Science.gov

Sample records for address cultural diversity

  1. Cultural Diversity Among Older Adults: Addressing Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2005-01-01

    The diversity of the older adult population is increasing, and health professionals need to learn new knowledge and skills to improve the adherence of older ethnic clients to their health recommendations. Much of the existing research literature on diversity in gerontology concludes that ethnic older adults are at a health disadvantage. Few if any…

  2. Teacher Education for Cultural Diversity: Enhancing the Capacity of Teacher Education Institutions To Address Diversity Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Susan L.; Zeichner, Kenneth M.

    This document reports on portions of a study on "Teacher Education for Diversity" in progress since 1990. The overall study includes an ongoing analysis of relevant literature, which has generated a conceptual framework describing the range of existing positions on teacher education for cultural diversity. The study includes the development of…

  3. Critical Issue: Addressing Literacy Needs in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Arlette Ingram

    The rapidly shifting demographics of school-aged children, as well as continuing projections for the future, suggest that the enrollment of children who are culturally and linguistically different from what is considered the mainstream U.S. culture will continue to increase. The diversity of students in today's classrooms underscores the…

  4. Addressing Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Student Overrepresentation in Special Education: Guidelines for Parents. NCCREST Practitioner Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J.; Harry, Beth

    2006-01-01

    This brief, also available in Spanish, defines the concept of overrpresentation, identifies possible causes for the problem, and offers a variety of ways that parents and families can help prevent or decrease overrpresentation of culturally and linguistically diverse students in special education programs. (Contains 2 tables.) [This brief was…

  5. Using Enrichment Clusters to Address the Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jennifer K.; Robbins, Margaret A.; Payne, Yolanda Denise; Brown, Katherine Backes

    2016-01-01

    Using data from teacher interviews, classroom observations, and a professional development workshop, this article explains how one component of the schoolwide enrichment model (SEM) has been implemented at a culturally diverse elementary school serving primarily Latina/o and African American students. Based on a broadened conception of giftedness,…

  6. Addressing Cultural Diversity: Effects of a Problem-Based Intercultural Learning Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busse, Vera; Krause, Ulrike-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores to what extent a problem-based learning unit in combination with cooperative learning and affectively oriented teaching methods facilitates intercultural learning. As part of the study, students reflected on critical incidents, which display misunderstandings or conflicts that arise as a result of cultural differences. In…

  7. Implementing a Culturally Attuned Functional Behavioural Assessment to Understand and Address Challenging Behaviours Demonstrated by Students from Diverse Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Gerardo; Wong-Lo, Mickie; Short, Maureen; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2014-01-01

    As the US student population continues to become increasingly diverse, educators have encountered difficulties in distinguishing between cultural differences and genuine disability indicators. This concern is clearly evident in assisting students from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate chronic challenging behaviours. Past practices (e.g.…

  8. Moving beyond "Those Kids": Addressing Teacher Beliefs Regarding the Role of Culture within Effective Science Pedagogy for Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carla C.; Bolshakova, Virginia L. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on intensive work within a large, urban, low-performing middle school in the southwest to address and transform teacher beliefs regarding the role of culture within their science pedagogy. Given the recent, rapid growth of numbers of students from Hispanic/Latino(a) backgrounds in the United States, it is critical that a…

  9. Teaching Culturally Diverse Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Vivian; Tulbert, Beth

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of culturally diverse students are discussed in terms of language, culture, and socioeconomic factors. Meeting the educational needs of culturally diverse students can involve interactive teaming of professionals; parent involvement; and providing appropriate services, assessment, curriculum, and instruction. (JDD)

  10. Diversity Statements: How Faculty Applicants Address Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmaling, Karen B.; Trevino, Amira Y.; Lind, Justin R.; Blume, Arthur W.; Baker, Dana L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine application materials for assistant professor positions in 3 academic disciplines. Applicants were asked to write a diversity statement describing how they would advance diversity through their research, teaching, and service. The sample included application materials submitted by 191 candidates for…

  11. Diversity: Gender, Color, and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essed, Philomena

    This book serves as an introduction to issues of diversity. Each chapter addresses an issue relevant to life and work in gender-conscious and ethnically diverse environments. Taken together, the chapters challenge the reader to develop alternative views on gender, color, culture, and human relations. The first chapter introduces key notions, such…

  12. [Cultural diversity reflexive learning].

    PubMed

    Pomarede, Ma José Morera; Caparà, Núria Roca

    2007-10-01

    Recent international migration trends contribute to set up new social scenarios where an increasing cultural diversity becomes self-evident. From a global diversity on a planetary scale, we enter into a local diversity comprised by persons, groups and emerging cultures with whom we share our daily life experiences. In this context, social relationships are not always easy and we may note difficulties due to the ethnocentrism each group has and due to a lack of knowledge, or distrust or prejudices among persons or groups having diverse cultural origins. PMID:18274398

  13. Embracing cultural diversity.

    PubMed

    Casady, W M

    2001-01-01

    Healthcare providers from all backgrounds are taught the Western medicine approach with little consideration given to cultural-specific care. Yet, today it is difficult to ignore that approximately 33 percent of Americans originate from ethnically diverse groups. As our population continues to become more diversified, it is imperative that healthcare professionals become more sensitive to cultural differences. Effectively managing cultural diversity in the workplace requires a complex set of skills as well as an understanding of the concept. Communication skills will be challenged in a complex and diverse work environment. Managers must learn to listen. Embracing cultural diversity is a two-step process. The first step begins with personal self-interest and self-examination. The second step in the process is the "awakening." Tomorrow's successful managers will take an active role today in creating an environment that views diversity as an asset to the work force. PMID:11302066

  14. Addressing the Needs of Racially/Culturally Diverse Student Populations in Higher Education: An Analysis of Educational Practices for Disadvantaged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pender, Matea

    2010-01-01

    The recent growth in the racial and cultural heterogeneity of college students in the United States has increased the demand for higher educational policies that will accommodate the needs of an increasingly diverse collective student body (Kao & Thompson, 2003). Traditionally, underrepresented minority students (i.e., African American, Hispanic…

  15. Activities for Exploring Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Susan K.

    1992-01-01

    Presents topics for parents to use when discussing cultural diversity with their children (basic needs, cultural attitudes, body language, the arts, and language). Activities for exploring cultural diversity are suggested, and a list of multicultural resources is included. (SM)

  16. Cultural and Diversity Issues in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Paul B., Ed.; Locke, Don C., Ed.

    Counseling has been culturally diversified for a long time, but only in recent years have counselors become aware of their clients' cultural diversity. This collection of articles addresses a growing need for specific information on multicultural concerns in counseling. The emphasis here is on the importance of the client and client's special…

  17. Religious Diversity in Schools: Addressing the Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Catharine R.; Salend, Spencer; Elhoweris, Hala

    2009-01-01

    The vignettes presented in this article indicate that today's schools are made up of diverse groups of students including those from a variety of religious and spiritual backgrounds. Students feel safe and are better able to learn when issues of diversity are handled with sensitivity. This article provides guidelines and strategies for helping…

  18. Teaching for Diversity: Addressing Diversity Issues in Responsive ESL Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Student diversity has become a typical phenomenon in American public schools. The impact of increasing diversity on literacy instruction is unchallenged. Teachers reinforce this message by often citing ESL student diversity as a barrier for literacy teaching. In order to better understand the complexity of diversity issues, I explored two ESL…

  19. Interculturalism: Addressing Diversity in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponciano, Leslie; Shabazian, Ani

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood educators work with children and families from a range of diverse backgrounds. As society becomes increasingly multiracial, multilingual, and multicultural, so too grows the need for educators' abilities to support children's development by instilling in them the tools they need to live together respectfully and stand up to…

  20. Addressing the Needs of Diverse Distributed Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimoni, Rena; Barrington, Gail; Wilde, Russ; Henwood, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Two interrelated studies were undertaken to assist Alberta post-secondary institutions with meeting challenges associated with providing services to diverse distributed students that are of similar quality to services provided to traditional classroom students. The first study identified and assessed best practices in distributed learning; the…

  1. Multiple views to address diversity issues: an initial dialog to advance the chiropractic profession

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Claire; Killinger, Lisa Zaynab; Christensen, Mark G.; Hyland, John K.; Mrozek, John P.; Zuker, R. Fred; Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Perle, Stephen M.; Oyelowo, Tolu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide expert viewpoints on the topic of diversity in the chiropractic profession, including cultural competency, diversity in the profession, educational and clinical practice strategies for addressing diversity, and workforce issues. Over the next decades, changing demographics in North America will alter how the chiropractic profession functions on many levels. As the population increases in diversity, we will need to prepare our workforce to meet the needs of future patients and society. PMID:23966884

  2. Understanding Leadership Strategies for Addressing the Politics of Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2008-01-01

    Given the importance of moving diversity agendas forward nationally and the lack of understanding about how to address the politics that almost always emerge when institutionalizing a diversity initiative, the author examined the method by which college presidents handled the politics related to moving a diversity agenda forward. She focused on…

  3. Do cultural diversity and human rights make a good match?

    PubMed

    Donders, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The link between cultural diversity and human rights was clearly established by the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, adopted by the member states of UNESCO in 2001, which holds that "the defence of cultural diversity is … inseparable from respect for human dignity" and that it "implies a commitment to human rights and fundamental freedoms." The UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, adopted in 2005, states that "cultural diversity can be protected and promoted only if human rights and fundamental freedoms … are guaranteed" (Article 2[1]). The precise relationship between cultural diversity and human rights, however, is not clarified and thus leaves room for further exploration. This contribution analyses the issues surrounding the relationship between cultural diversity and human rights, in particular cultural rights. Firstly, it addresses general human rights issues such as universality and cultural relativism and the principles of equality and non-discrimination. Secondly, it explores the scope of cultural rights, as well as the cultural dimension of human rights. Thirdly, several cases are discussed in which human rights were invoked to protect cultural interests, confirming the value of cultural diversity. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented, indicating which areas require attention in order to further improve the promotion and protection of human rights in relation to cultural diversity. PMID:21132940

  4. Diversity, Pedagogy, and Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amburgy, Patricia M.

    2011-01-01

    As new approaches have emerged in art education, teacher preparation programs in higher education have revised existing courses or created new ones that reflect those new approaches. At the university where the author teaches, one such course is Diversity, Pedagogy, and Visual Culture (A ED 225). A ED 225 is intended to offer preservice art…

  5. Leadership Training for Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Searetha

    1996-01-01

    Addresses leadership in a diverse society, especially in schools and the workplace, and examines one school administrator's success at getting a resistant faculty and principal to incorporate multicultural education into the school environment and curriculum. A 10-day multicultural leadership training program is described. (GR)

  6. Creativity and Giftedness in Culturally Diverse Students. Perspectives on Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquivel, Giselle B., Ed.; Houtz, John C., Ed.

    The 11 chapters in this text address issues concerned with identification and educational intervention with gifted students who are from culturally diverse backgrounds. Chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "The Culturally and Linguistically Diverse School Population in the United States" (Angela Reyes-Carrasquillo); (2) "Culturally…

  7. Structural Analysis of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Vanessa D.; Kang, Young-Shin; Thompson, George F.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the five-factor structure of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity (RACD) instrument, which assesses resident assistant (RA) confidence in addressing issues of cultural diversity in college and university residence halls. The instrument has five components that explore RA confidence: (1) belief in the need for cultural…

  8. Teacher Education's Responsibility to Address Diversity Issues: Enhancing Institutional Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Susan L.; Zeichner, Kenneth M.

    1998-01-01

    Preservice teachers must be prepared to address substantial student diversity and to educate all students to higher levels of understanding and competence. Many teacher educators are not competent to prepare new teachers in this area. Several approaches to handling institutional aspects of teacher education for diversity are discussed, noting…

  9. Addressing diversity and moving toward equity in hospital care.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Richard D; Beaudin, Christy L; Iwanabe, Kelly E

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare disparities are a major challenge for hospital and healthcare system leadership. Leaders must possess vision, visibility, and ability to drive organizational change toward an environment that fosters diversity and cultural competence. As challenging economic conditions force management to make difficult budgetary decisions, the integration of equity into the organization's core mission and strategic process is essential for sustainability. Building organizational capacity requires systematic actions including workforce composition, training and development, and policy advocacy. This article offers perspectives on the current state of diversity in hospitals, exemplars from pediatric hospitals, and considerations for the future. Healthcare leaders are influential in shaping the future of the organization through strategic planning and resource allocation to those efforts that enhance services, programs, and processes that support a culture of diversity and equity. PMID:20364641

  10. "Knowing Your Students" in the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Robyn; Saltmarsh, David

    2016-01-01

    The population movement of globalization brings greater cultural and linguistic diversity (CALD) to communities and education systems. To address the growing diversity in school classrooms, beginning teachers need an expanded set of skills and attitudes to support effective learning. It is an expectation today that teachers know their students and…

  11. Providing leadership in a culturally diverse workplace.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Geraldine

    2007-08-01

    Cultural diversity is an increasingly important characteristic of the work force. Occupational health nurses with sensitivity to the influence of culture on behavior and knowledge of strategies to deliver culturally competent services can lead to and/or help develop a culturally sensitive health care environment and influence corporate culture and policies. PMID:17847627

  12. Addressing the Achievement Gap and Disproportionality through the Use of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griner, Angela Christine; Stewart, Martha Lue

    2013-01-01

    Culturally responsive practices in schools and classrooms have been shown to be an effective means of addressing the achievement gap as well as the disproportionate representation of racially, culturally, ethnically, and linguistically diverse students in programs serving students with special needs. While there has been much research discussing…

  13. Cultural Diversity in the Workplace: Managing a Multicultural Work Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Larry G.; Ross-Gordon, Jovita M.

    1990-01-01

    The influx of minorities into the workplace requires attention to their participation in workplace training, to race relations and organizational culture, and to potential communication difficulties. Human resource professionals must address cultural diversity issues as they affect the attainment of organizational goals. (SK)

  14. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity.

    PubMed

    Valantine, Hannah A; Collins, Francis S

    2015-10-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation's population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation's health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity's impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  15. Cultural Diversity and the Changing Culture of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nderu-Boddington, Eulalee

    2008-01-01

    The paper will examine the change in schools brought about by cultural diversity and examines the theories that surround the topic. I will evaluate and examine ways in which schools can accommodate cultural diversity. References will be made to cultural and social changes in our schools and how education is affected by such changes. The issue of…

  16. National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    The US biomedical research workforce does not currently mirror the nation’s population demographically, despite numerous attempts to increase diversity. This imbalance is limiting the promise of our biomedical enterprise for building knowledge and improving the nation’s health. Beyond ensuring fairness in scientific workforce representation, recruiting and retaining a diverse set of minds and approaches is vital to harnessing the complete intellectual capital of the nation. The complexity inherent in diversifying the research workforce underscores the need for a rigorous scientific approach, consistent with the ways we address the challenges of science discovery and translation to human health. Herein, we identify four cross-cutting diversity challenges ripe for scientific exploration and opportunity: research evidence for diversity’s impact on the quality and outputs of science; evidence-based approaches to recruitment and training; individual and institutional barriers to workforce diversity; and a national strategy for eliminating barriers to career transition, with scientifically based approaches for scaling and dissemination. Evidence-based data for each of these challenges should provide an integrated, stepwise approach to programs that enhance diversity rapidly within the biomedical research workforce. PMID:26392553

  17. Cultural diversity, economic development and societal instability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nettle, D.; Grace, J.B.; Choisy, M.; Cornell, H.V.; Guegan, J.-F.; Hochberg, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Social scientists have suggested that cultural diversity in a nation leads to societal instability. However, societal instability may be affected not only by within-nation on ?? diversity, but also diversity between a nation and its neighbours or ?? diversity. It is also necessary to distinguish different domains of diversity, namely linguistic, ethnic and religious, and to distinguish between the direct effects of diversity on societal instability, and effects that are mediated by economic conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings. We assembled a large cross-national dataset with information on ?? and ?? cultural diversity, economic conditions, and indices of societal instability. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of cultural diversity on economics and societal stability. Results show that different type and domains of diversity have interacting effects. As previously documented, linguistic ?? diversity has a negative effect on economic performance, and we show that it is largely through this economic mechanism that it affects societal instability. For ?? diversity, the higher the linguistic diversity among nations in a region, the less stable the nation. But, religious ?? diversity has the opposite effect, reducing instability, particularly in the presence of high linguistic diversity. Conclusions. Within-nation linguistic diversity is associated with reduced economic performance, which, in turn, increases societal instability. Nations which differ linguistically from their neighbors are also less stable. However, religious diversity between, neighboring nations has the opposite effect, decreasing societal instability.

  18. Cultural Diversity: An Expectation for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Narviar Cathcart

    Educators' responsibility to cultural diversity among students is discussed. It is suggested that the presence of cultural diversity in the classroom seriously threatens the educative process when student and teacher are not connecting due to words and language. The educator's training tends to consist of jargon, stereotypic assessments, and…

  19. Cultural Diversity: New Directions for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lovern Root

    Perspectives concerning cultural diversity and the schools are presented. It is suggested that educational preparation is needed in the United States for the social, political, and economic realities brought about by the growth in both immigration and births among native minority groups. Schools should be aware of students' cultural diversity and…

  20. Social Justice and Cultural Diversity Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Debra A.; Alston, Reginald J.; Turner-Whittaker, Tyra

    2008-01-01

    Early definitions of cultural diversity focused primarily on race/ethnicity, with subsequent inclusion of age, gender, sexual orientation, class, religion, geography, and a combination of positionalities. More recently, social justice has resurfaced as a component of cultural diversity to explain experiences of people of color, women, and…

  1. The current debate on cultural diversity in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hamde, Kiflemariam

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines the conceptual context of cultural diversity in Sweden. It describes the background in which the former Social Democratic Government declared 2006 as the Year for Cultural Diversity. A related concern is scrutinizing whether in fact this year would be a starting point for more deeply engaged diversity programs or if such policy definitions remain mere symbolic acts of window dressing. The study is based on analysis of official documents, diversity events and agendas, and interviews with different actors and diversity consultants, and participation in seminars and conferences on the topic of diversity and integration as the main topics. A major concern is whether the current interest on cultural diversity may lead to its institutionalization in the Swedish cultural and social organizations (Hamde, 2002a) and address the virtues of diversity, such as diversity for profitability and competence in workplaces, social justice concerns, and finally, societal cohesion. Alternatively, the paper explores if the debate on diversity merely remains a 'traveling' idea to appear occasionally and then occur in fashion-like manner as many management ideas do, leaving little traces on peoples' lives. PMID:18649447

  2. Addressing Cultural and Native Language Interference in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, Daniele; Bourdeau, Jacqueline; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of cultural and native language interference in second/foreign language acquisition. More specifically, it examines issues of interference that can be traced to a student's native language and that also have a cultural component. To this effect, an understanding of what actually comprises both interference and…

  3. Workforce diversity and cultural competence in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Taylor, Y; Benesch, B

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of workforce diversity in healthcare and its attendant requisite of cultural competency. The first section of the paper argues that self-assessments and diversity training are integral to workforce diversity management. This paper maintains that diversity training should be a part of overall strategic goals, and that the development of management goals should be based on self-assessments. The second section of the review offers a framework of cultural competency in healthcare delivery based on the relationship between patient and provider, and the community and health system. For this relationship to be successful, this review argues that health systems should foster providers that can also be cultural brokers. The cultural broker role is seen as core to achieving cultural competency. PMID:10196937

  4. Cultural Diversity and Multicultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Geneva

    2013-01-01

    This discussion examines some of the major issues and attributes of culturally responsive teaching. It begins with explaining my views of culturally responsive teaching and how I incorporate cultural responsiveness in my writing to teach readers what it means. These general conceptual frameworks are followed by a discussion of some specific…

  5. Culturally Responsive Practices in Schools: A Checklist to Address Disproportionality in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiedler, Craig R.; Chiang, Bert; Van Haren, Barbara; Jorgensen, Jack; Halberg, Sara; Boreson, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    The overrepresentation of students with racial, cultural, ethnic, and linguistic diversity (RCELD) in special education has been well documented for over 30 years. This phenomenon is known as "disproportionality." In an effort to address the disproportionate issue, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction funded a collaborative 2-year…

  6. Urban Education: Challenges in Educating Culturally Diverse Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Min

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of America's urban population based on the 2000 Census and the implications of increasing cultural diversity for urban public schools. It addresses three basic questions: 1. What does America's population look like at the beginning of the 21st century? 2. What challenges do children and their families face in this…

  7. Curricular Changes, Communication Skills, and Cultural Diversity: The Next Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulden, Nancy Rost

    The place to begin curricular change (in response to changing demography and cultural diversity) is with establishing general learning goals that the changes will be designed to address. The first criteria for any curricular decisions for a basic speech communication course should be: change must provide an opportunity for learning that is…

  8. Experiences of Cultural Diversity in the Context of an Emergent Transnationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Fazal

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that despite wide-ranging appeal of the discourses of globalization, our modes of thinking and ways of addressing issues of cultural diversity remain trapped within a national framework. The dominant constructions of cultural diversity often overlook the ways in which experiences of diversity now take place in…

  9. Cultural Diversity in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Marlene G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Federal employees (N=242) completed 102-item questionnaire on work environment, job satisfaction, and career development. Results suggest that men, women, and people of color do not share a common organizational culture. Instead, each group defines and organizes its experience in different ways. Viewing gender and race as cultures provides a basis…

  10. Educational Leadership: Culture and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimmock, Clive; Walker, Allan

    2005-01-01

    The aim in writing this book is to explore the relationships between school leadership and culture. Educational leadership is a socially bounded process. It is subject to the cultural traditions and values of the society in which it is exercised. In this it is no different from other social processes. It thus manifests itself in different ways in…

  11. Teacher Transculturalism and Cultural Difference: Addressing Racism in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casinader, Niranjan R.; Walsh, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The increasing cultural diversity of students in Australia's schools is one of the salient changes in education over the last 30 years. In 2011, nearly half of all Australians had one or more parents born overseas, with migration from China, the Indian subcontinent and Africa increasing during the early 2000s (Australian Bureau of Statistics,…

  12. Leading Collective Capacity in Culturally Diverse Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Allan; Riordan, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the ways leaders may nurture collective relationships within culturally diverse staff bodies. We organise our discussion around five key, interrelated issues. These are how leaders position themselves within the school's cultural milieu; how they structure work for collective capacity; understanding collective work; giving expression to…

  13. Cultural Diversity or Cultural Imperialism: Liberal Education in Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanks, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A faculty member's experience at the American University in Cairo (Egypt) reveals that pluralism and tolerance are western concepts, even within the college curriculum. National identity affords cultural stability: where the American melting-pot experience is reinforced by the notion of cultural diversity, the national identity of Egypt is…

  14. Engaging and Supporting Culturally Diverse Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupla, C.; Buxner, S.; Peticolas, L. M.; Mendez, B.; Acevedo, S.; Begay, D.; Higgins, M. L.; Norman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This two hour special workshop was held during the 2012 ASP conference in Tucson. There are a variety of reasons that science education needs to reach out to culturally diverse audiences. Each culture, and each individual community, has its own challenges; each brings special insight to science. What does the research say about engaging these different audiences? How can science educators attract and sustain programs with various cultures? How do the needs of our audiences vary with culture and within communities? Moderators Shupla, Sanlyn, and Peticolas invited a variety of presenters with expertise to share their experiences: Salvador Acevado, David Begay, Michelle Higgins, Bryan Mendez, and Dara Norman. During the first hour, presenters shared a variety of best practices for engaging and supporting culturally diverse audiences; in the second hour, participants and presenters discussed specific programmatic challenges and possible directions.

  15. The evolution of the diversity of cultures

    PubMed Central

    Foley, R. A.; Mirazón Lahr, M.

    2011-01-01

    The abundant evidence that Homo sapiens evolved in Africa within the past 200 000 years, and dispersed across the world only within the past 100 000 years, provides us with a strong framework in which to consider the evolution of human diversity. While there is evidence that the human capacity for culture has a deeper history, going beyond the origin of the hominin clade, the tendency for humans to form cultures as part of being distinct communities and populations changed markedly with the evolution of H. sapiens. In this paper, we investigate ‘cultures’ as opposed to ‘culture’, and the question of how and why, compared to biological diversity, human communities and populations are so culturally diverse. We consider the way in which the diversity of human cultures has developed since 100 000 years ago, and how its rate was subject to environmental factors. We argue that the causes of this diversity lie in the distribution of resources and the way in which human communities reproduce over several generations, leading to fissioning of kin groups. We discuss the consequences of boundary formation through culture in their broader ecological and evolutionary contexts. PMID:21357230

  16. Leading change in diversity and cultural competence.

    PubMed

    de Leon Siantz, Mary Lou

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an expanded leadership role needed in schools of nursing as the nurse of the 21st century is prepared to assume expanded roles in a diverse society. With schools of nursing becoming more global, and the diverse population of the United States rapidly growing, a critical need exists for nurses who are ready to partner in the health care that multicultural communities need locally, nationally, and globally. Diversity and cultural competence have now become central issues in nursing education, research, practice, and health policy. Diversity leadership in a school of nursing can no longer concentrate only on issues of affirmative action, recruitment, and retention. The purpose of this article is to discuss how diversity leadership must increasingly focus on building a corporate environment in schools of nursing that integrates diversity and cultural competence with the strategic plan of the School's Chief Nursing Officer, across academic programs, research, practice, and public policy to eliminate health disparities in partnership with faculty, students, staff, the University infrastructure, and the community at large. The theoretical framework that guided the strategic planning is based on the model used by the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellowship Program. Examples of program initiatives designed to implement the strategic plan to strengthen the diversity and cultural competence of one school of nursing environment are described. PMID:18504031

  17. Strategies and Procedures for Designing Proactive Interventions with a Culturally Diverse Population of Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders and Their Families/Caregivers. Fourth CCBD Mini-Library Series: Addressing the Diverse Needs of Children and Youth with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders--Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Gardner, Ralph, III

    This monograph examines the special problems of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) who are from culturally diverse backgrounds and offers strategies for designing appropriate interventions. In the introductory chapter, the student demographics in the E/BD category of special education are reviewed and efforts of one state,…

  18. Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counseling Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Respect for diversity and for values different from one's own is a central value of counseling psychology training programs. The valuing of diversity is also consistent with the profession of psychology as mandated by the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct and as discussed in the Guidelines and…

  19. Cultural Diversity in Rainforest and Ecology Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Lachmann, Lyn

    1996-01-01

    A number of recently released software programs seek to introduce young people to rain forests and wildlife-rich areas of Africa. Seven of these programs are reviewed for the cultural diversity they acknowledged, and their ease of use and educational value are evaluated. (SLD)

  20. Transforming Curriculum for a Culturally Diverse Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollins, Etta R., Ed.

    This book is primarily designed for graduate courses in curriculum development and theory, and aims to assist practitioners in facilitating the shift in public school curriculum to accommodate large-scale trends toward a more culturally diverse society. In Part 1, the ideologies and values that form the basis of school practices are examined from…

  1. School, Cultural Diversity, Multiculturalism, and Contact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagani, Camilla; Robustelli, Francesco; Martinelli, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The basic assumption of this paper is that school's potential to improve cross-cultural relations, as well as interpersonal relations in general, is enormous. This assumption is supported by a number of theoretical considerations and by the analysis of data we obtained from a study we conducted on the attitudes toward diversity and…

  2. Culturally Diverse Exceptional Children in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazzaro, Jean N., Ed.

    Five author contributed papers focus on helping teachers work more effectively with culturally diverse handicapped or gifted children and their parents. The first chapter, "Understanding Where the Students Are Coming From" by J. Nazzaro and M. Portuondo considers the need to develop a multicultural perception, barriers to parent involvement in the…

  3. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Fidel

    2007-01-01

    The process of Bologna (European Space for Higher Education) has three fundamental nucleuses that are the European cultural diversity, the promotion of the exchange, and the knowledge among people of the different European countries. Neither the European dimension of the higher education nor the search of a system "easily comprehensible and…

  4. Career Opportunities for Culturally Diverse Handicapped Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, George W.; Sullivan, Allen R.

    1980-01-01

    The article provides an overview of the employment situation for minority individuals and its implications for career and vocational education of culturally diverse handicapped youth and delineates the enigma presented by being a member of a doubly stigmatized population. (Author/SBH)

  5. Human nature, cultural diversity and evolutionary theory

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating culture into an expanded theory of evolution will provide the foundation for a universal account of human diversity. Two requirements must be met. The first is to see learning as an extension of the processes of evolution. The second is to understand that there are specific components of human culture, viz. higher order knowledge structures and social constructions, which give rise to culture as invented knowledge. These components, which are products of psychological processes and mechanisms, make human culture different from the forms of shared knowledge observed in other species. One serious difficulty for such an expanded theory is that social constructions may not add to the fitness of all humans exposed to them. This may be because human culture has existed for only a relatively short time in evolutionary terms. Or it may be that, as some maintain, adaptation is a limited, even a flawed, aspect of evolutionary theory. PMID:21199849

  6. Managing a culturally diverse health care team.

    PubMed

    Covington, L W

    2001-01-01

    To be an effective leader, you must know yourself, be aware of your own limitations, and understand the impact of culture on others. The increased ethnic minority population in the health care system mandates that differences be recognized and responded to. Leaders must be cognizant that nurses are assessed and influenced by cultural factors that impact one's view of communication, space, social structure, time, and environment. Being creative and willing to tailor leadership styles to encompass individuals from different cultures is the hallmark of cultural competence. Your health care team will certainly be enriched and will benefit from your understanding of diversity, and so will you, as a leader and a person. PMID:12035471

  7. Evolutionary approaches to cultural and linguistic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Steele, James; Jordan, Peter; Cochrane, Ethan

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary approaches to cultural change are increasingly influential, and many scientists believe that a ‘grand synthesis’ is now in sight. The papers in this Theme Issue, which derives from a symposium held by the AHRC Centre for the Evolution of Cultural Diversity (University College London) in December 2008, focus on how the phylogenetic tree-building and network-based techniques used to estimate descent relationships in biology can be adapted to reconstruct cultural histories, where some degree of inter-societal diffusion will almost inevitably be superimposed on any deeper signal of a historical branching process. The disciplines represented include the three most purely ‘cultural’ fields from the four-field model of anthropology (cultural anthropology, archaeology and linguistic anthropology). In this short introduction, some context is provided from the history of anthropology, and key issues raised by the papers are highlighted. PMID:21041203

  8. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  9. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Nicolas; Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  10. Addressing Diversity in Special Education Research. ERIC/OSEP Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utley, Cheryl A.; Obiakor, Festus E.

    This digest reviews scientific and methodological problems in special education research related to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. The first section of the digest discusses the various definitions of race, ethnicity, culture, and socioeconomic status. The problems with current race classification and the difficulties in determining the…

  11. Diversity, culture and the glass ceiling.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    A reference to the term, the glass ceiling, has come to embody more than gender equality among women and men. Today the term embraces the quest of all minorities and their journey towards equality in the workplace. The purpose of this article is to bring attention to the subject of diversity, culture, and the glass ceiling. The article will discuss the history of the glass ceiling and how its broadened meaning is relevant in today's workplace. It will also provide statistics showing how diversity and culture are lacking among the top echelon of today's executives, the barriers faced by minorities as they journey towards executive leadership, and how to overcome these barriers to truly shatter the glass ceiling. PMID:25306838

  12. Application of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity to the Admission Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewy, Michael I.; Juntunen, Cindy L.; Duan, Changming

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the responsibility of counseling psychology programs to communicate and implement the professional training values regarding diversity as articulated in the "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") clearly and directly in the advertising and admission…

  13. Administrators' Attitudes toward Cultural Diversity Management: An Empirical Study;

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohapatra, Manindra K.; And Others

    A study was done to test four hypotheses on the orientation of American Urban Administrators toward cultural diversity management in the public sector workplace. The study sought to test: (1) the extent of familiarity with the literature on cultural diversity; (2) relative ranking of cultural diversity management capabilities; (3) how women and…

  14. Addressing the Needs of an Increasingly Diverse Society. OUS Diversity Report, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon University System, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The report includes an overview of the relevance of diverse educational environments and descriptions of the current initiatives within OUS to enhance the representation, inclusion, and engagement of diverse racial/ethnic populations. The issues associated with higher education diversity are multifaceted. Within OUS, the vision for diversity is a…

  15. Addressing diversity in adolescent sexual and reproductive health services.

    PubMed

    Laski, Laura; Wong, Sylvia

    2010-07-01

    The social, economic, and biological events that mark adolescence profoundly influence and shape future adult lives. Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, education, and other social programs are needed to support young people for a healthy start. As adolescents transition into adulthood, SRH programs and services that have skilled health providers, in combination with other social services including comprehensive sexuality education, can help prevent unwanted pregnancies, maternal mortality and morbidity, as well as sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS. Programs and services can also provide counseling to prevent sexual violence and abuse and deal with its consequences. Adolescent SRH programs can be more effective if the demographic diversity of this age group is studied. Vulnerable adolescents should be targeted as priority recipients of youth-friendly SRH and other social support services. Data demonstrate that adolescent girls living in rural areas who are not in school and who are often married as children are vulnerable to maternal mortality and morbidity, unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortion, HIV infection, and sexual violence and abuse. Building adolescent capacities and opportunities requires programs that support adolescent social, economic, and health assets so that they can contribute socially and economically to their societies. A healthy adolescent population is critical for low-resource countries, where a rising proportion of the population is under 24 years of age. Recommendations for strengthening the effectiveness of SRH programs detailed at the FIGO World Congress in 2009 are discussed. PMID:20423736

  16. Addressing Unconscious Bias: Steps toward an Inclusive Scientific Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Abigail

    2011-01-01

    In this talk I will outline the nature of unconscious bias, as it operates to exclude or marginalize some participants in the scientific community. I will show how bias results from non-conscious expectations about certain groups of people, including scientists and astronomers. I will outline scientific research in psychology, sociology and economics that has identified the impact these expectations have on interpersonal judgments that are at the heart of assessment of individuals' qualifications. This research helps us understand not only how bias operates within a single instance of evaluation, but how evaluation bias can accumulate over a career if not checked, creating an appearance of confirmation of biased expectations. Some research has focused on how best to interrupt and mitigate unconscious bias, and many institutions--including the University of Michigan--have identified strategic interventions at key points of institutional decision-making (particularly hiring, annual review, and promotion) that can make a difference. The NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transformation program encouraged institutions to draw on the social science literature to create experimental approaches to addressing unconscious bias. I will outline four approaches to intervention that have arisen through the ADVANCE program: (1) systematic education that increases awareness among decisionmakers of how evaluation bias operates; (2) development of practices that mitigate the operation of bias even when it is out of conscious awareness; (3) creation of institutional policies that routinize and sanction these practices; and (4) holding leaders accountable for these implementation of these new practices and policies. Although I will focus on ways to address unconscious bias within scientific institutions (colleges and universities, laboratories and research centers, etc.), I will close by considering how scientific organizations can address unconscious bias and contribute to creating an

  17. Diversity Consciousness: Opening Our Minds to People, Cultures, and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Richard D.

    This book examines the relationship between a person's success and his or her ability to understand, respect, and value diversity. It also explores how people can develop diversity consciousness. Chapter 1, "Diversity: An Overview," discusses the changing cultural landscape, dimensions of diversity, diversity between and within groups, diversity…

  18. OUS Diversity Report, 2004: Addressing the Needs of an Increasingly Diverse Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon University System, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Oregon University System (OUS) annual diversity report provides: (1) a "vision" for diversity with continuing themes regarding the enhancement of representation, inclusion, and engagement; and (2) an overview of the progress made in racial/ethnic diversity within the populations of OUS students, faculty and staff. The purposes of this report…

  19. Intersections and Translocations: New Paradigms for Thinking about Cultural Diversity and Social Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthias, Floya

    2011-01-01

    This article reflects on the concepts of cultural diversity, belonging and identity which inform important debates for managing "difference" in contemporary European societies. These address issues relating to transnational migration, ethnic diversity and racialisation in a range of social contexts. The article also reflects on the concept of…

  20. Cultural competency and recovery within diverse populations.

    PubMed

    Ida, D J

    2007-01-01

    Recovery for diverse populations with mental health problems includes communities of color, those with limited English proficiency and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT). The process of healing and recovery must take into consideration the critical role of culture and language and look at the individual within the context of an environment that is influenced by racism, sexism, colonization, homophobia, and poverty as well as the stigma and shame associated with having a mental illness. Recovery must assess the impact of isolation brought about by cultural and language barriers and work towards reducing the negative influence it has on the emotional and physical well-being of the person. It is imperative that recovery occur at multiple levels and involves the person in recovery, the service provider, the larger community and the system that establishes policies that often work against those who do not fit the mold of what mainstream society considers being "the norm." Recovery must respect the cultural and language backgrounds of the individual. PMID:17694715

  1. Are Educational Leadership Candidates Prepared to Address Diversity Issues in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak C.

    2006-01-01

    Standard 4 of the Educational Leadership Constituency Council (ELCC) Standards addresses school diversity issues and specifies requirements that all educational leadership programs need to meet. In response, all educational leadership programs in Georgia referenced ELCC Standards and have worked to foster diversity as a priority in their programs.…

  2. Critical Perspectives on Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood: Building an Inclusive Curriculum and Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the complexities that arise from addressing issues of cultural diversity in the early years context. It explores the challenges of developing an effective early years provision and pedagogy that values cultural difference within the framework of a mandated curriculum, "The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)" in…

  3. Treating and Precepting with RESPECT: A Relational Model Addressing Race, Ethnicity, and Culture in Medical Training

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Julie; Gordon, Sandra; Chapman, Sheila; Gonzalez, Peter; Hardt, Eric; Delgado, Leyda; James, Thea; David, Michele

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2000 a diverse group of clinicians/educators at an inner-city safety-net hospital identified relational skills to reduce disparities at the point of care. DESCRIPTION The resulting interviewing and precepting model helps build trust with patients as well as with learners. RESPECT adds attention to the relational dimension, addressing documented disparities in respect, empathy, power-sharing, and trust while incorporating prior cross-cultural models. Specific behavioral descriptions for each component make RESPECT a concrete, practical, integrated model for teaching patient care. CONCLUSIONS Precepting with RESPECT fosters a safe climate for residents to partner with faculty, address challenges with patients at risk, and improve outcomes. PMID:20352510

  4. Cultural Dimensions of Learning: Addressing the Challenges of Multicultural Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Patrick; Linder-VanBerschot, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    The growing multicultural nature of education and training environments makes it critical that instructors and instructional designers, especially those working in online learning environments, develop skills to deliver culturally sensitive and culturally adaptive instruction. This article explores research into cultural differences to identify…

  5. Addressing the Moral Agency of Culturally Specific Care Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Chrystal S.

    2011-01-01

    Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), as a culturally sensitive framework, realises the totality of caring in context. Few, if any, investigations into caring have articulated CHAT as a feasible mode of inquiry for inserting the cultural perspectives of both the researcher and the researched. This article elucidates CHAT as an intelligible…

  6. Aspiring and Practicing Leaders Addressing Issues of Diversity and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner, Darlene Y.

    2008-01-01

    For the most part, faculty preparing teachers and leaders for tomorrow's schools would agree that educators, regardless of their role, need to be sensitive to the diverse cultures represented in our schools. Leaders need to be sensitive to and understanding of different cultures, while working to ensure the success of all students regardless of…

  7. The Need for a Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Laurie B.; Jackson, Aaron P.; Neville, Helen A.; Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Winterowd, Carrie L.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2009-01-01

    The authors articulate the need for a "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth "Values Statement"). They discuss the historic unwillingness of the field to address values in a sophisticated or complex way and highlight the increasingly common training scenario in which trainees state that certain…

  8. Addressing Cultural and Linguistic Dissonance between Parents and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocque, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    In this era of increased diversity in schools, educators may struggle with effective methods for partnering with all parents in their classroom. Although all educators work to engage families, meeting the needs of diverse families sometimes require specific strategies for engaging all families and facilitating their participation as respected…

  9. "They're Just Students to Me": Strategies for Addressing Cultural Differences in the School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiring, Dean

    2003-01-01

    Examines issues related to teaching in culturally diverse classrooms. Provides proactive strategies teachers and administrators can use that begin the process of sharing cultural differences and working toward creating mutually agreeable solutions. (Author/VWL)

  10. Addressing Cultural Variables in Parent Training Programs with Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Chikira H.; Cook, Katrina L.; Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    There has recently been increased attention given to understanding how cultural variables may have an impact on the efficacy of treatments with Latino families seeking psychological services. Within parent training programs, understanding the extent to which culture can affect parenting practices is vital to providing quality care. The focus of…

  11. Becoming Culturally Responsive Teachers in Today's Diverse Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In an invitational learning environment (Purkey, 1991; Schmidt, 2004), 7 teachers began the process of identifying their cultural identity and perspectives, naming ways that they used their cultural identity with their culturally diverse students, and discovering culturally responsive teaching pedagogies that they could use in their classrooms. In…

  12. Implementing Diversity Plans: Principals' Perception of Their Ability to Address Diversity in Their Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Billy L.; Madsen, Jean; Young, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally schools in the past were mostly homogenous, but with demographic shifts, schools are becoming more ethnically diverse, disadvantaged, and multilingual. In contrast, the teaching population still reflects that outdated homogenous template: "predominantly white and female," middle-class, and unilingual. This exploratory study examined…

  13. A Case Study on Science Teacher Leadership to Address Diversity and Equity Through Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doraiswamy, Nithya

    This qualitative case study focused on the multifaceted issue of exploring science teacher leaders understanding and addressing of issues of diversity and equity with peers through professional development. The purpose of the study was to highlight the opportunities and barriers to the addressing of issues of diversity and equity through the work of a community of teachers leaders in science professional development. To frame this study, the researcher drew from the interdisciplinary field of multicultural education, transformative learning, and teacher leadership. In drawing out the connections from these vast bodies of literature, the study speaks to the need of both, creating teacher leaders in science education who are capable of meeting the twin demands of excellence and equity, and also attending to the challenges in the professional learning continuums of teachers leaders and their peers towards addressing issues of diversity and equity in science education.

  14. Respect for cultural diversity in bioethics is an ethical imperative

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Subrata; De Vries, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The field of bioethics continues to struggle with the problem of cultural diversity: can universal principles guide ethical decision making, regardless of the culture in which those decisions take place? Or should bioethical principles be derived from the moral traditions of local cultures? Ten Have and Gordijn (2011) and Bracanovic (2011) defend the universalist position, arguing that respect for cultural diversity in matters ethical will lead to a dangerous cultural relativity where vulnerable patients and research subjects will be harmed. We challenge the premises of moral universalism, showing how this approach imports and imposes moral notions of Western society and leads to harm in non-western cultures. PMID:22955969

  15. Cultural and Language Diversity in the Middle Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, John; Boothe, Diane

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the cultural and language diversity of young adolescents. Outlines 10 steps to foster a multicultural (or macro cultural) perspective in all students at the middle school level, strategies that build on students' diversity to create a positive and cooperative learning environment. Describes a cooperative activity that promotes…

  16. Cultural Diversity and Teamwork. ERIC Digest No. 152.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankard, Bettina A.

    In today's society, when increasing numbers of employees are being expected to work in teams and when cultural diversity is becoming commonplace in schools and workplaces, it is imperative that vocational and career educators prepare students for future interactions in a culturally diverse workplace. Communication differences between generations,…

  17. Management Strategies for Culturally Diverse Classrooms. Fastback 396.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Kenneth M; Espinoza, Connie

    What teachers consider to be "discipline problems" are determined by their own culture, and filtered through personal values and teaching styles. Therefore, to manage diverse classrooms effectively, it is essential for teachers to understand what constitutes good classroom discipline within the context of cultural diversity. The first section of…

  18. Supervising across Cultures: Navigating Diversity and Multiculturalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    Most colleges and universities have an expressed commitment to diversity. For most campuses, this means having aspirations to recruit and retain diverse students, staff, and faculty. In the process of becoming more diverse, institutions will need supervisors who can navigate the interpersonal, intergroup, and within-group relationships that come…

  19. Addressing Stereotypes by Moving along the Continuum of Cultural Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Cheryl James

    2013-01-01

    Programs to help middle school students deal with racism and hate have been in place for some years, yet almost monthly we hear of students committing suicide or killing other students due to issues of isolation or harassment. Within the confines of a safe classroom, doctoral students in Educational Leadership addressed issues of stereotypes and…

  20. Presidential Address: Culture and the Future of Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halse, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Recent changes in higher education have confronted education research with a conundrum: how our traditionally multidisciplinary field can refine itself as a unified discipline. In this address I sketch out what this conundrum may mean for education research, both substantively and methodologically, in the future. I propose that one starting point…

  1. Addressing the Challenge of Diversity in the Graduate Ranks: Good Practices Yield Good Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nancy L.; Campbell, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the impact of implementing three systemic practices on the diversity and institutional culture in biomedical and public health PhD training at Brown University. We hypothesized that these practices, designed as part of the National Institutes of Health-funded Initiative to Maximize Student Development (IMSD) program in…

  2. Implementing the Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity in University Counseling Center Internships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Lese-Fowler, Karen; Bursley, Kevin; Reyes, Elizabeth; Bieschke, Kathleen J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the potential contribution of the "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") to predoctoral internship training programs housed in university counseling centers. The purpose of this article is to present recommendations for how to best implement the Values…

  3. Integrating Cultural Diversity and Mathematics in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Sally

    1997-01-01

    Asserts that cultural celebrations and their symbols are one way teachers can enhance children's appreciation of diversity and develop mathematics literacy. Presents ideas for integrating learning around the theme of the new year, offering activities for such cultures as China, Japan, Morocco, and Africa, as well as cultural mathematics activities…

  4. Cultural Diversity Online: Student Engagement with Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, John; D'Netto, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to focus on how students from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds encounter online learning environments, and to assess the extent to which cultural factors impact on learners' engagement with online learning. Design/methodology/approach: The study explores how a culturally diverse cohort of…

  5. Cultural Diversity and Information and Communication Impacts on Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Hung; Chu, Ying-Chien

    2011-01-01

    Cultural diversity doesn't just entail differences in dress and language. It also encompasses different ways of thinking, managing, and communicating. The relationship between communication and culture is a very complex and intimate one. Cultures are created through communication; that is, communication is the means of human interaction through…

  6. Educating the Global Manager: Cultural Diversity and Cross-Cultural Training in International Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramburuth, Prem; Welch, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The culturally diverse classroom would seem to be the ideal resource that educators can tap to develop their students' cross-cultural competence and bridge different cultures. However, evidence from the education literature suggests that students typically do not benefit from classroom diversity and that, in general, there is a lack of…

  7. Cultural Diversity in Nursing Education: Perils, Pitfalls, and Pearls

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Hedi; Schim, Stephanie; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diversity in the classroom challenges nursing educators to identify issues that complicate teaching (perils), analyze barriers for themselves and their students (pitfalls), and select new strategies for working with nontraditional students (pearls). This article identifies concerns arising from attitudes and values within nursing and common approaches to diversity education, and then discusses key issues in nursing education that relate to human nature, culture, faculty workload, and student demographics. Finally, some strategies are proposed for increasing the effectiveness of professional preparation with diverse students through a focus on culturally congruent education and development of faculty cultural competence. PMID:20143759

  8. Cultural diversity teaching and issues of uncertainty: the findings of a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Nisha; Giordano, James; France, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    pressure to imbue cultural diversity issues with levels of objectivity and certainty representative of other aspects of the medical curriculum (e.g. – biochemistry). This may reflect a particular selection bias for students with a technocentric orientation. Inadvertently, medical education may enhance this bias through training effects, and accommodate disregard for subjectivity, over-reliance upon technology and thereby foster incorrect assumptions of objective certainty. We opine that it is important to teach students that technology cannot guarantee certainty, and that dealing with subjectivity, diversity, ambiguity and uncertainty is inseparable from the personal dimension of medicine as moral enterprise. Uncertainty is inherent in cultural diversity so this part of the curriculum provides an opportunity to address the issue as it relates to pateint care. PMID:17462089

  9. Media, cultural diversity and globalization: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Zayani, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the role media play in safeguarding cultural diversity, promoting cultural dialogue, facilitating the exercise of cultural rights,fostering cultural understanding and cultivating intercultural citizenship in the age of globalization. The paper highlights several interconnected leverage points: media content, practices, processes, ownership, education, structures, and policies. It argues that fostering cultural diversity in and through the media can go a long way toward bringing a civic discourse which favors tolerance and facilitates co-existence. It can contribute to the breaking down of cultural barriers, the initiation of cultural dialogues, the empowerment of marginalized groups, and the practice of good governance. At the same time, this paper argues, the celebration of difference does not preclude the valuation of a common cultural core or a common humanity which brings people together in spite of their differences. PMID:21744674

  10. Making Cultural Diversity Work in Suburban Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, J. Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Captures the cooperative spirit of a suburban Georgia high school with 2,000 highly mobile students from 60 countries and speaking over 30 different languages. Staff work to counter stereotypical assumptions and use diversity as a positive resource for learning and promotion of individual excellence. Diversity-management strategies related to…

  11. What Inclusive Dispositions Contribute to Culturally Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Students' Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Megan; Mackenzie, Jacqueline Zaleski

    2015-01-01

    Correlational research investigated relationships between PreService Teachers' dispositions and success with Culturally Linguistically Diverse Exceptional (CLDE) students, addressing disproportionality and multicultural teacher preparation. Results show a significant correlation between Inclusive Dispositional Self-Assessment scores (e.g.,…

  12. Cultural Diversity among Gifted Students and Their Teachers in Rural West Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Steve; Meikamp, Joyce

    This paper addresses both the underrepresentation of minority students in gifted education programs and the lack of culturally diverse gifted education teachers in rural West Virginia. The 1988 National Education Longitudinal Study found disproportionate representation of minority group students in gifted education. In West Virginia, only 3 Black…

  13. Contemporary Issues in the Assessment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Jacqueline; Shaftel, Julia; Markham, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses issues faced by school psychologists when assessing students who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD). The authors describe the growing CLD population and legal requirements for assessment of CLD students for special education eligibility. Difficulties associated with referral and assessment procedures of CLD…

  14. Education, Democracy, and Cultural Pluralism: Continuing Higher Education in an Age of Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, John F.

    1990-01-01

    Commonalities between the late nineteenth- and late twentieth-century U.S. society emphasize the idea of diversity as the basis of unity. Programs to encourage minority adult participation in education must address the serious problems of immigrants and minorities while respecting cultural identity. (36 references) (SK)

  15. Educating beyond Cultural Diversity: Redrawing the Boundaries of a Democratic Plurality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I draw some distinctions between the terms "cultural diversity" and "plurality" and argue that a radical conception of plurality is needed in order both to re-imagine the boundaries of democratic education and to address more fully the political aspects of conflict that plurality gives rise to. This paper begins with a brief…

  16. State Policy and Guidance for Identifying Learning Disabilities in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Amy N.; Boynton Hauerwas, Laura; Brown, Rachel D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how state Departments of Education address the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students as they relate to the identification of students with a specific learning disability (SLD). A qualitative research design of directed content analysis was used to examine each state's regulatory criteria for…

  17. Promoting Learning for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students. Classroom Applications from Contemporary Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gersten, Russell M.; Jimenez, Robert T.

    This collection of essays is designed to help teachers of linguistically and culturally diverse students address their students' needs effectively. Essays include: "A Balanced Approach to Early Spanish Literacy Instruction" (Claude Goldenberg); "Language and Preliteracy Development of English as a Second Language Learners in Early Childhood…

  18. Addressing "Who Am I?" before "Who Are They?" when Facing Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Jan L. H.; Frank, Kerry D.

    2006-01-01

    Before we as teachers can even begin to address the question of "Who are our students?" we must first reflect on and analyze ourselves--who we are in terms of race, ethnicity, class, gender, culture, personality, and other important factors. Relating to our students, challenging their thinking and actions, and being voices for change all demand…

  19. Addressing the Religious and Spiritual Diversity of Students with Disabilities and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhoweris, Hala; Whittaker, Catharine; Salend, Spencer J.

    2007-01-01

    It is critical for educators to understand the influence of religion or spirituality on students and their families. This article reviews the literature addressing religious, spiritual, and cultural beliefs with an emphasis on quality-of-life issues and provides suggestions educators can use to enhance the services that they provide.

  20. What Teachers Say about Addressing Culture in Their EFL Teaching Practices: The Vietnamese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Long; Harvey, Sharon; Grant, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Vietnamese EFL teachers' beliefs about the role of culture in language teaching. It also considers how they address culture in their teaching practices in a Vietnamese university. Ethnographic data collected from semi-structured interviews indicated that opportunities for culture to find its way into EFL classroom activities…

  1. Cultural Diversity in the Workplace: The State of the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Marlene G.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews three broad categories of research on cultural diversity in the workplace: general overviews, theoretical perspectives, and empirical research studies. Offers an explanation for the paucity of research on the topic, and suggests topics and methods for future research. (SR)

  2. Mathematics and Cultural Diversity in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillman, Rick

    2001-01-01

    Examines the place of mathematics in the general discussion of multicultural and international diversity. Discusses the importance of practicing mathematicians taking a positive role in K-12 mathematics education. (MM)

  3. Cultural Diversity and Anti-Poverty Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Michele; Small, Mario Luis

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how anti-poverty policy has considered the role of culture and how it ought to do so. While some have explained poverty as a function of the presumed cultural deficiency or distinctiveness of the poor, we suggest that these explanations have not been convincing and that policy requires a broader and more sophisticated…

  4. Language and Cultural Diversity in American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Roger D., Ed.; Troike, Rudolph C., Ed.

    The major aim of this book is to teach present or prospective teachers how to recognize the linguistic and cultural differences of their students. The essays selected for the anthology attempt to show how to make education more meaningful for the student by upgrading teachers' attitudes about minority cultures, developing a sensitivity to…

  5. Cognitive Adaptation to the Experience of Social and Cultural Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Richard J.; Turner, Rhiannon N.

    2011-01-01

    Diversity is a defining characteristic of modern society, yet there remains considerable debate over the benefits that it brings. The authors argue that positive psychological and behavioral outcomes will be observed only when social and cultural diversity is experienced in a way that challenges stereotypical expectations and that when this…

  6. Adapting Strategies of Effective Instruction for Culturally Diverse Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamauchi, Lois A.; Im, Seongah; Schonleber, Nanette S.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes collaboration between preschool and university educators focused on adapting the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and Excellence (CREDE) standards for Effective Pedagogy for use in early childhood (EC) settings. The CREDE standards are strategies of best practices for culturally diverse K-12 students. Teachers…

  7. Developing Diverse Faculty in Culturally Proficient Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezada, Reyes; Louque, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Teachers must be prepared to work in diverse schools. Preservice education programs and teacher educators must be culturally proficient to train them. Notes strategies for recruiting diverse faculty into education departments, discussing faculty mentoring and support, evaluation of faculty of color, teacher certification mandates versus…

  8. Pursuing Justice for Refugee Students: Addressing Issues of Cultural (Mis)Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keddie, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In this paper Nancy Fraser's conceptual tools are drawn on to theorise issues of justice in a culturally diverse primary school in Australia where approximately 30% of the student population are immigrant/refugees. The paper examines justice issues of cultural recognition in relation to refugee student identity, behaviour and assessment. Drawing…

  9. Teachers' Dispositions and Beliefs about Cultural and Linguistic Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vázquez-Montilla, Elia; Just, Megan; Triscari, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' beliefs towards their students' cultural backgrounds and languages affect all aspects of learning. Critical consciousness of attitudes and beliefs about the increasing culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) student population is necessary for aligning individual beliefs with effective teaching practices. Rethinking how to work with…

  10. Using Qualitative Methods to Assess Diverse Institutional Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Museus, Samuel D.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on describing how institutional researchers can use qualitative cultural assessments to better understand the role that their campus cultures play in shaping individual and group behaviors and experiences. A special emphasis is given to the implications of institutional diversity in the processes of designing and conducting…

  11. Evaluation and Analyses of Cultural Diversity Training with Environmental Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvan, Alma R.; LaRocque, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental Education and Training Partnership Cultural Diversity Workshops were based on theoretical models and designed to increase individuals' awareness, knowledge, and intentions toward increasing culturally sensitivity. This study reports on the evaluation results from 191 participants. Their responses indicate significant changes in…

  12. Empowering Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmani, Mubina Hassanali

    2007-01-01

    All deserve an early childhood education that is responsive to their families, communities, and racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds. For young children to experience optimum learning, early childhood professionals must be prepared to meet children's diverse developmental, cultural, linguistic, and educational needs. Remembering her son's…

  13. Adult Education, Social Inclusion and Cultural Diversity in Regional Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the outcomes of recent research into adult education programs and experiences in the Shire of Campaspe, a region in northern Victoria. Research data of people from diverse cultural backgrounds reveal how individuals can utilize adult education as a space to explore their own social and cultural isolation in a regional…

  14. Respect for cultural diversity in bioethics is an ethical imperative.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Subrata; De Vries, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    The field of bioethics continues to struggle with the problem of cultural diversity: can universal principles guide ethical decision making, regardless of the culture in which those decisions take place? Or should bioethical principles be derived from the moral traditions of local cultures? Ten Have and Gordijn (Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14:1-3, 2011) and Bracanovic (Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14:229-236, 2011) defend the universalist position, arguing that respect for cultural diversity in matters ethical will lead to a dangerous cultural relativity where vulnerable patients and research subjects will be harmed. We challenge the premises of moral universalism, showing how this approach imports and imposes moral notions of Western society and leads to harm in non-western cultures. PMID:22955969

  15. Accommodating Culture and Cultural Diversity in Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, Annegret; Craig, Annemieke; Coldwell, Jo

    2007-01-01

    The term "culture" has been in common use for a long time. However there is no universally accepted definition and hence it is important to define clearly what culture means in a particular research context. The research reported here is part of a project undertaken at a large Australian university in late 2005. The overall aim of the project was…

  16. Managing within a culturally diverse environment.

    PubMed

    Bhimani, R; Acorn, S

    1998-09-01

    Canada has long been a multicultural nation, but the increasing ethnic diversity of new Canadians has shifted our multicultural make-up. In 1967, the top five countries from which immigrants came to Canada were Britain, Italy, United States, Germany and Greece. Almost 30 years later, in 1995, the top five sources were Hong Kong, India, the Philippines, China and Sri Lanka. PMID:9923216

  17. Cultural Diversity in Mathematics (Education): CIEAEM 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Afzal; Williams, Honor; Kraemer, Jean Marie

    The 51st meeting of the Commission Internationale pour L'Etude et L'Amelioration de L'Ensignment des Mathematiques (CIEAEM) was held July, 1999 at Chichester, UK and facilitated the collaboration of delegates from over 30 countries providing a variety of perspectives on the theme OCultural Diversity in Mathematics Education'. The papers in this…

  18. Recreation Opportunity and Cultural Diversity. Research Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, John F.; Gobster, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing ethnic/racial diversity challenges parks and recreation (PR) planners. Research indicates enough group differences in recreational participation and preferences to suggest that racial/ethnic background is an important consideration in PR planning. Facilitated focus group discussions with community members can help planners understand…

  19. The structure of cross-cultural musical diversity

    PubMed Central

    Rzeszutek, Tom; Savage, Patrick E.; Brown, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Human cultural traits, such as languages, musics, rituals and material objects, vary widely across cultures. However, the majority of comparative analyses of human cultural diversity focus on between-culture variation without consideration for within-culture variation. In contrast, biological approaches to genetic diversity, such as the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) framework, partition genetic diversity into both within- and between-population components. We attempt here for the first time to quantify both components of cultural diversity by applying the AMOVA model to music. By employing this approach with 421 traditional songs from 16 Austronesian-speaking populations, we show that the vast majority of musical variability is due to differences within populations rather than differences between. This demonstrates a striking parallel to the structure of genetic diversity in humans. A neighbour-net analysis of pairwise population musical divergence shows a large amount of reticulation, indicating the pervasive occurrence of borrowing and/or convergent evolution of musical features across populations. PMID:22072606

  20. Learning to Live Together: An Exploration and Analysis of Managing Cultural Diversity in Centre-Based Early Childhood Development Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Jaclyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how early childhood development practitioners running centre-based programmes with children aged 3-6 years address the needs of an increasing number of children from diverse cultural backgrounds in their care. This is important as early childhood is a critical moment in which to create a positive awareness about diversity. A…

  1. Trends in Art Education from Diverse Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Heta, Ed.; Diket, Read, Ed.

    This anthology brings together art educators from 21 countries to provide information about the past record of art education along with recent developments and future prospects. In "Part I: Historical Perspectives," the role of cross cultural influences is reported in essays: (1) "Quality Criteria Shifts in One Century of Art Education in Dutch…

  2. Understanding Culture and Diversity: Australian Aboriginal Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vize, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Australian Aboriginal culture is rich, complex and fascinating. The art of Aboriginal Australians shows a great understanding of the earth and its creatures. This article presents an activity which has been designed as a multi-age project. The learning outcomes have been written to suit both younger and older students. Aspects of the project could…

  3. The Challenges of Cultural Diversity in the Recruitment of Faculty and Students from Diverse Backgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of cultural diversity and the significance of ethnicity, race, and race relations in the workplace focuses on the need to recruit library school faculty and students from diverse backgrounds. Highlights include racism; minority faculty; retaining and recruiting minority students; funding; and future possibilities. (Contains 12…

  4. Diagnostic Dilemmas and Cultural Diversity in Emergency Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Charlotte; Sklar, David

    1980-01-01

    Language and cultural beliefs play an extremely important role in the interaction between patients from diverse cultural groups and physicians. Especially in emergency rooms, there are many dangers in missed communications. A patient from a foreign culture, especially one who does not speak English, often expresses symptoms in ways that are unfamiliar to many American physicians. Specific areas of cultural vulnerability can be identified for the major ethnic groups in the United States as they interact with the scientific medical system. A short review of folk medical beliefs and recommendations for improving diagnostic accuracy and treatment may assist emergency room staffs in offering care that is culturally acceptable to patients of diverse ethnic backgrounds. PMID:7347053

  5. Culturable Gut Microbiota Diversity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sørby, Jan Roger Torp; Aleström, Peter; Sørum, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an increasingly used laboratory animal model in basic biology and biomedicine, novel drug development, and toxicology. The wide use has increased the demand for optimized husbandry protocols to ensure animal health care and welfare. The knowledge about the correlation between culturable zebrafish intestinal microbiota and health in relation to environmental factors and management procedures is very limited. A semi-quantitative level of growth of individual types of bacteria was determined and associated with sampling points. A total of 72 TAB line zebrafish from four laboratories (Labs A–D) in the Zebrafish Network Norway were used. Diagnostic was based on traditional bacterial culture methods and biochemical characterization using commercial kits, followed by 16S rDNA gene sequencing from pure subcultures. Also selected Gram-negative isolates were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility to 8 different antibiotics. A total of 13 morphologically different bacterial species were the most prevalent: Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas sobria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas luteola, Comamonas testosteroni, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Staphylococcus cohnii, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus capitis, and Staphylococcus warneri. Only Lab B had significantly higher levels of total bacterial growth (OR=2.03), whereas numbers from Lab C (OR=1.01) and Lab D (OR=1.12) were found to be similar to the baseline Lab A. Sexually immature individuals had a significantly higher level of harvested total bacterial growth than mature fish (OR=0.82), no statistically significant differences were found between male and female fish (OR=1.01), and the posterior intestinal segment demonstrated a higher degree of culturable bacteria than the anterior segment (OR=4.1). Multiple antibiotic (>3) resistance was observed in 17% of the strains. We propose that a rapid

  6. Breast Cancer Screening: Cultural Beliefs and Diverse Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Cassandra E.

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the role of culture in breast cancer screening behavior among African American, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian American/Pacific Islander, and Hispanic/Latina women. It reviews cultural beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge and their relative influence on women's decisions regarding health tests. The article explores how…

  7. Culturally Responsive Practices for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utley, Cheryl A.; Obiakor, Festus E.; Bakken, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses culturally responsive frameworks, principles, pedagogy, and curriculum for general and special educators who work with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students with learning disabilities (LD). Culturally responsive teaching has critical features that could benefit CLD students with LD. For example, culturally…

  8. Spirituality as a Cultural Asset for Culturally Diverse Youth in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Christine J.; Borrero, Noah E.; Shea, Munyi

    2011-01-01

    Spiritual issues are culturally important for many youth in urban schools. In this article, the authors describe how spirituality is associated with cultural values, mental health, coping strategies, and adjustment among culturally diverse youth. Using the case of a 17-year-old Samoan high school student, the authors demonstrate how spiritual…

  9. Cultural safety: does the theory work in practice for culturally and linguistically diverse groups?

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Annette

    2010-11-01

    Culturally diverse refugee and migrant groups under-utilise health services in New Zealand and cultural barriers are cited as reasons for not using health services. According to the Nursing Council nurses are required to demonstrate competency in culturally safe practice, yet cultural safety is determined by the person receiving the care. This article critically examines the theoretical base of the cultural safety guidelines for nursing practice with respect to culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups. Two key questions were posed: have the guidelines led to culturally safe nursing practice in health care for CALD groups, and have the guidelines contributed to provision of culturally acceptable health care for CALD groups? It is concluded that further theoretical consideration should be given to the conceptual basis for including CALD groups in the cultural safety model. The cultural competencies required for culturally safe nursing practice need to apply to the care of all culturally diverse groups present in New Zealand. Recommendations are made for strengthening the cultural safety model, and the registered nurse competencies for culturally safe practise. PMID:21188912

  10. Intervention Development and Cultural Adaptation Research With Diverse Families

    PubMed Central

    BERNAL, GUILLERMO

    2006-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the special issue on intervention development and cultural adaptation research with diverse families. The need for research on intervention development and on cultural adaptation of interventions is presented, followed by a discussion of frameworks on treatment development. Seven articles included in this special issue serve as examples of the stages of treatment and intervention development, and of the procedures employed in the cultural adaptation with diverse families. An overview of the seven articles is provided to illustrate the treatment development process and the use of pluralistic research methods. We conclude with a call to the field for creative and innovative intervention development research with diverse families to contribute to the body of evidence-based practice with these populations. PMID:16768015

  11. Addressing the Challenge of Diversity in the Graduate Ranks: Good Practices Yield Good Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Nancy L.; Campbell, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the impact of implementing three systemic practices on the diversity and institutional culture in biomedical and public health PhD training at Brown University. We hypothesized that these practices, designed as part of the National Institutes of Health–funded Initiative to Maximize Student Development (IMSD) program in the Division of Biology and Medicine, would have a positive effect on underrepresented minority (URM) recruitment and retention and objective measures of student success. These practices include: 1) develop strategic partnerships with selected undergraduate institutions; 2) provide a personalized education program of student support and skill-based modules to supplement discipline-based course work; and 3) transform institutional culture by engaging faculty in supporting diversity-related goals and practices. Data comparing URM numbers and key academic milestones before and after implementation of IMSD practices support the initial hypothesis and effectiveness of these practices at Brown. Program components are broadly applicable as best practices for others seeking to improve URM recruitment and achievements of graduate students traditionally underrepresented in the sciences. PMID:23463225

  12. Antarctic ice core samples: culturable bacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Shivaji, Sisinthy; Begum, Zareena; Shiva Nageswara Rao, Singireesu Soma; Vishnu Vardhan Reddy, Puram V; Manasa, Poorna; Sailaja, Buddi; Prathiba, Mambatta S; Thamban, Meloth; Krishnan, Kottekkatu P; Singh, Shiv M; Srinivas, Tanuku N R

    2013-01-01

    Culturable bacterial abundance at 11 different depths of a 50.26 m ice core from the Tallaksenvarden Nunatak, Antarctica, varied from 0.02 to 5.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1) of the melt water. A total of 138 bacterial strains were recovered from the 11 different depths of the ice core. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, the 138 isolates could be categorized into 25 phylotypes belonging to phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. All isolates had 16S rRNA sequences similar to previously determined sequences (97.2-100%). No correlation was observed in the distribution of the isolates at the various depths either at the phylum, genus or species level. The 25 phylotypes varied in growth temperature range, tolerance to NaCl, growth pH range and ability to produce eight different extracellular enzymes at either 4 or 18 °C. Iso-, anteiso-, unsaturated and saturated fatty acids together constituted a significant proportion of the total fatty acid composition. PMID:23041141

  13. Inequities of Intervention among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Liz

    2015-01-01

    Although Response to Intervention (RTI) has been generally studied in relation to student outcomes, the system itself requires further study, particularly for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students. CLD students have consistently suffered inequities in the educational system, including over representation in high incidence disability…

  14. Faculty and Student Challenges in Facing Cultural and Linguistic Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Lynne W., Ed.; Waltzman, Dava E., Ed.

    This volume on strategies for meeting the challenges of cultural and linguistic diversity is designed to help faculty and administration in the professional education programs of the allied health professionals. The book's 11 chapters are divided among 3 main parts. The first section offers an introduction to the challenges before faculty and…

  15. Study Abroad: Enhanced Learning Experience in Cultural Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaoko, Japheth

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how a study abroad experiential learning course in diversity provided a cultural immersion experience for a group of social work students from a small private university in central Kentucky. The students participated in a three-week international education experience in Kenya and reported this experience helped them become more…

  16. Educating Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Preschoolers: Moving the Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sharon L.; Garcia, Eugene E.

    Despite growing interest in children's policy and in research regarding childhood bilingualism and language acquisition, the early care and education of linguistically and culturally diverse preschoolers remains a matter of much concern. Relative inattention at the level of policy to the needs and interests of such children is due to several…

  17. Changes and Challenges: Families in a Diverse Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Carol Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Providing an overview of American families today is a difficult task because of diversity, not only in race and ethnicity, but also in social, geographical, and cultural backgrounds. These varied family dimensions can influence perceptions and reactions to age, family composition, family characteristics, gender roles, family interests, health…

  18. Who Owns History? (Teaching and Learning about Cultural Diversity).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Howard M.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that history is always based on someone's vision of truth, expressed through a process of distillation, selection, inclusion, exclusion, reorganization, and prioritizing. Argues that the shorthand, watered-down, or warped history of mainstream textbooks regarding cultural diversity should be supplemented with original documents, fiction, and…

  19. Cultural Diversity in Geography Curriculum: The Geography of American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Martha L.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the content of a university geography course on American Indians. Discusses the role of geography curriculum in teaching cultural diversity. Summarizes three lectures on the Great Lakes Chippewa. Describes student projects, outside activities, and learning evaluation. States that students improved geographical skills and increased…

  20. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity Representation in School Psychology Intervention Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarreal, Victor

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of the current intervention research is critical to the adoption of evidence-based practices in the delivery of psychological services; however, the generalizability and utility of intervention research for culturally and linguistically diverse youth may be limited by the types of research samples utilized. This study addresses…

  1. Performing Our World: Affirming Cultural Diversity through Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Adria R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a culturally responsive music curriculum through which students and teachers affirmed diverse stories of individuals present in our public school community. An arts-integrated curriculum project helped make learning more meaningful while concurrently creating a safe learning space for students. This grant-funded project…

  2. School Counselors and Administrators: Collaboratively Promoting Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Henry L.

    1999-01-01

    Because of their educational training, visibility, and leadership positions, school counselors and administrators must work as a team to promote cultural diversity for students, teachers, parents, and community members. Schools may choose to investigate racial-identity development through a model delineating conformity, dissonance, resistance and…

  3. DIVERSITY OF ARSENIC METABOLISM IN CULTURED HUMAN CANCER CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diversity of arsenic metabolism in cultured human cancer cell lines.

    Arsenic has been known to cause a variety of malignancies in human. Pentavalent As (As 5+) is reduced to trivalent As (As3+) which is further methylated by arsenic methyltransferase(s) to monomethylarson...

  4. The Implications of Contemporary Cultural Diversity for the Hospitality Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearns, Niamh; Devine, Frances; Baum, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This viewpoint paper aims to assess a curriculum response within a specific vocational sector, hospitality, driven by the recent surge in intra EU labour migration and the ensuing increase in workplace cultural diversity. Design/methodology/approach: The paper identifies an appropriate curriculum response by assessing the industry…

  5. Collaboration with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families: Ideal versus Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harry, Beth

    2008-01-01

    This review identifies research-based definitions of ideal collaborative relationships between special education professionals and culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) families of children with disabilities, examines research on actual collaboration with such families, and makes recommendations regarding improvement of such collaboration.…

  6. Cultural Diversity in the School: Implications for Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomotey, Kofi

    1989-01-01

    Given that America is still a dangerously racist, classist, and sexist society and that students need opportunities to celebrate their diverse cultural backgrounds, the failure of the nation's schools to educate African-American students must be reexamined. Change strategies include making the curriculum more multicultural and reorienting…

  7. Improving Test Performance among Culturally Diverse Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    When trying to explain the discrepancy between the numbers of white students in gifted education programs and the number of culturally diverse students in gifted education programs, it becomes apparent that there are multiple factors at play with the most prominent one being the identification process. Most districts begin the identification…

  8. Celebrating Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Gail E.; Cohen, Rachel Chazan

    Noting that the dramatic demographic changes in the United States in the last 30 years require that Head Start programs learn how to access new populations, encourage their participation, and tailor programs to meet their unique needs, this study was commissioned to better understand the diversity in language and culture of the Head Start…

  9. Teachers' Work in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Teachers in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms work in highly charged contexts where policy, curriculum, student backgrounds, equity issues and pedagogical expertise provide both resources and constraints. Often, these classrooms are in underachieving schools in low socio-economic areas. This study investigated one school in…

  10. Cultural Diversity Climate and Psychological Adjustment at School-Equality and Inclusion versus Cultural Pluralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachner, Maja K.; Noack, Peter; Van de Vijver, Fons J. R.; Eckstein, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The present study is concerned with cultural diversity climate at school and how it relates to acculturation orientations and psychological school adjustment of early adolescent immigrants. Specifically, the distinct role of two types of diversity policy is investigated, namely (a) fostering equality and inclusion and (b) acknowledging cultural…

  11. Cultural Diversity in Science Education through "Novelization": Against the "Epicization" of Science and Cultural Centralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2011-01-01

    Science educators are confronted with the challenge to accommodate in their classes an increasing cultural and linguistic diversity that results from globalization. Challenged by the call to work towards valuing and keeping this diversity in the face of the canonical nature of school science discourse, we propose a new way of thinking about and…

  12. Culturally Familiar Tasks on Reading Performance and Self-Efficacy of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Heather M.; Siwatu, Kamau Oginga; Tost, Jeremy R.; Martinez, James

    2015-01-01

    Grounded in the theoretical frameworks of constructivism and social cognitive theory, this study examined utilising culturally responsive pedagogy through a Latino themed reading task with the intention of increasing reading achievement and reading self-efficacy beliefs for culturally and linguistically diverse students. The research was conducted…

  13. Cultural Identity and Peer Influence as Predictors of Substance Use among Culturally Diverse Australian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazis, Nicki; Connor, Jason P.; Ho, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated cultural identity and peer influence on tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis use in a culturally diverse sample of Northern Australian adolescents. Middle school students (n = 274) completed the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) and measures of their own and perceived friends' substance use. Higher scores on the full…

  14. Parent Cultural Adaptation and Child Functioning in Culturally Diverse, Urban Families of Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calzada, Esther J.; Brotman, Laurie Miller; Huang, Keng-Yen; Bat-Chava, Yael; Kingston, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Parent cultural adaptation and preschool behavioral and socioemotional functioning were examined in a community sample of urban families from diverse cultural backgrounds. Participants were 130 families of children (mean age = 4.1 years) attending eight public Pre-Kindergarten programs in urban communities. Parents completed a measure of cultural…

  15. Cultural Transmission on the Taskscape: Exploring the Effects of Taskscape Visibility on Cultural Diversity.

    PubMed

    Premo, L S; Tostevin, Gilbert B

    2016-01-01

    Culturally transmitted behavior can be structured in its performance both geographically and temporally, in terms of where and when implements are made and used on the landscape (what Ingold calls "the taskscape"). Yet cultural transmission theory has not yet explored the consequences of behaviors transmitted differently due to their enactment at different taskscape locations, what Tostevin calls "taskscape visibility." Here, we use computer simulations to explore how taskscape visibility and forager mobility affect the diversity of two selectively neutral culturally transmitted traits within a single population of social learners. The trait that can be transmitted from residential bases only (lower taskscape visibility) shows greater diversity than the trait that can be transmitted from residential bases and logistical camps (higher taskscape visibility). In addition, increased logistical mobility has a positive effect on the diversity of the trait with the lower taskscape visibility while it generally shows little to no effect on the diversity of the trait with higher taskscape visibility. Without an appreciation for the ways in which taskscape visibility and mobility can structure cultural transmission in space and through time, the difference in the observed equilibrium diversity levels of the two traits might be incorrectly interpreted as resulting from qualitatively different forms of biased cultural transmission. The results of our simulation experiment suggest that researchers may need to take the taskscape visibility into account when inferring cultural transmission from archaeological data. PMID:27583682

  16. Macro-evolutionary studies of cultural diversity: a review of empirical studies of cultural transmission and cultural adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Ruth; Jordan, Fiona M.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of theoretical and empirical research has examined cultural transmission and adaptive cultural behaviour at the individual, within-group level. However, relatively few studies have tried to examine proximate transmission or test ultimate adaptive hypotheses about behavioural or cultural diversity at a between-societies macro-level. In both the history of anthropology and in present-day work, a common approach to examining adaptive behaviour at the macro-level has been through correlating various cultural traits with features of ecology. We discuss some difficulties with simple ecological associations, and then review cultural phylogenetic studies that have attempted to go beyond correlations to understand the underlying cultural evolutionary processes. We conclude with an example of a phylogenetically controlled approach to understanding proximate transmission pathways in Austronesian cultural diversity. PMID:21199844

  17. Cross-Cultural Communication: A Program Addressing the Effect of Migration on South African Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potgieter, Christo; Bredenkamp, Esther

    2002-01-01

    Presents general background information on migration in South Africa and its effect on education. Described a cross-cultural communication program that addresses creatively the outcomes of migration, including its theoretical model, an application, program operation for learners and educators, and challenges. Reviews lessons learned by migrant…

  18. A review of approaches to improve participation of culturally and linguistically diverse populations in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Jo-Anne; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Parker, Anna; Hajek, John; Bresin, Agnese; Knoch, Ute; Phan, Tuong; Story, David

    2016-01-01

    The under-representation of culturally and linguistically diverse participants in clinical trials is an ongoing concern for medical researchers and the community. The aim of this review is to examine the complex issue of recruiting culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) older people to medical research and to examine responses to these issues. The review focuses on (1) trends in the existing literature on barriers to and strategies for recruiting CALD and older people to clinical research, (2) issues with informed consent for CALD populations, and (3) the efficacy of innovative approaches, including approaches incorporating multimedia in research and consent processes. The literature indicates that predominant barriers to greater involvement of CALD patients in clinical trials are communication, including literacy and health literacy considerations; English language competence; and cultural factors in the research setting such as mistrust of consent processes, as well as considerable practical and logistical barriers, including mobility considerations. Some evidence exists that incorporating multimedia resources into the informed consent process can improve patient understanding and is preferred by patients, yet these findings are inconclusive. A multi-methodological approach, including the use of culturally and linguistically sensitive multimedia tools, may help address the issue of low inclusion of CALD groups in clinical research. Researcher education needs to be taken into account to address preconceptions about CALD resistance to research participation and to raise awareness of cultural concerns in regard to research participation. PMID:27229153

  19. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations. PMID:27111680

  20. Shifts in indigenous culture relate to forest tree diversity: a case study from the Tsimane’, Bolivian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Guèze, Maximilien; Luz, Ana Catarina; Paneque-Gálvez, Jaime; Macía, Manuel J.; Orta-Martínez, Martí; Pino, Joan; Reyes-García, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how indigenous peoples’ management practices relate to biological diversity requires addressing contemporary changes in indigenous peoples’ way of life. This study explores the association between cultural change among a Bolivian Amazonian indigenous group, the Tsimane’, and tree diversity in forests surrounding their villages. We interviewed 86 informants in six villages about their level of attachment to traditional Tsimane’ values, our proxy for cultural change. We estimated tree diversity (Fisher’s Alpha index) by inventorying trees in 48 0.1-ha plots in old-growth forests distributed in the territory of the same villages. We used multivariate models to assess the relation between cultural change and alpha tree diversity. Cultural change was associated with alpha tree diversity and the relation showed an inverted U-shape, thus suggesting that tree alpha diversity peaked in villages undergoing intermediate cultural change. Although the results do not allow for testing the direction of the relation, we propose that cultural change relates to tree diversity through the changes in practices and behaviors that affect the traditional ecological knowledge of Tsimane’ communities; further research is needed to determine the causality. Our results also find support in the intermediate disturbance hypothesis, and suggest that indigenous management can be seen as an intermediate form of anthropogenic disturbance affecting forest communities in a subtle, non-destructive way. PMID:26097240

  1. Cultural diversity and differences in formal reasoning ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Anton E.; Bealer, Jonathan M.

    To test the hypothesis that cultural diversity contributes to the development of formal reasoning, samples of adolescents from three predominately white middle-class communities located in areas that varied in the extent to which they offered cultural diversity (i.e., rural, suburan homogeneous, suburban heterogeneous) were administered a test of formal reasoning and a test of analytical intelligence. Results showed significant differences in formal reasoning in favor of the suburban heterogeneous sample on complex reasoning items. The suburban groups showed equal performance (but superior to the rural Ss) on the test of analytical intelligence. On the less complex reasoning items and on one item embedded in a rural farming context, the rural Ss showed relatively better performance. Implications for using science instruction to promote formal reasoning are discussed.

  2. Creation of Culturally Responsive Classrooms: Teachers' Conceptualization of a New Rationale for Cultural Responsiveness and Management of Diversity in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hue, Ming-Tak; Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, there are a growing number of ethnic minority students in Hong Kong schools. This article examines teachers' views of the cross-cultural experience of ethnic minority students, their influence on the performance of these students, and how the diverse learning needs of these students are being addressed. Qualitative data were collected…

  3. Serving Culturally Diverse E-Learners in Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Bunt-Kokhuis, Sylvia; Weir, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight how future teaching in business schools will probably take place in an online (here called 24/7) classroom, where culturally diverse e-learners around the globe meet. Technologies such as iPhone, iPad and a variety of social media, to mention but a few, give management learners of any age easy…

  4. Improving diversity in cultures of bacteria from an extreme environment.

    PubMed

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2013-08-01

    The ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Greenland represent one of the few permanently cold and alkaline environments on Earth, and the interior of the columns is home to a bacterial community adapted to these extreme conditions. The community is characterized by low cell numbers imbedded in a calcium carbonate matrix, making extraction of bacterial cells and DNA a challenge and limiting molecular and genomic studies of this environment. To utilize this genetic resource, cultivation at high pH and low temperature was studied as a method for obtaining biomass and DNA from the fraction of this community that would not otherwise be amenable to genetic analyses. The diversity and community dynamics in mixed cultures of bacteria from ikaite columns was investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA. Both medium composition and incubation time influenced the diversity of the culture and many hitherto uncharacterized genera could be brought into culture by extended incubation time. Extended incubation time also gave rise to a more diverse community with a significant number of rare species not detected in the initial community. PMID:23899002

  5. Perceptions of Norwegian physiotherapy students: cultural diversity in practice.

    PubMed

    Fougner, Marit; Horntvedt, And Tone

    2012-01-01

    At the Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College there is a growing recognition of the need for cultural competency training among students at the bachelor programmes. At the Mensendieck-physiotherapy bachelor programme the students are engaged in leading physical activity groups for Muslim women. This qualitative study describes ethnically Norwegian students experiencing cultural diversity in practice. Twenty-two female physiotherapy students participated in the interviews; 6 students were interviewed individually by telephone, and 16 students were interviewed in person in 8 pairs. The students' framework for dealing with diversity is based on preconceived notions about Muslim women and is reflected in two particular ways. One is how the values and norms of Norwegian "ideology of sameness" are pursued by the students. The other is how the students constructed images of the women as "the others." The interview responses indicate difficulties in uniting the reality of diversity and the "need" for integration. The curriculum requires additional attention on cultural competency for health care professionals in a multicultural society. PMID:21682583

  6. The distribution of cultural and biological diversity in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Joslin L; Manne, Lisa; Brooks, Thomas; Burgess, Neil D; Davies, Robert; Rahbek, Carsten; Williams, Paul; Balmford, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Anthropologists, biologists and linguists have all noted an apparent coincidence in species diversity and human cultural or linguistic diversity. We present, to our knowledge, one of the first quantitative descriptions of this coincidence and show that, for 2 degrees x 2 degrees grid cells across sub-Saharan Africa, cultural diversity and vertebrate species diversity exhibit marked similarities in their overall distribution. In addition, we show that 71% of the observed variation in species richness and 36% in language richness can be explained on the basis of environmental factors, suggesting that similar factors, especially those associated with rainfall and productivity, affect the distributions of both species and languages. Nevertheless, the form of the relationships between species richness and language richness and environmental factors differs, and it is unlikely that comparable mechanisms underpin the similar patterns of species and language richness. Moreover, the fact that the environmental factors considered here explain less than half of the variation in language richness indicates that other factors, many of which are likely to be historical or social, also influence the distribution of languages. PMID:12204124

  7. Diversity and cultural competence training in health care organizations: hallmarks of success.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Ellen Foster; Dreachslin, Janice L; Sinioris, Marie

    2007-01-01

    The authors reviewed recent literature on diversity training interventions and identified effective practices for health care organizations. Self-reported satisfaction was especially likely to be found as a result of training, whereas attitude change measured by standardized instruments was mixed. Although those responsible for diversity training in the workplace agree that behavioral change is key, awareness building and associated attitude change remain the focus of most diversity training in the workplace. Consequently, the authors recommend a systems approach to diversity training interventions wherein training is a key component of a health care organization's strategic approach to organizational performance, and diversity training is linked to the organizations' strategic goals for improved quality of care. The systems approach requires these steps: determine diversity and cultural competence goals in the context of strategy, measure current performance against needs, design training to address the gap, implement the training, assess training effectiveness, and strive for continuous improvement. Higher level evaluations measuring whether employees have transferred learning from training to their jobs are paramount to the systems approach to diversity training interventions. Measuring other positive changes in a "return on investment" format can be used to convince stakeholders of training's value. PMID:17938595

  8. Addressing Stereotype Threat is Critical to Diversity and Inclusion in Organizational Psychology.

    PubMed

    Casad, Bettina J; Bryant, William J

    2016-01-01

    Recently researchers have debated the relevance of stereotype threat to the workplace. Critics have argued that stereotype threat is not relevant in high stakes testing such as in personnel selection. We and others argue that stereotype threat is highly relevant in personnel selection, but our review focused on underexplored areas including effects of stereotype threat beyond test performance and the application of brief, low-cost interventions in the workplace. Relevant to the workplace, stereotype threat can reduce domain identification, job engagement, career aspirations, and receptivity to feedback. Stereotype threat has consequences in other relevant domains including leadership, entrepreneurship, negotiations, and competitiveness. Several institutional and individual level intervention strategies that have been field-tested and are easy to implement show promise for practitioners including: addressing environmental cues, valuing diversity, wise feedback, organizational mindsets, reattribution training, reframing the task, values-affirmation, utility-value, belonging, communal goal affordances, interdependent worldviews, and teaching about stereotype threat. This review integrates criticisms and evidence into one accessible source for practitioners and provides recommendations for implementing effective, low-cost interventions in the workplace. PMID:26834681

  9. Addressing Stereotype Threat is Critical to Diversity and Inclusion in Organizational Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Casad, Bettina J.; Bryant, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently researchers have debated the relevance of stereotype threat to the workplace. Critics have argued that stereotype threat is not relevant in high stakes testing such as in personnel selection. We and others argue that stereotype threat is highly relevant in personnel selection, but our review focused on underexplored areas including effects of stereotype threat beyond test performance and the application of brief, low-cost interventions in the workplace. Relevant to the workplace, stereotype threat can reduce domain identification, job engagement, career aspirations, and receptivity to feedback. Stereotype threat has consequences in other relevant domains including leadership, entrepreneurship, negotiations, and competitiveness. Several institutional and individual level intervention strategies that have been field-tested and are easy to implement show promise for practitioners including: addressing environmental cues, valuing diversity, wise feedback, organizational mindsets, reattribution training, reframing the task, values-affirmation, utility-value, belonging, communal goal affordances, interdependent worldviews, and teaching about stereotype threat. This review integrates criticisms and evidence into one accessible source for practitioners and provides recommendations for implementing effective, low-cost interventions in the workplace. PMID:26834681

  10. Institutions and Cultural Diversity: Effects of Democratic and Propaganda Processes on Local Convergence and Global Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Roberto; Kacperski, Celina; Sancho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In a connected world where people influence each other, what can cause a globalized monoculture, and which measures help to preserve the coexistence of cultures? Previous research has shown that factors such as homophily, population size, geography, mass media, and type of social influence play important roles. In the present paper, we investigate for the first time the impact that institutions have on cultural diversity. In our first three studies, we extend existing agent-based models and explore the effects of institutional influence and agent loyalty. We find that higher institutional influence increases cultural diversity, while individuals' loyalty to their institutions has a small, preserving effect. In three further studies, we test how bottom-up and top-down processes of institutional influence impact our model. We find that bottom-up democratic practices, such as referenda, tend to produce convergence towards homogeneity, while top-down information dissemination practices, such as propaganda, further increase diversity. In our last model—an integration of bottom-up and top-down processes into a feedback loop of information—we find that when democratic processes are rare, the effects of propaganda are amplified, i.e., more diversity emerges; however, when democratic processes are common, they are able to neutralize or reverse this propaganda effect. Importantly, our models allow for control over the full spectrum of diversity, so that a manipulation of our parameters can result in preferred levels of diversity, which will be useful for the study of other factors in the future. We discuss possible mechanisms behind our results, applications, and implications for political and social sciences. PMID:27058247

  11. Institutions and Cultural Diversity: Effects of Democratic and Propaganda Processes on Local Convergence and Global Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Roberto; Kacperski, Celina; Sancho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In a connected world where people influence each other, what can cause a globalized monoculture, and which measures help to preserve the coexistence of cultures? Previous research has shown that factors such as homophily, population size, geography, mass media, and type of social influence play important roles. In the present paper, we investigate for the first time the impact that institutions have on cultural diversity. In our first three studies, we extend existing agent-based models and explore the effects of institutional influence and agent loyalty. We find that higher institutional influence increases cultural diversity, while individuals' loyalty to their institutions has a small, preserving effect. In three further studies, we test how bottom-up and top-down processes of institutional influence impact our model. We find that bottom-up democratic practices, such as referenda, tend to produce convergence towards homogeneity, while top-down information dissemination practices, such as propaganda, further increase diversity. In our last model--an integration of bottom-up and top-down processes into a feedback loop of information--we find that when democratic processes are rare, the effects of propaganda are amplified, i.e., more diversity emerges; however, when democratic processes are common, they are able to neutralize or reverse this propaganda effect. Importantly, our models allow for control over the full spectrum of diversity, so that a manipulation of our parameters can result in preferred levels of diversity, which will be useful for the study of other factors in the future. We discuss possible mechanisms behind our results, applications, and implications for political and social sciences. PMID:27058247

  12. A culturally diverse staff population: challenges and opportunities for nurses.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The United States is seeing an increase in ethnic and cultural diversity that is reflected (albeit to a smaller extent) in the nursing workforce. There are also more nurses who are foreign-born and educated. These nurses bring elements of their ethnic culture to the healthcare setting, including that of the "healthcare provider" culture of their home country. Often these values conflict with, or at least differ from, many American values seen in the workplace, such as autonomy of patients, an individualistic approach to relationships, peer relationships rather than hierarchical ones, democracy as an ideal norm, optimal health is ideal, and an emphasis on time/schedules and use of technology. A major cultural difference in the work setting has to do with the meaning of "work" itself, which can vary among cultural groups; in addition, some cultures are viewed as more "collective" in nature than the American ones, which are considered "individualistic." In particular, foreign-born and educated nurses from different healthcare systems bring with them values of the political system in which they work, the concept of a socialized system of medicine, language and accent differences, different concepts of nursing duties, and varying psychosocial skills. PMID:19704294

  13. Teaching physiotherapy skills in culturally-diverse classes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cultural competence, the ability to work in cross-cultural situations, has been acknowledged as a core skill for physiotherapists and other health professionals. Literature in this area has focused on the rationale for physiotherapists to provide culturally-competent care and the effectiveness of various educational strategies to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge about cultural competence by physiotherapists and physiotherapy students. However, there is a paucity of research on how students with different cultural needs, who are attending one university class, can be accommodated within a framework of learning core physiotherapy skills to achieve professional standards. Results This paper reports on steps which were taken to resolve the specific needs of a culturally-diverse body of first year physiotherapy students, and the impact this had on teaching in a new physiotherapy program located in Greater Western Sydney, Australia. Physiotherapy legislative, accreditation and registration requirements were considered in addition to anti-discrimination legislation and the four ethical principles of decision making. Conclusions Reflection on this issue and the steps taken to resolve it has resulted in the development of a generic framework which focuses on providing quality and equitable physiotherapy education opportunities to all students. This framework is generalizable to other health professions worldwide. PMID:21679404

  14. Is culture important in the choice of role models? Experiences from a culturally diverse medical school.

    PubMed

    McLean, Michelle

    2004-03-01

    In a multicultural student population at a South African medical school, for over one-third of students (Years 1-5) undertaking a traditional curriculum, culture was an important consideration in their choice of a role model. This was particularly so for senior students, perhaps reflecting their relatively recent exposure to patients and their forthcoming internship. Some student comments might, however, be interpreted as reflecting a rigid perception of culture that could translate into a possible lack of respect for other cultures. It is therefore imperative that each institution provide appropriate early and continuous mainstream diversity training, as well as identify role models to match the student profile. With the increasing diversity of students globally, this issue of culture should assume even greater importance in medical education than it is currently afforded. PMID:15203523

  15. Critical cultural competence for culturally diverse workforces: toward equitable and peaceful health care.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Adel F; Rondney, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we argue that attaining equity, and therefore peace in health care delivery, necessitates that nursing and other health care professions more carefully attend to the sociocultural context in which health care is delivered. That sociocultural context includes culturally diverse patients, families, and communities, as well as health care providers who are themselves culturally diverse. We draw on findings from Almutairi's doctoral research with health care providers in Saudi Arabia to argue for what he has identified as critical cultural competence for health care providers. In so doing, we explicate the complexity of cultural and linguistic issues and power relations induced by race, class, and gender that can contribute to vulnerabilities for health care providers and recipients alike. PMID:23907302

  16. Finding Balance in a Mix of Culture: Appreciation of Diversity through Multicultural Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nethsinghe, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the understandings of cultural diversity as enacted in multicultural music education and is located in Victoria, which is identified as the most culturally diverse state in Australia with a population that comes from various countries and speaks many languages. This cultural diversity is reflected in the schools. This…

  17. A Challenge for Culturally Diverse Families of Gifted Children: Forced Choices between Achievement or Affiliation. Multicultural

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Donna

    2004-01-01

    Parents and educators must recognize that culturally diverse students are gifted and culturally diverse. Like gifted students, they need to have their abilities recognized and they need to be challenged. Like diverse students, they need to have their culture (e.g., values, traditions, customs, etc.) acknowledged, respected, and otherwise affirmed.…

  18. Y chromosome diversity, human expansion, drift, and cultural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chiaroni, Jacques; Underhill, Peter A.; Cavalli-Sforza, Luca L.

    2009-01-01

    The relative importance of the roles of adaptation and chance in determining genetic diversity and evolution has received attention in the last 50 years, but our understanding is still incomplete. All statements about the relative effects of evolutionary factors, especially drift, need confirmation by strong demographic observations, some of which are easier to obtain in a species like ours. Earlier quantitative studies on a variety of data have shown that the amount of genetic differentiation in living human populations indicates that the role of positive (or directional) selection is modest. We observe geographic peculiarities with some Y chromosome mutants, most probably due to a drift-related phenomenon called the surfing effect. We also compare the overall genetic diversity in Y chromosome DNA data with that of other chromosomes and their expectations under drift and natural selection, as well as the rate of fall of diversity within populations known as the serial founder effect during the recent “Out of Africa” expansion of modern humans to the whole world. All these observations are difficult to explain without accepting a major relative role for drift in the course of human expansions. The increasing role of human creativity and the fast diffusion of inventions seem to have favored cultural solutions for many of the problems encountered in the expansion. We suggest that cultural evolution has been subrogating biologic evolution in providing natural selection advantages and reducing our dependence on genetic mutations, especially in the last phase of transition from food collection to food production. PMID:19920170

  19. Managing diversity.

    PubMed

    Epting, L A; Glover, S H; Boyd, S D

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. work force is becoming increasingly diverse as the 20th century approaches. Statistics prove that most organizations are experiencing gender, culture, and age diversity within their labor forces. All managers and leaders must accept this diversity and work to handle it effectively. This article examines the current literature concerning management of diversity and its implications for the health care profession. Gender, culture, and age diversity and the potential problems that may arise with each are also addressed. Reasons to manage diversity are offered, as well as methods of managing diversity for both the manager and the chief executive officer. PMID:10134144

  20. Cultural Diversity Creative Genius Cognitive Development: Teaching Deeper Culture in Elementary School Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivers, Nathaniel N.; Ivers, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors believe that exposure to cultural diversity may force children (or even adults) to form new neural connections in the brain to be able to sufficiently interpret meaning in things to which they are not accustomed. Once formed, these new neural connections may be at one's permanent disposal to assist in a myriad of potential cognitive…

  1. Immigration, ethnicity, and accessibility to culturally diverse family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu

    2007-09-01

    The study concerns ethnicity, spatial equity, and healthcare access in the context of diversity and integration. The paper first explores how Chinese immigrants in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area choose between ethnic Chinese family physicians and other family physicians, based on a probability survey. It then applies and modifies gravity-type accessibility measures, of which a special type is the so-called floating catchment area (FCA) method, to evaluate three types of geographical accessibility in family physician utilization. The study suggests a certain degree of spatial inequality among Chinese immigrants in accessing culturally sensitive care. The paper yields important methodological and policy implications. PMID:17174590

  2. How do we address the disconnect between genetic and morphological diversity in germplasm collections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Morphology has long provided key data to assess diversity in landrace collections in genebanks worldwide. We explored, through an F2 cross between two inbred diploid potato clones, the utility of tuber morphology to assess diversity of potato landraces. We assessed the F2 population created by self-...

  3. Addressing Diversity in the Decade of Behavior: Focus on Women of Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Nancy Felipe; Vaz, Kim

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the lives of women of color, illustrating diversity-minded feminist principles that may inform research and program development related to other aspects of diversity. Notes perspectives and priorities of women of color in psychology. Considers why implementing feminist psychology's inclusive vision for research is a continuing struggle,…

  4. Jail Diversion: Addressing the Needs of Offenders with Mental Illness and Co-Occurring Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mire, Scott; Forsyth, Craig J.; Hanser, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research is to illuminate three critical components related to the success of jail diversion programs. First, prior to diversion there is the need to identify those offenders most open to therapeutic services. Second, for those offenders diverted, there must be a proper match between the offender and the mental health…

  5. Community health workers as cultural producers in addressing gender-based violence in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Naydene; Mitchell, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    South Africa has been experiencing an epidemic of gender-based violence (GBV) for a long time and in some rural communities health workers, who are trained to care for those infected with HIV, are positioned at the forefront of addressing this problem, often without the necessary support. In this article, we pose the question: How might cultural production through media making with community health workers (CHWs) contribute to taking action to address GBV and contribute to social change in a rural community? This qualitative participatory arts-based study with five female CHWs working from a clinic in a rural district of South Africa is positioned as critical research, using photographs in the production of media posters. We offer a close reading of the data and its production and discuss three data moments: CHWs drawing on insider cultural knowledge; CHWs constructing messages; and CHWs taking action. In our discussion, we take up the issue of cultural production and then offer concluding thoughts on 'beyond engagement' when the researchers leave the community. PMID:27080871

  6. The State of Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    Examines what is being done to implement cultural diversity in libraries. Topics addressed include affirmative action; defining cultural diversity, including the significance of ethnicity, race, and race relations in the workplace; problems in implementing cultural diversity; and examples of successful implementation programs. (Contains three…

  7. Bridging Diversity and Family Systems: Culturally Informed and Flexible Family Based Treatment for Hispanic Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Santisteban, Daniel A.; Mena, Maite P.; Abalo, Clara

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in identifying interventions that have been tested and found efficacious with minority families. This interest is fueled in part by the growth of Hispanics in the U.S. as well as by research findings that suggest that Hispanics have better outcomes when treatments are adapted to their unique experiences, and risk and protective factors. Family-based treatments for culturally diverse populations require the integration of advances from both the cultural and family systems domains. Current intervention research has begun to move towards developing and advancing individualized interventions for patients/clients. Adaptive interventions, tailored interventions, adapted interventions, and targeted interventions have all been identified in the literature as appropriate for addressing distinct cultural characteristics which generic interventions may not address effectively. To date, research has focused less on tailored or adaptive interventions partly due to the fact that they require decision rules, more careful implementation, and measurement of individualized outcomes. In this article we present evidence for the usefulness of adaptive interventions that can address not only subgroup variability but within group variability as well. Culturally Informed and Flexible Family-Based Treatment for Adolescents is presented as an adaptive treatment that allows for the tailoring of treatment to the unique clinical and cultural variations of individual adolescents and families, but that does so in a systematic and replicable fashion. By building decision-making processes into the manualized treatment, the transportability of the treatment may be enhanced as family therapists appreciate it’s flexibility to address the complexity of clinical work. PMID:24772378

  8. Geographic axes and the persistence of cultural diversity

    PubMed Central

    Laitin, David D.; Moortgat, Joachim; Robinson, Amanda Lea

    2012-01-01

    Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel [Diamond J, (1997) Guns, Germs, and Steel (WW Norton, NY)] has provided a scientific foundation for answering basic questions, such as why Eurasians colonized the global South and not the other way around, and why there is so much variance in economic development across the globe. Diamond’s explanatory variables are: (i) the susceptibility of local wild plants to be developed for self-sufficient agriculture; (ii) the domesticability of large wild animals for food, transport, and agricultural production; and (iii) the relative lengths of the axes of continents with implications for the spread of human populations and technologies. This third “continental axis” thesis is the most difficult of Diamond’s several explanatory factors to test, given that the number of continents are too few for statistical analysis. This article provides a test of one observable implication of this thesis, namely that linguistic diversity should be more persistent to the degree that a geographic area is oriented more north-south than east-west. Using both modern states and artificial geographic entities as the units of analysis, the results provide significant confirmation of the relationship between geographic orientation and cultural homogenization. Beyond providing empirical support for one observable implication of the continental axis theory, these results have important implications for understanding the roots of cultural diversity, which is an important determinant of economic growth, public goods provision, local violence, and social trust. PMID:22689972

  9. Addressing diabetes at the crossroads of global pandemic and regional culture

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, William C.; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    As diabetes and obesity rates continue to climb at astronomical rates in the Middle East, future generations are at an even greater risk for diabetes and the associated complications. Many factors are at play and it is clear that creative solutions are needed to retool provider resources in the Middle East towards prevention of diabetes and its complications while leveraging technology to maximize outreach within the accepted cultural norms. Only by building the capacity to address the current diabetes burden as well focusing on prevention for the future, can Middle East countries create a strong infrastructure for a successful future. PMID:25114948

  10. Untangling cultural inheritance: language diversity and long-house architecture on the Pacific northwest coast

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Peter; O'Neill, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Many recent studies of cultural inheritance have focused on small-scale craft traditions practised by single individuals, which do not require coordinated participation by larger social collectives. In this paper, we address this gap in the cultural transmission literature by investigating diversity in the vernacular architecture of the Pacific northwest coast, where communities of hunter–fisher–gatherers constructed immense wooden long-houses at their main winter villages. Quantitative analyses of long-house styles along the coastline draw on a range of models and methods from the biological sciences and are employed to test hypotheses relating to basic patterns of macro-scale cultural diversification, and the degree to which the transmission of housing traits has been constrained by the region's numerous linguistic boundaries. The results indicate relatively strong branching patterns of cultural inheritance and also close associations between regional language history and housing styles, pointing to the potentially crucial role played by language boundaries in structuring large-scale patterns of cultural diversification, especially in relation to ‘collective’ cultural traditions like housing that require substantial inputs of coordinated labour. PMID:21041212

  11. Untangling cultural inheritance: language diversity and long-house architecture on the Pacific northwest coast.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Peter; O'Neill, Sean

    2010-12-12

    Many recent studies of cultural inheritance have focused on small-scale craft traditions practised by single individuals, which do not require coordinated participation by larger social collectives. In this paper, we address this gap in the cultural transmission literature by investigating diversity in the vernacular architecture of the Pacific northwest coast, where communities of hunter-fisher-gatherers constructed immense wooden long-houses at their main winter villages. Quantitative analyses of long-house styles along the coastline draw on a range of models and methods from the biological sciences and are employed to test hypotheses relating to basic patterns of macro-scale cultural diversification, and the degree to which the transmission of housing traits has been constrained by the region's numerous linguistic boundaries. The results indicate relatively strong branching patterns of cultural inheritance and also close associations between regional language history and housing styles, pointing to the potentially crucial role played by language boundaries in structuring large-scale patterns of cultural diversification, especially in relation to 'collective' cultural traditions like housing that require substantial inputs of coordinated labour. PMID:21041212

  12. Globalisation in the Lecture Room? Gender and Cultural Diversity in Work Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umans, Timurs

    2011-01-01

    This paper empirically investigates the relationship between cultural and gender diversity and performance in groups of business students working on complex assignments. The study finds that gender diversity in student groups has a positive influence on group outcomes, while cultural diversity, irrespective of its conceptualisation, leads to…

  13. Parent Cultural Adaptation and Child Functioning in Culturally Diverse, Urban Families of Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Calzada, Esther J.; Brotman, Laurie Miller; Huang, Keng-Yen; Bat-Chava, Yael; Kingston, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Parent cultural adaptation and preschool behavioral and socioemotional functioning were examined in a community sample of urban families from diverse cultural backgrounds. Participants were 130 families of children (mean age = 4.1 years) attending eight public Pre-Kindergarten programs in urban communities. Parents completed a measure of cultural adaptation that taps into acculturation and enculturation, and teachers reported on children’s externalizing problems, internalizing problems and adaptive behavior in the classroom. Parents’ ethnic identity was a significant predictor of children’s functioning. The retention of parents’ culture of origin and specific aspects of acculturation are related to positive outcomes in a sample of culturally diverse families of preschoolers living in urban communities. Bicultural parents (those with high ethnic and US American identity) had children with lower levels of internalizing problems and higher levels of adaptive behavior relative to parents who were not bicultural. Implications for enhancing positive child outcomes through the promotion of parental ethnic identity are discussed. PMID:20559417

  14. Oncogenic transformation of diverse gastrointestinal tissues in primary organoid culture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingnan; Nadauld, Lincoln; Ootani, Akifumi; Corney, David C.; Pai, Reetesh K.; Gevaert, Olivier; Cantrell, Michael A.; Rack, Paul G.; Neal, James T.; Chan, Carol W-M.; Yeung, Trevor; Gong, Xue; Yuan, Jenny; Wilhelmy, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Attardi, Laura D.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; Hung, Kenneth E.; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Ji, Hanlee P.; Kuo, Calvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of primary organoid cultures containing epithelial and mesenchymal elements to cancer modeling holds promise for combining the accurate multilineage differentiation and physiology of in vivo systems with the facile in vitro manipulation of transformed cell lines. Here, a single air-liquid interface culture method was used without modification to engineer oncogenic mutations into primary epithelial/mesenchymal organoids from mouse colon, stomach and pancreas. Pancreatic and gastric organoids exhibited dysplasia upon KrasG12D expression and/or p53 loss, and readily generated adenocarcinoma upon in vivo transplantation. In contrast, primary colon organoids required combinatorial Apc, p53, KrasG12D and Smad4 mutations for progressive transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma-like histology in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, recapitulating multi-hit models of colorectal cancer (CRC), and versus more promiscuous transformation of small intestinal organoids. Colon organoid culture functionally validated the microRNA miR-483 as a dominant driver oncogene at the Insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF2) 11p15.5 CRC amplicon, inducing dysplasia in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. These studies demonstrate the general utility of a highly tractable primary organoid system for cancer modeling and driver oncogene validation in diverse gastrointestinal tissues. PMID:24859528

  15. Cultural Diversity Climate and Psychological Adjustment at School-Equality and Inclusion Versus Cultural Pluralism.

    PubMed

    Schachner, Maja K; Noack, Peter; Van de Vijver, Fons J R; Eckstein, Katharina

    2016-07-01

    The present study is concerned with cultural diversity climate at school and how it relates to acculturation orientations and psychological school adjustment of early adolescent immigrants. Specifically, the distinct role of two types of diversity policy is investigated, namely (a) fostering equality and inclusion and (b) acknowledging cultural pluralism. Longitudinal multilevel analyses based on 386 early adolescent immigrant students (Mage  = 10.49 years) in 44 ethnically heterogeneous classrooms in Germany revealed that the manifestations of both types of policies promote psychological school adjustment (i.e., better well-being and fewer psychological and behavioral problems) at the individual level. However, they differ in their effects on acculturation orientations. At the classroom level, equality and inclusion promote assimilation. Implications for research and educational practice are discussed. PMID:27091829

  16. In the right words: addressing language and culture in providing health care.

    PubMed

    2003-08-01

    As part of its continuing mission to serve trustees, executives, and staff of health foundations and corporate giving programs, Grantmakers In Health (GIH) convened a group of experts from philanthropy, research, health care practice, and policy on April 4, 2003, to discuss the roles of language and culture in providing effective health care. During this Issue Dialogue, In the Right Words: Addressing Language and Culture in Providing Health Care, health grantmakers and experts from policy and practice participated in an open exchange of ideas and perspectives on language access and heard from fellow grantmakers who are funding innovative programs in this area. Together they explored ways to effectively support comprehensive language services, including the use of interpreters and translation of written materials. This Issue Brief synthesizes key points from the day's discussion with a background paper previously prepared for Issue Dialogue participants. It focuses on the challenges and opportunities involved with ensuring language access for the growing number of people who require it. Sections include: recent immigration trends and demographic changes; the effect of language barriers on health outcomes and health care processes; laws and policies regarding the provision of language services to patients, including an overview of public financing mechanisms; strategies for improving language access, including enhancing access in delivery settings, promoting advocacy and policy change, improving interpreter training, and advancing research; and roles for foundations in supporting improved language access, including examples of current activities. The Issue Dialogue focused mainly on activities and programs that ensure linguistic access to health care for all patients. Although language and culture are clearly inseparable, a full exploration of the field of cultural competence and initiatives that promote its application to the health care setting are beyond the scope

  17. Learning How to "Swallow the World": Engaging with Human Difference in Culturally Diverse Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Oord, Lodewijk; Corn, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The perception of culture prevailing in the literature on international and intercultural education is often too limited to be effectively utilized by educators who wish to embrace the diversity in their classrooms. Only by reimagining the notions of "culture" and "cultural diversity" and by liberating them from the rigidities of dominant…

  18. Toward Culturally Centered Integrative Care for Addressing Mental Health Disparities among Ethnic Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Kisha; McGregor, Brian; Thandi, Poonam; Fresh, Edith; Sheats, Kameron; Belton, Allyson; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, recognition and treatment of mental illness and its co-morbidities still remain a significant public health problem in the United States. Ethnic minorities are identified as a population that is vulnerable to mental health disparities and face unique challenges pertaining to mental health care. Psychiatric illness is associated with great physical, emotional, functional, and societal burden. The primary health care setting may be a promising venue for screening, assessment, and treatment of mental illnesses for ethnic minority populations. We propose a comprehensive, innovative, culturally centered integrated care model to address the complexities within the health care system, from the individual level, that includes provider and patient factors, to the system level, which include practice culture and system functionality issues. Our multi-disciplinary investigative team acknowledges the importance of providing culturally tailored integrative healthcare to holistically concentrate on physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral problems among ethnic minorities in a primary care setting. It is our intention that the proposed model will be useful for health practitioners, contribute to the reduction of mental health disparities, and promote better mental health and well-being for ethnic minority individuals, families, and communities. PMID:25383991

  19. The Mission of the University--Addressing Issues of Universality, Diversity and Interdependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBiaggio, John

    Rapid changes in science, technology, economics, and politics present great opportunities and even larger responsibilities to leaders in higher education. The concepts of universality, diversity, and interdependence are components of the mission of American universities. Many American universities are universal in two senses, in that they offer an…

  20. The Guided Reading Approach: A Practical Method to Address Diverse Needs in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Laura M.; Schirmer, Barbara R.

    2010-01-01

    Many deaf students struggle with learning to read. This is the case nationally as well as at the Michigan School for the Deaf (MSD). In 2006, the elementary teaching staff began working together to implement a change in their reading instruction so their approach would be systematic and consistent across grade levels. With the diverse backgrounds…

  1. Addressing Religious Diversity through Children's Literature: An "English as a Foreign Language" Classroom in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayik, Rawia

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts between different religious groups occasionally arise in my Christian and Muslim Israeli-Arab EFL students' school and area. In an attempt to increase students' knowledge of and respect for other faiths in the region, I conducted practitioner inquiry research in my religiously diverse Middle-Eastern classroom. Grounded in critical…

  2. Chimpanzees copy dominant and knowledgeable individuals: implications for cultural diversity

    PubMed Central

    Kendal, Rachel; Hopper, Lydia M.; Whiten, Andrew; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Lambeth, Susan P.; Schapiro, Steven J.; Hoppitt, Will

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that natural selection will fashion cognitive biases to guide when, and from whom, individuals acquire social information, but the precise nature of these biases, especially in ecologically valid group contexts, remains unknown. We exposed four captive groups of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) to a novel extractive foraging device and, by fitting statistical models, isolated four simultaneously operating transmission biases. These include biases to copy (i) higher-ranking and (ii) expert individuals, and to copy others when (iii) uncertain or (iv) of low rank. High-ranking individuals were relatively un-strategic in their use of acquired knowledge, which, combined with the bias for others to observe them, may explain reports that high innovation rates (in juveniles and subordinates) do not generate a correspondingly high frequency of traditions in chimpanzees. Given the typically low rank of immigrants in chimpanzees, a ‘copying dominants’ bias may contribute to the observed maintenance of distinct cultural repertoires in neighboring communities despite sharing similar ecology and knowledgeable migrants. Thus, a copying dominants strategy may, as often proposed for conformist transmission, and perhaps in concert with it, restrict the accumulation of traditions within chimpanzee communities whilst maintaining cultural diversity. PMID:27053916

  3. The Impact of Language and Culture Diversity in Occupational Safety.

    PubMed

    De Jesus-Rivas, Mayra; Conlon, Helen Acree; Burns, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing plays a critical part in improving the safety of foreign labor workers. The development and implementation of safety training programs do not always regularly take into account language barriers, low literacy levels, or cultural elements. This oversight can lead to more injuries and fatalities among this group. Despite established health and safety training programs, a significant number of non-native English speakers are injured or killed in preventable, occupation-related accidents. Introducing safety programs that use alternative teaching strategies such as pictograms, illustrations, and hands-on training opportunities will assist in addressing challenges for non-English laborers. Occupational health nursing has an opportunity to provide guidance on this subject and assist businesses in creating a safer and more productive work environment. PMID:26800895

  4. Ralph F. Hirschmann award address 2009: Merger of organic chemistry with peptide diversity.

    PubMed

    Meldal, Morten; Tornøe, Christian W; Nielsen, Thomas E; Diness, Frederik; Le Quement, Sebastian T; Christensen, Christian A; Jensen, Jakob Feldthusen; Worm-Leonhard, Kasper; Groth, Thomas; Bouakaz, Lamine; Wu, Boqian; Hagel, Grith; Keinicke, Lise

    2010-01-01

    A huge unleashed potential lies hidden in the large and diverse pool of encoded and particularly nonencoded chiral alpha-, beta-, and gamma-amino acids available today. Although these have been extensively exploited in peptide science, the community of organic chemistry has only used this source of diversity in a quite focused and targeted manner. The properties and behavior of peptides as functional molecules in biology are well documented and based on the ability of peptides to adapt a range of discrete conformers at a minimal entropic penalty and therefore ideally fitting their endogenous targets. The development of new organic reactions and chemistries that in a general and quantitative way transform peptides into new functional molecules, preferably on solid support, is a source of completely new classes of molecules with important and advantageous functional properties. The peptide diversity and the ability to perform chemistry on solid support add tremendously to the combinatorial scope of such reactions in pharmaceutical and materials screening scenario. In recent years, the need for "click" reactions to shape complex molecular architecture has been realized mainly with a basis in the world of peptides and DNA, and in polymer chemistry where connection of highly functionalized biologically active substances or property bearing fragments are assembled as molecular LEGO using quantitative and orthogonal click chemistries. In this article, three such new reactions originating in the Carlsberg Laboratory over the last decade taking advantage of organic transformations in the peptide framework is presented. Initially, the click reaction between azide and terminal alkynes catalyzed by Cu(1) (CuAAC-reaction) is described. This CuAAC "click" reaction was observed first at Carlsberg Laboratory in reactions of azido acid chlorides with alkynes on solid support. Second, the Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution Cyclization-Intramolecular Click-Cascade (EASCy

  5. Enhancing pediatric workforce diversity and providing culturally effective pediatric care: implications for practice, education, and policy making.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    This policy statement serves to combine and update 2 previously independent but overlapping statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on culturally effective health care (CEHC) and workforce diversity. The AAP has long recognized that with the ever-increasing diversity of the pediatric population in the United States, the health of all children depends on the ability of all pediatricians to practice culturally effective care. CEHC can be defined as the delivery of care within the context of appropriate physician knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of all cultural distinctions, leading to optimal health outcomes. The AAP believes that CEHC is a critical social value and that the knowledge and skills necessary for providing CEHC can be taught and acquired through focused curricula across the spectrum of lifelong learning. This statement also addresses workforce diversity, health disparities, and affirmative action. The discussion of diversity is broadened to include not only race, ethnicity, and language but also cultural attributes such as gender, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, and disability, which may affect the quality of health care. The AAP believes that efforts must be supported through health policy and advocacy initiatives to promote the delivery of CEHC and to overcome educational, organizational, and other barriers to improving workforce diversity. PMID:24081998

  6. Poi Balls, Breadfruit, and Quilts: Exploring Cultural Diversity Through Reading, Writing, and Drawing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gali, Kari; McArthur, Janice

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how students in a culturally diverse fourth grade class explored their own cultures and learned about other cultures, using quilts as a context. Notes that the students read books about quilts, conducted oral interviews of family members, wrote about their cultural traditions, and designed individual quilt squares. Concludes that the…

  7. Density: A measure of the diversity of concepts addressed in semantic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, H. B. B.; Fadigas, I. S.; Monteiro, R. L. S.; Cordeiro, A. J. A.; Moret, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we studied density effects in semantic networks constructed from a database of titles of papers published in scientific journals as a parameter to indicate the diversity of concepts in a journal. The proposed method essentially consists of fixing the number of titles for all of the studied scientific journals and analyzing the behavior of the density variation curves with regard to the inclusion of cliques (that is, complete networks associated with the titles). We observed that density behaves as a critically self-organized object when titles (cliques) are included in the network.

  8. Food-Based Interventions to Modify Diet Quality and Diversity to Address Multiple Micronutrient Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nair, Madhavan K; Augustine, Little Flower; Konapur, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Global data indicate a high prevalence of hidden hunger among population. Deficiencies of certain micronutrients such as folic acid, iodine, iron, and vitamin A have long lasting effects on growth and development and therefore have been a National priority from many decades. The strategy implemented so far limits to the use of supplemental sources or fortified foods in alleviating the burden of deficiencies. These approaches however undermine the food-based strategies involving dietary diversification as the long-term sustainable strategy. There is lack of understanding on the level of evidence needed to implement such strategies and the level of monitoring required for impact evaluation. Dietary diversity concerns how to ensure access for each individual to a quality and safe diet with adequate macro- and micronutrients. The key to success in using dietary diversity as a strategy to tackle hidden hunger is in integrating it with the principles of bioavailability, translated to efficient food synergies with due emphasis on food accessibility, affordability, and outdoor physical activity/life style modifications. Promoting enabling environment and sustainable agriculture is crucial for practicing dietary diversification with behavior change communication as an integral segment. It can be concluded that food-based strategies require careful understanding of the factors associated with it and moderate it to form an effective strategy for controlling multiple micronutrient deficiencies. PMID:26779472

  9. Food-Based Interventions to Modify Diet Quality and Diversity to Address Multiple Micronutrient Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhavan K.; Augustine, Little Flower; Konapur, Archana

    2016-01-01

    Global data indicate a high prevalence of hidden hunger among population. Deficiencies of certain micronutrients such as folic acid, iodine, iron, and vitamin A have long lasting effects on growth and development and therefore have been a National priority from many decades. The strategy implemented so far limits to the use of supplemental sources or fortified foods in alleviating the burden of deficiencies. These approaches however undermine the food-based strategies involving dietary diversification as the long-term sustainable strategy. There is lack of understanding on the level of evidence needed to implement such strategies and the level of monitoring required for impact evaluation. Dietary diversity concerns how to ensure access for each individual to a quality and safe diet with adequate macro- and micronutrients. The key to success in using dietary diversity as a strategy to tackle hidden hunger is in integrating it with the principles of bioavailability, translated to efficient food synergies with due emphasis on food accessibility, affordability, and outdoor physical activity/life style modifications. Promoting enabling environment and sustainable agriculture is crucial for practicing dietary diversification with behavior change communication as an integral segment. It can be concluded that food-based strategies require careful understanding of the factors associated with it and moderate it to form an effective strategy for controlling multiple micronutrient deficiencies. PMID:26779472

  10. Proteomic-based biotyping reveals hidden diversity within a microalgae culture collection: An example using Dunaliella

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Kaveh; Hack, Ethan; Nelson, Andrew; Brain, Chelsea M.; Lyne, Fern M.; Mesbahi, Ehsan; Day, John G.; Caldwell, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and defendable taxonomic identification of microalgae strains is vital for culture collections, industry and academia; particularly when addressing issues of intellectual property. We demonstrate the remarkable effectiveness of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) biotyping to deliver rapid and accurate strain separation, even in situations where standard molecular tools prove ineffective. Highly distinctive MALDI spectra were obtained for thirty two biotechnologically interesting Dunaliella strains plus strains of Arthrospira, Chlorella, Isochrysis, Tetraselmis and a range of culturable co-occurring bacteria. Spectra were directly compared with genomic DNA sequences (internal transcribed spacer, ITS). Within individual Dunaliella isolates MALDI discriminated between strains with identical ITS sequences, thereby emphasising and enhancing knowledge of the diversity within microalgae culture collections. Further, MALDI spectra did not vary with culture age or growth stage during the course of the experiment; therefore MALDI presents stable and accurate strain-specific signature spectra. Bacterial contamination did not affect MALDI’s discriminating power. Biotyping by MALDI-TOF-MS will prove effective in situations wherein precise strain identification is vital, for example in cases involving intellectual property disputes and in monitoring and safeguarding biosecurity. MALDI should be accepted as a biotyping tool to complement and enhance standard molecular taxonomy for microalgae. PMID:25963242

  11. Proteomic-based biotyping reveals hidden diversity within a microalgae culture collection: An example using Dunaliella.

    PubMed

    Emami, Kaveh; Hack, Ethan; Nelson, Andrew; Brain, Chelsea M; Lyne, Fern M; Mesbahi, Ehsan; Day, John G; Caldwell, Gary S

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and defendable taxonomic identification of microalgae strains is vital for culture collections, industry and academia; particularly when addressing issues of intellectual property. We demonstrate the remarkable effectiveness of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) biotyping to deliver rapid and accurate strain separation, even in situations where standard molecular tools prove ineffective. Highly distinctive MALDI spectra were obtained for thirty two biotechnologically interesting Dunaliella strains plus strains of Arthrospira, Chlorella, Isochrysis, Tetraselmis and a range of culturable co-occurring bacteria. Spectra were directly compared with genomic DNA sequences (internal transcribed spacer, ITS). Within individual Dunaliella isolates MALDI discriminated between strains with identical ITS sequences, thereby emphasising and enhancing knowledge of the diversity within microalgae culture collections. Further, MALDI spectra did not vary with culture age or growth stage during the course of the experiment; therefore MALDI presents stable and accurate strain-specific signature spectra. Bacterial contamination did not affect MALDI's discriminating power. Biotyping by MALDI-TOF-MS will prove effective in situations wherein precise strain identification is vital, for example in cases involving intellectual property disputes and in monitoring and safeguarding biosecurity. MALDI should be accepted as a biotyping tool to complement and enhance standard molecular taxonomy for microalgae. PMID:25963242

  12. Proteomic-based biotyping reveals hidden diversity within a microalgae culture collection: An example using Dunaliella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Kaveh; Hack, Ethan; Nelson, Andrew; Brain, Chelsea M.; Lyne, Fern M.; Mesbahi, Ehsan; Day, John G.; Caldwell, Gary S.

    2015-05-01

    Accurate and defendable taxonomic identification of microalgae strains is vital for culture collections, industry and academia; particularly when addressing issues of intellectual property. We demonstrate the remarkable effectiveness of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) biotyping to deliver rapid and accurate strain separation, even in situations where standard molecular tools prove ineffective. Highly distinctive MALDI spectra were obtained for thirty two biotechnologically interesting Dunaliella strains plus strains of Arthrospira, Chlorella, Isochrysis, Tetraselmis and a range of culturable co-occurring bacteria. Spectra were directly compared with genomic DNA sequences (internal transcribed spacer, ITS). Within individual Dunaliella isolates MALDI discriminated between strains with identical ITS sequences, thereby emphasising and enhancing knowledge of the diversity within microalgae culture collections. Further, MALDI spectra did not vary with culture age or growth stage during the course of the experiment; therefore MALDI presents stable and accurate strain-specific signature spectra. Bacterial contamination did not affect MALDI’s discriminating power. Biotyping by MALDI-TOF-MS will prove effective in situations wherein precise strain identification is vital, for example in cases involving intellectual property disputes and in monitoring and safeguarding biosecurity. MALDI should be accepted as a biotyping tool to complement and enhance standard molecular taxonomy for microalgae.

  13. Multiple Determinants, Common Vulnerabilities, and Creative Responses: Addressing the AIDS Pandemic in Diverse Populations Globally

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kenneth H.; Pape, Jean William; Wilson, Phill; Diallo, Dazon Dixon; Saavedra, Jorge; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Koenig, Serena; Farmer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic has been fueled by global inequities. Ranging from gender inequality and underdevelopment to homophobia impeding health care access for men who have sex with men (MSM), imbalanced resource allocations and social biases have potentiated the epidemic’s spread. However, recognition of culturally specific aspects of each microepidemic has yielded development of community-based organizations, which have resulted in locally effective responses to AIDS. This effective approach to HIV prevention, care and treatment is illustrated through examples of community-based responses in Haiti, the United States, Africa, and other impoverished settings. PMID:22772387

  14. Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods reveal diverse methylotrophic communities in terrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Eyice, Özge; Schäfer, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    One-carbon compounds such as methanol, dimethylsulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) are significant intermediates in biogeochemical cycles. They are suggested to affect atmospheric chemistry and global climate. Methylotrophic microorganisms are considered as a significant sink for these compounds; therefore, we analyzed the diversity of terrestrial bacteria that utilize methanol, DMS and DMSO as carbon and energy source using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The effect of habitat type on the methylotrophic community structure was also investigated in rhizosphere and bulk soil. While thirteen strains affiliated to the genera Hyphomicrobium, Methylobacterium, Pseudomonas, Hydrogenophaga, Rhodococcus, Flavobacterium and Variovorax were isolated, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the dominance of Thiobacillus, Rhodococcus, Flavobacterium and Bacteroidetes species. Furthermore, methylotrophic communities that degrade methanol or DMS are not shaped by terrestrial habitat type. Rhizosphere and soil samples showed dominance of Methylophilus spp. and Methylovorus spp. for methanol enrichments; Cytophaga spp., Pseudomonas tremae and Thiobacillus thioparus for DMS enrichments. PMID:26475353

  15. Defining cultural competence: a practical framework for addressing racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care.

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Joseph R.; Green, Alexander R.; Carrillo, J. Emilio; Ananeh-Firempong, Owusu

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Racial/ethnic disparities in health in the U.S. have been well described. The field of "cultural competence" has emerged as one strategy to address these disparities. Based on a review of the relevant literature, the authors develop a definition of cultural competence, identify key components for intervention, and describe a practical framework for implementation of measures to address racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care. METHODS: The authors conducted a literature review of academic, foundation, and government publications focusing on sociocultural barriers to care, the level of the health care system at which a given barrier occurs, and cultural competence efforts that address these barriers. RESULTS: Sociocultural barriers to care were identified at the organizational (leadership/workforce), structural (processes of care), and clinical (provider-patient encounter) levels. A framework of cultural competence interventions--including minority recruitment into the health professions, development of interpreter services and language-appropriate health educational materials, and provider education on cross-cultural issues--emerged to categorize strategies to address racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care. CONCLUSIONS: Demographic changes anticipated over the next decade magnify the importance of addressing racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care. A framework of organizational, structural, and clinical cultural competence interventions can facilitate the elimination of these disparities and improve care for all Americans. PMID:12815076

  16. Cultural Diversity in Compulsory Education: An Overview of the Context of Madrid (Spain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaurena, Ines Gil

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines educational practices in Spain and in particular Madrid. With this contextual frame as the starting point the following issues are discussed: the "official" conceptualization of cultural diversity, educational policies and resolutions related to cultural diversity, and school programs and resources facilitated by educational…

  17. Thinking Differently about Cultural Diversity: Using Postcolonial Theory to (Re)Read Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lyn

    2004-01-01

    This paper makes use of postcolonial theory to think differently about aspects of cultural diversity within science education. It briefly reviews some of the increasing scholarship on cultural diversity, and then describes the genealogy and selected key themes of postcolonial theory. Postcolonial theory as oppositional or deconstructive reading…

  18. Volunteering in a Culturally Diverse Context: Implications for Project Designers and Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jay

    1999-01-01

    The volunteer pool of social services organizations often does not reflect the cultural diversity of their clientele. Cultural values and past experiences of discrimination are among the reasons for this limited diversity in volunteers. An Australian project found that refugees were reluctant to be clients of agencies whose volunteers did not…

  19. Paths to Equity: Cultural, Linguistic and Racial Diversity in Canadian Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhard, Judith K.; Lefebvre, Marie Louise; Chud, Gyda; Lange, Rika

    Childcare centers in Canada's largest cities frequently have children with family languages other than English or French and who are of diverse racial and cultural backgrounds. This three-part study focused on cultural diversity in early childhood education (ECE) settings in Toronto (Ontario), Vancouver (British Columbia), and Montreal (Quebec).…

  20. Breaking the Silence of Exclusion: Examining the Complexities of Teacher Education for Cultural Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maged, Shireen

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on an in-depth case study that examined how a teacher education programme in New Zealand prepared pre-service teachers for cultural diversity (based on the author's unpublished PhD thesis, "Teacher Education for Cultural Diversity"; conferred by Curtin University, June 2012). Framed within a critical…

  1. CU-STARs: Promoting STEM Diversity by Addressing First-year Attrition of Underrepresented Minorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Silvia, Devin W.; Ellingson, Erica; Sturner, Andrew P.; Peck, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Upon first entering university, the fraction of students interested in pursuing a STEM major are distributed according to societal demographics (with 25% being underrepresented minorities), but by graduation, the fraction of students receiving STEM degrees is unbalanced, with underrepresented minorities receiving only 15% of STEM bachelor's degrees. The CU-STARs (CU Science, Technology, and Astronomy Recruits) program at the University of Colorado, Boulder is targeted to address the main triggers of early career attrition for underrepresented minorities in STEM disciplines. A select group of students are given financial support through work-study at the Fiske planetarium on campus, while resources to address other triggers of attrition are available to the entire cohort of interested students (typically ~5-10 per year). These resources are designed to promote social engagement and mentorship, while also providing a support network and resources to combat inadequate high school preparation for STEM courses. We achieve these goals through activities that include social events, mentor meetings, free tutoring, and special events to meet and talk with scientists. The culmination of the program for the recruits are a series of high school outreach events in underserved areas (inner city and rural alike), in which they become the expert. The STARs are paid for their time and take the lead in planning, teaching, and facilitating programs for the high school students, including classroom presentations, interactive lab activities, solar observing, and star parties. The high school outreach events provide role models and STEM exposure for the underserved high school community while simultaneously cementing the personal achievements and successes for the STARs. CU-STARs is now in its 4th year and is still growing. We are beginning the process of formal assessments of the program's success. We present details of the program implementation, a discussion of potential obstacles

  2. What is the role of culture, diversity, and community engagement in transdisciplinary translational science?

    PubMed

    Graham, Phillip W; Kim, Mimi M; Clinton-Sherrod, A Monique; Yaros, Anna; Richmond, Alan N; Jackson, Melvin; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2016-03-01

    Concepts of culture and diversity are necessary considerations in the scientific application of theory generation and developmental processes of preventive interventions; yet, culture and/or diversity are often overlooked until later stages (e.g., adaptation [T3] and dissemination [T4]) of the translational science process. Here, we present a conceptual framework focused on the seamless incorporation of culture and diversity throughout the various stages of the translational science process (T1-T5). Informed by a community-engaged research approach, this framework guides integration of cultural and diversity considerations at each phase with emphasis on the importance and value of "citizen scientists" being research partners to promote ecological validity. The integrated partnership covers the first phase of intervention development through final phases that ultimately facilitate more global, universal translation of changes in attitudes, norms, and systems. Our comprehensive model for incorporating culture and diversity into translational research provides a basis for further discussion and translational science development. PMID:27012259

  3. Investigating hypoxia in aquatic environments: diverse approaches to addressing a complex phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.; Janssen, F.; Aleynik, D.; Bange, H. W.; Boltacheva, N.; Çağatay, M. N.; Dale, A. W.; Etiope, G.; Erdem, Z.; Geraga, M.; Gilli, A.; Gomoiu, M. T.; Hall, P. O. J.; Hansson, D.; He, Y.; Holtappels, M.; Kirf, M. K.; Kononets, M.; Konovalov, S.; Lichtschlag, A.; Livingstone, D. M.; Marinaro, G.; Mazlumyan, S.; Naeher, S.; North, R. P.; Papatheodorou, G.; Pfannkuche, O.; Prien, R.; Rehder, G.; Schubert, C. J.; Soltwedel, T.; Sommer, S.; Stahl, H.; Stanev, E. V.; Teaca, A.; Tengberg, A.; Waldmann, C.; Wehrli, B.; Wenzhöfer, F.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we synthesize the new knowledge on oxygen and oxygen-related phenomena in aquatic systems, resulting from the EU-FP7 project HYPOX ("In situ monitoring of oxygen depletion in hypoxic ecosystems of coastal and open seas, and land-locked water bodies", www.hypox.net). In view of the anticipated oxygen loss in aquatic systems due to eutrophication and climate change, HYPOX was set up to improve capacities to monitor hypoxia as well as to understand its causes and consequences. Temporal dynamics and spatial patterns of hypoxia were analysed in field studies in various aquatic environments, including the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea, Scottish and Scandinavian fjords, Ionian Sea lagoons and embayments, and in Swiss lakes. Examples of episodic and rapid (hours) occurrences of hypoxia as well as seasonal changes in bottom-water oxygenation in stratified systems are discussed. Geologically-driven hypoxia caused by gas seepage is demonstrated. Using novel technologies, temporal and spatial patterns of water-column oxygenation, from basin-scale seasonal patterns to meter-scale submicromolar oxygen distributions were resolved. Existing multi-decadal monitoring data were used to demonstrate the imprint of climate change and eutrophication on long-term oxygen distributions. Organic and inorganic proxies were used to extend investigations on past oxygen conditions to centennial and even longer timescales not resolved by monitoring. The effects of hypoxia on faunal communities and biogeochemical processes were also addressed in the project. An investigation of benthic fauna is presented as an example of hypoxia-devastated benthic communities that slowly recover upon a reduction in eutrophication in a system where natural and anthropogenic hypoxia overlap. Biogeochemical investigations reveal that oxygen intrusions have a strong effect on microbially-mediated redox cycling of elements. Observations and modeling studies of

  4. Investigating hypoxia in aquatic environments: diverse approaches to addressing a complex phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.; Janssen, F.; Aleynik, D.; Bange, H. W.; Boltacheva, N.; Çagatay, M. N.; Dale, A. W.; Etiope, G.; Erdem, Z.; Geraga, M.; Gilli, A.; Gomoiu, M. T.; Hall, P. O. J.; Hansson, D.; He, Y.; Holtappels, M.; Kirf, M. K.; Kononets, M.; Konovalov, S.; Lichtschlag, A.; Livingstone, D. M.; Marinaro, G.; Mazlumyan, S.; Naeher, S.; North, R. P.; Papatheodorou, G.; Pfannkuche, O.; Prien, R.; Rehder, G.; Schubert, C. J.; Soltwedel, T.; Sommer, S.; Stahl, H.; Stanev, E. V.; Teaca, A.; Tengberg, A.; Waldmann, C.; Wehrli, B.; Wenzhöfer, F.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we provide an overview of new knowledge on oxygen depletion (hypoxia) and related phenomena in aquatic systems resulting from the EU-FP7 project HYPOX ("In situ monitoring of oxygen depletion in hypoxic ecosystems of coastal and open seas, and landlocked water bodies", http://www.hypox.net). In view of the anticipated oxygen loss in aquatic systems due to eutrophication and climate change, HYPOX was set up to improve capacities to monitor hypoxia as well as to understand its causes and consequences. Temporal dynamics and spatial patterns of hypoxia were analyzed in field studies in various aquatic environments, including the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea, Scottish and Scandinavian fjords, Ionian Sea lagoons and embayments, and Swiss lakes. Examples of episodic and rapid (hours) occurrences of hypoxia, as well as seasonal changes in bottom-water oxygenation in stratified systems, are discussed. Geologically driven hypoxia caused by gas seepage is demonstrated. Using novel technologies, temporal and spatial patterns of water-column oxygenation, from basin-scale seasonal patterns to meter-scale sub-micromolar oxygen distributions, were resolved. Existing multidecadal monitoring data were used to demonstrate the imprint of climate change and eutrophication on long-term oxygen distributions. Organic and inorganic proxies were used to extend investigations on past oxygen conditions to centennial and even longer timescales that cannot be resolved by monitoring. The effects of hypoxia on faunal communities and biogeochemical processes were also addressed in the project. An investigation of benthic fauna is presented as an example of hypoxia-devastated benthic communities that slowly recover upon a reduction in eutrophication in a system where naturally occurring hypoxia overlaps with anthropogenic hypoxia. Biogeochemical investigations reveal that oxygen intrusions have a strong effect on the microbially mediated

  5. Teaching Culture Conscious Diversity Strategies for Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipps, Doris

    1999-01-01

    Provides an overview of cultural issues in rural schools serving American-Indian students. Discusses an Eastern-Cherokee school as a typical example, culture and democratic values in education, Indian cultural influences on education, learning styles, dropout concerns, history of Indian education policy, and cultural sensitivity of teachers.…

  6. Speaking Culturally: Language Diversity in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Fern L.

    Using a language-centered perspective about culture, this book aims to provide culture-based interpretations for language-in-use and for broader discourse issues. The first three chapters present an overview of language and culture in the United States and introduce the concepts and vocabulary for understanding language and cultural complexity.…

  7. Cultural diversity as resistance to neoliberal globalization: The emergence of a global movement and convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan-Tibergien, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    While there have been numerous discussions of the impact on educational services made by trade liberalization through the World Trade Organization (WTO), this study looks at the emergence of global resistance to the commodification of culture through the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) within the WTO. In line with the Council of Europe Declaration on Cultural Diversity in 2000 and the UNESCO Declaration on Cultural Diversity in 2001, a global movement has been fighting for a legally binding global convention on cultural diversity under the auspices of UNESCO. The author examines how `cultural diversity' is defined by various groups and nations. She also discusses the potential implications of such a global convention on cultural diversity for `cognitive justice', that is, for affirming the validity of diverse knowledge systems over against the dominance of neoliberal ideology. Finally, she argues that the leading definition of cultural diversity, contrary to its stated intention, actually serves to re-assert the cultural hegemony of the North rather than benefit subjugated knowledges of the South.

  8. D-PLACE: A Global Database of Cultural, Linguistic and Environmental Diversity.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Kathryn R; Gray, Russell D; Greenhill, Simon J; Jordan, Fiona M; Gomes-Ng, Stephanie; Bibiko, Hans-Jörg; Blasi, Damián E; Botero, Carlos A; Bowern, Claire; Ember, Carol R; Leehr, Dan; Low, Bobbi S; McCarter, Joe; Divale, William; Gavin, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    From the foods we eat and the houses we construct, to our religious practices and political organization, to who we can marry and the types of games we teach our children, the diversity of cultural practices in the world is astounding. Yet, our ability to visualize and understand this diversity is limited by the ways it has been documented and shared: on a culture-by-culture basis, in locally-told stories or difficult-to-access repositories. In this paper we introduce D-PLACE, the Database of Places, Language, Culture, and Environment. This expandable and open-access database (accessible at https://d-place.org) brings together a dispersed corpus of information on the geography, language, culture, and environment of over 1400 human societies. We aim to enable researchers to investigate the extent to which patterns in cultural diversity are shaped by different forces, including shared history, demographics, migration/diffusion, cultural innovations, and environmental and ecological conditions. We detail how D-PLACE helps to overcome four common barriers to understanding these forces: i) location of relevant cultural data, (ii) linking data from distinct sources using diverse ethnonyms, (iii) variable time and place foci for data, and (iv) spatial and historical dependencies among cultural groups that present challenges for analysis. D-PLACE facilitates the visualisation of relationships among cultural groups and between people and their environments, with results downloadable as tables, on a map, or on a linguistic tree. We also describe how D-PLACE can be used for exploratory, predictive, and evolutionary analyses of cultural diversity by a range of users, from members of the worldwide public interested in contrasting their own cultural practices with those of other societies, to researchers using large-scale computational phylogenetic analyses to study cultural evolution. In summary, we hope that D-PLACE will enable new lines of investigation into the major drivers

  9. D-PLACE: A Global Database of Cultural, Linguistic and Environmental Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Kathryn R.; Gray, Russell D.; Greenhill, Simon J.; Jordan, Fiona M.; Gomes-Ng, Stephanie; Bibiko, Hans-Jörg; Blasi, Damián E.; Botero, Carlos A.; Bowern, Claire; Ember, Carol R.; Leehr, Dan; Low, Bobbi S.; McCarter, Joe; Divale, William; Gavin, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    From the foods we eat and the houses we construct, to our religious practices and political organization, to who we can marry and the types of games we teach our children, the diversity of cultural practices in the world is astounding. Yet, our ability to visualize and understand this diversity is limited by the ways it has been documented and shared: on a culture-by-culture basis, in locally-told stories or difficult-to-access repositories. In this paper we introduce D-PLACE, the Database of Places, Language, Culture, and Environment. This expandable and open-access database (accessible at https://d-place.org) brings together a dispersed corpus of information on the geography, language, culture, and environment of over 1400 human societies. We aim to enable researchers to investigate the extent to which patterns in cultural diversity are shaped by different forces, including shared history, demographics, migration/diffusion, cultural innovations, and environmental and ecological conditions. We detail how D-PLACE helps to overcome four common barriers to understanding these forces: i) location of relevant cultural data, (ii) linking data from distinct sources using diverse ethnonyms, (iii) variable time and place foci for data, and (iv) spatial and historical dependencies among cultural groups that present challenges for analysis. D-PLACE facilitates the visualisation of relationships among cultural groups and between people and their environments, with results downloadable as tables, on a map, or on a linguistic tree. We also describe how D-PLACE can be used for exploratory, predictive, and evolutionary analyses of cultural diversity by a range of users, from members of the worldwide public interested in contrasting their own cultural practices with those of other societies, to researchers using large-scale computational phylogenetic analyses to study cultural evolution. In summary, we hope that D-PLACE will enable new lines of investigation into the major drivers

  10. Cultural Nuances, Assumptions, and the Butterfly Effect: Addressing the Unpredictability Caused by Unconscious Values Structures in Cross-Cultural Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remer, Rory

    2007-01-01

    Cultural values, cross-cultural interaction patterns that are produced by dynamical (chaotic) systems, have a significant impact on interaction, particularly among and between people from different cultures. The butterfly effect, which states that small differences in initial conditions may have severe consequences for patterns in the long run,…

  11. Leading with Diversity: Cultural Competencies for Teacher Preparation and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumbull, Elise; Pacheco, Maria

    2005-01-01

    As the student population in schools becomes increasingly diverse, many teachers need professional development to build cultural competencies--the skills and awareness related to issues such as culture, language, race, and ethnicity. This book draws together in one place the research and practical knowledge about cultural competencies that…

  12. Too Pale and Stale: Prescribed Texts Used for Teaching Culturally Diverse Students in Australia and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jogie, Melissa Reshma

    2015-01-01

    How are English texts selected to teach students from culturally diverse backgrounds in Australia and England? The English curricula in both countries aim for students to read and interpret meanings through texts, while learning about their culture, and that of cultural others. However, the current list of prescribed texts in both curricula are…

  13. Cultural Adjustment of White Teachers to a Diverse Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roat, Benjamin C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to understand the cultural adjustment of White female teachers to a diverse urban school environment. This research focused on what factors contributed to White teachers' successful, or unsuccessful, cultural adjustment to a school district that was predominantly of a differing cultural background. The…

  14. The Culture Audit: A Leadership Tool for Assessment and Strategic Planning in Diverse Schools and Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustamante, Rebecca M.

    2006-01-01

    This module is designed to introduce educational leaders to an organizational assessment tool called a "culture audit." Literature on organizational cultural competence suggests that culture audits are a valuable tool for determining how well school policies, programs, and practices respond to the needs of diverse groups and prepare…

  15. Preparing Science Teachers for Culturally Diverse Students: Developing Cultural Literacy Through Cultural Immersion, Cultural Translators and Communities of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Pauline W. U.

    2006-09-01

    This three year study of P-12 professional development is grounded in sociocultural theories that hold that building knowledge and relationships among individuals from different cultural backgrounds entails joint activity toward common goals and cultural dialogues mediated by cultural translators. Sixty P-12 pre and in-service teachers in a year long interdisciplinary science curriculum course shared the goal of developing culturally relevant, standards-based science curricula for Native Hawai'ian students. Teachers and Native Hawai'ian instructors lived and worked together during a five day culture-science immersion in rural school and community sites and met several times at school, university, and community sites to build knowledge and share programs. Teachers were deeply moved by immersion experiences, learned to connect cultural understandings, e.g., a Hawai'ian sense of place and curriculum development, and highly valued collaborating with peers on curriculum development and implementation. The study finds that long term professional development providing situated learning through cultural immersion, cultural translators, and interdisciplinary instruction supports the establishment of communities of practice in which participants develop the cross-cultural knowledge and literacy needed for the development of locally relevant, place and standards-based curricula and pedagogy.

  16. Community Psychology, Diversity, and the Many Forms of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2010-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Many forms of culture," by A. B. Cohen. Cohen argued that psychology must broaden its conceptualization of culture to consider its many forms, such as religion, socioeconomic status, and region. The current author could not agree more with Cohen's proposed conceptualization of culture and its potential impact on…

  17. Cultural Diversity in English Language Teaching: Learners' Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinh, Nguyen Duc

    2013-01-01

    The focus of culture in English language teaching (ELT) has traditionally been on the target culture of English speaking countries. However, the new status of English as international language (EIL) has led to significant changes in the practice of teaching and learning culture in ELT. Rather than relying on the paradigm of native speaker…

  18. Systematic review on embracing cultural diversity for developing and sustaining a healthy work environment in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Alan; Srivastava, Rani; Craig, Dianna; Tucker, Donna; Grinspun, Doris; Bajnok, Irmajean; Griffin, Pat; Long, Leslye; Porritt, Kylie; Han, Thuzar; Gi, Aye A

    2007-03-01

    quality  Methodological quality was independently established by two reviewers, using standardised techniques from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information (SUMARI) package. Discussion with a third reviewer was initiated where a low level of agreement was identified for a particular paper. Following inclusion, data extraction was conducted using standardised data extraction tools from the JBI SUMARI suite for quantitative and qualitative research. Data synthesis was performed using the JBI Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument and JBI Narrative, Opinion and Text Assessment and Review Instrument software to aggregate findings by identifying commonalities across texts. Quantitative data were presented in narrative summary, as statistical pooling was not appropriate with the included studies. Results  Of the 659 identified papers, 45 were selected for full paper retrieval, and 19 were considered to meet the inclusion criteria for this review. The results identified a number of processes that would contribute to the development of a culturally competent workforce. Appropriate and competent linguistic services, and intercultural staff training and education, were identified as key findings in this review. Conclusions  The review recommends that health provider agencies establish links with organisations that can address needs of culturally diverse groups of patients, include cultural competence in decision support systems and staff education as well as embed them in patient brochures and educational materials. The review also concluded that staff in-service programs consider the skills needed to foster a culturally competent workforce, and recruitment strategies that also explicitly address this need. PMID:21631782

  19. Managing the culturally diverse medical practice team: twenty-five strategies.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A common misconception is that the phrase workplace diversity means meeting certain quotas in employee race or gender categories. In fact, diversity is much more than that. This article explores the unique benefits and challenges of managing a culturally diverse medical practice team and offers practice managers 25 practical strategies. It describes the two types of diversity training that are beneficial to practice managers and the kinds of policies, practices, and procedures that foster and promote diversity. This article also explores ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, sexism, stereotyping, and other potentially divisive issues among a diverse medical practice team. It provides an assessment instrument practice managers can use to evaluate their own diversity management skills. Finally, this article defines specifically what is meant by the term diversity and explores the top 10 diversity issues in workplaces today. PMID:24873132

  20. Integrating community perceptions and cultural diversity in social impact assessment in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Nzeadibe, Thaddeus Chidi; Ajaero, Chukwuedozie Kelechukwu; Okonkwo, Emeka Emmanuel; Okpoko, Patrick Uche; Akukwe, Thecla Iheoma; Njoku-Tony, Roseline Feechi

    2015-11-15

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Act of 1992 aimed to make the environment a central theme in development in Nigeria. Nevertheless, the extent of engagement with local cultures in the Nigerian EIA process is not statutorily guaranteed. While most EIAs in Nigeria have been for oil and gas projects in the Niger Delta, and have focused strongly on the biophysical environment, socio-economic and cultural aspects have remained marginal. The palpable neglect of community perceptions and cultural diversity in social impact assessment (SIA) in this region prone to conflict has tended to alienate the people in the decision-making process. Thus, despite claims to compliance with regulatory requirements for EIAs, and numerous purported sustainable development initiatives by international oil companies (IOCs), the region continues to face multiple sustainability challenges. This paper situates local perceptions and cultural diversity in participatory development and canvasses the integration of community perceptions and cultural diversity into SIA in the Niger Delta region. It is argued that doing this would be critical to ensuring acceptance and success of development actions within the context of local culture while also contributing to sustainable development policy in the region. - Highlights: • Nigeria EIA Act aimed to make the environment central to development in Nigeria. • Engagement with local communities in the process is not statutorily guaranteed. • SIAs in Nigeria neglect community perceptions and cultural diversity. • Article canvasses integrating community perceptions and cultural diversity in SIA. • Local acceptance in context of culture would yield sustainable development outcomes.

  1. Rethinking Classroom Diversity: Three Student Cultures in a Mainline Seminary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2007-01-01

    Discussions on teaching and learning within theological seminaries often center on the question of student diversity, focused primarily upon issues of race, gender, and ethnicity. At the same time that seminaries are challenged to deal with a multitude of pedagogical suppositions emerging from increasingly diverse learning goals, seminaries must…

  2. Internationalisation without Cultural Diversity? Higher Education in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Rennie J.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines why universities in Korea champion internationalisation and aggressively recruit foreign students with diverse ethnic backgrounds, yet resist ideas of valorising diversity. Through a qualitative analysis of university curricula at three major Korean universities, ethnographic interviews with 50 foreign students and focus…

  3. Diversity Initiatives in Academic Psychiatry: Applying Cultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Russell F.; Luo, John S.; Suo, Shannon; Hales, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the process of change in an academic department of psychiatry that has led to the development of a diversity initiative in teaching, research, recruitment, and services. Methods: The authors performed a literature review of diversity initiatives using PubMed. The authors then wrote a case study of the development…

  4. Combined Culture-Based and Culture-Independent Approaches Provide Insights into Diversity of Jakobids, an Extremely Plesiomorphic Eukaryotic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Pánek, Tomáš; Táborský, Petr; Pachiadaki, Maria G.; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Čepička, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We used culture-based and culture-independent approaches to discover diversity and ecology of anaerobic jakobids (Excavata: Jakobida), an overlooked, deep-branching lineage of free-living nanoflagellates related to Euglenozoa. Jakobids are among a few lineages of nanoflagellates frequently detected in anoxic habitats by PCR-based studies, however only two strains of a single jakobid species have been isolated from those habitats. We recovered 712 environmental sequences and cultured 21 new isolates of anaerobic jakobids that collectively represent at least ten different species in total, from which four are uncultured. Two cultured species have never been detected by environmental, PCR-based methods. Surprisingly, culture-based and culture-independent approaches were able to reveal a relatively high proportion of overall species diversity of anaerobic jakobids—60 or 80%, respectively. Our phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rDNA and six protein-coding genes showed that anaerobic jakobids constitute a clade of morphologically similar, but genetically and ecologically diverse protists—Stygiellidae fam. nov. Our investigation combines culture-based and environmental molecular-based approaches to capture a wider extent of species diversity and shows Stygiellidae as a group that ordinarily inhabits anoxic, sulfide- and ammonium-rich marine habitats worldwide. PMID:26635756

  5. Education Policies and Practices to Address Cultural Diversity in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malakolunthu, Suseela; Rengasamy, Nagappan C.

    2012-01-01

    The 1969 racial riot in Kuala Lumpur served as a historical landmark in the development of Malaysian education, as it raised concerns about the state of national unity in the country. Subsequently, education was coupled with the socioeconomic restructuring of Malaysian society in line with the New Economic Policy (NEP) that commenced in 1970.…

  6. Addressing the Effects of Culture on the Boundary-Keeping Practices of Psychiatry Residents Educated outside of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The author sought to develop a curriculum for international medical graduate (IMG) psychiatry residents that addresses their culture-based deviations from normative boundary-keeping practices common to U.S.-based psychotherapy practices. Methods: A group consisting of 12 IMG psychiatry residents and one United States graduate (USG)…

  7. Addressing health disparities through patient education: the development of culturally-tailored health education materials at Puentes de Salud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Isobel; O'Brien, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    The availability of culturally appropriate written health information is essential for promoting health in diverse populations. Lack of English fluency has been shown to negatively impact health outcomes for Latinos in the United States. The authors conducted a needs assessment at a clinic serving Latino immigrants, focusing on patients' health and previous experiences with written health information. Based on these results and a literature review, we developed 10 Spanish language brochures to better serve the target population. This article outlines the process of developing and implementing this intervention, which can serve as a model for similar projects targeting diverse populations. PMID:22053763

  8. Crossing Borders, Addressing Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagarajah, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a story of applied linguistics from my personal vantage point as a multilingual scholar whose career began outside the centers of research and scholarship. The article explains the assumptions and practices characterizing the foundation of the discipline in modernist discourses, and delineates the changes resulting from…

  9. Addressing Hazing in Black Greek Organizations through an Awareness of Organizational Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Pamela

    1993-01-01

    Theories of organizational development and culture used to diagnose problems and institute changes in organizations can be applied to the problem of hazing in black sororities and fraternities. This requires understanding the group culture's underlying values, as illustrated in stories about the organization. Appropriate interventions can then…

  10. The Benefits and Challenges of Becoming Cross-Culturally Competent Counseling Psychologists. Presidential Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, P. Paul

    2006-01-01

    The central thesis of this article is that focusing on cross-cultural competence will enhance both the science and the practice of counseling psychology. Developing cross-cultural competence is a lifelong journey, replete with many joys and challenges, that will (a) increase the sophistication of our research, (b) expand the utility and…

  11. Engaging with Issues of Cultural Diversity and Discrimination through Critical Emotional Reflexivity in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this article are to describe the adult learners' emotional experiences as a result of engaging with issues of cultural diversity and discrimination, and to interrogate the ways in which critical emotional reflexivity emerges in the online format. The analysis is done in the context of an online course on diversity, inequality, and…

  12. Centering Culture: Teaching for Critical Sexual Literacy Using the Sexual Diversity Wheel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, James T.

    1997-01-01

    Explicates the concept of sexual literacy within the context of four curricular models for multicultural sexuality education: tolerance, diversity, difference, and "differance." Presents the Sexual Diversity Wheel as a tool to facilitate inquiry into the multiple cross-cultural constructions and valuations of gender and sexuality. Illustrates with…

  13. University Students' Perceptions of and Attitudes towards Culturally Diverse Group Work: Does Context Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Karen; Volet, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This article presents two consecutive studies aimed at disentangling the significance of study contexts on students' attitudes towards learning and interacting in culturally diverse groups. Context was operationalised as two distinct study programmes with contrasting organisational and instructional characteristics and diverse/nondiverse groups…

  14. What Counts and How: Mathematics Teaching in Culturally, Linguistically, and Socioeconomically Diverse Urban Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahnmann, Melisa S.; Remillard, Janine T.

    2002-01-01

    Examined urban teachers' efforts to embrace mathematics reform with culturally, linguistically, and socioeconomically diverse student populations, noting teachers' roles in providing accessible and valuable mathematical learning opportunities to diverse students. Data from two third grade teachers indicate that such work is complex. However,…

  15. Teaching Respect for Cultural Diversity in Australian Early Childhood Programs: A Challenge for Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNaughton, Glenda; Hughes, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Early childhood teachers in Victoria, Australia face increasing cultural and "racial" diversity among the children and families with whom they work. A small-scale exploratory study found that many teachers were uncertain about how best to respond to such diversity and a mismatch between social expectations that teachers would encourage children to…

  16. Developing Strategies and Practices for Culturally Diverse Classrooms. The Bill Harp Professional Teachers Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Joyce Taylor

    Designed to teach educators how to consciously develop strategies and practices for cultural groups that are at risk for education failure, this book defines and describes diversity; offers a unique process for developing strategies to serve diverse populations; and provides opportunities to practice the approach through questions, exercises, and…

  17. The Impact of Shadowing Culturally Different Students on Preservice Teachers' Disposition toward Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ukpokodu, Omiunota Nelly

    2004-01-01

    A critical issue in teacher education today is the mismatch between racially homogenous teachers and students from increasingly diverse cultural backgrounds. In the United States, the student population is becoming more diverse while the teaching force is becoming increasingly monocultural, white, and middle class. Current data on the teaching…

  18. Advancing Cultural Understanding through a "Celebrate Diversity!" Event: Perspectives from Three Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frumkin, Rhoda; Baver, Michael; Mustakas, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    "Celebrate Diversity!" is the signature event of the Mosaic Coalition, a campus-community partnership created by Wagner College and the New York Center for Interpersonal Development (NYCID) to further the appreciation of diverse cultures on Staten Island. As a celebration of the unique characteristics and contributions of the Island's ethnic…

  19. Cultural diversity and transcultural nursing as they impact health care.

    PubMed

    Clark, C; Robinson, T M

    1999-01-01

    This article examines and critiques what can be broadly defined as "culturally sensitive nursing practice." The authors argue that both past and present research on culturally sensitive nursing practice, regardless of which branch of such practice it subscribes to (transcultural, cross-cultural, multicultural, intercultural, international, and so forth), is not sufficiently based in a sociopolitical context. As a result, there is not significant positive improvement in health care outcomes for patients from traditionally under-represented social membership groups (i.e., groups based on race, gender, socioeconomic class, etc.). Realizing sincere and affective culturally sensitive nursing practice is contingent upon the development and implementation of a comprehensive, sociopolitically conceptualized multicultural nursing education curriculum and pedagogy. PMID:10732596

  20. Supporting culturally and linguistically diverse children with speech, language and communication needs: Overarching principles, individual approaches.

    PubMed

    Verdon, Sarah; McLeod, Sharynne; Wong, Sandie

    2015-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are working with an increasing number of families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds as the world's population continues to become more internationally mobile. The heterogeneity of these diverse populations makes it impossible to identify and document a one size fits all strategy for working with culturally and linguistically diverse families. This paper explores approaches to practice by SLPs identified as specialising in multilingual and multicultural practice in culturally and linguistically diverse contexts from around the world. Data were obtained from ethnographic observation of 14 sites in 5 countries on 4 continents. The sites included hospital settings, university clinics, school-based settings, private practices and Indigenous community-based services. There were 652 individual artefacts collected from the sites which included interview transcripts, photographs, videos, narrative reflections, informal and formal field notes. The data were analysed using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (Engeström, 1987). From the analysis six overarching Principles of Culturally Competent Practice (PCCP) were identified. These were: (1) identification of culturally appropriate and mutually motivating therapy goals, (2) knowledge of languages and culture, (3) use of culturally appropriate resources, (4) consideration of the cultural, social and political context, (5) consultation with families and communities, and (6) collaboration between professionals. These overarching principles align with the six position statements developed by the International Expert Panel on Multilingual Children's Speech (2012) which aim to enhance the cultural competence of speech pathologists and their practice. The international examples provided in the current study demonstrate the individualised ways that these overarching principles are enacted in a range of different organisational, social, cultural and political contexts

  1. Is the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program Acceptable to Parents from Culturally Diverse Backgrounds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morawska, Alina; Sanders, Matthew; Goadby, Elizabeth; Headley, Clea; Hodge, Lauren; McAuliffe, Christine; Pope, Sue; Anderson, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural parenting programs are an effective intervention for behavioural and emotional problems in children, however these programs have low utilisation rates by culturally diverse parents. We examined the cultural acceptability of program materials, preferences for delivery methods, and barriers to use of the Triple P-Positive Parenting…

  2. Bringing Theory to Life: Strategies That Make Culturally Responsive Pedagogy a Reality in Diverse Secondary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Socorro G.; Holmes, Melissa A.; Kavimandan, Shabina K.

    2012-01-01

    Preparing U.S. teachers for effectiveness with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) secondary students remains a challenge, given the relative homogeneity of educators and their enculturation to an educational system based on European American norms and values. Although culturally responsive pedagogy has emerged as a promising avenue for…

  3. Nature and Culture of Finger Counting: Diversity and Representational Effects of an Embodied Cognitive Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2012-01-01

    Studies like the one conducted by Domahs et al. (2010, in Cognition) corroborate that finger counting habits affect how numbers are processed, and legitimize the assumption that this effect is culturally modulated. The degree of cultural diversity in finger counting, however, has been grossly underestimated in the field at large, which, in turn,…

  4. Career and Technical Education Teachers' Perceptions of Culturally Diverse Classes: Rewards, Difficulties, and Useful Teaching Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehm, Marsha L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify CTE teachers' perceptions of selected rewards, difficulties, and useful teaching strategies in culturally diverse classes. The sample was comprised of 41 trade and industrial, business technology, and family and consumer sciences teachers who taught students from 30 cultural backgrounds. The data were…

  5. Initiate, Create, Activate: Practical Solutions for Making Culturally Diverse Music Education a Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Melissa; Lindblom, Shari; Walden, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Cross-cultural music education can motivate children to look at music in fresh ways and awaken their imagination to new possibilities and ways of thinking. This paper presents the voices of three practitioners experienced in, and passionate about the field of culturally diverse music education. Over the past 25 years the presenters have ignited an…

  6. Skilled Dialogue: Strategies for Responding to Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Isaura; Corso, Robert M.; Macpherson, Dianne

    Understanding how to respond to cultural diversity is one key to successful interaction with young children and their families. This book for early childhood professionals introduces the strategy of Skilled Dialogue, a field-tested model for respectful, reciprocal, and responsive interaction that honors cultural beliefs and values, and that will…

  7. Providing Transition Services for Students with Disabilities from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avoke, Selete Kofi; Simon-Burroughs, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Youth with disabilities from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds are at high risk for a number of negative postschool outcomes including high unemployment, low wages, and limited access to postsecondary education and training. Cultural and linguistic differences may negatively impact transition planning for these youth as they…

  8. Reaching New Horizons: Gifted and Talented Education for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Jaime A., Ed.; Diaz, Eva I., Ed.

    This book provides 14 readings on issues in the education of gifted and talented students from culturally or linguistically diverse populations. Its overall theme is the insoluble and reciprocal dependence of excellence and equity in education. Chapters include: (1) "Framing an Historical Context for the Education of Culturally and Linguistically…

  9. Drawing Their Way into Writing: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Finding Voice through Mini-Novelas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessels, Stephanie; Herrera, Socorro G.

    2014-01-01

    Writing can be a difficult task for many students in today's classrooms; however, for students who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD), writing can be especially difficult. These students often are in the process of developing their facility with the English language, and they possess cultural backgrounds that differ from those of…

  10. Multiple Embedded Inequalities and Cultural Diversity in Educational Systems: A Theoretical and Empirical Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the social construction of cultural diversity in education, with a view to social justice. It examines how educational systems organize ethno-cultural difference and how this process contributes to inequalities. Theoretical resources are drawn from social philosophy as well as from recent developments in social organisation…

  11. Intelligence Testing and Cultural Diversity: Concerns, Cautions, and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Donna Y.

    2004-01-01

    With so many unanswered questions and controversies regarding intelligence, testing in general, and testing diverse students in particular, what can educators in gifted education do to ensure that these students have access to and are represented in gifted education programs and services? In this monograph, the author examines test bias by first…

  12. Standards-Based Teaching in Culturally Diverse Schools. Viewers' Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clair, Nancy; Adger, Carolyn Temple

    This videotape and viewer's guide kit is designed for use in a teachers' study group that is part of a comprehensive professional development plan. It encourages teachers to critique and inquire about standards and standards-based teaching in their diverse schools and classrooms. The kit was designed based on a 3-year project in which researchers…

  13. Gender and Cultural Diversity Bias in Developmental Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conti, Nancy E.; Kimmel, Ellen B.

    This paper reports the results of a content-analysis for the treatment of gender and diversity in the 11 top-selling lifespan developmental textbooks. The purposes were to measure the amount of information provided on aspects of development specific to Caucasian females and females of Color and to evaluate qualitatively the incorporation of the…

  14. Effective Schools for Culturally Diverse Students: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denbo, Sheryl, Comp.

    This 354-item annotated bibliography is intended to help teachers improve the educational experiences of diverse student bodies. Research reports, journal articles, books, and audiovisual materials are briefly described that focus on effective teaching methods for use with minority group students, special needs students, and females. The following…

  15. Using Discussion Methods to Inspire Diversity: Harnessing Social & Cultural Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raison, Brian; Gordon, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    How can you better harness the powerful social capital that exists within diverse individuals, families, businesses, and schools to make positive impacts in your community? What could you add to your next meeting--a Chamber strategic planning session, an employee wellness program, a non-profit board development--to better connect participants with…

  16. One Size Does Not Fit All: Taking Diversity, Culture and Context Seriously

    PubMed Central

    Alegria, Margarita; Atkins, Marc; Farmer, Elizabeth; Slaton, Elaine; Stelk, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the current mental health system is failing in the provision of quality mental health care for diverse children and families. This paper discusses one critical domain missing to improve care: serious attention given to diversity, culture, and context. It discusses what we mean by understanding culture and context at the individual, family, organizational, and societal level. Focusing on key predictors of children’s adjustment in natural contexts would increase attention to building community and family capacities that strengthen children’s mental health. To conclude, we suggest changes in organizational culture to build natural supports to enhance children's mental health. PMID:20165910

  17. Learning to value differences. A Catholic healthcare system implements a cultural diversity education program.

    PubMed

    Peel, K C

    1992-09-01

    Each year the U.S. labor force is becoming increasingly diverse. Many healthcare organizations are adopting plans to meet the needs of leaders who manage culturally diverse groups of employees and to ensure that the organization can continue to attract and retain employees of all cultures. In December 1988 Mercy Health Services, Farmington Hills, MI, began a cultural diversity program to increase the number of minority and women employees, especially in management and leadership positions. Its education program was designed to enhance manager and employee awareness of their own biases and those of others and to build skills in dealing with persons from a variety of cultures. Mercy Health Services first held 90-minute educational sessions for managers. The sessions covered expected demographic changes and the importance of working together. Employees then attended sessions where they practiced interactive exercises to help each person recognize his or her own biases. In the subsequent weeks the corporate human resources staff experienced an increase in the number of employee relations problems managers and nonmanagers attributed to diversity conflict. In response, Mercy developed a pilot series of awareness- and skill-building workshops for those who managed Mercy's most culturally diverse staffs. They heard lectures on racial and gender issues and watched and discussed conflict resolution videos. Most workshop participants increased their awareness of cultural bias and their commitment to learning and practicing skills to deal with conflict. PMID:10120202

  18. The experience of nurses in care for culturally diverse families: A qualitative meta-synthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Saidy Eliana Arias; Lopez, Lucero

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to understand the experience of nurses in care delivery to culturally diverse families. Method: qualitative meta-synthesis. Exhaustive search in seven databases, three repositories and a manual search in references without time limit, in English, Spanish and Portuguese, resulting in 1609 potentially relevant studies. These were assessed based on the title, summary and full text, determining the final inclusion of 14 studies. Two independent reviewers used the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) to assess the quality. The interpretative synthesis implied permanent contrast and consensus among the authors, revealing four categories and one meta-theme. Results: "taking care of a culturally diverse family, the experience of crossing a tightrope". Conclusion: the experience of nurses in care delivery to culturally diverse families is demanding and challenging because it imprints a constant tension among barriers, cultural manifestations and the ethical responsibility of care, incipiently revealing elements of cultural competency. The omission of information in the participants' reports in the studies represents a limitation. The findings offer a baseline for professionals and organizations to focus their intervention efforts on the continuing barriers in care delivery to culturally diverse families and strengthens the need for cultural competency training for nurses. PMID:27384469

  19. 2010 Presidential Address: Learning Religion and Religiously Learning amid Global Cultural Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging social media that build on digital technologies are reshaping how we interact with each other. Religious education and identity formation within these new cultural flows demands recognition of the shifts in authority, authenticity, and agency that are taking place, as well as the challenges posed by "context collapse." Digital…

  20. A Culturally Responsive Intervention for Addressing Problematic Behaviors in Counseling Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Shin, Richard Q.

    2013-01-01

    Counseling faculty serve as gatekeepers to protect the public from trainees who demonstrate significant deficiencies in professional functioning. Two issues that have not been thoroughly examined are how different cultural values may intersect with the assessment of appropriate professional competencies and whether the multicultural environment of…

  1. Developing a Contextual Consciousness: Learning to Address Gender, Societal Power, and Culture in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esmiol, Elisabeth E.; Knudson-Martin, Carmen; Delgado, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing number of culturally sensitive training models and considerable literature on the importance of training clinicians in larger contextual issues, research examining how students learn to apply these issues is limited. In this participatory action research project, we systematically studied our own process as marriage and family…

  2. An Exploration of Fraternity Culture: Implications for Programs to Address Alcohol-Related Sexual Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foubert, John D.; Garner, Dallas N.; Thaxter, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Three focus group interviews with multiple men from every fraternity at a small to midsized public university were conducted to study the fraternal culture with regard to alcohol and consent in sexually intimate encounters. Specifically, fraternity men were asked to share their experiences with asking for consent after one or both parties have…

  3. Addressing Social Injustices, Displacement, and Minority Rights through Cases of Culturally Responsive Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Helga; Chaplin, Shane S.; Dessouky, Shimaa; Aklilu, Liya; Hopson, Rodney K.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of programs that address the lingering effects of human rights abuses during times of conflict is necessary to improve program sustainability and create a knowledge bank about the effectiveness of strategies. Outcomes, however, are hard to measure. Evaluators have to gain understanding of the roots of a conflict, surrounding events,…

  4. Creating Culturally Responsive Environments: Ethnic Minority Teachers' Constructs of Cultural Diversity in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hue, Ming-tak; Kennedy, Kerry John

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges facing Hong Kong schools is the growing cultural diversity of the student population that is a result of the growing number of ethnic minority students in the schools. This study uses semi-structured interviews with 12 American, Canadian, Indian, Nepalese and Pakistani teachers working in three secondary schools in the public…

  5. Challenging Western Hegemony through Systematic Study of Cultural Diversity: An Undergraduate Course on Child Development and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganapathy-Coleman, Hema; Serpell, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Traditional courses in developmental psychology treat the development of white, middle-class European American children as normative. This approach offers an inaccurate representation of child development, displays a lack of sensitivity towards the cultural diversity of students, and fails to meet these students' intellectual needs. This paper…

  6. Learning through Cultural Conflict? A Longitudinal Analysis of German Teachers' Strategies for Coping with Cultural Diversity at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender-Szymanski, Dorothea

    2000-01-01

    Investigated changes in German beginning teachers that occurred following interactions with diverse students during their 2-year probationary period. Pre- and post-probation interviews indicated that at the end of the 2 years, teachers coped with culture conflict in either synergy-oriented or ethno-oriented ways. Synergy-oriented teachers coped…

  7. Cultural Diversity and the Imagined Community of the Global Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Cally; Green, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Transnational academic mobility and the ongoing push towards "internationalization" together raise challenges for the cultural climate of today's universities. This paper explores these issues from the perspective of supervisors of research degrees in an Australian university in which "internationalization" and "academic…

  8. Using Cultural Diversity in Teaching Economics: Global Business Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitry, Darryl J.

    2008-01-01

    Globalization and increasing cross-cultural interactivity have implications for education in general and may also present valuable pedagogical opportunities in the practice of teaching economics for business students. Therefore, the author investigated this proposition and offers some empirical observations from research and teaching experiments.…

  9. Sexual Orientation: A Cultural Diversity Issue for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misener, Terry R.; Sowell, Richard L.; Phillips, Kenneth D.; Harris, Charlotte

    1997-01-01

    Traditional approaches to the development of a culturally aware work force have consistently ignored the importance of gender role and sexual orientation as sources of potential conflict in the workplace. Nursing must end personal and professional discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. (JOW)

  10. Cultural Diversity in Schools: From Rhetoric to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVillar, Robert A., Ed.; And Others

    This book addresses the patterns of school failure that are often faced by subordinated minority groups in the United States by presenting a socioacademic framework based on the notion that all groups can have comparable access to quality schooling, can realize comparable participation in the schooling, and can derive comparable education benefits…

  11. Immigration, Cultural-Linguistic Diversity, and Topics in Language Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Li-Rong Lilly

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes 4 topics contributed by the author over the last 30 years of "Topics in Language Disorders" that address the issues of immigration, migration, and refugees. The focus is on the historical perspectives on evolution of terminologies from limited English proficient to English language learner and English as a new language.…

  12. Voices Off: Reconstructing Career Theory and Practice for Cultural Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Mark B.

    2006-01-01

    The most fundamental challenge that career psychology faces is the construction of a new identity that will challenge the career theories and counselling practices that have occupied centre stage in evolving forms for over a century. As part of that challenge, career practitioners and career educators need to address the critical question of what…

  13. Assessment of professional nursing students' knowledge and attitudes about patients of diverse cultures.

    PubMed

    Bond, M L; Kardong-Edgren, S; Jones, M E

    2001-01-01

    This study examined personal attitudes of 152 Bachelors of Science in Nursing (BSN), registered nurse (RN) to BSN, and master's students enrolled in a school of nursing in the southwestern United States toward culturally diverse patients and their perceived knowledge of specific cultural practices and culture-specific skills. Three instruments were used to collect data: the Ethnic Attitude Scale-Part I, the Transcultural Questionnaire, and a demographic survey. Findings reveal that students in all three programs had a relatively low knowledge base about specific cultural groups. The only statistically significant difference found in attitudes, perceived knowledge of cultural patterns, or perceived cultural skills by program was the slightly higher perceived ability of generic BSN students to distinguish between concepts such as ethnocentrism and discrimination, intra- and intercultural diversity, and ethnicity and culture. Similar to other studies of measurement of provider attitudes and perceived cultural knowledge, the results of this study reinforce the struggle experienced by educators and the challenges faced by health care administrators grappling with teaching and delivering culturally competent care. The findings imply that nurse educators need to examine alternate models and teaching strategies to move students along the continuum of cultural learning. PMID:11712116

  14. Observational Tools to Inform Instruction for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurkewecz, Thea

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the need for teachers to use observational tools to identify and understand their learners' cultural backgrounds and literacy skills, including the importance of preparing teacher candidates to become culturally responsive educators. This topic is critical because one of the new teacher certification exams in New York…

  15. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations in Medical Research: Perceptions and Experiences of Older Italians, Their Families, Ethics Administrators and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hughson, Jo-anne; Parker, Anna; Bresin, Agnese; Hajek, John; Knoch, Ute; Phan, Tuong Dien; Story, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-participation of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients in medical research remains a problem in migrant and refugee destination countries such as Australia. The aims of this study were to explore i) CALD persons’ perceptions and experiences of the medical system and medical research, in this case, older Italian Australians; and ii) the views of research professionals on CALD patient participation in medical research. Design and Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, in 2015 utilising in-depth interviews and focus groups with four stakeholder groups: older Italian Australians (n=21); adult children of older Italian Australians (n=10); hospital Human Research Ethics Committee administrators (n=4); and clinical researchers (n=4). The data were analysed for content and thematic analysis. Results Themes for the CALD and family group were getting by in medical interactions; receptivity to medical research: testing the waters; and, receptivity to technology for support: passive versus active. Themes for the researcher and HREC groups about CALD patient participation in research were: exclusion; cultural factors; and e-consent. Conclusions Our findings from four stakeholder perspectives and experiences confirm that there were considerable cultural, linguistic, and resourcing barriers hindering the participation of older Italian-Australians in medical research. Furthermore, our findings showed that in this study setting there were few enabling strategies in place to address these barriers despite the national ethics guidelines for equitable participation in research. The findings informed the creation of a multimedia tool whose purpose is to address and improve representation of CALD groups in clinical research. Significance for public health Many people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds remain excluded from medical research such as clinical trials due to a range of language and

  16. Addressing Cultural Contexts in the Management of Stress via Narrative and Mobile Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew D; Kang, Xiao; Hanrahan, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    In developing applications for stress management and mental health, developers have largely ignored cultural context in design, opting instead to produce apps for a general audience. However, apps designed without a specific population in mind actually have limited reach. Generally stress trackers and socalled "therapists in your pocket", tend to be lost among a jungle of other generic apps that appeal only to the quantified self population and those already predisposed to help-seeking behavior. To reach a broader audience, designing for a specific population may have appeal. The AppHappy Project's Journey to the West is a mobile app being developed by a multidisciplinary group of students at the University of Pennsylvania. The objective is to promote better stress management and mental health among Asian international college students and facilitate their social integration with the general student population. With a prevalence of depression twice that of domestic college students, a reluctance to engage in help-seeking behavior due to stigma, and the challenge of cultural integration, creating interventions for this population requires a different approach to app-mediated therapy. Journey to the West packages bite-sized pieces of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques within the framework of a role-playing game. Every element of its design-from its characters to its art style, from its narrative to its mechanics to its approach to community features-is rooted in a culturally appropriate context. An avatar serves as a surrogate of self while experiencing externalized stressors. Each quest blends therapeutic elements into gameplay with the goal of building resilience towards stressful events. PMID:24875715

  17. Addressing mental health challenges facing the "Next America": A call for culture change.

    PubMed

    McLeigh, Jill D; Melton, Gary B

    2015-09-01

    Provides an editorial addressing future mental health challenges. The articles in this issue highlight the need to create environments conducive to promoting the well-being of future generations. The articles build on symposia held by the American Orthopsychiatric Association in 2015, which focused on the effects on well-being of changing sociodemographics and labor market trends. Included in these pages are articles that lay out some of the challenges young people today face and strategies for helping them transition to adulthood successfully. PMID:26460709

  18. In Search of Cultural Diversity: Recent Literature in Cross-Cultural and Ethnic Minority Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Gordon C. Nagayama; Maramba, Gloria Gia

    2001-01-01

    Identifies where most work on cross-cultural and ethnic minority psychology is being published and the authors. Very little overlap was found between literature in cross-cultural and ethnic minority psychology. Top scholars in cross-cultural psychology are men of European ancestry, while in ethnic minority psychology, scholars are ethnic…

  19. Diversity and Biosynthetic Potential of Culturable Microbes Associated with Toxic Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Rocky; Kalaitzis, John A.; Wood, Susanna A.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a neurotoxin that has been reported from taxonomically diverse organisms across 14 different phyla. The biogenic origin of tetrodotoxin is still disputed, however, TTX biosynthesis by host-associated bacteria has been reported. An investigation into the culturable microbial populations from the TTX-associated blue-ringed octopus Hapalochlaena sp. and sea slug Pleurobranchaea maculata revealed a surprisingly high microbial diversity. Although TTX was not detected among the cultured isolates, PCR screening identifiedsome natural product biosynthesis genes putatively involved in its assembly. This study is the first to report on the microbial diversity of culturable communities from H. maculosa and P. maculata and common natural product biosynthesis genes from their microbiota. We also reassess the production of TTX reported from three bacterial strains isolated from the TTX-containing gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus. PMID:23917066

  20. Diversity and biosynthetic potential of culturable microbes associated with toxic marine animals.

    PubMed

    Chau, Rocky; Kalaitzis, John A; Wood, Susanna A; Neilan, Brett A

    2013-08-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a neurotoxin that has been reported from taxonomically diverse organisms across 14 different phyla. The biogenic origin of tetrodotoxin is still disputed, however, TTX biosynthesis by host-associated bacteria has been reported. An investigation into the culturable microbial populations from the TTX-associated blue-ringed octopus Hapalochlaena sp. and sea slug Pleurobranchaea maculata revealed a surprisingly high microbial diversity. Although TTX was not detected among the cultured isolates, PCR screening identifiedsome natural product biosynthesis genes putatively involved in its assembly. This study is the first to report on the microbial diversity of culturable communities from H. maculosa and P. maculata and common natural product biosynthesis genes from their microbiota. We also reassess the production of TTX reported from three bacterial strains isolated from the TTX-containing gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus. PMID:23917066

  1. Racial/ethnic diversity management and cultural competency: the case of Pennsylvania hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L; Dansky, Kathryn H; De Souza, Gita; Gatto, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Major demographic trends are changing the face of America's labor pool, and healthcare managers increasingly face a scarcer and more diverse workforce. As a result, healthcare organizations (HCOs) must develop policies and practices aimed at recruiting, retaining, and managing a diverse workforce and must meet the demands of a more diverse patient population by providing culturally appropriate care and improving access to care for racial/ethnic minorities. Ultimately, the goal of managing diversity is to enhance workforce and customer satisfaction, to improve communication among members of the workforce, and to further improve organizational performance. Research on diversity management practices in HCOs is scarce, providing few guidelines for practitioners. This study attempted to close that gap. Results show that hospitals in Pennsylvania have been relatively inactive with employing diversity management practices, and equal employment requirements are the main driver of diversity management policy. The number and scope of diversity management practices used were not influenced by organizational or market characteristics. The results suggest that hospitals need to adopt diversity management practices for their workforces and need to pay particular attention to marketing and service planning activities that meet the needs of a diverse patient population. PMID:11933599

  2. Addressing the need for access to culturally and linguistically appropriate HIV/AIDS prevention for Latinos.

    PubMed

    Rios-Ellis, Britt; Frates, Janice; D'Anna, Laura Hoyt; Dwyer, Maura; Lopez-Zetina, Javier; Ugarte, Carlos

    2008-10-01

    This article reports a comprehensive national needs assessment of Latinos' access to HIV/AIDS prevention and education services in 14 cities throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with Latinos who were HIV-positive and at risk for HIV infection. The study explored risk behaviors, access to health care services, and exposure to HIV prevention messages. Differences in predictors of risk behaviors were noted by sex. For women, increased age, being married, foreign-born, and a U.S. resident, and having tested for HIV previously, were associated with reduced HIV/AIDS risk. Thematic analysis of qualitative findings revealed limited awareness of risk factors, and a need for culturally and linguistically appropriate, family-centered HIV/AIDS education incorporating Latino values. Findings were incorporated into culturally relevant brochures featuring vignettes and quotes. Brochures were distributed and evaluated by 71 community-based organizations (CBOs) in the U.S. and Latin America. Evaluators responded positively to the brochures, and Latino-serving organizations in 48 states now use them for HIV/AIDS prevention outreach and education. PMID:18157640

  3. Diversity and functional traits of culturable microbiome members, including cyanobacteria in the rice phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, S; Ranjan, K; Prasanna, R; Ramakrishnan, B; Thapa, S; Kanchan, A

    2016-07-01

    The diversity and abundance of culturable microbiome members of the rice phyllosphere was investigated using cv. Pusa Punjab Basmati 1509. Both diversity and species richness of bacteria were significantly higher in plants in pots in a semi-controlled environment than those in fields. Application of fertilisers reduced both diversity and species richness in field-grown plants under a conventional flooded system of rice intensification (SRI) and in dry-seeded rice (DSR) modes. Sequence analyses of 16S rDNA of culturable bacteria, those selected after amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), showed the dominance of α-proteobacteria (35%) and actinobacteria (38%); Pantoea, Exiguobacterium and Bacillus were common among the culturable phyllospheric bacteria. About 34% of 83 culturable bacterial isolates had higher potential (>2 μg·ml(-1) ) for indole acetic acid production in the absence of tryptophan. Interestingly, the phyllosphere bacterial isolates from the pot experiment had significantly higher potential for nitrogen fixation than isolates from the field experiment. Enrichment for cyanobacteria showed both unicellular forms and non-heterocystous filaments under aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions. PCR-DGGE analysis of these showed that aerobic and anaerobic conditions as well as the three modes of cultivation of rice in the field strongly influenced the number and abundance of phylotypes. The adaptability and functional traits of these culturable microbiome members suggest enormous diversity in the phyllosphere, including potential for plant growth promotion, which was also significantly influenced by the different methods of growing rice. PMID:26849835

  4. Subaerial biofilms on granitic historic buildings: microbial diversity and development of phototrophic multi-species cultures.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nion, D; Rodríguez-Castro, J; López-Rodríguez, M C; Fernández-Silva, I; Prieto, B

    2016-07-01

    Microbial communities of natural subaerial biofilms developed on granitic historic buildings of a World Heritage Site (Santiago de Compostela, NW Spain) were characterized and cultured in liquid BG11 medium. Environmental barcoding through next-generation sequencing (Pacific Biosciences) revealed that the biofilms were mainly composed of species of Chlorophyta (green algae) and Ascomycota (fungi) commonly associated with rock substrata. Richness and diversity were higher for the fungal than for the algal assemblages and fungi showed higher heterogeneity among samples. Cultures derived from natural biofilms showed the establishment of stable microbial communities mainly composed of Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria. Although most taxa found in these cultures were not common in the original biofilms, they are likely common pioneer colonizers of building stone surfaces, including granite. Stable phototrophic multi-species cultures of known microbial diversity were thus obtained and their reliability to emulate natural colonization on granite should be confirmed in further experiments. PMID:27192622

  5. Plant powder teabags: a novel and practical approach to resolve culturability and diversity of rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Mohamed S; Mourad, Elhussein F; Hamza, Mervat A; Youssef, Hanan H; Scherwinski, Ann-Christin; El-Tahan, Mahmoud; Fayez, Mohamed; Ruppel, Silke; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2016-08-01

    We have developed teabags packed with dehydrated plant powders, without any supplements, for preparation of plant infusions necessary to develop media for culturing rhizobacteria. These bacteria are efficiently cultivated on such plant teabag culture media, with better progressive in situ recoverability compared to standard chemically synthetic culture media. Combining various plant-based culture media and incubation conditions enabled us to resolve unique denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) bands that were not resolved by tested standard culture media. Based on polymerase chain reaction PCR-DGGE of 16S rDNA fingerprints and sequencing, the plant teabag culture media supported higher diversity and significant increases in the richness of endo-rhizobacteria, namely Gammaproteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae) and predominantly Alphaproteobacteria (Rhizobiaceae). This culminated in greater retrieval of the rhizobacteria taxa associated with the plant roots. We conclude that the plant teabag culture medium by itself, without any nutritional supplements, is sufficient and efficient for recovering and mirroring the complex and diverse communities of rhizobacteria. Our message to fellow microbial ecologists is: simply dehydrate your plant canopy, teabag it and soak it to prepare your culture media, with no need for any additional supplementary nutrients. PMID:27178359

  6. Modeling spatial accessibility of immigrants to culturally diverse family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Lu; Roisman, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This article uses accessibility as an analytical tool to examine health care access among immigrants in a multicultural urban setting. It applies and improves on two widely used accessibility models—the gravity model and the two-step floating catchment area model—in measuring spatial accessibility by Mainland Chinese immigrants in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area. Empirical data on physician-seeking behaviors are collected through two rounds of questionnaire surveys. Attention is focused on journey to physician location and utilization of linguistically matched family physicians. Based on the survey data, a two-zone accessibility model is developed by relaxing the travel threshold and distance impedance parameters that are traditionally treated as a constant in the accessibility models. General linear models are used to identify relationships among spatial accessibility, geography, and socioeconomic characteristics of Mainland Chinese immigrants. The results suggest a spatial mismatch in the supply of and demand for culturally sensitive care, and residential location is the primary factor that determines spatial accessibility to family physicians. The article yields important policy implications. PMID:21488318

  7. Diversity of culturable bacterial endophytes of saffron in Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tanwi; Kaul, Sanjana; Dhar, Manoj K

    2015-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus) is a medicinally important plant. The Kashmir valley (J&K, India) emblematizes one of the major and quality saffron producing areas in the world. Nonetheless, the area has been experiencing a declining trend in the production of saffron during the last decade. Poor disease management is one of the major reasons for declining saffron production in the area. Endophytes are known to offer control against many diseases of host plant. During the present study, culturable bacterial endophytes were isolated from saffron plant, identified and assessed for plant growth promoting activities. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis grouped the fifty-four bacterial isolates into eleven different taxa, viz. Bacillus licheniformis, B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. humi, B. pumilus, Paenibacillus elgii, B. safensis, Brevibacillus sp., Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus hominis and Enterobacter cloacae. The results were also supported with the identification based on BIOLOG system. B. licheniformis was the dominant endophyte in both leaves and corms of saffron. 81 % isolates showed lipase activity, 57 % cellulase, 48 % protease, 38 % amylase, 33 % chitinase and 29 % showed pectinase activity. 24 % of the isolates were phosphate solublizers, 86 % showed siderophore production and 80 % phytohormone production potential. The present repository of well characterized bacterial endophytes of saffron, have plant growth promoting potential which can be explored further for their respective roles in the biology of the saffron plant. PMID:26558164

  8. Cross-cultural medicine and diverse health beliefs. Ethiopians abroad.

    PubMed Central

    Hodes, R

    1997-01-01

    A large number of Ethiopians reside abroad as refugees, immigrants, or students. To provide adequate care, physicians must understand their beliefs about health and medicine. To Ethiopians, health is an equilibrium between the body and the outside. Excess sun is believed to cause mitch ("sunstroke"), leading to skin disease. Blowing winds are thought to cause pain wherever they hit. Sexually transmitted disease is attributed to urinating under a full moon. People with buda, "evil eye," are said to be able to harm others by looking at them. Ethiopians often complain of rasehn, "my head" (often saying it burns); yazorehnyal, "spinning" (not a true vertigo); and libehn, "my heart" (usually indicating dyspepsia rather than a cardiac problem). Most Ethiopians have faith in traditional healers and procedures. In children, uvulectomy (to prevent presumed suffocation during pharyngitis in babies), the extraction of lower incisors (to prevent diarrhea), and the incision of eyelids (to prevent or cure conjunctivitis) are common. Circumcision is performed on almost all men and 90% of women. Ethiopians do bloodletting for moygnbagegn, a neurologic disease that includes fever and syncope. Chest pain is treated by cupping. Ethiopians often prefer injections to tablets. Bad news is usually given to families of patients and not the patients themselves. Zar is a form of spirit possession treated by a traditional healer negotiating with the alien spirit and giving gifts to the possessed patient. Health education must address Ethiopian concerns and customs. Images Figure 1. PMID:9074336

  9. Challenges of educational and cultural diversity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Hyde, S; White, S

    1993-01-01

    In South Africa, the estimate of HIV-infected population was 300,000 in September 1993, with 500 new infections occurring daily, mostly in poor neighborhoods with illiteracy rates of 25-50%. The AIDS Education and Training (AET) targeted low-literate groups by developing an educational package for the workplace. The methodology included repetition of key messages, stories from their own culture with pictures, interaction in groups, and visual aids to retain information. The content involved biomedical aspects of HIV/AIDS, testing and counseling, safe sex, traditional healers, the needs of the infected, and workplace/community issues. The pictures depicted men and women of all racial varieties to drive home the message that the infection can infect everybody. 31 colorful laminated posters were developed for the AIDS flip chart kit, and over 100 flip chart sessions were conducted at workplaces. An evaluation of the flip chart sessions queried 143 English- and 897 Tswana-speaking people at one company. 58% of respondents considered condom use and reducing the number of partners the most important message. 28% deemed biomedical facts and latency of the infection important, 25% the deadly nature of the disease, and 15% the modes of transmission. 44% desired to learn about prevention and 30% appreciated the interactive method of learning. All participants sought more information on STDs, where to get an HIV test, and how to have safer sex. AET provides assistance to clients to become educators themselves by means of policy development, refresher courses for educators, and action planning (condom distribution, STD control, referral for testing, and follow-up). The flip chart is also used for other health and lifestyle education regarding family planning, tuberculosis, sexuality, and communication skills aimed at company managers, union officials, and supervisors. PMID:12345400

  10. Exploring Teaching Practices in Physical Education with Culturally Diverse Classes: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagkas, Symeon

    2007-01-01

    This is a cross-cultural comparative study that sets out to explore teachers' knowledge, understanding and practices of the teaching of Physical Education (PE) to students from different cultural backgrounds. More specifically, it explores key issues in the teaching of PE to Muslim students. Thirteen PE teachers, six from England and seven from…

  11. [Seasonal variation of functional diversity of aquatic microbial community in Apostichopus japonicus cultural pond].

    PubMed

    Yan, Fa-Jun; Tian, Xiang-Li; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Yang, Gang

    2014-05-01

    The functional diversity of aquatic microbial communities in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) cultural ponds was examined in this paper. The Biolog plate technique and redundancy analysis (RDA) method were used to evaluate seasonal changes and their relationships with environmental factors. The results showed that both total amount and types of carbon sources utilized by microbes in the sea cucumber cultural ponds varied seasonally, and were the highest in summer and lowest in winter, with polymers being the main type of carbon sources. Principal component analysis revealed that the carbon utilization diversity of the microbial communities varied significantly over the seasonal courses. A total of 10 categories of carbon sources were significantly related to the principal component 1, among which were polymers, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, amino acids, and amines. Significant seasonal changes were detected for all carbon utilization diversity indices of the microbial communities, including Shannon, McIntosh, Simpson, and S-E. However, seasonal variations were different among the microbial diversity indices. RDA analysis revealed that TP, NO(3-)-N, TN, and PO4(3-)-P were the critical environmental factors influencing the seasonal changes in functional diversity of aquatic microbial community in sea cucumber cultural ponds. PMID:25129954

  12. Drawing upon Lessons Learned: Effective Curriculum and Instruction for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Gifted Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Julie Dingle

    2016-01-01

    Javits Gifted and Talented Education Program has provided a wealth of knowledge on culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) gifted learners and how to support teachers in their work with CLD students. This study examined five impactful Javits projects through qualitative inquiry centered on how innovative practice takes root or not. Using…

  13. Challenging Racism through Schools: Teacher Attitudes to Cultural Diversity and Multicultural Education in Sydney, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, James; Lean, Garth; Dunn, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    How school teachers act to challenge racism in schools is a vital concern in an immigrant society like Australia. A 10% response from a self-administered online survey of government (public) primary and secondary school teachers across Sydney, Australia's largest EthniCity, examines attitudes of classroom teachers towards cultural diversity, goals…

  14. Linguistic and Cultural Diversity: A Growing Challenge to American Higher Education. CSE Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Clifford

    This document originated in the Roundtable on Linguistic/Cultural Diversity and American Higher Education organized by the National Task Force on minority High Achievement held in San Juan, Puerto Rico, December 6-8, 1998. It represents one participant's view of important themes that emerged during the Roundtable. Three trends combine to present a…

  15. Acknowledging the Complexity and Diversity of Historical and Cultural ICT Professional Learning Practices in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Renata; Graham, Anne; Watts, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Professional development in information and communication technology (ICT) remains a major imperative for schools as technologies, and what teachers are able to do with them, continue to evolve. The responses of individual schools to this ongoing challenge can be highly diverse and inevitably shaped by past and current cultural practices, which…

  16. Teaching in Culturally Diverse Contexts: What Knowledge about "Self" and "Others" Do Teachers Need?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Ninetta

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on data from a small-scale qualitative study conducted in Australia that explored how pre-service teachers engaged with students from culturally diverse backgrounds during practicum and how they understood their own ethnic identities. The findings of the study suggest that pre-service teachers have simplistic understandings of…

  17. Crossing Borders: Adding Cultural Diversity to Music Education Expands Horizons for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Thanks to technology and modern conveniences, the world continues to become a smaller place, while communities become more diverse. At the same time, it's becoming easier to learn about the world's many cultures, to appreciate their unique qualities, to understand their significance--and their fragility. For music teachers with wide-ranging…

  18. Fostering Collaboration with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families of Children with Moderate to Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivos, Edward M.; Gallagher, R. J.; Aguilar, Jill

    2010-01-01

    In this review, challenges to family-school collaboration and a framework describing how special educators can foster a climate of collaboration with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) families of children with moderate to severe disabilities are described. Conditions for collaboration in this circumstance require that educators…

  19. Culturally, Linguistically, and Cognitively Diverse Learners and Brain-Compatible Content Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Marjorie Hall

    2007-01-01

    As a teacher educator in a large public university, the author's methods courses are frequently comprised of both pre- and in-service teachers who are, or will be, working with culturally, linguistically, and cognitively diverse (CLCD) early language learners. It is incumbent upon the author to equip them with skills, strategies, and a sound…

  20. A Contrastive Study of Cultural Diversity of Learning Styles between China and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper makes a contrastive study of learning styles between China and the U.S. from five aspects and recognizes that the differences are due to the influence of cultural diversity such as individualism and collectivism, Confucianism, utilitarianism and pragmatism etc.

  1. Celebrating Musical Diversity: Training Culturally Responsive Music Educators in Multiracial Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article explores outcomes of research into the role and place of cultural diversity in primary music classes at five government schools in Singapore. The study highlights the ways in which a variety of factors such as specialist music training, government policy, curriculum documents, and professional development influence teacher practice.…

  2. No Longer "Catholic, White and Gaelic": Schools in Ireland Coming to Terms with Cultural Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker-Jenkins, Marie; Masterson, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Irish society has experienced unprecedented demographic change since the turn of the twenty-first century, and increasingly, educators are facing the prospect of having to respond to the changing nature of cultural diversity in their classrooms. Traditionally characterised as"Catholic, white and Gaelic", Irish schools are said to be…

  3. The Cultural and Linguistic Diversity of 3-Year-Old Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y. C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their…

  4. A Distance-Delivered Teacher Education Program for Rural Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohfink, Gayla; Morales, Amanda; Shroyer, Gail; Yahnke, Sally; Hernandez, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative, distance-delivered, teacher preparation program for rural, culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) teacher candidates. Multiple institutions partnered with one university in order to diversify the teaching force in the region and meet the needs of CLD students living there. In describing the program's…

  5. Investigating Preservice Teachers' Beliefs toward Cultural Diversity Employing an Inquiry through Literature Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangseechatchawan, Dusadee

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated preservice teachers' beliefs toward cultural diversity by employing an inquiry through literature approach. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an inquiry through literature instructional format, such as book clubs, and whole class and individual inquiry, on preservice teachers' beliefs…

  6. Reading Instruction for Diverse Classrooms: Research-Based, Culturally Responsive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Ellen; Hulan, Nancy; Layne, Vicky

    2010-01-01

    This practical, teacher-friendly book provides indispensable guidance for implementing research-based reading instruction that is responsive to students' diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Structured around the "big five" core topics of an effective reading program--phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension--the…

  7. Creating Taxonomies to Improve School-Home Connections with Families of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linse, Caroline Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Families of culturally and linguistically diverse pupils often do not participate fully in their children's school-based education. The purpose of this article is to introduce taxonomies as a means to examine and improve school practices and levels of responsiveness to families whose home language is not English, so that families feel more…

  8. Cultural Diversity in Australia: Promoting the Teaching and Learning of South African Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Australian society is increasingly multicultural, and this article provides some theoretical perspectives on multiculturalism, cultural diversity and the teaching and learning of African music. It identifies the need for teachers, practitioners and artists to jointly work together to create a community of practitioners where pedagogy meets…

  9. The Teacher's Guide to Diversity: Building a Knowledge Base. Volume I: Human Development, Culture, and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumbull, Elise; Pacheco, Maria

    2005-01-01

    What are the reigning theories of human development and cognition? How are human development and culture related? How does identity development intersect with achievement motivation? What is intelligence? How can our knowledge of human development inform our work as educators working with an increasingly diverse student population? What is known…

  10. Contrasting Views: Embedding Cultural Diversity in the FE Art and Design Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Exploring the interface between curriculum practicalities and policy agendas, this paper rationalises the need to embed cultural diversity in the further education (FE) curriculum and explores processes whereby this may take place. It offers a personal view of the national context of recent policy change and debate around education for cultural…

  11. The Politics of Resistance to Workplace Cultural Diversity Education for Health Service Providers: An Australian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study has as its focus an exploration of health service providers' perceptions and experiences of the processes and implications of delivering workplace cultural diversity education for staff. Data were obtained from conducting in-depth individual and focus group interviews with a purposeful sample of 137 healthcare professionals,…

  12. Culturally Diverse Cohorts: The Exploration of Learning in Context and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaghan, Carolyn M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores the experiences of culturally diverse interactions and learning in adult cohorts. A cohort is defined as a group of students who enter a program of study together and complete a series of common learning experiences during a specified period of time (Saltiel & Russo, 2001). There is much research on the general use,…

  13. An Exploration of the Uses of Children's Books as an Approach for Enhancing Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardeck, John T.; Pardeck, Jean A.

    1998-01-01

    Offers strategies for using children's books as tools for teaching able-bodied children about the unique needs of children with disabilities and how disabilities are an important aspect of cultural diversity. Notes five genres for conducting bibliotherapy: fiction, nonfiction, self-help books, fairy tales, and picture books. Provides an annotated…

  14. Practicum Assessment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Early Childhood Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Joce; Ortlipp, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The practicum is an integral component of teacher education courses, but culturally and linguistically diverse pre-service teachers can face particular struggles in meeting assessment requirements on the practicum in early childhood settings. This paper reports from a small, exploratory study of early childhood practicum handbooks from four…

  15. Appreciating Differences: Teaching and Learning in a Culturally Diverse Classroom. Hot Topics: Usable Research. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploumis-Devick, Evelyn; Follman, Joseph

    The purpose of this publication is to provide educators with useful information on and examples of how teachers and students can better communicate and learn in today's culturally diverse classrooms. Educators are offered background information and resources for increasing sensitivity and responsiveness to the needs of students of different…

  16. Teacher Education and Preparation: Attitudes, Beliefs, and Perceptions of Preparedness about Teaching the Culturally Diverse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel May, Rozanna

    2010-01-01

    The researcher of this study endeavored to determine if a treatment of a multicultural awareness presentation, multicultural coursework, and field experiences impacted teacher candidates' attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions of preparedness about teaching culturally diverse students. Today, as evidenced by disaggregation of test scores, and dropout…

  17. Developing Conceptions of Racism among Young White Adults in the Context of Cultural Diversity Coursework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bidell, Thomas R.; And Others

    An exploratory study was conducted to evaluate a model that predicts a five-step developmental sequence from dualistic to systematic conceptions of racism among young white adults. The model predicts developmental changes for white middle-class young adults within the context of a college cultural-diversity course. The following steps in…

  18. Learning To Talk about Taboo Topics: A First Step in Examining Cultural Diversity with Preservice Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Janet E.; Daniel, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    Presents strategies to create a classroom environment in which preservice teachers can break the taboo of silence and begin discussion of cultural diversity issues, drawing on faculty experience. A community atmosphere and mutual respect are key elements in encouraging open discussion. (SLD)

  19. Adaptations for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families of English Language Learning Students with Autisim Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, grounded theory study was to describe adaptations for culturally and linguistically diverse families of English language learning students with autism spectrum disorders. Each family's parent was interviewed three separate times to gather information to understand the needs and experiences regarding their…

  20. Attitudes Toward Campus Diversity: Participation in a Racial or Cultural Awareness Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Leonard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study (n=1,060 students) found that white college students' sex and major were significantly related to precollege attitudes toward diversity on campus, and gender and major separately predicted participation in a racial or cultural awareness workshop. Father's education, family income, and degree aspiration were also considered as variables.…

  1. Learning from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms: Using Inquiry to Inform Practice. Language & Literacy Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fingon, Joan C., Ed.; Ulanoff, Sharon H., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This resource guide looks at new classroom-based literacy research that supports "all" learners, including culturally and linguistically diverse students. The authors demonstrate how teachers and researchers develop instructional practices based on multiple languages and the literacy contexts of their schools. They describe classrooms where…

  2. Cultural Diversity, Racialisation and the Experience of Racism in Rural Australia: The South Australian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, James; Dunn, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Rural spaces in settler nations like Australia are commonly perceived as "white", with low numbers of "non-white" ethnic minorities. Perhaps because of this, although ethnic diversity is a feature of some rural communities, there is a paucity of research into issues of cultural exclusion. This is surprising in view of recent federal government…

  3. Enhancing Practice with Infants and Toddlers from Diverse Language and Cultural Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemeth, Karen N.; Erdosi, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    As infant/toddler programs encounter growing diversity, they need to reenvision the impact they have on children and families in all areas of practice, from recruiting new enrollees to stocking classrooms to changing the ways adults interact with children and families with different languages and from different cultures. What happens on the first…

  4. A Descriptive Case Study of Stigma: Constructing Labels of Culturally Linguistically Diverse and Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Laura O.

    2012-01-01

    Stigma is a social construct and a process of social rejection, devaluation and discrimination (Brown et al., 2010, p.351). The stigmatization of students who carry multiple labels does occur. When those labels are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) and Emotional Disturbance (ED), the perceived process of stigmatization may be difficult…

  5. Construction and Validation of a Questionnaire to Study Future Teachers' Beliefs about Cultural Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López López, M. Carmen; Hinojosa Pareja, Eva F.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the construction and validation process of a questionnaire designed to study student teachers' beliefs about cultural diversity. The study, beyond highlighting the complexity involved in the study of beliefs, emphasises their relevance in implementing inclusive educational processes that guarantee the right to a good education…

  6. Improving Achievement for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners through an Inquiry-Based Earth Systems Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Julie; Ariza, Eileen N. Whelan

    2008-01-01

    This report describes an inquiry-based Earth systems curriculum and strategies for teaching diverse students, which were embedded in the curriculum. The curriculum was implemented with 5th-grade students with varied linguistic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds in five schools in a large, southeastern U.S., urban school district. At the end…

  7. Schools and the Culturally Diverse Exceptional Student: Promising Practices and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Alba A., Ed.; Ramirez, Bruce A., Ed.

    The 14 papers were given at a 1986 Ethnic and Multicultural Symposia and are intended to provide state-of-the-art information on the education of culturally and linguistically diverse exceptional students. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Demography As It Affects Special Education" (James Yates); "A Prereferral Process for Preventing…

  8. Designing Better Schools for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children: A Science of Performance Model for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    How can schools be better designed to enable equitable academic outcomes for culturally and linguistically diverse children from communities lacking in economic, political and social power? Putting forward a robust "science of performance" model of school change based on a specified process of research and development in local contexts, this book:…

  9. Talking about Writing: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Adolescents' Socialization into Academic Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes and analyzes the academic language socialization of culturally and linguistically diverse adolescents through a multi-case ethnographic study of high school writing instruction in California. I argue that there is a significant gap between the norms for writing in English language development classes and those in the…

  10. Postcolonial Interventions within Science Education: Using Postcolonial Ideas to Reconsider Cultural Diversity Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lyn

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, I utilise key postcolonial perspectives on multiculturalism and boundaries to reconsider some of science education's scholarship on cultural diversity in order to extend the discourses and methodologies of science education. I begin with a brief overview of postcolonialism that argues its ability to offer theoretical insights to…

  11. Thinking differently about cultural diversity: Using postcolonial theory to (re)read science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Lyn

    2004-11-01

    This paper makes use of postcolonial theory to think differently about aspects of cultural diversity within science education. It briefly reviews some of the increasing scholarship on cultural diversity, and then describes the genealogy and selected key themes of postcolonial theory. Postcolonial theory as oppositional or deconstructive reading practice is privileged, and its practical application illustrated by using some of these key ideas to (re)read Gloria Snively and John Corsiglia's (2001) article Discovering indigenous science: implications for science education and their rejoinder, from the special issue of Science Education (Vol. 85, pp. 6-34) on multiculturalism and science education. While many would regard the expressed views on diversity, inclusivity, multiculturalism, and sustainability to be just and equitable, postcolonial analysis of the texts reveals subtle and lingering referents that unwittingly work against the very attitudes Snively and Corsiglia (2001) seek to promote. Such postcolonial analyses open up thinking about the material and cultural conditions in which science education is produced, circulated, interpreted, and enacted. They also privilege a unique methodology already prominent in academic inquiry that is yet to be well explored within science education. Finally, I conclude this paper with some general comments regarding postcolonialism and the science education scholarship on cultural diversity.

  12. Supporting Cultural and Religious Diversity in Higher Education: Pedagogy and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomalin, Emma

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present and interpret the findings of a recent questionnaire-based survey amongst staff working in higher education, which was concerned to explore the impact of cultural and religious diversity upon their working practices. We were also interested to find out in which areas staff felt that they required support. Many…

  13. Learning to Teach Elementary Science through Iterative Cycles of Enactment in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, SueAnn I.; Ciechanowski, Kathryn M.; Hartman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Iterative cycles of enactment embedded in culturally and linguistically diverse contexts provide rich opportunities for preservice teachers (PSTs) to enact core practices of science. This study is situated in the larger Families Involved in Sociocultural Teaching and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (FIESTAS) project, which weaves…

  14. Why Interculturalisation? A Neo-Marxist Approach to Accommodate Cultural Diversity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    The paper offers a neo-Marxist framework of interculturalisation to accommodate the increasing cultural diversity in the internationalisation of higher education with specific reference to Chinese students in New Zealand. At present, there are few official strategies in place to provide for the needs of international students in New Zealand…

  15. African American Public Administrators and Cultural Diversity Management: Findings of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohapatra, Manindra K.; And Others

    This paper presents the results of a pilot study of African American public administrators' attitudes toward cultural diversity management in the Fall of 1995. It is based on an open-ended national survey that was mailed to 394 federal, state, and local African American public administrators. The study asked respondents about the special knowledge…

  16. Orientations of State Administrators toward Cultural Diversity in Public Agencies: An Empirical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohapatra, Manindra K.; And Others

    This study identified the views of state administrators from seven midwestern states about cultural diversity and workforce 2000. A survey of 500 high level state public administrators from Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin was conducted in Spring 1993. Respondents (n=125) were 66 percent male, 77 percent white, 98…

  17. Cultural Diversity Awareness Inventory = Inventario Sobre el Reconocimiento de Diversas Culturas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Gertrude B.

    This booklet features a checklist designed to help persons who are involved in providing direct services to culturally diverse, young special needs children to assess their attitudes, beliefs, and behavior toward these children. The booklet also contains suggestions and lists of print, film, and filmstrip resources for developing a school program…

  18. Language and Cultural Diversity in U.S. Schools: Democratic Principles in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Terry A., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "With the idea in mind that America will continue to move toward a truly democratic society, however slowly, the contributors of these eight articles and introduction examine the possibility that language and culture will eventually not be an impediment to fulfilling the idea that America is a democracy. Diversity is at the heart of today's…

  19. Critical Entanglement: Research on Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Parental Involvement in Special Education 2000-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Cam

    2014-01-01

    If parental involvement in a child's education is generally viewed in positive terms, then it is important to understand what sorts of barriers might hinder it. This article reviews literature on culturally and linguistically diverse parental involvement in special education in the United States and Canada. In analyzing 20 articles published…

  20. James M. Kauffman's Ideas about Special Education: Implications for Educating Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetzloff, Lynn; Obiakor, Festus E.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, James M. Kauffman has been a reputable scholar in the field of special education. While his contributions to the field cannot be doubted, his ideas about special education have been somewhat controversial and even devastating to the education of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners with and without disabilities.…

  1. Culturally Diverse Literature: Enriching Variety in an Era of Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Fenice B.; Causey, Lauren L.; Galda, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The authors argue for the overwhelming importance of finding and including culturally diverse literature into the curricula teachers are authorized to teach. They discuss the implications of use and offer ideas on how to identify quality literature to include in classroom and school libraries.

  2. Technical Assistance Document for Assessment and Evaluation of Preschool Children Who Are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Jeff; Lopez, Eric J.; De Leon, Jozi

    This manual presents New Mexico state guidelines for the assessment and evaluation of preschool children who are culturally and linguistically diverse, and focuses on the principles of parent participation and nondiscriminatory evaluation as defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the New Mexico Administrative Codes. A…

  3. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in Gifted Education: Recruitment and Retention Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Donna Y.; Grantham, Tarek C.; Whiting, Gilman W.

    2008-01-01

    The field of gifted education has faced criticism about the underrepresentation of African American, Hispanic/Latino, and American Indian students who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) in its programs. This article proposes that efforts targeting both recruitment and retention barriers are essential to remedying this disparity.…

  4. Examining Practice for Educating Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Populations in Middle School Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keeffe, Suzanne Becker

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the relationship between instructional practice in the classroom and current theory when educating culturally and linguistically diverse exceptional (CLDE) middle school students in inclusive settings. Participants for this study were chosen using community nomination and data were collected using classroom observation.…

  5. Comprehension and Content: Planning Literacy in Low Socioeconomic and Culturally Diverse Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Allan; Dooley, Karen; Woods, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This article defines comprehension as a pragmatic social and intellectual practice. It reviews literature on current approaches to reading instruction for linguistically and culturally diverse and low socioeconomic students, noting the current policy emphasis on the teaching of comprehension as autonomous skills and strategies. The Four Resources…

  6. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity and Special Education: A Case Study of One Mother's Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeley, Sherry L.; Lukacs, Karrin

    2015-01-01

    Special education services have seen great improvement since the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) in 1975, but culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) families still face exceptional challenges when advocating for special education services for their children (Artiles & Harry, 2006; Palawat & May,…

  7. Creating a School Environment for the Effective Management of Cultural Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobler, B. R.; Moloi, K. C.; Loock, C. F.; Bisschoff, T. C.; Mestry, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the factors which impact upon the creation of a school environment for the effective management of cultural diversity as legislated for in the directive principles of the South African Schools Act of 1996 and the Schools Education Act of 1995. The two Acts determine that every person shall have the right to basic education…

  8. Cultural Diversity on the Council of Europe Documents: The Role of Education and the Intercultural Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Democratic governance of cultural diversity is one of the more important worries of the majority of European states. A few years ago, this concern existed mainly in central and northern Europe; today, however, it has become a matter of general interest for the whole continent. This is shown through two relevant facts: the European Union declared…

  9. Can Academic Reference Librarians Enhance the Cultural Diversity of the Nation's Colleges and Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, David

    Academic reference librarians can enhance the campus cultural diversity of colleges and universities by displaying sensitivity at the reference desk; understanding multicultural group behaviors; avoiding stereotyped attitudes; appreciating a wide range of cognitive style differences; striving to make multicultural students feel comfortable;…

  10. Culturally Responsive Leadership in a Diverse School: A Case Study of a High School Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhlangobe, Lewis; Gordon, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes how a culturally responsive school leader promoted equity in a racially and linguistically diverse school. The authors shadowed Faith, an assistant principal, and did follow-up interviews with her after each day of shadowing. They observed teachers in their classrooms, conducted multiple interviews with teachers and parents,…

  11. Knowledge, Communication, and Advocacy of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Parents at Individualized Education Program Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews using Cognitive Interview method techniques were conducted with nine Culturally and Linguistically Diverse parents of students with disabilities in this exploratory study. Parents recalled experiences asking questions and making advocacy statements at Individualized Education Program meetings. Four major findings were…

  12. Transition Planning for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Youth. Brookes Transition to Adulthood Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Too often, culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) youth with disabilities have a tougher road to adulthood than their Caucasian peers with disabilities. Reverse the odds with this concise how-to book, the first guide to easing the complex transition process for CLD students with a wide range of special needs. A veteran trainer of transition…

  13. Compendium: Writings on Effective Practices for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Bridgie Alexis, Ed.

    Derived from two national multicultural symposia, this compendium focuses on an array of topics that combine research and educational practices for youth from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds with disabilities and/or gifts. Specific papers include: (1) "Parent-Involved Social Skill Instruction and the Perceptions of Children At…

  14. Parental Opinion Concerning School Sexuality Education in a Culturally Diverse Population in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Janet R.; Johnson, Helen L.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to expand upon previous research related to parental opinion concerning school sexuality education by sampling a culturally diverse, low-income population that has been traditionally under-represented in the literature. A total of 191 parents attending an urban community college completed a written questionnaire about what topics…

  15. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  16. A responsive evaluation of mental health treatment in Cambodia: Intentionally addressing poverty to increase cultural responsiveness in therapy.

    PubMed

    Seponski, Desiree M; Lewis, Denise C; Megginson, Maegan C

    2014-01-01

    Mental health issues are significant contributors to the global burden of disease with the highest incidence in resource poor countries; 90% of those in need of mental health treatment reside in low resource countries but receive only 10% of the world's resources. Cambodia, the eighth least developed country in the world, serves as one example of the need to address mental health concerns in low-income, resource poor countries. The current study utilises responsive evaluation methodology to explore how poverty-stricken Cambodian clients, therapists and supervisors experience Western models of therapy as culturally responsive to their unique needs. Quantitative and qualitative data were triangulated across multiple stakeholders using numerous methods including a focus group, interviews, surveys, case illustrations and live supervision observation and analysed using constant comparative analysis. Emerging findings suggest that poverty, material needs, therapy location and financial situations greatly impact the daily lives and mental health conditions of Cambodians and hinder clients' therapeutic progress. The local community needs and context of poverty greatly hinder clients' therapeutic progress in therapy treatment and when therapy does not directly address the culture of poverty, clients did not experience therapy as valuable despite some temporary decreases in mental health symptoms. PMID:25204750

  17. Networking with Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Cultural Diversity in Public Administration Education at Indiana State University. A Final Report on a Cultural Diversity Innovation in Public Administration Education Project, 1992-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohapatra, Manindra K.; McDowell, James L.

    This final report describes a Cultural Diversity Innovation project implemented in 1992-93 at Indiana State University (ISU). The central objective of the project was to enrich cultural diversity elements in the Masters in Public Administration (MPA) curriculum at ISU through the presentations of visiting faculty from historically black colleges…

  18. Teaching Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners: Effective Programs and Practices. Proceedings of an Institute Hosted by the National Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning (Santa Cruz, California, June 28-30, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montone, Christopher L., Ed.

    The proceedings presented consist of summaries and reports of the presentations given during a summer institute on teaching linguistically and culturally diverse learners. Summaries of the following papers are provided: "Education 2000 and Beyond: The Challenge of Our Culturally Diverse Students" (Eugene Garcia); "Second Language Learning in…

  19. [Cultural diversity and pluralism in the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights].

    PubMed

    Romeo Casabona, Carlos María

    2011-01-01

    The Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights represents a significant milestone in the history of Law, particularly in the application of International Law to an important area of human activity, namely the medical sciences, the life sciences and the technologies which, linked to both, can be applied to human relations. In parallel with this, and as will be analysed in this article, the Declaration has involved adopting a clear position regarding cultural diversity and pluralism in relation to Biomedicine. In this paper the author highlights the fact that perspectives have been opened which have hardly been explored concerning Biomedicine, such as the recognition of the value and respect which cultural diversity (multiculturalism), economic and social diversity deserve in relation to the issues covered by the Declaration, and the acceptance that the owners of the rights are not only individuals, but can also be groups. PMID:22984748

  20. Reconciling long-term cultural diversity and short-term collective social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Valori, Luca; Picciolo, Francesco; Allansdottir, Agnes; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2012-01-01

    An outstanding open problem is whether collective social phenomena occurring over short timescales can systematically reduce cultural heterogeneity in the long run, and whether offline and online human interactions contribute differently to the process. Theoretical models suggest that short-term collective behavior and long-term cultural diversity are mutually excluding, since they require very different levels of social influence. The latter jointly depends on two factors: the topology of the underlying social network and the overlap between individuals in multidimensional cultural space. However, while the empirical properties of social networks are intensively studied, little is known about the large-scale organization of real societies in cultural space, so that random input specifications are necessarily used in models. Here we use a large dataset to perform a high-dimensional analysis of the scientific beliefs of thousands of Europeans. We find that interopinion correlations determine a nontrivial ultrametric hierarchy of individuals in cultural space. When empirical data are used as inputs in models, ultrametricity has strong and counterintuitive effects. On short timescales, it facilitates a symmetry-breaking phase transition triggering coordinated social behavior. On long timescales, it suppresses cultural convergence by restricting it within disjoint groups. Moreover, ultrametricity implies that these results are surprisingly robust to modifications of the dynamical rules considered. Thus the empirical distribution of individuals in cultural space appears to systematically optimize the coexistence of short-term collective behavior and long-term cultural diversity, which can be realized simultaneously for the same moderate level of mutual influence in a diverse range of online and offline settings. PMID:22232656

  1. Cultural/interpersonal values and smoking in an ethnically diverse sample of Southern California adolescents.

    PubMed

    Unger, Jennifer B; Shakib, Sohaila; Gallaher, Peggy; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Mouttapa, Michele; Palmer, Paula H; Johnson, C Anderson

    2006-01-01

    In ethnically diverse school contexts, values from multiple cultures might influence adolescents' attitudes and behaviors. This study developed scales to assess cultural values among Southern California 6'-grade adolescents (N=2281) and evaluated the associations between values and smoking. The scales assessed values salient in many Hispanic and Asian cultures: Respect for Adults (e.g., filial piety, respeto), Interpersonal Harmony (e.g., saving face, simpatia), and Differentiated Gender Roles (e.g., machismo). In cross-sectional and one-year longitudinal models, Respect for Adults and Interpersonal Harmony were associated with a lower risk of lifetime smoking. The associations were significant even after controlling for demographic characteristics, friends' smoking, and parents' smoking, indicating that values influence adolescents' behavior over and above the effects of modeling and peer influence. Increased understanding of adolescents' values could inform the creation of smoking prevention programs for ethnically diverse adolescents. PMID:16696546

  2. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Early Childhood Teacher Preparation: The Impact of Contextual Characteristics on Coursework and Practica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Chih-Ing; Maxwell, Kelly L.; Able-Boone, Harriet; Zimmer, Catherine R.

    2009-01-01

    The population of children in early childhood settings is becoming increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse, and these changes in demographics have warranted teachers becoming more culturally responsive and better prepared to work with diverse young children and families. Teacher preparation programs across the nation have responded…

  3. Infusing Cultural Diversity into the Community College Macroeconomics Principles Course: Some Suggested Essays and Group Work Exercises for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrowsky, Michael C.

    This brief handbook provides a set of exercises that instructors can use if they decide to incorporate cultural diversity topics into a macroeconomics principles course. It is hoped that this guidebook will: (1) help instructors grapple with any curriculum changes in macroeconomics that require a cultural diversity segment; and (2) sensitize…

  4. Phylogenetic diversity of culturable fungi in the Heshang Cave, central China

    PubMed Central

    Man, Baiying; Wang, Hongmei; Xiang, Xing; Wang, Ruicheng; Yun, Yuan; Gong, Linfeng

    2015-01-01

    Caves are nutrient-limited and dark subterranean ecosystems. To date, attention has been focused on geological research of caves in China, whilst indigenous microbial diversity has been insufficiently characterized. Here, we report the fungal diversity in the pristine, oligotrophic, karst Heshang Cave, central China, using a culture-dependent method coupled with the analysis of the fungal rRNA-ITS gene sequences. A total of 194 isolates were obtained with six different media from 14 sampling sites of sediments, weathered rocks, and bat guanos. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the 194 sequenced isolates into 33 genera within 15 orders of three phyla, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota, indicating a high degree of fungal diversity in the Heshang Cave. Notably, 16 out of the 36 fungal genera were also frequently observed in solution caves around the world and 23 genera were previously found in carbonate cave, indicating potential similarities among fungal communities in cave ecosystems. However, 10 genera in this study were not reported previously in any solution caves, thus expanding our knowledge about fungal diversity in cave ecosystems. Moreover, culturable fungal diversity varied from one habitat to another within the cave, being the highest in sediments, followed by weathered rocks and bat guanos as indicated by α-diversity indexes. At the genus level, Penicillium accounted for 40, 54, and 52% in three habitats of sediments, weathered rocks, and bat guanos, respectively. Trichoderma, Paecilomyces, and Aspergillus accounted for 9, 22, and 37% in the above habitats, correspondingly. Despite of the dominance of Penicillium in all samples, β-diversity index indicated significant differences between each two fungal communities in the three habitats in view of both the composition and abundance. Our study is the first report on fungal communities in a natural pristine solution cave system in central China and sheds light on fungal diversity and functions in

  5. Understanding and enhancing the learning experiences of culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students in an Australian bachelor of nursing program.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sarah Yeun-Sim; Hickey, Noelene; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Pitt, Victoria; Hoffman, Kerry; Norton, Carol Anne; Ohr, Se Ok

    2011-04-01

    The growth in numbers of culturally and linguistically diverse students entering nursing programs in Australia presents challenges for academic and clinical staff, and most importantly the students themselves. In this paper we present the findings from a pilot study designed to explore these issues and to develop strategies to address them. This study used a qualitative explorative approach to gain rich in-depth data. Eleven culturally and linguistically diverse students, three clinical facilitators, and four academic staff participated in focus group interviews. Four major themes emerged: level of English language competence, feelings of isolation, limited opportunities for learning, and inadequate university support. The issues we identified led to a meaningful discussion of the political, financial, social and intercultural context that they are entrapped in. This paper provides educators, clinicians, policy makers and researchers with an insight where and how they commence to break the trap and highlights, the need for further research into the perspectives of Australian students' who study and socialise with their international peers. PMID:21078536

  6. Examining physical activity service provision to culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in Australia: a qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Kolt, Gregory S; Mummery, W Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for the role of physical activity in preventing and managing a range of chronic health conditions. A particular challenge in promoting physical activity as a health strategy exists in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups, as such groups demonstrate high risk for a range of non-communicable diseases. The aim of this research was to examine the perspective of multicultural health service providers for CALD groups with respect to the physical activity services/initiatives on offer, access barriers to these services, and ideas for future service delivery in this area. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 multicultural health service providers across the capital cities of the three most populous states in Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria), and thematic content analysis was used to examine the data. Findings indicated that the majority of physical activity initiatives were associated with organizations offering other social services for CALD communities but were greatly restrained by resources. As well, it was found that most services were not designed by taking into account specific cultural requirements for CALD communities or their cultural expectations. Common barriers identified to service uptake were classified as socio-cultural (e.g., gender, language, context of health) and environmental (e.g., transportation) in nature. These findings should be utilized when planning future physical activity and health promotion initiatives for increasing CALD participation. In particular, programs need to be culturally tailored to the specific expectations of CALD groups, addressing cultural safety and sensitivity, and should be in partnership with other organizations to extend the reach and capacity. PMID:23638145

  7. Examining Physical Activity Service Provision to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Communities in Australia: A Qualitative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Caperchione, Cristina M.; Kolt, Gregory S.; Mummery, W. Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for the role of physical activity in preventing and managing a range of chronic health conditions. A particular challenge in promoting physical activity as a health strategy exists in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups, as such groups demonstrate high risk for a range of non-communicable diseases. The aim of this research was to examine the perspective of multicultural health service providers for CALD groups with respect to the physical activity services/initiatives on offer, access barriers to these services, and ideas for future service delivery in this area. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 multicultural health service providers across the capital cities of the three most populous states in Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria), and thematic content analysis was used to examine the data. Findings indicated that the majority of physical activity initiatives were associated with organizations offering other social services for CALD communities but were greatly restrained by resources. As well, it was found that most services were not designed by taking into account specific cultural requirements for CALD communities or their cultural expectations. Common barriers identified to service uptake were classified as socio-cultural (e.g., gender, language, context of health) and environmental (e.g., transportation) in nature. These findings should be utilized when planning future physical activity and health promotion initiatives for increasing CALD participation. In particular, programs need to be culturally tailored to the specific expectations of CALD groups, addressing cultural safety and sensitivity, and should be in partnership with other organizations to extend the reach and capacity. PMID:23638145

  8. iDiversity and LIS Education: Student-Based Groups Promoting Cultural Competence as a Vision for the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    New homegrown groups such as iDiversity call attention to the important and essential role that student-based groups play in promoting cultural competency within their own institutions and the profession at large. The iDiversity story outlines (1) how student engagement can be transformed into leadership and action by diversity focus within the…

  9. Expansion of Cultured Bacterial Diversity by Large-Scale Dilution-to-Extinction Culturing from a Single Seawater Sample.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Jo; Kang, Ilnam; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cultivation (HTC) based on a dilution-to-extinction method has been applied broadly to the cultivation of marine bacterial groups, which has often led to the repeated isolation of abundant lineages such as SAR11 and oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria (OMG). In this study, to expand the phylogenetic diversity of HTC isolates, we performed a large-scale HTC with a single surface seawater sample collected from the East Sea, the Western Pacific Ocean. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA genes from 847 putative pure cultures demonstrated that some isolates were affiliated with not-yet-cultured clades, including the OPB35 and Puniceicoccaceae marine group of Verrucomicrobia and PS1 of Alphaproteobacteria. In addition, numerous strains were obtained from abundant clades, such as SAR11, marine Roseobacter clade, OMG (e.g., SAR92 and OM60), OM43, and SAR116, thereby increasing the size of available culture resources for representative marine bacterial groups. Comparison between the composition of HTC isolates and the bacterial community structure of the seawater sample used for HTC showed that diverse marine bacterial groups exhibited various growth capabilities under our HTC conditions. The growth response of many bacterial groups, however, was clearly different from that observed with conventional plating methods, as exemplified by numerous isolates of the SAR11 clade and Verrucomicrobia. This study showed that a large number of novel bacterial strains could be obtained by an extensive HTC from even a small number of samples. PMID:26573832

  10. Between Relativism and Imperialism: Navigating Moral Diversity in Cross-Cultural Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Beck, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The need for explicit theoretical reflection on cross-cultural bioethics continues to grow as the spread of communication technologies and increased human migration has made interactions between medical professionals and patients from different cultural backgrounds much more common. I claim that this need presents us with the following dilemma. On the one hand, we do not want to operate according to an imperialist ethical framework that denies and silences the legitimacy of cultural values other than our own. On the other hand, we do not want to backslide into a form of cultural relativism that is unable to critically appraise cultural practices that are harmful, unjust, or oppressive. I examine two prominent attempts - the principlism of Tom Beauchamp and James Childress and the Contractarianism of Robert Baker - to frame cross-cultural bioethics between these two extremes and argue that both approaches have significant flaws. The principlist approach fails to provide a non-question begging way to identify cross-cultural norms that does not already assume the universal legitimacy of moral principles dominant in North American society. Baker's contractarianism cannot grapple with the realities of political power imbalances that often characterize cross-cultural moral disputes. I suggest that a naturalized feminist framework, though not free of its own theoretical difficulties, provides the best alternative for approaching moral diversity respectfully and critically. PMID:24750579

  11. A multilevel investigation of motivational cultural intelligence, organizational diversity climate, and cultural sales: evidence from U.S. real estate firms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Dong; Portnoy, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Adopting a multilevel theoretical framework, the authors examined how motivational cultural intelligence influences individual cultural sales--the number of housing transactions occurring between people of different cultural origins. Data from 305 real estate agents employed at 26 real estate firms in the United States demonstrated that an individual's motivational cultural intelligence is positively related to his or her cultural sales. This positive relationship is enhanced by the firm's motivational cultural intelligence and diversity climate. The authors discuss the theoretical and practical implications of their findings in a workplace context that involves cross-cultural interpersonal interactions. PMID:21806296

  12. Enabling Curricula: The Development of a Teaching Observation Protocol to Address Students' Diverse Learning Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Diverse learning needs are students' learning needs in areas such as language, learning styles, background, disabilities, technology skills, motivation, engagement, and access. Teacher candidates must be aware of and plan to meet these needs. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides guidelines that can increase the level of student…

  13. Modeling Effects of Local Extinctions on Culture Change and Diversity in the Paleolithic

    PubMed Central

    Premo, L. S.; Kuhn, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of early stone tool technologies has puzzled archaeologists for decades. Cognitively based explanations, which presume either lack of ability to innovate or extreme conformism, do not account for the totality of the empirical patterns. Following recent research, this study explores the effects of demographic factors on rates of culture change and diversification. We investigate whether the appearance of stability in early Paleolithic technologies could result from frequent extinctions of local subpopulations within a persistent metapopulation. A spatially explicit agent-based model was constructed to test the influence of local extinction rate on three general cultural patterns that archaeologists might observe in the material record: total diversity, differentiation among spatially defined groups, and the rate of cumulative change. The model shows that diversity, differentiation, and the rate of cumulative cultural change would be strongly affected by local extinction rates, in some cases mimicking the results of conformist cultural transmission. The results have implications for understanding spatial and temporal patterning in ancient material culture. PMID:21179418

  14. Communicating with culturally and linguistically diverse patients in an acute care setting: nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, R N Jane

    2003-03-01

    Communication with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) patients has been shown to be difficult. This study describes nurses' experiences of communicating with CLD patients in an acute care setting. A purposive sample of registered nurses and certified midwives (n=23) were interviewed. Main findings were: interpreters, bilingual health workers and combinations of different strategies were used to communicate with CLD patients; some nurses showed empathy, respect and a willingness to make an effort in the communication process with others showing an ethnocentric orientation. Main recommendations were: prioritising access to appropriate linguistic services, providing nurses with support from health care workers, e.g., bilingual health care workers who are able to provide more in-depth information, increasing nurses' understanding of legal issues within patient encounters, supporting nurses to translate their awareness of cultural diversity into acceptance of, appreciation for and commitment to CLD patients and their families. PMID:12605952

  15. Linguistic Diversity and Traffic Accidents: Lessons from Statistical Studies of Cultural Traits

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Seán; Winters, James

    2013-01-01

    The recent proliferation of digital databases of cultural and linguistic data, together with new statistical techniques becoming available has lead to a rise in so-called nomothetic studies [1]–[8]. These seek relationships between demographic variables and cultural traits from large, cross-cultural datasets. The insights from these studies are important for understanding how cultural traits evolve. While these studies are fascinating and are good at generating testable hypotheses, they may underestimate the probability of finding spurious correlations between cultural traits. Here we show that this kind of approach can find links between such unlikely cultural traits as traffic accidents, levels of extra-martial sex, political collectivism and linguistic diversity. This suggests that spurious correlations, due to historical descent, geographic diffusion or increased noise-to-signal ratios in large datasets, are much more likely than some studies admit. We suggest some criteria for the evaluation of nomothetic studies and some practical solutions to the problems. Since some of these studies are receiving media attention without a widespread understanding of the complexities of the issue, there is a risk that poorly controlled studies could affect policy. We hope to contribute towards a general skepticism for correlational studies by demonstrating the ease of finding apparently rigorous correlations between cultural traits. Despite this, we see well-controlled nomothetic studies as useful tools for the development of theories. PMID:23967132

  16. Expanding our borders: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology's special issue on immigration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nadine; Tummala-Narra, Pratyusha; Zárate, Michael A

    2013-07-01

    Introduces the current special issue of the journal, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. This special issue focuses on the topic of immigration and highlights the important within group differences often overlooked when immigrants are conceptualized as a homogeneous group. The articles in this journal consider a variety of microsystems, such as educational settings, ethnic and gay communities, and communities with anti-immigration laws. PMID:23875848

  17. Increasing Mathematics and Science Achievement for Culturally Diverse Students through Teaching Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahon, Lee

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this proposal was to field test and evaluate a Teacher Training program that would prepare teachers to increase the motivation and achievement of culturally diverse students in the areas of science and mathematics. Designed as a three year program, this report covers the first two years of the training program at the Ronald McNair School in the Ravenswood School district, using the resources of the NASA Ames Research Center and the California Framework for Mathematics and Science.

  18. The Efficacy of Screencasts to Address the Diverse Academic Needs of Students in a Large Lecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder-Grover, Tershia; Green, Katie R.; Millunchick, Joanna Mirecki

    2011-01-01

    In large lecture courses, it can be challenging for instructors to address student misconceptions, supplement background knowledge, and identify ways to motivate the various interests of all students during the allotted class time. Instructors can harness instructional technology such as screencasts, recordings that capture audio narration along…

  19. Late HIV diagnosis of people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in Sydney: the role of culture and community.

    PubMed

    Körner, H

    2007-02-01

    In Australia more than 85% of newly diagnosed HIV infections in 1999-2003 were homosexually acquired. In contrast, among people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, there is a much higher proportion of heterosexual exposure and many of the heterosexually acquired infections are diagnosed 'late', with people sometimes presenting with symptoms of AIDS. This paper reports on circumstances of late HIV diagnosis, meaning of an HIV-positive diagnosis and perceptions of risk among HIV-positive people from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds in Sydney. The focus was on commonalities across cultures and ethnicities. Data were collected through semi-structured in-depth interviews with clients of the Multicultural HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Service and a sexual health clinic. Regular HIV tests were the exception in this group. Testing was usually motivated by a serious health crisis. Participants interpreted their diagnosis in the context of their knowledge and experiences with HIV/AIDS in their country of birth and the perceptions of HIV/AIDS in their ethnic communities in Australia. Many were not aware of the relationship between HIV and AIDS. Risk was perceived in terms of 'risk group' membership not in terms of practices and behaviours. Late diagnosis cannot be explained solely by association with country of birth, race or ethnicity. Rather, it is located within complex sets of social and cultural relations: the values attributed to HIV/AIDS and those infected and the social and cultural relations of ethnic communities in Australia and the dominant culture. These are enacted in healthcare seeking behaviour, perceptions of people with HIV and perceptions of being 'at risk'. PMID:17364395

  20. Assessing Diverse Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    This keynote address begins with examples that underscore how profoundly the issues of multiculturalism and diversity impact the consciousness of society at the end of the 20th century. Changes in assessment that can lead to assessment for change in a culturally diverse society are based on the ideas that "assessment as a process must be…

  1. Developing culturally diverse direct caregivers for care work with older adults: challenges and potential strategies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Boyd H; Smith, Mary K

    2013-01-01

    This discussion presents real-world examples of challenges that occur in geriatric training as a contribution to the ongoing conversation about tailored training for direct caregivers. Numerous discussions are available on the need for more geriatric training in nursing, including aspects of care for patients with dementia, but few if any studies have identified a similar need on behalf of direct care workers, including home health care aides,personal care aides, and nursing assistants who are not part of a licensure track or a baccalaureate-based nursing curriculum. This discussion examines three cultural factors that underlie challenges for nursing educators and supervisors in dementia care who oversee direct care workers: (1) the effect of immigrant cultures and languages; (2) the effect of different intergenerational cultural constructs; and (3) the effect of culturally derived attitudes about aging and dementia. Strategies to address these challenges are offered. PMID:23413445

  2. Teaching engineering ethics using role-playing in a culturally diverse student group.

    PubMed

    Prince, Robert H

    2006-04-01

    The use of role-playing ("active learning") as a teaching tool has been reported in areas as diverse as social psychology, history and analytical chemistry. Its use as a tool in the teaching of engineering ethics and professionalism is also not new, but the approach develops new perspectives when used in a college class of exceptionally wide cultural diversity. York University is a large urban university (40,000 undergraduates) that draws its enrolment primarily from the Greater Toronto Area, arguably one of the most culturally diverse cities in the world, embracing the largest percentage of Canada's immigration. Among the area's five million inhabitants, 50% identify themselves as a visible minority born outside Canada, while over 100 languages and dialects are spoken daily. Although students admitted from this international pool have usually been exposed to western attitudes during secondary education and are rapidly assimilated into Canadian culture, responses to specific ethical issues are strongly influenced by their prior culture. Two and three-part scripts for case studies based on NSF or original scenarios were written to illustrate issues such as gifts, attitudes towards women and ethnic minorities, conflict of interest, whistle-blowing, sexual harassment, individual rights, privacy, environment, intellectual property, and others. Following the presentation, the actors lead group discussion based on previously specified questions. Once the initial shyness and reluctance of some cultures has been overcome through the building of rapport, students have written original scripts based on hypothetical or prior personal situations. The method is now being adopted in a short course format to assist the professional integration of foreign trained engineers. PMID:16609718

  3. Addressing the Challenges of Diverse Knowledge Systems through Landscape Analysis: A Case Study in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, A. H.; Griggs, D.; Joachim, L.; Heider, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Barmah-Millewa region of the Murray-Darling Basin is the heart of the Traditional Lands of the Yorta Yorta people. Management of water and ecosystem services in the region is governed by a wide array of sometimes inconsistent legislation and policies with differing rules, management focus and plans, and permitting and allocation procedures. Geographic information systems are a common framework for the integration of Indigenous knowledge and insights into natural resources management. But only with appropriate collection, management and database design protocols in place can geodatabase development and analysis support the effective and respectful participation of the Yorta Yorta community in management of this ecologically, economically and culturally important region. Here we describe the knowledge collection and protection protocols that were applied to develop the integrated geodatabase. We present approaches to generating meaningful guidance for water managers on the cultural implications of water allocation decisions.

  4. Science knowledge and cognitive strategy use among culturally and linguistically diverse students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Okhee; Fradd, Sandra H.; Sutman, Frank X.

    Science performance is determined, to a large extent, by what students already know about science (i.e., science knowledge) and what techniques or methods students use in performing science tasks (i.e., cognitive strategies). This study describes and compares science knowledge, science vocabulary, and cognitive strategy use among four diverse groups of elementary students: (a) monolingual English Caucasian, (b) African-American, (c) bilingual Spanish, and (d) bilingual Haitian Creole. To facilitate science performance in culturally and linguistically congruent settings, the study included student dyads and teachers of the same language, culture, and gender. Science performance was observed using three science tasks: weather phenomena, simple machines, and buoyancy. Data analysis involved a range of qualitative methods focusing on major themes and patterns, and quantitative methods using coding systems to summarize frequencies and total scores. The findings reveal distinct patterns of science knowledge, science vocabulary, and cognitive strategy use among the four language and culture groups. The findings also indicate relationships among science knowledge, science vocabulary, and cognitive strategy use. These findings raise important issues about science instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse groups of students.Received: 3 January 1995;

  5. Preserved genetic diversity in organoids cultured from biopsies of human colorectal cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Weeber, Fleur; van de Wetering, Marc; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Dijkstra, Krijn K.; Krijgsman, Oscar; Kuilman, Thomas; Gadellaa-van Hooijdonk, Christa G. M.; van der Velden, Daphne L.; Peeper, Daniel S.; Cuppen, Edwin P. J. G.; Vries, Robert G.; Clevers, Hans; Voest, Emile E.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor organoids are 3D cultures of cancer cells. They can be derived from the tumor of each individual patient, thereby providing an attractive ex vivo assay to tailor treatment. Using patient-derived tumor organoids for this purpose requires that organoids derived from biopsies maintain the genetic diversity of the in vivo tumor. In this study tumor biopsies were obtained from 14 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (i) to test the feasibility of organoid culture from metastatic biopsy specimens and (ii) to compare the genetic diversity of patient-derived tumor organoids and the original tumor biopsy. Genetic analysis was performed using SOLiD sequencing for 1,977 cancer-relevant genes. Copy number profiles were generated from sequencing data using CopywriteR. Here we demonstrate that organoid cultures can be established from tumor biopsies of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with a success rate of 71%. Genetic analysis showed that organoids reflect the metastasis from which they were derived. Ninety percent of somatic mutations were shared between organoids and biopsies from the same patient, and the DNA copy number profiles of organoids and the corresponding original tumor show a correlation of 0.89. Most importantly, none of the mutations that were found exclusively in either the tumor or organoid culture are in driver genes or genes amenable for drug targeting. These findings support further exploration of patient-derived organoids as an ex vivo platform to personalize anticancer treatment. PMID:26460009

  6. Culturally diverse Malayan milieu: experiences and perceptions of RAANC nurses 1955-1960.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Margaret

    2007-07-01

    The war exploits of Australian Army nurses have been represented in a number of literary sources, but there is a paucity of data about the nurses who served in the Malayan Emergency (1948-1960). Using descriptive interpretive historiography, with a central focus on oral testimony, this paper aims to highlight the culturally rich and diverse environment of Malaya in the 1950s. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four women from the Royal Australian Army Nursing Corps to expose their experiences and perceptions of the Malayan environment and its people. The information provided by these nurses was subjected to manual thematic analysis resulting in the emergence of a number of themes. One prominent theme, Malaya's cultural diversity, was chosen for this paper because it contained an abundant source of new and rich data. To protect the identities of the informants pseudonyms were used in the presentation of the oral narratives. This approach led to revelations about how Australian women, with limited knowledge or exposure to other cultural groups, engaged in work and leisure time pursuits in Malaya's exotic cultural milieu. PMID:18074769

  7. Application of culture culture-independent molecular biology based methods to evaluate acetic acid bacteria diversity during vinegar processing.

    PubMed

    Ilabaca, Carolina; Navarrete, Paola; Mardones, Pamela; Romero, Jaime; Mas, Albert

    2008-08-15

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are considered fastidious microorganisms because they are difficult to isolate and cultivate. Different molecular approaches were taken to detect AAB diversity, independently of their capacity to grow in culture media. Those methods were tested in samples that originated during traditional vinegar production. Bacterial diversity was assessed by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, obtained by PCR amplifications of DNA extracted directly from the acetification container. Bacterial composition was analyzed by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA gene, Temporal Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) separation of amplicons containing region V3-V5 of 16S rRNA gene and cloning of those amplicons. TTGE bands and clones were grouped based on their electrophoretic pattern similarity and sequenced to be compared with reference strains. The main microorganism identified in vinegar was Acetobacter pasteurianus, which at the end of the acetification process was considered to be the only microorganism present. The diversity was the highest at 2% acetic acid, where indefinite species of Gluconacetobacter xylinus/europaeus/intermedius were also present. PMID:18571262

  8. Learning to Teach Elementary Science Through Iterative Cycles of Enactment in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoms, SueAnn I.; Ciechanowski, Kathryn M.; Hartman, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Iterative cycles of enactment embedded in culturally and linguistically diverse contexts provide rich opportunities for preservice teachers (PSTs) to enact core practices of science. This study is situated in the larger Families Involved in Sociocultural Teaching and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (FIESTAS) project, which weaves together cycles of enactment, core practices in science education and culturally relevant pedagogies. The theoretical foundation draws upon situated learning theory and communities of practice. Using video analysis by PSTs and course artifacts, the authors studied how the iterative process of these cycles guided PSTs development as teachers of elementary science. Findings demonstrate how PSTs were drawing on resources to inform practice, purposefully noticing their practice, renegotiating their roles in teaching, and reconsidering "professional blindness" through cultural practice.

  9. Preparing culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students for clinical practice in the health care setting.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Frohman, Rena

    2013-07-01

    The number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students seeking enrollment in higher education courses in Western countries where English is the predominant language has grown considerably in the past decade, especially in undergraduate health care courses. When enrolled in nursing courses, students are required to complete clinical placements. Such experiences can create significant challenges for CALD students where language, cultural differences, and interpretation of cultural norms complicate the learning process. To assist CALD nursing students to transition successfully, an extracurricular integrated curriculum program was developed and implemented at a university in Queensland, Australia. The program is a series of interactive workshops based on the principles of caring pedagogy and student-centered learning. The program applies strategies that combine small-group discussions with peers, role-plays, and interactions with final-year nursing student volunteers. Evaluation of the program suggests it has assisted most of the students surveyed to be successful in their clinical studies. PMID:23721071

  10. Cultural Adaptation for Ethnic Diversity: A Review of Obesity Interventions for Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Mary Jo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity disproportionately affects U.S. ethnic minority preschool children, placing them at risk for obesity related co-morbidities and premature death. Effective culturally appropriate interventions are needed to improve health behaviors and reduce obesity in young high-risk minority children, while their behaviors are still developing. All known obesity intervention studies (e.g., diet and physical activity) since 2000 targeting U.S. ethnic minority preschool children were reviewed. Five electronic databases and eight published literature reviews were used to identify the studies. Intervention studies without identified ethnic minority participants were excluded. Ten obesity interventions studies met the review criteria. Published cultural adaptation guidelines were used to develop a mechanism to analyze, score, and rank the intervention adaptations. Cultural adaptations varied widely in rigor, depth, and breadth. Results indicated a relative absence of appropriately adapted obesity interventions for ethnic minority groups, suggesting a need for more rigorous cultural adaptation guidelines when designing obesity interventions for diverse ethnicities. Culturally appropriate adaptations appeared to enhance intervention relevance, effectiveness, and feasibility. The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate 1) the type and extent of cultural adaptations strategies applied to the interventions, and 2) how these adaptations related to the study outcomes. PMID:24159268

  11. Discipline-Based Art Education and Cultural Diversity. Seminar Proceedings of a National Invitational Seminar (3rd, Austin Texas, August 6-9, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getty Center for Education in the Arts, Los Angeles, CA.

    This publication contains proceedings of a seminar structured around five basic themes: (1) cultural diversity in education; (2) discipline based art education (DBAE) and cultural diversity; (3) how cultural diversity has affected practices in art history, aesthetics, criticism, and art making; (4) experiences in other disciplines which effect…

  12. Opening up mental health service delivery to cultural diversity: current situation, development and examples from three northern European countries.

    PubMed

    Bäärnhielm, Sofie; Jávo, Cecilie; Mösko, Mike-Oliver

    2013-01-01

    There are inequalities in health among migrants and local populations in Europe. Due to migration, Germany, Norway and Sweden have become ethnic culturally diverse nations. There are barriers to mental health care access for refugees, migrants and minorities, and problems with quality of culturally sensitive care in the three countries. This is despite tax-funded health care systems based on equity in service provision. There is a need to develop culturally sensitive mental health services that respond to the increasing diversity of the populations. In this chapter, we will take a closer look at cultural diversity in the countries in question, discuss challenges and give examples of current work to open up mental health services to cultural diversity. The German example will focus on the movement of Interkulturelle Öffnung (cross-cultural opening of the health care system) and work on creating national guidelines and quality standards. From Norway, the work of the National Centre for Mental Health for the indigenous Sámi population will be presented. The Swedish example will focus on the work carried out by the Transcultural Centre. The latter is a competence centre supporting development of culturally sensitive care as an integrated part of the regional health and mental health care system in Stockholm. Finally, the relevance of mental health care for a culturally diverse population, as a part of the larger social project of building tolerant multicultural societies, will be discussed. PMID:23816862

  13. Production of novel types of antibacterial liamocins by diverse strains of Aureobasidium pullulans grown on different culture media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The objective was to compare production of antibacterial liamocins by diverse strains of A. pullulans grown on different culture media. Results: Liamocins produced by strains of A. pullulans have potential agricultural and pharmaceutical applications as antibacterials with specificity aga...

  14. Providing Outreach to Families of Youth with Disabilities from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds by Working with Cultural Groups and Community Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tracey R.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored how informal community networks (i.e., faith based organizations, community cultural centers and service agencies) provided information to culturally and linguistically diverse families. The goals of this study were, first, to gain a better understanding of the methods the informal community networks used to…

  15. Empowering Equity in Postsecondary Transition for Marginalized Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students with Disabilities by Implementing a Culturally Responsive Summary of Performance Teacher Training and Support Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jez, Rebekka Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Marginalized culturally and linguistically diverse students with special needs often struggle after high school. Many special educators are unaware of legal mandates and best practice in postsecondary transition, especially the intricate needs when working this group. The culturally responsive Summary of Performance (CRSOP) training and support…

  16. The key role of cultural preservation in maize diversity conservation in the argentine yungas.

    PubMed

    Hilgert, Norma I; Zamudio, Fernando; Furlan, Violeta; Cariola, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    Farmers' decisions on what to grow and why can contribute in understanding the conservation of agrobiodiversity. Culture and ethnicity are indicated as first-class factors leading preservation of heirloom cultivars but this has been little considered in studies examining factors that influence the loss or preservation of agrobiodiversity. We propose that corn's ethnotaxa of less diverse uses, which are also key partners in local cultural reproduction, are usually cultivated by a few households. We analyse if there is a relationship between uses and richness of cultivated ethnotaxa at household level and describe corn's medicinal and ritual uses. We found 25 cultivated ethnotaxa, heterogeneously distributed in the region, and we also found that ethnotaxa with less diverse uses are cultivated in fewer households. We identified that, at regional scale, richness is related with food use diversity. The most frequently cited medicinal uses were urinary and tract infections, diarrhoea, and liver disorders. Medicinal recipes involve combinations with other elements. Maize is an indispensable resource in the rituals that propitiate productive activity, to augur prosperity or misfortune according to signals. We have identified the vulnerability in preserving the richness of corn in the region and the factors that shape its cultivation at different scales. PMID:24078829

  17. The Key Role of Cultural Preservation in Maize Diversity Conservation in the Argentine Yungas

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Norma I.; Zamudio, Fernando; Cariola, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    Farmers' decisions on what to grow and why can contribute in understanding the conservation of agrobiodiversity. Culture and ethnicity are indicated as first-class factors leading preservation of heirloom cultivars but this has been little considered in studies examining factors that influence the loss or preservation of agrobiodiversity. We propose that corn's ethnotaxa of less diverse uses, which are also key partners in local cultural reproduction, are usually cultivated by a few households. We analyse if there is a relationship between uses and richness of cultivated ethnotaxa at household level and describe corn's medicinal and ritual uses. We found 25 cultivated ethnotaxa, heterogeneously distributed in the region, and we also found that ethnotaxa with less diverse uses are cultivated in fewer households. We identified that, at regional scale, richness is related with food use diversity. The most frequently cited medicinal uses were urinary and tract infections, diarrhoea, and liver disorders. Medicinal recipes involve combinations with other elements. Maize is an indispensable resource in the rituals that propitiate productive activity, to augur prosperity or misfortune according to signals. We have identified the vulnerability in preserving the richness of corn in the region and the factors that shape its cultivation at different scales. PMID:24078829

  18. [Diversity and enzyme-producing activity of culturable halophilic bacteria in Daishan Saltern of East China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan-Dan; Li, Qian; Huang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Min

    2012-11-01

    Soil and saline water samples were collected from the Daishan Saltern of East China, and the halophilic bacteria were isolated and cultured by using selective media, aimed to investigate the diversity and enzyme-producing activity of culturable halophilic bacteria in saltern environment. A total of 181 strains were isolated by culture-dependent method. Specific primers were used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and archaea. The operation taxonomy units (OTUs) were determined by ARDRA method, and the representative strain of each OTU was sequenced. The phylogenetic position of all the isolated strains was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing. The results showed that the isolated 181 strains displayed 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of which, 12 OTUs belonged to halophilic bacteria, and the others belonged to halophilic archaea. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there were 7 genera presented among the halophilic bacteria group, and 4 genera presented among the halophilic archaea group. The dominant halophilic strains were of Halomonas and Haloarcula, with 46.8% in halophilic bacteria and 49.1% in halophilic archaea group, respectively. Enzyme-producing analysis indicated that most strains displayed enzyme-producing activity, including the activities of producing amylase, proteinase and lipase, and the dominant strains capable of enzyme-producing were of Haloarcula. Our results showed that in the environment of Daishan Saltern, there existed a higher diversity of halophilic bacteria, being a source sink for screening enzyme-producing bacterial strains. PMID:23431797

  19. Assessment of microbial diversity in biofilms recovered from endotracheal tubes using culture dependent and independent approaches.

    PubMed

    Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Matthijs, Nele; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Vosters, Peter; De Bus, Liesbet; Nelis, Hans J; Depuydt, Pieter; Coenye, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection in mechanically ventilated patients. Biofilm formation is one of the mechanisms through which the endotracheal tube (ET) facilitates bacterial contamination of the lower airways. In the present study, we analyzed the composition of the ET biofilm flora by means of culture dependent and culture independent (16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and pyrosequencing) approaches. Overall, the microbial diversity was high and members of different phylogenetic lineages were detected (Actinobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, Candida spp., Clostridia, epsilon-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria). Culture dependent analysis, based on the use of selective growth media and conventional microbiological tests, resulted in the identification of typical aerobic nosocomial pathogens which are known to play a role in the development of VAP, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other opportunistic pathogens were also identified, including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Kocuria varians. In general, there was little correlation between the results obtained by sequencing 16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and by cultivation. Pyrosequencing of PCR amplified 16 S rRNA genes of four selected samples resulted in the identification of a much wider variety of bacteria. The results from the pyrosequencing analysis suggest that these four samples were dominated by members of the normal oral flora such as Prevotella spp., Peptostreptococcus spp. and lactic acid bacteria. A combination of methods is recommended to obtain a complete picture of the microbial diversity of the ET biofilm. PMID:22693635

  20. Assessment of Microbial Diversity in Biofilms Recovered from Endotracheal Tubes Using Culture Dependent and Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Matthijs, Nele; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Vosters, Peter; De Bus, Liesbet; Nelis, Hans J.; Depuydt, Pieter; Coenye, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection in mechanically ventilated patients. Biofilm formation is one of the mechanisms through which the endotracheal tube (ET) facilitates bacterial contamination of the lower airways. In the present study, we analyzed the composition of the ET biofilm flora by means of culture dependent and culture independent (16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and pyrosequencing) approaches. Overall, the microbial diversity was high and members of different phylogenetic lineages were detected (Actinobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, Candida spp., Clostridia, epsilon-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria). Culture dependent analysis, based on the use of selective growth media and conventional microbiological tests, resulted in the identification of typical aerobic nosocomial pathogens which are known to play a role in the development of VAP, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other opportunistic pathogens were also identified, including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Kocuria varians. In general, there was little correlation between the results obtained by sequencing 16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and by cultivation. Pyrosequencing of PCR amplified 16 S rRNA genes of four selected samples resulted in the identification of a much wider variety of bacteria. The results from the pyrosequencing analysis suggest that these four samples were dominated by members of the normal oral flora such as Prevotella spp., Peptostreptococcus spp. and lactic acid bacteria. A combination of methods is recommended to obtain a complete picture of the microbial diversity of the ET biofilm. PMID:22693635

  1. Exploring Two Interventions to Promote Graduate Education Majors' Dispositions toward Culturally Responsive Teaching: Taking Action to Address My Shortcomings as a Literacy Teacher Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Janet

    2011-01-01

    For five years I have supervised a summer literacy camp that connects graduate education majors with students from diverse ethnicities. Each summer I noted I inadequately challenged the education majors to extend their knowledge, examine their attitudes, and expand their abilities to offer culturally responsive literacy instruction to students in…

  2. The Formation of Communities of Practice in a Network of Schools Serving Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Martin; Zisselsberger, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students comprise the most rapidly expanding, and among the most educationally marginalized, group in the United States. CLD students' opportunities to learn are often diminished through service delivery models that are deficit-oriented, viewing linguistic diversity as a challenge to overcome, not a…

  3. Interrogating Practice in Culturally Diverse Classrooms: What Can an Analysis of Student Resistance and Teacher Response Reveal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Ninetta; Forghani-Arani, Neda

    2015-01-01

    As classrooms have increasingly become diverse and complex, developing culturally responsive pedagogies is a professional imperative for teachers. However, considerable international research suggests that meeting the needs of diverse pupil cohorts is challenging for many teachers. In this article, we highlight how curriculum and teaching…

  4. What Can Teacher Education Programs Do to Prepare Teachers to Teach High-Achieving Culturally Diverse Male Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, H. Richard; Tenore, F. Blake; Laughter, Judson

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss what teacher education programs can do to prepare teachers to teach high-achieving culturally diverse male students. They suggest that special attention needs to be directed at the educational experiences of high-achieving Black male students. They also believe that diverse male learners, and especially high…

  5. Themes in the Research on Preservice Teachers' Views of Cultural Diversity: Implications for Researching Millennial Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Antonio J.

    2010-01-01

    This article traces themes found in the research on preservice teachers' views of cultural diversity published in peer-reviewed journals from 1985 to 2007. The article seeks to draw insights that inform education researchers interested in interrogating and unpacking views about diversity expressed by today's millennial college students. Findings…

  6. Collaborative Teaching in a Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Higher Education Setting: A Case Study of a Postgraduate Accounting Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Elaine; Tindale, Jen; Cable, Dawn; Mead, Suzanne Hamil

    2009-01-01

    The Language for Professional Communication in Accounting project has changed teaching practice in a linguistically and culturally diverse postgraduate accounting program at Macquarie University in Australia. This paper reflects on the project's interdisciplinary and collaborative approach to diversity in the classroom by tracing its growth and…

  7. The Diversity of Cultural Participation: Findings from a National Survey. Building Arts Participation: New Findings from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrower, Francie

    2005-01-01

    This survey represents a preliminary step toward demonstrating the diversity of motivations and circumstances that characterize cultural participation. This report examines only live attendance. The evidence presented in this report indicates the pressing need for additional analyses that make diversity a central facet of examining other…

  8. Social Capital and Ethno-Cultural Diverse Immigrants: A Canadian Study on Settlement House and Social Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Miu Chung; Lauer, Sean

    2008-01-01

    With ethno-culturally diverse immigrants arriving in constantly increasing numbers, connecting newcomers to residents in the local community is a growing challenge. Settlement houses have traditionally been the "machinery of connection" that bridges such diverse groups. This article reports the results of a study on settlement houses in an urban…

  9. Cultural Diversity in Rehabilitation. Report from the Study Group. Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (19th, San Antonio, Texas, October 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Research and Training Center in Vocational Rehabilitation.

    This study examines cultural diversity of the population served by vocational rehabilitation and emphasizes the importance of building capacity within organizations and service personnel to effectively serve diverse populations. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the study noting its purpose and scope and intended audience. Chapter 2 reviews…

  10. All Health Plans Need CLAMS: Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Materials for Diverse Populations Can Overcome Language Barriers to Effective Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra; Gonzales, Virginia

    2000-01-01

    CLAMs are "Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Materials" designed for diverse populations to help them overcome language barriers to effective treatment. The demographic shift underway in the United States is making the country more linguistically diverse. Health plans need to accommodate this shift, because without information patients…

  11. A Coral Reef as an Analogical Model to Promote Collaborative Learning on Cultural & Ethnic Diversity in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Robert W.; Gonzalez, Edward L. F.

    2008-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is integral to everyday living. The diversity associated with a coral reef provides a familiar model for initiating discussions focusing on cultural diversity and gender of past and present scientists with non-western science endeavors. These concepts are strengthened through the use of scientific biographical and historical…

  12. A recent bottleneck of Y chromosome diversity coincides with a global change in culture.

    PubMed

    Karmin, Monika; Saag, Lauri; Vicente, Mário; Wilson Sayres, Melissa A; Järve, Mari; Talas, Ulvi Gerst; Rootsi, Siiri; Ilumäe, Anne-Mai; Mägi, Reedik; Mitt, Mario; Pagani, Luca; Puurand, Tarmo; Faltyskova, Zuzana; Clemente, Florian; Cardona, Alexia; Metspalu, Ene; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Hudjashov, Georgi; DeGiorgio, Michael; Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Eichstaedt, Christina; Eelmets, Mikk; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Tambets, Kristiina; Litvinov, Sergei; Mormina, Maru; Xue, Yali; Ayub, Qasim; Zoraqi, Grigor; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Akhatova, Farida; Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah; Momynaliev, Kuvat; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Kusuma, Pradiptajati; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Pierron, Denis; Cox, Murray P; Sultana, Gazi Nurun Nahar; Willerslev, Rane; Muller, Craig; Westaway, Michael; Lambert, David; Skaro, Vedrana; Kovačevic, Lejla; Turdikulova, Shahlo; Dalimova, Dilbar; Khusainova, Rita; Trofimova, Natalya; Akhmetova, Vita; Khidiyatova, Irina; Lichman, Daria V; Isakova, Jainagul; Pocheshkhova, Elvira; Sabitov, Zhaxylyk; Barashkov, Nikolay A; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Mihailov, Evelin; Seng, Joseph Wee Tien; Evseeva, Irina; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Abdullah, Syafiq; Andriadze, George; Primorac, Dragan; Atramentova, Lubov; Utevska, Olga; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Marjanovic, Damir; Kushniarevich, Alena; Behar, Doron M; Gilissen, Christian; Vissers, Lisenka; Veltman, Joris A; Balanovska, Elena; Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Metspalu, Andres; Fedorova, Sardana; Eriksson, Anders; Manica, Andrea; Mendez, Fernando L; Karafet, Tatiana M; Veeramah, Krishna R; Bradman, Neil; Hammer, Michael F; Osipova, Ludmila P; Balanovsky, Oleg; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Johnsen, Knut; Remm, Maido; Thomas, Mark G; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Underhill, Peter A; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Rasmus; Metspalu, Mait; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas

    2015-04-01

    It is commonly thought that human genetic diversity in non-African populations was shaped primarily by an out-of-Africa dispersal 50-100 thousand yr ago (kya). Here, we present a study of 456 geographically diverse high-coverage Y chromosome sequences, including 299 newly reported samples. Applying ancient DNA calibration, we date the Y-chromosomal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in Africa at 254 (95% CI 192-307) kya and detect a cluster of major non-African founder haplogroups in a narrow time interval at 47-52 kya, consistent with a rapid initial colonization model of Eurasia and Oceania after the out-of-Africa bottleneck. In contrast to demographic reconstructions based on mtDNA, we infer a second strong bottleneck in Y-chromosome lineages dating to the last 10 ky. We hypothesize that this bottleneck is caused by cultural changes affecting variance of reproductive success among males. PMID:25770088

  13. Microbial diversity in sugarcane ethanol production in a Brazilian distillery using a culture-independent method.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ohana Yonara Assis; Souto, Betulia Morais; Tupinambá, Daiva Domenech; Bergmann, Jessica Carvalho; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; Quirino, Betania Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane ethanol production occurs in non-sterile conditions, and microbial contamination can decrease productivity. In this study, we assessed the microbial diversity of contaminants of ethanol production in an industrial facility in Brazil. Samples obtained at different stages were analyzed by pyrosequencing-based profiling of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer region. A total of 355 bacterial groups, 22 archaeal groups, and 203 fungal groups were identified, and community changes were related to temperature changes at certain stages. After fermentation, Lactobacillus and unclassified Lactobacillaceae accounted for nearly 100 % of the bacterial sequences. Predominant Fungi groups were "unclassified Fungi," Meyerozyma, and Candida. The predominant Archaea group was unclassified Thaumarchaeota. This is the first work to assess the diversity of Bacteria, and Archaea and Fungi associated with the industrial process of sugarcane-ethanol production using culture-independent techniques. PMID:25404204

  14. A recent bottleneck of Y chromosome diversity coincides with a global change in culture

    PubMed Central

    Saag, Lauri; Vicente, Mário; Sayres, Melissa A. Wilson; Järve, Mari; Talas, Ulvi Gerst; Rootsi, Siiri; Ilumäe, Anne-Mai; Mägi, Reedik; Mitt, Mario; Pagani, Luca; Puurand, Tarmo; Faltyskova, Zuzana; Clemente, Florian; Cardona, Alexia; Metspalu, Ene; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Hudjashov, Georgi; DeGiorgio, Michael; Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Eichstaedt, Christina; Eelmets, Mikk; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Tambets, Kristiina; Litvinov, Sergei; Mormina, Maru; Xue, Yali; Ayub, Qasim; Zoraqi, Grigor; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Akhatova, Farida; Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah; Momynaliev, Kuvat; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Kusuma, Pradiptajati; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Pierron, Denis; Cox, Murray P.; Sultana, Gazi Nurun Nahar; Willerslev, Rane; Muller, Craig; Westaway, Michael; Lambert, David; Skaro, Vedrana; Kovačevic´, Lejla; Turdikulova, Shahlo; Dalimova, Dilbar; Khusainova, Rita; Trofimova, Natalya; Akhmetova, Vita; Khidiyatova, Irina; Lichman, Daria V.; Isakova, Jainagul; Pocheshkhova, Elvira; Sabitov, Zhaxylyk; Barashkov, Nikolay A.; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Mihailov, Evelin; Seng, Joseph Wee Tien; Evseeva, Irina; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Abdullah, Syafiq; Andriadze, George; Primorac, Dragan; Atramentova, Lubov; Utevska, Olga; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Marjanovic´, Damir; Kushniarevich, Alena; Behar, Doron M.; Gilissen, Christian; Vissers, Lisenka; Veltman, Joris A.; Balanovska, Elena; Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Metspalu, Andres; Fedorova, Sardana; Eriksson, Anders; Manica, Andrea; Mendez, Fernando L.; Karafet, Tatiana M.; Veeramah, Krishna R.; Bradman, Neil; Hammer, Michael F.; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Balanovsky, Oleg; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Johnsen, Knut; Remm, Maido; Thomas, Mark G.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Underhill, Peter A.; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Rasmus; Metspalu, Mait; Villems, Richard

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly thought that human genetic diversity in non-African populations was shaped primarily by an out-of-Africa dispersal 50–100 thousand yr ago (kya). Here, we present a study of 456 geographically diverse high-coverage Y chromosome sequences, including 299 newly reported samples. Applying ancient DNA calibration, we date the Y-chromosomal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in Africa at 254 (95% CI 192–307) kya and detect a cluster of major non-African founder haplogroups in a narrow time interval at 47–52 kya, consistent with a rapid initial colonization model of Eurasia and Oceania after the out-of-Africa bottleneck. In contrast to demographic reconstructions based on mtDNA, we infer a second strong bottleneck in Y-chromosome lineages dating to the last 10 ky. We hypothesize that this bottleneck is caused by cultural changes affecting variance of reproductive success among males. PMID:25770088

  15. Gender, human rights and cultural diversity: reflections on a career in transcultural psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kastrup, Marianne C

    2011-04-01

    The three issues of gender equality, human rights and cultural diversity have dominated my organizational commitments, research, and clinical practice in transcultural psychiatry. These issues are intertwined in many ways and have broad implications for transcultural psychiatry. With increasing globalization, psychiatrists in many countries are likely to be treating patients who have migrated from different cultures and who may have been exposed to a variety of traumatic experiences that have a profound impact on their mental health. Of particular concern is the group of torture survivors and the elucidation of their symptom manifestations, as well as effective therapeutic interventions, which clearly show how human rights issues are linked to research and clinical psychiatry. The analyses of how different ethnic groups use psychiatric services, epitomize how important it is to pay attention to gender aspects in the interpretation of the findings and their therapeutic, as well as policy, implications. PMID:21511847

  16. A qualitative study into the use of formal services for dementia by carers from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People with dementia and their family carers need to be able to access formal services in the community to help maintain their wellbeing and independence. While knowing about and navigating one’s way through service systems is difficult for most people, it is particularly difficult for people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. This study addresses a lack of literature on the use of formal services for dementia by people from CALD backgrounds by examining the experiences and perceptions of dementia caregiving within four CALD communities – Italian, Chinese, Spanish and Arabic-speaking – in south western Sydney, Australia. Methods The study used a qualitative design and the methods included focus groups with family carers and one-to-one interviews with bilingual/bicultural community workers, bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians. A total of 121 family carers participated in 15 focus groups and interviews were held with 60 health professionals. All fieldwork was audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Results People from CALD communities are often unfamiliar with the concept of formal services and there may be strong cultural norms about maintaining care within the family, rather than relying on external services. CALD communities often have limited knowledge of services. There is a preference for services that will allow families to keep their relative at home, for safety as well as cultural reasons, and they are particularly reluctant to use residential care. While there is a preference for ethno-specific or multicultural services, mainstream services also need to ensure they are more flexible in providing culturally appropriate care. Positive outcomes occur when ethno-specific services work in partnership with mainstream programs. Dementia service providers need to develop a trusting relationship with their local CALD communities and promote their services in a way that is understandable

  17. Taxonomic and functional diversity of the culturable microbiomes of epigeic earthworms and their prospects in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arjun; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Sharma, Anamika; Adak, Anurup; Singh, Surender; Prasanna, Radha; Saxena, Anil K; Nain, Lata; Singh, Ran Vir

    2016-09-01

    Eisenia foetida and Perionyx excavatus are potent vermicomposting earthworms having immense importance in organic matter recycling under tropical conditions, particularly in India. Comparative assessment of the cultivable gut microbiome of these two epigeic earthworms after growth on lignocellulosic biomass, revealed populations of 3.2-8.3 × 10(9) CFU. Diversity analyses using 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the major dominating classes were Firmicutes (50-60%), followed by Actinobacteria (26.7-33%), and Alphaproteobacteria (5.6-6.7%). Despite exhibiting similar diversity indices and species richness, Betaproteobacteria (6.7%) and Gammaproteobacteria (11.1%) were solely present in E. foetida and P. excavatus, respectively. A set of 33 distinct morphotypes, including 18 from E. foetida and 15 from P. excavatus were selected. Carbohydrate utilization profiles generated using Hi-Carbo™ kits revealed that the isolates from the gut of P. excavatus - Arthrobacter pascens IARI-L13 and Bacillus subtilis IARIC were able to utilize 54 and 51.4% of the carbohydrates tested. Sorbose was not utilized, while unusual carbohydrates - adonitol and methyl-d-mannoside were utilized only by members from the gut of P. excavatus, while melizitose was utilized by those uniquely by E. foetida microbiome. Functional characterization revealed that β-glucosidase activity was most prevalent in the culturable microbial community. Alkaline and acid phosphatase activity was more widespread in the E. foetida gut microbiome. All the culturable gut bacterial isolates produced ammonia, but IAA was detected only in five cultures. The unique functional attributes of the two culturable microbiomes, grown on a similar diet, reveals the significance of proper selection of earthworm substrate combinations for effective vermicomposting. PMID:27133232

  18. Nature and culture of finger counting: diversity and representational effects of an embodied cognitive tool.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2012-08-01

    Studies like the one conducted by Domahs et al. (2010, in Cognition) corroborate that finger counting habits affect how numbers are processed, and legitimize the assumption that this effect is culturally modulated. The degree of cultural diversity in finger counting, however, has been grossly underestimated in the field at large, which, in turn, has restricted research questions and designs. In this paper, we demonstrate that fingers as a tool for counting are not only naturally available, but are also-and crucially so-culturally encoded. To substantiate this, we outline the variability in finger counting and illustrate each of its types with instances from the literature. We argue that the different types of finger counting all constitute distinct representational systems, and we use their properties-dimensionality, dimensional representation, base and sub-base values, extendibility and extent, sign count, and regularity-to devise a typology of such systems. This allows us to explore representational effects, that is, the cognitive implications these properties may have, for instance, for the efficiency of information encoding and representation, ease of learning and mastering the system, or memory retrieval and cognitive load. We then highlight the ambivalent consequences arising from structural inconsistencies between finger counting and other modes of number representation like verbal or notational systems, and we discuss how this informs questions on the evolution and development of counting systems. Based on these analyses, we suggest some directions for future research in the field of embodied cognition that would profit substantially from taking into account the cultural diversity in finger counting. PMID:22695379

  19. Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport: case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity.

    PubMed

    Benn, Tansin; Pfister, Gertrud

    2013-01-01

    This paper contains a sociocultural analysis of school sport experiences of Muslim girls in two countries with different gender policies in physical education (PE) classes: England and Denmark. In Denmark, PE lessons take place in co-educative classes, in England schools are more diverse, with predominantly co-educational but also single-sex and faith schools offering different learning contexts. Two case studies from Denmark and England are used to explore the experiences of migrant Muslim girls in these different settings. A social constructionist approach to gender underpins the interpretation of stakeholders' voices on the inclusion of Muslim girls and the analysis of PE discourses in these countries. Findings illustrate similarities and differences at the interface of cultural diversity, political rhetoric of inclusion and realities of sport experiences for Muslim girls in both countries. Complex influences on PE experiences include gender stereotypes, cultural and religious orientations and practices, as well as actions and expectations of parents, communities and coaches/teachers. The studies provide insights into the ways participants managed their identities as Muslim girls in different sport environments to enable participation and retention of their cultural identities. Highlighted throughout the paper are the ways in which school sport policy and practice, providers and gatekeepers, can include or exclude groups, in this case Muslim girls. Too often coaches and teachers are unaware of crucial facts about their learners, not only in terms of their physical development and capabilities but also in terms of their cultural needs. Mistakes in creating conducive learning environments leave young people to negotiate a way to participate or refrain from participation. PMID:24050475

  20. Training Needs of Early Childhood Professionals Who Work with Children and Families Who Are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Rashida; Luckner, John

    2014-01-01

    The increase in numbers of children and families who are culturally and linguistically diverse served in early intervention and early childhood special education requires greater awareness and use of family-centered and culturally responsive practices. The purpose of this study was to identify the training needs, challenges, and level of…

  1. "I Actually Learned a Lot from This": A Field Assignment to Prepare Future Preservice Math Teachers for Culturally Diverse Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Jayne A.; Cobbs, Georgia A.

    2007-01-01

    Teacher education programs are cognizant of the need to prepare preservice teachers (PTs) to work effectively with children from diverse cultural backgrounds. Well-constructed field experiences can help PTs develop awareness and gain understanding of important cultural considerations related to effective teaching and learning (Sleeter, 2001). This…

  2. A Study of Two Generations of Culturally Diverse Community College Students Views on Leader Attributes in Self and Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkowski, Paula Jeanine

    2011-01-01

    One community college mission is preparing students for the expectations and opportunities of the workplace including roles as collaborators and leaders. Increasingly, representatives from "cultures" of generation, gender, and diverse ethnicities are gaining an education in community colleges. Research supports that cultural aspects and views of…

  3. When and Where I Enter: A Case Study of Preservice Teachers Preparing to Teach in Culturally Diverse Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jester, Michellana Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    As the proportion of children from culturally diverse backgrounds in the nation's schools increases, the teacher workforce is projected to remain overwhelmingly White, monolingual, and female. These differences are believed to have fostered a cultural mismatch, where teachers are challenged in their ability to meaningfully connect with their…

  4. Guidelines for Services for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Preschool Students with Disabilities, Ages 3-5 [with Updated Appendices].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This document provides guidance on the appropriate evaluation and placement of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) preschool students with disabilities. The document discusses the need for providers to be aware of the individual needs generated by disabilities and their interaction with early development and take specific cultural and…

  5. Beyond the Pragmatic and the Liminal: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Code-Switching in Early-Years Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannacci, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the code-switching (CS) practices of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) young children in kindergarten and grade 1 classrooms. The author argues that their use of CS went beyond relief of psycholinguistic stress or coping with liminality (sense of living between two languages and cultures). Through several narratives…

  6. Meeting the Challenge of Linguistic and Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood Education. Yearbook in Early Childhood Education Series, Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Eugene E., Ed.; And Others

    Geared toward early childhood educators, reading and writing teachers, bilingual and English as a Second Language teachers, and to courses in these fields, this yearbook examines the issues of linguistic and cultural diversity in early childhood programs. Following an introduction (Eugene Garcia and Barry McLaughlin) on the cultural context…

  7. America's Women of Color: Integrating Cultural Diversity into Non-Sex-Biased Curricula. Teacher-Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Public Schools, MN.

    "Integrating Cultural Diversity into Non-Sex-Biased Curricula" is a training and development program designed to help students understand the status, needs, and contributions of minority group women. It deals with American Indian, Asian American, black, and Hispanic women and points out relevant aspects of the history, culture, and contributions…

  8. Phylogenetic diversity and biological activity of culturable Actinobacteria isolated from freshwater fish gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Jami, Mansooreh; Ghanbari, Mahdi; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of Actinobacteria isolated from the gut microbiota of two freshwater fish species namely Schizothorax zarudnyi and Schizocypris altidorsalis was investigated employing classical cultivation techniques, repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), partial and full 16S rDNA sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis. A total of 277 isolates were cultured by applying three different agar media. Based on rep-PCR profile analysis a subset of 33 strains was selected for further phylogenetic investigations, antimicrobial activity testing and diversity analysis of secondary-metabolite biosynthetic genes. The identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the isolates belong to eight genera distributed among six families. At the family level, 72% of the 277 isolates belong to the family Streptomycetaceae. Among the non-streptomycetes group, the most dominant group could be allocated to the family of Pseudonocardiaceae followed by the members of Micromonosporaceae. Phylogenetic analysis clearly showed that many of the isolates in the genera Streptomyces, Saccharomonospora, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium and Agromyces formed a single and distinct cluster with the type strains. Notably, there is no report so far about the occurrence of these Actinobacteria in the microbiota of freshwater fish. Of the 33 isolates, all the strains exhibited antibacterial activity against a set of tested human and fish pathogenic bacteria. Then, to study their associated potential capacity to synthesize diverse bioactive natural products, diversity of genes associated with secondary-metabolite biosynthesis including PKS I, PKS II, NRPS, the enzyme PhzE of the phenazine pathways, the enzyme dTGD of 6-deoxyhexoses glycosylation pathway, the enzyme Halo of halogenation pathway and the enzyme CYP in polyene polyketide biosynthesis were investigated among the isolates. All the strains possess at least two types of the investigated

  9. ESL TEACHER CANDIDATES' PERCEPTIONS OF STRENGTHS AND INADEQUACIES OF INSTRUCTING CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS: POST CLINICAL EXPERIENCE.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chiu-Yin; Indiatsi, John; Wong, Gary K W

    2016-01-01

    The present case study examined English as a second language (ESL) teacher candidates' views on their preparedness on instructing culturally and linguistically diverse students. A survey was administrated to a group of ESL teacher candidates at the end of the training program. Results revealed that although the participants received training in culture and instructional strategies, lacking adequate knowledge in students' diverse cultures and languages was reported as a major challenge. Personality traits and knowing specific strategies are reported as their strengths. However, there is a mismatch between the data gathered from the self-ranking component and the open-ended questions. Implications and suggestions are discussed. PMID:27439232

  10. In and out of the Cross-Cultural Classroom Closet: Negotiating Queer Teacher Identity and Culturally Diverse Cohorts in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Rebecca; Hill, Braden; Jones, Angela

    2015-01-01

    There is a gap in queer theory and higher education literature, regarding how queer university teachers negotiate their sexuality in cross-cultural classrooms. This article moves to address this gap by examining the complex intersection between gay teacher identity and cross-cultural sensitivity, evident in the stories of two queer academics.…

  11. Diversity of Cultured Thermophilic Anaerobes in Hot Springs of Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Lu, Y.; Dong, X.; Liu, X.; Wei, Y.; Ji, X.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic anaerobes including Archaea and Bacteria refer to those growing optimally at temperatures above 50°C and do not use oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor for growth. Study on thermophilic anaerobes will help to understand how life thrives under extreme conditions. Meanwhile thermophilic anaerobes are of importance in potential application and development of thermophilic biotechnology. We have surveyed culturable thermophilic anaerobes in hot springs (pH6.5-7.5; 70 - 94°C) in Rehai of Tengchong, Bangnazhang of Longlin, Eryuan of Dali,Yunnan, China. 50 strains in total were cultured from the hot springs water using Hungate anaerobic technique, and 30 strains were selected based on phenotypic diversity for analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 28 strains belonged to the members of five genera: Caldanaerobacter, Calaramator, Thermoanaerobacter, Dictyoglomus and Fervidobacterium, which formed five branches on the phylogenetic tree. Besides, 2 strains of methanogenic archaea were obtained. The majority of the isolates were the known species, however, seven strains were identified as novel species affiliated to the five genera based on the lower 16S rDNA sequence similarities (less than 93 - 97%) with the described species. This work would provide the future study on their diversity, distribution among different regions and the potential application of thermophilic enzyme. Supported by State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences(SKLMR-080605)and the Foundation of State Natural Science (30660009, 30960022, 31081220175).

  12. Microbial diversity in an Armenian geothermal spring assessed by molecular and culture-based methods.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Hovik; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2014-11-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the prokaryotic community thriving in the Arzakan hot spring in Armenia was studied using molecular and culture-based methods. A sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries demonstrated the presence of a diversity of microorganisms belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes phyla, and Cyanobacteria. Proteobacteria was the dominant group, representing 52% of the bacterial clones. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments also indicated the abundance of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Cyanobacteria populations. Most of the sequences were most closely related to uncultivated microorganisms and shared less than 96% similarity with their closest matches in GenBank, indicating that this spring harbors a unique community of novel microbial species or genera. The majority of the sequences of an archaeal 16S rRNA gene library, generated from a methanogenic enrichment, were close relatives of members of the genus Methanoculleus. Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria mainly belonging to Bacillus and Geobacillus were detected only by culture-dependent methods. Three isolates were successfully obtained having 99, 96, and 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to Arcobacter sp., Methylocaldum sp., and Methanoculleus sp., respectively. PMID:24740751

  13. Culturable diversity of aerobic halophilic archaea (Fam. Halobacteriaceae) from hypersaline, meromictic Transylvanian lakes.

    PubMed

    Baricz, Andreea; Cristea, Adorján; Muntean, Vasile; Teodosiu, Gabriela; Andrei, Adrian-Ştefan; Molnár, Imola; Alexe, Mircea; Rakosy-Tican, Elena; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2015-03-01

    Perennially stratified salt lakes situated in the Transylvanian Basin (Central Romania) were surveyed for the diversity of culturable halophilic archaea (Fam. Halobacteriaceae). The physical and chemical characteristics of the waters indicated that all the investigated lakes were meromictic and neutral hypersaline. Samples collected from upper, intermediate, and deeper water layers and sediments were used for the isolation of halophilic strains followed by 16S rRNA gene-based identification and phenotypic characterization. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all 191 isolates reported in this study and 43 strains previously isolated were affiliated with the family Halobacteriaceae and classified to 18 genera. Haloferax was the most frequently isolated genus (~47 %), followed by Halobacterium spp. (~12 %), and Halorubrum spp. (~11 %). Highest culturable diversity was detected in Brâncoveanu Lake, the oldest and saltiest of all studied lakes, while the opposite was observed in the most stable and least human-impacted Fără Fund Lake. One strain from Ursu Lake might possibly constitute a novel Halorubrum species as shown by phylogenetic analysis. Several haloarchaeal taxa recently described in Asian (i.e., Iran, China) saline systems were also identified as inhabiting the Transylvanian salt lakes thus expanding our knowledege on the geographic distribution of Halobacteriaceae. PMID:25680859

  14. The Cultural and Linguistic Diversity of 3-Year-Old Children with Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their caregivers when children were 3 years old. The data were from the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study, a prospective, population-based study of children with hearing loss in Australia. The majority of the 406 children used spoken English at home; however, 28 other languages also were spoken. Compared with their caregivers, the children in this study used fewer spoken languages and had higher rates of oral monolingualism. Few children used a spoken language other than English in their early education environment. One quarter of the children used sign to communicate at home and/or in their early education environment. No associations between caregiver hearing status and children’s communication mode were identified. This exploratory investigation of the communication modes and languages used by young children with hearing loss and their caregivers provides an initial examination of the cultural and linguistic diversity and heritage language attrition of this population. The findings of this study have implications for the development of resources and the provision of early education services to the families of children with hearing loss, especially where the caregivers use a language that is not the lingua franca of their country of residence. PMID:22942315

  15. The cultural and linguistic diversity of 3-year-old children with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Y C

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children with hearing loss informs the provision of assessment, habilitation, and education services to both children and their families. Data describing communication mode, oral language use, and demographic characteristics were collected for 406 children with hearing loss and their caregivers when children were 3 years old. The data were from the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study, a prospective, population-based study of children with hearing loss in Australia. The majority of the 406 children used spoken English at home; however, 28 other languages also were spoken. Compared with their caregivers, the children in this study used fewer spoken languages and had higher rates of oral monolingualism. Few children used a spoken language other than English in their early education environment. One quarter of the children used sign to communicate at home and/or in their early education environment. No associations between caregiver hearing status and children's communication mode were identified. This exploratory investigation of the communication modes and languages used by young children with hearing loss and their caregivers provides an initial examination of the cultural and linguistic diversity and heritage language attrition of this population. The findings of this study have implications for the development of resources and the provision of early education services to the families of children with hearing loss, especially where the caregivers use a language that is not the lingua franca of their country of residence. PMID:22942315

  16. Cultural Diversity and Views on Alzheimer’s Disease in Older African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Harris, Lynn Fields

    2012-01-01

    Cultural constructs prevalent in older African Americans may influence their risk perceptions and knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To examine this issue, we administered 3 sociocultural scales, the Alzheimer’s Disease Knowledge Scale, and a Risk Perception questionnaire to 271 older African Americans who were recruited from a large community senior center and local churches. Higher Present Time Orientation was significantly related to perceptions of having little control over risks to health (p = .004), God’s Will in determining AD (p = .001), and lower AD knowledge (p < .0001), and marginally related to having little control over developing AD (p = .052). Religiosity was marginally related to having little control over risks to health (p = .055) and getting AD″ (p =.057). Post hoc inter-group comparisons found significant differences in the highest vs. lowest scoring Religiosity groups. There were no significant differences by Future Time Orientation. Most subjects (57.6%) were unaware that African Americans were at higher risk for AD than whites. These data indicate that cultural diversity within older African Americans may shape health perceptions and knowledge of AD. This diversity may contribute to disparities in the detection and treatment of AD in this high risk population. PMID:22828323

  17. Diversity of Integron- and Culture-Associated Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Freshwater Floc

    PubMed Central

    Drudge, Christopher N.; Elliott, Amy V. C.; Plach, Janina M.; Ejim, Linda J.; Wright, Gerard D.; Droppo, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically important antibiotic resistance genes were detected in culturable bacteria and class 1 integron gene cassettes recovered from suspended floc, a significant aquatic repository for microorganisms and trace elements, across freshwater systems variably impacted by anthropogenic activities. Antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in floc total community DNA differed appreciably in number and type from genes detected in bacteria cultured from floc. The number of floc antibiotic resistance gene cassette types detected across sites was positively correlated with total (the sum of Ag, As, Cu, and Pb) trace element concentrations in aqueous solution and in a component of floc readily accessible to bacteria. In particular, concentrations of Cu and Pb in the floc component were positively correlated with floc resistance gene cassette diversity. Collectively, these results identify suspended floc as an important reservoir, distinct from bulk water and bed sediment, for antibiotic resistance in aquatic environments ranging from heavily impacted urban sites to remote areas of nature reserves and indicate that trace elements, particularly Cu and Pb, are geochemical markers of resistance diversity in this environmental reservoir. The increase in contamination of global water supplies suggests that aquatic environments will become an even more important reservoir of clinically important antibiotic resistance in the future. PMID:22467502

  18. Supervising culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) nursing students: A challenge for clinical educators.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arab, Adela; Parry, Arlene

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents and discusses the challenges faced by a group of clinical educators in teaching and assessing nursing students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds in Australian English-speaking hospitals. A questionnaire was administered to eight university-appointed clinical educators external to the clinical venues in order to find out what issues they had experienced with CALD students and how they had responded to them. The educators' responses were contextualised with the perspectives of 19 CALD students who responded to a student questionnaire, and analysed using Yoder's (1996) framework of instructional responses to ethnically diverse students. It was found that the clinical educators encountered difficulties in responding to CALD students with an instructional response that was not patronising, assimilationist or demeaning for the students. The findings suggest that most educators would have benefitted from targeted support by the school of nursing to develop a pedagogically appropriate approach to interacting with CALD students. This study points to the need for continuing education in cross-cultural communication for nurses working in clinical education roles and provides ideas to this respect that build on CALD students' strengths and participants' suggestions. PMID:25814150

  19. Genetic diversity based on SSR analysis of the cultured snakehead fish, Channa argus, (Channidae) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S-R; Li, J-L; Xie, N; Zhu, L-M; Wang, Q; Yue, G-H

    2014-01-01

    The snakehead fish Channa argus is an important food fish in China. We identified six microsatellite loci for C. argus. These six microsatellite loci and four other microsatellite markers were used to analyze genetic diversity in four cultured populations of C. argus (SD, JX, HN, and ZJ) and determine their relationships. A total of 154 alleles were detected at the 10 microsatellite loci. The average expected and observed heterozygosities varied from 0.70-0.84 and 0.69-0.83, respectively, and polymorphism information content ranged between 0.66 and 0.82 in the four populations, indicating high genetic diversity. Population JX deviated from mutation-drift equilibrium and may have experienced a recent bottleneck. Analysis of pairwise genetic differentiation revealed FST values that ranged from 0.028 to 0.100, which indicates a moderate level of genetic differentiation. The largest distances were observed between populations HN and SD, whereas the smallest distances were obtained between populations HN and JX. Genetic clustering analysis demonstrated that the ZJ and HN populations probably share the same origin. This information about the genetic diversity within each of the four populations, and their genetic relationships will be useful for future genetic improvement of C. argus through selective breeding. PMID:24615092

  20. Red Soils Harbor Diverse Culturable Actinomycetes That Are Promising Sources of Novel Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Ning; Li, Xiaomin; Ding, Yun; Shang, Fei; Gao, Yongsheng; Ruan, Jisheng

    2015-01-01

    Red soils, which are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of southern China, are characterized by low organic carbon, high content of iron oxides, and acidity and, hence, are likely to be ideal habitats for acidophilic actinomycetes. However, the diversity and biosynthetic potential of actinomycetes in such habitats are underexplored. Here, a total of 600 actinomycete strains were isolated from red soils collected in Jiangxi Province in southeast China. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed a high diversity of the isolates, which were distributed into 26 genera, 10 families, and 7 orders within the class Actinobacteria; these taxa contained at least 49 phylotypes that are likely to represent new species within 15 genera. The isolates showed good physiological potentials for biosynthesis and biocontrol. Chemical screening of 107 semirandomly selected isolates spanning 20 genera revealed the presence of at least 193 secondary metabolites from 52 isolates, of which 125 compounds from 39 isolates of 12 genera were putatively novel. Macrolides, polyethers, diketopiperazines, and siderophores accounted for most of the known compounds. The structures of six novel compounds were elucidated, two of which had a unique skeleton and represented characteristic secondary metabolites of a putative novel Streptomyces phylotype. These results demonstrate that red soils are rich reservoirs for diverse culturable actinomycetes, notably members of the families Streptomycetaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, and Streptosporangiaceae, with the capacity to synthesize novel bioactive compounds. PMID:25724963

  1. Chopsticks Don't Make It Culturally Competent: Addressing Larger Issues for HIV Prevention among Gay, Bisexual, and Queer Asian Pacific Islander Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Chong-suk

    2009-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, men who have sex with men account for the largest proportion of cumulative AIDS cases among Asian Pacific Islanders. Yet little is known about the factors that need to be addressed in developing culturally competent intervention strategies for members of this group. This article explores…

  2. Addressing Cultural Issues in an Organizational Context. Edited Conference Proceedings of the Teachers College Winter Roundtable (New York, New York, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Samuel D., Jr., Ed.; Carter, Robert T., Ed.

    Papers from this year's conference reflect the Roundtable's theme of addressing cultural issues in an organizational context. Topics cover a wide range of institutional and organizational issues in corporate, educational, and treatment settings. Papers include: (1) "The New Corporate Language for Race Relations" (keynote) (Clayton P. Alderfer);…

  3. Teaching science in culturally diverse classrooms: The relevance of multicultural coursework on novice teachers' instructional choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Thais B. P. da

    Science education reform in the United States has been slow to reduce the troubling science achievement gap between students from mainstream and non-mainstream backgrounds. Recent data suggest the gap persists in spite of improved attention to the multicultural education of teachers, and in spite of recent, more culturally inclusive and responsive curricular materials and instructional recommendations. In this study, I examine the cases of two European American male novice science teachers in middle schools with highly diverse populations, exploring their perceptions of the necessity of adapting their instructional approaches and the science curricula in order to meet the needs of their predominantly Native American, Mexican American, and African American students. Two theoretical frameworks inform this study, Rodriguez's (2005) sociotransformative constructivism, and Freire's critical pedagogy. I apply a qualitative case study method, to better understand and analyze the classroom setting and power relations of the context. Data consist of semi-structured interviews with each teacher, classroom observation and other field notes, the science curricular and instructional materials, and teachers' lesson plans. Each teacher acknowledged the ethnicities of students positively and noticed distinctive ethnocultural features (e.g., quinceaneras, Mexican Americans). Yet, their teaching approaches were primarily teacher-centric and monocultural. Each followed the book, usually lecturing, and striving dutifully to "cover" the topics. They did not solicit students' knowledge or engage them in dialog to explore their thinking. Even when the curriculum guide detailed relevant science knowledge students of some cultural groups might have, both teachers declined to use it. These well-meaning teachers did not fully perceive that students whose culture was different from their own might have different and relevant knowledge, experiences, or histories which were resources for

  4. Head Start Instructional Assistants and Teachers: Culturally Responsive Practice, Children with Disabilities and Ability to Address Each

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assaf, Mona M.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined instructional assistants' (IAs) and teachers' perceptions of culturally responsive and quality instructional practices for young children, especially those from various cultural and linguistic backgrounds and those who might have disabilities from low socioeconomic families, in Head Start classrooms. In…

  5. Assessment of endophytic yeast diversity in rice leaves by a culture-independent approach.

    PubMed

    Tantirungkij, Manee; Nasanit, Rujikan; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-09-01

    Endophytic microorganisms inhabit internal plant tissues in the host plant without causing any symptoms or negative effects. Although the diversity of endophytes has been evaluated by both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, less information is available on yeast communities. Therefore, in this study a culture-independent method was used to examine endophytic yeasts associated with rice leaves based on the large subunit of ribosomal DNA using a semi-nested PCR technique. Sequence analysis indicated that the colonization frequency and the relative species frequency (RF) of endophytic yeast phylotypes were 0.41 and 0.06, respectively, and the majority of the yeast phylotypes were basidiomycetous yeasts. The phylotypes were designated as five known species (Cryptococcus victoriae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Debaryomyces vindobonensis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Pseudozyma antarctica), together with seventeen phylotypes closest to Candida metapsilosis, Cryp. foliicola, Cryp. laurentii, Pseudozyma abaconensis, Pseudozyma aphidis and Trichosporon asahii, among which some could be novel species. The most prevalent phylotypes were those closest to Cryp. foliicola (47.5 % RF) followed by D. hansenii (22.8 % RF) and P. antarctica (16.8 % RF). The presence of the phylotypes related to species known for their potential applications as biocontrol agents and plant growth promoting hormone producers suggests that they may have valuable applications. In addition, our findings revealed the occurrence of novel phylotypes at high frequency, which should encourage extensive studies to discover novel yeast species and to understand their roles in the rice leaves. PMID:26122889

  6. Respect for cultural diversity and the empirical turn in bioethics: a plea for caution

    PubMed Central

    Mbugua, Karori

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, there have been numerous calls for a culturally sensitive bioethics. At the same time, bioethicists have become increasingly involved in empirical research, which is a sign of dissatisfaction with the analytic methods of traditional bioethics. In this article, I will argue that although these developments have broadened and enriched the field of bioethics, they can easily be construed to be an endorsement of ethical relativism, especially by those not well grounded in academic moral philosophy. I maintain that bioethicists must resist the temptation of moving too quickly from cultural relativism to ethical relativism and from empirical findings to normative conclusions. Indeed, anyone who reasons in this way is guilty of the naturalistic fallacy. I conclude by saying that properly conceptualized, empirical research and sensitivity to cultural diversity should give rise to objective rational discourse and criticism and not indiscriminate tolerance of every possible moral practice. Bioethics must remain a normative discipline that is characterized by rigorous argumentation. PMID:23908754

  7. Diversity or Difference? New Research Supports the Case for a Cultural Perspective on Women in Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieze, Carol; Quesenberry, Jeria L.; Kemp, Elizabeth; Velázquez, Anthony

    2012-08-01

    Gender difference approaches to the participation of women in computing have not provided adequate explanations for women's declining interest in computer science (CS) and related technical fields. Indeed, the search for gender differences can work against diversity which we define as a cross-gender spectrum of characteristics, interests, abilities, experiences, beliefs and identities. Our ongoing case studies at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) provide evidence to show that a focus on culture offers the most insightful and effective approach for investigating women's participation in CS. In this paper, we illustrate this approach and show the significance of cultural factors by describing a new case study which examines the attitudes of CS majors at CMU. Our analysis found that most men and women felt comfortable in the school, believed they could be successful in the CS environment at CMU, and thought they fit in socially and academically. In brief, we did not see any evidence of a strong gender divide in student attitudes towards fitting in or feeling like they could be successful; indeed we found that the Women-CS fit remained strong from prior years. Hence, our research demonstrates that women, alongside their male peers, can fit successfully into a CS environment and help shape that environment and computing culture, for the benefit of everyone, without accommodating presumed gender differences or any compromises to academic integrity.

  8. Respect for cultural diversity and the empirical turn in bioethics: a plea for caution.

    PubMed

    Mbugua, Karori

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, there have been numerous calls for a culturally sensitive bioethics. At the same time, bioethicists have become increasingly involved in empirical research, which is a sign of dissatisfaction with the analytic methods of traditional bioethics. In this article, I will argue that although these developments have broadened and enriched the field of bioethics, they can easily be construed to be an endorsement of ethical relativism, especially by those not well grounded in academic moral philosophy. I maintain that bioethicists must resist the temptation of moving too quickly from cultural relativism to ethical relativism and from empirical findings to normative conclusions. Indeed, anyone who reasons in this way is guilty of the naturalistic fallacy. I conclude by saying that properly conceptualized, empirical research and sensitivity to cultural diversity should give rise to objective rational discourse and criticism and not indiscriminate tolerance of every possible moral practice. Bioethics must remain a normative discipline that is characterized by rigorous argumentation. PMID:23908754

  9. Education and Diversity in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeman, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    This article sets out the Dutch approach to the multicultural question. It focuses on how national policies, schools, teachers and teacher educators are addressing and making sense of questions of cultural and religious diversity. The article shows how the Netherlands has partly accommodated itself to greater cultural diversity through compulsory…

  10. Addressing diabetes at the crossroads of global pandemic and regional culture: Comment on "The curse of wealth - Middle Eastern countries need to address the rapidly rising burden of diabetes".

    PubMed

    Hsu, William C; Gabbay, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    As diabetes and obesity rates continue to climb at astronomical rates in the Middle East, future generations are at an even greater risk for diabetes and the associated complications. Many factors are at play and it is clear that creative solutions are needed to retool provider resources in the Middle East towards prevention of diabetes and its complications while leveraging technology to maximize outreach within the accepted cultural norms. Only by building the capacity to address the current diabetes burden as well focusing on prevention for the future, can Middle East countries create a strong infrastructure for a successful future. PMID:25114948

  11. Complex Epidemiology of a Zoonotic Disease in a Culturally Diverse Region: Phylogeography of Rabies Virus in the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Daniel L.; McElhinney, Lorraine M.; Freuling, Conrad M.; Marston, Denise A.; Banyard, Ashley C.; Goharrriz, Hooman; Wise, Emma; Breed, Andrew C.; Saturday, Greg; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Zilahi, Erika; Al-Kobaisi, Muhannad F.; Nowotny, Norbert; Mueller, Thomas; Fooks, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    The Middle East is a culturally and politically diverse region at the gateway between Europe, Africa and Asia. Spatial dynamics of the fatal zoonotic disease rabies among countries of the Middle East and surrounding regions is poorly understood. An improved understanding of virus distribution is necessary to direct control methods. Previous studies have suggested regular trans-boundary movement, but have been unable to infer direction. Here we address these issues, by investigating the evolution of 183 rabies virus isolates collected from over 20 countries between 1972 and 2014. We have undertaken a discrete phylogeographic analysis on a subset of 139 samples to infer where and when movements of rabies have occurred. We provide evidence for four genetically distinct clades with separate origins currently circulating in the Middle East and surrounding countries. Introductions of these viruses have been followed by regular and multidirectional trans-boundary movements in some parts of the region, but relative isolation in others. There is evidence for minimal regular incursion of rabies from Central and Eastern Asia. These data support current initiatives for regional collaboration that are essential for rabies elimination. PMID:25811659

  12. Two sides of the coin: patient and provider perceptions of health care delivery to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Australia is a culturally diverse nation with one in seven Australians born in a non-English speaking country. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) populations are at a high risk of developing preventable chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, renal disease, and chronic respiratory disease, especially communities from the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, North Africa, the Indian subcontinent and China. Previous studies have shown that access to services may be a contributing factor. This study explores the experiences, attitudes and opinions of immigrants from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds and their health care providers with regard to chronic disease care. Methods Five focus groups were conducted comprising participants from an Arabic speaking background, or born in Sudan, China, Vietnam or Tonga. A total of 50 members participated. All focus groups were conducted in the participants’ language and facilitated by a trained multicultural health worker. In addition, 14 health care providers were interviewed by telephone. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. All qualitative data were analysed with the assistance of QSR NVivo 8 software. Results Participants were generally positive about the quality and accessibility of health services, but the costs of health care and waiting times to receive treatment presented significant barriers. They expressed a need for greater access to interpreters and culturally appropriate communication and education. They mentioned experiencing racism and discriminatory practices. Health professionals recommended recruiting health workers from CALD communities to assist them to adequately elicit and address the needs of patients from CALD backgrounds. Conclusions CALD patients, carers and community members as well as health professionals all highlighted the need for establishing culturally tailored programs for chronic disease prevention and management

  13. The Campus Diversity Initiative: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayak, Sharada

    2005-01-01

    This Case Study presents the Campus Diversity Initiative (CDI), a three-phase project lead by the Educational Resources Project Centre Trust, in New Delhi, India. In a historic and cultural context different from that of India, the American Diversity Initiative was launched by the Ford Foundation in 1990 and addressed their diversity issues by…

  14. Diversity and biochemical features of culturable fungi from the coastal waters of Southern China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fungi play a major role in various biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial and marine ecosystems. However, fungi in marine environments remain to be one of the most under-studied microbial groups. This study investigates the diversity of planktonic fungi from the coastal habitat off Pearl River Delta (China) using culture-dependent approach. A total of 22 fungi and 9 yeast isolates were recovered from 30 seawater and 2 sediment samples. Microscopic and ITS rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that most of the fungi belonged to the phylum Ascomycota and Basidiomycota with a very small percentage (3%) of the subphylum Mucoromycotina of the Phylum Zygomycota. Most of these fungal isolates exhibited considerable production of extracellular enzymes, cellulase, lipase and laccase. Fungal isolates of two genera Mucor and Aspergillus sp. demonstrated pelletization capability over a wide range of pH, suggesting them as potential agents towards algae harvesting and wastewater treatment. PMID:25401065

  15. Future research on dementia relating to culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

    PubMed

    Low, Lee-Fay; Draper, Brian; Cheng, Ada; Cruysmans, Benedict; Hayward-Wright, Nicky; Jeon, Yun-Hee; LoGiudice, Dina; Wu, Helen Zong Ying; Zogalis, Georgia; Brodaty, Henry

    2009-09-01

    About one in five older Australians were born overseas. However, there has been very little information published in Australia or internationally about dementia in persons from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. This limits our ability to plan for and provide evidence-based medical care, social care and aged care services to persons from CALD backgrounds. This paper describes challenges to conducting CALD dementia research; these include sampling, having valid instruments and costs. Nine key research recommendations in the areas of epidemiology, community knowledge, carers, service delivery, screening and assessment, medical management, residential aged care and minority CALD reached by consensus by an expert group are presented. The paper closes with some strategies to encourage CALD research. The material presented here will provide guidance for future research endeavours. PMID:19845655

  16. Diversity and antimicrobial potential of culturable heterotrophic bacteria associated with the endemic marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Cintia P.J.; Trindade-Silva, Amaro E.; Appolinario, Luciana R.; Venas, Tainá M.; Garcia, Gizele D.; Carvalho, Lucas S.; Lima, Alinne; Kruger, Ricardo; Pereira, Renato C.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S.; Valle, Rogério A.B.; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges are the oldest Metazoa, very often presenting a complex microbial consortium. Such is the case of the marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis, endemic to Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. In this investigation we characterized the diversity of some of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria living in association with A. brasiliensis and determined their antimicrobial activity. The genera Endozoicomonas (N = 32), Bacillus (N = 26), Shewanella (N = 17), Pseudovibrio (N = 12), and Ruegeria (N = 8) were dominant among the recovered isolates, corresponding to 97% of all isolates. Approximately one third of the isolates living in association with A. brasiliensis produced antibiotics that inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that bacteria associated with this sponge play a role in its health. PMID:25024903

  17. Diversity and Antimicrobial Activity of Culturable Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Moso Bamboo Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chun-Ju; Fan, Li; Gao, Jian; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Bamboos, regarded as therapeutic agents in ethnomedicine, have been used to inhibit inflammation and enhance natural immunity for a long time in Asia, and there are many bamboo associated fungi with medical and edible value. In the present study, a total of 350 fungal strains were isolated from the uncommon moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) seeds for the first time. The molecular diversity of these endophytic fungi was investigated and bioactive compound producers were screened for the first time. All the fungal endophytes were categorized into 69 morphotypes according to culturable characteristics and their internal transcriber spacer (ITS) regions were analyzed by BLAST search with the NCBI database. The fungal isolates showed high diversity and were divided in Ascomycota (98.0%) and Basidiomycota (2.0%), including at least 19 genera in nine orders. Four particular genera were considered to be newly recorded bambusicolous fungi, including Leptosphaerulina, Simplicillium, Sebacina and an unknown genus in Basidiomycetes. Furthermore, inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens and phytopathogens were screened preliminarily and strains B09 (Cladosporium sp.), B34 (Curvularia sp.), B35 (undefined genus 1), B38 (Penicillium sp.) and zzz816 (Shiraia sp.) displayed broad-spectrum activity against clinical bacteria and yeasts by the agar diffusion method. The crude extracts of isolates B09, B34, B35, B38 and zzz816 under submerged fermentation, also demonstrated various levels of bioactivities against bambusicolous pathogenic fungi. This study is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with moso bamboo seeds, and the results show that they could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds and plant defense activators. In addition, it is the first time that strains of Shiraia sp. have been isolated and cultured from moso bamboo seeds, and one of them (zzz816) could produce hypocrellin A at high yield, which is

  18. Diversity of benzyl- and alkylsuccinate synthase genes in hydrocarbon-impacted environments and enrichment cultures.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Amy V; Davidova, Irene A; Savage-Ashlock, Kristen; Parisi, Victoria A; Gieg, Lisa M; Suflita, Joseph M; Kukor, Jerome J; Wawrik, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms play an important role in the natural attenuation of spilled petroleum in a variety of anoxic environments. The role of benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS) in aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and its use as a biomarker for field investigations are well documented. The recent discovery of alkylsuccinate synthase (ASS) allows the opportunity to test whether its encoding gene, assA, can serve as a comparable biomarker of anaerobic alkane degradation. Degenerate assA- and bssA-targeted PCR primers were designed in order to survey the diversity of genes associated with aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in petroleum-impacted environments and enrichment cultures. DNA was extracted from an anaerobic alkane-degrading isolate (Desulfoglaeba alkenexedens ALDC), hydrocarbon-contaminated river and aquifer sediments, a paraffin-degrading enrichment, and a propane-utilizing mixed culture. Partial assA and bssA genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced, yielding several novel clades of assA genes. These data expand the range of alkane-degrading conditions for which relevant gene sequences are available and indicate that considerable diversity of assA genes can be found in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. The detection of genes associated with anaerobic alkane degradation in conjunction with the in situ detection of alkylsuccinate metabolites was also demonstrated. Comparable molecular signals of assA/bssA were not found when environmental metagenome databases of uncontaminated sites were searched. These data confirm that the assA gene is a useful biomarker for anaerobic alkane metabolism. PMID:20504044

  19. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable endophytic fungi isolated from moso bamboo seeds.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Ye; Cheng, Yan-Lin; Cai, Chun-Ju; Fan, Li; Gao, Jian; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Bamboos, regarded as therapeutic agents in ethnomedicine, have been used to inhibit inflammation and enhance natural immunity for a long time in Asia, and there are many bamboo associated fungi with medical and edible value. In the present study, a total of 350 fungal strains were isolated from the uncommon moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) seeds for the first time. The molecular diversity of these endophytic fungi was investigated and bioactive compound producers were screened for the first time. All the fungal endophytes were categorized into 69 morphotypes according to culturable characteristics and their internal transcriber spacer (ITS) regions were analyzed by BLAST search with the NCBI database. The fungal isolates showed high diversity and were divided in Ascomycota (98.0%) and Basidiomycota (2.0%), including at least 19 genera in nine orders. Four particular genera were considered to be newly recorded bambusicolous fungi, including Leptosphaerulina, Simplicillium, Sebacina and an unknown genus in Basidiomycetes. Furthermore, inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens and phytopathogens were screened preliminarily and strains B09 (Cladosporium sp.), B34 (Curvularia sp.), B35 (undefined genus 1), B38 (Penicillium sp.) and zzz816 (Shiraia sp.) displayed broad-spectrum activity against clinical bacteria and yeasts by the agar diffusion method. The crude extracts of isolates B09, B34, B35, B38 and zzz816 under submerged fermentation, also demonstrated various levels of bioactivities against bambusicolous pathogenic fungi. This study is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with moso bamboo seeds, and the results show that they could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds and plant defense activators. In addition, it is the first time that strains of Shiraia sp. have been isolated and cultured from moso bamboo seeds, and one of them (zzz816) could produce hypocrellin A at high yield, which is

  20. Child mental health services: cultural diversity training and its impact on practice.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Nisha; Vostanis, Panos; Frake, Clay

    2007-01-01

    We are supportive of the desire to ensure that CAMHS staff provide appropriate care that is tailor made for each child and family they encounter, and would argue that this is a benchmark for quality. It is important to qualify that this is not just a case of giving the consumer what they want, but rather helping families think about the issues they present with, and then arriving collaboratively at a management plan that is coherent to all parties. However, we would be more cautious about what can be achieved through individual strategies such as cultural competence or diversity training, that are not linked to other strategies. There is a need to reflect on what we are doing rather than responding in a knee jerk fashion. We also need to consider the evidence we use to frame our interventions. Sometimes there is no evidence available and action is needed. In these situations we need to be transparent about our approaches and be prepared to change them in light of emerging evidence. Delivering appropriate services to diverse populations is so much more than having a checklist and sending the workforce to be superficially trained. Before we embark on training, we should ask what we anticipate the training to achieve. This has to be set within an educational rather than political -framework, if educational objectives are to be met. It is also inexcusable to fund or support any kind of intervention without building in evaluation processes. Finally, we need to find out what kind of training improves the patient experience and health care outcomes. Unless we take all these factors into account, paying attention to diverse populations may end up being nothing more than a passing fad. PMID:17375815