Molecular beacons are oligonucleotide probes that become fluorescent upon hybridization. We developed a new approach to detect the presence of Salmonella species using these fluorogenic reporter molecules and demonstrated their ability to discriminate between similar E. coli species in real-time PCR assays. A detection limit of 1 CFU per PCR reaction was obtained. The assays were carried out entirely in sealed PCR tubes, enabling fast and direct detection in a semiautomated format.

  14. Polymer beacons for luminescence and magnetic resonance imaging of DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Joshua M; Fichter, Katye M; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Li, Jing; Madsen, Louis A; McLendon, Patrick M; Reineke, Theresa M

    2009-10-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids with polycations offers tremendous potential for developing highly specific treatments for various therapeutic targets. Although materials have been developed and studied for polynucleotide transfer, the biological mechanisms and fate of the synthetic vehicle has remained elusive due to the limitations with current labeling technologies. Here, we have developed polymer beacons that allow the delivery of nucleic acids to be visualized at different biological scales. The polycations have been designed to contain repeated oligoethyleneamines, for binding and compacting nucleic acids into nanoparticles, and lanthanide (Ln) chelates [either luminescent europium (Eu(3+)) or paramagnetic gadolinium (Gd(3+))]. The chelated Lns allow the visualization of the delivery vehicle both on the nm/microm scale via microscopy and on the sub-mm scale via MRI. We demonstrate that these delivery beacons effectively bind and compact plasmid (p)DNA into nanoparticles and protect nucleic acids from nuclease damage. These delivery beacons efficiently deliver pDNA into cultured cells and do not exhibit toxicity. Micrographs of cultured cells exposed to the nanoparticle complexes formed with fluorescein-labeled pDNA and the europium-chelated polymers reveal effective intracellular imaging of the delivery process. MRI of bulk cells exposed to the complexes formulated with pDNA and the gadolinium-chelated structures show bright image contrast, allowing visualization of effective intracellular delivery on the tissue-scale. Because of their versatility, these delivery beacons posses remarkable potential for tracking and understanding nucleic acid transfer in vitro, and have promise as in vivo theranostic agents. PMID:19805101

  15. Comparison of OLYMPUS beacon and radiometric attenuation measurements at Blacksburg, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, J. B.; Jacobson, M. D.; Beeler, R. H.; Hazen, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of attenuation of the 20 and 30 GHz beacons onboard the OLYMPUS satellite are compared to simultaneous observations of atmospheric attenuation by a multichannel microwave radiometer along the same path. Departures from high correlation between the two measurements are believed to be related to differences in antenna beamwidths. Mean equivalent zenith attenuations derived from the slant path data are compared to zenith observations made at previous locations.

  16. Development of BEACON technology. Topical report: tandem reactor testing of hydrogen catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Both the methane production and hydrogen production processes from low Btu gases have been developed successfully through bench-scale under a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy and TRW, Inc. Bench-scale development of the methane process was completed during the second quarter of 1983. Also catalyst selection testing (screening tests) for hydrogen manufacturing was completed at the same time and the results reported in a Topical Report dated October 1983. This document summarizes the data generated at bench-scale on the production of hydrogen from low Btu gas. Bench-scale development of the BEACON hydrogen process was concluded with the completion of Task 3. The objective of Task 3 was to qualify through bench-scale a BEACON-type catalyst for the production of hydrogen from low Btu gases. Catalyst No. 11, a modified SNG BEACON catalyst which proved highly selective to hydrogen production during laboratory scale screening tests was subjected to a total of 265 hours of steady state operation at three pressures (50, 75 and 100 psig) in the fluidized bed Tandem Reactor apparatus (bench-scale). The catalyst met all the requirements of stability and selectivity cited above. Carbon deposition and carbon steaming to hydrogen took place at near equilibrium yields, methane suppression was greater than 80% at all pressures, and there was no significant build-up of inactive carbon residue on the catalyst. 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, J. Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (target area ), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a

  18. Direct identification of major Gram-negative pathogens in respiratory specimens by respiFISH® HAP Gram (-) Panel, a beacon-based FISH methodology.

    PubMed

    Koncan, R; Parisato, M; Sakarikou, C; Stringari, G; Fontana, C; Favuzzi, V; Ligozzi, M; Lo Cascio, G

    2015-10-01

    Rapid detection of microorganisms in respiratory specimens is of paramount importance to drive the proper antibiotic regimen to prevent complications and transmission of infections. In the present study, the respiFISH® HAP Gram (-) Panel (miacom diagnostics GmbH, Duesseldorf, Germany) for the etiological diagnosis of hospital-acquired pneumonia was compared with the traditional culture method for the detection of major Gram-negative pathogens in respiratory specimens. respiFISH® combined the classical fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology with fluorescence-labeled DNA molecular beacons as probes. From September 2011 to January 2012, 165 samples were analyzed: the sensitivity and specificity were 94.39 and 87.93%, respectively. Only six pathogens (3.6%) were not identified with respiFISH®, while seven specimens (3%) provided false-positive results. This beacon-based identification shortens the time to result by at least one work day, providing species-level identification within half an hour. Considering the high sensitivity and specificity and the significant time saving, the introduction of bbFISH® assays could effectively complement traditional systems in microbiology laboratories. PMID:26219682

  19. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  20. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  1. Address of the President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Frederic W.

    1976-01-01

    The president of the Association of American Colleges addresses at the 62nd annual meeting the theme of the conference: "Looking to the Future--Liberal Education in a Radically Changing Society." Contributions to be made by AAC are examined. (LBH)

  2. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  3. Space sciences - Keynote address

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Joseph K.

    1990-01-01

    The present status and projected future developments of the NASA Space Science and Applications Program are addressed. Emphasis is given to biochemistry experiments that are planned for the Space Station. Projects for the late 1990s which will study the sun, the earth's magnetosphere, and the geosphere are briefly discussed.

  4. Addressing Socio-Emotional Development and Infant Mental Health in Early Childhood Systems: Executive Summary. Building State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Series, Number 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Paula; Nagle, Geoffrey; Stafford, Brian; Rice, Thomas; Farrer, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    During the past three decades, there has been an increase in knowledge about early childhood development. Early experiences can function as either risk factors or protective factors for a child's future health and development. This has led to concern about how current health systems contribute to the quality of the earliest experiences of life.…

  5. A Microfluidic Love-Wave Biosensing Device for PSA Detection Based on an Aptamer Beacon Probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Shuangming; Cao, Kang; Wang, Pengjuan; Su, Yan; Zhu, Xinhua; Wan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A label-free and selective aptamer beacon-based Love-wave biosensing device was developed for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. The device consists of the following parts: LiTaO3 substrate with SiO2 film as wave guide layer, two set of inter-digital transducers (IDT), gold film for immobilization of the biorecongniton layer and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels. DNA aptamer, or "artificial antibody", was used as the specific biorecognition probe for PSA capture. Some nucleotides were added to the 3'-end of the aptamer to form a duplex with the 3'-end, turning the aptamer into an aptamer-beacon. Taking advantage of the selective target-induced assembly changes arising from the "aptamer beacon", highly selective and specific detection of PSA was achieved. Furthermore, PDMS microfluidic channels were designed and fabricated to realize automated quantitative sample injection. After optimization of the experimental conditions, the established device showed good performance for PSA detection between 10 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL, with a detection limit of 10 ng/mL. The proposed sensor might be a promising alternative for point of care diagnostics. PMID:26110408

  6. Fluorescent DNAzyme biosensors for metal ions based on catalytic molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juewen; Lu, Yi

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, methods for designing metal ion sensors using fluorophore- and quencher-labeled DNAzymes are discussed. In contrast to the classical molecular beacon method based on binding, the methods described here utilize catalytic cleavage to release the fluorophore for detection and quantification, making it possible to take advantage of catalytic turnovers for signal amplification. Unlike classical molecular beacons that detect only nucleic acids, catalytic molecular beacons can be applied to different DNAzymes to detect a broad range of analytes. The methods described are based on the finding that almost all known trans-cleaving DNAzymes share a similar structure comprised of a catalytic DNAzyme core flanked by two substrate recognition arms. Using a typical DNAzyme called the "8-17" DNAzyme as an example, the design of highly sensitive and selective Pb2+ sensors is described in detail. The initial design employs a single fluorophore-quencher pair in close proximity, with the fluorophore on the 5'-end of the substrate and the quencher on the 3'-end of the enzyme. Although this sensor is highly sensitive and selective at 4 degrees C, high background fluorescence is observed at higher temperatures. Therefore a new design with an additional quencher attached to the 3'-end of the substrate is employed to suppress background fluorescence. The dual quencher method allows the sensor to perform at ambient temperatures with a high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:16785634

  7. Rationally Manipulating Aptamer Binding Affinities in a Stem-Loop Molecular Beacon

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA sequences that are highly specific for a target ligand are called aptamers. While the incorporation of aptamer sequences into stem-loop molecular beacons has become an essential tool in optical biosensors, the design principles that determine the magnitude of binding affinity and its relationship to placement of the aptamer sequence in the stem-loop architecture are not well defined. By controlled placement of the aptamer along the loop region of the molecular beacon, it is observed that the binding affinity can be tuned over 4 orders of magnitude (1.3 nM – 203 μM) for the Huizenga and Szostak ATP DNA aptamer sequence. It is observed that the Kd is enhanced for the fully exposed sequence, with reduced binding affinity when the aptamer is part of the stem region of the beacon. Analysis of the ΔG values indicate a clear correlation between the aptamer hybridized length in the stem and its observed Kd. The use of a nanometal surface energy transfer probe method for monitoring ATP binding to the aptamer sequence allows the observation of negative cooperativity between the two ATP binding events. Maintenance of the high binding affinity of this ATP aptamer and the observation of two separate Kd’s for ATP binding indicate NSET as an effective, nonmanipulative, optical method for tracking biomolecular changes. PMID:25170558

  8. A multistatic HF beacon network for ionospheric specification in the Peruvian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.; Vierinen, J.

    2016-05-01

    A small network of HF beacon transmitters and receivers has been deployed in Peru for specifying the F region ionosphere in the sector. The effort is motivated by ionospheric disturbances associated with equatorial spread F (ESF) and specifically disturbances arising under inauspicious conditions for ESF as determined by numerical simulations. The beacons operate at dual frequencies (2.72 and 3.64 MHz). They are CW but incorporate pseudorandom noise (PRN) coding so that the group delays of the links can be measured. Other observables are power, Doppler shift, bearing, and polarization. A transmitter is currently deployed at Ancon (11°46'37''S, 77°09'1''W, 51 m above sea level (asl)), while receivers are at Jicamarca (11°57'5.8''S, 76°52'27''W, 510 m asl) and Huancayo (12°02'30''S, 75°19'15''W, 3315 m asl). An algorithm for inverting the beacon data combined with electron density profiles from Jicamarca is described. Data and representative solutions from an experimental campaign held in August 2015 are presented and evaluated.

  9. Star Death Beacon at the Edge of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. This discovery not only sets a new astronomical record, it is also fundamental to the understanding of the very young Universe. Being such powerful emitters, these Gamma Ray Bursts serve as useful beacons, enabling the study of the physical conditions that prevailed in the early Universe. Indeed, since GRBs are so luminous, they have the potential to outshine the most distant known galaxies and may thus probe the Universe at higher redshifts than currently known. And because Gamma-ray Burst are thought to be associated with the catastrophic death of very massive stars that collapse into black holes, the existence of such objects so early in the life of the Universe provide astronomers with important information to better understand its evolution. The Gamma-Ray Burst GRB050904 was first detected on September 4, 2005, by the NASA/ASI/PPARC Swift satellite, which is dedicated to the discovery of these powerful explosions. Immediately after this detection, astronomers in observatories worldwide tried to identify the source by searching for the afterglow in the visible and/or near-infrared, and study it. First observations by American astronomers with the Palomar Robotic 60-inch Telescope failed to find the source. This sets a very stringent limit: in the visible, the afterglow should thus be at least a million times fainter than the faintest object that can be seen with the unaided eye (magnitude 21). But observations by another team of American astronomers detected the source in the near-infrared J-band with a magnitude 17.5, i.e. at least 25 times brighter than in the visible. This was indicative of the fact

  10. A universal decision support system. Addressing the decision-making needs of patients, families, and clinicians in the setting of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Cox, Christopher E; White, Douglas B; Abernethy, Amy P

    2014-08-15

    In the setting of a complex critical illness, preference-sensitive decision making-choosing between two or more reasonable treatment options-can be difficult for patients, families, and clinicians alike. A common challenge to making high-quality decisions in this setting is a lack of critical information access and sharing among participants. Decision aids-brochures, web applications, and videos-are a major focus of current research because mounting evidence suggests they can improve decision-making quality and enhance collaborative shared decision making. However, many decision aids have important limitations, including a relatively narrow capacity for personalization, an inability to gather and generate clinical data, a focus on only a single disease or treatment, and high developmental costs. To address these issues and to help guide future research, we propose a model of "universal" electronic decision support that can be easily adapted by clinicians and patients/families for whatever decision is at hand. In this scalable web-based platform, a general shared decision-making core structure would accommodate simple, interchangeable disease and treatment information modules. The format and content of the system could be adapted to decisional participants' unique characteristics, abilities, and needs. Universal decision support can better standardize a decisional approach and also allow a unique degree of personalization within a framework of shared decision making. We also discuss potential criticisms of this approach as well as strategies that can overcome them in a critical illness setting. PMID:25019639

  11. Excerpts from keynote address

    SciTech Connect

    Creel, G.C.

    1995-06-01

    Excerpts from the keynote principally address emissions issues in the fossil power industry as related to heat rate improvements. Stack emissions of both sulfur and nitrogen oxides are discussed, and a number of examples are given: (1) PEPCO`s Potomac River Station, and (2) Morgantown station`s NOX reduction efforts. Circulating water emissions are also briefly discussed, as are O & M costs of emission controls.

  12. Use of siRNA molecular beacons to detect and attenuate mycobacterial infection in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    George, Remo; Cavalcante, Renata; Jr, Celso Carvalho; Marques, Elyana; Waugh, Jonathan B; Unlap, M Tino

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading infectious diseases plaguing mankind and is mediated by the facultative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Once the pathogen enters the body, it subverts the host immune defenses and thrives for extended periods of time within the host macrophages in the lung granulomas, a condition called latent tuberculosis (LTB). Persons with LTB are prone to reactivation of the disease when the body’s immunity is compromised. Currently there are no reliable and effective diagnosis and treatment options for LTB, which necessitates new research in this area. The mycobacterial proteins and genes mediating the adaptive responses inside the macrophage is largely yet to be determined. Recently, it has been shown that the mce operon genes are critical for host cell invasion by the mycobacterium and for establishing a persistent infection in both in vitro and in mouse models of tuberculosis. The YrbE and Mce proteins which are encoded by the MTB mce operons display high degrees of homology to the permeases and the surface binding protein of the ABC transports, respectively. Similarities in structure and cell surface location impute a role in cell invasion at cholesterol rich regions and immunomodulation. The mce4 operon is also thought to encode a cholesterol transport system that enables the mycobacterium to derive both energy and carbon from the host membrane lipids and possibly generating virulence mediating metabolites, thus enabling the bacteria in its long term survival within the granuloma. Various deletion mutation studies involving individual or whole mce operon genes have shown to be conferring varying degrees of attenuation of infectivity or at times hypervirulence to the host MTB, with the deletion of mce4A operon gene conferring the greatest degree of attenuation of virulence. Antisense technology using synthetic siRNAs has been used in knocking down genes in bacteria and over the years this has evolved into a powerful tool for

  13. Selective amyloid β oligomer assay based on abasic site-containing molecular beacon and enzyme-free amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linling; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Ya; Lu, Linlin; Feng, Chongchong; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2016-04-15

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers are highly toxic species in the process of Aβ aggregation and are regarded as potent therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Herein, a label-free molecular beacon (MB) system integrated with enzyme-free amplification strategy was developed for simple and highly selective assay of Aβ oligomers. The MB system was constructed with abasic site (AP site)-containing stem-loop DNA and a fluorescent ligand 2-amino-5,6,7-trimethyl-1,8-naphyridine (ATMND), of which the fluorescence was quenched upon binding to the AP site in DNA stem. Enzyme-free amplification was realized by target-triggered continuous opening of two delicately designed MBs (MB1 and MB2). Target DNA hybridization with MB1 and then MB2 resulted in the release of two ATMND molecules in one binding event. Subsequent target recycling could greatly amplify the detection sensitivity due to the greatly enhanced turn-on emission of ATMND fluorescence. Combining with Aβ oligomers aptamers, the strategy was applied to analyze Aβ oligomers and the results showed that it could quantify Aβ oligomers with high selectivity and monitor the Aβ aggregation process. This novel method may be conducive to improve the diagnosis and pathogenic study of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26613510

  14. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  15. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  16. Addressing the impact of environmental uncertainty in plankton model calibration with a dedicated software system: the Marine Model Optimization Testbed (MarMOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmings, J. C. P.; Challenor, P. G.

    2011-08-01

    A wide variety of different marine plankton system models have been coupled with ocean circulation models, with the aim of understanding and predicting aspects of environmental change. However, an ability to make reliable inferences about real-world processes from the model behaviour demands a quantitative understanding of model error that remains elusive. Assessment of coupled model output is inhibited by relatively limited observing system coverage of biogeochemical components. Any direct assessment of the plankton model is further inhibited by uncertainty in the physical state. Furthermore, comparative evaluation of plankton models on the basis of their design is inhibited by the sensitivity of their dynamics to many adjustable parameters. The Marine Model Optimization Testbed is a new software tool designed for rigorous analysis of plankton models in a multi-site 1-D framework, in particular to address uncertainty issues in model assessment. A flexible user interface ensures its suitability to more general inter-comparison, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses, including model comparison at the level of individual processes, and to state estimation for specific locations. The principal features of MarMOT are described and its application to model calibration is demonstrated by way of a set of twin experiments, in which synthetic observations are assimilated in an attempt to recover the true parameter values of a known system. The experimental aim is to investigate the effect of different misfit weighting schemes on parameter recovery in the presence of error in the plankton model's environmental input data. Simulated errors are derived from statistical characterizations of the mixed layer depth, the horizontal flux divergences of the biogeochemical tracers and the initial state. Plausible patterns of uncertainty in these data are shown to produce strong temporal and spatial variability in the expected simulation error over an annual cycle, indicating

  17. Addressing the impact of environmental uncertainty in plankton model calibration with a dedicated software system: the Marine Model Optimization Testbed (MarMOT 1.1 alpha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmings, J. C. P.; Challenor, P. G.

    2012-04-01

    A wide variety of different plankton system models have been coupled with ocean circulation models, with the aim of understanding and predicting aspects of environmental change. However, an ability to make reliable inferences about real-world processes from the model behaviour demands a quantitative understanding of model error that remains elusive. Assessment of coupled model output is inhibited by relatively limited observing system coverage of biogeochemical components. Any direct assessment of the plankton model is further inhibited by uncertainty in the physical state. Furthermore, comparative evaluation of plankton models on the basis of their design is inhibited by the sensitivity of their dynamics to many adjustable parameters. Parameter uncertainty has been widely addressed by calibrating models at data-rich ocean sites. However, relatively little attention has been given to quantifying uncertainty in the physical fields required by the plankton models at these sites, and tendencies in the biogeochemical properties due to the effects of horizontal processes are often neglected. Here we use model twin experiments, in which synthetic data are assimilated to estimate a system's known "true" parameters, to investigate the impact of error in a plankton model's environmental input data. The experiments are supported by a new software tool, the Marine Model Optimization Testbed, designed for rigorous analysis of plankton models in a multi-site 1-D framework. Simulated errors are derived from statistical characterizations of the mixed layer depth, the horizontal flux divergence tendencies of the biogeochemical tracers and the initial state. Plausible patterns of uncertainty in these data are shown to produce strong temporal and spatial variability in the expected simulation error variance over an annual cycle, indicating variation in the significance attributable to individual model-data differences. An inverse scheme using ensemble-based estimates of the

  18. Human-specific CpG "beacons" identify loci associated with human-specific traits and disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher G; Wilson, Gareth A; Butcher, Lee M; Roos, Christian; Walter, Lutz; Beck, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    Regulatory change has long been hypothesized to drive the delineation of the human phenotype from other closely related primates. Here we provide evidence that CpG dinucleotides play a special role in this process. CpGs enable epigenome variability via DNA methylation, and this epigenetic mark functions as a regulatory mechanism. Therefore, species-specific CpGs may influence species-specific regulation. We report non-polymorphic species-specific CpG dinucleotides (termed "CpG beacons") as a distinct genomic feature associated with CpG island (CGI) evolution, human traits and disease. Using an inter-primate comparison, we identified 21 extreme CpG beacon clusters (≥ 20/kb peaks, empirical p < 1.0 × 10(-3)) in humans, which include associations with four monogenic developmental and neurological disease related genes (Benjamini-Hochberg corrected p = 6.03 × 10(-3)). We also demonstrate that beacon-mediated CpG density gain in CGIs correlates with reduced methylation in these species in orthologous CGIs over time, via human, chimpanzee and macaque MeDIP-seq. Therefore mapping into both the genomic and epigenomic space the identified CpG beacon clusters define points of intersection where a substantial two-way interaction between genetic sequence and epigenetic state has occurred. Taken together, our data support a model for CpG beacons to contribute to CGI evolution from genesis to tissue-specific to constitutively active CGIs. PMID:22968434

  19. How agro-ecological research helps to address food security issues under new IPM and pesticide reduction policies for global crop production systems.

    PubMed

    E Birch, A Nicholas; Begg, Graham S; Squire, Geoffrey R

    2011-06-01

    Drivers behind food security and crop protection issues are discussed in relation to food losses caused by pests. Pests globally consume food estimated to feed an additional one billion people. Key drivers include rapid human population increase, climate change, loss of beneficial on-farm biodiversity, reduction in per capita cropped land, water shortages, and EU pesticide withdrawals under policies relating to 91/414 EEC. IPM (Integrated Pest Management) will be compulsory for all EU agriculture by 2014 and is also being widely adopted globally. IPM offers a 'toolbox' of complementary crop- and region-specific crop protection solutions to address these rising pressures. IPM aims for more sustainable solutions by using complementary technologies. The applied research challenge now is to reduce selection pressure on single solution strategies, by creating additive/synergistic interactions between IPM components. IPM is compatible with organic, conventional, and GM cropping systems and is flexible, allowing regional fine-tuning. It reduces pests below economic thresholds utilizing key 'ecological services', particularly biocontrol. A recent global review demonstrates that IPM can reduce pesticide use and increase yields of most of the major crops studied. Landscape scale 'ecological engineering', together with genetic improvement of new crop varieties, will enhance the durability of pest-resistant cultivars (conventional and GM). IPM will also promote compatibility with semiochemicals, biopesticides, precision pest monitoring tools, and rapid diagnostics. These combined strategies are urgently needed and are best achieved via multi-disciplinary research, including complex spatio-temporal modelling at farm and landscape scales. Integrative and synergistic use of existing and new IPM technologies will help meet future food production needs more sustainably in developed and developing countries, in an era of reduced pesticide availability. Current IPM research gaps are

  20. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), "Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities-Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015", we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  1. Superfund explanation of significant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 1): Beacon Heights Landfill, Beacon Falls, CT, September 9, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    EPA issued a ROD on September 23, 1985 (PB86-134004), documenting the selected remedial actions for the Site. EPA issued the Supplemental ROD on September 28, 1990 (PB91-921418). The Supplemental ROD included an evaluation of alternatives for treatment and disposal of the leachate collected from the Site. These alternatives consisted of: treatment at the Beacon Falls Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW), treatment at the Naugatuck POTW, trucking the leachate off Site for treatment, and treatment on Site. As a direct result of events that developed after the completion of the ROD and the Supplemental ROD, decisions were made to change the selected location for leachate treatment, to modify the RCRA cap design, and to require the construction of compensatory wetlands.

  2. Bax: Addressed to kill.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Manon, Stéphen

    2011-09-01

    The pro-apoptototic protein Bax (Bcl-2 Associated protein X) plays a central role in the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. In healthy mammalian cells, Bax is essentially cytosolic and inactive. Following a death signal, the protein is translocated to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it promotes a permeabilization that favors the release of different apoptogenic factors, such as cytochrome c. The regulation of Bax translocation is associated to conformational changes that are under the control of different factors. The evidences showing the involvement of different Bax domains in its mitochondrial localization are presented. The interactions between Bax and its different partners are described in relation to their ability to promote (or prevent) Bax conformational changes leading to mitochondrial addressing and to the acquisition of the capacity to permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:21641962

  3. Detection of Periodic Beacon Loads in Electrical Distribution Substation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Guttromson, Ross T.; Lu, Ning; Boyd, Paul A.; Trudnowski, Daniel; Chassin, David P.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Shaw, James M.

    2006-05-31

    This research explores methods for identifying a whether a load is sending a signal to the utility SCADA system. Such a system can identify whether various loads are signialing using existing SCADA infrastructure, that is, without added, high cost communications infrastructure.

  4. Novel molecular beacon DNA probes for protein-nucleic acid interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei J.; Perlette, John; Fang, Xiaohong; Kelley, Shannon; Tan, Weihong

    2000-03-01

    We report a novel approach to study protein-nucleic acid interactions by using molecular beacons (MBs). Molecular beacons are hairpin-shaped DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher, and can report the presence of target DNA/RNA sequences. MBs can also report the existence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) through non-sequence specific binding. The interaction between SSB and MB has resulted in significant fluorescence restoration of the MB. The fluorescence enhancement brought by SSB and by complementary DNA is very comparable. The molar ratio of the binding between SSB and the molecular beacon is 1:1 with a binding constant of 2 X 107 M-1. Using the MB-SSB binding, we are able to determine SSB at 2 X 10-10 M with a conventional spectrometer. We have also applied MB DNA probes for the analysis of an enzyme lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and for the investigation of its binding properties with ssDNA. The biding process between MB and different isoenzymes of LDH has been studied. We also show that there are significant differences in MB binding affinity to different proteins, which will enable selective binding studies of a variety of proteins. This new approach is potentially useful for protein-DNA/RNA interaction studies that require high sensitivity, speed and convenience. The results also open the possibility of using easily obtainable, custom designed, modified DNA molecules for studies of drug interactions and targeting. Our results demonstrate that MB can be effectively used for sensitive protein quantitation and for efficient protein-DNA interaction studies. MB has the signal transduction mechanism built within the molecule, and can thus be used for quick protein assay development and for real-time measurements.

  5. Making It Local: Beacon Communities Use Health Information Technology to Optimize Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R.; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R.; Lobach, David F.; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M.; Schachter, Abigail A.; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C.; Turske, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks—including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation—the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability. (Population Health Management 2014;17:149–158) PMID

  6. Development of BEACON technology: Hydrogen catalyst selection and preparation: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Bench scale development of the methane process was completed during the second quarter 1983 and the results reported to DOE. Bench scale development of the hydrogen process is currently underway. This document summarizes the effort expended in the selection and preparation of the primary and back-up hydrogen production catalysts to be used in multi-cycle testing at bench scale. The effort comprised the Task 1 experimentation of the current BEACON program and was six weeks in duration. From 20 catalysts screened at laboratory scale as candidates for hydrogen production from BEACON carbon, two were selected as promising for exhibiting good performance (activity and selectivity) at reaction pressures above ambient. These two catalysts, No. 6 and No. 11, were subjected to extensive carbon deposition-steaming testing at 50, 75 and 100 psig (3 to 5 cycles at each pressure); 10 to 20 gram batches of solids were used in these tests. Performance comparisons led to the selection of Catalyst No. 11 as the primary catalyst for the hydrogen process. Catalyst No. 6 performed well enough at pressures up to 50 psig to be considered as a potential replacement to Catalyst No. 11 should the latter fail multi-cycle testing (long-term activity tests at elevated pressures). The multi-cycle testing (a minimum operation of 250 hours of simultaneous carbon deposition and steaming to hydrogen) will be performed in the existing Tandem Reactor apparatus under Task 2 of this program. 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Toward improving hurricane forecasts using the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS): A framework to address the issues of Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Boothe, M.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Haddad, Z. S.; Knosp, B.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Li, P.; montgomery, M. T.; Niamsuwan, N.; Tallapragada, V. S.; Tanelli, S.; Turk, J.; Vukicevic, T.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate forecasting of extreme weather requires the use of both regional models as well as global General Circulation Models (GCMs). The regional models have higher resolution and more accurate physics - two critical components needed for properly representing the key convective processes. GCMs, on the other hand, have better depiction of the large-scale environment and, thus, are necessary for properly capturing the important scale interactions. But how to evaluate the models, understand their shortcomings and improve them? Satellite observations can provide invaluable information. And this is where the issues of Big Data come: satellite observations are very complex and have large variety while model forecast are very voluminous. We are developing a system - TCIS - that addresses the issues of model evaluation and process understanding with the goal of improving the accuracy of hurricane forecasts. This NASA/ESTO/AIST-funded project aims at bringing satellite/airborne observations and model forecasts into a common system and developing on-line tools for joint analysis. To properly evaluate the models we go beyond the comparison of the geophysical fields. We input the model fields into instrument simulators (NEOS3, CRTM, etc.) and compute synthetic observations for a more direct comparison to the observed parameters. In this presentation we will start by describing the scientific questions. We will then outline our current framework to provide fusion of models and observations. Next, we will illustrate how the system can be used to evaluate several models (HWRF, GFS, ECMWF) by applying a couple of our analysis tools to several hurricanes observed during the 2013 season. Finally, we will outline our future plans. Our goal is to go beyond the image comparison and point-by-point statistics, by focusing instead on understanding multi-parameter correlations and providing robust statistics. By developing on-line analysis tools, our framework will allow for consistent

  8. Magnetic content addressable memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenye

    Content Addressable Memories are designed with comparison circuits built into every bit cell. This parallel structure can increase the speed of searching from O(n) (as with Random Access Memories) to O(1), where n is the number of entries being searched. The high cost in hardware limits the application of CAM within situations where higher searching speed is extremely desired. Spintronics technology can build non-volatile Magnetic RAM with only one device for one bit cell. There are various technologies involved, like Magnetic Tunnel Junctions, off-easy-axis programming method, Synthetic Anti-Ferromagnetic tri-layers, Domain Wall displacement, Spin Transfer Torque tri-layers and etc. With them, particularly the Tunnel Magneto-Resistance variation in MTJ due to difference in magnetization polarity of the two magnets, Magnetic CAM can be developed with reduced hardware cost. And this is demonstrated by the discussion in this dissertation. Six MCAM designs are discussed. In the first design, comparand (C), local information (S) and their complements are stored into 4 MTJs connected in XOR gate pattern. The other five designs have one or two stacks for both information storage and comparison, and full TMR ratio can be taken advantage of. Two challenges for the five are specifically programming C without changing S and selectively programming a cell out of an array. The solutions to specific programming are: by confining the programming field for C in a ring structure design; by using field programming and spin polarized current programming respectively for C and S in the SAF+DW and SAF+STT tri-layer design; by making use of the difference in thresholds between direct mode and toggle mode switching in the SAF+SAF design. The problem of selective programming is addressed by off-easy-axis method and by including SAF tri-layers. Cell with STT tri-layers for both C and S can completely avoid the problems of specific and selective programming, but subject to the limit of

  9. Quick topological method for acquiring the beacon in inter-satellite laser communications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2014-11-20

    Background starlight can lead to some spot noise in the image collected by a CCD, disturbing the beacon acquisition in inter-satellite laser communications. Removing the spot noise takes much time by using the existing method that is based on the reference star calendar table. We present a novel method to reduce the processing time in this paper. The key point is to use the topological characteristic of the spot noise in the graph that is obtained through threshold segmentation to the image on the CCD. The method helps to improve the acquisition probability and to save valuable onboard computing resources. PMID:25607859

  10. Steranes and triterpanes in the Beacon Supergroup samples from southern Victoria Land in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Genki I.; Machihara, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Funaki, Minoru; Watanuki, Kunihiko

    1987-10-01

    Steranes and triterpanes in Beacon Supergroup samples (sedimentary rock and silicified wood) from Allan Hills and Carapace Nunatak of southern Victoria Land in Antarctica were studied to elucidate sources of organic materials, sedimentary paleoenvironment and thermal history after deposition. Relative abundances of C 27, C 28 and C 29 steranes and visual kerogen results of Beacon Supergroup samples from Allan Hills imply that organic materials in the sedimentary paleoenvironments are contributed mainly by vascular plants with some influence of microorganisms, while those of the Carapace Nunatak sample may be largely due to fern spores. The pristane/phytane and pristane/heptadecane ratios of the samples were generally close to unity and between 0.50 and 0.99, respectively, suggesting that the sedimentary paleoenvironment was shallow lacustrine with alternating oxic and anoxic conditions. The ( 22S/22R)-17α(H),21β(H)-C 31-C 33 triterpane ratios are approximately at thermal equilibrium values ( ca. 1.5) in most samples, while the ( 20S/20R)-5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29 sterane ratios and the (20R + 20S)-5α(H), 14β(H), 17β(H)/5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29 sterane ratios vary from 0.0 to 1.1 and from 0.0 to 1.4, respectively. Most of the ( 20S/20R)-5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29 sterane ratios did not reach thermal equilibrium values. The correlation coefficient between the ( 20S/20R)-5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29 sterane ratios and (20R + 20S)-5α(H), 14β(H), 17β(H)/5α(H), 14α(H), 17α(H)-C 29, sterane ratios is very high (0.96). These variable maturities probably reflect thermal effects of basaltic dikes on the Beacon Supergroup at Allan Hills and Carapace Nunatak during Jurassic time. Thermal stresses on the Beacon Supergroup prior to basaltic intrusion have been estimated to be quite low, so the paleotemperatures of this formation have been quite low.

  11. Dual-band beacon experiment over Southeast Asia for ionospheric irregularity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watthanasangmechai, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Saito, A.; Saito, S.; Maruyama, T.; Tsugawa, T.; Nishioka, M.

    2013-12-01

    An experiment of dual-band beacon over Southeast Asia was started in March 2012 in order to capture and analyze ionospheric irregularities in equatorial region. Five GNU Radio Beacon Receivers (GRBRs) were aligned along 100 degree geographic longitude. The distances between the stations reach more than 500 km. The field of view of this observational network covers +/- 20 degree geomagnetic latitude including the geomagnetic equator. To capture ionospheric irregularities, the absolute TEC estimation technique was developed. The two-station method (Leitinger et al., 1975) is generally accepted as a suitable method to estimate TEC offsets of dual-band beacon experiment. However, the distances between the stations directly affect on the robustness of the technique. In Southeast Asia, the observational network is too sparse to attain a benefit of the classic two-station method. Moreover, the least-squares approch used in the two-station method tries too much to adjust the small scales of the TEC distribution which are the local minima. We thus propose a new technique to estimate the TEC offsets with the supporting data from absolute GPS-TEC from local GPS receivers and the ionospheric height from local ionosondes. The key of the proposed technique is to utilize the brute-force technique with weighting function to find the TEC offset set that yields a global minimum of RMSE in whole parameter space. The weight is not necessary when the TEC distribution is smooth, while it significantly improves the TEC estimation during the ESF events. As a result, the latitudinal TEC shows double-hump distribution because of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA). In additions, the 100km-scale fluctuations from an Equatorial Spread F (ESF) are captured at night time in equinox seasons. The plausible linkage of the meridional wind with triggering of ESF is under invatigating and will be presented. The proposed method is successful to estimate the latitudinal TEC distribution from dual

  12. Satellite dual antenna pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keigler, John E. (Inventor); Hartshorne, Frank A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A satellite antenna pointing system for separately pointing separated transmit and receive high gain antenna systems includes means for separately and sequentially applying a beacon signal to the transmit and receive antenna systems and a broad beam width antenna which has a coverage area greater than the overall coverage region of the spot beam antenna systems. The system includes ground stations located at or near the periphery of the overall coverage region adapted to receive these beacon signals. At a central control station these beacon signals are compared to provide first signals proportional to the ratio of said beacon signals received from said transmit antenna system and said broad beam width antenna and second signals proportional to the ratio of said beacon signals received from said satellite receive antenna system and said broad beam width antenna. The central station generates from said first signals transmit antenna control signals which are sent to the satellite to control the orientation of said transmit antenna system. Likewise, the central control station generates from the second signals receiver antenna control signals which are applied to the satellite to control the orientation of the satellite receive antenna system.

  13. Addressing a Historical Mission in a Performance Driven System: A Case Study of a Public Historically Black University Engaged in the Equity Scorecard Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    The case study utilizes interviews, observations, and document analysis to examine how the Equity Scorecard supported a public Historically Black University's ability to (a) respond to their state Performance-Based Funding policy and (b) address outcomes such as retention and graduation rates. The participants identified nurturing, discussions of…

  14. Close-Range Tracking of Underwater Vehicles Using Light Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Josep; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere; Istenič, Klemen; Ribas, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new tracking system for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) navigating in a close formation, based on computer vision and the use of active light markers. While acoustic localization can be very effective from medium to long distances, it is not so advantageous in short distances when the safety of the vehicles requires higher accuracy and update rates. The proposed system allows the estimation of the pose of a target vehicle at short ranges, with high accuracy and execution speed. To extend the field of view, an omnidirectional camera is used. This camera provides a full coverage of the lower hemisphere and enables the concurrent tracking of multiple vehicles in different positions. The system was evaluated in real sea conditions by tracking vehicles in mapping missions, where it demonstrated robust operation during extended periods of time. PMID:27023547

  15. Close-Range Tracking of Underwater Vehicles Using Light Beacons.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Josep; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere; Istenič, Klemen; Ribas, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new tracking system for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) navigating in a close formation, based on computer vision and the use of active light markers. While acoustic localization can be very effective from medium to long distances, it is not so advantageous in short distances when the safety of the vehicles requires higher accuracy and update rates. The proposed system allows the estimation of the pose of a target vehicle at short ranges, with high accuracy and execution speed. To extend the field of view, an omnidirectional camera is used. This camera provides a full coverage of the lower hemisphere and enables the concurrent tracking of multiple vehicles in different positions. The system was evaluated in real sea conditions by tracking vehicles in mapping missions, where it demonstrated robust operation during extended periods of time. PMID:27023547

  16. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Town Garage Radio Beacon, Londonderry, NH. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The Town Garage Radio Beacon, NH, site includes the Holton Circle residential development of 23 homes, a town garage area, and an undeveloped hillslope and wetlands area in Londonderry, New Hampshire. From 1940 to 1968, the area was owned by the Department of Defense (DOD), who reportedly used it as a radio beacon facility from 1940 to 1947. The ROD provides a final remedy for the contaminated onsite ground water. No further remedial actions are anticipated for the site. The primary contaminants affecting the ground water are VOCs; and metals, including chromium.

  17. Addressing failures in exascale computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Abraham, Jacob A.; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, Jim; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, William; Chien, Andrew A.; Coteus, Paul; Debardeleben, Nathan A.; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Saverio, Fazzari; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Robert; Stearly, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on “Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing” held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system; and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia; and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  18. Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert; Abraham, Jacob; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, J.; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, Bill; Chien, Andrew; Coteus, Paul; DeBardeleben, Nathan; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Fazzari, Saverio; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Rob; Stearley, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on Addressing failures in exascale computing' held in Park City, Utah, 4-11 August 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system, discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system, and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia, and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  19. Developing a Communitywide Electronic Health Record Disease Registry in Primary Care Practices: Lessons Learned from the Western New York Beacon Community

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Arvela R.; Maloney, Nancy A.; Satchidanand, Nikhil; Allen, Geoffrey M.; Mueller, Raymond; Gangloff, Steven; Singh, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    Background and Introduction: Disease registries, as part of electronic health records (EHRs), have shown promise in improving care and outcomes. However, little is known about how best to implement them across communities, especially in communities that are not highly integrated. The Western New York (WNY) primary care community consists largely of independent practices using at least 20 different EHR products. This paper discusses the processes undertaken to develop a communitywide EHR disease registry in WNY, improvements it engendered, barriers overcome, and the lessons learned. Methods: HEALTHeLINK, under the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Beacon Community Initiative, reached out to 98 primary care practices in the WNY region to establish EHR-based diabetes registries. Working with practices, community partners, and vendors, registry specifications were created. The registry was piloted with practices using one local vendor’s EHR product and then rolled out to other practices, including five other EHR products. Using identified and de-identified registry datasets, quality benchmarking within and between practices and population health management were undertaken. Findings: From 2011 to 2013, the WNY Beacon Community assisted 98 practices (344 providers) serving over 50,000 adult diabetic patients. A major focus was on EHR registry development across diverse systems, and overcoming the challenges this presented. The Beacon diabetes registry was implemented at 85 of the 98 targeted practices. Of these registries, 65 met the criteria described in a later section for quality benchmarking and population health management purposes. Practices received quarterly benchmark reports summarizing their performance on key diabetes quality metrics and were compared to community practice averages. Practices used their registries for population health management by identifying and targeting patients in need of follow-up or specific

  20. 7 CFR 1730.3 - RUS addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false RUS addresses. 1730.3 Section 1730.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC SYSTEM OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE General § 1730.3 RUS addresses. (a) Persons wishing to obtain forms referred to in this part...