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Sample records for address human resource

  1. Managing Human Resources. Greater OPM Leadership Needed To Address Critical Challenges. Report to the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    The General Accounting Office examined the Office of Personnel Management's (OPM's) leadership role in addressing critical human resource problems and preparing the government to meet future challenges. Federal managers, OPM employees, and federal personnel officials were surveyed to study federal government problems in hiring, managing, and…

  2. Addressing the human resources crisis: a case study of the Namibian health service

    PubMed Central

    McCourt, Willy; Awases, Magda

    2007-01-01

    Background This paper addresses an important practical challenge to staff management. In 2000 the United Nations committed themselves to the ambitious targets embodied in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Only five years later, it was clear that poor countries were not on track to achieve them. It was also clear that achieving the three out of the eight MDGs that concern health would only be possible if the appropriate human resources (HR) were in place. Methods We use a case study based on semi-structured interview data to explore the steps that Namibia, a country facing severe health problems that include an alarmingly high AIDS infection rate, has taken to manage its health workers. Results In the fifteen years since independence, Namibia has patiently built up a relatively good strategic framework for health policy in the context of government policy as a whole, including strong training arrangements at every level of health staffing, and it has brought HIV/AIDS under the strategic umbrella through its National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS. Its major weakness is that it has not kept pace with the rise in HIV/AIDS and TB infection: the community counselling service, still at the pilot stage at the time of this study, was the only specific response. That has created a tension between building long-term capacity in a strategic context and responding to the short-term demands of the AIDS and TB crisis, which in turn affects the ability of HR to contribute to improving health outcomes. Conclusion It is suggested that countries like Namibia need a new paradigm for staffing their health services. Building on the existing strategic framework, it should target the training of 'mid-level cadres'. Higher-level cadres should take on the role of supporting and monitoring the mid-level cadres. To do that, they will need management training and a performance management framework for staff support and monitoring. PMID:17224048

  3. Recruitment and Selection Strategies in Optometric Education towards Addressing Human Resource Disparities in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodley, V. R.; Loughman, James; Naidoo, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    The dire need for eye care services and a dearth of human resources (HR) in sub-Saharan Africa motivated the setting up of new optometry programmes. However, to make a meaningful impact, geographical, gender, economic and educational disparities must additionally be addressed. A qualitative study utilizing purposive sampling to select academic…

  4. Disparities in human resources: addressing the lack of diversity in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Grumbach, Kevin; Mendoza, Rosalia

    2008-01-01

    African Americans, Latinos, and American Indians are severely underrepresented in the health professions. A strong case for diversity may be made on the grounds of civil rights, public health and educational benefit, and business gains. Improving the diversity of the health professions requires multiprong strategies addressing the educational pipeline, admissions policies and the institutional culture at health professions schools, and the broader policy environment.

  5. Policy Options for Addressing Health System and Human Resources for Health Crisis in Liberia Post-Ebola Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Budy, Fidel C.T.

    2015-01-01

    Qualified healthcare workers within an effective health system are critical in promoting and achieving greater health outcomes such as those espoused in the Millennium Development Goals. Liberia is currently struggling with the effects of a brutal 14-year long civil war that devastated health infrastructures and caused most qualified health workers to flee and settle in foreign countries. The current output of locally trained health workers is not adequate for the tasks at hand. The recent Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) exposed the failings of the Liberian healthcare system. There is limited evidence of policies that could be replicated in Liberia to encourage qualified diaspora Liberian health workers to return and contribute to managing the phenomenon. This paper reviews the historical context for the human resources for health crisis in Liberia; it critically examines two context-specific health policy options to address the crisis, and recommends reverse brain drain as a policy option to address the immediate and critical crisis facing the health care sector in Liberia. PMID:27622002

  6. Policy Options for Addressing Health System and Human Resources for Health Crisis in Liberia Post-Ebola Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Budy, Fidel C T

    2015-01-01

    Qualified healthcare workers within an effective health system are critical in promoting and achieving greater health outcomes such as those espoused in the Millennium Development Goals. Liberia is currently struggling with the effects of a brutal 14-year long civil war that devastated health infrastructures and caused most qualified health workers to flee and settle in foreign countries. The current output of locally trained health workers is not adequate for the tasks at hand. The recent Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) exposed the failings of the Liberian healthcare system. There is limited evidence of policies that could be replicated in Liberia to encourage qualified diaspora Liberian health workers to return and contribute to managing the phenomenon. This paper reviews the historical context for the human resources for health crisis in Liberia; it critically examines two context-specific health policy options to address the crisis, and recommends reverse brain drain as a policy option to address the immediate and critical crisis facing the health care sector in Liberia.

  7. Addressing the human resources crisis: a case study of Cambodia’s efforts to reduce maternal mortality (1980–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Noriko; Abe, Kimiko; Rotem, Arie; Tung, Rathavy; Keat, Phuong; Robins, Ann; Zwi, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify factors that have contributed to the systematic development of the Cambodian human resources for health (HRH) system with a focus on midwifery services in response to high maternal mortality in fragile resource-constrained countries. Design Qualitative case study. Review of the published and grey literature and in-depth interviews with key informants and stakeholders using an HRH system conceptual framework developed by the authors (‘House Model’; Fujita et al, 2011). Interviews focused on the perceptions of respondents regarding their contributions to strengthening midwifery services and the other external influences which may have influenced the HRH system and reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR). Setting Three rounds of interviews were conducted with senior and mid-level managers of the Ministries of Health (MoH) and Education, educational institutes and development partners. Participants A total of 49 interviewees, who were identified through a snowball sampling technique. Main outcome measures Scaling up the availability of 24 h maternal health services at all health centres contributing to MMR reduction. Results The incremental development of the Cambodian HRH system since 2005 focused on the production, deployment and retention of midwives in rural areas as part of a systematic strategy to reduce maternal mortality. The improved availability and access to midwifery services contributed to significant MMR reduction. Other contributing factors included improved mechanisms for decision-making and implementation; political commitment backed up with necessary resources; leadership from the top along with a growing capacity of mid-level managers; increased MoH capacity to plan and coordinate; and supportive development partners in the context of a conducive external environment. Conclusions Lessons from this case study point to the importance of a systemic and comprehensive approach to health and HRH system strengthening and

  8. Strengthening the Paediatricians Project 2: The effectiveness of a workshop to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders of adolescence in low-health related human resource countries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Paediatricians can be empowered to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders at primary care level. To evaluate the effectiveness of a collaborative workshop in enhancing the adolescent psychiatry knowledge among paediatricians. Methods A 3-day, 27-hours workshop was held for paediatricians from different regions of India under the auspices of the National Adolescent Paediatric Task Force of the Indian Academy of Paediatrics. A 5-item pretest-posttest questionnaire was developed and administered at the beginning and end of the workshop to evaluate the participants' knowledge acquisition in adolescent psychiatry. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed on an intention-to-participate basis. Results Forty-eight paediatricians completed the questionnaire. There was significant enhancement of the knowledge in understanding the phenomenology, identifying the psychopathology, diagnosing common mental disorder and selecting the psychotropic medication in the bivariate analysis. When the possible confounders of level of training in paediatrics and number of years spent as paediatrician were controlled, in addition to the above areas of adolescent psychiatry, the diagnostic ability involving multiple psychological concepts also gained significance. However, both in the bivariate and multivariate analyses, the ability to refer to appropriate psychotherapy remained unchanged after the workshop. Conclusions This workshop was effective in enhancing the adolescent psychiatry knowledge of paediatricians. Such workshops could strengthen paediatricians in addressing the priority mental health disorders at the primary-care level in countries with low-human resource for health as advocated by the World Health Organization. However, it remains to be seen if this acquisition of adolescent psychiatry knowledge results in enhancing their adolescent psychiatry practice. PMID:20167069

  9. Human Resource Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  10. Developing integrated methods to address complex resource and environmental issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; McCafferty, Anne E.; Clark, Roger N.

    2016-02-08

    IntroductionThis circular provides an overview of selected activities that were conducted within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Integrated Methods Development Project, an interdisciplinary project designed to develop new tools and conduct innovative research requiring integration of geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and remote-sensing expertise. The project was supported by the USGS Mineral Resources Program, and its products and acquired capabilities have broad applications to missions throughout the USGS and beyond.In addressing challenges associated with understanding the location, quantity, and quality of mineral resources, and in investigating the potential environmental consequences of resource development, a number of field and laboratory capabilities and interpretative methodologies evolved from the project that have applications to traditional resource studies as well as to studies related to ecosystem health, human health, disaster and hazard assessment, and planetary science. New or improved tools and research findings developed within the project have been applied to other projects and activities. Specifically, geophysical equipment and techniques have been applied to a variety of traditional and nontraditional mineral- and energy-resource studies, military applications, environmental investigations, and applied research activities that involve climate change, mapping techniques, and monitoring capabilities. Diverse applied geochemistry activities provide a process-level understanding of the mobility, chemical speciation, and bioavailability of elements, particularly metals and metalloids, in a variety of environmental settings. Imaging spectroscopy capabilities maintained and developed within the project have been applied to traditional resource studies as well as to studies related to ecosystem health, human health, disaster assessment, and planetary science. Brief descriptions of capabilities and laboratory facilities and summaries of some

  11. Human Resource Accounting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    I AD-RI54 787 HUMAN RESOURCE ACCOUNTING (U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 1/2 F MONTEREY CR J C MARTINS DEC 84 1UNCLASSIFIED /G 5/9 NL -~~ .. 2. . L...Monterey, California JUN1im THESISG HUMAN RESOURCE ACCOUNTING by Joaquim C. Martins LLJ.. December 1984 Thesis Advisor: R.A. McGonigal Approved for...REPORT & PECRI00 COVERED Master’s Thesis; Human Resource Accounting Dcme 94- ’ 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTOR(*) . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER

  12. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  13. The Effective Use of Human Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippitt, Ronald

    1980-01-01

    In tandem with the energy crisis the author sees widespread misuse and waste of human resources. Analyzing issues of environmental deprivation, neglect of the old and the young, social isolation, the search for self, and specialization, he discusses ways that organizational and human resources development can address these challenges. (SK)

  14. Addressing the Human Resources for Health crisis in countries: How far have we gone? What can we expect to achieve by 2015?

    PubMed

    Dayrit, Manuel M; Dolea, Carmen; Dreesch, Norbert

    2011-06-01

    The World Health Report 2006 identified 57 countries world-wide whose health worker to population density fell below a critical threshold of 2.3 per 1,000 population. This meant that below this critical threshold, a country could not provide the basic health services to its population, defined here as 80% immunization coverage and 80% skilled birth attendance at delivery. Of the 57 countries, 36 are located in Africa. This article reviews the progress countries have made in addressing their health workforce crisis. It cites 3 of the most recent global studies and the indicators used to measure progress. It also features the experiences of 8 countries, namely Malawi, Peru, Ethiopia, Brazil, Thailand, Philippines, Zambia, Mali. Their situations provide a diverse picture of country efforts, challenges, and successes. The article asks the question of whether the target of 25% reduction in the number of crisis countries can be achieved by 2015. This was a goal set by the World Health Assembly in 2008. While the authors wish to remain optimistic about the striving towards this target, their optimism must be matched by an adequate level of investment in countries on HRH development. The next four years will show how much will really be achieved.

  15. Interweaving Knowledge Resources to Address Complex Environmental Health Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Beth Ellen; Suk, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex problems do not respect academic disciplinary boundaries. Environmental health research is complex and often moves beyond these boundaries, integrating diverse knowledge resources to solve such challenges. Here we describe an evolving paradigm for interweaving approaches that integrates widely diverse resources outside of traditional academic environments in full partnerships of mutual respect and understanding. We demonstrate that scientists, social scientists, and engineers can work with government agencies, industry, and communities to interweave their expertise into metaphorical knowledge fabrics to share understanding, resources, and enthusiasm. Objective Our goal is to acknowledge and validate how interweaving research approaches can contribute to research-driven, solution-oriented problem solving in environmental health, and to inspire more members of the environmental health community to consider this approach. Discussion The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program (SRP), as mandated by Congress, has evolved to become a program that reaches across a wide range of knowledge resources. SRP fosters interweaving multiple knowledge resources to develop innovative multidirectional partnerships for research and training. Here we describe examples of how motivation, ideas, knowledge, and expertise from different people, institutions, and agencies can integrate to tackle challenges that can be as complex as the resources they bring to bear on it. Conclusions By providing structure for interweaving science with its stakeholders, we are better able to leverage resources, increase potential for innovation, and proactively ensure a more fully developed spectrum of beneficial outcomes of research investments. Citation Anderson BE, Naujokas MF, Suk WA. 2015. Interweaving knowledge resources to address complex environmental health challenges. Environ Health Perspect 123:1095–1099

  16. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  17. Accelerating adaptation of natural resource management to address climate change.

    PubMed

    Cross, Molly S; McCarthy, Patrick D; Garfin, Gregg; Gori, David; Enquist, Carolyn A F

    2013-02-01

    Natural resource managers are seeking tools to help them address current and future effects of climate change. We present a model for collaborative planning aimed at identifying ways to adapt management actions to address the effects of climate change in landscapes that cross public and private jurisdictional boundaries. The Southwest Climate Change Initiative (SWCCI) piloted the Adaptation for Conservation Targets (ACT) planning approach at workshops in 4 southwestern U.S. landscapes. This planning approach successfully increased participants' self-reported capacity to address climate change by providing them with a better understanding of potential effects and guiding the identification of solutions. The workshops fostered cross-jurisdictional and multidisciplinary dialogue on climate change through active participation of scientists and managers in assessing climate change effects, discussing the implications of those effects for determining management goals and activities, and cultivating opportunities for regional coordination on adaptation of management plans. Facilitated application of the ACT framework advanced group discussions beyond assessing effects to devising options to mitigate the effects of climate change on specific species, ecological functions, and ecosystems. Participants addressed uncertainty about future conditions by considering more than one climate-change scenario. They outlined opportunities and identified next steps for implementing several actions, and local partnerships have begun implementing actions and conducting additional planning. Continued investment in adaptation of management plans and actions to address the effects of climate change in the southwestern United States and extension of the approaches used in this project to additional landscapes are needed if biological diversity and ecosystem services are to be maintained in a rapidly changing world.

  18. Strengthening the Paediatricians Project 1: The need, content and process of a workshop to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders of adolescence in countries with low human resource for health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    delegates with basic information on adolescent psychiatry prior to the workshop was suggested to make the workshop more valuable. Conclusions There is a need to expand training for paediatricians from various backgrounds in adolescent psychiatry to strengthen their clinical skills to address the PMHD at the primary-care level. The evaluation suggests that the design and collaborative approach evident in this programme have merit as a model for training paediatricians in adolescent psychiatry in countries with low human resource for health. PMID:20167076

  19. Tackling Malawi's human resources crisis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Debbie

    2006-05-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, health systems are fragile and staffing is grossly inadequate to meet rising health needs. Despite growing international attention, donors have been reluctant to undertake the significant investments required to address the human resources problem comprehensively, given social and political sensitivities, and concerns regarding sustainability of interventions and risks of rising donor dependency. In Malawi, one of the poorest nations in Africa, declining human resource levels have fueled an accelerating collapse of public health services since the late 1990s. In an effort to improve health outcomes, in 2004 the government launched a new health initiative to deliver an Essential Health Package, including a major scale-up of HIV and AIDS related services. Improving staffing levels is the single biggest challenge to implementing this approach. Donors agreed to help the government develop an Emergency Human Resources Programme with five main facets: improving incentives for recruitment and retention of staff through salary top-ups, expanding domestic training capacity, using international volunteer doctors and nurse tutors as a stop-gap measure, providing international technical assistance to bolster planning and management capacity and skills, and establishing more robust monitoring and evaluation capacity. Industrial relations were a prominent consideration in determining the shape of the Programme. The combination of short- and long-term measures appears to be helpful in maintaining commitment to the programme.

  20. [Management human resources].

    PubMed

    Schena, F P

    2004-01-01

    The management of human resources may follow different models, defined as bureaucratic, technocratic or managerial-entrepreneurial models. The latter being the most used. However, the relationship individual-enterprise is based on both a legal and a psychological contract regardless of the model used. The winning concept considers the personnel as the first and most important customer to be trained, informed and kept updated. For these reasons it is necessary to create a warm working environment, which is the first marketing tool, thus improving the marketing skills (enterprise-customer). The improved results (products, processes and publications) will be achieved by total quality management, which includes training and transformation of the chief's role from the hierarchical management to a coaching approach. This approach will recreativity, personality and competence of the personnel. This new type of leadership is based on the authority recognised by the personnel, service and motivation.

  1. Addressing structural and observational uncertainty in resource management.

    PubMed

    Fackler, Paul; Pacifici, Krishna

    2014-01-15

    Most natural resource management and conservation problems are plagued with high levels of uncertainties, which make good decision making difficult. Although some kinds of uncertainties are easily incorporated into decision making, two types of uncertainty present more formidable difficulties. The first, structural uncertainty, represents our imperfect knowledge about how a managed system behaves. The second, observational uncertainty, arises because the state of the system must be inferred from imperfect monitoring systems. The former type of uncertainty has been addressed in ecology using Adaptive Management (AM) and the latter using the Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDP) framework. Here we present a unifying framework that extends standard POMDPs and encompasses both standard POMDPs and AM. The approach allows any system variable to be observed or not observed and uses any relevant observed variable to update beliefs about unknown variables and parameters. This extends standard AM, which only uses realizations of the state variable to update beliefs and extends standard POMDP by allowing more general stochastic dependence among the observable variables and the state variables. This framework enables both structural and observational uncertainty to be simultaneously modeled. We illustrate the features of the extended POMDP framework with an example.

  2. Accelerating Adaptation of Natural Resource Management to Address Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Molly S; McCarthy, Patrick D; Garfin, Gregg; Gori, David; Enquist, Carolyn AF

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Natural resource managers are seeking tools to help them address current and future effects of climate change. We present a model for collaborative planning aimed at identifying ways to adapt management actions to address the effects of climate change in landscapes that cross public and private jurisdictional boundaries. The Southwest Climate Change Initiative (SWCCI) piloted the Adaptation for Conservation Targets (ACT) planning approach at workshops in 4 southwestern U.S. landscapes. This planning approach successfully increased participants’ self-reported capacity to address climate change by providing them with a better understanding of potential effects and guiding the identification of solutions. The workshops fostered cross-jurisdictional and multidisciplinary dialogue on climate change through active participation of scientists and managers in assessing climate change effects, discussing the implications of those effects for determining management goals and activities, and cultivating opportunities for regional coordination on adaptation of management plans. Facilitated application of the ACT framework advanced group discussions beyond assessing effects to devising options to mitigate the effects of climate change on specific species, ecological functions, and ecosystems. Participants addressed uncertainty about future conditions by considering more than one climate-change scenario. They outlined opportunities and identified next steps for implementing several actions, and local partnerships have begun implementing actions and conducting additional planning. Continued investment in adaptation of management plans and actions to address the effects of climate change in the southwestern United States and extension of the approaches used in this project to additional landscapes are needed if biological diversity and ecosystem services are to be maintained in a rapidly changing world. Acelerando la Adaptación del Manejo de Recursos Naturales para

  3. Team Packs: Addressing Human Sexuality Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Inst. for Child Health Policy.

    This kit provides materials that teach about Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS), sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and pregnancy using group instructional methodology to actively engage students in the learning process. Using cooperative learning materials and videotape recordings, the program stresses…

  4. Human Resource Development: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.

    This information analysis concerns human resource development (HRD), defined as consisting of programs and activities that positively affect the development of the individual and the productivity and profit of the organization. Several key human resource development components are identified and discussed: (1) training and development; (2)…

  5. Human Resource Management. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Cynthia D.; And Others

    This book offers students, practicing managers, and human resource professionals a comprehensive, current, research-based introduction to the human resource management (HRM) function. It is organized in eight sections, logically following the progression of individuals into, through, and out of the organization. Part 1, overview and introduction,…

  6. Human Rights Resource Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrano, Elias, Comp.

    This document provides information about 25 programs/brochures which focus on human rights topics. Specific topics include: (1) counselor preparation; (2) multicultural awareness; (3) abuse and neglect; (4) Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; (5) self-awareness; (6) human rights awareness and human rights of students; (7) cultural diversity; (8)…

  7. Managing Human Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    The author challenges traditional views of productivity and offers alternative concepts and models for evaluating resources and their relationships to productivity. He discusses how to measure productivity, how to measure effectiveness, applying a productivity formula, coping with a cost cutback, adjusting to a variable workload, and benefits from…

  8. Automation and Human Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the automation of personnel administration in libraries covers (1) new developments in human resource management systems; (2) system requirements; (3) software evaluation; (4) vendor evaluation; (5) selection of a system; (6) training and support; and (7) benefits. (MES)

  9. What resources? Addressing the needs of the epilepsy community.

    PubMed

    Brown, S W

    1995-09-01

    Epilepsy is a condition which spans several disciplines within medicine, as well as having an impact on many non-medical areas such as employment and education. Services for epilepsy in the UK have not been developed according to any coherent strategy and remain fragmented and unevenly distributed. Successive attempts to address these shortcomings by publishing recommendations, even with government assistance, have not led to major improvements. Recent changes in the organization of health care services might at least present an opportunity to effect change by educational initiatives directed towards purchasers and providers. However, the absence of epilepsy from The Health of the Nation objectives represents a failure to get the message through to those with the ability to direct policy. The plethora of new, effective and expensive pharmaceutical treatments should lead to a raising of epilepsy awareness among the medical profession as a consequence of marketing activity, but this is already causing conflict with Family Health Service Associations (FHSAs) and others with equivalent lack of vision. I would suggest that only by politicizing the consumer can the change we seek be brought about.

  10. Human Resource Management in Library and Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Line, Maurice B.; Kinnell, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of human resource management focuses on academic libraries. Topics addressed include the influence of information technology; strategic planning; equal opportunities; recruitment; staff appraisal; quality of working life; motivation; job satisfaction; participative management; leadership; burnout; conflict; organizational structures;…

  11. Strategic Human Resource Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on strategic human resource (HR) development. "Strategic HR Orientation and Firm Performance in India" (Kuldeep Singh) reports findings from a study of Indian business executives that suggests there is a positive link between HR policies and practices and workforce motivation and loyalty and…

  12. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  13. Educating Students with Disabilities: Resources Addressing More than One Disability. NICHCY Inclusion Bibliography 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupper, Lisa, Ed.

    This annotated bibliography lists print and nonprint resources on educating students with disabilities, with special emphasis on inclusive settings. Most of the resources listed discuss a variety of disabilities, with chapters on how to address the unique needs of students with each of the disabilities. Information provided for the 33 print…

  14. Natural Resources and Human Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkel, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    It is rotational movement of the Earth that decides on the climatic zonation of natural resources, as modified by the positions of the continents and oceans and the irregular spread of fossil fuels. Intensive human activity poses threats to the development of natural geoecosystems. The last century also brought growing civilizational threats to the environment on the global, regional and local scales. The author characterise the prospects in regard to global changes, and discuss the solutions needing to be pursued if human geoecosystems are to be protected (through management and education).

  15. Population and human resources development.

    PubMed

    Jones, G W

    1992-06-01

    The concern of this discourse on social development planning was that individuals be part of human resources development. Population growth is an obstacle to social development, but so is national expenditures on the military rather than diverting funds for social improvements. There are important benefits for society in social development: a valued consumption good, increased productivity, and reduced fertility. Dissatisfaction with an economic growth model of development occurred during the 1960s, and by the mid-1980s, human resource development was capsuled in Asia and the Pacific Region in the Jakarta Plan of Action on Human Resources Development and adopted in 1988. Earlier approaches favored the supply side. This article emphasizes "human" development which considers people as more than inputs to productivity. The quality of human resources is dependent on the family and society, the educational system, and individual levels of health and nutrition. Differences in income levels between East and South Asia have been attributed by Oshima to full use of the labor force and mechanization and training of workers. Ogawa, Jones, and Williamson contend that huge investment in infrastructure, efficient absorption of advanced technology, a stable political environment, and commitment to human capital formation are key to development. Demographic transition and decline in fertility at one point reflect growth and engagement in the labor force and resource accumulation. Although East Asia had higher levels of literacy and educational attainment than many developing countries, South Asia still has high fertility. Human resource development is dependent on reduced population growth rates, but rapid population growth is not an insurmountable obstacle to achieving higher levels of education. Rapid population growth is a greater obstacle in poorer countries. The impact can be reflected in increased costs of attaining educational targets of universal primary education or in

  16. Human Resources for Information Development in Sudan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley, Cecile

    1992-01-01

    Describes the state of human resources development in Sudan's information industry. Training problems and the emigration of high level personnel are discussed, guidelines for human resource development are suggested, and national strategies to develop and retain Sudan's human resources are suggested. (EA)

  17. Enterprise Resource Planning Software in the Human Resource Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedell, Michael D.; Floyd, Barry D.; Nicols, Kay McGlashan; Ellis, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    The relatively recent development of comprehensive human resource information systems (HRIS) software has led to a large demand for technologically literate human resource (HR) professionals. For the college student who is about to begin the search for that first postcollege job, the need to develop technology literacy is even more necessary. To…

  18. Project NO REST: Addressing Human Trafficking in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Dean F

    Project NO REST (North Carolina Organizing and Responding to the Exploitation and Sexual Trafficking of Children) is a 5-year effort funded by the US Children's Bureau to address the trafficking of individuals age 25 years and younger in North Carolina. The project aims to increase awareness of human trafficking affecting children and youth, especially those in the child welfare system; to reduce the number of these youth who are trafficked; and to improve outcomes for those who are trafficked. In the project's first year, nearly 100 stakeholders statewide developed a comprehensive plan to address trafficking. Later, 5 communities were recruited to implement the plan at the local level. Their experiences will be used to develop a toolkit for future anti-trafficking efforts.

  19. Human resources for health in India.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mohan; Rao, Krishna D; Kumar, A K Shiva; Chatterjee, Mirai; Sundararaman, Thiagarajan

    2011-02-12

    India has a severe shortage of human resources for health. It has a shortage of qualified health workers and the workforce is concentrated in urban areas. Bringing qualified health workers to rural, remote, and underserved areas is very challenging. Many Indians, especially those living in rural areas, receive care from unqualified providers. The migration of qualified allopathic doctors and nurses is substantial and further strains the system. Nurses do not have much authority or say within the health system, and the resources to train them are still inadequate. Little attention is paid during medical education to the medical and public health needs of the population, and the rapid privatisation of medical and nursing education has implications for its quality and governance. Such issues are a result of underinvestment in and poor governance of the health sector--two issues that the government urgently needs to address. A comprehensive national policy for human resources is needed to achieve universal health care in India. The public sector will need to redesign appropriate packages of monetary and non-monetary incentives to encourage qualified health workers to work in rural and remote areas. Such a policy might also encourage task-shifting and mainstreaming doctors and practitioners who practice traditional Indian medicine (ayurveda, yoga and naturopathy, unani, and siddha) and homoeopathy to work in these areas while adopting other innovative ways of augmenting human resources for health. At the same time, additional investments will be needed to improve the relevance, quantity, and quality of nursing, medical, and public health education in the country.

  20. Managing Human Resources in a Multinational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumetzberger, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To develop more sensitivity for different patterns of human resource management in multinational companies. Design/methodology/approach: Systemic approach; the concepts and models are based on the evaluation of consulting projects in the field of human resource management. Findings: A concept of four typical varieties of human resource…

  1. Strategic Imperative of Human Resource Leadership Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajini, G.; Gomathi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Using multiple constituencies approach, variances in competencies in human resource leadership have been studied as this is becoming highly significant in India's globalisation efforts. Previous research in leadership orientation focused on localisation of human resource competencies rather than its globalisation. For this, human resource…

  2. Governance and human resources for health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Despite an increase in efforts to address shortage and performance of Human Resources for Health (HRH), HRH problems continue to hamper quality service delivery. We believe that the influence of governance is undervalued in addressing the HRH crisis, both globally and at country level. This thematic series has aimed to expand the evidence base on the role of governance in addressing the HRH crisis. The six articles comprising the series present a range of experiences. The articles report on governance in relation to developing a joint vision, building adherence and strengthening accountability, and on governance with respect to planning, implementation, and monitoring. Other governance issues warrant attention as well, such as corruption and transparency in decision-making in HRH policies and strategies. Acknowledging and dealing with governance should be part and parcel of HRH planning and implementation. To date, few experiences have been shared on improving governance for HRH policy making and implementation, and many questions remain unanswered. There is an urgent need to document experiences and for mutual learning. PMID:22115191

  3. Compensated individually addressable array technology for human breast imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, D. Kent

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming broad bandwidth acoustic or microwave beams which encompass array design, array excitation, source signal preprocessing, and received signal postprocessing. This technique uses several different methods to achieve improvement over conventional array systems. These methods are: 1) individually addressable array elements; 2) digital-to-analog converters for the source signals; 3) inverse filtering from source precompensation; and 4) spectral extrapolation to expand the bandwidth of the received signals. The components of the system will be used as follows: 1) The individually addressable array allows scanning around and over an object, such as a human breast, without any moving parts. The elements of the array are broad bandwidth elements and efficient radiators, as well as detectors. 2) Digital-to-analog converters as the source signal generators allow virtually any radiated field to be created in the half-space in front of the array. 3) Preprocessing allows for corrections in the system, most notably in the response of the individual elements and in the ability to increase contrast and resolution of signal propagating through the medium under investigation. 4) Postprocessing allows the received broad bandwidth signals to be expanded in a process similar to analytic continuation. Used together, the system allows for compensation to create beams of any desired shape, control the wave fields generated to correct for medium differences, and improve contract and resolution in and through the medium.

  4. Human Resource Management in Virtual Organizations. Research in Human Resource Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heneman, Robert L., Ed.; Greenberger, David B., Ed.

    This document contains 14 papers on human resources (HR) and human resource management (HRM) in virtual organizations. The following papers are included: "Series Preface" (Rodger Griffeth); "Volume Preface" (Robert L. Heneman, David B. Greenberger); "The Virtual Organization: Definition, Description, and…

  5. CDC’s Health Equity Resource Toolkit: Disseminating Guidance for State Practitioners to Address Obesity Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Gayle Holmes; James, Stephen D.; Hawley, Lisa; Corrigan, Bethany; Kramer, Rachel E.; Overton, Samantha N.; Farris, Rosanne P.; Wasilewski, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been on the rise in the United States over the past three decades, and is high. In addition to population-wide trends, it is clear that obesity affects some groups more than others and can be associated with age, income, education, gender, race and ethnicity, and geographic region. To reverse the obesity epidemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) promotes evidence-based and practice-informed strategies to address nutrition and physical activity environments and behaviors. These public health strategies require translation into actionable approaches that can be implemented by state and local entities to address disparities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention used findings from an expert panel meeting to guide the development and dissemination of the Health Equity Resource Toolkit for State Practitioners Addressing Obesity Disparities (available at http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/health_equity/toolkit.html). The Toolkit helps public health practitioners take a systematic approach to program planning using a health equity lens. The Toolkit provides a six-step process for planning, implementing, and evaluating strategies to address obesity disparities. Each section contains (a) a basic description of the steps of the process and suggested evidence-informed actions to help address obesity disparities, (b) practical tools for carrying out activities to help reduce obesity disparities, and (c) a “real-world” case study of a successful state-level effort to address obesity with a focus on health equity that is particularly relevant to the content in that section. Hyperlinks to additional resources are included throughout. PMID:24962967

  6. CDC's Health Equity Resource Toolkit: disseminating guidance for state practitioners to address obesity disparities.

    PubMed

    Payne, Gayle Holmes; James, Stephen D; Hawley, Lisa; Corrigan, Bethany; Kramer, Rachel E; Overton, Samantha N; Farris, Rosanne P; Wasilewski, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been on the rise in the United States over the past three decades, and is high. In addition to population-wide trends, it is clear that obesity affects some groups more than others and can be associated with age, income, education, gender, race and ethnicity, and geographic region. To reverse the obesity epidemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) promotes evidence-based and practice-informed strategies to address nutrition and physical activity environments and behaviors. These public health strategies require translation into actionable approaches that can be implemented by state and local entities to address disparities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention used findings from an expert panel meeting to guide the development and dissemination of the Health Equity Resource Toolkit for State Practitioners Addressing Obesity Disparities (available at http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/health_equity/toolkit.html). The Toolkit helps public health practitioners take a systematic approach to program planning using a health equity lens. The Toolkit provides a six-step process for planning, implementing, and evaluating strategies to address obesity disparities. Each section contains (a) a basic description of the steps of the process and suggested evidence-informed actions to help address obesity disparities, (b) practical tools for carrying out activities to help reduce obesity disparities, and (c) a "real-world" case study of a successful state-level effort to address obesity with a focus on health equity that is particularly relevant to the content in that section. Hyperlinks to additional resources are included throughout.

  7. Linking Career Development and Human Resource Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutteridge, Thomas G.

    When organizations integrate their career development and human resources planning activities into a comprehensive whole, it is the exception rather than the rule. One reason for the frequent dichotomy between career development and human resource planning is the failure to recognize that they are complements rather than synonyms or substitutes.…

  8. Strategic Human Resource Planning in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulferts, Gregory; Wirtz, Patrick; Peterson, Evan

    2009-01-01

    A strategic plan guides a college in successfully meeting its mission. Based on the strategic plan, a college can develop a human resource plan that will allow it to make management decisions in the present to support the future direction of the college. The overall purpose of human resource management is to: (1) ensure the organization has…

  9. Economics and Human Resource Development: A Rejoinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Greg G.; Swanson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the areas agreement between two recent and seemingly disparate Human Resource Development Review articles by Wang and Swanson (2008) and McLean, Lynham, Azevedo, Lawrence, and Nafukho (2008). The foundational roles of economics in human resource development theory and practice are highlighted as well as the need for…

  10. IAB presidential address: bioethics in a globalized world: creating space for flourishing human relationships.

    PubMed

    Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2011-10-01

    Bioethics in a globalized world is meeting a number of challenges - fundamentalism in its different forms, and a focus on economic growth neglecting issues such as equity and sustainability, being prominent among them. How well are we as bioethicists equipped to make meaningful contributions in these times? The paper identifies a number of restraints and proceeds to probe potential resources such as the capability approach, care ethics, cosmopolitanism, and pragmatism. These elements serve to outline a perspective that focuses on the preconditions for flourishing human relationships as a way to address bioethical challenges in a globalized world.

  11. Human Resources Development in the 70s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludeman, Bart L.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses five major objectives (put forth by the behavioral scientist, Dr. Gordon Lippitt) for human resource development which focus on the need for teamwork among future leaders, company management, and top educators. (LAS)

  12. Keep an eye on human resources 'yardsticks'.

    PubMed

    McKimmy, D L

    1979-01-01

    By monitoring certain human resources "yardsticks", personnel administrators can demonstrate the results of institutional and departmental goals and objectives. Thus, taking an economic approach to personnel management can help the hospital in the struggle to contain costs.

  13. The state of human dimensions capacity for natural resource management: needs, knowledge, and resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Leong, Kirsten M.; Milley, Brad J.; Clarke, Melinda M.; Teel, Tara L.; Chase, Mark A.; Dietsch, Alia M.

    2013-01-01

    The social sciences have become increasingly important in understanding natural resource management contexts and audiences, and are essential in design and delivery of effective and durable management strategies. Yet many agencies and organizations do not have the necessary resource management. We draw on the textbook definition of HD: how and why people value natural resources, what benefits people seek and derive from those resources, and how people affect and are affected by those resources and their management (Decker, Brown, and Seimer 2001). Clearly articulating how HD information can be used and integrated into natural resource management planning and decision-making is an important challenge faced by the HD field. To address this challenge, we formed a collaborative team to explore the issue of HD capacity-building for natural resource organizations and to advance the HD field. We define HD capacity as activities, efforts, and resources that enhance the ability of HD researchers and practitioners and natural managers and decision-makers to understand and address the social aspects of conservation. Specifically, we sought to examine current barriers to integration of HD into natural resource management, knowledge needed to improve HD capacity, and existing HD tools, resources, and training opportunities. We conducted a needs assessment of HD experts and practitioners, developed a framework for considering HD activities that can contribute both directly and indirectly throughout any phase of an adaptive management cycle, and held a workshop to review preliminary findings and gather additional input through breakout group discussions. This paper provides highlights from our collaborative initiative to help frame and inform future HD capacity-building efforts and natural resource organizations and also provides a list of existing human dimensions tools and resources.

  14. USSOCOM’s Role in Addressing Human Trafficking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-02

    modern slavery . Its size, global scope, and potential to threaten national security warrants appropriate Department of Defense attention. However, the...manifests itself in slavery – indefensible abuse of the vulnerable by the more powerful. Addressing this issue will require a systemic and sustained... slavery today rivals that of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, that naïveté cannot prevent purposeful action to address the modern form of

  15. Urgent need for human resources to promote global cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Vedanthan, Rajesh; Fuster, Valentin

    2011-02-01

    The World Health Organization estimates the existence of a global shortage of over 4 million health-care workers. Given the growing global burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the shortfall in global human resources for health (HRH) is probably even greater than predicted. A critical challenge going forward is to determine how to integrate CVD-related human resource needs into the overall global HRH agenda. We describe the CVD implications of core HRH objectives, including coverage, motivation, and competence, in addition to issues such as health-care worker migration and the need for input from multiple stakeholders to successfully address the current problems. We emphasize gaps in knowledge regarding HRH for global CVD-related care and research opportunities. In light of the current global epidemiologic transition from communicable to noncommunicable diseases, now is the time for the global health community to focus on CVD-related human resource needs.

  16. Web-Based Geospatial Tools to Address Hazard Mitigation, Natural Resource Management, and Other Societal Issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn,, Paul P.

    2009-01-01

    Federal, State, and local government agencies in the United States face a broad range of issues on a daily basis. Among these are natural hazard mitigation, homeland security, emergency response, economic and community development, water supply, and health and safety services. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) helps decision makers address these issues by providing natural hazard assessments, information on energy, mineral, water and biological resources, maps, and other geospatial information. Increasingly, decision makers at all levels are challenged not by the lack of information, but by the absence of effective tools to synthesize the large volume of data available, and to utilize the data to frame policy options in a straightforward and understandable manner. While geographic information system (GIS) technology has been widely applied to this end, systems with the necessary analytical power have been usable only by trained operators. The USGS is addressing the need for more accessible, manageable data tools by developing a suite of Web-based geospatial applications that will incorporate USGS and cooperating partner data into the decision making process for a variety of critical issues. Examples of Web-based geospatial tools being used to address societal issues follow.

  17. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources... executive development, employee and labor relations, employee benefits and retirement assistance,...

  18. Advances in addressing technical challenges of point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuQi; Lifson, Mark A; Inci, Fatih; Liang, Li-Guo; Sheng, Ye-Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    The striking prevalence of HIV, TB and malaria, as well as outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, such as influenza A (H7N9), Ebola and MERS, poses great challenges for patient care in resource-limited settings (RLS). However, advanced diagnostic technologies cannot be implemented in RLS largely due to economic constraints. Simple and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, which rely less on environmental context and operator training, have thus been extensively studied to achieve early diagnosis and treatment monitoring in non-laboratory settings. Despite great input from material science, biomedical engineering and nanotechnology for developing POC diagnostics, significant technical challenges are yet to be overcome. Summarized here are the technical challenges associated with POC diagnostics from a RLS perspective and the latest advances in addressing these challenges are reviewed.

  19. Advances in addressing technical challenges of point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ShuQi; Lifson, Mark A.; Inci, Fatih; Liang, Li-Guo; Sheng, Ye-Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    The striking prevalence of HIV, TB and malaria, as well as outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, such as influenza A (H7N9), Ebola and MERS, poses great challenges for patient care in resource-limited settings (RLS). However, advanced diagnostic technologies cannot be implemented in RLS largely due to economic constraints. Simple and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, which rely less on environmental context and operator training, have thus been extensively studied to achieve early diagnosis and treatment monitoring in non-laboratory settings. Despite great input from material science, biomedical engineering and nanotechnology for developing POC diagnostics, significant technical challenges are yet to be overcome. Summarized here are the technical challenges associated with POC diagnostics from a RLS perspective and the latest advances in addressing these challenges are reviewed. PMID:26777725

  20. Predicting Nursing Human Resources: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Allison; Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram

    2010-01-01

    The nurse-to-population ratio (NPOP) is a standard indicator used to indicate a country’s health care human resources capacity for responding to its disease burden. This study sought to explore if socioeconomic development indicators could predict the NPOP in a country. Mexico served as the case example for this exploratory study, with the final five variables selected based on findings from a qualitative study analyzing the development of nursing human resources in the country. Multiple linear regression showed that two variables proved significant predictors of the NPOP and the model itself explained 70% of the variance (r2 = .7; p = .0000). The findings have multiple implications for nursing human resources policy in Mexico and at a global level as governments attempt to build human capital to respond to population health needs. PMID:19628510

  1. Resources from the NASA SMD Astrophysics Forum: Addressing the needs of the higher education community (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Schultz, G. R.; Smith, D.; Bianchi, L.; Blair, W. P.; Fraknoi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Four NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach Forums organize individual SMD-funded E/PO projects and their teams into a coordinated effort. The Forums assist scientists and educators with becoming involved in SMD E/PO and make SMD E/PO resources and expertise accessible to the science and education communities. The Astrophysics Forum and the Astrophysics E/PO community have focused efforts to support and engage the higher education community on enhancing awareness of the resources available to them. To ensure Astrophysics higher education efforts are grounded in audience needs, we held informal conversations with instructors of introductory astronomy courses, convened sessions with higher education faculty and E/PO professionals at conferences, and examined existing literature and findings of the SMD Higher Education Working Group. This work indicates that most Astronomy 101 instructors are not specialists in areas of astrophysics where rapid progress is being made, older textbooks are out of date, and ideas are challenging for students. Instructors are seeking resources and training that support them in effectively teaching the latest science and are in need both basic material and information on new results. In this session, we will discuss our efforts to address these expressed needs, namely through Resource Guides and Slide Sets, and how these are applicable to topics in Heliophysics and Planetary Science. We have collaborated with the Astrophysics E/PO community, researchers, and Astronomy 101 instructors to create two Resource Guides on the topics of cosmology and exoplanets. These fields are ripe with scientific developments that college instructors have told us they find challenging to stay current. Each guide includes a wide variety of sources of background information, links to animations/simulations, classroom activities, and references on teaching each topic. Feedback from Astronomy 101 instructors indicated that the

  2. Addressing Grand Challenges in Earth Observation Science: The Earth Observation Data Centre for Water Resources Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, W.; Fröhlich, J.; Wotawa, G.; Stowasser, R.; Staudinger, M.; Hoffmann, C.; Walli, A.; Federspiel, C.; Aspetsberger, M.; Atzberger, C.; Briese, C.; Notarnicola, C.; Zebisch, M.; Boresch, A.; Enenkel, M.; Kidd, R.; von Beringe, A.; Hasenauer, S.; Naeimi, V.; Mücke, W.

    2014-09-01

    Earth observation is entering a new era where the increasing availability of free and open global satellite data sets combined with the computing power offered by modern information technologies opens up the possibility to process high-resolution data sets at global scale and short repeat intervals in a fully automatic fashion. This will not only boost the availability of higher level earth observation data in purely quantitative terms, but can also be expected to trigger a step change in the quality and usability of earth observation data. However, the technical, scientific, and organisational challenges that need to be overcome to arrive at this point are significant. First of all, Petabyte-scale data centres are needed for storing and processing complete satellite data records. Second, innovative processing chains that allow fully automatic processing of the satellite data from the raw sensor records to higher-level geophysical products need to be developed. Last but not least, new models of cooperation between public and private actors need to be found in order to live up to the first two challenges. This paper offers a discussion of how the Earth Observation Data Centre for Water Resources Monitoring (EODC) - a catalyser for an open and international cooperation of public and private organisations - will address these three grand challenges with the aim to foster the use of earth observation for monitoring of global water resources.

  3. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, L.W.; Chawla, M.K.; Swor, C.T.

    2014-01-15

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  4. Addressing the human factors issues associated with control room modifications

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.; Stubler, W.; Kramer, J.

    1998-03-01

    Advanced human-system interface (HSI) technology is being integrated into existing nuclear plants as part of plant modifications and upgrades. The result of this trend is that hybrid HSIs are created, i.e., HSIs containing a mixture of conventional (analog) and advanced (digital) technology. The purpose of the present research is to define the potential effects of hybrid HSIs on personnel performance and plant safety and to develop human factors guidance for safety reviews of them where necessary. In support of this objective, human factors issues associated with hybrid HSIs were identified. The issues were evaluated for their potential significance to plant safety, i.e., their human performance concerns have the potential to compromise plant safety. The issues were then prioritized and a subset was selected for design review guidance development.

  5. Human resources: a common-sense discipline.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Lisa R

    2004-02-01

    Being able to hire the right team members, keeping them engaged ina professional and productive environment, and avoiding litigation help keep the team functioning and meeting the everyday goals of providing quality patient care. Although these topics may seem complex, medical providers and professionals have resources available to them, such as the Human Resources department, the Medical Director, senior management,and legal counsel. Hiring the right people, creating a positive work environment, and avoiding litigation are all common sense principals that are relevant regardless of profession, industry, or company. Understanding how to apply the principles and concepts of Human Resources and personnel management can seem overwhelming: however, asking for help from the resources mentioned previously and applying the common sense information found in this article will help one to be a successful leader and practitioner.

  6. Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) Conference Proceedings (Arlington, Virginia, March 3-7, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchinke, K. Peter, Ed.

    This document contains papers from 39 symposia as well as two town forum presentations and a poster session at the 1999 Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) conference. The town forum papers address certification in the human resource development (HRD) field. Symposium topics are as follows: (1) adult learning in the workplace; (2)…

  7. The Human Resource Cycle as Basis of Human Resource Development System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jereb, Janez

    The primary aim of human-resource-development systems in companies is to improve organizational performance through satisfying the development needs of individual employees. This paper presents findings of a study that looked at how human-resource-development systems worked in practice, in particular, how performance management, selection,…

  8. Marine and Human Systems: Addressing Multiple Scales and Multiple Stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, E. E.; Bundy, A.; Chuenpagdee, R.; Maddison, L.; Svendsen, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research (IMBER) project aims to develop a comprehensive understanding of, and predictive capacity of ocean responses to accelerating global change and the consequent effects on the Earth System and human society. Understanding the changing ecology and biogeochemistry of marine ecosystems and their sensitivity and resilience to multiple drivers, pressures and stressors is critical to developing responses that will help reduce the vulnerability of marine-dependent human communities. The cumulative pressure of anthropogenic activities on marine systems is already apparent and is projected to increase in the next decades. Policy- and decision-makers need assessments of the status and trends of marine habitats, species, and ecosystems to promote sustainable human activities in the marine environment, particularly in light of global environmental change and changing social systems and human pressures. The IMBER community recently undertook a synthesis and evaluation of approaches for ecosystem-based marine governance, integrated modeling of marine social-ecological systems, and the social and ecological consequences of changing marine ecosystems. The outcomes of this activity provide assessments of current understanding, indicate approaches needed to predict the effects of multiple stressors, at multiple scales, on marine ecosystems and dependent human populations, and highlight approaches for developing innovative societal responses to changing marine ecosystems.

  9. Fort Collins Science Center Ecosystem Dynamics branch--interdisciplinary research for addressing complex natural resource issues across landscapes and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wilson, Juliette T.

    2013-01-01

    The Ecosystem Dynamics Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center offers an interdisciplinary team of talented and creative scientists with expertise in biology, botany, ecology, geology, biogeochemistry, physical sciences, geographic information systems, and remote-sensing, for tackling complex questions about natural resources. As demand for natural resources increases, the issues facing natural resource managers, planners, policy makers, industry, and private landowners are increasing in spatial and temporal scope, often involving entire regions, multiple jurisdictions, and long timeframes. Needs for addressing these issues include (1) a better understanding of biotic and abiotic ecosystem components and their complex interactions; (2) the ability to easily monitor, assess, and visualize the spatially complex movements of animals, plants, water, and elements across highly variable landscapes; and (3) the techniques for accurately predicting both immediate and long-term responses of system components to natural and human-caused change. The overall objectives of our research are to provide the knowledge, tools, and techniques needed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, state agencies, and other stakeholders in their endeavors to meet the demand for natural resources while conserving biodiversity and ecosystem services. Ecosystem Dynamics scientists use field and laboratory research, data assimilation, and ecological modeling to understand ecosystem patterns, trends, and mechanistic processes. This information is used to predict the outcomes of changes imposed on species, habitats, landscapes, and climate across spatiotemporal scales. The products we develop include conceptual models to illustrate system structure and processes; regional baseline and integrated assessments; predictive spatial and mathematical models; literature syntheses; and frameworks or protocols for improved ecosystem monitoring, adaptive management, and program evaluation. The descriptions

  10. Patching the Wetware: Addressing the Human Factor in Information Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    was done to obtain an untainted set of beliefs that are not argued over often such as “It’s a good idea to brush your teeth ”, “Mental illness is not...this vulnerability. Some psychologists theorize that humans have evolved with some of the same fixed- action patterns as our counterparts in the animal

  11. Design and Implementation of a Decision Support System for Assigning Human Resources in the Hellenic Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    IMPLEMENTATION OF A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR ASSIGNING HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE HELLENIC NAVY by Konstantinos Agas September 2006 Thesis Advisor...Implementation of a Decision Support System for Assigning Human Resources in the Hellenic Navy 6. AUTHOR(S) Konstantinos Agas 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7...SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/ A 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views expressed

  12. Organizations with Resources Relevant to Addressing Barriers to Student Learning: A Catalogue of Clearinghouses, Technical Assistance Centers, and Other Agencies. A Resource Aid Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This catalogue has been created as part of the UCLA Center for Mental Health in Schools' effort to compile and disseminate a set of resources useful to addressing barriers to student learning. This resource packet categorizes and provides contact information on organizations focusing on children's mental health, education and schools, school-based…

  13. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Office of Human Resources Management. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources Management, which is managed by the Director of the Office, provides human resources management support...

  14. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Office of Human Resources Management. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources Management, which is managed by the Director of the Office, provides human resources management support...

  15. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Human Resources Management. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources Management, which is managed by the Director of the Office, provides human resources management support...

  16. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Human Resources Management. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources Management, which is managed by the Director of the Office, provides human resources management support...

  17. An Innovative Approach to Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Labor Relations.

    This document describes the Technology Training Program (TTP) designed as an approach to human resource development. Objectives of the program include: (1) increasing the supply of technicians and paraprofessionals in energy and energy-related fields; (2) providing laboratory or industrial-based training experiences; (3) sharing TTP instructional…

  18. Human Resource Planning: An Introduction. Report 312.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Peter

    This report is designed to give readers an introduction to the principles of human resource planning (HRP) and the areas in which it can be used, including those facing today's managers. Chapter 1 outlines why some organizations no longer plan, describes the background of change and uncertainty that discouraged them, and defines HRP. Chapter 2…

  19. A Proposed Human Resources Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake Tahoe Community Coll. District, South Lake Tahoe, CA.

    Lake Tahoe Community College's (LTCC's) Human Resources Development Program is designed to foster professional development through in-service activities for instructional, administrative, classified employees, and the governing board. The comprehensive program is intended to support the instructional process, improve student success, enhance…

  20. The Thinking Styles of Human Resource Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Paul; Zhang, Li-fang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Drawing upon Sternberg's theory of mental self-government, this paper aims to investigate the thinking styles and workplace experiences of 152 human resource (HR) practitioners pursuing Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) membership. It seeks to explore whether their thinking styles complemented their jobs and consider…

  1. Competency-Based Human Resource Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangani, Noordeen T.; McLean, Gary N.; Braden, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores issues in developing and implementing a competency-based human resource development strategy. The paper summarizes a literature review on how competency models can improve HR performance. A case study is presented of American Medical Systems (AMS), a mid-sized health-care and medical device company, where the model is being…

  2. Handbook on Human Resources: Recordkeeping and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korb, Roslyn

    This handbook was undertaken in response to the needs expressed by the higher education community for a common language--common data categories and definitions--to describe the human resources of postsecondary education institutions, and is intended as a basic guide to help institutions develop analytically useful databases of faculty and staff to…

  3. Integrating Oracle Human Resources with Other Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Karl; Shope, Shawn

    1998-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of implementing an enterprise-wide business system is achieving integration of the different modules to the satisfaction of diverse customers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) implementation of the Oracle application suite demonstrates the need to coordinate Oracle Human Resources Management System (HRMS) decision across the Oracle modules.

  4. Cultural Implications of Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiranpruk, Chaiskran

    A discussion of the cultural effects of economic and, by extension, human resource development in Southeast Asia looks at short- and long-term implications. It is suggested that in the short term, increased competition will affect distribution of wealth, which can promote materialism and corruption. The introduction of labor-saving technology may…

  5. The Human Resources Management System: Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceriello, Vincent R.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a systematic and disciplined approach to planning for the development and implementation of an information system which will collect, store, maintain, and report human resources data. Discusses guidelines, priorities, training requirements, security, auditing, interface with payroll, and personnel reporting. (CT)

  6. Philosophical Foundations of Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchinke, K. Peter

    Three alternative views of adult development can serve to distinguish competing schools of thought regarding the research, theory, and practice of human resource development (HRD). These views are as follows: (1) the person-centered view, which aims at self-realization of the individual and is grounded in humanistic psychology and liberalism; (2)…

  7. Managing human resources to improve employee retention.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    Managers face increased challenges as the demand for health care services increases while the supply of employees with the requisite skills continues to lag. Employee retention will become more important in the effort to service health care needs. Appropriate human resource management strategies and policies implemented effectively can significantly assist managers in dealing with the employee retention challenges ahead.

  8. New Perspectives in Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    These three papers are from a symposium on new perspectives in human resource development (HRD). "Developing an Instrument to Measure the Use of Play-Based Training Methods in Healthcare Education" (Rebecca J. Adams, Karen E. Watkins, Tom Valentine) reports preliminary findings from a pilot study that tested data collection procedures…

  9. Resources and Recommendations for Using Transcriptomics to Address Grand Challenges in Comparative Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mykles, Donald L.; Burnett, Karen G.; Durica, David S.; Joyce, Blake L.; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Schmidt, Carl J.; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology has become an important tool for studying physiological responses of organisms to changes in their environment. De novo assembly of RNA-seq data has allowed researchers to create a comprehensive catalog of genes expressed in a tissue and to quantify their expression without a complete genome sequence. The contributions from the “Tapping the Power of Crustacean Transcriptomics to Address Grand Challenges in Comparative Biology” symposium in this issue show the successes and limitations of using RNA-seq in the study of crustaceans. In conjunction with the symposium, the Animal Genome to Phenome Research Coordination Network collated comments from participants at the meeting regarding the challenges encountered when using transcriptomics in their research. Input came from novices and experts ranging from graduate students to principal investigators. Many were unaware of the bioinformatics analysis resources currently available on the CyVerse platform. Our analysis of community responses led to three recommendations for advancing the field: (1) integration of genomic and RNA-seq sequence assemblies for crustacean gene annotation and comparative expression; (2) development of methodologies for the functional analysis of genes; and (3) information and training exchange among laboratories for transmission of best practices. The field lacks the methods for manipulating tissue-specific gene expression. The decapod crustacean research community should consider the cherry shrimp, Neocaridina denticulata, as a decapod model for the application of transgenic tools for functional genomics. This would require a multi-investigator effort. PMID:27639274

  10. Resources and Recommendations for Using Transcriptomics to Address Grand Challenges in Comparative Biology.

    PubMed

    Mykles, Donald L; Burnett, Karen G; Durica, David S; Joyce, Blake L; McCarthy, Fiona M; Schmidt, Carl J; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2016-12-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology has become an important tool for studying physiological responses of organisms to changes in their environment. De novo assembly of RNA-seq data has allowed researchers to create a comprehensive catalog of genes expressed in a tissue and to quantify their expression without a complete genome sequence. The contributions from the "Tapping the Power of Crustacean Transcriptomics to Address Grand Challenges in Comparative Biology" symposium in this issue show the successes and limitations of using RNA-seq in the study of crustaceans. In conjunction with the symposium, the Animal Genome to Phenome Research Coordination Network collated comments from participants at the meeting regarding the challenges encountered when using transcriptomics in their research. Input came from novices and experts ranging from graduate students to principal investigators. Many were unaware of the bioinformatics analysis resources currently available on the CyVerse platform. Our analysis of community responses led to three recommendations for advancing the field: (1) integration of genomic and RNA-seq sequence assemblies for crustacean gene annotation and comparative expression; (2) development of methodologies for the functional analysis of genes; and (3) information and training exchange among laboratories for transmission of best practices. The field lacks the methods for manipulating tissue-specific gene expression. The decapod crustacean research community should consider the cherry shrimp, Neocaridina denticulata, as a decapod model for the application of transgenic tools for functional genomics. This would require a multi-investigator effort.

  11. Empowering marginalized communities in water resources management: addressing inequitable practices in Participatory Model Building.

    PubMed

    Butler, Cameron; Adamowski, Jan

    2015-04-15

    Within the field of water resource management, Group Model Building (GMB) is a growing method used to engage stakeholders in the development of models that describe environmental and socioeconomic systems to create and test policy alternatives. While there is significant focus on improving stakeholder engagement, there is a lack of studies specifically looking at the experiences of marginalized communities and the barriers that prevent their fuller participation in the decision-making process. This paper explores the common issues and presents recommended improved practices, based on anti-oppression, related to the stages of problem framing, stakeholder identification and selection, workshop preparation, and workshop facilitation. For problem defining and stakeholder selection, the major recommendations are to engage diverse stakeholder communities from the earliest stages and give them control over framing the project scope. With regards to planning the model building workshops, it is recommended that the facilitation team work closely with marginalized stakeholders to highlight and address barriers that would prevent their inclusion. With the actual facilitation of the workshops, it is best to employ activities that allow stakeholders to provide knowledge and input in mediums that are most comfortable to them; additionally, the facilitation team needs to be able to challenge problematic interpersonal interactions as they manifest within conversations. This article focuses on building comfortability with political language so that the systemic oppression in which existing participatory processes occur can be understood, thus allowing GMB practitioners to engage in social justice efforts.

  12. Addressing Human System Risks to Future Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.; Francisco, D. R.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is contemplating future human exploration missions to destinations beyond low Earth orbit, including the Moon, deep-space asteroids, and Mars. While we have learned much about protecting crew health and performance during orbital space flight over the past half-century, the challenges of these future missions far exceed those within our current experience base. To ensure success in these missions, we have developed a Human System Risk Board (HSRB) to identify, quantify, and develop mitigation plans for the extraordinary risks associated with each potential mission scenario. The HSRB comprises research, technology, and operations experts in medicine, physiology, psychology, human factors, radiation, toxicology, microbiology, pharmacology, and food sciences. Methods: Owing to the wide range of potential mission characteristics, we first identified the hazards to human health and performance common to all exploration missions: altered gravity, isolation/confinement, increased radiation, distance from Earth, and hostile/closed environment. Each hazard leads to a set of risks to crew health and/or performance. For example the radiation hazard leads to risks of acute radiation syndrome, central nervous system dysfunction, soft tissue degeneration, and carcinogenesis. Some of these risks (e.g., acute radiation syndrome) could affect crew health or performance during the mission, while others (e.g., carcinogenesis) would more likely affect the crewmember well after the mission ends. We next defined a set of design reference missions (DRM) that would span the range of exploration missions currently under consideration. In addition to standard (6-month) and long-duration (1-year) missions in low Earth orbit (LEO), these DRM include deep space sortie missions of 1 month duration, lunar orbital and landing missions of 1 year duration, deep space journey and asteroid landing missions of 1 year duration, and Mars orbital and landing missions of 3 years duration. We then

  13. Human resources for the control of road traffic injury.

    PubMed

    Mock, Charles; Kobusingye, Olive; Anh, Le Vu; Afukaar, Francis; Arreola-Risa, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    The definition of the ideal numbers and distribution of human resources required for control of road traffic injury (RTI) is not as advanced as for other health problems. We can nonetheless identify functions that need to be addressed across the spectrum of injury control: surveillance; road safety (including infrastructure, vehicle design, and behaviour); and trauma care. Many low-cost strategies to improve these functions in low- or middle-income countries can be identified. For all these strategies, there is need for adequate institutional capacity, including funding, legal authority, and human resources. Several categories of human resources need to be developed: epidemiologists who can handle injury data, design surveillance systems, and undertake research; engineers and planners versed in safety aspects of road design, traffic flow, urban planning, and vehicle design; police and lawyers who understand the health impact of traffic law; clinicians who can develop cost-effective improvements in the entire system of trauma treatment; media experts to undertake effective behaviour change and social marketing; and economists to assist with cost-effectiveness evaluations. RTI control can be strengthened by enhancing such training in these disciplines, as well as encouraging retention of those who have the needed skills. Mechanisms to enhance collaboration between these different fields need to be promoted. Finally, the burden of RTI is borne disproportionately by the poor; in addition to technical issues, more profound equity issues must be addressed. This mandates that people from all professional backgrounds who work for RTI control should develop skills in advocacy and politics.

  14. Shared resource control between human and computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendler, James; Wilson, Reid

    1989-01-01

    The advantages of an AI system of actively monitoring human control of a shared resource (such as a telerobotic manipulator) are presented. A system is described in which a simple AI planning program gains efficiency by monitoring human actions and recognizing when the actions cause a change in the system's assumed state of the world. This enables the planner to recognize when an interaction occurs between human actions and system goals, and allows maintenance of an up-to-date knowledge of the state of the world and thus informs the operator when human action would undo a goal achieved by the system, when an action would render a system goal unachievable, and efficiently replans the establishment of goals after human intervention.

  15. Human milk: an invisible food resource.

    PubMed

    Hatløy, A; Oshaug, A

    1997-12-01

    Human milk is an invaluable food resource for infants and young children in Sub-Saharan Africa. Statistics on production of human milk at local and national levels are lacking. In this article, estimates of the quantity of human milk production in Mali, Senegal, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe were calculated. Annual production in the urban and rural areas in Mali was 13 and 17 kg per capita, respectively. National annual median production ranged from 93,000 (Zimbabwe) to 1.3 million metric tons (Nigeria), and from 9 (Zimbabwe) to 15 kg per capita (Mali). Given a value of (US)$1 per liter, inclusion of human milk in calculations of the gross national product (GNP) for these countries would increase this value by more than 5% for Mali, and nearly 2% for Senegal. Human milk is a significant food source to children in this region and should be included in national food statistics due to its nutritional and economic importance.

  16. Human resources for health: overcoming the crisis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lincoln; Evans, Timothy; Anand, Sudhir; Boufford, Jo Ivey; Brown, Hilary; Chowdhury, Mushtaque; Cueto, Marcos; Dare, Lola; Dussault, Gilles; Elzinga, Gijs; Fee, Elizabeth; Habte, Demissie; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Jacobs, Marian; Kurowski, Christoph; Michael, Sarah; Pablos-Mendez, Ariel; Sewankambo, Nelson; Solimano, Giorgio; Stilwell, Barbara; de Waal, Alex; Wibulpolprasert, Suwit

    In this analysis of the global workforce, the Joint Learning Initiative-a consortium of more than 100 health leaders-proposes that mobilisation and strengthening of human resources for health, neglected yet critical, is central to combating health crises in some of the world's poorest countries and for building sustainable health systems in all countries. Nearly all countries are challenged by worker shortage, skill mix imbalance, maldistribution, negative work environment, and weak knowledge base. Especially in the poorest countries, the workforce is under assault by HIV/AIDS, out-migration, and inadequate investment. Effective country strategies should be backed by international reinforcement. Ultimately, the crisis in human resources is a shared problem requiring shared responsibility for cooperative action. Alliances for action are recommended to strengthen the performance of all existing actors while expanding space and energy for fresh actors.

  17. 10 CFR 1.39 - Office of Human Resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Office of Human Resources. 1.39 Section 1.39 Energy... § 1.39 Office of Human Resources. The Office of Human Resources— (a) Plans and implements NRC policies... agency's human resources; (b) Provides labor relations and personnel policy guidance and...

  18. 10 CFR 1.39 - Office of Human Resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Office of Human Resources. 1.39 Section 1.39 Energy... § 1.39 Office of Human Resources. The Office of Human Resources— (a) Plans and implements NRC policies... agency's human resources; (b) Provides labor relations and personnel policy guidance and...

  19. 10 CFR 1.39 - Office of Human Resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Human Resources. 1.39 Section 1.39 Energy... § 1.39 Office of Human Resources. The Office of Human Resources— (a) Plans and implements NRC policies... agency's human resources; (b) Provides labor relations and personnel policy guidance and...

  20. 10 CFR 1.39 - Office of Human Resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Human Resources. 1.39 Section 1.39 Energy... § 1.39 Office of Human Resources. The Office of Human Resources— (a) Plans and implements NRC policies... agency's human resources; (b) Provides labor relations and personnel policy guidance and...

  1. [Human resources for local health systems].

    PubMed

    Linger, C

    1989-01-01

    The economic and social crises affecting Latin America have had a profound social and political effect on its structures. This paper analyzes this impact from 2 perspectives: 1) the impact on the apparatus of the state, in particular on its health infra-structures; and 2) the direction of the democratic process in the continent and the participatory processes of civil societies. The institutionalization of the Local Health Systems (SILOS) is an effort to analyze the problem from within the health sector and propose solutions. This paper discusses the issues of human resource development in health systems; training in human resource development and human resource development in local health care systems. There are 3 strategies used to change health systems: 1) The judicial-political system: The state's apparatus 2) The political-administrative system: the national health care system; and 3) the political-operative system: local health care systems. To assure implementation of SILOS there are 4 steps to be followed: 1) create political conditions that allow the transformation and development of local health systems; 2) development of high-level institutional and political initiatives to develop health care networks; 3) offer key players institutional space and social action to develop the SILOS process; 4) rapidly develop SILOS in regions to assure its integration with other development efforts. The labor force in the health sector and organized communities play critical roles in proposing and institutionalizing health programs.

  2. Addressing Human Variability in Next-Generation Human Health Risk Assessments of Environmental Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Bois, Frederic Y.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Hattis, Dale; Rusyn, Ivan; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Characterizing variability in the extent and nature of responses to environmental exposures is a critical aspect of human health risk assessment. Objective: Our goal was to explore how next-generation human health risk assessments may better characterize variability in the context of the conceptual framework for the source-to-outcome continuum. Methods: This review was informed by a National Research Council workshop titled “Biological Factors that Underlie Individual Susceptibility to Environmental Stressors and Their Implications for Decision-Making.” We considered current experimental and in silico approaches, and emerging data streams (such as genetically defined human cells lines, genetically diverse rodent models, human omic profiling, and genome-wide association studies) that are providing new types of information and models relevant for assessing interindividual variability for application to human health risk assessments of environmental chemicals. Discussion: One challenge for characterizing variability is the wide range of sources of inherent biological variability (e.g., genetic and epigenetic variants) among individuals. A second challenge is that each particular pair of health outcomes and chemical exposures involves combinations of these sources, which may be further compounded by extrinsic factors (e.g., diet, psychosocial stressors, other exogenous chemical exposures). A third challenge is that different decision contexts present distinct needs regarding the identification—and extent of characterization—of interindividual variability in the human population. Conclusions: Despite these inherent challenges, opportunities exist to incorporate evidence from emerging data streams for addressing interindividual variability in a range of decision-making contexts. PMID:23086705

  3. Summary of technical information and agreements from Nuclear Management and Resources Council industry reports addressing license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, C.; Lee, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Ma, D.C.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-10-01

    In about 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) submitted for NRC review ten industry reports (IRs) addressing aging issues associated with specific structures and components of nuclear power plants ad one IR addressing the screening methodology for integrated plant assessment. The NRC staff had been reviewing the ten NUMARC IRs; their comments on each IR and NUMARC responses to the comments have been compiled as public documents. This report provides a brief summary of the technical information and NUMARC/NRC agreements from the ten IRs, except for the Cable License Renewal IR. The technical information and agreements documented herein represent the status of the NRC staffs review when the NRC staff and industry resources were redirected to address rule implementation issues. The NRC staff plans to incorporate appropriate technical information and agreements into the draft standard review plan for license renewal.

  4. The Importance of Human Resource Planning in Industrial Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltnerová, Kristína; Chlpeková, Andrea; Samáková, Jana

    2012-12-01

    Human resource planning in the business practice should represent generally used and key activity for human resource management because human resource planning helps to make optimum utilisation of the human resources in the enterprise and it helps to avoid wastage of human resources. Human resource planning allows to forecast the future manpower requirements and also to forecast the number and type of employees who will be required by the enterprise in a near future. In the long term period, success of any enterprise depends on whether the right people are in the right places at the right time, which is the nature of human resource planning. The aim of this contribution is to explain the importance of human resource planning and to outline results of questionnaire survey which it was realized in industrial enterprises.

  5. Human Resource Development in Europe--At the Crossroads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhan, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Two competing human resource management theories are the humanistic developmental approach, which compliments mainstream European traditions, and the instrumental-utilitarian perspective, a response to increasing globalization. Human resource development policymakers in Europe are currently debating these two approaches. (SK)

  6. Human metabolic atlas: an online resource for human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pornputtapong, Natapol; Nookaew, Intawat; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) provide comprehensive understanding of human metabolism, which is of great value to the biomedical research community. To make this kind of data easily accessible to the public, we have designed and deployed the human metabolic atlas (HMA) website (http://www.metabolicatlas.org). This online resource provides comprehensive information about human metabolism, including the results of metabolic network analyses. We hope that it can also serve as an information exchange interface for human metabolism knowledge within the research community. The HMA consists of three major components: Repository, Hreed (Human REaction Entities Database) and Atlas. Repository is a collection of GEMs for specific human cell types and human-related microorganisms in SBML (System Biology Markup Language) format. The current release consists of several types of GEMs: a generic human GEM, 82 GEMs for normal cell types, 16 GEMs for different cancer cell types, 2 curated GEMs and 5 GEMs for human gut bacteria. Hreed contains detailed information about biochemical reactions. A web interface for Hreed facilitates an access to the Hreed reaction data, which can be easily retrieved by using specific keywords or names of related genes, proteins, compounds and cross-references. Atlas web interface can be used for visualization of the GEMs collection overlaid on KEGG metabolic pathway maps with a zoom/pan user interface. The HMA is a unique tool for studying human metabolism, ranging in scope from an individual cell, to a specific organ, to the overall human body. This resource is freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

  7. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  8. Ice Dragon: A Mission to Address Science and Human Exploration Objectives on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, Carol R.; Davila, A.; Sanders, G.; Glass, Brian; Gonzales, A.; Heldmann, Jennifer; Karcz, J.; Lemke, L.; Sanders, G.

    2012-01-01

    We present a mission concept where a SpaceX Dragon capsule lands a payload on Mars that samples ground ice to search for evidence of life, assess hazards to future human missions, and demonstrate use of Martian resources.

  9. Ice Dragon: A Mission to Address Science and Human Exploration Objectives on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C.; Davilla, A.; Davis, S.; Glass, B.; Gonzales, A.; Heldmann, J.; Karcz, J.; Lemke, L.; Sanders, G.

    2012-06-01

    We present a mission concept where a SpaceX Dragon capsule lands a payload on Mars that samples ground ice to search for evidence of life, assess hazards to future human missions, and demonstrate use of Martian resources.

  10. Toward Strategic Human Resource Management in the Central Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley Linhardt, Heather LeAnn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and explore how human resources are managed, what human resource management can look like, and what organizational issues, tensions, and ambiguities are likely to surface as a district central office moves toward being more strategic with their human resources. The research design was an exploratory case…

  11. 20 CFR 628.215 - State Human Resource Investment Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false State Human Resource Investment Council. 628... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT State Planning § 628.215 State Human Resource..., 702, and 703 of the Act, establish a State Human Resource Investment Council (HRIC). The...

  12. 20 CFR 628.215 - State Human Resource Investment Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State Human Resource Investment Council. 628... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT State Planning § 628.215 State Human Resource..., 702, and 703 of the Act, establish a State Human Resource Investment Council (HRIC). The...

  13. 20 CFR 628.215 - State Human Resource Investment Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false State Human Resource Investment Council. 628... PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT State Planning § 628.215 State Human Resource..., 702, and 703 of the Act, establish a State Human Resource Investment Council (HRIC). The...

  14. Retaining an aging nurse workforce: perceptions of human resource practices.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Mary Val; McIntosh, Barbara; Rambur, Betty; Naud, Shelly

    2009-01-01

    The expected retirement of the largest cohort of nurses will push the RN workforce below projected need by 2020. The challenges of managing a nursing workforce with the majority of nurses over 45 years of age are now necessitating attention to polices for recruitment and retention of older nurses, particularly in rural areas. This convenience sample study employed a mailed survey to investigate perceptions of nurses in 12 institutions (four hospitals, seven home health agencies, and one nursing home serving a small rural state). The goal was to explore rural RNs' perceptions of intent to stay in their current position, with their organization, and employment as a nurse; organizational and unit-level culture regarding older nurses in the workplace; importance of specific human resource practices/policies to their own intention to stay; and extent to which these human resource practices/policies are currently done. The results indicate that although there are similarities across age cohorts, important differences exist that can be addressed to create career-span sensitive policies and practices. This study provides an indicator of progress or lack of progress in addressing older nurse recruitment and retention, and also offers guidance for differentiating policies and practices for younger and older nurses.

  15. Human resources for the control of road traffic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Charles; Kobusingye, Olive; Anh, Le Vu; Afukaar, Francis; Arreola-Risa, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The definition of the ideal numbers and distribution of human resources required for control of road traffic injury (RTI) is not as advanced as for other health problems. We can nonetheless identify functions that need to be addressed across the spectrum of injury control: surveillance; road safety (including infrastructure, vehicle design, and behaviour); and trauma care. Many low-cost strategies to improve these functions in low- or middle-income countries can be identified. For all these strategies, there is need for adequate institutional capacity, including funding, legal authority, and human resources. Several categories of human resources need to be developed: epidemiologists who can handle injury data, design surveillance systems, and undertake research; engineers and planners versed in safety aspects of road design, traffic flow, urban planning, and vehicle design; police and lawyers who understand the health impact of traffic law; clinicians who can develop cost-effective improvements in the entire system of trauma treatment; media experts to undertake effective behaviour change and social marketing; and economists to assist with cost-effectiveness evaluations. RTI control can be strengthened by enhancing such training in these disciplines, as well as encouraging retention of those who have the needed skills. Mechanisms to enhance collaboration between these different fields need to be promoted. Finally, the burden of RTI is borne disproportionately by the poor; in addition to technical issues, more profound equity issues must be addressed. This mandates that people from all professional backgrounds who work for RTI control should develop skills in advocacy and politics. PMID:15868021

  16. Somali Perspectives on Physical Activity: Photovoice to Address Barriers and Resources in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kate; Mohamed, Amina Sheik; Dawson, Darius B.; Syme, Maggie; Abdi, Sahra; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background Though many immigrants enter the U.S. with a healthy body weight, this health advantage disappears the longer they reside in the U.S. To better understand the complexities of obesity change within a cultural framework, a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, Photovoice, was utilized focusing on physical activity among Muslim Somali women. Objectives The CBPR partnership was formed to identify barriers and resources to engaging in physical activity with goals of advocacy and program development. Methods Muslim Somali women (n = 8) were recruited to participate, trained and provided cameras, and engaged in group discussions about the scenes they photographed. Results Participants identified several barriers, including safety concerns, minimal culturally appropriate resources, and financial constraints. Strengths included public resources and a community support system. The CBPR process identified opportunities and challenges to collaboration and dissemination processes. Conclusions The findings laid the framework for subsequent program development and community engagement. PMID:25981428

  17. Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered People and Human Resource Development: An Examination of the Literature in Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steven W.; Githens, Rod P.; Rocco, Tonette S.; Kormanik, Martin B.

    2012-01-01

    Issues related to human resource development (HRD) and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people such as workplace inclusion, employee affinity groups, and LGBT-specific diversity initiatives are being addressed in organizations more often now than ever before. This article explores the existing literature on LGBT issues in HRD and…

  18. Strategies for Addressing Asthma within a Coordinated School Health Program, with Updated Resources. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication offers concrete suggestions for schools working to improve the health and school attendance of students with asthma. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified six strategies for schools and districts to consider when addressing asthma within a coordinated school health program. The six strategies detailed…

  19. Content Guidelines for an Undergraduate Human Resources Curriculum: Recommendations from Human Resources Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sincoff, Michael Z.; Owen, Crystal L.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors surveyed 445 human resources (HR) professionals to determine their views regarding the HR curriculum content that will lead to graduates' success in entry-level (first-job) HR positions. Ninety-eight questionnaires (22%) were returned. Respondents identified five topics--equal employment opportunity/affirmative action…

  20. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Wisconsin. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushing, Ellen; Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Meyer, Cassandra

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  1. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Indiana. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Cassandra; Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  2. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Illinois. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Coby; Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  3. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Michigan. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Cassandra; Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  4. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Minnesota. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Monica; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen; Wraight, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  5. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Ohio. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  6. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Iowa. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrstock, Ellen; Bhatt, Monica; Cushing, Ellen; Wraight, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  7. The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context

    PubMed Central

    Kabene, Stefane M; Orchard, Carole; Howard, John M; Soriano, Mark A; Leduc, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM) in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. Methods We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. Results Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management. This paper will reveal how human resources management is essential to any health care system and how it can improve health care models. Challenges in the health care systems in Canada, the United States of America and various developing countries are examined, with suggestions for ways to overcome these problems through the proper implementation of human resources management practices. Comparing and contrasting selected countries allowed a deeper understanding of the practical and crucial role of human resources management in health care. Conclusion Proper management of human resources is critical in providing a high quality of health care. A refocus on human resources management in health care and more research are needed to develop new policies. Effective human resources management strategies are greatly needed to achieve better outcomes from and access to health care around the world. PMID:16872531

  8. The resources of Mars for human settlement.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T R; McKay, C P

    1989-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration of Mars has shown that the essential resources necessary for life support are present on the martian surface. The key life-support compounds O2, N2, and H2O are available on Mars. The soil could be used as radiation shielding and could provide many useful industrial and construction materials. Compounds with high chemical energy, such as rocket fuels, can be manufactured in-situ on Mars. Solar power, and possibly wind power, are available and practical on Mars. Preliminary engineering studies indicate that fairly autonomous processes can be designed to extract and stockpile Martian consumables. The ability to utilize these materials in support of a human exploration effort allows missions that are more robust and economical than would otherwise be possible.

  9. Technology-Related Research in Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) Publications: A Review between 2000 and 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Githens, Rod P.; Dirani, Khalil; Gitonga, Jacqueline; Teng, Ya-Ting; Benson, Angela D.

    2006-01-01

    The growth of technology has influenced human resource development (HRD) practitioners to embrace technology for both training and non-training interventions. This study examined technology-related articles in Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) publications in order to understand what these articles address and the future needs of…

  10. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  11. The Human Resource Management in Dry-Bulk Shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Alexopoulos, Aristotelis B.

    2007-12-01

    This article investigates some positions and human resource management practices in dry-bulk shipping. The particularity of the human resource management field, as well as the crews' nationality change that has occurred over the last years, underpin the configuration of the hypothesis of this present research. The results demonstrate that the Greek dry-bulk shipping is going through a transition phase regarding the sector of the ships' human resource management by the captains.

  12. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, May G.; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P.

    2008-01-01

    Problem: Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Method: Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. Results: There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Conclusions: Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted. PMID:18219380

  13. Achieving competitive advantage through strategic human resource management.

    PubMed

    Fottler, M D; Phillips, R L; Blair, J D; Duran, C A

    1990-01-01

    The framework presented here challenges health care executives to manage human resources strategically as an integral part of the strategic planning process. Health care executives should consciously formulate human resource strategies and practices that are linked to and reinforce the broader strategic posture of the organization. This article provides a framework for (1) determining and focusing on desired strategic outcomes, (2) identifying and implementing essential human resource management actions, and (3) maintaining or enhancing competitive advantage. The strategic approach to human resource management includes assessing the organization's environment and mission; formulating the organization's business strategy; assessing the human resources requirements based on the intended strategy; comparing the current inventory of human resources in terms of numbers, characteristics, and human resource management practices with respect to the strategic requirements of the organization and its services or product lines; formulating the human resource strategy based on the differences between the assessed requirements and the current inventory; and implementing the appropriate human resource practices to reinforce the strategy and attain competitive advantage.

  14. Addressing Humanness in Education: Truth-Seeking Scholarship for Excelled Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Educators addressing humanness helps bring into focus a concept that developing a broad, liberal, critical, cynical, skeptical, and tolerant mind leads to truth seeking, personal freedom and autonomy, improved pedagogy, and ultimately, higher-quality living. It is not enough for teacher and student to come together in dialogue to gain knowledge of…

  15. A theoretical model to address organizational human conflict and disruptive behavior in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical model for leaders to use to address organizational human conflict and disruptive behavior in health care organizations. Leadership is needed to improve interpersonal relationships within the workforce. A workforce with a culture of internal conflict will be unable to achieve its full potential to delivery quality patient care.

  16. Training Social Workers and Human Service Professionals to Address the Complex Financial Needs of Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jodi Jacobson; Hopkins, Karen; Osteen, Philip; Callahan, Christine; Hageman, Sally; Ko, Jungyai

    2017-01-01

    In social work and other community-based human services settings, clients often present with complex financial problems. As a need for more formal training is beginning to be addressed, evaluation of existing training is important, and this study evaluates outcomes from the Financial Stability Pathway (FSP) project. Designed to prepare…

  17. Convocation address.

    PubMed

    Kakodkar, A

    1999-07-01

    This convocation addressed by Dr. Anil Kakodkar focuses on the challenges faced by graduating students. In his speech, he emphasized the high level of excellence achieved by the industrial sector; however, he noted that there has been a loss of initiative in maximizing value addition, which was worsened by an increasing population pressure. In facing a stiff competition in the external and domestic markets, it is imperative to maximize value addition within the country in a competitive manner and capture the highest possible market share. To achieve this, high-quality human resources are central. Likewise, family planning programs should become more effective and direct available resources toward national advantage. To boost the domestic market, he suggests the need to search for strengths to achieve leadership position in those areas. First, an insight into the relationship between the lifestyles and the needs of our people and the natural resource endowment must be gained. Second, remodeling of the education system must be undertaken to prepare the people for adding the necessary innovative content in our value addition activities. Lastly, Dr. Kakodkar emphasizes the significance of developing a strong bond between parents and children to provide a sound foundation and allow the education system to grow upon it.

  18. Human resources in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Mills, D Q

    1979-01-01

    As the decade of the 1970s closes, new trends in human resources will test the ingenuity of corporate planners to produce policies for the 1980s that will match changing corporate demands with changing employee expectations. The 1970s have produced much-publicized problems--for example, the introduction to the work force of larger numbers of minorities and women--that are not yet fully resolved and that can be expected to continue. But the 1980s will bring their own special challenges. Shifting populations (such as legal and illegal immigrants), the women's movement's demand for equal pay for work of comparable worth, and the push for civil liberties at the workplace are all factors that will dramatically change the business climate. With these factors in mind, the author examines the 1980s' business environment, takes a backward look at planning policies in the 1970s, and shows how the priorities of those policies will have to be reevaluated to meet the challenges of the future.

  19. [HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT BASED ON COMPETENCIES].

    PubMed

    Larumbe Andueza, Ma Carmen; De Mendoza Cánton, Juana Hermoso

    2016-05-01

    We are living in a time with a lot of changes in which health organizations have more challenges to face. One of them is to recognize, strengthen, develop and retain the talent they have. Competency-based human resources management is emerging as a tool that contributes to achieve that aim. Competencies from the generic or characteristic perspective: personality traits, values and motivations, which are deeply rooted in the person. Through elaborating a competencies map for the organization, and identifying the job competencies profile, above all in key jobs, the employees know what it is going to expect from them. After, detect and cover the learning needs, it is possible to achieve better adjust between worker-job. The nursing unit manager is a key job because it is a link between management team and nursing team. The way that it is performed, it will have impact on the quality of care and its team motivation. So, the most adequate person who covers this job would have a part of knowledge, skills, attitudes and compatible interests with her job. Competency-based management helps identify both the potential and learning needs to performing this job.

  20. Human resources and their possible forensic meanings.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea; Urlić, Ivan; Kasum, Josip

    2015-09-01

    Forensics (forensic--before the Forum) means the application of knowledge from different scientific fields in order to define facts in judicial and/or administrative procedures. Nowadays forensics, besides this, finds its application even in different economic processes. For example, forensics enters the commercial areas of business intelligence and of different security areas. The European Commission recognized the importance of forensics, and underscored the importance of development of its scientific infrastructure in member States. We are witnessing the rise of various tragedies in economic and other kinds of processes. Undoubtedly, the world is increasingly exposed to various forms of threats whose occurrences regularly involve people. In this paper we are proposing the development of a new approach in the forensic assessment of the state of human resources. We are suggesting that in the focus should be the forensic approach in the psychological assessment of awareness of the individual and of the critical infrastructure sector operator (CISO) in determining the level of actual practical, rather than formal knowledge of an individual in a particular field of expertise, or in a specific scientific field, and possible forensic meanings.

  1. Human Resource Management: Accountability, Reciprocity and the Nexus between Employer and Employee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlton, Donna; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2009-01-01

    The article addresses teacher retention challenges employers are experiencing in the quest to effectively meet standard human resource management practices. The quality of the employer-employee relationship forms the foundation upon which effective management practices thrive. Teachers who remain in education value students and their personal…

  2. Toward A Multilevel Theory of Career Development: Advancing Human Resource Development Theory Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, Matthew G.; Egan, Toby Marshall

    2007-01-01

    The established limitations of career development (CD) theory and human resource development (HRD) theory building are addressed by expanding the framing of these issues to multilevel contexts. Multilevel theory building is an approach most effectively aligned with HRD literature and CD and HRD practice realities. An innovative approach multilevel…

  3. The Database Business: Managing Today--Planning for Tomorrow. Optimizing Human Resource Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Joseph E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The first paper describes the National Technical Information Service productivity improvement system and its emphasis on human resources development. The second addresses the benefits of telecommuting to employers and employees. The third discusses the problems generated by the baby boom work force pressing for advancement at a time when many…

  4. The Use of Information Technology in Training Human Resources: An E-Learning Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasco, Jose L.; Llopis, Juan; Gonzalez, M. Reyes

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the influence of information technology in human resources management (HRM) and specifically on training policy through the experience of a Spanish telecommunications firm, "Telefonica". The characteristics of the training model designed by this firm to face new environments is considered and the technologies used,…

  5. Human Resource Management Issues. Symposium 22. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on human resource management issues consists of three presentations. "Work and Family Conflict: A Review of the Theory and Literature" (Susan R. Madsen) explores the literature related to work and family conflict and its possible implications to human resource development (HRD) theory and practice. It presents four existing…

  6. Global Preparedness and Human Resources: College and Corporate Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikson, T. K.; Law, S. A.

    A research study explored the human resource implications of the emerging economic globalism, including the following questions: How is globalism understood by corporations and colleges in the United States? What are the perceived human resource implications of globalism? and What are corporations and colleges doing today to meet these human…

  7. Human Resources & Demographics: Characteristics of People and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Economic Committee, Washington, DC.

    The Human Resources and Demographics staff study for the Joint Economic Committee's Special Study on Economic Change presents demographic data to support the position that it will take a strong economy to enable the United States to utilize its human resources. Data are presented, in narrative format, on fertility, population, characteristics of…

  8. Promoting E-Learning for Human Resource Development in Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Soo-Kyoung

    In Korea, e-learning is becoming increasingly prevalent and spreading into various aspects of human resources development. Korea's Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development (MOEHRD) and Ministry of Labor (MOL) have been especially active in establishing the legal basis and institutional framework to make e-learning a reality.…

  9. The Need for an Operational Thrust to Human Resources Developet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses some of the issues involved in professionalizing human resources planning and implementation at the national level. Issues include (1) incorporating human resources into national development, (2) demand considerations, (3) using the skill supply system, (4) obstacles to effectiveness, and (5) enhancing roles of social partners. (CH)

  10. Outsourcing HR Services: The Role of Human Resource Intermediaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Henrik; Wallo, Andreas; Nilsson, Barbro; Hoglund, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the area of interest is an emerging type of organisation called human resource intermediaries (HRIs), which focus on delivering human resource (HR) services to public sector organisations and private companies. The purpose of this article is, thus, to explore HRIs as deliverers of HR services. More specifically, the…

  11. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  12. The Changing Human Resources Function. Report Number 950.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Audrey

    The role of the top human resources executive in major corporations has changed during the past decade into a directly involved business advisor, strategist, and implementer of business objectives. Intense competition has overridden previous human resources concerns and forced priorities toward internal, business-driven issues. Since cost-cutting…

  13. Human Resources Administration in Education: A Management Approach. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebore, Ronald W.

    This book reflects the changing aspects of school human-resources management. Current concerns include the impact of new laws related to disabilities, civil rights, family and medical leave, and the testing of school bus drivers for alcohol and controlled substances. Also examined are human resources' responsibilities to military reservists and…

  14. Mind Mapping on Development of Human Resource of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauzi, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Human resources in the field of education consists of students, teachers, administrative staff, university students, lecturers, structural employees, educational bureaucrats, stakeholders, parents, the society around the school, and the society around the campus. The existence of human resources need to be cultivated and developed towards the…

  15. Big Hat, No Cattle: Managing Human Resources, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Wickham

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses why business has difficulty in motivating its employees and proposes a new approach to developing human resources. Discusses mistaken premises, personnel and supervision, setting a long-term goal, changing management's philosophy, and selling human resource development as a company priority. (CT)

  16. Human resources management for a hospital pharmacy department.

    PubMed

    Chase, P A

    1989-06-01

    The concepts of human resources management (HRM) are presented, and the application of HRM concepts to a hospital pharmacy department is described. Low salaries and poor working conditions had precipitated a mass exodus of pharmacists from a 650-bed, tertiary-care medical center. The newly hired director of pharmacy sought to rebuild the department by developing a three-stage HRM model consisting of needs forecasting, performance management, and advanced management systems. In the needs-forecasting stage, the strengths and weaknesses of departmental programs were determined through analysis of existing standards of practice, situational analysis, and financial analyses; the strengths and weaknesses of departmental employees were determined through the use of talent inventories, turnover analysis, analysis of time and leave records, reevaluation of the department's job classifications, performance and productivity evaluations, and productivity evaluations, and development of a philosophy of practice and mission statement. Needs and problems were addressed by examining each existing program and developing new policies and procedures, performance standards, quality assurance mechanisms, and productivity expectations. Personnel needs and problems were addressed by designing a system of differentiated career ladders, contracting with pharmacists for career moves, developing the skills of currently employed pharmacists, and implementing a succession planning model. The model has been in place for approximately three years and is beginning to yield the desired results. Application of HRM concepts to a hospital pharmacy department appears to have been successful in improving employee morale and in helping the department to meet goals of expanded and improved services.

  17. Human Resource Accounting: Operationalization and Effects of Human Resource Replacement Cost System in Naval Operations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-20

    MANAGEM UNCLASSIFIED E G FLAMHOLTZ 20 DEC 85 CHRM-85-81 F/G 5/i N Ehhhmhhmhiu I: 1 , flflflfllfl...flmflmEEhEhhhmh ji *..0 w im U .L2= 1.25 1111.4 1.6...PAGE (When O-,*emtered__ READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 1 . REPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 3. RECIPIENT’S...CATALOG NUMBER CHRM - 85 - 01 P- 1 1 / ., "/) , 4. TITLE (endSubit.) Human Resource Accounting: S. TYPEOF REPORT PERIODCOVERED Operationalizatin and Effects

  18. The quest for One Health: human resource training aspects.

    PubMed

    Kiwara, Angwara; Semakafu, Ave-Maria; Frumence, Gasto

    2014-04-23

    Appropriately trained Human Resources for Health (HRH) are key inputs into One Health. '… more than 50% of all infectious diseases of humans originate from animals and that, of the emerging diseases about 75% could be traced back to animal origin' (Rweyemamu et al. 2006). A comprehensive understanding of the social determinants of health, through an appropriate training model for HRH, is a key input. This study aimed to explore if human and veterinary medical schools were using such a model or providing time for this model in their curricula. Specific objectives were to: determine the time that human and veterinary medical schools' curricula provide for subjects or courses related to the social determinants of health; analyse the curricula contents to establish how they relate to the social determinants of health; and explore how a bio-medical model may influence the graduates' understanding and practice of One Health. A review of human and veterinary graduate-level medical schools' curricula in East Africa was performed in April 2013 and May 2013. The findings were: in the curricula, SDH contents for knowledge enhancement about One Health are minimal and that teaching is Germ Theory model-driven and partisan. Out of the total training time for physicians and veterinarians, less than 10% was provided for the social determinants of health-related courses. In conclusion, the curricula and training times provided are inadequate for graduates to fully understand the social determinants of health and their role in One Health. Furthermore, the Germ Theory model that has been adopted addresses secondary causes and is inappropriate. There is a need for more in-depth model. This article suggests that a vicious cycle of ill-health model must be taught.

  19. Strategies and resources to address colorectal cancer screening rates and disparities in the United States and globally.

    PubMed

    Potter, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a significant cause of mortality in the United States and globally. In the United States, increased access to screening and effective treatment has contributed to a reduction in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality for the general population, though significant disparities persist. Worldwide, the disparities are even more pronounced, with vastly different colorectal cancer mortality rates and trends among nations. Newly organized colorectal cancer screening programs in economically developed countries with a high burden of colorectal cancer may provide pathways to reduce these disparities over time. This article provides an overview of colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, screening, and disparities in the United States and other world populations. Promising strategies and resources are identified to address colorectal cancer screening rates and disparities in the United States and worldwide.

  20. National Implications for Urban School Systems: Strategic Planning in the Human Resource Management Department in a Large Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Clarence; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses several key ongoing issues in a large urban school district. Literature focuses on what make a large urban school district effective in Human Resource Management. The effectiveness is addressed through recruitment and retention practices. A comparison of the school district with current research is the main approach to the…

  1. Practical guidelines addressing ethical issues pertaining to the curation of human locus-specific variation databases (LSDBs)

    PubMed Central

    Povey, Sue; Al Aqeel, Aida I; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dalgleish, Raymond; den Dunnen, Johan T; Firth, Helen V; Greenblatt, Marc S; Barash, Carol Isaacson; Parker, Michael; Patrinos, George P; Savige, Judith; Sobrido, Maria-Jesus; Winship, Ingrid; Cotton, Richard GH

    2010-01-01

    More than 1,000 Web-based locus-specific variation databases (LSDBs) are listed on the Website of the Human Genetic Variation Society (HGVS). These individual efforts, which often relate phenotype to genotype, are a valuable source of information for clinicians, patients, and their families, as well as for basic research. The initiators of the Human Variome Project recently recognized that having access to some of the immense resources of unpublished information already present in diagnostic laboratories would provide critical data to help manage genetic disorders. However, there are significant ethical issues involved in sharing these data worldwide. An international working group presents second-generation guidelines addressing ethical issues relating to the curation of human LSDBs that provide information via a Web-based interface. It is intended that these should help current and future curators and may also inform the future decisions of ethics committees and legislators. These guidelines have been reviewed by the Ethics Committee of the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). Hum Mutat 31:–6, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20683926

  2. Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merryfield, Merry M.; Badang, Germain; Bragg, Christina; Kvasov, Aleksandr; Taylor, Nathan; Waliaula, Anne; Yamaguchi, Misato

    2012-01-01

    The study of human rights is inseparable from social studies. Beyond the basic political, economic, and social freedoms and rights spelled out in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, hundreds of specialized topics have developed that demonstrate the complex nature of human rights in the twenty-first-century world--environmental exploitation…

  3. Competition over Personal Resources Favors Contribution to Shared Resources in Human Groups

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jessica L.; Barclay, Pat; Reeve, H. Kern

    2013-01-01

    Members of social groups face a trade-off between investing selfish effort for themselves and investing cooperative effort to produce a shared group resource. Many group resources are shared equitably: they may be intrinsically non-excludable public goods, such as vigilance against predators, or so large that there is little cost to sharing, such as cooperatively hunted big game. However, group members' personal resources, such as food hunted individually, may be monopolizable. In such cases, an individual may benefit by investing effort in taking others' personal resources, and in defending one's own resources against others. We use a game theoretic “tug-of-war” model to predict that when such competition over personal resources is possible, players will contribute more towards a group resource, and also obtain higher payoffs from doing so. We test and find support for these predictions in two laboratory economic games with humans, comparing people's investment decisions in games with and without the options to compete over personal resources or invest in a group resource. Our results help explain why people cooperatively contribute to group resources, suggest how a tragedy of the commons may be avoided, and highlight unifying features in the evolution of cooperation and competition in human and non-human societies. PMID:23520535

  4. 42 CFR 486.326 - Condition: Human resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Human resources. 486.326 Section 486.326 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Process Performance Measures § 486.326 Condition: Human...

  5. 42 CFR 486.326 - Condition: Human resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Human resources. 486.326 Section 486.326 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Process Performance Measures § 486.326 Condition: Human...

  6. 42 CFR 486.326 - Condition: Human resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Human resources. 486.326 Section 486.326 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Process Performance Measures § 486.326 Condition: Human...

  7. 42 CFR 486.326 - Condition: Human resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Human resources. 486.326 Section 486.326 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Process Performance Measures § 486.326 Condition: Human...

  8. 45 CFR 1304.52 - Human resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Human resources management. 1304.52 Section 1304.52 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES,...

  9. 45 CFR 1304.52 - Human resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Human resources management. 1304.52 Section 1304.52 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES,...

  10. 42 CFR 486.326 - Condition: Human resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Human resources. 486.326 Section 486.326 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Organizations Organ Procurement Organization Process Performance Measures § 486.326 Condition: Human...

  11. Human resources for maternal health: multi-purpose or specialists?

    PubMed

    Fauveau, Vincent; Sherratt, Della R; de Bernis, Luc

    2008-09-30

    A crucial question in the aim to attain MDG5 is whether it can be achieved faster with the scaling up of multi-purpose health workers operating in the community or with the scaling up of professional skilled birth attendants working in health facilities. Most advisers concerned with maternal mortality reduction concur to promote births in facilities with professional attendants as the ultimate strategy. The evidence, however, is scarce on what it takes to progress in this path, and on the 'interim solutions' for situations where the majority of women still deliver at home. These questions are particularly relevant as we have reached the twentieth anniversary of the safe motherhood initiative without much progress made. In this paper we review the current situation of human resources for maternal health as well as the problems that they face. We propose seven key areas of work that must be addressed when planning for scaling up human resources for maternal health in light of MDG5, and finally we indicate some advances recently made in selected countries and the lessons learned from these experiences. Whilst the focus of this paper is on maternal health, it is acknowledged that the interventions to reduce maternal mortality will also contribute to significantly reducing newborn mortality. Addressing each of the seven key areas of work--recommended by the first International Forum on 'Midwifery in the Community', Tunis, December 2006--is essential for the success of any MDG5 programme. We hypothesize that a great deal of the stagnation of maternal health programmes has been the result of confusion and careless choices in scaling up between a limited number of truly skilled birth attendants and large quantities of multi-purpose workers with short training, fewer skills, limited authority and no career pathways. We conclude from the lessons learnt that no significant progress in maternal mortality reduction can be achieved without a strong political decision to empower

  12. Human resources for maternal health: multi-purpose or specialists?

    PubMed Central

    Fauveau, Vincent; Sherratt, Della R; de Bernis, Luc

    2008-01-01

    A crucial question in the aim to attain MDG5 is whether it can be achieved faster with the scaling up of multi-purpose health workers operating in the community or with the scaling up of professional skilled birth attendants working in health facilities. Most advisers concerned with maternal mortality reduction concur to promote births in facilities with professional attendants as the ultimate strategy. The evidence, however, is scarce on what it takes to progress in this path, and on the 'interim solutions' for situations where the majority of women still deliver at home. These questions are particularly relevant as we have reached the twentieth anniversary of the safe motherhood initiative without much progress made. In this paper we review the current situation of human resources for maternal health as well as the problems that they face. We propose seven key areas of work that must be addressed when planning for scaling up human resources for maternal health in light of MDG5, and finally we indicate some advances recently made in selected countries and the lessons learned from these experiences. Whilst the focus of this paper is on maternal health, it is acknowledged that the interventions to reduce maternal mortality will also contribute to significantly reducing newborn mortality. Addressing each of the seven key areas of work – recommended by the first International Forum on 'Midwifery in the Community', Tunis, December 2006 – is essential for the success of any MDG5 programme. We hypothesize that a great deal of the stagnation of maternal health programmes has been the result of confusion and careless choices in scaling up between a limited number of truly skilled birth attendants and large quantities of multi-purpose workers with short training, fewer skills, limited authority and no career pathways. We conclude from the lessons learnt that no significant progress in maternal mortality reduction can be achieved without a strong political decision to

  13. Ethnic Minority Human Resourcs in Psychology Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Esteban L., Comp.; And Others

    Minority members of the American Psychological Association (APA) who have expressed a desire to serve as professional resources are listed in this directory. Individuals are identified under one of four broad categories of ethnic minority groups: American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific American, Black/Afro American, and Hispanic. Within each…

  14. Education and Human Resources Sector Assessment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigozzi, Mary Joy; Cieutat, Victor J.

    This manual endorses and adopts the sector-assessment approach for planning and managing the allocation of educational resources. Chapter 1 presents the manual's goals. Chapter 2 describes the manual's content and information sources, explains the term "sector assessment," identifies the groups that benefit from recommendations made by…

  15. Library and Information Resources and Users of Digital Resources in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Claire; Terras, Melissa; Galina, Isabel; Huntington, Paul; Pappa, Nikoleta

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the results of the Log Analysis of Internet Resources in the Arts and Humanities (LAIRAH) study. It aims to concentrate upon the use and importance of information resources, physical research centres and digital finding aids in scholarly research. Design/methodology/approach: Results are presented…

  16. Resources that Make You Generous: Effects of Social and Human Resources on Charitable Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiepking, Pamala; Maas, Ineke

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examine whether and why human and social resources increase charitable giving. Using the Giving in The Netherlands Panel Study 2003, we find that people with more extended networks and higher education are more generous. However, these effects can be completely explained by financial resources, church attendance, requests for…

  17. Human Genetics: Educational Resources for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greendale, Karen; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Potential sources of information and assistance on human genetics are identified, including a brief description of the National Clearinghouse for Human Genetic Diseases, genetic service centers, voluntary groups, state programs, commercial procedures, workshops, speakers, curriculum development aids, and general references. (DC)

  18. The Role of Business Programs in Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaney, Joseph P.

    1981-01-01

    Explains the changes in graduate business education as they relate to human resource development (HRD) and suggests that the HRD specialist can achieve professional growth through accounting, finance, economics, marketing, statistics, management theory training, and practical internships. (MER)

  19. Does America Need a National Human Resource Development Strategy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Robert L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Essays by Robert L. Craig, Mervyn M. Dymally, Nolen M. Ellison, Sheila M. Korhammer, Rich Redeker, Markley Roberts, and Richard F. Schubert present various perspectives on U.S. human resource development needs and strategies. (DMM)

  20. Global-minded Human Resources and Expectations for Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hiroshi

    Under the globalized economy, Japanese corporations compete with rivals of the western countries and emerging economies. And domestically, they face with deflation, falling birth-rate, an aging society, and shrinking market. So they need to foster and retain global-minded human resources who can play an active role in global business, and who can drive innovation. What Japanese corporations expect for global-minded human resources are ability to meet challenges, ability to think independently free from conventional wisdom, communication skills in foreign languages, interests in foreign cultures and different values, and so on. In order to foster global-minded human resources, Keidanren work with the 13 universities selected under the Japanese Government‧s “Global 30” projects to undertake “Global-minded Human Resources Development Projects” .

  1. HRIS: Introduction to Tomorrow's System for Managing Human Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Albert C.; Shafritz, Jay M.

    1977-01-01

    Reports on the U.S. State Department's experiment with a new concept in management information systems for personnel resources--the Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS). Suggests that the HRIS approach may meet public executives' demands for accurate, rapid, responsive, and flexible information systems. (Author/JG)

  2. Emotional Intelligence Research within Human Resource Development Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnia, Forouzan; Nafukho, Fredrick Muyia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review and synthesize pertinent emotional intelligence (EI) research within the human resource development (HRD) scholarship. Design/methodology/approach: An integrative review of literature was conducted and multiple electronic databases were searched to find the relevant resources. Using the content…

  3. Investing in human capital: an academic-service partnership to address the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rebecca Culver; Allison-Jones, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The well-documented shortage of nurses and the impact of educational preparation of nurses on patient care outcomes provide a compelling argument for the need to increase the number of registered nurses and to advance their educational preparation. This article describes the application of human capital theory in a creative venture between a health system and a school of nursing that has demonstrated success in addressing these issues. A tuition advancement program was developed to support interested personnel in attaining the associate degree in nursing and to support current RNs in attaining the baccalaureate degree. The venture included support for graduate preparation of nurses interested in becoming faculty.

  4. Developmental Leadership: A Human Resource Development Project.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-11

    organization as a useful, productive, respected and worthy being. His self - esteem goes up, fostering more pride in his future performance of work. In essence...Training on Leader- ship Orientation, Values, and Self -Image." Speech Teacher 23 (September 1974):197-205. 14 The study was undertaken to provide some...technique does not greatly affect one’s self -image or values. Identifying and Utilizing Management Resources Effectively. Leavenworth: A Report on the Region

  5. Addressing water resources risk in England and Wales: Long term infrastructure planning in a private, regulated industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Sean

    2015-04-01

    Water resources planning is a complex and challenging discipline in which decision makers must deal with conflicting objectives, contested socio-economic values and vast uncertainties, including long term hydrological variability. The task is arguably more demanding in England and Wales, where private water companies must adhere to a rigid set of regulatory planning guidelines in order to justify new infrastructural investments. These guidelines prescribe a "capacity expansion" approach to planning: ensure that a deterministic measure of supply, known as "Deployable Output," meets projected demand over a 25-year planning horizon. Deployable Output is derived using a method akin to yield analysis and is commensurate with the maximum rate of supply that a water resources system can sustain without incurring failure under a simulation of historical recorded hydrological conditions. This study examines whether Deployable Output analysis is fit to serve an industry in which: water companies are seeking to invest in cross-company water transfer schemes to deal with loss of water availability brought about by European environmental legislation and an increase in demand driven by population growth; water companies are expected address potential climate change impacts through their planning activities; and regulators wish to benchmark water resource system performance across the separate companies. Of particular interest, then, is the adequacy of Deployable Output analysis as a means to measuring current and future water shortage risk and comparing across supply systems. Data from the UK National River Flow Archive are used to develop a series of hypothetical reservoir systems in two hydrologically contrasting regions -- northwest England/north Wales and Southeast England. The systems are varied by adjusting the draft ratio (ratio of target annual demand to mean annual inflow), the inflow diversity (covariance of streamflow sequences supplying the system), the strength of

  6. Private sector, human resources and health franchising in Africa.

    PubMed

    Prata, Ndola; Montagu, Dominic; Jefferys, Emma

    2005-04-01

    In much of the developing world, private health care providers and pharmacies are the most important sources of medicine and medical care and yet these providers are frequently not considered in planning for public health. This paper presents the available evidence, by socioeconomic status, on which strata of society benefit from publicly provided care and which strata use private health care. Using data from The World Bank's Health Nutrition and Population Poverty Thematic Reports on 22 countries in Africa, an assessment was made of the use of public and private health services, by asset quintile groups, for treatment of diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections, proxies for publicly subsidized services. The evidence and theory on using franchise networks to supplement government programmes in the delivery of public health services was assessed. Examples from health franchises in Africa and Asia are provided to illustrate the potential for franchise systems to leverage private providers and so increase delivery-point availability for public-benefit services. We argue that based on the established demand for private medical services in Africa, these providers should be included in future planning on human resources for public health. Having explored the range of systems that have been tested for working with private providers, from contracting to vouchers to behavioural change and provider education, we conclude that franchising has the greatest potential for integration into large-scale programmes in Africa to address critical illnesses of public health importance.

  7. Private sector, human resources and health franchising in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Prata, Ndola; Montagu, Dominic; Jefferys, Emma

    2005-01-01

    In much of the developing world, private health care providers and pharmacies are the most important sources of medicine and medical care and yet these providers are frequently not considered in planning for public health. This paper presents the available evidence, by socioeconomic status, on which strata of society benefit from publicly provided care and which strata use private health care. Using data from The World Bank's Health Nutrition and Population Poverty Thematic Reports on 22 countries in Africa, an assessment was made of the use of public and private health services, by asset quintile groups, for treatment of diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections, proxies for publicly subsidized services. The evidence and theory on using franchise networks to supplement government programmes in the delivery of public health services was assessed. Examples from health franchises in Africa and Asia are provided to illustrate the potential for franchise systems to leverage private providers and so increase delivery-point availability for public-benefit services. We argue that based on the established demand for private medical services in Africa, these providers should be included in future planning on human resources for public health. Having explored the range of systems that have been tested for working with private providers, from contracting to vouchers to behavioural change and provider education, we conclude that franchising has the greatest potential for integration into large-scale programmes in Africa to address critical illnesses of public health importance. PMID:15868018

  8. The resources of Mars for human settlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Thomas R.; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1989-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration of Marshas shown that the essential resources necessary for life support are present on the Martian surface. The key life-support compounds O2, N2, and H2O are available on Mars. The soil could be used as radiation shielding and could provide many useful industrial and construction materials. Compounds with high chemical energy, such as rocket fuels, can be manufactured in-situ on Mars. Solar power, and possibly wind power, are available and practical on Mars. Preliminary engineering studies indicate that fairly autonomous processes can be designed to extract and stockpile Martian consumables.

  9. The resources of Mars for human settlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, T. R.; McKay, C. P.

    1989-04-01

    Spacecraft exploration of Marshas shown that the essential resources necessary for life support are present on the Martian surface. The key life-support compounds O2, N2, and H2O are available on Mars. The soil could be used as radiation shielding and could provide many useful industrial and construction materials. Compounds with high chemical energy, such as rocket fuels, can be manufactured in-situ on Mars. Solar power, and possibly wind power, are available and practical on Mars. Preliminary engineering studies indicate that fairly autonomous processes can be designed to extract and stockpile Martian consumables.

  10. The human rights of intersex people: addressing harmful practices and rhetoric of change.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Morgan

    2016-05-01

    Intersex people and bodies have been considered incapable of integration into society. Medical interventions on often healthy bodies remain the norm, addressing perceived familial and cultural demands, despite concerns about necessity, outcomes, conduct and consent. A global and decentralised intersex movement pursues simple core goals: the rights to bodily autonomy and self-determination, and an end to stigmatisation. The international human rights system is responding with an array of new policy statements from human rights institutions and a handful of national governments recognising the rights of intersex people. However, major challenges remain to implement those statements. Human rights violations of intersex individuals persist, deeply embedded in a deliberate history of silencing. Rhetoric of change to clinical practices remain unsubstantiated. Policy disjunctions arise in a framing of intersex issues as matters of sexual orientation and gender identity, rather than innate sex characteristics; this has led to a rhetoric of inclusion that is not matched by the reality. This paper provides an overview of harmful practices on intersex bodies, human rights developments, and rhetorics of change and inclusion.

  11. Health, human rights and mobilization of resources for health

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Reidar K

    2004-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in the role of a human rights framework to mobilize resources for health. Discussion This paper argues that the human rights framework does provide us with an appropriate understanding of what values should guide a nation's health policy, and a potentially powerful means of moving the health agenda forward. It also, however, argues that appeals to human rights may not necessarily be effective at mobilizing resources for specific health problems one might want to do something about. Specifically, it is not possible to argue that a particular allocation of scarce health care resources should be changed to a different allocation, benefiting other groups. Lack of access to health care services by some people only shows that something has to be done, but not what should be done. Summary The somewhat weak claim identified above together with the obligation to realize progressively a right to health can be used to mobilize resources for health. PMID:15473899

  12. Health, human rights and mobilization of resources for health.

    PubMed

    Lie, Reidar K

    2004-10-08

    BACKGROUND: There has been an increased interest in the role of a human rights framework to mobilize resources for health. DISCUSSION: This paper argues that the human rights framework does provide us with an appropriate understanding of what values should guide a nation's health policy, and a potentially powerful means of moving the health agenda forward. It also, however, argues that appeals to human rights may not necessarily be effective at mobilizing resources for specific health problems one might want to do something about. Specifically, it is not possible to argue that a particular allocation of scarce health care resources should be changed to a different allocation, benefiting other groups. Lack of access to health care services by some people only shows that something has to be done, but not what should be done. SUMMARY: The somewhat weak claim identified above together with the obligation to realize progressively a right to health can be used to mobilize resources for health.

  13. Globally Competitive People: Final Report to the Human Resource Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Hilary; Austin, John

    A globally competitive Mississippi must be built through investment in the education, training, and skills of its people. Recommendations for improving the system involve (1) a human resource and economic development strategy built on a partnership between the state and communities and (2) a state-level human capital strategy board. Critical…

  14. 42 CFR 482.98 - Condition of participation: Human resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Human resources. 482.98 Section 482.98 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Specialty Hospitals Transplant Center Process Requirements § 482.98 Condition of participation:...

  15. 42 CFR 482.98 - Condition of participation: Human resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Human resources. 482.98 Section 482.98 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Specialty Hospitals Transplant Center Process Requirements § 482.98 Condition of participation:...

  16. How sustainable agriculture can address the environmental and human health harms of industrial agriculture.

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Leo; Lawrence, Robert S; Walker, Polly

    2002-01-01

    The industrial agriculture system consumes fossil fuel, water, and topsoil at unsustainable rates. It contributes to numerous forms of environmental degradation, including air and water pollution, soil depletion, diminishing biodiversity, and fish die-offs. Meat production contributes disproportionately to these problems, in part because feeding grain to livestock to produce meat--instead of feeding it directly to humans--involves a large energy loss, making animal agriculture more resource intensive than other forms of food production. The proliferation of factory-style animal agriculture creates environmental and public health concerns, including pollution from the high concentration of animal wastes and the extensive use of antibiotics, which may compromise their effectiveness in medical use. At the consumption end, animal fat is implicated in many of the chronic degenerative diseases that afflict industrial and newly industrializing societies, particularly cardiovascular disease and some cancers. In terms of human health, both affluent and poor countries could benefit from policies that more equitably distribute high-protein foods. The pesticides used heavily in industrial agriculture are associated with elevated cancer risks for workers and consumers and are coming under greater scrutiny for their links to endocrine disruption and reproductive dysfunction. In this article we outline the environmental and human health problems associated with current food production practices and discuss how these systems could be made more sustainable. PMID:12003747

  17. How sustainable agriculture can address the environmental and human health harms of industrial agriculture.

    PubMed

    Horrigan, Leo; Lawrence, Robert S; Walker, Polly

    2002-05-01

    The industrial agriculture system consumes fossil fuel, water, and topsoil at unsustainable rates. It contributes to numerous forms of environmental degradation, including air and water pollution, soil depletion, diminishing biodiversity, and fish die-offs. Meat production contributes disproportionately to these problems, in part because feeding grain to livestock to produce meat--instead of feeding it directly to humans--involves a large energy loss, making animal agriculture more resource intensive than other forms of food production. The proliferation of factory-style animal agriculture creates environmental and public health concerns, including pollution from the high concentration of animal wastes and the extensive use of antibiotics, which may compromise their effectiveness in medical use. At the consumption end, animal fat is implicated in many of the chronic degenerative diseases that afflict industrial and newly industrializing societies, particularly cardiovascular disease and some cancers. In terms of human health, both affluent and poor countries could benefit from policies that more equitably distribute high-protein foods. The pesticides used heavily in industrial agriculture are associated with elevated cancer risks for workers and consumers and are coming under greater scrutiny for their links to endocrine disruption and reproductive dysfunction. In this article we outline the environmental and human health problems associated with current food production practices and discuss how these systems could be made more sustainable.

  18. Development and evaluation of information resources for patients, families, and healthcare providers addressing behavioral and cognitive sequelae among adults with a primary brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kylie M; Simpson, Grahame K; Koh, Eng-Siew; Whiting, Diane L; Gillett, Lauren; Simpson, Teresa; Firth, Rochelle

    2015-06-01

    Behavioral and cognitive changes in patients with primary brain tumor (PBT) are common and may be distressing to patients and their family members. Healthcare professionals report a strong need for information, practical strategies, and training to assist consumers and better address management issues. A literature review by the current project found that 53% of the information resources currently available to consumers and health professionals contained minimal or no information about cognitive/behavioral changes after PBT, and 71% of the resources contained minimal or no information on associated strategies to manage these changes. This project aimed to develop an information resource for patients, carers, and health professionals addressing the behavioral and cognitive sequelae of PBT, including strategies to minimize the disabling impact of such behaviors. In consultation with staff and patient groups, 16 key information topics were identified covering cognitive and communication changes and challenging behaviors including executive impairment, behavioral disturbance, and social/emotional dysfunction. Sixteen fact sheets and 11 additional resource sheets were developed and evaluated according to established consumer communication guidelines. Preliminary data show that these resources have been positively received and well utilized. These sheets are the first of their kind addressing challenging behaviors in the neuro-oncology patient group and are a practical and useful information resource for health professionals working with these patients and their families. The new resource assists in reinforcing interventions provided to individual patients and their relatives who are experiencing difficulties in managing challenging behaviors after PBT.

  19. Model Programs Addressing Perinatal Drug Exposure and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Integrating Women's and Children's Needs

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, Vicki; Chavkin, Wendy; Layton, Christine; Wise, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Many of the efforts to address perinatal drug exposure and human immunodeficiency virus infection have been influenced by a perspective of conflict between the interests of mother and infant. This article highlights several programs that integrate women's and children's services while dealing with these health issues. It discusses the challenges encountered by these programs, such as funding restrictions, institutional barriers, professional attitudes, regulatory constraints, and local political issues. It presents strategies for overcoming these barriers including the creative coordination of funding streams, innovative relationships with child protective agencies, effective collaboration with other agencies, and advocacy on behalf of clients and programs, and makes recommendations for certain policy changes, which could foster the development of programs that serve women and children together. PMID:19313104

  20. The future of human embryonic stem cell research: addressing ethical conflict with responsible scientific research.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, David M

    2004-05-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have almost unlimited regenerative capacity and can potentially generate any body tissue. Hence they hold great promise for the cure of degenerative human diseases. But their derivation and the potential for misuse have raised a number of ethical issues. These ethical issues threaten to paralyze pubic funding for ES cell research, leaving experimentation in the hands of the private sector and precluding the public's ability to monitor practices, research alternatives, and effectively address the very ethical issues that are cause for concern in the first place. With new technology being inevitable, and the potential for abuse high, government must stay involved if the public is to play a role in shaping the direction of research. In this essay, I will define levels of ethical conflict that can be delineated by the anticipated advances in technology. From the urgent need to derive new ES cell lines with existing technology, to the most far-reaching goal of deriving genetically identical tissues from an adult patients cells, technology-specific ethical dilemmas can be defined and addressed. This staged approach provides a solid ethical framework for moving forward with ES cell research. Moreover, by anticipating the moral conflicts to come, one can predict the types of scientific advances that could overcome these conflicts, and appropriately direct federal funding toward these goals to offset potentially less responsible research directives that will inevitably go forward via private or foreign funding.

  1. Optimal use of human and machine resources for Space Station assembly operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the issues involved in determining the best mix of human and machine resources for assembly of the Space Station. It presents the current Station assembly sequence, along with descriptions of the available assembly resources. A number of methodologies for optimizing the human/machine tradeoff problem have been developed, but the Space Station assembly offers some unique issues that have not yet been addressed. These include a strong constraint on available EVA time for early flights and a phased deployment of assembly resources over time. A methodology for incorporating the previously developed decision methods to the special case of the Space Station is presented. This methodology emphasizes an application of multiple qualitative and quantitative techniques, including simulation and decision analysis, for producing an objective, robust solution to the tradeoff problem.

  2. The demonstration projects: creating the capacity for nursing health human resource planning in Ontario's healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Burkoski, Vanessa; Tepper, Joshua

    2010-05-01

    Timely access to healthcare services requires the right number, mix and distribution of appropriately educated nurses, physicians and other healthcare professionals. In Ontario, as in several other jurisdictions, changing demographics, patterns of health service utilization and an aging workforce have created challenges related to the supply of nurses available now and in the future to deliver quality patient care. From 2006 to 2009, the Nursing Secretariat (NS) of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (the ministry) undertook a progressive and comprehensive approach to address the issue of nursing supply across the province through the introduction of 17 Nursing Health Human Resources Demonstration Projects (demonstration projects). The demonstration projects initiative has led to the creation of a unique collection of best practices, tools and resources aimed at improving organizational planning capacity. Evaluation of the initiative generated recommendations that may guide the ministry toward policy and program development to foster improved nursing health human resource planning capacity in Ontario healthcare organizations.

  3. A cross-country review of strategies of the German development cooperation to strengthen human resources

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Ricarda; Wyss, Kaspar; Prytherch, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent years have seen growing awareness of the importance of human resources for health in health systems and with it an intensifying of the international and national policies in place to steer a response. This paper looks at how governments and donors in five countries – Cameroon, Indonesia, Malawi, Rwanda and Tanzania – have translated such policies into action. More detailed information with regard to initiatives of German development cooperation brings additional depth to the range and entry doors of human resources for health initiatives from the perspective of donor cooperation. Methods This qualitative study systematically presents different approaches and stages to human resources for health development in a cross-country comparison. An important reference to capture implementation at country level was grey literature such as policy documents and programme reports. In-depth interviews along a predefined grid with national and international stakeholders in the five countries provided information on issues related to human resources for health policy processes and implementation. Results All five countries have institutional entities in place and have drawn up national policies to address human resources for health. Only some of the countries have translated policies into strategies with defined targets and national programmes with budgets and operational plans. Traditional approaches of supporting training for individual health professionals continue to dominate. In some cases partners have played an advocacy and technical role to promote human resources for health development at the highest political levels, but usually they still focus on the provision of ad hoc training within their programmes, which may not be in line with national human resources for health development efforts or may even be counterproductive to them. Countries that face an emergency, such as Malawi, have intensified their efforts within a relatively short time and by

  4. The Ghanaian Rural Youth: Human Resource or Human Burden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, C. K.

    Defining rural youth as the 14-25 age group (literate or illiterate and employed or unemployed) and as residents of localities with less than 5,000 people, this paper addresses Ghanaian rural youth and its relationship to: the total population; youth policy and organizations; rural-urban differences; and societal improvements. Major points of…

  5. Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachaluba, Sarah Buck; Brady, Jessica Evans; Critten, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on quantitative and qualitative research examining humanities scholars' understandings of the advantages and disadvantages of print versus electronic information resources. It explores how humanities' faculty members at Florida State University (FSU) use print and electronic resources, as well as how they perceive these…

  6. TEPCO's Approach to Power-Engineer Human Resource Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masaki

    We think 'human resources and technology' is developed only by self-training continuously, keeping higher motivation and practicing repeatedly. Moreover it is indispensable for sustainable development of company. Management vision, top-down message with vertical communication, and bottom-up systematic approaches are necessary for sustainable human resource development, sharing the value with coordination, and in addition, OJT and Off-JT method should be used effectively. This paper shows TEPCO's attempts to develop engineers' technical skills as a reference of a in-company continuing professional development.

  7. [Human resources and health work: challenges for a research agenda].

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ada Avila; Belisário, Soraya Almeida; Campos, Francisco Eduardo; D'Avila, Luciana Souza

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses several key concepts for human resources policy in health in the context of Latin America's regional integration efforts. The article focuses on different concepts of integration to emphasize the analytical distinction between regional and conceptual integration. It also presents labor and human resources concepts before discussing, in the final analysis, the challenges that a common research agenda faces in the context of current health sector reforms in Latin America. The conclusion emphasizes the need to develop a technology and research system capable of supporting the agenda for exchange between MERCOSUR member countries.

  8. Human resource policies and older workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Clark, R L; Ogawa, N

    1996-10-01

    Substantial changes in human resource policies are occurring in Japanese firms in response to the rapid aging of the population. Employers are reconsidering the concept of lifetime employment, seniority-based wages, retirement policies, and employment opportunities for older workers. In response to government pressure, mandatory retirement ages are being raised. These trends are examined using a variety of sources of information concerning employment practices in Japan. The analysis indicates that important changes in human resource management practices are underway and further changes are anticipated as the labor force continues to age.

  9. Human resources for health policies: a critical component in health policies

    PubMed Central

    Dussault, Gilles; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2003-01-01

    In the last few years, increasing attention has been paid to the development of health policies. But side by side with the presumed benefits of policy, many analysts share the opinion that a major drawback of health policies is their failure to make room for issues of human resources. Current approaches in human resources suggest a number of weaknesses: a reactive, ad hoc attitude towards problems of human resources; dispersal of accountability within human resources management (HRM); a limited notion of personnel administration that fails to encompass all aspects of HRM; and finally the short-term perspective of HRM. There are three broad arguments for modernizing the ways in which human resources for health are managed: • the central role of the workforce in the health sector; • the various challenges thrown up by health system reforms; • the need to anticipate the effect on the health workforce (and consequently on service provision) arising from various macroscopic social trends impinging on health systems. The absence of appropriate human resources policies is responsible, in many countries, for a chronic imbalance with multifaceted effects on the health workforce: quantitative mismatch, qualitative disparity, unequal distribution and a lack of coordination between HRM actions and health policy needs. Four proposals have been put forward to modernize how the policy process is conducted in the development of human resources for health (HRH): • to move beyond the traditional approach of personnel administration to a more global concept of HRM; • to give more weight to the integrated, interdependent and systemic nature of the different components of HRM when preparing and implementing policy; • to foster a more proactive attitude among human resources (HR) policy-makers and managers; • to promote the full commitment of all professionals and sectors in all phases of the process. The development of explicit human resources policies is a crucial link

  10. Human resources FY 1995 Site Program Plan WBS 6.10.2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This document contains information concerning human resources management at the Hanford Reservation. Information discusses the following topics: Cost estimates, closure and placement of labor resources, and management of human resources throughout the Hanford Site.

  11. Public health human resources: a comparative analysis of policy documents in two Canadian provinces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    addressed and later documents providing evidence of beginning policy development and implementation. While many similarities exist between the provinces, the context distinctive to each province has influenced and shaped how they have focused their public health human resources policies. PMID:24564931

  12. Strategy for preventing the waste of human resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William E.

    1992-05-01

    Rapid technological advances and the declining educational preparedness of industrial workers has established a need for new training strategies and initiatives regarding human resource development. The productivity, competitiveness, motivation, and creativity of our people determines whether our business enterprises succeed or fail during the next decade. Due to a change process that many organizations have undertaken to become more competitive toward the year 2000, many of the previous styles of engineering leadership that involves the management of projects and human resources require new approaches. It is also important to recognize that technology has its limits and a broader focus to include the human aspects of accomplishing jobs over the long term is more critical than ever before. More autonomy and the responsibility for broader practices by the professional staff requires that the professional worker operate differently. Business planning and development of the organization's future strategic intent requires a high priority on the human resource linkage to the business plans and strategies. A review of past practices to motivate the worker toward higher productivity clearly shows that past techniques are not as effective in today's work environment. Many practices of organizational and individual leadership don't fit today's approach of worker involvement because they were designed for administrative supervisory control processes. Therefore, if we are going to organize a business strategy that prevents the `waste of human resources,' we need to develop a strategy that is appropriate for the times which considers the attitude of the employees and their work environment. Having worked with scientists and engineers for the majority of my twenty-five year career, I know they see and appreciate the logic of a formula. A formula fits when developing a future strategy because a formula can become a model to enhance balanced planning. In this paper, I want to

  13. Human Resource Management Systems and Their Role in the Development of Strategic Resources: Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez de Pablos, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is double. First, it provides a conceptual framework linking human resource management, organisational learning and knowledge management. Second, the paper builds a causal model and tests it with a sample of firms from the Spanish manufacturing industry, using a structural equation modelling technique. In particular, after…

  14. Canadian Human Rights on the Internet. Internet Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Jack

    1999-01-01

    Explains that the Internet is a good source of information and misinformation about the rights that Canadians do and do not enjoy. Provides websites that address human rights issues, such as government and non-governmental organizations, and information for locating newsgroups and listservs. (CMK)

  15. Human resource processes and the role of the human resources function during mergers and acquisitions in the electricity industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dass, Ted K.

    Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) have been a popular strategy for organizations to consolidate and grow for more than a century. However, research in this field indicates that M&A are more likely to fail than succeed, with failure rates estimated to be as high as 75%. People-related issues have been identified as important causes for the high failure rate, but these issues are largely neglected until after the deal is closed. One explanation for this neglect is the low involvement of human resource (HR) professionals and the HR function during the M&A process. The strategic HR management literature suggests that a larger role for HR professionals in the M&A process would enable organizations to identify potential problems early and devise appropriate solutions. However, empirical research from an HR perspective has been scarce in this area. This dissertation examines the role of the HR function and the HR processes followed in organizations during M&A. Employing a case-study research design, this study examines M&A undertaken by two large organizations in the electricity industry through the lens of a "process" perspective. Based on converging evidence, the case studies address three sets of related issues: (1) how do organizations undertake and manage M&A; (2) what is the extent of HR involvement in M&A and what role does it play in the M&A process; and (3) what factors explain HR involvement in the M&A process and, more generally, in the formulation of corporate goals and strategies. Results reveal the complexity of issues faced by organizations in undertaking M&A, the variety of roles played by HR professionals, and the importance of several key contextual factors---internal and external to the organization---that influence HR involvement in the M&A process. Further, several implications for practice and future research are explored.

  16. Human protein reference database as a discovery resource for proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J. Daniel; Kristiansen, Troels Z.; Amanchy, Ramars; Surendranath, Vineeth; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T. K. B.; Chandrika, K. N.; Deshpande, Nandan; Suresh, Shubha; Rashmi, B. P.; Shanker, K.; Padma, N.; Niranjan, Vidya; Harsha, H. C.; Talreja, Naveen; Vrushabendra, B. M.; Ramya, M. A.; Yatish, A. J.; Joy, Mary; Shivashankar, H. N.; Kavitha, M. P.; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R.; Chandran, Sreenath; Mohan, Sujatha; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Prasad, C. K.; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2004-01-01

    The rapid pace at which genomic and proteomic data is being generated necessitates the development of tools and resources for managing data that allow integration of information from disparate sources. The Human Protein Reference Database (http://www.hprd.org) is a web-based resource based on open source technologies for protein information about several aspects of human proteins including protein–protein interactions, post-translational modifications, enzyme–substrate relationships and disease associations. This information was derived manually by a critical reading of the published literature by expert biologists and through bioinformatics analyses of the protein sequence. This database will assist in biomedical discoveries by serving as a resource of genomic and proteomic information and providing an integrated view of sequence, structure, function and protein networks in health and disease. PMID:14681466

  17. New Models and Metaphors for Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains two reports from a poster session on new ideas and models in human resource development (HRD). The first presentation, "Two-way Customer-Service Provider Cycle" (Harriet V. Lawrence, Albert K. Wiswell), discusses a two-way supply cycle model that illustrates relational issues in customer service, including needs…

  18. From Bystander to Ally: Transforming the District Human Resources Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Christine; DeArmond, Michael; Schumwinger, Abigail

    2004-01-01

    Although policymakers and academics tend to overlook the behind-the-scenes role that district human resources (HR) departments play in education, the HR office's effect is far from small. HR departments determine whether qualified teacher candidates make it to the classroom, or slip through the cracks. They can help principals find teachers who…

  19. FEDERAL-STATE PROGRAMS FOR DEVELOPING HUMAN RESOURCES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    COUNTY AND STATE EXTENSION WORKERS MAY USE THESE FACT SHEETS FOR 35 FEDERAL-STATE PROGRAMS IN SIX MAJOR AREAS OF HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT TO ACQUAINT THEMSELVES AND THEIR COMMUNITIES WITH PROGRAM PROVISIONS AND ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS. THE PROGRAMS ARE CLASSIFIED AS (1) COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT WHICH INCLUDE ADVANCES FOR PUBLIC WORKS…

  20. Human Resource Development and Manpower Training. Paper Presentations: Session B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains 18 papers from the human resource development and manpower training section of an international conference on vocational education and training (VET) for lifelong learning in the information era. The following papers are included: "Use of Social and Economic Modeling to Plan Vocational Education and Training"…

  1. When the Resources Are Human: Managing Staff, Students, and Ourselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Managing people can be an unanticipated responsibility--suddenly there aren't only collections to care for, but also human beings. Learning what resources and training opportunities are available to hone managerial skills is a task that can't be delayed until a difficult personnel situation develops. Working with supervisors, those we supervise…

  2. Ten years development of human resources in Serbian health system.

    PubMed

    Krstic, Maja; Grozdanov, Jasmina; Ivanovic, Ivan; Korac, Vesna; Vasic, Milena

    2010-01-01

    A key component of any healthcare reform process is to ensure that the services are delivered by the right numbers of staff with appropriate skills and training. In 2007, public health institutions in Serbia had 2% more employees than before the economic transition. Nevertheless, the trend of the total number of employees in the Serbian health care system still preserved a mild rising trend. The most prominent changes in the structure of human resources were effectuated in the total numbers of physicians, nurses and administrative and technical staff. Development of medical science and practice in Serbia is characterized by more intensive processes of specializations, resulting in increased number of specialists among medical doctors. Health care provided in in-patient institutions still employs most of the doctors. The number of unemployed physicians, dentists and pharmacists has been rising since 2000. Another aspect that explains the rise of unemployed, university educated human resources is the rising number of graduated physicians, dentist and pharmacists. Health care policy makers may recognize the need for more integrated planning of human resources in health care, in particular, making management of human resources responsive to system needs and design, instead of vice versa.

  3. Human Resources Skills: Learning through an Interactive Multimedia Business Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Johanna; Drummond, Damon

    2000-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the design and development of an interactive multimedia simulation package for management education called Business Simulation which combines the concepts of case study methods with business simulation games. It is designed to provide students with skills-based training in human resources management, particularly…

  4. Coordination and Human Resource Planning in the Hawaii Visitor Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Commission on Manpower and Full Employment, Honolulu.

    This report was undertaken in response to a request by the Sixth Legislature, which expressed its concern with the lack of coordination and overall human resource planning in the visitor industry and that the findings of the January 6-7, 1970 Travel Industry Congress had not been fully implemented. The State Commission on Manpower and Full…

  5. Alignment of Human Resource Practices and Teacher Performance Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heneman III, Herbert G.; Milanowski, Anthony T.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we argue that human resource (HR) management practices are important components of strategies for improving student achievement in an accountability environment. We present a framework illustrating the alignment of educational HR management practices to a teacher performance competency model, which in turn is aligned with student…

  6. Beginning Teachers' Perceptions of School Human Resource Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Human resource (HR) management is defined as the sum of activities employed by an organization to attract, develop, and retain people with the appropriate knowledge and skills for effectively and efficiently achieving organizational goals. An understanding of the HR practices in schools is important, as the assembly of a team of qualified and…

  7. Driving Performance Improvements by Integrating Competencies with Human Resource Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jin Gu; Park, Yongho; Yang, Gi Hun

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the issues in the development and application of a competency model and provides implications for more precise integration of competencies into human resource (HR) functions driving performance improvement. This research is based on a case study from a Korean consumer corporation. This study employed document reviews,…

  8. A Competency-Based Human Resource Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangani, Noordeen; McLean, Gary N.; Braden, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores some of the major issues in developing and implementing a competency-based human resource development strategy. The article summarizes a brief literature review on how competency models can be developed and implemented to improve employee performance. A case study is presented of American Medical Systems (AMS), a mid-sized…

  9. Williamsburg County Human Resources Campus (WCHRC): Planning Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn, Eddie D.; And Others

    Investigating the feasibility of a human resources campus designed to locate all Williamsburg County (a rurally disadvantaged South Carolina county) health and social service agencies in one consolidated area, project objectives were to investigate: agency characteristics; ownership, management, and financing aspects of the campus concept;…

  10. New Technology and Human Resource Development in the Automobile Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    This document contains five case studies of plants within large enterprises in the automobile industry (Ford, Toyota, Volkswagen, Renault, and Volvo), plus reports of each company's views on human resource development, new technology, and changes in work organization and skill formation. The document is composed of five narrative sections,…

  11. Human Resources for Health Challenges in Nigeria and Nurse Migration.

    PubMed

    Salami, Bukola; Dada, Foluke O; Adelakun, Folake E

    2016-05-01

    The emigration of sub-Saharan African health professionals to developed Western nations is an aspect of increasing global mobility. This article focuses on the human resources for health challenges in Nigeria and the emigration of nurses from Nigeria as the country faces mounting human resources for health challenges. Human resources for health issues in Nigeria contribute to poor population health in the country, alongside threats from terrorism, infectious disease outbreaks, and political corruption. Health inequities within Nigeria mirror the geographical disparities in human resources for health distribution and are worsened by the emigration of Nigerian nurses to developed countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom. Nigerian nurses are motivated to emigrate to work in healthier work environments, improve their economic prospects, and advance their careers. Like other migrant African nurses, they experience barriers to integration, including racism and discrimination, in receiving countries. We explore the factors and processes that shape this migration. Given the forces of globalization, source countries and destination countries must implement policies to more responsibly manage migration of nurses. This can be done by implementing measures to retain nurses, promote the return migration of expatriate nurses, and ensure the integration of migrant nurses upon arrival in destination countries.

  12. The Process Approach to Management of Enterprise Human Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, O.; Mozhayeva, T.

    2016-04-01

    The paper describes the approach to human resources management in the quality management system of an enterprise on the basis of their dual nature. The expediency of this approach application is analysed to ensure harmony between the interests of the company and its personnel and to improve the quality of labour.

  13. Reflections and Future Prospects for Evaluation in Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Heeyoung; Boulay, David

    2013-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) evaluation has often been criticized for its limited function in organizational decision making. This article reviews evaluation studies to uncover the current status of HRD evaluation literature. The authors further discuss general evaluation theories in terms of value, use, and evaluator role to extend the…

  14. Human Resources Administration: A School-Based Perspective. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced and updated, this Fourth Edition of Richard E. Smith's highly successful text examines the growing role of the principal in planning, hiring, staff development, supervision, and other human resource functions. The Fourth Edition includes new sections on ethics, induction, and the role of the mentor teacher. This edition also introduces…

  15. Human Resource Development in Mauritius: Context, Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garavan, Thomas N.; Neeliah, Harris; Auckloo, Raj; Ragaven, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore human resource development (HRD) in Mauritius and the challenges and opportunities faced by organisations in different sectors in adopting HRD practices. Findings: This special issue presents four papers that explore dimensions of HRD in public sector, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and…

  16. Empowering the Human Resources and the Role of Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lama, Sukmaya; Kashyap, Mridusmita

    2012-01-01

    As the world is invaded by technological inventions and wonders, life becoming more fast and crazy, yet there can be no doubt that the critical factor for the development of a nation or a state is its human resource. The productivity of a nation is influenced by the number of its skilled population. When we look into the problem of…

  17. Human Resource Management in Australian Registered Training Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Hawke Geof

    2008-01-01

    This report forms part of a comprehensive research program that has examined issues related to building the organisational capability of vocational education and training providers. In particular, this report focuses on the current state of human resource management practice in both technical and further education and private registered training…

  18. Human Resource Architectures for New Teachers in Flemish Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vekeman, Eva; Devos, Geert; Valcke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Since research shows that the quality of a school's teaching force is related to its personnel practices, there is a growing interest in human resource management (HRM) in education. Existing research has generated insights into the differences, constraints and effects of single and isolated HR practices. Yet, little research is available…

  19. Human Resource Education in the Middle East Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirani, Khalil M.; Hamie, Christine Silva

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of human resource development (HRD) education in Middle Eastern countries. In particular, the authors discuss the current state of HRD education, country readiness and challenges that hinder HRD progress in Middle Eastern countries. They argue that HRD programs need to prepare young…

  20. The Microfoundations of Human Resources Management in US Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogodzinski, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the extent to which human resources (HR) decision making is influenced by the social context of school systems. More specifically, this study draws upon organizational theory focussed on the microfoundations of organizations as a lens identify key aspects of school HR decision making at the…

  1. Personnel vs. Strategic Human Resource Management in Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Education human resources (HR) professionals have often been neglected in education research. This study seeks to better understand their role in the American school industry, by first examining how districts conceptualize the position of HR professionals and then exploring how the professionals themselves understand their role in school business.…

  2. Human Resource Development. Trends and Issues Alert No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Because of its focus on improving work performance at the individual, group, organizational, and interorganizational levels, the field of human resource development (HRD) is affected by and responds to trends in work, organizations, and the global economy. A literature review reveals that the following themes recur throughout the HRD literature:…

  3. The Future Competencies of Department Chairs: A Human Resources Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Faye R.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study of department chairs, deans, and faculty at extensive research public universities in Florida resulted in the identification of 85 future competencies of department chairs using a human resources perspective. Results include a discussion of the top 20 most important competencies and the top 20 competencies anticipated to be…

  4. Promoting Instructional Improvement: A Strategic Human Resource Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smylie, Mark A.; Wenzel, Stacy A.

    2006-01-01

    This report argues that instructional improvement, which goes hand-in-hand with efforts at education reform, can be promoted through the strategic use of human resource management (HRM) practices at the school, district, and state levels. The authors present information from the organizational and management literatures on how firms in several…

  5. Integrating Workforce Planning, Human Resources, and Service Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Birch, Stephen; Baumann, Andrea; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    The feasibility of integrated health human resources planning (IHHRP) was examined. The analysis focused on the following topics: ways of integrating labor market indicators into service planning; whether planning is sufficiently responsive and flexible to retain relevance and validity in rapidly changing health systems; different models and…

  6. Attitudes of Prospective Human Resource Personnel towards Distance Learning Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udegbe, I. Bola

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes of Prospective Human Resource Personnel toward degrees obtained by distance learning in comparison to those obtained through conventional degree program. Using a cross-sectional survey design, a total of 215 postgraduate students who had been or had potential to be involved in the hiring process in their…

  7. Communicator Style: A Study of Human Resource Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Jennifer Payne

    Researchers who have focused on issues of interpersonal communication in organizations have concluded that it is an essential component of organizational life. This paper presents findings of a study that examined the communicator image of human-resource managers. A survey instrument called the Norton Communicator Style Measure (CSM) was sent to…

  8. Human Resource Professionals' Report on Communication Practices in Their Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Allan D.

    One hundred fifty human resource professionals responded to survey questions on communication effectiveness within their business organizations. Their responses on formal and informal communication patterns, communicating change, small group communication, and superior-subordinate communication were supplemented by interviews with 58…

  9. Developing a Gap Taxonomy to Address Crew Health Risks in NASA's Human Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Edwards, J. Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The mission of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is to understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions. The HRP addresses 27 specific risks by identifying and then filling gaps in understanding the risks and in the ability to disposition the risks. The primary bases for identifying gaps have been past experience and requirements definition. This approach has been very effective in identifying some important, relevant gaps, but may be inadequate for identifying gaps outside the past experience base. We are exploring the use of a gap taxonomy as a comprehensive, underlying conceptual framework that allows a more systematic identification of gaps. The taxonomy is based on these stages in medical care: prediction, prevention, detection/diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, rehabilitation, and lifetime surveillance. This gap taxonomy approach identifies new gaps in HRP health risks. Many of the new gaps suggest risk reduction approaches that are more cost effective than present approaches. A major benefit of the gap taxonomy approach is to identify new, economical approaches that reduce the likelihood and/or consequence of a risk.

  10. Socio-Ecohydrologic Agents And Services: Integrating Human And Natural Components To Address Coupled System Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavao-zuckerman, M.; Pope, A.; Chan, D.; Curl, K.; Gimblett, H. R.; Hough, M.; House-Peters, L.; Lee, R.; Scott, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Riparian corridors in arid regions are highly valued for their relative scarcity, and because healthy riparian systems support high levels of biodiversity, can meet human demand for water and water-related resources and functions. Our team is taking a transdiciplinary social-ecological systems approach to assessing riparian corridor resilience in two watersheds (the San Pedro River in USA and Mexico, and the Rio San Miguel in Mexico) through a project funded by the NSF CNH program ("Strengthening Resilience of Arid Region Riparian Corridors"). Multiple perspectives are integrated in the project, including hydrology, ecology, institutional dynamics, and decision making (at the level of both policy and individual choice), as well as the perspectives of various stakeholder groups and individuals in the watersheds. Here we discuss initial findings that center around linking changes in ecohydrology and livelihoods related to decisions in response to climatic, ecological, and social change. The research team is implementing two approaches to integrate the disparate disciplines participating in the research (and the varied perspectives among the stakeholders in this binational riparian context): (1) ecosystem service assessment, and (2) agent based model simulation. We are developing an ecosystem service perspective that provides a bridge between ecological dynamics in the landscape and varied stakeholder perspectives on the implications of ecohydrology for well-being (economic, cultural, ecological). Services are linked on one hand to the spatial patterns of traits of individuals within species (allowing a more predictive application of ecosystem services as they vary with community change in time), and to stakeholder perspectives (facilitating integration of ecosystem services into our understanding of decision making processes) in a case study in the San Pedro River National Conservation Area. The agent- based model (ABM) approach incorporates the influence of human

  11. Aggregate resource availability in the conterminous United States, including suggestions for addressing shortages, quality, and environmental concerns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Although potential sources of aggregate are widespread throughout the United States, many sources may not meet certain physical property requirements, such as soundness, hardness, strength, porosity, and specific gravity, or they may contain contaminants or deleterious materials that render them unusable. Encroachment by conflicting land uses, permitting considerations, environmental issues, and societal pressures can prevent or limit development of otherwise suitable aggregate. The use of sustainable aggregate resource management can help ensure an economically viable supply of aggregate. Sustainable aggregate resource management techniques that have successfully been used include (1) protecting potential resources from encroachment; (2) using marginal-quality local aggregate for applications that do not demand a high-quality resource; (3) using substitute materials such as clinker, scoria, and recycled asphalt and concrete; and (4) using rail and water to transport aggregates from remote sources.

  12. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources.

    PubMed

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-09-15

    Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle, UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large-scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly, HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long-term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention.

  13. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources

    PubMed Central

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention. PMID:26395135

  14. [Human resources for health in Chile: the reform's pending challenge].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Claudio A

    2009-09-01

    Omission of human resources from health policy development has been identified as a barrier in the health sector reform's adoption phase. Since 2002, Chile's health care system has been undergoing a transformation based on the principles of health as a human right, equity, solidarity, efficiency, and social participation. While the reform has set forth the redefinition of the medical professions, continuing education, scheduled accreditation, and the introduction of career development incentives, it has not considered management options tailored to the new setting, a human resources strategy that has the consensus of key players and sector policy, or a process for understanding the needs of health care staff and professionals. However, there is still time to undo the shortcomings, in large part because the reform's implementation phase only recently has begun. Overcoming this challenge is in the hands of the experts charged with designing public health strategies and policies.

  15. Human Resource Management in Public Higher Education in the Tempus Partner Countries. A Tempus Study. Issue 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubosc, Flora; Kelo, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give an overview of the ways in which human resources are managed in public higher education institutions in the Tempus Partner Countries. It is based on a survey addressed to individuals involved in Tempus projects and on information gathered at the level of the national authorities. In all the countries covered by the…

  16. Animal Dissection. [Fact Sheet and Resource List Information Packet from the Humane Society of the United States].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcombe, Jonathan

    Killing animals for classroom dissection causes animal suffering, cheapens the value of life, and depletes wild animal populations, yet it remains commonplace. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) addresses the issue in this information packet which includes a fact sheet and three resource lists "on Dissection." The fact sheet discusses…

  17. Retooling Our Human Resources for the Space Age (Papers and Findings: A Conference on Human Resources). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, J. Earl

    A conference was held to discuss the problems of the hard-core unemployed. The purpose of the conference was to spread the experience of the five Human Resources Development programs with special emphasis on Houston's success in the Outreach phase and to stimulate representatives from 12 southern states to promote HRD programs in their areas.…

  18. The software analysis project for the Office of Human Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    There were two major sections of the project for the Office of Human Resources (OHR). The first section was to conduct a planning study to analyze software use with the goal of recommending software purchases and determining whether the need exists for a file server. The second section was analysis and distribution planning for retirement planning computer program entitled VISION provided by NASA Headquarters. The software planning study was developed to help OHR analyze the current administrative desktop computing environment and make decisions regarding software acquisition and implementation. There were three major areas addressed by the study: current environment new software requirements, and strategies regarding the implementation of a server in the Office. To gather data on current environment, employees were surveyed and an inventory of computers were produced. The surveys were compiled and analyzed by the ASEE fellow with interpretation help by OHR staff. New software requirements represented a compilation and analysis of the surveyed requests of OHR personnel. Finally, the information on the use of a server represents research done by the ASEE fellow and analysis of survey data to determine software requirements for a server. This included selection of a methodology to estimate the number of copies of each software program required given current use and estimated growth. The report presents the results of the computing survey, a description of the current computing environment, recommenations for changes in the computing environment, current software needs, management advantages of using a server, and management considerations in the implementation of a server. In addition, detailed specifications were presented for the hardware and software recommendations to offer a complete picture to OHR management. The retirement planning computer program available to NASA employees will aid in long-range retirement planning. The intended audience is the NASA civil

  19. The implications of health sector reform for human resources development.

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Ala'; Hornby, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The authors argue that "health for all" is not achievable in most countries without health sector reform that incorporates a process of coordinated health and human resources development. They examine the situation in countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of the World Health Organization. Though advances have been made, further progress is inhibited by the limited adaptation of traditional health service structures and processes in many of these countries. National reform strategies are needed. These require the active participation of health professional associations and academic training institutions as well as health service managers. The paper indicates some of the initiatives required and suggests that the starting point for many countries should be a rigorous appraisal of the current state of human resources development in health. PMID:11884974

  20. Managing information technology human resources in health care.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Sathiadev; Crow, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    The health care sector has seen a major increase in the use of information technology (IT). The increasing permeation of IT into the enterprise has resulted in many non-IT employees acquiring IT-related skills and becoming an essential part of the IT-enabled enterprise. Health care IT employees work in a continually changing environment dealing with new specializations that are often unfamiliar to other personnel. The widespread use of outsourcing and offshoring in IT has introduced a third layer of complexity in the traditional hierarchy and its approach to managing human resources. This article studies 3 major issues in managing these human resources in an IT-enabled health care enterprise and recommends solutions to the problem.

  1. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and Methods Exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. PMID:25741056

  2. Bringing Human Rights Back Home: Learning from "Superman" and Addressing Political Issues at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Human rights are commonly conceived as more relevant to foreign policy than day-to-day living. Drawing on Eleanor Roosevelt's conception of human rights as beginning close to home, this article illustrates how human rights principles might inform everyday processes of schooling and learning to live together. It considers rights to, in and…

  3. Theory Development and Convergence of Human Resource Fields: Implications for Human Performance Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Yonjoo; Yoon, Seung Won

    2010-01-01

    This study examines major theory developments in human resource (HR) fields and discusses implications for human performance technology (HPT). Differentiated HR fields are converging to improve organizational performance through knowledge-based innovations. Ruona and Gibson (2004) made a similar observation and analyzed the historical evolution…

  4. 76 FR 60934 - Proposal Review Panel for Human Resource Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Human Resource Development; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... Person: Kelly Mack, Division of Human Resource Development, Room 815, National Science Foundation... following meeting: Name: ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Site Visit; Proposal Review Panel...

  5. 76 FR 60933 - Proposal Review Panel for Human Resource Development; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Human Resource Development; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... Person: Kelly Mack, Division of Human Resource Development, Room 815, National Science Foundation... following meeting: Name: ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Site Visit, Proposal Review Panel...

  6. Analysis of Human Resources Management Strategy in China Electronic Commerce Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Fang

    The paper discussed electronic-commerce's influence on enterprise human resources management, proposed and proved the human resources management strategy which electronic commerce enterprise should adopt from recruitment strategy to training strategy, keeping talent strategy and other ways.

  7. High-Performance Local Search for Task Scheduling with Human Resource Allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estellon, Bertrand; Gardi, Frédéric; Nouioua, Karim

    In this paper, a real-life problem of task scheduling with human resource allocation is addressed. This problem was approached by the authors in the context of the ROADEF 2007 Challenge, which is an international competition organized by the French Operations Research Society. The subject of the contest, proposed by the telecommunications company France Télé com, consists in planning maintenance interventions and teams of technicians needed for their achievements. The addressed combinatorial optimization problem is very hard: it contains several NP-hard subproblems and its scale (hundreds of interventions and technicians) induces a huge combinatorics. An effective and efficient local-search heuristic is described to solve this problem. This algorithm was ranked 2nd of the competition (over the 35 teams who have submitted a solution). Moreover, a methodology is revealed to design and engineer high-performance local-search heuristics for solving practically discrete optimization problems.

  8. Educational Planning and Human Resources Development with Reference to Arab Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaleldin, Mohamed Al Awad

    Human resources development sees human beings as the means to socioeconomic development. This differs from human development which sees human beings as the immediate and ultimate goals and ends of socio-economic development. Arab states have tended to utilize the human resources development approach as part of their forecasting of manpower…

  9. Rights for All: The Human Rights of Rural Citizens. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sodoti, Chris

    The Australian Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission visited over 50 communities throughout Australia to assess the state of human rights in rural, regional, and remote Australia. Education and health services predominated the discussions. Rural children, especially Aboriginal children, have lower school attendance and completion rates…

  10. Webquest and Comics in the Formation of Human Resources in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Maruxo, Harriet Bárbara; Prado, Cláudia; Almeida, Denise Maria de; Tobase, Lucia; Grossi, Manoela Gomes; Vaz, Débora Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Objective To describe the process of constructing and implementation of Webquest as pedagogical strategy as guiding the study about the pedagogical concepts using Comic. Method The first stage of the study was outlined applied research of technological production. The second stage was characterized as research exploratory, descriptive documentary for the analysis of Comic. in the teaching diploma in Nursing of EEUSP in 2013. Results The proposed Webquest was implemented, resulting in 18 Comic. All Pedagogical Concepts studied were addressed; used the software indicated and the power point, the plots developed in different scenarios and most Comic contemplated mandatory items. Conclusion The use of different technological resources provide learning, by mobilizing multiple potentialities, abilities and interests of students, favoring the construction of collective and collaborative learning, strengthening important and necessary features in training that will influence the human resource profile in tune with the aspirations of the labor market.

  11. The Relevancy of Graduate Curriculum to Human Resource Professionals' Electronic Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoell, Robert C.; Henry, Gordon O.

    2003-01-01

    Electronic communications of human resource professionals and the content of 23 university human resource management courses were categorized using the Human Resource Certification Institute's body of knowledge. Differences between proportion of topics discussed and topics covered in curricula suggest some topics are over- or undertaught.…

  12. 78 FR 61400 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources ( 1119). Date/Time: November 6...'s science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and human resources...

  13. 24 CFR 7.14 - Responsibilities of the Office of Human Resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Human Resources. 7.14 Section 7.14 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of... Reprisal Responsibilities § 7.14 Responsibilities of the Office of Human Resources. In accordance with guidelines issued by the Assistant Secretary for Administration, Human Resources Officers shall: (a)...

  14. 24 CFR 7.14 - Responsibilities of the Office of Human Resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Human Resources. 7.14 Section 7.14 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of... Reprisal Responsibilities § 7.14 Responsibilities of the Office of Human Resources. In accordance with guidelines issued by the Assistant Secretary for Administration, Human Resources Officers shall: (a)...

  15. 77 FR 23766 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the... the following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources ( 1119). Date/Time..., and mathematics (STEM) education and human resources programming. Agenda May 9, 2012...

  16. 77 FR 61033 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources ( 1119). Date/Time: November 7... technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and human resources programming. Agenda November...

  17. 75 FR 63209 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources ( 1119). Date/Time: November 3..., and mathematics (STEM) education and human resources programming. Agenda November 3, 2010...

  18. 7 CFR 2.91 - Director, Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Director, Office of Human Resources Management. 2.91... Secretary for Administration § 2.91 Director, Office of Human Resources Management. (a) Delegations... Assistant Secretary for Administration to the Director, Office of Human Resources Management: (1)...

  19. 7 CFR 2.92 - Director, Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Director, Office of Human Resources Management. 2.92... Secretary for Administration § 2.92 Director, Office of Human Resources Management. (a) Delegations... Human Resources Management: (1) Formulate and issue Department policy, standards, rules and...

  20. Information systems on human resources for health: a global review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although attainment of the health-related Millennium Development Goals relies on countries having adequate numbers of human resources for health (HRH) and their appropriate distribution, global understanding of the systems used to generate information for monitoring HRH stock and flows, known as human resources information systems (HRIS), is minimal. While HRIS are increasingly recognized as integral to health system performance assessment, baseline information regarding their scope and capability around the world has been limited. We conducted a review of the available literature on HRIS implementation processes in order to draw this baseline. Methods Our systematic search initially retrieved 11 923 articles in four languages published in peer-reviewed and grey literature. Following the selection of those articles which detailed HRIS implementation processes, reviews of their contents were conducted using two-person teams, each assigned to a national system. A data abstraction tool was developed and used to facilitate objective assessment. Results Ninety-five articles with relevant HRIS information were reviewed, mostly from the grey literature, which comprised 84 % of all documents. The articles represented 63 national HRIS and two regionally integrated systems. Whereas a high percentage of countries reported the capability to generate workforce supply and deployment data, few systems were documented as being used for HRH planning and decision-making. Of the systems examined, only 23 % explicitly stated they collect data on workforce attrition. The majority of countries experiencing crisis levels of HRH shortages (56 %) did not report data on health worker qualifications or professional credentialing as part of their HRIS. Conclusion Although HRIS are critical for evidence-based human resource policy and practice, there is a dearth of information about these systems, including their current capabilities. The absence of standardized HRIS profiles

  1. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain

  2. [Human resources in Iaşi Pharmacists Association].

    PubMed

    Streit, Gabriela; Voitcu, Mariana; Ionaşcu, Rodica; Cojocaru, Ileana

    2004-01-01

    The authors present the results of the 2000 and 2001 census of the human resources of the Iaşi County, realised by the Pharmacists Association. The results underline that most of the pharmacists are working in public pharmacies (69%). In the 188 community pharmacies are working 490 pharmacists, meaning a pharmacist/1707 inhabitants of the Iaşi County. Most of the actual pharmacies (75%) are small, with 1-2 pharmacists. Comparing the results of the two consecutive census it was observed an increase of the number of the pharmacies and pharmacists.

  3. Population, human resources and development planning: towards an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Farooq, G M

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made in this discussion to outline in broad terms an analytical and operational framework for integrating population and human resources related issues. 3 sections provide a rationale for comprehensive population, human resources, and development planning; contain a brief description of the kind of policy research needed as part of the analytical base for comprehensive planning; and describe proposed institutional arrangements under which the national effort could be organized and coordinated and the related programs implemented. For comprehensive development planning, it is essential to consider population problems in their broad perspective. Population problems are related to the prevailing levels of mortality, health and nutrition, population movements, levels of unemployment, underemployment and child labor, women's roles, income inequalities, incidence of poverty, and quality of environment and the like, as well as, population growth. A model for the integration of population variables into national socioeconomic planning would involve, in increasing order of complexity, the following types of analytical work: detailed demographic estimates and projections; translation of the consequences of population dynamics into estimates of social and economic needs for the purpose of sectoral planning; and research on the more important demographic, social, and economic linkages in order to contribute to the formulation of population policies and related measures for influencing population variables directly and the overall development plan, sectoral plans, and individual programs and projects. Some of the more basic studies that would help to establish an appropriate analytical base for a comprehensive planning approach are outlined. A suitable operational framework is required for an effective and integrated approach to population, human resources, and development planning. What is necessary is the establishment of a permanent high level institution

  4. ADP Analysis project for the Human Resources Management Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The ADP (Automated Data Processing) Analysis Project was conducted for the Human Resources Management Division (HRMD) of NASA's Langley Research Center. The three major areas of work in the project were computer support, automated inventory analysis, and an ADP study for the Division. The goal of the computer support work was to determine automation needs of Division personnel and help them solve computing problems. The goal of automated inventory analysis was to find a way to analyze installed software and usage on a Macintosh. Finally, the ADP functional systems study for the Division was designed to assess future HRMD needs concerning ADP organization and activities.

  5. Impact of information technology on human resources in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Mehran

    2007-01-01

    Incorporation of advances in information communications technology (ICT) into the workplace has had a major impact in human resource utilization in sectors of the economy where it has occurred in a substantial manner, such as manufacturing and financial services. While some benefits of ICT have been realized in healthcare, the full impact of its benefits will only be realized if it is incorporated in a systematic form, rather than in the current patchy and uneven manner seen around the province and across the country to date.

  6. The Story Behind the Numbers: Lessons Learned from the Integration of Monitoring Resources in Addressing an ISS Water Quality Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, Torin; Flint, Stephanie; Straub, John, II; Gazda, Dan; Schultz, John

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in June of 2010 an environmental mystery was unfolding on the International Space Station (ISS). The U.S. Water Processor Assembly (WPA) began to produce water with increasing levels of total organic carbon (TOC). A surprisingly consistent upward TOC trend was observed through weekly in-flight total organic carbon analyzer (TOCA) monitoring. As TOC is a general organics indicator, return of water archive samples was needed to make better-informed crew health decisions and to aid in WPA troubleshooting. TOCA-measured TOC was more than halfway to its health-based screening limit before archive samples could be returned on Soyuz 22 and analyzed. Although TOC was confirmed to be elevated, somewhat surprisingly, none of the typical target compounds were the source. After some solid detective work, it was confirmed that the TOC was associated with a compound known as dimethylsilanediol (DMSD). DMSD is believed to be a breakdown product of silicon-containing compounds present on ISS. A toxicological limit was set for DMSD and a forward plan developed for operations given this new understanding of the source of the TOC. This required extensive coordination with ISS stakeholders and innovative use of available in-flight and archive monitoring resources. Behind the numbers and scientific detail surrounding this anomaly, there exists a compelling story of multi-disciplinary awareness, teamwork, and important environmental lessons learned.

  7. Leveraging human decision making through the optimal management of centralized resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyden, Paul; McGrath, Richard G.

    2016-05-01

    Combining results from mixed integer optimization, stochastic modeling and queuing theory, we will advance the interdisciplinary problem of efficiently and effectively allocating centrally managed resources. Academia currently fails to address this, as the esoteric demands of each of these large research areas limits work across traditional boundaries. The commercial space does not currently address these challenges due to the absence of a profit metric. By constructing algorithms that explicitly use inputs across boundaries, we are able to incorporate the advantages of using human decision makers. Key improvements in the underlying algorithms are made possible by aligning decision maker goals with the feedback loops introduced between the core optimization step and the modeling of the overall stochastic process of supply and demand. A key observation is that human decision-makers must be explicitly included in the analysis for these approaches to be ultimately successful. Transformative access gives warfighters and mission owners greater understanding of global needs and allows for relationships to guide optimal resource allocation decisions. Mastery of demand processes and optimization bottlenecks reveals long term maximum marginal utility gaps in capabilities.

  8. Place Based STEM: Leveraging Local Resources to Engage K-12 Teachers in Teaching Integrated STEM and for Addressing the Local STEM Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Louis Nadelson; Anne Louise Seifert; Meagan McKinney

    2014-06-01

    Business, industry, parks, nature settings, government infrastructure, and people, can be invaluable resources for connecting STEM curriculum within context which results in conditions ideal for promoting purposeful learning of authentic STEM content. Thus, community-based STEM resources offer ideal context for teaching STEM content. A benefit of focusing teacher attention on these contextual, content aligned resources is that they are in every community; making place-based STEM education a possibility, regardless of the location of STEM teaching and learning. Further, associating STEM teaching and learning with local resources addresses workforce development and the STEM pipeline by exposing students to STEM careers and applications in their local communities. The desire to align STEM teaching and learning with local STEM related resources guided the design of our week-long integrated STEM K-12 teacher professional development (PD) program, i-STEM. We have completed four years of our i-STEM PD program and have made place-based STEM a major emphasis of our curriculum. This report focuses on the data collected in the fourth year of our program. Our week-long i-STEM PD served over 425 educators last summer (2013), providing them with in depth theme-based integrated STEM short courses which were limited to an average of 15 participants and whole group plenary sessions focused around placed based integrated STEM, inquiry, engineering design, standards and practices of Common Core and 21st Century skills. This state wide PD was distributed in five Idaho community colleges and took place over two weeks. The STEM short courses included topics on engineering for sustainability, using engineering to spark interest in STEM, municipal water systems, health, agriculture, food safety, mining, forestry, energy, and others. Integral to these short courses were field trips designed to connect the K-12 educators to the resources in their local communities that could be leveraged

  9. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. An imminent human resource crisis in ground water hydrology?

    PubMed

    Stephens, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence, mostly from the United States, suggests that it has become increasingly difficult to find well-trained, entry-level ground water hydrologists to fill open positions in consulting firms and regulatory agencies. The future prospects for filling positions that require training in ground water hydrology are assessed by considering three factors: the market, the numbers of qualified students entering colleges and universities, and the aging of the existing workforce. The environmental and water resources consulting industry has seen continuous albeit variable growth, and demand for environmental scientists and hydrologists is expected to increase significantly. Conversely, students' interest and their enrollment in hydrology and water resources programs have waned in recent years, and the interests of students within these departments have shifted away from ground water hydrology in some schools. This decrease in the numbers of U.S. students graduating in hydrology or emphasizing ground water hydrology is coinciding with the aging of and pending retirement of ground water scientists and engineers in the baby boomer generation. We need to both trigger the imagination of students at the elementary school level so that they later want to apply science and math and communicate the career opportunities in ground water hydrology to those high school and college graduates who have acquired the appropriate technical background. Because the success of a consulting firm, research organization, or regulatory agency is derived from the skills and judgment of the employees, human resources will be an increasingly more critical strategic issue for many years.

  11. Human resource development for a community-based health extension program: a case study from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ethiopia is one of the sub-Saharan countries most affected by high disease burden, aggravated by a shortage and imbalance of human resources, geographical distance, and socioeconomic factors. In 2004, the government introduced the Health Extension Program (HEP), a primary care delivery strategy, to address the challenges and achieve the World Health Organization Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) within a context of limited resources. Case description The health system was reformed to create a platform for integration and institutionalization of the HEP with appropriate human capacity, infrastructure, and management structures. Human resources were developed through training of female health workers recruited from their prospective villages, designed to limit the high staff turnover and address gender, social and cultural factors in order to provide services acceptable to each community. The service delivery modalities include household, community and health facility care. Thus, the most basic health post infrastructure, designed to rapidly and cost-effectively scale up HEP, was built in each village. In line with the country’s decentralized management system, the HEP service delivery is under the jurisdiction of the district authorities. Discussion and evaluation The nationwide implementation of HEP progressed in line with its target goals. In all, 40 training institutions were established, and over 30,000 Health Extension Workers have been trained and deployed to approximately 15,000 villages. The potential health service coverage reached 92.1% in 2011, up from 64% in 2004. While most health indicators have improved, performance in skilled delivery and postnatal care has not been satisfactory. While HEP is considered the most important institutional framework for achieving the health MDGs in Ethiopia, quality of service, utilization rate, access and referral linkage to emergency obstetric care, management, and evaluation of the program are the key

  12. Understanding human resource management practices in Botswana's public health sector.

    PubMed

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna Stannie; Gauld, Robin; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2016-11-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the management of the public sector health workforce in Botswana. Using institutional frameworks it aims to document and analyse human resource management (HRM) practices, and make recommendations to improve employee and health system outcomes. Design/methodology/approach The paper draws from a large study that used a mixed methods approach to assess performance of Botswana's Ministry of Health (MOH). It uses data collected through document analysis and in-depth interviews of 54 key informants comprising policy makers, senior staff of the MOH and its stakeholder organizations. Findings Public health sector HRM in Botswana has experienced inadequate planning, poor deployment and underutilization of staff. Lack of comprehensive retention strategies and poor working conditions contributed to the failure to attract and retain skilled personnel. Relationships with both formal and informal environments affected HRM performance. Research limitations/implications While document review was a major source of data for this paper, the weaknesses in the human resource information system limited availability of data. Practical implications This paper presents an argument for the need for consideration of formal and informal environments in developing effective HRM strategies. Originality/value This research provides a rare system-wide approach to health HRM in a Sub-Saharan African country. It contributes to the literature and evidence needed to guide HRM policy decisions and practices.

  13. Human resource management in the health care industry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, J; Kleiner, B H

    1998-01-01

    Human resource management practices with special reference to the latest developments of the 1990s such as environmental effects and managing diversity, were investigated. The purpose of the study was to unveil how the health care industry can benefit from these new concepts, as well as to describe how the traditional health care facilities can adapt these new ideas. Specific examples were provided to illustrate this point. In compilation of this report, both primary and secondary research was used. As primary research, many reputable individuals in the health care industry were consulted, and asked to comment on the rough draft of this report. Secondary sources included many journal articles, original researches and books that were written on this technical subject. It can be concluded from this research, that the health care industry should adapt the latest methods to compete and survive, such as use more marketing tools to attract human resource management personnel from other industries, promote diversity at the work place, promote from within the company, and cross-train personnel whenever possible. Health care industry has generally lagged behind other industries in securing high-performance individuals and marketing personnel; however, with the development of health maintenance organizations, this trend is changing.

  14. A Possible Approach for Addressing Neglected Human Factors Issues of Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Holloway, C. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The increasing complexity of safety-critical applications has led to the introduction of decision support tools in the transportation and process industries. Automation has also been introduced to support operator intervention in safety-critical applications. These innovations help reduce overall operator workload, and filter application data to maximize the finite cognitive and perceptual resources of system operators. However, these benefits do not come without a cost. Increased computational support for the end-users of safety-critical applications leads to increased reliance on engineers to monitor and maintain automated systems and decision support tools. This paper argues that by focussing on the end-users of complex applications, previous research has tended to neglect the demands that are being placed on systems engineers. The argument is illustrated through discussing three recent accidents. The paper concludes by presenting a possible strategy for building and using highly automated systems based on increased attention by management and regulators, improvements in competency and training for technical staff, sustained support for engineering team resource management, and the development of incident reporting systems for infrastructure failures. This paper represents preliminary work, about which we seek comments and suggestions.

  15. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-04-04

    Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome-wide transcriptome analyses of different tissues. Gene expression measurements from these independent datasets, generated using samples from fresh frozen surgical specimens and postmortem tissues, are consistent. Overall, the different genome-wide analyses support a distribution in which many proteins are found in all tissues and relatively few in a tissue-restricted manner. Moreover, we discuss the applications of publicly available omics data for building genome-scale metabolic models, used for analyzing cell and tissue functions both in physiological and in disease contexts.

  16. Presidential Address: Social Change and Human Development--Experiences from German Unification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that human development is influenced by social change. In particular, as evidenced by research on German unification, the rapid change of social institutions can impact on various aspects of behaviour and development. Based on my own research experience in this field, I want to show the necessity for a better interdisciplinary…

  17. Environmentally responsive material to address human-system interaction in the automotive cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehkopf, Jackie D.; Barbat, Saeed D.; Goldman, Neil M.; Samus, Marsha A.; Gold, Harris

    2001-06-01

    There is significant human-system interaction in an automotive cockpit, and for particular components this interaction can be ever-present while being transient in nature. It is envisioned that environmentally responsive materials can be used in some components to accommodate personal and transient differences in the desired human-system interaction. Systems containing responsive gels have been developed to provide user activation and adjustment of the physical properties of a particular interior automotive component. Proprietary reverse viscosification gel formulations were developed that are thermally responsive. Formulations were modified to adjust the dynamic modulus and viscosity in terms of magnitude, amount of change over the viscosification transition, and the temperature over which the transition occurs. Changes in the physical properties of two orders of magnitude and more were achieved over a narrow transition region. Preliminary human factors assessment indicates that this order of magnitude of change is desirable. As the system of responsive gel, encapsulating material and activation mechanism is developed further, additional human factors studies will refine the desired physical properties and thermal activation mechanism. Ultimately, this system will have to perform over the broad range of temperatures imposed on interior automotive components and exhibit long-term durability chemically, physically and mechanically.

  18. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be found on the web, through local libraries, your health care provider, and the yellow pages under "social service organizations." AIDS - resources Alcoholism - resources Allergy - resources ...

  19. The Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed-based Approach: where social and natural sciences meet to address today's water resource challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    A growing number of governmental organizations at the local, state, and federal level collaborate with nongovernmental organizations and individuals to solve watershed scale problems (Imperial and Koontz, 2007). Such a shift in policy approach from hierarchical regulation to bottom-up collaboration is largely a result of regulator’s recognition of the interdependence of natural and socio-economic systems on a watershed scale (Steelman and Carmin, 2002. Agencies throughout the federal government increasingly favored new governing institutions that encourage cooperation between local actors with conflicting interests, divergent geographic bases, and overlapping administrative jurisdictions to resolve continuing disputes over resource management (Bardach 1998). This favoritism of collaborative over command-and-control approaches for managing nonpoint source pollution led to the development of watershed partnerships and the watershed-based approach (Lubell et al., 2002). This study aims to further collaborative governance scholarship and aid decision-makers in identifying the critical elements of collaborative governance resulting in environmental improvements. To date, this relationship has not been empirically determined, in spite of the fact that collaborative governance is used routinely by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in resolving issues related to watershed management and other applications. This gap in the research is largely due to the lack of longitudinal data. In order to determine whether changes have occurred, environmental data must be collected over relatively long time periods (Koontz and Thomas, 2006; Sabatier, et al., 2005). However, collecting these data is often cost prohibitive. Monitoring water quality is expensive and requires technical expertise, and is often the first line item cut in environmental management budgets. This research is interdisciplinary, looking at the physical, chemical, and biological parameters for 44 waterbodies

  20. Addressing the ethical issues raised by synthetic human entities with embryo-like features

    PubMed Central

    Aach, John; Lunshof, Jeantine; Iyer, Eswar; Church, George M

    2017-01-01

    The "14-day rule" for embryo research stipulates that experiments with intact human embryos must not allow them to develop beyond 14 days or the appearance of the primitive streak. However, recent experiments showing that suitably cultured human pluripotent stem cells can self-organize and recapitulate embryonic features have highlighted difficulties with the 14-day rule and led to calls for its reassessment. Here we argue that these and related experiments raise more foundational issues that cannot be fixed by adjusting the 14-day rule, because the framework underlying the rule cannot adequately describe the ways by which synthetic human entities with embryo-like features (SHEEFs) might develop morally concerning features through altered forms of development. We propose that limits on research with SHEEFs be based as directly as possible on the generation of such features, and recommend that the research and bioethics communities lead a wide-ranging inquiry aimed at mapping out solutions to the ethical problems raised by them. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20674.001

  1. Human Resources for Cancer Control in Uttar Pradesh, India: A Case Study for Low and Middle Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Daphtary, Maithili; Agrawal, Sushma; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2014-01-01

    For addressing the growing burden of cancer in low and middle income countries, an important first step is to estimate the human resources required for cancer control in a country, province, or city. However, few guidelines are available to decision makers in that regard. Here, we propose a methodology for estimating the human and other resources needed in the state of Uttar Pradesh (UP), India as a case study. Information about the population of UP and its cities was obtained from http://citypopulation.de/. The number of new cancer cases annually for the commonest cancers was estimated from GLOBOCAN 20081. For estimating the human resources needed, the following assumptions were made: newly diagnosed cancer patients need pathology for diagnosis and for treatment surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy. The percentage of patients requiring each of those modalities, their average lengths of stay as in-patients, and number of in-patient oncology beds were estimated. The resources already available in UP were determined by a telephone survey and by searching the websites of radiation therapy centers and medical colleges. Twenty-four radiation oncologists at 24 cancer centers in 10 cities responded to the survey. As detailed in this manuscript, an enormous shortage of human resources for cancer control exists in UP. Human resources are the key to diagnosing cancers early and treating them appropriately. Addressing the shortage will not be easy but we hope that the methodology described here can guide decision makers and form a framework for discussion among the various stakeholders. This methodology is readily adaptable to local practices and data. PMID:25237650

  2. Human Factors in Training - Space Flight Resource Management Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryne, Vicky; Connell, Erin; Barshi, Immanuel; Arsintescu, L.

    2009-01-01

    . Work on SFRM training has been conducted in collaboration with the Expedition Vehicle Division at the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) and with United Space Alliance (USA) which provides training to Flight Controllers. The space flight resource management training work is part of the Human Factors in Training Directed Research Project (DRP) of the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project under the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element of the Human Research Program (HRP). Human factors researchers at the Ames Research Center have been investigating team work and distributed decision making processes to develop a generic SFRM training framework for flight controllers. The work proposed for FY10 continues to build on this strong collaboration with MOD and the USA Training Group as well as previous research in relevant domains such as aviation. In FY10, the work focuses on documenting and analyzing problem solving strategies and decision making processes used in MCC by experienced FCers.

  3. Being Human: A Resource Guide in Human Growth and Development for the Developmentally Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogle, Peggy

    The resource guide is intended to help practitioners develop curricula in human growth and development for developmentally disabled students. A matrix guide is presented for evaluating clients in three domains (social identity, health and hygiene, and physiological identity). Behavioral indicators are then noted which relate to adaptive behaviors…

  4. Strategic Concepts for the Development of Chinese Education and Human Resources for the Next Fifty Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education and Society, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the strategic concepts for the development of Chinese education and human resources for the next 50 years. These concepts include: (a) Strategic Choice: Human Resources Are the Most Important Resource Development; (b) Strategic Targets: Realize the "Three Steps" of Education and the "Two Promotions" of…

  5. Theorizing Strategic Human Resource Development: Linking Financial Performance and Sustainable Competitive Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Po

    2007-01-01

    This paper is to explore potential new underlying theory of strategic human resource development based on critiques of current theoretical foundations of HRD. It offers a new definition and model of Strategic HRD based on resource-based view of firm and human resource, with linkage to financial performance and competitiveness. Proposed new model…

  6. A public-policy practicum to address current issues in human, animal, and ecosystem health.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, John A; Johnson, Yvette J; Troutt, H Fred; Prudhomme, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    There are recognized needs for cross-training health professionals in human, animal, and ecosystem health and for public health policy to be informed by experts from medical, science, and social science disciplines. Faculty members of the Community Health and Preventive Medicine Section at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have offered a public-policy course designed to meet those needs. The course was designed as a practicum to teach students the policy-making process through the development of policy proposals and to instruct students on how to effectively present accurate scientific, demographic, and statistical information to policy makers and to the public. All students substantially met the learning objectives of the course. This course represents another model that can be implemented to help students learn about complex, multifactorial issues that affect the health of humans, animals, and ecosystems, while promoting participation in public health policy development.

  7. Addressing Future Epidemics: Historical Human Rights Lessons from the AIDS Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ambar; Quinn, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Ebola epidemic in West Africa sparked many ethical and polarizing public health questions on how to adequately control transmission of the virus. These deliberations had and will continue to influence patients, healthcare workers, public perceptions of disease, and governmental responses. Such extensive and potential ramifications warranted an analysis of prior epidemics to sufficiently inform policy makers and prepare them and other authorities for future epidemics. We analyzed how the general public, medical institutions, federal government, and patients themselves responded during the early stages of the AIDS pandemic in two different countries and cultures, the United States and India. Discussion Our analysis identified four key findings pertaining to the human rights of patients and healthcare workers and to the crucial roles of the government and medical community. The first demands that authoritative officials acknowledge the presence of high-risk behaviors and properly educate the public without stigmatizing groups of individuals. For this task, the medical community and federal government must form and display to the public a respectful and collaborative partnership towards battling the epidemic. These two synergistic endeavors will then allow appropriate officials to implement effective, yet civil, interventions for limiting transmission. Finally, the same officials must ensure that their interventions maintain the human rights of high-risk populations and of healthcare workers. Conclusions Applying these findings to future epidemics of infectious diseases can aid policy makers in navigating complicated ethical and public health questions, and help prevent them from repeating past mistakes in handling epidemics. PMID:27284578

  8. Simulating Irrational Human Behavior to Prevent Resource Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Sircova, Anna; Karimi, Fariba; Osin, Evgeny N.; Lee, Sungmin; Holme, Petter; Strömbom, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In a situation with a limited common resource, cooperation between individuals sharing the resource is essential. However, people often act upon self-interest in irrational ways that threaten the long-term survival of the whole group. A lack of sustainable or environmentally responsible behavior is often observed. In this study, we examine how the maximization of benefits principle works in a wider social interactive context of personality preferences in order to gain a more realistic insight into the evolution of cooperation. We used time perspective (TP), a concept reflecting individual differences in orientation towards past, present, or future, and relevant for making sustainable choices. We developed a personality-driven agent-based model that explores the role of personality in the outcomes of social dilemmas and includes multiple facets of diversity: (1) The agents have different behavior strategies: individual differences derived by applying cluster analysis to survey data from 22 countries (N = 10,940) and resulting in 7 cross-cultural profiles of TP; (2) The non-uniform distribution of the types of agents across countries; (3) The diverse interactions between the agents; and (4) diverse responses to those interactions in a well-mixed population. As one of the results, we introduced an index of overall cooperation for each of the 22 countries, which was validated against cultural, economic, and sustainability indicators (HDI, dimensions of national culture, and Environment Performance Index). It was associated with higher human development, higher individualism, lower power distance, and better environmental performance. The findings illustrate how individual differences in TP can be simulated to predict the ways people in different countries solve the personal vs. common gain dilemma in the global limited-resource situation. This interdisciplinary approach to social simulation can be adopted to explain the possible causes of global environmental issues

  9. Simulating irrational human behavior to prevent resource depletion.

    PubMed

    Sircova, Anna; Karimi, Fariba; Osin, Evgeny N; Lee, Sungmin; Holme, Petter; Strömbom, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In a situation with a limited common resource, cooperation between individuals sharing the resource is essential. However, people often act upon self-interest in irrational ways that threaten the long-term survival of the whole group. A lack of sustainable or environmentally responsible behavior is often observed. In this study, we examine how the maximization of benefits principle works in a wider social interactive context of personality preferences in order to gain a more realistic insight into the evolution of cooperation. We used time perspective (TP), a concept reflecting individual differences in orientation towards past, present, or future, and relevant for making sustainable choices. We developed a personality-driven agent-based model that explores the role of personality in the outcomes of social dilemmas and includes multiple facets of diversity: (1) The agents have different behavior strategies: individual differences derived by applying cluster analysis to survey data from 22 countries (N = 10,940) and resulting in 7 cross-cultural profiles of TP; (2) The non-uniform distribution of the types of agents across countries; (3) The diverse interactions between the agents; and (4) diverse responses to those interactions in a well-mixed population. As one of the results, we introduced an index of overall cooperation for each of the 22 countries, which was validated against cultural, economic, and sustainability indicators (HDI, dimensions of national culture, and Environment Performance Index). It was associated with higher human development, higher individualism, lower power distance, and better environmental performance. The findings illustrate how individual differences in TP can be simulated to predict the ways people in different countries solve the personal vs. common gain dilemma in the global limited-resource situation. This interdisciplinary approach to social simulation can be adopted to explain the possible causes of global environmental issues

  10. The human resource crisis in neuro-ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Frohman, Larry P

    2008-09-01

    Neuro-ophthalmology is facing a serious human resource issue. Few are entering the subspecialty, which is perceived as being poorly compensated compared with other subspecialties of ophthalmology. The low compensation comes from the fact that 1) non-procedural encounters remain undervalued, 2) efforts that benefit other medical specialists are not counted, and 3) the relatively low expenses of neuro-ophthalmologists are not factored into compensation formulas. Mission-based budgeting, which forces academic departments to be financially accountable without the expectation of fiscal relief from medical schools or practice plans, has exacerbated the compensation issue. Solutions must come from within neuro-ophthalmology, academic departments, medical schools, and medical practice plans. They include 1) providing educational resources so that neuro-ophthalmologists need not spend so much time teaching the basics, 2) factoring into compensation the impact of neuro-ophthalmologists in teaching and on revenue generation by procedure-based specialists, 3) improving the efficiency of neuro-ophthalmologists in their consultative practices by providing ample clerical support and other measures, 4) providing contractual salary compensation by departments such as neurosurgery to recognize the contributions made by neuro-ophthalmologists, and 5) reorganizing the academic clinical effort as multidisciplinary rather than departmental.

  11. Sustainable Human Presence on the Moon using In Situ Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, Carol A.; Fikes, John C.; McCarley, Kevin S.; Darby, Charles A.; Curreri, Peter A.; Kennedy, James P.; Good, James E.; Gilley, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    New capabilities, technologies and infrastructure must be developed to enable a sustained human presence on the moon and beyond. The key to having this permanent presence is the utilization of in situ resources. To this end, NASA is investigating how in situ resources can be utilized to improve mission success by reducing up-mass, improving safety, reducing risk, and bringing down costs for the overall mission. To ensure that this capability is available when needed, technology development is required now. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is supporting this endeavor, along with other NASA centers, by exploring how lunar regolith can be mined for uses such as construction, life support, propulsion, power, and fabrication. Efforts at MSFC include development of lunar regolith simulant for hardware testing and development, extraction of oxygen and other materials from the lunar regolith, production of parts and tools on the moon from local materials or from provisioned feedstocks, and capabilities to show that produced parts are "ready for use". This paper discusses the lunar regolith, how the regolith is being replicated in the development of simulants and possible uses of the regolith.

  12. IGD: a resource for intronless genes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Louhichi, Amel; Fourati, Ahmed; Rebaï, Ahmed

    2011-11-15

    Intronless genes (IGs) fraction varies between 2.7 and 97.7% in eukaryotic genomes. Although many databases on exons and introns exist, there was no curated database for such genes which allowed their study in a concerted manner. Such a database would be useful to identify the functional features and the distribution of these genes across the genome. Here, a new database of IGs in eukaryotes based on GenBank data was described. This database, called IGD (Intronless Gene Database), is a collection of gene sequences that were annotated and curated. The current version of IGD contains 687 human intronless genes with their protein and CDS sequences. Some features of the entries are given in this paper. Data was extracted from GenBank release 183 using a Perl script. Data extraction was followed by a manual curation step. Intronless genes were then analyzed based on their RefSeq annotation and Gene Ontology functional class. IGD represents a useful resource for retrieval and in silico study of intronless genes. IGD is available at http://www.bioinfo-cbs.org/igd with comprehensive help and FAQ pages that illustrate the main uses of this resource.

  13. Sandhill crane roost selection, human disturbance, and forage resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Krapu, Gary; Brandt, David

    2017-01-01

    Sites used for roosting represent a key habitat requirement for many species of birds because availability and quality of roost sites can influence individual fitness. Birds select roost sites based on numerous factors, requirements, and motivations, and selection of roosts can be dynamic in time and space because of various ecological and environmental influences. For sandhill cranes (Antigone canadensis) at their main spring-staging area along the Platte River in south-central Nebraska, USA, past investigations of roosting cranes focused on physical channel characteristics related to perceived security as motivating roost distribution. We used 6,310 roost sites selected by 313 sandhill cranes over 5 spring migration seasons (2003–2007) to quantify resource selection functions of roost sites on the central Platte River using a discrete choice analysis. Sandhill cranes generally showed stronger selection for wider channels with shorter bank vegetation situated farther from potential human disturbance features such as roads, bridges, and dwellings. Furthermore, selection for roost sites with preferable physical characteristics (wide channels with short bank vegetation) was more resilient to nearby disturbance features than more narrow channels with taller bank vegetation. The amount of cornfields surrounding sandhill crane roost sites positively influenced relative probability of use but only for more narrow channels < 100 m and those with shorter bank vegetation. We confirmed key resource features that sandhill cranes selected at river channels along the Platte River, and after incorporating spatial variation due to human disturbance, our understanding of roost site selection was more robust, providing insights on how disturbance may interact with physical habitat features. Managers can use information on roost-site selection when developing plans to increase probability of crane use at existing roost sites and to identify new areas for potential use if

  14. View of human problems to be addressed for long-duration space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the principal physiological changes seen in space flight, and discussion of various countermeasures which may prove to be useful in combating these changes in long-term space flight. A number of transient changes seen in Apollo astronauts following space flights are discussed, including cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses to weightlessness, musculoskeletal changes, changes in fluid and electrolyte balance, microbiological changes, and vestibular effects. A number of countermeasures to the effects of space flight on man are cited, including exercise, medication, diet, lower-body negative pressure, gradient positive pressure, venous occlusion cuffs, and others. A detailed review is then made of a number of psychological factors bearing on the ability of the human organism to withstand the rigors of long space flights.

  15. Human exposure assessment resources on the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Schwela, Dieter; Hakkinen, Pertti J

    2004-05-20

    Human exposure assessment is frequently noted as a weak link and bottleneck in the risk assessment process. Fortunately, the World Wide Web and Internet are providing access to numerous valuable sources of human exposure assessment-related information, along with opportunities for information exchange. Internet mailing lists are available as potential online help for exposure assessment questions, e.g. RISKANAL has several hundred members from numerous countries. Various Web sites provide opportunities for training, e.g. Web sites offering general human exposure assessment training include two from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and four from the US National Library of Medicine. Numerous other Web sites offer access to a wide range of exposure assessment information. For example, the (US) Alliance for Chemical Awareness Web site addresses direct and indirect human exposures, occupational exposures and ecological exposure assessments. The US EPA's Exposure Factors Program Web site provides a focal point for current information and data on exposure factors relevant to the United States. In addition, the International Society of Exposure Analysis Web site provides information about how this society seeks to foster and advance the science of exposure analysis. A major opportunity exists for risk assessors and others to broaden the level of exposure assessment information available via Web sites. Broadening the Web's exposure information could include human exposure factors-related information about country- or region-specific ranges in body weights, drinking water consumption, etc. along with residential factors-related information on air changeovers per hour in various types of residences. Further, country- or region-specific ranges on how various tasks are performed by various types of consumers could be collected and provided. Noteworthy are that efforts are underway in Europe to develop a multi-country collection of exposure factors and the European

  16. 78 FR 8192 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project... study will assess the implementation of resources, models, and technologies to determine how and...

  17. Learning about the Human Genome. Part 2: Resources for Science Educators. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haury, David L.

    This ERIC Digest identifies how the human genome project fits into the "National Science Education Standards" and lists Human Genome Project Web sites found on the World Wide Web. It is a resource companion to "Learning about the Human Genome. Part 1: Challenge to Science Educators" (Haury 2001). The Web resources and…

  18. 78 FR 43258 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records, State-31

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records, State-31 SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Department of State proposes to amend an existing system of records, Human Resources Records, State- 31... filed with the Office of Management and Budget. The amended system description, ``Human...

  19. 75 FR 34146 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues and Cells From Donors With an Epidemiology Profile (NCI) SUMMARY... Collection: Title: Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues and Cells From Donors With...

  20. Ecological Momentary Assessment in Behavioral Research: Addressing Technological and Human Participant Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Saul; Music, Edvin; Styn, Mindi A; Kriska, Andrea; Smailagic, Asim; Siewiorek, Daniel; Ewing, Linda J; Chasens, Eileen; French, Brian; Mancino, Juliet; Mendez, Dara; Strollo, Patrick; Rathbun, Stephen L

    2017-01-01

    the 12-month study interval, adherence to completing EMA surveys was high, with 88.3% (66,978/75,888) completion of random assessments and around 90% (23,411/25,929 and 23,343/26,010) completion of time-contingent assessments, despite the duration of EMA data collection and challenges with implementation. Conclusions This work informed us of the necessary preliminary steps to plan and prepare a longitudinal study using smartphone technology and the critical elements to ensure participant engagement in the potentially burdensome protocol, which spanned 12 months. While this was a technology-supported and -programmed study, it required close oversight to ensure all elements were functioning correctly, particularly once human participants became involved. PMID:28298264

  1. Human resources for control of tuberculosis and HIV-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Zachariah, R; Bergström, K; Blanc, L; Salaniponi, F M; Elzinga, G

    2005-02-01

    The global targets for tuberculosis (TB) control were postponed from 2000 to 2005, but on current evidence a further postponement may be necessary. Of the constraints preventing these targets being met, the primary one appears to be the lack of adequately trained and qualified staff. This paper outlines: 1) the human resources and skills for global TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) TB control, including the human resources for implementing the DOTS strategy, the additional human resources for implementing joint HIV-TB control strategies and what is known about human resource gaps at global level; 2) the attempts to quantify human resource gaps by focusing on a small country in sub-Saharan Africa, Malawi; and 3) the main constraints to human resources and their possible solutions, under six main headings: human resource planning; production of human resources; distribution of the work-force; motivation and staff retention; quality of existing staff; and the effect of HIV/AIDS. We recommend an urgent shift in thinking about the human resource paradigm, and exhort international policy makers and the donor community to make a concerted effort to bridge the current gaps by investing for real change.

  2. Unaccompanied Children at the United States Border, a Human Rights Crisis that can be Addressed with Policy Change.

    PubMed

    Ataiants, Janna; Cohen, Chari; Riley, Amy Henderson; Tellez Lieberman, Jamile; Reidy, Mary Clare; Chilton, Mariana

    2017-04-08

    In recent years, unaccompanied minors have been journeying to the United States (U.S.)-Mexico border in great numbers in order to escape violence, poverty and exploitation in their home countries. Yet, unaccompanied children attempting to cross the United States border face treatment at the hands of government representatives which violates their inherent rights as children. The result is a human rights crisis that has severe health consequences for the children. Their rights as children are clearly delineated in various, international human rights documents which merit increased understanding of and recognition by the U.S. government. This paper calls for the improvement of policies and procedures for addressing the rights of unaccompanied immigrant children; it provides specific, rights-based recommendations which work together to safeguard the rights of the child at the U.S. southwestern border.

  3. Africa's neglected area of human resources for health research - the way forward.

    PubMed

    Ijsselmuiden, C; Marais, D L; Becerra-Posada, F; Ghannem, H

    2012-03-07

    Building the skills for doing, managing and delivering health research is essential for every country's development. Yet, human resources for health research (HRHR) are seldom considered in Africa and elsewhere. Africa's health research capacity has grown considerably, with potential to increase this growth. However, a systemic way of defining, co-ordinating and growing the HRHR needed to support health systems development is missing. Reviewing the status of HRHR in Africa, we assert that it consists of uncoordinated, small-scale activities, primarily driven from outside Africa. We present examples of ongoing HRHR capacity building initiatives in Africa. There is no overarching framework, strategy or body for African countries to optimise research support and capacity in HRHR. A simple model is presented to help countries plan and strategise for a comprehensive approach to research capacity strengthening. Everyone engaged with global, regional and national research for health enterprises must proactively address human resource planning for health research in Africa. Unless this is made explicit in global and national agendas, Africa will remain only an interested spectator in the decisions, prioritisation, funding allocations, conduct and interpretation, and in the institutional, economic and social benefits of health research, rather than owning and driving its own health research agendas.

  4. Multi-Criteria Decision-Making Methods and Their Applications for Human Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, M. G.; Masi, D.

    2015-05-01

    Both within the formation field and the labor market Multi-Criteria Decision Methods (MCDM) provide a significant support to the management of human resources in which the best choice among several alternatives can be very complex. This contribution addresses fuzzy logic in multi-criteria decision techniques since they have several applications in the management of human resources with the advantage of ruling out mistakes due to the subjectivity of the person in charge of making a choice. Evaluating educational achievements as well as the professional profile of a technician more suitable for a job in a firm, industry or a professional office are valuable examples of fuzzy logic. For all of the previous issues subjectivity is a fundamental aspect so that fuzzy logic, due to the very meaning of the word fuzzy, should be the preferred choice. However, this is not sufficient to justify its use; fuzzy technique has to make the system of evaluation and choice more effective and objective. The methodological structure of the multi-criteria fuzzy criterion is hierarchic and allows one to select the best alternatives in all those cases in which several alternatives are possible; thus, the optimal choice can be achieved by analyzing the different scopes of each criterion and sub-criterion as well as the relevant weights.

  5. Have health human resources become more equal between rural and urban areas after the new reform?

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Dong, Hengjin

    2014-12-01

    The lack of health human resources is a global issue. China also faces the same issue, in addition to the equity of human resources allocation. With the launch of new healthcare reform of China in 2009, have the issues been improved? Relevant data from China Health Statistical Yearbook and a qualitative study show that the unequal allocation of health human resources is getting worse than before.

  6. Have health human resources become more equal between rural and urban areas after the new reform?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Dong, Hengjin

    2014-01-01

    The lack of health human resources is a global issue. China also faces the same issue, in addition to the equity of human resources allocation. With the launch of new healthcare reform of China in 2009, have the issues been improved? Relevant data from China Health Statistical Yearbook and a qualitative study show that the unequal allocation of health human resources is getting worse than before. PMID:25489591

  7. 76 FR 20376 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ..., technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and human resources programming. Agenda May 4, 2011... Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Discussion of future STEM program...

  8. Human tyrosinase produced in insect cells: a landmark for the screening of new drugs addressing its activity.

    PubMed

    Fogal, Stefano; Carotti, Marcello; Giaretta, Laura; Lanciai, Federico; Nogara, Leonardo; Bubacco, Luigi; Bergantino, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Human tyrosinase is the first enzyme of the multistep process of melanogenesis. It catalyzes the hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-dihydroxyphenylalanine and the following oxidation of o-diphenol to the corresponding quinone, L-dopaquinone. In spite of its biomedical relevance, its reactivity is far from being fully understood, mostly because of the lack of a suitable expression system. Indeed, until now, studies on substrates and inhibitors of tyrosinases have been performed in vitro almost exclusively using mushroom or bacterial enzymes. We report on the production of a recombinant human tyrosinase in insect cells (Sf9 line). Engineering the protein, improving cell culture conditions, and setting a suitable purification protocol optimized product yield. The obtained active enzyme was truthfully characterized with a number of substrate and inhibitor molecules. These results were compared to those gained from a parallel analysis of the bacterial (Streptomyces antibioticus) enzyme and those acquired from the literature for mushroom tyrosinase, showing that the reactivity of the human enzyme appears unique and pointing out the great bias introduced when using non-human tyrosinases to measure the inhibitory efficacy of new molecules. The described enzyme is therefore an indispensable paradigm in testing pharmaceutical or cosmetic agents addressing tyrosinase activity.

  9. Spatial patterns of schistosomiasis in Burkina Faso: relevance of human mobility and water resources development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Saez, Javier; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Frohelich, Jean-Marc; Mande, Theophile; Ceperley, Natalie; Sou, Mariam; Yacouba, Hamma; Maiga, Hamadou; Sokolow, Susanne; De Leo, Giulio; Casagrandi, Renato; Gatto, Marino; Mari, Lorenzo; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    We study the spatial geography of schistosomiasis in the african context of Burkina Faso by means of a spatially explicit model of disease dynamics and spread. The relevance of our work lies in its ability to describe quantitatively a geographic stratification of the disease burden capable of reproducing important spatial differences, and drivers/controls of disease spread. Among the latters, we consider specifically the development and management of water resources which have been singled out empirically as an important risk factor for schistosomiasis. The model includes remotely acquired and objectively manipulated information on the distributions of population, infrastructure, elevation and climatic drivers. It also includes a general description of human mobility and addresses a first-order characterization of the ecology of the intermediate host of the parasite causing the disease based on maximum entropy learning of relevant environmenal covariates. Spatial patterns of the disease were analyzed about their disease-free equilibrium by proper extraction and mapping of suitable eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix subsuming all stability properties of the system. Human mobility was found to be a primary control of both pathogen invasion success and of the overall distribution of disease burden. The effects of water resources development were studied by accounting for the (prior and posterior) average distances of human settlements from water bodies that may serve as suitable habitats to the intermediate host of the parasite. Water developments, in combination with human mobility, were quantitatively related to disease spread into regions previously nearly disease-free and to large-scale empirical incidence patterns. We concluded that while the model still needs refinements based on field and epidemiological evidence, the framework proposed provides a powerful tool for large-scale, long-term public health planning and management of schistosomiasis.

  10. An approach to estimating human resource requirements to achieve the Millennium Development Goals.

    PubMed

    Dreesch, Norbert; Dolea, Carmen; Dal Poz, Mario R; Goubarev, Alexandre; Adams, Orvill; Aregawi, Maru; Bergstrom, Karin; Fogstad, Helga; Sheratt, Della; Linkins, Jennifer; Scherpbier, Robert; Youssef-Fox, Mayada

    2005-09-01

    In the context of the Millennium Development Goals, human resources represent the most critical constraint in achieving the targets. Therefore, it is important for health planners and decision-makers to identify what are the human resources required to meet those targets. Planning the human resources for health is a complex process. It needs to consider both the technical aspects related to estimating the number, skills and distribution of health personnel for meeting population health needs, and the political implications, values and choices that health policy- and decision-makers need to make within given resources limitations. After presenting an overview of the various methods for planning human resources for health, with their advantages and limitations, this paper proposes a methodological approach to estimating the requirements of human resources to achieve the goals set forth by the Millennium Declaration. The method builds on the service-target approach and functional job analysis.

  11. Mapping the governance of human resources for health in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Santric Milicevic, Milena; Vasic, Milena; Edwards, Matt

    2015-12-01

    This article maps the current governance of human resources for health (HRH) in relation to universal health coverage in Serbia since the health sector reforms in 2003. The study adapts the Global Health Workforce Alliance/World Health Organization four-dimensional framework of HRH in the context of governance for universal health coverage. A set of proxies was established for the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of HRH. Analysis of official HRH documentation from relevant institutions and reports were used to construct a governance profile of HRH for Serbia from the introduction of the reform in 2003 up to 2013. The results show that all Serbian districts (except Sremski) surpass the availability threshold of 59.4 skilled midwives, nurses and physicians per 10,000 inhabitants. District accessibility of health workforce greatly differed from the national average with variances from +26% to -34%. Analysis of national averages and patient load of general practitioners showed variances among districts by ± 21%, whilst hospital discharges per 100 inhabitants deviated between +52% and -45%. Pre-service and in-service education of health workforce is regulated and accredited. However, through its efforts to respond to population health needs Serbia lacks a single coordinating entity to take overall responsibility for effective and coordinated HRH planning, management and development within the broader landscape of health strategy development.

  12. Using the World Health Organization's 4S-Framework to Strengthen National Strategies, Policies and Services to Address Mental Health Problems in Adolescents in Resource-Constrained Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most adolescents live in resource-constrained countries and their mental health has been less well recognised than other aspects of their health. The World Health Organization's 4-S Framework provides a structure for national initiatives to improve adolescent health through: gathering and using strategic information; developing evidence-informed policies; scaling up provision and use of health services; and strengthening linkages with other government sectors. The aim of this paper is to discuss how the findings of a recent systematic review of mental health problems in adolescents in resource-constrained settings might be applied using the 4-S Framework. Method Analysis of the implications of the findings of a systematic search of the English-language literature for national strategies, policies, services and cross-sectoral linkages to improve the mental health of adolescents in resource-constrained settings. Results Data are available for only 33/112 [29%] resource-constrained countries, but in all where data are available, non-psychotic mental health problems in adolescents are identifiable, prevalent and associated with reduced quality of life, impaired participation and compromised development. In the absence of evidence about effective interventions in these settings expert opinion is that a broad public policy response which addresses direct strategies for prevention, early intervention and treatment; health service and health workforce requirements; social inclusion of marginalised groups of adolescents; and specific education is required. Specific endorsed strategies include public education, parent education, training for teachers and primary healthcare workers, psycho-educational curricula, identification through periodic screening of the most vulnerable and referral for care, and the availability of counsellors or other identified trained staff members in schools from whom adolescents can seek assistance for personal, peer and family

  13. Presidential address.

    PubMed

    Vohra, U

    1993-07-01

    The Secretary of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare serves as Chair of the Executive Council of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay. She addressed its 35th convocation in 1993. Global population stands at 5.43 billion and increases by about 90 million people each year. 84 million of these new people are born in developing countries. India contributes 17 million new people annually. The annual population growth rate in India is about 2%. Its population size will probably surpass 1 billion by the 2000. High population growth rates are a leading obstacle to socioeconomic development in developing countries. Governments of many developing countries recognize this problem and have expanded their family planning programs to stabilize population growth. Asian countries that have done so and have completed the fertility transition include China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Burma, Malaysia, North Korea, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam have not yet completed the transition. Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Nepal, and Pakistan are half-way through the transition. High population growth rates put pressure on land by fragmenting finite land resources, increasing the number of landless laborers and unemployment, and by causing considerable rural-urban migration. All these factors bring about social stress and burden civic services. India has reduced its total fertility rate from 5.2 to 3.9 between 1971 and 1991. Some Indian states have already achieved replacement fertility. Considerable disparity in socioeconomic development exists among states and districts. For example, the states of Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh have female literacy rates lower than 27%, while that for Kerala is 87%. Overall, infant mortality has fallen from 110 to 80 between 1981 and 1990. In Uttar Pradesh, it has fallen from 150 to 98, while it is at 17 in Kerala. India needs innovative approaches to increase contraceptive prevalence rates

  14. Human Needs and Nature's Balance: Population, Resources, and the Environment. A Population Learning Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, Kimberly A.

    One of the challenges that face humanity is how to manage resource and environmental endowments in a way that will guarantee continued survival and ensure the well-being of future generations. Those resources most important to human survival are food, water, and energy. When the population of the world reached 5 billion in 1987, approximately 87…

  15. Quality Service in the International Hotel Sector: A Catalyst for Strategic Human Resource Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Gill; Watson, Sandra; Quail, Samantha

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the nature of, and relationship between, a quality service initiative and the concept of strategic human resource development. Hilton International is the case study used for this analysis. The principal finding is that the quality initiative is acting as a catalyst for a strategic approach to human resource development to…

  16. Forecasting Performance in Organizations: An Application of Current-Value Human Resources Accounting. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecorella, Patricia A.; And Others

    A methodology to describe current-value human resources accounting (HRA) was developed to aid management in decision making and provide information about the effects of organizational policies and practices on the value of the organizations' human resources. A two-phase activity was designed to investigate the nature of the relationship between…

  17. The University Council for Workforce and Human Resource Education: Its History, Purpose, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott D.; Martinez, Reynaldo L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This article features the University Council for Workforce and Human Resource Education, a nonprofit organization representing leading United States universities that offer graduate programs in career and technical education (CTE) and human resource development (HRD). The mission of the Council is to be a recognized force in shaping the future of…

  18. The Contributions of Human Resource Development Research across Disciplines: A Citation and Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeung, Chang-Wook; Yoon, Hea Jun; Park, Sunyoung; Jo, Sung Jun

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of the current study is to identify how human resource development (HRD) research has contributed to the knowledge base across social science disciplines during the past two decades. We identified the top 20 Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) journal articles that have been most frequently cited in research articles…

  19. Comparative Analysis of OECD Member Countries' Competitive Advantage in National Human Resource Development System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hunseok; Choi, Yeseul; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, evaluate, and compare the competitive advantages of the human resource development systems of advanced countries. The Global Human Resource Development Index was utilized for this study, since it has been validated through an expert panel's content review and analytic hierarchy process. Using a sample of 34…

  20. Human Resource Development Issues in the Implementation of the Western China Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Mingzheng

    2007-01-01

    This paper systematically illustrates the value and role of human resource development in the implementation of the Western China development strategy. It analyzes in details some current human resource issues constraining the implementation of the Western China development strategy and those on the sustainable development process of economic…

  1. Human Resource Management in Australian Registered Training Organisations: Literature Review and Discussion Starter. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This project seeks to establish the current state of human resource management practice in RTOs in Australia. The project takes a strategic approach, particularly in the case study phase where the research will attempt to examine the links between human resource management and the strategy of the organisation. The results of the project will…

  2. Human Resource Management: Managerial Efficacy in Recruiting and Retaining Teachers-- National Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Jennifer; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    Human Resource Management is a branch of an organization which recruits and develops personnel to promote the organization's objectives. Human Resource Management involves interviewing applicants, training staff, and employee retention. Compensation, benefits, employee/labor relations, health, safety, and security issues are a few of the aspects…

  3. Involvement of Higher Education in Building Human Resources Character in the Era of Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishomuddin

    2015-01-01

    In general, the objectives of this study were to explain the role played by universities in improving its human resources are office holders, lecturers, and students, explain the program what is being done related to the improvement of human resources, and explains the non-academic program to support the implementation of a program that has been…

  4. People Strategy in Human Resources: Lessons for Mentoring in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Vicki L.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I offer the notion of alignment, a human resources framework, as a conceptual tool for better informing the development of mentoring programming and policy in higher education. Alignment accounts for both individual and organizational factors as means for providing the necessary connections among human resources and organizational…

  5. Boundary Conditions of the High-Investment Human Resource Systems-Small-Firm Labor Productivity Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Clint; Way, Sean A.; Kerr, Gerry; Thacker, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Although a few published, multiindustry, firm-level, empirical studies have linked systems of high-investment or high-performance human resource management practices to enhanced small-firm performance, this stream of strategic human resource management research is underdeveloped and equivocal. Accordingly, in this study, we use a sample of…

  6. A Beginner's Guide to Integrating Human Resources Faculty Data and Cost Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter serves as a beginner's guide to some essentials of human resource faculty data and cost data and their integration into products to facilitate institutional decision making. It begins with a brief overview of general higher education cost data concepts, followed by a similar synopsis of relevant higher education human resource data.…

  7. Collaboration between Supported Employment and Human Resource Services: Strategies for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Michal; Campbell, Camille; Heinz, Tom; Kotsonas, Lori; Montgomery, Joyce; Storey, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the benefits of successful collaboration between supported employment agencies and human resource managers when working together to secure employment for individuals with disabilities. Two case studies are presented: one involving a successful collaboration with county human resource managers in negotiating a change in the…

  8. A Development Dilemma for Secondary Vocational Education: Instrumentalist Tendencies in Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Human resource development is one of the theories guiding China's development of secondary vocational education. Secondary vocational education has always played a role in human resource training and development from the nation's founding to the present. In Chinese society today, however, there is a clear instrumentalist tendency in secondary…

  9. Adoption of Internet2 in a Southwestern University: Human Resources Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza-Diaz, Noemi V.; Dooley, Larry M.; Dooley, Kim E.

    2007-01-01

    Human Resources are often times challenged by the integration of new technologies (Benson, Johnson, & Kichinke, 2002). Universities pose a unique challenge since they reluctantly adapt to changes (Torraco & Hoover, 2005; Watkins 2005). This is a dissertation study of the human resource concerns about adopting Internet2 in a…

  10. Managing Human Resource Capabilities for Sustainable Competitive Advantage: An Empirical Analysis from Indian Global Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khandekar, Aradhana; Sharma, Anuradha

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to examine the role of human resource capability (HRC) in organisational performance and sustainable competitive advantage (SCA) in Indian global organisations. Design/Methodology/Approach: To carry out the present study, an empirical research on a random sample of 300 line or human resource managers from…

  11. Human Resources Management in Educational Faculties of State Universities in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öztürk, Sevim

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the human resources management in the faculties of education of state universities in Turkey within the context of Human Resources Management Principles. The study population consisted of 40 academic members in the faculties of education of 20 different state universities and 10 academic unit administrators at different…

  12. 78 FR 64254 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Cancellation of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Cancellation of Meeting SUMMARY: As a result of the... cancel the November 6-7, 2013 Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources meeting. The...

  13. 78 FR 78401 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources ( 1119). Date/Time: January 7... attend the meeting in person, all visitors should contact the Directorate for Education and...

  14. Human Resource Management in Hong Kong Preschools: The Impact of Falling Rolls on Staffing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Choi-Wa Dora

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact of falling rolls on human resource management in local preschools in Hong Kong. It aims to argue that the developing role of leadership in creating a culture and procedures for collective participation in staff appraisal is important for human resource management in preschool settings.…

  15. From Bunker to Building: Results from the 2010 Chief Human Resource Officer Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Patrick M.; Stewart, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the researchers, with funding from the Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies (CAHRS), began conducting the annual Chief Human Resource Officers (CHRO) Survey. The 2009 survey was sent to CHROs at the U.S. Fortune 150 companies, as well as to ten other CHROs at CAHRS partner companies. That survey focused on understanding how CHROs…

  16. Human Resource Accounting: Interests and Conflicts. A Discussion Paper. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Jens V.; Westphalen, Sven-Age

    This document examines the principles, use, and benefits of human resource accounting (HRA), which uses numerical and nonnumerical data on items such as costs and benefits of training, staff turnover, absenteeism, and the value of employees' knowledge to measure the value of human resources in enterprises. The introduction presents an overview of…

  17. SEARCHBreast: a new resource to locate and share surplus archival material from breast cancer animal models to help address the 3Rs.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Karen; Carter, Phil; Morrissey, Bethny; Chelala, Claude; Jones, Louise; Holen, Ingunn; Speirs, Valerie

    2016-04-01

    Animal models have contributed to our understanding of breast cancer, with publication of results in high-impact journals almost invariably requiring extensive in vivo experimentation. As such, many laboratories hold large collections of surplus animal material, with only a fraction being used in publications relating to the original projects. Despite being developed at considerable cost, this material is an invisible and hence an underutilised resource, which often ends up being discarded. Within the breast cancer research community there is both a need and desire to make this valuable material available for researchers. Lack of a coordinated system for visualisation and localisation of this has prevented progress. To fulfil this unmet need, we have developed a novel initiative called Sharing Experimental Animal Resources: Coordinating Holdings-Breast (SEARCHBreast) which facilitates sharing of archival tissue between researchers on a collaborative basis and, de facto will reduce overall usage of animal models in breast cancer research. A secure searchable database has been developed where researchers can find, share, or upload materials related to animal models of breast cancer, including genetic and transplant models. SEARCHBreast is a virtual compendium where the physical material remains with the original laboratory. A bioanalysis pipeline is being developed for the analysis of transcriptomics data associated with mouse models, allowing comparative study with human and cell line data. Additionally, SEARCHBreast is committed to promoting the use of humanised breast tissue models as replacement alternatives to animals. Access to this unique resource is freely available to all academic researchers following registration at https://searchbreast.org.

  18. Project scheduling: A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that optimizes the effectiveness of human resources and the project makespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannibelli, Virginia; Amandi, Analía

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the project scheduling problem is addressed in order to assist project managers at the early stage of scheduling. Thus, as part of the problem, two priority optimization objectives for managers at that stage are considered. One of these objectives is to assign the most effective set of human resources to each project activity. The effectiveness of a human resource is considered to depend on its work context. The other objective is to minimize the project makespan. To solve the problem, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm is proposed. This algorithm designs feasible schedules for a given project and evaluates the designed schedules in relation to each objective. The algorithm generates an approximation to the Pareto set as a solution to the problem. The computational experiments carried out on nine different instance sets are reported.

  19. Role of educational institutions in identifying and responding to emerging health human resources needs.

    PubMed

    Tzountzouris, John-Paul; Gilbert, John H V

    2009-01-01

    The healthcare system continues to evolve, requiring innovation to promote patient-centred, fiscally responsible healthcare delivery. This evolution includes changes to the skills and competencies required of the health human resources (HHR), both regulated and unregulated, who are central supports to healthcare delivery. This has become a priority agenda item at the international, national, provincial, regional and local levels. This paper describes the system factors that drive the emergence of HHR skill and competency needs, and explores the roles of various institutions in the identification of and response to HHR needs. Educational institutions play an important role in responding to emerging HHR needs. Their actual response to HHR skill and competency needs will ultimately depend on the risk posed to the organizations of either addressing, or not addressing, these needs. These decisions are complex and are balanced against strategic, operational and educational risks, benefits and realities within each given educational institution. Educational institutions - through their linkages with the workplace, industry, professional organizations and government - have a unique view and understanding of many facets of the complexity of HHR planning. This paper proposes that educational institutions play a pivotal role as levers in a more coordinated response to emerging HHR needs and, as such, should be intimately involved in comprehensive HHR planning.

  20. Strengthening human resources for health through multisectoral approaches and leadership: the case of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Kingue, S; Rosskam, E; Bela, AC; Adjidja, A

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Problem Cameroon has a severe shortage of human resources for health (HRH) and those that are available are concentrated in urban areas. Approach As the result of a national emergency plan for the years 2006–2008, innovative strategies and a multisectoral partnership – led by the Ministry of Public Health and supported by diverse national and international organizations – were developed to address the shortages and maldistribution of HRH in Cameroon. Local setting At the time that the emergency plan was developed, Cameroon had health services of poor quality, an imbalance between HRH training and employment, a maldistribution of HRH between urban and rural areas and a poor allocation of financial resources for HRH. It also lacked an accreditation system for use in the training of health workers. Relevant changes Between 2007 and 2009, the number of active health workers in Cameroon increased by 36%, several new institutions for higher education in health care and training schools for paramedical staff and midwives were opened, and a national strategy for universal health coverage was developed. Lessons learnt In the improvement of HRH, strong leadership is needed to ensure effective coordination and communication between the many different stakeholders. A national process of coordination and facilitation can produce a consensus-based view of the main HRH challenges. Once these challenges have been identified, the stakeholders can plan appropriate interventions that are coordinated, evidence-based and coherent. PMID:24347711

  1. High Density Individually Addressable Nanowire Arrays Record Intracellular Activity from Primary Rodent and Human Stem Cell Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren; Chen, Renjie; Elthakeb, Ahmed T; Lee, Sang Heon; Hinckley, Sandy; Khraiche, Massoud L; Scott, John; Pre, Deborah; Hwang, Yoontae; Tanaka, Atsunori; Ro, Yun Goo; Matsushita, Albert K; Dai, Xing; Soci, Cesare; Biesmans, Steven; James, Anthony; Nogan, John; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Pete, Douglas V; Webb, Denise B; Zou, Yimin; Bang, Anne G; Dayeh, Shadi A

    2017-04-10

    We report a new hybrid integration scheme that offers for the first time a nanowire-on-lead approach, which enables independent electrical addressability, is scalable, and has superior spatial resolution in vertical nanowire arrays. The fabrication of these nanowire arrays is demonstrated to be scalable down to submicrometer site-to-site spacing and can be combined with standard integrated circuit fabrication technologies. We utilize these arrays to perform electrophysiological recordings from mouse and rat primary neurons and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons, which revealed high signal-to-noise ratios and sensitivity to subthreshold postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). We measured electrical activity from rodent neurons from 8 days in vitro (DIV) to 14 DIV and from hiPSC-derived neurons at 6 weeks in vitro post culture with signal amplitudes up to 99 mV. Overall, our platform paves the way for longitudinal electrophysiological experiments on synaptic activity in human iPSC based disease models of neuronal networks, critical for understanding the mechanisms of neurological diseases and for developing drugs to treat them.

  2. International Human Rights on the Internet. Internet Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of websites that focus on international human rights. Explains that human rights can be incorporated into curricula whether the focus is on human geography or contemporary global issues. Indicates that the Northern Light search engine produced over 700,000 hits for human rights websites. (CMK)

  3. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  4. Assessment of human resources management practices in Lebanese hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sound human resources (HR) management practices are essential for retaining effective professionals in hospitals. Given the recruitment and retention reality of health workers in the twenty-first century, the role of HR managers in hospitals and those who combine the role of HR managers with other responsibilities should not be underestimated. The objective of this study is to assess the perception of HR managers about the challenges they face and the current strategies being adopted. The study also aims at assessing enabling factors including role, education, experience and HR training. Methods A cross-sectional survey design of HR managers (and those who combine their role as HR manager with other duties) in Lebanese hospitals was utilized. The survey included a combination of open- and close-ended questions. Questions included educational background, work experience, and demographics, in addition to questions about perceived challenges and key strategies being used. Quantitative data analysis included uni-variate analysis, whereas thematic analysis was used for open-ended questions. Results A total of 96 respondents from 61 hospitals responded. Respondents had varying levels of expertise in the realm of HR management. Thematic analysis revealed that challenges varied across respondents and participating hospitals. The most frequently reported challenge was poor employee retention (56.7%), lack of qualified personnel (35.1%), and lack of a system for performance evaluation (28.9%). Some of the strategies used to mitigate the above challenges included offering continuing education and training for employees (19.6%), improving salaries (14.4%), and developing retention strategies (10.3%). Mismatch between reported challenges and strategies were observed. Conclusion To enable hospitals to deliver good quality, safe healthcare, improving HR management is critical. There is a need for a cadre of competent HR managers who can fully assume these

  5. Meshing human resources planning with strategic business planning: a model approach.

    PubMed

    Baird, L; Meshoulam, I; DeGive, G

    1983-01-01

    Many people are touting the need to take a strategic approach to human resources management--but this is more easily said than done, point out authors Lloyd Baird, associate professor of management at the School of Management and the Human Resources Policy Institute at Boston University; Ilan Meshoulam, personnel executive at Digital Equipment Corporation; and Ghislaine DeGive, Boston University. Obviously, people cannot be moved around as easily or as speedily as can other resources to help move a company to a strategically identified future position. Thus a great deal of planning is required. The authors present an integrative human resources strategic planning model that focuses on four elements: the environment, the organization's culture, the corporate mission statement, and overall corporate strategy. Each part of the model is thoroughly discussed, and checklist questions are included to help the individual manager develop and implement human resources management plans for his or her own organization.

  6. Human Adaptive Behavior in Common Pool Resource Systems

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Gunnar; Merico, Agostino; Vollan, Björn; Schlüter, Achim

    2012-01-01

    Overexploitation of common-pool resources, resulting from uncooperative harvest behavior, is a major problem in many social-ecological systems. Feedbacks between user behavior and resource productivity induce non-linear dynamics in the harvest and the resource stock that complicate the understanding and the prediction of the co-evolutionary system. With an adaptive model constrained by data from a behavioral economic experiment, we show that users’ expectations of future pay-offs vary as a result of the previous harvest experience, the time-horizon, and the ability to communicate. In our model, harvest behavior is a trait that adjusts to continuously changing potential returns according to a trade-off between the users’ current harvest and the discounted future productivity of the resource. Given a maximum discount factor, which quantifies the users’ perception of future pay-offs, the temporal dynamics of harvest behavior and ecological resource can be predicted. Our results reveal a non-linear relation between the previous harvest and current discount rates, which is most sensitive around a reference harvest level. While higher than expected returns resulting from cooperative harvesting in the past increase the importance of future resource productivity and foster sustainability, harvests below the reference level lead to a downward spiral of increasing overexploitation and disappointing returns. PMID:23285180

  7. The Platte River - High Plains Aquifer (PR-HPA) Long Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) Network - Data and Technological Resources to Address Current and Emerging Issues in Agroecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okalebo, J. A.; Wienhold, B.; Suyker, A.; Erickson, G.; Hayes, M. J.; Awada, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Platte River - High Plains Aquifer (PR-HPA) is one of 18 established Long Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) networks across the US. PR-HPA is a partnership between the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), the USDA-ARS Agroecosystem Management Research Unit (AMRU) in Lincoln, and the USDA-ARS Environmental Management Research Unit (EMRU) in Clay Center, NE. The PR-HPA network encompasses 27,750 ha of research sites with data going back to the early 1900s. A partial list of on-going research projects include those encompassing long-term manuring and continuous corn (Est. 1912), dryland tillage plots (Est. 1970), soil nutrients and tillage (Est. 1983), biofuel feedstock studies (Est. 2001), and carbon sequestration study (Est. 2000). Affiliated partners include the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) that develops measures to improve preparedness and adaptation to climate variability and drought; the High Plains Regional Climate Center (HPRCC) that coordinates data acquisition from over 170 automated weather stations and around 50 automated soil moisture network across NE and beyond; the AMERIFLUX and NEBFLUX networks that coordinate the water vapor and carbon dioxide flux measurements across NE with emphasis on rainfed and irrigated crop lands; the ARS Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement network (GRACEnet) and the Resilient Economic Agricultural Practices (REAP) project; and the Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies (CALMIT) that assists with the use of geospatial technologies for agriculture and natural resource applications. Current emphases are on addressing present-day and emerging issues related to profitability and sustainability of agroecosystems. The poster will highlight some of the ongoing and planned efforts in research pertaining to climate variability and change, water sustainability, and ecological and agronomic challenges associated

  8. Radiotherapy infrastructure and human resources in Europe - present status and its implications for 2020.

    PubMed

    Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Samiei, Massoud; Bodis, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is required for nearly half of the newly diagnosed cancer patients. To optimise the quality and availability of RT, guidelines have been proposed by European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology-QUAntification of Radiation Therapy Infrastructure And Staffing Needs (ESTRO-QUARTS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study evaluates the present status of RT capacity in Europe and the projected needs by 2020 as per these recommendations. Thirty-nine of the 53 countries, listed in Europe by the UN Statistical Division, whose cancer incidences, teletherapy and human resources were available in the Global Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence (GLOBOCAN), International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and DIrectory of RAdiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) (IAEA) databases were evaluated. A total of 3550 teletherapy units (TRT), 7017 radiation oncologists (RO), 3685 medical physicists (MP) and 12,788 radiotherapy technologists (RTT) are presently available for the 3.44 million new cancer cases reported annually in these countries. The present infrastructure and human resources in RT are estimated to provide RT access to 74.3% of the patients requiring RT. The current capacity in TRT, RO, MP and RTT when compared with recommended guidelines has a deficit of 25.6%, 18.3%, 22.7% and 10.6%, respectively. Thus, to respond to requirements by 2020, the existing capacity needs to be augmented by an additional 1698 TRTs, 2429 ROs, 1563 MPs and 2956 RTTs. With an imminent rise in cancer incidence, multifaceted strategic planning at national and international levels within a coordinated comprehensive cancer control programme is highly desirable to give adequate access to all patients who require radiotherapy across Europe. Specific steps to address this issue at national and continental levels involving all major stakeholders are proposed.

  9. Human resource management in post-conflict health systems: review of research and knowledge gaps

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In post-conflict settings, severe disruption to health systems invariably leaves populations at high risk of disease and in greater need of health provision than more stable resource-poor countries. The health workforce is often a direct victim of conflict. Effective human resource management (HRM) strategies and policies are critical to addressing the systemic effects of conflict on the health workforce such as flight of human capital, mismatches between skills and service needs, breakdown of pre-service training, and lack of human resource data. This paper reviews published literatures across three functional areas of HRM in post-conflict settings: workforce supply, workforce distribution, and workforce performance. We searched published literatures for articles published in English between 2003 and 2013. The search used context-specific keywords (e.g. post-conflict, reconstruction) in combination with topic-related keywords based on an analytical framework containing the three functional areas of HRM (supply, distribution, and performance) and several corresponding HRM topic areas under these. In addition, the framework includes a number of cross-cutting topics such as leadership and governance, finance, and gender. The literature is growing but still limited. Many publications have focused on health workforce supply issues, including pre-service education and training, pay, and recruitment. Less is known about workforce distribution, especially governance and administrative systems for deployment and incentive policies to redress geographical workforce imbalances. Apart from in-service training, workforce performance is particularly under-researched in the areas of performance-based incentives, management and supervision, work organisation and job design, and performance appraisal. Research is largely on HRM in the early post-conflict period and has relied on secondary data. More primary research is needed across the areas of workforce supply, workforce

  10. Human resource management in post-conflict health systems: review of research and knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Roome, Edward; Raven, Joanna; Martineau, Tim

    2014-01-01

    In post-conflict settings, severe disruption to health systems invariably leaves populations at high risk of disease and in greater need of health provision than more stable resource-poor countries. The health workforce is often a direct victim of conflict. Effective human resource management (HRM) strategies and policies are critical to addressing the systemic effects of conflict on the health workforce such as flight of human capital, mismatches between skills and service needs, breakdown of pre-service training, and lack of human resource data. This paper reviews published literatures across three functional areas of HRM in post-conflict settings: workforce supply, workforce distribution, and workforce performance. We searched published literatures for articles published in English between 2003 and 2013. The search used context-specific keywords (e.g. post-conflict, reconstruction) in combination with topic-related keywords based on an analytical framework containing the three functional areas of HRM (supply, distribution, and performance) and several corresponding HRM topic areas under these. In addition, the framework includes a number of cross-cutting topics such as leadership and governance, finance, and gender. The literature is growing but still limited. Many publications have focused on health workforce supply issues, including pre-service education and training, pay, and recruitment. Less is known about workforce distribution, especially governance and administrative systems for deployment and incentive policies to redress geographical workforce imbalances. Apart from in-service training, workforce performance is particularly under-researched in the areas of performance-based incentives, management and supervision, work organisation and job design, and performance appraisal. Research is largely on HRM in the early post-conflict period and has relied on secondary data. More primary research is needed across the areas of workforce supply, workforce

  11. Humane Education: Resource Guide. A Guide for Elementary School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Humane education promotes responsible behavior and improves the quality of life for animals and humans. Teaching the humane treatment of animals is a complex, philosophical, and values-oriented subject. Lessons for each grade level have performance objectives, materials, and activities. Student activity sheets are provided for follow-up…

  12. Strategic Frameworks for Human Performance and Human Systems Integration: Spotlight on General Systems Performance Theory and Nonlinear Causal Resource Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-14

    Brown, Lex Col USAF Director, Human Performance Directorate, 711th Human Performance Wing Brown, Randy USAF Chief Engineer, 711th Human Performance...infinite number of complex task behaviors , as chemical elements are combined to produce an infinite number of compounds. Discussion: Q – Any...address it. Accepted models of human performance have been based on observable behavior , but this only infers cognition. Can we model cognition itself

  13. Sexual Exploitation of Children and Youth. Human Resources Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Shelley A.

    1983-01-01

    This issue brief explores the problem of child pornography and teenage prostitution and examines some of the strategies federal, state, and local governments employ to address these social problems. After a brief review of Congressional actions and Supreme Court decisions, state statutes affecting pornography and prostitution are reviewed, and…

  14. Potential International Approaches to Ownership/Control of Human Genetic Resources.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    In its governance activities for genetic resources, the international community has adopted various approaches to their ownership, including: free access; common heritage of mankind; intellectual property rights; and state sovereign rights. They have also created systems which combine elements of these approaches. While governance of plant and animal genetic resources is well-established internationally, there has not yet been a clear approach selected for human genetic resources. Based on assessment of the goals which international governance of human genetic resources ought to serve, and the implications for how they will be accessed and utilised, it is argued that common heritage of mankind will be the most appropriate approach to adopt to their ownership/control. It does this with the aim of stimulating discussion in this area and providing a starting point for deeper consideration of how a common heritage of mankind, or similar, regime for human genetic resources would function and be implemented.

  15. Transpersonal Psychology: Exploring the Frontiers in Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Michael H.

    Important insights about how to develop human potential are being discovered these days in a field called transpersonal psychology. This new field is called the fourth force in psychology because like psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and humanistic psychology before it, it is on the cutting edge of what it means to be fully human. It seeks to develop…

  16. Technological Literacy and Human Cloning. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how technology educators can deal with advances in human genetics, specifically, cloning. Includes a definition and history of cloning, discusses its benefits, and looks at social concerns and arguments for and against human cloning. Includes classroom activities and websites. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  17. Retaining Staff Employees: The Relationship between Human Resources Management Strategies and Organizational Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Jeffrey M.; Watson, John L.

    2002-01-01

    Explored whether an institution's human resources management (HRM) strategies can influence individuals' organizational commitment levels, which ultimately can affect staff turnover rates. Found significant relationship between certain HRM strategies and commitment constructs. (EV)

  18. Workplace Democracy: A Review of Literature and Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2007-01-01

    A review of workplace democracy revealed that both practice and research need updating. The results are discussed in terms of history, theory, research and practice. Implications for human resource development research and practice are also included. (Contains 2 tables.)

  19. Building Virtuality into University-Based Human Resources Policy in China's Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guoliang, Zhang

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of discussing the notion of virtual human resources and its structure, this paper analyzes the necessity of building up virtual university teaching staff and proposes a model for the structural makeup of virtual university teaching staff.

  20. [Impact of health care reform on human resources and employment management].

    PubMed

    Brito Quintana, P E

    2000-01-01

    According to those in charge of health sector reform, human resources are the key component of health sector reform processes and offer health services their greatest competitive advantage. With the help of the Observatory for Human Resources within Health Sector Reform promoted by the Pan American Health Organization and other groups, countries of the Region of the Americas have now begun to gather, in a methodical fashion, tangible evidence of the decisive importance of human resources within health sector reform initiatives and particularly of the impact of these initiatives on health personnel. This mutual influence is the main theme of this article, which explores the most disturbing aspects of health sector reform from a human resources perspective, including job instability and conflicting interests of employers and employees.

  1. Mars Methane: An In-Situ Resource in Support of Human Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. D.; Clifford, S. M.

    2012-06-01

    Identification and utilization of natural resources on Mars that can be directly used to support sustainable human habitation and produce materials such as food and fuels are critical to support further planetary exploration.

  2. Scaling Up Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services in South Africa: Human Resource Requirements and Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Crick; Boyce, Gerard; Flisher, Alan J.; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Dawes, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background: Children and adolescents with mental health problems have poor service cover in low- and middle-income countries. Little is known about the resources that would be required to provide child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in these countries. The purpose of this study was to calculate the human resources and associated…

  3. Use of Case Study Methods in Human Resource Management, Development, and Training Courses: Strategies and Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, James R.; Gilberti, Anthony F.; Mupinga, Davison M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will study some of the problems associated with case studies and make recommendations using standard and innovative methodologies effectively. Human resource management (HRM) and resource development cases provide context for analysis and decision-making designs in different industries. In most HRM development and training courses…

  4. Human Sexuality. A Resource Guide for Parents and Teachers on Teaching...High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This guide provides information and resources that will facilitate parents' ability to help adolescents understand human sexuality within the context of home and family values and ideals. It provides teachers with resources to facilitate the decision making process. Contents are organized within a framework of objectives and guidelines for both…

  5. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3... General Prohibitions § 261.3 Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program..., intimidating, or intentionally interfering with any Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource...

  6. Predictive Relationships between Web and Human Resource Use and Middle School Students' Interest in Science Careers: An Exploratory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Grabowski, Barbara L.; Darling, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated relationships among the use of web and human resource during science class and science career interest. Results suggested that levels of science career interest could be predicted based on classroom use of web and human resources. Regular use of human resources was predictive of science career interests for boys and girls.…

  7. How Can We Assess and Evaluate the Competitive Advantage of a Country's Human Resource Development System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hunseok; Ryu, Hyue-Hyun; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an index to assess and evaluate the competitive advantage of a country's human resource development system. Based on an extensive literature review, a theoretical model of a human resource development system at the national level (named National Human Resource Development: NHRD) was constructed. The…

  8. Competency Modeling in Extension Education: Integrating an Academic Extension Education Model with an Extension Human Resource Management Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheer, Scott D.; Cochran, Graham R.; Harder, Amy; Place, Nick T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast an academic extension education model with an Extension human resource management model. The academic model of 19 competencies was similar across the 22 competencies of the Extension human resource management model. There were seven unique competencies for the human resource management model.…

  9. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3... General Prohibitions § 261.3 Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program..., intimidating, or intentionally interfering with any Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource...

  10. Resources, stress, and immunity: an ecological perspective on human psychoneuroimmunology.

    PubMed

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C

    2010-08-01

    Ecological immunology provides a broad theoretical perspective on phenotypic plasticity in immunity, that is, changes related to the value of immunity across different situations, including stressful situations. Costs of a maximally efficient immune response may at times outweigh benefits, and some aspects of immunity may be adaptively suppressed. This review provides a basic overview of the tenets of ecological immunology and the energetic costs of immunity and relates them to the literature on stress and immunity. Sickness behavior preserves energy for use by the immune system, acute stress mobilizes "first-line" immune defenders while suppressing more costly responses, and chronic stress may suppress costly responses in order to conserve energy to counteract the resource loss associated with stress. Unexpected relationships between stress "buffers" and immune functions demonstrate phenotypic plasticity related to resource pursuit or preservation. In conclusion, ecological models may aid in understanding the relationship between stress and immunity.

  11. Air Force Human Resources Laboratory Annual Report - Fiscal Year 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Simulator for Pilot program was adjudged technically sound and well Training ( ASPT ) image generator, though limited, balanced, given the user needs as...training even though current ASPT image related to the lack of depth in personnel resources generation capacity is inadequate to "decorate" and the...broad "front occur. Data from studies conducted on the end" look at some of the potential training Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT

  12. Coastal Resilience: Using interactive decision support to address the needs of natural and human communities in Long Island Sound, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, B.; Whelchel, A.; Newkirk, S.; Beck, M.; Shepard, C.; Ferdana, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal Resilience (www.coastalresilience.org) is an ecosystem-based, coastal and marine spatial planning framework and web mapping application that illustrates ecological, socioeconomic, and coastal hazards information in Long Island Sound (New York and Connecticut), USA. Much of Long Island Sound’s private property is only inches above sea level, placing millions of dollars in public and private funds at risk to rising sea levels and other coastal hazards. These impacts also threaten wetlands and other coastal ecosystems that provide habitat, natural buffers to storms, and other ecosystem services. Despite a growing awareness of global climate change, local decision makers still lack the tools to examine different management objectives as sea levels rise and coastal hazards increase. The Coastal Resilience project provides tools and information to better inform decision-making with a primary goal of identifying vulnerable human and natural communities, while illustrating the important role that ecosystems will play in the face of sea level rise and increased storm intensity. This study focuses on The Nature Conservancy’s use of innovative spatial analysis techniques and community engagement to identify and plan for the protection of vulnerable coastal communities and ecosystems, natural resource migration, and economic risk. This work is intended to help identify ecosystem based adaptation solutions in the face of global climate change. The Nature Conservancy, working with multiple partners such as the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and NOAA’s Coastal Services Center, deliver this information via the internet to help local decision makers keep the environment and public safety in mind.

  13. Opioid abuse in the United States and Department of Health and Human Services actions to address opioid-drug-related overdoses and deaths.

    PubMed

    U S Department Of Health And Human Services

    2015-06-01

    On March 26, 2015, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) published an online Issue Brief that addresses opioid abuse in the United States and (HHS) actions to address opioid-drug-related overdoses and deaths. This report, which contains the full content of the Issue Brief, is adapted from that document.

  14. Effect of Total Quality Management on the Quality and Productivity of Human Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siregar, I.; Nasution, A. A.; Sari, R. M.

    2017-03-01

    Human resources is the main factor in improving company performance not only in industrial products but also services. Therefore, all of the organization performers involved must work together to achieve product quality services expected by consumers. Educational institutions are the service industries which are educators and instructor involved in it. Quality of product and services produced depends on the education organization performers. This study did a survey of instructors in public and private universities in North Sumatra to obtain the factors that affect quality of human resources and productivity of human resources. Human resources quality is viewed by the elements of TQM. TQM elements that are discussed in this study are leadership, communication, training and education, support structure, measurement and reward and recognition. The results of this study showed a correlation numbers across the exogenous variables on endogenous variables relationships tend to be strong and be positive. In addition, elements of TQM are discussed except the support structure which has a direct influence on the quality of human resources. Variable leadership, reward and recognition and quality of human resources have a significant effect on productivity.

  15. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system.

  16. Human resources for health in southeast Asia: shortages, distributional challenges, and international trade in health services.

    PubMed

    Kanchanachitra, Churnrurtai; Lindelow, Magnus; Johnston, Timothy; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Lorenzo, Fely Marilyn; Huong, Nguyen Lan; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus; dela Rosa, Jennifer Frances

    2011-02-26

    In this paper, we address the issues of shortage and maldistribution of health personnel in southeast Asia in the context of the international trade in health services. Although there is no shortage of health workers in the region overall, when analysed separately, five low-income countries have some deficit. All countries in southeast Asia face problems of maldistribution of health workers, and rural areas are often understaffed. Despite a high capacity for medical and nursing training in both public and private facilities, there is weak coordination between production of health workers and capacity for employment. Regional experiences and policy responses to address these challenges can be used to inform future policy in the region and elsewhere. A distinctive feature of southeast Asia is its engagement in international trade in health services. Singapore and Malaysia import health workers to meet domestic demand and to provide services to international patients. Thailand attracts many foreign patients for health services. This situation has resulted in the so-called brain drain of highly specialised staff from public medical schools to the private hospitals. The Philippines and Indonesia are the main exporters of doctors and nurses in the region. Agreements about mutual recognition of professional qualifications for three groups of health workers under the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Framework Agreement on Services could result in increased movement within the region in the future. To ensure that vital human resources for health are available to meet the needs of the populations that they serve, migration management and retention strategies need to be integrated into ongoing efforts to strengthen health systems in southeast Asia. There is also a need for improved dialogue between the health and trade sectors on how to balance economic opportunities associated with trade in health services with domestic health needs and equity issues.

  17. A review of the application and contribution of discrete choice experiments to inform human resources policy interventions.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Mylene; Blaauw, Duane

    2009-07-24

    Although the factors influencing the shortage and maldistribution of health workers have been well-documented by cross-sectional surveys, there is less evidence on the relative determinants of health workers' job choices, or on the effects of policies designed to address these human resources problems. Recently, a few studies have adopted an innovative approach to studying the determinants of health workers' job preferences. In the absence of longitudinal datasets to analyse the decisions that health workers have actually made, authors have drawn on methods from marketing research and transport economics and used Discrete Choice Experiments to analyse stated preferences of health care providers for different job characteristics. We carried out a literature review of studies using discrete choice experiments to investigate human resources issues related to health workers, both in developed and developing countries. Several economic and health systems bibliographic databases were used, and contacts were made with practitioners in the field to identify published and grey literature. Ten studies were found that used discrete choice experiments to investigate the job preferences of health care providers. The use of discrete choice experiments techniques enabled researchers to determine the relative importance of different factors influencing health workers' choices. The studies showed that non-pecuniary incentives are significant determinants, sometimes more powerful than financial ones. The identified studies also emphasized the importance of investigating the preferences of different subgroups of health workers. Discrete choice experiments are a valuable tool for informing decision-makers on how to design strategies to address human resources problems. As they are relatively quick and cheap survey instruments, discrete choice experiments present various advantages for informing policies in developing countries, where longitudinal labour market data are seldom

  18. Monitoring antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: balancing clinical care, technology, and human resources.

    PubMed

    Hosseinipour, Mina C; Schechter, Mauro

    2010-08-01

    Due to the rapid expansion of first-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings (RLS), increasing numbers of people are living with HIV for prolonged periods of time. Treatment programs must now decide how to balance monitoring costs necessary to maximize health benefits for those already on treatment with the continued demand to initiate more patients on first-line treatment. We review currently available evidence related to monitoring strategies in RLS and discuss their implications on timing of switching to second-line treatment, development of HIV resistance, and clinical outcome.

  19. A hybrid human and machine resource curation pipeline for the Neuroscience Information Framework.

    PubMed

    Bandrowski, A E; Cachat, J; Li, Y; Müller, H M; Sternberg, P W; Ciccarese, P; Clark, T; Marenco, L; Wang, R; Astakhov, V; Grethe, J S; Martone, M E

    2012-01-01

    The breadth of information resources available to researchers on the Internet continues to expand, particularly in light of recently implemented data-sharing policies required by funding agencies. However, the nature of dense, multifaceted neuroscience data and the design of contemporary search engine systems makes efficient, reliable and relevant discovery of such information a significant challenge. This challenge is specifically pertinent for online databases, whose dynamic content is 'hidden' from search engines. The Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF; http://www.neuinfo.org) was funded by the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research to address the problem of finding and utilizing neuroscience-relevant resources such as software tools, data sets, experimental animals and antibodies across the Internet. From the outset, NIF sought to provide an accounting of available resources, whereas developing technical solutions to finding, accessing and utilizing them. The curators therefore, are tasked with identifying and registering resources, examining data, writing configuration files to index and display data and keeping the contents current. In the initial phases of the project, all aspects of the registration and curation processes were manual. However, as the number of resources grew, manual curation became impractical. This report describes our experiences and successes with developing automated resource discovery and semiautomated type characterization with text-mining scripts that facilitate curation team efforts to discover, integrate and display new content. We also describe the DISCO framework, a suite of automated web services that significantly reduce manual curation efforts to periodically check for resource updates. Lastly, we discuss DOMEO, a semi-automated annotation tool that improves the discovery and curation of resources that are not necessarily website-based (i.e. reagents, software tools). Although the ultimate goal of automation was to

  20. A hybrid human and machine resource curation pipeline for the Neuroscience Information Framework

    PubMed Central

    Bandrowski, A. E.; Cachat, J.; Li, Y.; Müller, H. M.; Sternberg, P. W.; Ciccarese, P.; Clark, T.; Marenco, L.; Wang, R.; Astakhov, V.; Grethe, J. S.; Martone, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The breadth of information resources available to researchers on the Internet continues to expand, particularly in light of recently implemented data-sharing policies required by funding agencies. However, the nature of dense, multifaceted neuroscience data and the design of contemporary search engine systems makes efficient, reliable and relevant discovery of such information a significant challenge. This challenge is specifically pertinent for online databases, whose dynamic content is ‘hidden’ from search engines. The Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF; http://www.neuinfo.org) was funded by the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research to address the problem of finding and utilizing neuroscience-relevant resources such as software tools, data sets, experimental animals and antibodies across the Internet. From the outset, NIF sought to provide an accounting of available resources, whereas developing technical solutions to finding, accessing and utilizing them. The curators therefore, are tasked with identifying and registering resources, examining data, writing configuration files to index and display data and keeping the contents current. In the initial phases of the project, all aspects of the registration and curation processes were manual. However, as the number of resources grew, manual curation became impractical. This report describes our experiences and successes with developing automated resource discovery and semiautomated type characterization with text-mining scripts that facilitate curation team efforts to discover, integrate and display new content. We also describe the DISCO framework, a suite of automated web services that significantly reduce manual curation efforts to periodically check for resource updates. Lastly, we discuss DOMEO, a semi-automated annotation tool that improves the discovery and curation of resources that are not necessarily website-based (i.e. reagents, software tools). Although the ultimate goal of automation was to

  1. Achieving effective cervical screening coverage in South Africa through human resources and health systems development.

    PubMed

    Kawonga, Mary; Fonn, Sharon

    2008-11-01

    South Africa's cervical screening policy recommends three free Pap smears at ten-year intervals for all women over 30 years of age, aiming to achieve 70% coverage by 2010 by targeting the age group most at risk of developing pre-cancerous cervical lesions. Attaining wide coverage requires an adequate supply of motivated and supported public sector health workers with appropriate training and skills, working in a functional health system. Given the dearth of doctors in South Africa, professional nurses were tasked with performing the bulk of Pap smears at primary care level. Coverage remains sub-optimal and a significant proportion of women with precursor lesions do not receive treatment. Further, health system strengthening - essential for cytology-based screening - has not happened. Research to evaluate alternative screening technologies has proliferated in recent years, but regrettably, strengthening of the health system required to make the new technology work has not received similar attention. Using the South African experience, this article argues that technological interventions and innovations alone are not sufficient to improve cervical screening programmes. Task-shifting is limited unless other human resource concerns (e.g. training, increasing demands on personnel, attrition, and skills mix) are concurrently addressed within a comprehensive workforce development strategy, alongside work to make the health care delivery system functional.

  2. Projections of specialist physicians in Mexico: a key element in planning human resources for health.

    PubMed

    Nigenda, Gustavo; Muños, José Alberto

    2015-09-22

    Projections are considered a useful tool in the planning of human resources for health. In Mexico, the supply and demand of specialist doctors are clearly disconnected, and decisions must be made to reduce labour market imbalances. Thus, it is critical to produce reliable projections to assess future interactions between supply and demand. Using a service demand approach, projections of the number of specialist physicians required by the three main public institutions were calculated using the following variables: a) recent recruitment of specialists, b) physician productivity and c) retirement rates. Two types of scenarios were produced: an inertial one with no changes made to current production levels and an alternative scenario adjusted by recommended productivity levels. Results show that institutions must address productivity as a major policy element to act upon in future contracting of specialist physicians. The projections that adjusted for productivity suggest that the hiring trends for surgeons and internists should be maintained or increased to compensate for the increase in demand for services. In contrast, due to the decline in demand for obstetric and paediatric services, the hiring of new obstetrician-gynaecologists and paediatricians should be reduced to align with future demand.

  3. Human Health and the Biological Effects of Tritium in Drinking Water: Prudent Policy Through Science - Addressing the ODWAC New Recommendation.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, S; Mills, C E; Phan, N; Taylor, K; Boreham, D R

    2011-02-22

    Tritium is a radioactive form of hydrogen and is a by-product of energy production in Canadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The release of this radioisotope into the environment is carefully managed at CANDU facilities in order to minimize radiation exposure to the public. However, under some circumstances, small accidental releases to the environment can occur. The radiation doses to humans and non-human biota from these releases are low and orders of magnitude less than doses received from naturally occurring radioisotopes or from manmade activities, such as medical imaging and air travel. There is however a renewed interest in the biological consequences of low dose tritium exposures and a new limit for tritium levels in Ontario drinking water has been proposed. The Ontario Drinking Water Advisory Council (ODWAC) issued a formal report in May 2009 in response to a request by the Minister of the Environment, concluding that the Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard for tritium should be revised from the current 7,000 Bq/L level to a new, lower 20 Bq/L level. In response to this recommendation, an international scientific symposium was held at McMaster University to address the issues surrounding this change in direction and the validity of a new policy. Scientists, regulators, government officials, and industrial stakeholders were present to discuss the potential health risks associated with low level radiation exposure from tritium. The regulatory, economic, and social implications of the new proposed limit were also considered.The new recommendation assumed a linear-no-threshold model to calculate carcinogenic risk associated with tritium exposure, and considered tritium as a non-threshold chemical carcinogen. Both of these assumptions are highly controversial given that recent research suggests that low dose exposures have thresholds below which there are no observable detrimental effects. Furthermore, mutagenic and carcinogenic risk calculated from

  4. Sustainable development goals and the human resources crisis.

    PubMed

    Freer, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Achieving universal health coverage by 2030 requires that lessons from the Millennium Development Goals must be heeded. The most important lesson is that the workforce underpins every function of the health system, and is the rate-limiting step. The three dimensions that continue to limit the success of the development agenda are availability, distribution and performance of health workers - and the Sustainable Development Goals cannot be achieved without addressing all three. Hence, the traditional response of scaling up supply is inadequate: a paradigm shift is required in the design of systems that can properly identify, train, allocate and retain health workers.

  5. Air Force Human Resources Laboratory Annual Report - Fiscal Year 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    with its application of fiber-optics. technical reviews was based on a week-long meeting with helmet- mounted display. advanced (IG. and division...optics. training and combat conditions. The thrust consists of helmet- mounted display. advanced computer image four subthtrusts: (a) Air Combat ,’aining...formais of Mntissiort T rainier . N\\e% efforts inivolvi ig t[lie use of T \\C expjetiritenrtalI cotoli are- di fficulIt a ti(l % here resources toi BR A L

  6. Air Force Human Resources Laboratory Annual Report - Fiscal Year 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    D of the other conditions. resource not only to the Air Force, but also to those segments of DoD where data collected on the ASPT Utilisation: The...requiring low-level navigation for threat avoidance. simulation. A segment including imagery of a bridge 85...8217.% J, i.4 AFHRL GEOGRAPICAL LOCATIONS tmd TRAEININ SOSWM DIV LOWRY All (KMW) CO M O UIGUT-PAIIE SM(DAY1UN)ON WERAIUNS TRAINING DIV ILAS AID (MuiWI) AZ

  7. KEPCO‧s Activity to Power-Engineer Human Resource Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Kazushi

    While business environment changes a lot, in order to aim at realization of “what we want the Group to look like in 2030” , it is necessary to cultivate human resources with a strong sense of mission. We need to prepare an opportunity to teach and to be taught, in order to cultivate resources and a measure for connecting every person‧s growth to growth of a company. In chapter one, we show Five Trends for attaining what KANSAI Electric Power Corporation wants to be and explain the importance of human resource development under the changing environment. In chapter two, we explain the fundamental policy of human resource cultivation and describe the development plan and the facilities for training based on the policy in chapter two. In chapter three, we express the specific efforts in the field of maintenance, construction, and operation at the department of Engineering and Operation.

  8. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The resources listed different types of materials related to the aerospace science under specified categories: free materials and inexpensive, selected government publication, audiovisual (government, nongovernment), aviation books, and space books. The list includes the publisher's name and the price for each publication. (SK)

  9. Global water resources affected by human interventions and climate change.

    PubMed

    Haddeland, Ingjerd; Heinke, Jens; Biemans, Hester; Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina; Hanasaki, Naota; Konzmann, Markus; Ludwig, Fulco; Masaki, Yoshimitsu; Schewe, Jacob; Stacke, Tobias; Tessler, Zachary D; Wada, Yoshihide; Wisser, Dominik

    2014-03-04

    Humans directly change the dynamics of the water cycle through dams constructed for water storage, and through water withdrawals for industrial, agricultural, or domestic purposes. Climate change is expected to additionally affect water supply and demand. Here, analyses of climate change and direct human impacts on the terrestrial water cycle are presented and compared using a multimodel approach. Seven global hydrological models have been forced with multiple climate projections, and with and without taking into account impacts of human interventions such as dams and water withdrawals on the hydrological cycle. Model results are analyzed for different levels of global warming, allowing for analyses in line with temperature targets for climate change mitigation. The results indicate that direct human impacts on the water cycle in some regions, e.g., parts of Asia and in the western United States, are of the same order of magnitude, or even exceed impacts to be expected for moderate levels of global warming (+2 K). Despite some spread in model projections, irrigation water consumption is generally projected to increase with higher global mean temperatures. Irrigation water scarcity is particularly large in parts of southern and eastern Asia, and is expected to become even larger in the future.

  10. Learning To Be Human: Confucian Resources for Rethinking General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, France H.

    Arguing that the traditionally central position of genuine liberal learning in the college curriculum has been seriously eroded, this paper recommends that Confucian principles be incorporated into general education and faculty development to reinstill the element of "learning to be human" into the freshman and sophomore years. Part 1 suggests…

  11. Global water resources affected by human interventions and climate change

    PubMed Central

    Haddeland, Ingjerd; Heinke, Jens; Biemans, Hester; Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina; Hanasaki, Naota; Konzmann, Markus; Ludwig, Fulco; Masaki, Yoshimitsu; Schewe, Jacob; Stacke, Tobias; Tessler, Zachary D.; Wada, Yoshihide; Wisser, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Humans directly change the dynamics of the water cycle through dams constructed for water storage, and through water withdrawals for industrial, agricultural, or domestic purposes. Climate change is expected to additionally affect water supply and demand. Here, analyses of climate change and direct human impacts on the terrestrial water cycle are presented and compared using a multimodel approach. Seven global hydrological models have been forced with multiple climate projections, and with and without taking into account impacts of human interventions such as dams and water withdrawals on the hydrological cycle. Model results are analyzed for different levels of global warming, allowing for analyses in line with temperature targets for climate change mitigation. The results indicate that direct human impacts on the water cycle in some regions, e.g., parts of Asia and in the western United States, are of the same order of magnitude, or even exceed impacts to be expected for moderate levels of global warming (+2 K). Despite some spread in model projections, irrigation water consumption is generally projected to increase with higher global mean temperatures. Irrigation water scarcity is particularly large in parts of southern and eastern Asia, and is expected to become even larger in the future. PMID:24344275

  12. Human Resource Blueprints in Irish High-Tech Start-Up Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Mary A.; Olivares, Mariabrisa

    2006-01-01

    Focusing on Irish high-tech start-ups, this paper reports on the results of an empirical study of organization building by entrepreneurial firms, specifically in relation to human resource practices. The research findings are benchmarked with findings from SPEC, the Stanford Project of Emerging Companies (Baron and Hannan, 2002). Human resources…

  13. Knowledge Management, Human Resource Management, and Higher Education: A Theoretical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Peggy D.; Brewer, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written on the importance of knowledge management, the challenges facing organizations, and the important human resource management activities involved in assuring the acquisition and transfer of knowledge. Higher business education plays an important role in preparing students to assume the knowledge management and human resource…

  14. Human resources data collection--Central Information Service.

    PubMed

    Teodosijevic, Nada; Rikanovic, Sasa

    2010-01-01

    The Central Information Service--(CIS) is located at the Institute of Public Health of Serbia, which maintains and upgrades it. CIS has been developed through the Serbia Health Project, a project developed by the Ministry of Health and funded by the World Bank loan. Through its web portal CIS ensures that all health institutions enter and maintain HR and other resource data, at the same time enabling all users of the system (Ministry of Health, Health Insurance Fund, Institutions of Public Health, all health institutions) to use CIS data in accordance with the pre-established rights. In the following period CIS will offer its services to the private sector as well, and it shall be a basis for the establishment of Serbia e-Health portal for citizens.

  15. Human resource management in a union-free environment

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.P.

    1997-12-01

    The title would suggest that there are two separate styles in managing companies: those that are represented and those that are union-free. In actuality, the management style is the same for both types of operations. For example, Zeigler Coal Holding Company has both types of operations; union-represented and union-free, and the company fundamentally manages them the same. A review of past employees relations shows that from the 1920s through the 1960s, there were two opposing positions which were anti-union and pro-company. The atmosphere was almost always confrontational and was normally a win/lose relationship, at best. It is good to first clarify terminology. A union is a third party who represents employees to management. Non-union is usually referred to smaller operations with limited resources and workers who are not represented by a union. Union-free operations are those that are not represented but practice positive employee relations and attempt to develop a win/win situation. This latter should be the management style regardless of whether or not employees are represented.

  16. Future trends in ophthalmology health human resources in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Lorne

    2016-06-01

    Projections of future Canadian ratios of ophthalmologists to population have fluctuated because of changes in numbers of residency spots and retirement rates. Although this ratio plateaued in recent years, the ratio of ophthalmologists to the population over 65 years of age is projected to steadily deteriorate. All graduating residents are going to be needed to meet the upcoming workload, yet current graduates are finding increasing difficulty obtaining full-time positions with operating room privileges. This problem is affecting all specialties who require hospital facilities, and exploration of this problem by the Royal College, Canadian Medical Association (CMA), Resident Doctors of Canada, and council of the Provincial Deputy Ministers of Health is presented. Proposed solutions to the current job shortages include residents starting in positions outside of major metropolitan areas, clinicians in practice giving up some operating room time to make way for new graduates, government increasing infrastructure commensurate with the increased number of medical school positions, and optimizing use of current resources by running operating rooms for longer hours and on the weekends.

  17. Water Resources Vulnerability Assessment Accounting for Human Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehran, A.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoirs are one of the main infrastructures that provide resilience against extremes (e.g., floods and droughts) and they play a key role in water resources management. Based on International Commission of Large Dams (ICOLD 2003) records, the total volume of reservoirs is over 6200 km3, which is twice larger than the global annual water use estimated as 3000 km3. Just a simple comparison of the two numbers indicates the importance of reservoirs and their role in providing resilience for water security. On the other hand, man-made reservoirs change the water distribution throughout the year. Most climate change impact studies ignore the role of reservoirs in water availability studies. However, water availability cannot be properly assessed without a thorough assessment of reservoir conditions. By combining classical methods for climate variability assessment (top-down approach) and influence assessment (bottom-up approach), this study offers a hybrid framework that integrates different drivers of water storage vulnerability. Final index is termed as the Multivariate Standardized Reliability and Resilience Index (MSRRI). This index investigates the adaptive capacity of the reservoir and exposure of the system to variable conditions. MSRRI has been investigated over several major reservoirs in Australia and California, United States. This presentation reviews recent findings and discusses reservoir conditions in Australia and California using MSRRI under different climatic change scenarios.

  18. Frontier In-Situ Resource Utilization for Enabling Sustained Human Presence on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    The currently known resources on Mars are massive, including extensive quantities of water and carbon dioxide and therefore carbon, hydrogen and oxygen for life support, fuels and plastics and much else. The regolith is replete with all manner of minerals. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applicable frontier technologies include robotics, machine intelligence, nanotechnology, synthetic biology, 3-D printing/additive manufacturing and autonomy. These technologies combined with the vast natural resources should enable serious, pre- and post-human arrival ISRU to greatly increase reliability and safety and reduce cost for human colonization of Mars. Various system-level transportation concepts employing Mars produced fuel would enable Mars resources to evolve into a primary center of trade for the inner solar system for eventually nearly everything required for space faring and colonization. Mars resources and their exploitation via extensive ISRU are the key to a viable, safe and affordable, human presence beyond Earth. The purpose of this paper is four-fold: 1) to highlight the latest discoveries of water, minerals, and other materials on Mars that reshape our thinking about the value and capabilities of Mars ISRU; 2) to summarize the previous literature on Mars ISRU processes, equipment, and approaches; 3) to point to frontier ISRU technologies and approaches that can lead to safe and affordable human missions to Mars; and 4) to suggest an implementation strategy whereby the ISRU elements are phased into the mission campaign over time to enable a sustainable and increasing human presence on Mars.

  19. The interface between health sector reform and human resources in health.

    PubMed

    Rigoli, Felix; Dussault, Gilles

    2003-11-03

    The relationship between health sector reform and the human resources issues raised in that process has been highlighted in several studies. These studies have focused on how the new processes have modified the ways in which health workers interact with their workplace, but few of them have paid enough attention to the ways in which the workers have influenced the reforms.The impact of health sector reform has modified critical aspects of the health workforce, including labor conditions, degree of decentralization of management, required skills and the entire system of wages and incentives. Human resources in health, crucial as they are in implementing changes in the delivery system, have had their voice heard in many subtle and open ways - reacting to transformations, supporting, blocking and distorting the proposed ways of action.This work intends to review the evidence on how the individual or collective actions of human resources are shaping the reforms, by spotlighting the reform process, the workforce reactions and the factors determining successful human resources participation. It attempts to provide a more powerful way of predicting the effects and interactions in which different "technical designs" operate when they interact with the human resources they affect. The article describes the dialectic nature of the relationship between the objectives and strategies of the reforms and the objectives and strategies of those who must implement them.

  20. The interface between health sector reform and human resources in health

    PubMed Central

    Rigoli, Felix; Dussault, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between health sector reform and the human resources issues raised in that process has been highlighted in several studies. These studies have focused on how the new processes have modified the ways in which health workers interact with their workplace, but few of them have paid enough attention to the ways in which the workers have influenced the reforms. The impact of health sector reform has modified critical aspects of the health workforce, including labor conditions, degree of decentralization of management, required skills and the entire system of wages and incentives. Human resources in health, crucial as they are in implementing changes in the delivery system, have had their voice heard in many subtle and open ways – reacting to transformations, supporting, blocking and distorting the proposed ways of action. This work intends to review the evidence on how the individual or collective actions of human resources are shaping the reforms, by spotlighting the reform process, the workforce reactions and the factors determining successful human resources participation. It attempts to provide a more powerful way of predicting the effects and interactions in which different "technical designs" operate when they interact with the human resources they affect. The article describes the dialectic nature of the relationship between the objectives and strategies of the reforms and the objectives and strategies of those who must implement them. PMID:14613523

  1. Human resources for mental health care: current situation and strategies for action.

    PubMed

    Kakuma, Ritsuko; Minas, Harry; van Ginneken, Nadja; Dal Poz, Mario R; Desiraju, Keshav; Morris, Jodi E; Saxena, Shekhar; Scheffler, Richard M

    2011-11-05

    A challenge faced by many countries is to provide adequate human resources for delivery of essential mental health interventions. The overwhelming worldwide shortage of human resources for mental health, particularly in low-income and middle-income countries, is well established. Here, we review the current state of human resources for mental health, needs, and strategies for action. At present, human resources for mental health in countries of low and middle income show a serious shortfall that is likely to grow unless effective steps are taken. Evidence suggests that mental health care can be delivered effectively in primary health-care settings, through community-based programmes and task-shifting approaches. Non-specialist health professionals, lay workers, affected individuals, and caregivers with brief training and appropriate supervision by mental health specialists are able to detect, diagnose, treat, and monitor individuals with mental disorders and reduce caregiver burden. We also discuss scale-up costs, human resources management, and leadership for mental health, particularly within the context of low-income and middle-income countries.

  2. The effects of control of resources on magnitudes of sex differences in human mate preferences.

    PubMed

    Moore, Fhionna; Cassidy, Clare; Perrett, David I

    2010-12-03

    We tested the hypothesis that magnitudes of sex differences in human mate preferences would be inversely related to control of resources. Specifically, we predicted that the ideal partner age, maximum and minimum partner ages tolerated and preferences for "physical attractiveness" over "good financial prospects" of female participants would approach parity with that of men with increasing control of resources. In a sample of 3770 participants recruited via an online survey, the magnitudes of sex differences in age preferences increased with resource control whereas the sex difference in preferences for "physical attractiveness" over "good financial prospects" disappeared when resource control was high. Results are inconsistent, and are discussed in the context of adaptive tradeoff and biosocial models of sex differences in human mate preferences.

  3. Lunar Polar In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) as a Stepping Stone for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.

    2013-01-01

    A major emphasis of NASA is to extend and expand human exploration across the solar system. While specific destinations are still being discussed as to what comes first, it is imperative that NASA create new technologies and approaches that make space exploration affordable and sustainable. Critical to achieving affordable and sustainable exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) are the development of technologies and approaches for advanced robotics, power, propulsion, habitats, life support, and especially, space resource utilization systems. Space resources and how to use them, often called In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), can have a tremendous beneficial impact on robotic and human exploration of the Moon, Mars, Phobos, and Near Earth Objects (NEOs), while at the same time helping to solve terrestrial challenges and enabling commercial space activities. The search for lunar resources, demonstration of extraterrestrial mining, and the utilization of resource-derived products, especially from polar volatiles, can be a stepping stone for subsequent human exploration missions to other destinations of interest due to the proximity of the Moon, complimentary environments and resources, and the demonstration of critical technologies, processes, and operations. ISRU and the Moon: There are four main areas of development interest with respect to finding, obtaining, extracting, and using space resources: Prospecting for resources, Production of mission critical consumables like propellants and life support gases, Civil engineering and construction, and Energy production, storage, and transfer. The search for potential resources and the production of mission critical consumables are the primary focus of current NASA technology and system development activities since they provide the greatest initial reduction in mission mass, cost, and risk. Because of the proximity of the Moon, understanding lunar resources and developing, demonstrating, and implementing lunar ISRU

  4. A Conceptual Framework to Address Stress-Associated Human Health Effects of Ecosystem Services Degraded by Disasters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic stress leads to a variety of mental and physiological disorders, and stress effects are the primary concern after traumatic injury and exposure to infectious diseases or toxic agents from disaster events. We developed a conceptual model to address the question of whether...

  5. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  6. Acquisition and allocation of human, financial, and physical resources in the health care system.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Based on the current financial status and forthcoming changes in the health care system, governing boards give chief executive officers the responsibility to manage human, financial, and physical resources. The role and degree of involvement of chief executive officers in managing resources--the resource allocation process, retention and recruitment, technology adaptation, reimbursement, and expansion of the outpatient program--are illustrated in this article. A new strategy for diverting resources to tap into the outpatient market is the appropriate direction to choose during days when the economy is down and people are not seeking inpatient treatment as in the past. Reimbursement in the future will depend on customer satisfaction scores; therefore, a dedicated and loyal staff is the most important resource for any service organization.

  7. Religious Congregations' Collaborations: With Whom Do They Work and What Resources Do They Share in Addressing HIV and Other Health Issues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werber, Laura; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Dominguez, Blanca X.; Mata, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how religious congregations interact with other community organizations to address health and, in particular, HIV-related needs within their membership and/or local communities. Case study data from a diverse sample of 14 urban congregations (6 Black, 4 Latino, 2 White, and 2 mixed race-ethnicity) indicate that they engaged in…

  8. Human resources for health through conflict and recovery: lessons from African countries.

    PubMed

    Pavignani, Enrico

    2011-10-01

    A protracted conflict affects human resources for health (HRH) in multiple ways. In most cases, the inflicted damage constitutes the main obstacle to health sector recovery. Interventions aimed at healing derelict human resources are however fraught with difficulties of a political, technical, financial and administrative order. The experience accumulated in past recovery processes has made some important players aware of the cost incurred by neglecting human resource development. Several transitions from conflict to peace have been documented, even if largely in unpublished reports. This paper presents condensed descriptions of some African HRH-related recovery processes, which provide useful lessons. The technical work demanded to resuscitate a derelict health workforce is fairly well understood. In most situations, the highest hurdles lie outside of the health domain, and are of a political and administrative nature. Success stories are rare. But useful lessons are taught by failure as well as by success.

  9. A Study on Governance and Human Resources for Cooperative Road Facilities Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Sachiko; Takagi, Akiyoshi; Kurauchi, Fumitaka; Demura, Yoshifumi

    Within today's infrastructure management, Asset Management systems are becoming a mainstream feature. For region where the risk is low, it is necessary to create a "cooperative road facilities management system". This research both examined and suggested what kind of cooperative road facilities management system should be promoted by the regional society. Concretely, this study defines the operational realities of a previous case. It discusses the problem of the road facilities management as a governance. Furthermore, its realization depends on "the cooperation between municipalities", "the private-sector initiative", and "residents participation" .Also, it discusses the problem of human resources for governance. Its realization depends on "the engineers' promotion", and "creation of a voluntary activity of the resident" as a human resources. Moreover, it defines that the intermediary is important because the human resources tied to the governance. As a result, the prospect of the road facilities management is shown by the role of the player and the relation among player.

  10. Application of research and information to human resources policies: regional goals for the Americas.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, Marcos; Rigoli, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Objective Report experiences involving the use of research and information systems to support national human resources policies through benchmarking between different countries, with comparisons over time and between similar countries or regions. Method In 2007, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) promoted a set of goals for all the countries in the Americas to improve the situation of health human resources, using a uniform methodology and research process carried out by Observatories of Human Resources. Results The analysis focused on the progress made in relation to the main challenges in the Southern Cone countries, with a special emphasis on Brazil, noting improvements in the distribution of professionals in the regions. Conclusion These experiences showed how research and the use of information systems can stimulate the expansion of good practices in the training, retention and development of the health workforce in the Americas.

  11. When Two Worlds Don't Collide: Can Social Curation Address the Marginalisation of Open Educational Practices and Resources from Outside Academia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perryman, Leigh-Anne; Coughlan, Tony

    2014-01-01

    A canyonesque gulf has long existed between open academia and many external subject communities. Since 2011, we have been developing and piloting the public open scholar role (Coughlan and Perryman 2012)--involving open academics discovering, sharing and discussing open educational resources (OER) with online communities outside formal education…

  12. What if You Build It and They Still Won't Come? Addressing Student Awareness of Resources and Services with Promotional Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalal, Heather A.; Lackie, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    After a needs assessment exposed that even daily library users were unaware of the best resources, tools, and services, the Rider University Libraries switched gears from a focus on the creation of long step-by-step tutorials, to the creation of short promotional videos for all users, with attention on the needs of distance learners. This project…

  13. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  14. [Human brain resource--experience at the Brain Research Institute,University of Niigata].

    PubMed

    Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-10-01

    Through 40 years of neuropathological practice,the Brain Research Institute, University of Niigata (BRI-Niigata), Japan has accumulated extensive human brain resource,including fresh-frozen brain slices,for scientific research. Over 30,000 slices obtained from consecutive autopsies have been systematically stored in 25 deep freezers. Establishment of effective networks between brain banks and institutional collections in Japan is essential for promoting scientific activities that require human brain resource. We at the BRI-Niigata are eager to contribute to the establishment of such networks.

  15. [Diagnostic studies in the planning process of human resources: the Central American experience].

    PubMed

    de Canales, F; Martínez Chopen, O; Tercero Talavera, I; González, G

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the authors analyze various aspects of one of the essential stages in the process of planning human resources--diagnostic studies and research which will serve as a starting point. They stress the role of diagnostic personnel studies in formulating human resources policies and planning, and describe the phases to be followed in their execution, according to the results obtained in the three Central American countries (Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua) in which the studies were completed. The paper concludes with a summary of the process in the three countries.

  16. Human Capital: Additional Actions Needed to Enhance DOD’s Efforts to Address Mental Health Care Stigma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    stress disorder or traumatic brain injury. Additionally, the Defense Suicide Prevention Office reports through the Executive Director of the Office of...Efforts to Address Mental Health Care Stigma Why GAO Did This Study A 2010 DOD task force on suicide prevention concluded that stigma—the negative...Representatives A 2010 Department of Defense (DOD) Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces concluded that

  17. Relationships among Organizational Attitudes, Work Environment, Satisfaction with Human Resource Programs and Benefits, and Army Career Intentions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    WORK ENVIRONMENT , 4 SATISFACTION WITH HUMAN RESOURCE PROGRAMS AND BENEFITS, AND...OP" THiS inAGE(Wtiofi Dejta linte) ,’- Technal Report 572 RELATIONSHIPS AMONG ORGANIZATIONAL ATTITUDES, WORK ENVIRONMENT , SATISFACTION WITH HUMAN...8217& ’ ’ . " ’ , " . .. " . . , . , . . . . . -. . RELATIONSHIPS AMONG ORGANIZATIONAL ATTITUDES, WORK ENVIRONMENT , SATISFACTION WITH HUMAN RESOURCE PROGRAMS AND BENEFITS, AND ARMY CAREER

  18. Facilitating job retention for chronically ill employees: perspectives of line managers and human resource managers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases are a leading contributor to work disability and job loss in Europe. Recent EU policies aim to improve job retention among chronically ill employees. Disability and occupational health researchers argue that this requires a coordinated and pro-active approach at the workplace by occupational health professionals, line managers (LMs) and human resource managers (HRM). Little is known about the perspectives of LMs an HRM on what is needed to facilitate job retention among chronically ill employees. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore and compare the perspectives of Dutch LMs and HRM on this issue. Methods Concept mapping methodology was used to elicit and map statements (ideas) from 10 LMs and 17 HRM about what is needed to ensure continued employment for chronically ill employees. Study participants were recruited through a higher education and an occupational health services organization. Results Participants generated 35 statements. Each group (LMs and HRM) sorted these statements into six thematic clusters. LMs and HRM identified four similar clusters: LMs and HRM must be knowledgeable about the impact of chronic disease on the employee; employees must accept responsibility for work retention; work adaptations must be implemented; and clear company policy. Thematic clusters identified only by LMs were: good manager/employee cooperation and knowledge transfer within the company. Unique clusters identified by HRM were: company culture and organizational support. Conclusions There were both similarities and differences between the views of LMs and HRM on what may facilitate job retention for chronically ill employees. LMs perceived manager/employee cooperation as the most important mechanism for enabling continued employment for these employees. HRM perceived organizational policy and culture as the most important mechanism. The findings provide information about topics that occupational health researchers and planners should

  19. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  20. Climate change impact assessments on the water resources of India under extensive human interventions.

    PubMed

    Madhusoodhanan, C G; Sreeja, K G; Eldho, T I

    2016-10-01

    Climate change is a major concern in the twenty-first century and its assessments are associated with multiple uncertainties, exacerbated and confounded in the regions where human interventions are prevalent. The present study explores the challenges for climate change impact assessment on the water resources of India, one of the world's largest human-modified systems. The extensive human interventions in the Energy-Land-Water-Climate (ELWC) nexus significantly impact the water resources of the country. The direct human interventions in the landscape may surpass/amplify/mask the impacts of climate change and in the process also affect climate change itself. Uncertainties in climate and resource assessments add to the challenge. Formulating coherent resource and climate change policies in India would therefore require an integrated approach that would assess the multiple interlinkages in the ELWC nexus and distinguish the impacts of global climate change from that of regional human interventions. Concerted research efforts are also needed to incorporate the prominent linkages in the ELWC nexus in climate/earth system modelling.

  1. Human resources for maternal, newborn and child health: from measurement and planning to performance for improved health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is increasing attention, globally and in countries, to monitoring and addressing the health systems and human resources inputs, processes and outputs that impede or facilitate progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals for maternal and child health. We reviewed the situation of human resources for health (HRH) in 68 low- and middle-income countries that together account for over 95% of all maternal and child deaths. Methods We collected and analysed cross-nationally comparable data on HRH availability, distribution, roles and functions from new and existing sources, and information from country reviews of HRH interventions that are associated with positive impacts on health services delivery and population health outcomes. Results Findings from 68 countries demonstrate availability of doctors, nurses and midwives is positively correlated with coverage of skilled birth attendance. Most (78%) of the target countries face acute shortages of highly skilled health personnel, and large variations persist within and across countries in workforce distribution, skills mix and skills utilization. Too few countries appropriately plan for, authorize and support nurses, midwives and community health workers to deliver essential maternal, newborn and child health-care interventions that could save lives. Conclusions Despite certain limitations of the data and findings, we identify some key areas where governments, international partners and other stakeholders can target efforts to ensure a sufficient, equitably distributed and efficiently utilized health workforce to achieve MDGs 4 and 5. PMID:21702913

  2. The CITI program: an international online resource for education in human subjects protection and the responsible conduct of research.

    PubMed

    Braunschweiger, Paul; Goodman, Kenneth W

    2007-09-01

    Since 2000, the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program has evolved into an international resource for education in human subjects protection and the responsible conduct of research (RCR). More than 600,000 people at more than 715 institutions in dozens of countries have made use of CITI's online curricula. Although this Web-based resource was created in response to federal requirements for education in human subjects protection, the author's evaluation suggests that learners value and respond to the content in ways that transcend mere compliance. Recent expansion of the CITI model to address the RCR is motivated by such evidence, despite the absence of global federal requirement for RCR training. The authors give an overview of the CITI project, report and analyze evaluation data, and discuss the very idea of online education in research ethics. Although the authors exercise extreme caution in suggesting that CITI or any other four-hour curriculum will be causally related to any reduction in misconduct, they submit that when all members of the team are educated about common moral standards and appropriately mentored, the temptation for misbehavior by any one member is reduced, better science is promoted, and the public trust is preserved. At the very least, providing RCR education is a positive and useful means of reminding taxpayers and others that the same investigators who are spending their billions on research are simultaneously striving to ensure that integrity is woven into the fabric of the scientific enterprise.

  3. Effects of Human Resource Audit on Employee Performance in Secondary Schools in Kenya; a Case of Non Teaching Staff in Secondary Schools in Nyamache Sub County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moke, Oeri Lydia; Muturi, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Human Resources Audit measures human resource outputs and effectiveness under the given circumstances and the degree of utilization of human resource skills. The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of Human resource Audit on employee performance in secondary schools in Nyamache Sub County. The specific objectives for the study included…

  4. Neanderthals versus Modern Humans: Evidence for Resource Competition from Isotopic Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Virginie; Condemi, Silvana; Degioanni, Anna; Herrscher, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    During later MOIS3, in Europe two populations were present, autochthonous Neanderthals and modern humans. Ecological competition between these two populations has often been evoked but never demonstrated. Our aim is to establish whether resource competition occurred. In this paper, in order to examine the possibility of ecological competition between these two populations, 599 isotopic data were subjected to rigorous statistical treatment and analysis through mixing models. The aim of this paper was to compare dietary strategies of Neanderthals and modern humans over time. Our conclusions suggest that Neanderthals and modern humans shared dietary habits in the particular environmental context of MOIS3 characterised in Europe by climatic deterioration. In this environmental context, the resource competition between Neanderthals and modern humans may have accelerated the disappearance of the Neanderthal population. PMID:21941674

  5. Direct evidence for human reliance on rainforest resources in late Pleistocene Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Patrick; Perera, Nimal; Wedage, Oshan; Deraniyagala, Siran; Perera, Jude; Eregama, Saman; Gledhill, Andrew; Petraglia, Michael D; Lee-Thorp, Julia A

    2015-03-13

    Human occupation of tropical rainforest habitats is thought to be a mainly Holocene phenomenon. Although archaeological and paleoenvironmental data have hinted at pre-Holocene rainforest foraging, earlier human reliance on rainforest resources has not been shown directly. We applied stable carbon and oxygen isotope analysis to human and faunal tooth enamel from four late Pleistocene-to-Holocene archaeological sites in Sri Lanka. The results show that human foragers relied primarily on rainforest resources from at least ~20,000 years ago, with a distinct preference for semi-open rainforest and rain forest edges. Homo sapiens' relationship with the tropical rainforests of South Asia is therefore long-standing, a conclusion that indicates the time-depth of anthropogenic reliance and influence on these habitats.

  6. Neanderthals versus Modern Humans: Evidence for Resource Competition from Isotopic Modelling.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Virginie; Condemi, Silvana; Degioanni, Anna; Herrscher, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    During later MOIS3, in Europe two populations were present, autochthonous Neanderthals and modern humans. Ecological competition between these two populations has often been evoked but never demonstrated. Our aim is to establish whether resource competition occurred. In this paper, in order to examine the possibility of ecological competition between these two populations, 599 isotopic data were subjected to rigorous statistical treatment and analysis through mixing models. The aim of this paper was to compare dietary strategies of Neanderthals and modern humans over time. Our conclusions suggest that Neanderthals and modern humans shared dietary habits in the particular environmental context of MOIS3 characterised in Europe by climatic deterioration. In this environmental context, the resource competition between Neanderthals and modern humans may have accelerated the disappearance of the Neanderthal population.

  7. Methodological issues in health human resource planning: cataloguing assumptions and controlling for variables in needs-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G T

    2002-03-01

    Health Human Resource Planning (HHRP) models approximate future nursing requirements based on a variety of factors specific to the model being employed. There is an urgent need to develop a better understanding of the sources of bias in statistical modelling in order to ensure that we are guided by accurate and robust formulae. This paper addresses these issues as they apply in the context of needs-based HHRP research for nursing by presenting a review and discussion of the relevant literature as it relates to: (1) the testing of assumptions, (2) avoiding ecological and atomistic fallacies, (3) how need is directly or indirectly related to health care, and (4) alternatives to aggregate analysis for assessing the relationship between health needs and utilization of nursing services. The paper concludes that multilevel modelling is useful for the simulation analysis of individuals and their ecologies, and that small area variation modelling holds promise for assessing the relationship between health needs and utilization of nursing services.

  8. FAMILY AND HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FEMALE CRACK-SELLER CAREER

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Eloise; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is primarily concerned with resources which family and kin network bring to drug careers. The general thesis is that specific human resources available during childhood influence both the nature and extent of participation in crack use and sales. The availability of family and human resources are critical in determining the extent to which drug abusers could develop and maintain a “conventional” identity while engaging in a drug-distribution career. Although females are becoming more evident in crack-distribution roles, they remain a minority among crack sellers and usually perform the lowest roles. This case study of Rachel represents a truly hidden population, a minority female who has been a successful crack seller for several years. The paper provides insight about persons that rarely come to attention when studying drug distribution and participation. Such persons acquire skills and resources during their lives that enable them to function in two diverse worlds. Such crack sellers are “truly hidden” because they do not have criminal records, almost never come to the attention of police, and function adequately in conventional roles. By analyzing a detailed case study of a female drug seller, this paper delineates some of the human resources and skills which may account for her differential outcome in a career of drug use and sales in inner-city settings. PMID:19809522

  9. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovini, L.

    1994-01-01

    IMGC this is an extremely valuable opportunity to compare our results with others using combined x-ray and optical interferometry to measure Si lattice spacing and dimensional and mass metrology to determine Si density. The initial impetus for the organization of this workshop was given by several colleagues, and with special emphasis and competence by the late Prof. Peter Seyfried of the PTB. We all mourn the loss of such a distinguished scientist to whom very important achievements in NA determination have to be credited. Prof. Seyfried was well known at the IMGC, some of our scientists having very profitably cooperated with him and his co-workers—a cooperation that is being steadily carried on. I wish to acknowledge the endorsements of the Regione Piemonte, of the CNR, of Turin University, and of the Commission of the European Communities, in terms of grants and other resources without which the workshop could not have been realized. I also wish to very warmly thank my colleagues on the Organizing Committee who have worked so well for this event. Lastly, I am pleased to acknowledge the fruitful cooperation between the IMGC and the Istituto di Fisica Generale "A Avogadro"—not the first case of its kind and, I am convinced, not the last. To conclude, let me draw your attention to an enlargement of an Italian stamp commemorating A Avogadro. The statement reads: "Equal volumes of gas in the same temperature and pressure conditions contain the same number of molecules". He simply stated the existence of such a number, leaving us with the pleasure of measuring it.

  10. Expanding the human-machine interface model to address the effect of leadership and management on performance

    SciTech Connect

    Briant, V.S.; Childress, J.R.; Hannaman, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    The US nuclear industry now focuses on improving plant performance in measurable areas such as availability, safety, and operations. Risk assessment and pioneering work in human reliability analysis (HRA) have provided methods to identify and prioritize numerous design improvements. Improvements such as control room design, training, and procedures have contributed positively to plant performance. Human performance is increasingly recognized as a fundamental contributor to safe, economic, and reliable operation. Industry leaders suggest that improved leadership and management are keys to enhanced plant performance. This paper identifies several critical aspects of individual and group behavior that, if managed, could significantly contribute to improved performance. Some existing tools for measuring performance are cited.

  11. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions. PMID:27445556

  12. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions.

  13. 76 FR 63666 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Education and Human Resources ( 1119). Date/Time: November 2, 2011; 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; November 3, 2011; 8...: Increasing the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers Committee.... Susanne Bolton, Committee Management Officer. [FR Doc. 2011-26350 Filed 10-12-11; 8:45 am] BILLING...

  14. HRD and Learning Organisations in Europe. Routledge Studies in Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjepkema, Saskia, Ed.; Stewart, Jim, Ed.; Sambrook, Sally, Ed.; Mulder, Martin, Ed.; ter Horst, Hilde, Ed.; Scheerens, Jaap, Ed.

    This book presents results of a European study into the changing role of human resource development (HRD). Chapter 1, "Introduction," describes the background, objectives, research questions, and underlying research project. Chapter 2, "Learning Organizations and HRD" (Saskia Tjepkema, Hilde ter Horst, Martin Mulder), discusses…

  15. Teaching and Learning about Managing People: Human Resource Management for Education Settings--A Queensland Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrea, Nadine L.; Ehrich, Lisa C.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development of a human resource management (HRM) elective for educators aspiring to management positions in various educational settings. The unit is part of a graduate diploma offered within the Faculty of Education at one Australian university. The paper argues the necessity of HRM studies in postgraduate education courses. (SM)

  16. Managing Human Resources in Higher Education: The Implications of a Diversifying Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, George; Whitchurch, Celia

    2007-01-01

    Human resource capacity has become a critical issue for contemporary universities as a result of increasing pressures from governments and global markets. As a consequence, particularly where the institution is the employer, changes are occurring in the expectations of staff and institutions about employment terms and conditions, as well as the…

  17. European Social Fund in Portugal: A Complex Question for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to review the application of the funds awarded by the European Social Fund (ESF) to Portugal, since 1986, from a human resource development (HRD) perspective. Design/methodology/approach: Several variables are analyzed: investment, absorption, people, impact of investment, evolution of skills, main programs, supply and…

  18. Critical Review on Power in Organization: Empowerment in Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Sung Jun; Park, Sunyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to analyze current practices, discuss empowerment from the theoretical perspectives on power in organizations and suggest an empowerment model based on the type of organizational culture and the role of human resource development (HRD). Design/methodology/approach: By reviewing the classic viewpoint of power, Lukes'…

  19. An Investigation of Outcomes Related to Human Resources Development Attributed to Societal Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    The investigation explores the impact that changing economies have had and will continue to have upon Human Resources Development (HRD)--the collective body responsible for training and retraining labor--and from that perspective offers recommendations to improve the impact HRD has upon society. The challenge for HRD is to recognize the economic,…

  20. Information Technology Applications on Human Resources Management Functions in Large U.S. Metropolitan Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsawafy, Qais Abdulkadum Kahalf

    2013-01-01

    The existing bond between human resources (HR) that team up in a business enterprise and the "real medium" information technology (IT) itself appears in the moment that the relationship is generated independently of the kind of enterprise and the relationship established between them. In today's competitive business world, companies who…

  1. 7 CFR 2.91 - Director, Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... appropriate. (6) Receive, review, and recommend action on all requests for the Secretary's or Assistant Secretary for Administration's approval in human resources matters. (7) Authorize and make final decisions... Department in all contacts with the national offices of labor organizations in fulfilling the...

  2. 7 CFR 2.91 - Director, Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... appropriate. (6) Receive, review, and recommend action on all requests for the Secretary's or Assistant Secretary for Administration's approval in human resources matters. (7) Authorize and make final decisions... Department in all contacts with the national offices of labor organizations in fulfilling the...

  3. 7 CFR 2.91 - Director, Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... appropriate. (6) Receive, review, and recommend action on all requests for the Secretary's or Assistant Secretary for Administration's approval in human resources matters. (7) Authorize and make final decisions... Department in all contacts with the national offices of labor organizations in fulfilling the...

  4. Review of Human Resource Operations in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In October 2006, the Superintendent of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, asked the Council of the Great City Schools to examine the district's human resources division and to provide: (1) High level review of the division's organizational and administrative structure with recommendations for improvements; (2) Assessment of the effectiveness of…

  5. Perspectives on Adult Education, Human Resource Development, and the Emergence of Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a perspective on the relationship between adult education and human resource development of the past two decades and the subsequent emergence of workforce development. The lesson taken from the article should be more than simply a recounting of events related to these fields of study. Instead, the more general lesson may be…

  6. Working with Pregnant and Parenting Teenage Clients. A Resource Guide for Human Service Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervera, Neil, Ed.; Videka-Sherman, Lynn, Ed.

    Each year in the United States, approximately one million adolescents become pregnant. This guide, the seventh in a series of resource guides for human service professionals, features a collection of articles that explores and explains the different facets of teenage pregnancy, while offering strategies for intervention. The volume begins with an…

  7. Robert Owen: A Historiographic Study of a Pioneer of Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the ideals and activities of the nineteenth century Welsh industrialist and reformer Robert Owen (1771-1858), and how they informed modern human resource development (HRD) concepts and practices and provided evidence of Owen as a HRD pioneer. Design/methodology/approach: Historiography provided…

  8. Managing Human Resources. PACE Revised. Level 2. Unit 12. Research & Development Series No. 240BB12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This unit on managing human resources in a small business, the 12th in a series of 18 modules, is on the second level of the revised PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) comprehensive curriculum. Geared to advanced secondary and beginning postsecondary or adult students, the modules provide an opportunity to learn about and…

  9. Building Human Resources Management Capacity for University Research: The Case at Four Leading Vietnamese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    At research-intensive universities, building human resources management (HRM) capacity has become a key approach to enhancing a university's research performance. However, despite aspiring to become a research-intensive university, many teaching-intensive universities in developing countries may not have created effective research-promoted HRM…

  10. Lessons for Managers: England's Human Resource Dilemmas. Training and Development Research Center Project Number Forty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Joan B.; And Others

    The countries of the European Community represent a commitment to European economic and political unity as part of a trend toward the globalization of the world's economic life. Economic, social, and political challenges are bound up in economic competitiveness. Countries are examining human resource issues in order to compete for the world…

  11. Program Excellence Network of the Academy of Human Resource Development: Its Purpose and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruona, Wendy E. A.

    2009-01-01

    This article features the Program Excellence Network (PEN) of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) which was established in September 2006 in response to a proposal brought forward by the author. The mission of PEN is to strengthen HRD academic programs and promote excellence in teaching HRD. PEN provides a forum for its members to…

  12. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2006-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  13. AB 1725 Human Resources Development Plan for the Period July 1, 1989-June 30, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desert Community Coll. District, Palm Desert, CA.

    Funds set aside by California Assembly Bill (AB) 1725 for staff development programs were used by the Desert Community College District (DCCD) to supplement its existing human resources development plan (HRDP). The HRDP, which was based on the results of a needs assessment of all employees, was designed to respond to the changing professional…

  14. School Leadership in Support of Teachers' Transformational Learning: Drawing from the Well of Human Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drago-Severson, Eleanor; Pinto, Kristina C.

    This report describes a study of the human-resource challenges of principals in facilitating teachers' transformational learning, and their creative strategies for overcoming such challenges. The purpose of the study was to examine how a diverse sample of school leaders made sense of teacher learning and to examine their efforts to support the…

  15. Aligning Human Resource Development with the Strategic Priorities of Healthcare Organizations: The CFO Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carla Breedlove

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of how human resource development (HRD) can align more closely with the healthcare system's strategic priorities from the perspective of chief financial officers (CFOs). Five common themes emerged: (a) training is well aligned to the strategic priority to optimize clinical…

  16. Competencies Required of Human Resource Professionals in the Government Contracting Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Dawn Denise

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a unique set of Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) were required of Human Resource Practitioners (HRPs) in federal-level Government Contracting Companies (GCC) in the United States. Study results identified additional sets of HR-related KSAs to perform with minimum competency within a…

  17. Human Resources Policies Compared: What Can the EU and the USA Learn from Each Other?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare in a fruitful way the human resources (HR) policies that exist in the European Union (EU) and in the United States of America (USA). Nowadays, the world is evolving to a situation in which big economic spaces like Brazil, Russia, India, China, Japan, the EU and the USA are becoming dominant. Those spaces can learn from one…

  18. Human Resource Management Strategies and Teacher's Efficiency within Schools: A Co-Relational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashmi, Kiran

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to study Human Resource Management and Development (HRMD) strategies and their effect on teachers' efficiency within the Catholic Board of Education (CBE) schools of Pakistan whose teachers are graduates in educational leadership courses from a private teacher education institutes in Karachi. The study endeavored to build a…

  19. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  20. Building Futurism into the Institution's Strategic Planning and Human Resource Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Warren H.

    A process for building futurism into the institution's strategic planning and human resource development model is described. It is an attempt to assist faculty and staff to understand the future and the formulation and revision of professional goals in relation to an image of the future. A conceptual framework about the changing nature of human…

  1. Human Resource Development Planning in a Community College Program Based on a View of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Steven B.

    In recognition of the importance of futures information in planning efforts and continued staff development in achieving institutional goals, Lincoln Land Community College (LLCC), in Springfield, Illinois, undertook a project to develop and validate a strategic planning process for human resource development of faculty and staff in a radiologic…

  2. EDI (electronic data interchange) for human resources saves money and time.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, J J; Kibat, G

    1994-01-01

    Healthcare financial managers seeking immediate cost savings through the use of electronic data interchange (EDI) may find that the automation of repetitive transactions can reduce staffing levels in hospital human resource departments and lower the cost of employee benefits. New procedures and EDI also can tighten controls on hospital employee health benefit eligibility and reduce the per employee cost of benefits.

  3. Web-Based Training Design for Human Resources Topics: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Patricia Yee

    2004-01-01

    Human resources (HR) departments are often responsible for providing employee and supervisory training in soft skill areas-such as performance management-and in compliance with HR-related laws, such as the Family and Medical Leave Act. Traditionally, this training has occurred in classrooms. In recent years, however, HR departments have made…

  4. Web Accessibility and Usability of the Homepages from Academy of Human Resource Development Members' Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Xiaoming; Sligar, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Human resource development programs in various institutions communicate with their constituencies including persons with disabilities through websites. Web sites need to be accessible for legal, economic and ethical reasons. We used an automated web usability evaluation tool, aDesigner, to evaluate 205 home pages from the organizations of AHRD…

  5. Issues in Work-Related Education. EAE605 Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin Univ., Victoria (Australia).

    This publication is part of the study materials for the one-semester distance education unit, Human Resource Development, in the Open Campus Program at Deakin University (Australia). It contains three essays that explore the approaches to learning currently modeled within industry. "Training for Women" (Kathy MacDermott) presents the…

  6. "Brothers and Sisters": A Novel Way to Teach Human Resources Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumpus, Minnette

    2000-01-01

    The novel "Brothers and Sisters" by Bebe Moore Campbell was used in a management course to explore human resource management issues, concepts, and theories. The course included prereading and postreading surveys, lecture, book review, and examination. Most of the students (92%) felt the novel was an appropriate way to meet course…

  7. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Adult Continuing Education (ACE) and Human Resource Development (HRD) have grown tremendously in the last quarter century. ACE experienced tremendous growth in the 60s and 70s, with over 17 million attending colleges and universities, and local school and community adult education programs by the end of the 1970s. More ACE programs were started…

  8. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2006-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  9. The Future of Blended Learning and the Emerging Competencies of Human Resource Development Professionals in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teng, Ya-Ting; Bonk, Curtis J.; Kim, Kyong-Jee

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the future direction of blended learning in workplace in Taiwan and to probe into emerging competencies of human resource development (HRD) professionals. One hundred and twelve participants who worked in various types of organizations, including government, business, and non-profit organizations were…

  10. Quality Assurance of Human Resources Development Programs: A Socio-Technical Continuum Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandenburg, Dale C.

    A useful, values-oriented human resource development (HRD) program evaluation approach is one that is empirical with its orientation derived from a social/technical perspective. The optimum mix between the technical skills of evaluation and the required social skills of evaluation delivery is crucial for the quality assurance process. The core to…

  11. The Challenges of Human Resource Management towards Organizational Effectiveness: A Comparative Study in Southern EU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavrou-Costea, Eleni

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims to examine the human resource management challenges in Southern EU and their effect on organizational performance. Design/methodology/approach: First, key challenges were identified in the existing literature. Then, these challenges were matched with those reported most often in the CRANET questionnaire. These challenges…

  12. Academy of Human Resource Development Conference Proceedings (St. Louis, Missouri, March 2-5, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Elwood F., III, Ed.

    This document contains papers from 23 of 25 symposia held at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. Keynote speeches, symposium 6, and symposium 25 are not included. The 23 symposia are on the following topics: (1) HRD town forum; (2) core directions in HRD; (3) university instruction in HRD; (4) evaluation in HRD; (5)…

  13. Beyond the Paycheck: A Human Resources Management Guide for Leaders of Small Youth-Serving Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    This guide aims to help organization leaders develop the tools and knowledge they need to create and use sound human resources management (HRM) systems and practices that support program success and sustainability. It identifies key components of HRM systems and discusses important considerations in designing HRM policies, procedures, and…

  14. Building the Learning Organisation: A New Role for Human Resource Developers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    1992-01-01

    Human resource development practice extends beyond training to the broader and more visionary role of facilitating learning for individuals, teams, and organizations. Designers of learning organizations seek to increase overall learning capacity, create ongoing adaptive capacity, and build autonomy and empowerment. (SK)

  15. Equality in the Workplace. An Equal Opportunities Handbook for Trainers. Human Resource Management in Action Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Helen

    This workbook, which is intended as a practical guide for human resource managers, trainers, and others concerned with developing and implementing equal opportunities training programs in British workplaces, examines issues in and methods for equal opportunities training. The introduction gives an overview of current training trends and issues.…

  16. Human Resource Development Practices as Determinant of HRD Climate and Quality Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Arif; Hashim, Junaidah; Ismail, Ahmad Zaki Hj

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to measure employees' perception of human resource development (HRD) practices, to explore whether ISO certification leads to any improvements in HRD system, and to examine the role of HRD practices on employees' development climate and quality orientation in the organization. Design/methodology/approach: A total…

  17. Human Resource Development in the Irish Hotel Industry: The Case of the Small Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Clara

    2002-01-01

    A profile of small businesses in the Irish hotel industry shows that all claim to believe in human resource development but few practice it. Small hotels favor informal, specific job training focused on solution of immediate problems rather than long-term development. (Contains 119 references.) (SK)

  18. Exploring the Strategic Role of Human Resource Development in Organizational Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jia; Hutchins, Holly M.; Garavan, Thomas N.

    2009-01-01

    Crisis management has been a largely overlooked territory in human resource development (HRD) despite the increasingly recognized impact of organizational crises on the individual and organizational performance. This article explores the strategic role of HRD in the context of organizational crisis management using Garavan's strategic HRD model as…

  19. Special Issue: Creating a Tipping Point--Strategic Human Resources in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alvin; Chun, Edna

    2012-01-01

    This monograph examines the emergence of strategic human resource (HR) practices in higher education at a time when the budgetary crisis in public higher education has never been more acute. The wave of financial pressures on public research universities today heralds the advent of an era of unprecedented change. Financial upheaval resulting from…

  20. World Bank Education Policy and Human Resource Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutamba, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the intersection of education and training through societal development in the developing world, a concept linked to national human resource development (NHRD). In addition, education and training is known to correlate strongly with employment outcomes that are connected to economic success, health and family…