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Sample records for address impulse source

  1. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories' high power electromagnetic impulse sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, L. F.; Buttram, M. T.; Denison, G. J.; Lundstrom, J. M.; Crowe, W. R.; Aurand, J. F.; Patterson, P. E.

    1994-05-01

    Three impulse sources have been developed to cover a wide range of peak power, bandwidth and center frequency requirements. Each of the sources can operate in single shot, rep-rate, or burst modes. These devices are of rugged construction and are suitable for field use. This paper will describe the specifications and principals of operation for each source. The sources to be described are: SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator), a coaxial Blumlein pulser with an in-line (series) peaking switch; EMBL (EnantioMorphic BLurfflein), a bipolar parallel plate Blumlein with a crowbar type (parallel) peaking switch; and the LCO (L-C Oscillator) a spark-switched L-C oscillator with damped sinusoidal output. SNIPER and EMBL are ultra-wideband (UWB) sources which produce a very fast high voltage transition. When differentiated by the antenna, an impulse whose width corresponds to the transition time is radiated. The LCO operates with a center frequency up to 800 MHz and up to 100 MHz bandwidth. Because the LCO output is relatively narrow band, high gain antennas may be employed to produce very high radiated field strengths.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories` high power electromagnetic impulse sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Denison, G.J.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Crowe, W.R.; Aurand, J.F.; Patterson, P.E.

    1994-10-01

    Three impulse sources have been developed to cover a wide range of peak power, bandwidth and center frequency requirements. Each of the sources can operate in single shot, rep-rate, or burst modes. These devices are of rugged construction and are suitable for field use. This paper will describe the specifications and principals of operation for each source. The sources to be described are: SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator), a coaxial Blumlein pulser with an in-line (series) peaking switch; EMBL (EnantioMorphic BLurfflein), a bipolar parallel plate Blumlein with a crowbar type (parallel) peaking switch; and the LCO (L-C Oscillator) a spark-switched L-C oscillator with damped sinusoidal output. SNIPER and EMBL are ultra-wideband (UWB) sources which produce a very fast high voltage transition. When differentiated by the antenna, an impulse whose width corresponds to the transition time is radiated. The LCO operates with a center frequency up to 800 MHz and up to 100 MHz bandwidth. Because the LCO output is relatively narrow band, high gain antennas may be employed to produce very high radiated field strengths.

  4. Impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilmer, N.; Trotter, G.; Kane, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reports recent observations of a relatively large hard X-ray burst with well developed impulsive and gradual components, that was associated with a relatively modest optical flare on Aug. 14, 1979. The impulsive X-ray source has a much higher ion density and the electron injection in the phase is shorter in duration consisting of fewer energetic electrons than in the gradual phase. The gradual X-ray source seems to consist of a lower density region, probably bounded by a magnetic arch in which the energetic electrons are perfectly trapped. The different temporal development of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray components suggest large differences in the physical parameters of the ambient plasma.

  5. X-ray Diffraction and Multi-Frame Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostics for IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Adam; Carlson, Carl; Young, Jason; Curtis, Alden; Jensen, Brian; Ramos, Kyle; Yeager, John; Montgomery, David; Fezza, Kamel

    2013-07-08

    The diagnostic needs of any dynamic loading platform present unique technical challenges that must be addressed in order to accurately measure in situ material properties in an extreme environment. The IMPULSE platform (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is no exception and, in fact, may be more challenging, as the imaging diagnostics must be synchronized to both the experiment and the 60 ps wide x-ray bunches produced at APS. The technical challenges of time-resolved x-ray diffraction imaging and high-resolution multi-frame phase contrast imaging (PCI) are described in this paper. Example data from recent IMPULSE experiments are shown to illustrate the advances and evolution of these diagnostics with a focus on comparing the performance of two intensified CCD cameras and their suitability for multi-frame PCI. The continued development of these diagnostics is fundamentally important to IMPULSE and many other loading platforms and will benefit future facilities such as the Dynamic Compression Sector at APS and MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  6. IP address management : augmenting Sandia's capabilities through open source tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Nayar, R. Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Internet Protocol (IP) address management is an increasingly growing concern at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the networking community as a whole. The current state of the available IP addresses indicates that they are nearly exhausted. Currently SNL doesn't have the justification to obtain more IP address space from Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). There must exist a local entity to manage and allocate IP assignments efficiently. Ongoing efforts at Sandia have been in the form of a multifunctional database application notably known as Network Information System (NWIS). NWIS is a database responsible for a multitude of network administrative services including IP address management. This study will explore the feasibility of augmenting NWIS's IP management capabilities utilizing open source tools. Modifications of existing capabilities to better allocate available IP address space are studied.

  7. Ray-theoretic localization of an impulsive source in a stratified ocean using two hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarsoulis, E. K.; Kalogerakis, M. A.

    2005-11-01

    A method is presented for passive localization of impulsive acoustic sources in a stratified ocean by measuring relative times of direct and surface-reflected arrivals at two hydrophones. The proposed method is based on ray theory and takes into account the effects of refraction on the geometry of acoustic paths (ray bending) and travel times, generalizing previous approaches based on the homogeneous-ocean assumption (straight-line localization). If the hydrophone depths are known, then the source depth and distance from each hydrophone can be estimated from the three differential arrival times. If in addition the hydrophone separation is known, the bearing of the source can be estimated as well. Apart from the effects on ray geometry and travel times, stratification affects localization by introducing shadow zones and caustics. For source locations in the neighborhood of caustics, the localization problem accepts two solutions, one of which is the true source location and the other one which is an artifact (ghost solution). This ambiguity can be resolved in the case of tracking moving sources since as the source moves away from the caustic only the track corresponding to the true source position will be continued. The present method has been developed primarily for monitoring the dive behavior of sperm whales producing acoustic clicks, yet it is general and can be applied for the localization and tracking of any kind of impulsive acoustic source in the ocean.

  8. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated. PMID:24993239

  9. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated.

  10. SAVAH: Source Address Validation with Host Identity Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, Dmitriy; Gurtov, Andrei

    Explosive growth of the Internet and lack of mechanisms that validate the authenticity of a packet source produced serious security and accounting issues. In this paper, we propose validating source addresses in LAN using Host Identity Protocol (HIP) deployed in a first-hop router. Compared to alternative solutions such as CGA, our approach is suitable both for IPv4 and IPv6. We have implemented SAVAH in Wi-Fi access points and evaluated its overhead for clients and the first-hop router.

  11. Dynamic evolution of the source volumes of gradual and impulsive solar flare emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Crannell, C. J.; Goetz, F.; Magun, A.; Mckenzie, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    This study compares flare source volumes inferred from impulsive hard X-rays and microwaves with those derived from density sensitive soft X-ray line ratios in the O VII spectrum. The data for this study were obtained with the SMM Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer, Earth-based radio observatories, and the SOLEX-B spectrometer on the P78-1 satellite. Data were available for the flares of 1980 April 8, 1980 May 9, and 1981 February 26. The hard X-ray/microwave source volume is determined under the assumption that the same electron temperature or power law index characterizes both the source of hard X-rays and the source of microwaves. The O VII line ratios yield the density and volume of the 2 X 10 to the 6th K plasma. For all three flares, the O VII source volume is found to be smallest at the beginning of the flare, near the time when the impulsive hard X-ray/microwave volume reaches its first maximum. At this time, the O VII volume is three to four orders of magnitude smaller than that inferred from the hard X-ray/microwave analysis. Subsequently, the O VII source volume increases by one or two orders of magnitude then remains almost constant until the end of the flare when it apparently increases again.

  12. Crosswell electromagnetic modeling from impulsive source: Optimization strategy for dispersion suppression in convolutional perfectly matched layer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sinan; Pan, Heping; Du, Ting; Konaté, Ahmed Amara; Deng, Chengxiang; Qin, Zhen; Guo, Bo; Peng, Ling; Ma, Huolin; Li, Gang; Zhou, Feng

    2016-01-01

    This study applied the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to forward modeling of the low-frequency crosswell electromagnetic (EM) method. Specifically, we implemented impulse sources and convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML). In the process to strengthen CPML, we observed that some dispersion was induced by the real stretch κ, together with an angular variation of the phase velocity of the transverse electric plane wave; the conclusion was that this dispersion was positively related to the real stretch and was little affected by grid interval. To suppress the dispersion in the CPML, we first derived the analytical solution for the radiation field of the magneto-dipole impulse source in the time domain. Then, a numerical simulation of CPML absorption with high-frequency pulses qualitatively amplified the dispersion laws through wave field snapshots. A numerical simulation using low-frequency pulses suggested an optimal parameter strategy for CPML from the established criteria. Based on its physical nature, the CPML method of simply warping space-time was predicted to be a promising approach to achieve ideal absorption, although it was still difficult to entirely remove the dispersion. PMID:27585538

  13. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. STATISTICS AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SOURCE REGION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I.; Utz, D.

    2011-09-10

    We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and COR instruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from their initiation through impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For a set of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity, and acceleration profiles and statistically analyzed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration, peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peak velocity, height at peak acceleration, and size of the CME source region. The CME peak accelerations we derived range from 20 to 6800 m s{sup -2} and are inversely correlated with the acceleration duration and the height at peak acceleration. Seventy-four percent of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 R{sub sun}. CMEs that originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive and reach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can be explained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations and decreases with height and CME size.

  14. Crosswell electromagnetic modeling from impulsive source: Optimization strategy for dispersion suppression in convolutional perfectly matched layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sinan; Pan, Heping; Du, Ting; Konaté, Ahmed Amara; Deng, Chengxiang; Qin, Zhen; Guo, Bo; Peng, Ling; Ma, Huolin; Li, Gang; Zhou, Feng

    2016-09-01

    This study applied the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to forward modeling of the low-frequency crosswell electromagnetic (EM) method. Specifically, we implemented impulse sources and convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML). In the process to strengthen CPML, we observed that some dispersion was induced by the real stretch κ, together with an angular variation of the phase velocity of the transverse electric plane wave; the conclusion was that this dispersion was positively related to the real stretch and was little affected by grid interval. To suppress the dispersion in the CPML, we first derived the analytical solution for the radiation field of the magneto-dipole impulse source in the time domain. Then, a numerical simulation of CPML absorption with high-frequency pulses qualitatively amplified the dispersion laws through wave field snapshots. A numerical simulation using low-frequency pulses suggested an optimal parameter strategy for CPML from the established criteria. Based on its physical nature, the CPML method of simply warping space-time was predicted to be a promising approach to achieve ideal absorption, although it was still difficult to entirely remove the dispersion.

  15. Crosswell electromagnetic modeling from impulsive source: Optimization strategy for dispersion suppression in convolutional perfectly matched layer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sinan; Pan, Heping; Du, Ting; Konaté, Ahmed Amara; Deng, Chengxiang; Qin, Zhen; Guo, Bo; Peng, Ling; Ma, Huolin; Li, Gang; Zhou, Feng

    2016-01-01

    This study applied the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to forward modeling of the low-frequency crosswell electromagnetic (EM) method. Specifically, we implemented impulse sources and convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML). In the process to strengthen CPML, we observed that some dispersion was induced by the real stretch κ, together with an angular variation of the phase velocity of the transverse electric plane wave; the conclusion was that this dispersion was positively related to the real stretch and was little affected by grid interval. To suppress the dispersion in the CPML, we first derived the analytical solution for the radiation field of the magneto-dipole impulse source in the time domain. Then, a numerical simulation of CPML absorption with high-frequency pulses qualitatively amplified the dispersion laws through wave field snapshots. A numerical simulation using low-frequency pulses suggested an optimal parameter strategy for CPML from the established criteria. Based on its physical nature, the CPML method of simply warping space-time was predicted to be a promising approach to achieve ideal absorption, although it was still difficult to entirely remove the dispersion. PMID:27585538

  16. Perception-based automatic classification of impulsive-source active sonar echoes.

    PubMed

    Young, Victor W; Hines, Paul C

    2007-09-01

    Impulsive-source active sonar systems are often plagued by false alarm echoes resulting from the presence of naturally occurring clutter objects in the environment. Sonar performance could be improved by a technique for discriminating between echoes from true targets and echoes from clutter. Motivated by anecdotal evidence that target echoes sound very different than clutter echoes when auditioned by a human operator, this paper describes the implementation of an automatic classifier for impulsive-source active sonar echoes that is based on perceptual signal features that have been previously identified in the musical acoustics literature as underlying timbre. Perceptual signal features found in this paper to be particularly useful to the problem of active sonar classification include: the centroid and peak value of the perceptual loudness function, as well as several features based on subband attack and decay times. This paper uses subsets of these perceptual signal features to train and test an automatic classifier capable of discriminating between target and clutter echoes with an equal error rate of roughly 10%; the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve corresponding to this classifier is found to be 0.975.

  17. Localizing nearby sound sources in a classroom: binaural room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G; Kopco, Norbert; Martin, Tara J

    2005-05-01

    Binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) were measured in a classroom for sources at different azimuths and distances (up to 1 m) relative to a manikin located in four positions in a classroom. When the listener is far from all walls, reverberant energy distorts signal magnitude and phase independently at each frequency, altering monaural spectral cues, interaural phase differences, and interaural level differences. For the tested conditions, systematic distortion (comb-filtering) from an early intense reflection is only evident when a listener is very close to a wall, and then only in the ear facing the wall. Especially for a nearby source, interaural cues grow less reliable with increasing source laterality and monaural spectral cues are less reliable in the ear farther from the sound source. Reverberation reduces the magnitude of interaural level differences at all frequencies; however, the direct-sound interaural time difference can still be recovered from the BRIRs measured in these experiments. Results suggest that bias and variability in sound localization behavior may vary systematically with listener location in a room as well as source location relative to the listener, even for nearby sources where there is relatively little reverberant energy.

  18. IMPULSIVE PHASE CORONAL HARD X-RAY SOURCES IN AN X3.9 CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qingrong; Petrosian, Vahe E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu

    2012-03-20

    We present the analysis of a pair of unusually energetic coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources detected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the impulsive phase of an X3.9 class solar flare on 2003 November 3, which simultaneously shows two intense footpoint (FP) sources. A distinct loop top (LT) coronal source is detected up to {approx}150 keV and a second (upper) coronal source up to {approx}80 keV. These photon energies, which were not fully investigated in earlier analysis of this flare, are much higher than commonly observed in coronal sources and pose grave modeling challenges. The LT source in general appears higher in altitude with increasing energy and exhibits a more limited motion compared to the expansion of the thermal loop. The high-energy LT source shows an impulsive time profile and its nonthermal power-law spectrum exhibits soft-hard-soft evolution during the impulsive phase, similar to the FP sources. The upper coronal source exhibits an opposite spatial gradient and a similar spectral slope compared to the LT source. These properties are consistent with the model of stochastic acceleration of electrons by plasma waves or turbulence. However, the LT and FP spectral index difference (varying from {approx}0 to 1) is much smaller than commonly measured and than that expected from a simple stochastic acceleration model. Additional confinement or trapping mechanisms of high-energy electrons in the corona are required. Comprehensive modeling including both kinetic effects and the macroscopic flare structure may shed light on this behavior. These results highlight the importance of imaging spectroscopic observations of the LT and FP sources up to high energies in understanding electron acceleration in solar flares. Finally, we show that the electrons producing the upper coronal HXR source may very likely be responsible for the type III radio bursts at the decimetric/metric wavelength observed during the impulsive phase of this

  19. Dynamic Initiator Experiments using IMPULSE (Impact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Nathaniel; Jensen, Brian; Ramos, Kyle; Iverson, Adam; Martinez, Michael; Liechty, Gary; Fezzaa, Kamel; Clarke, Steven

    2015-06-01

    We have successfully imaged, for the first time, the operation of copper slapper initiators that are used to initiate high explosive detonators. These data will aid in model development and calibration in order to provide a robust predictive capability and as a design tool in future applications. The initiation system consists of a copper bridge fixed to a parylene flyer. The copper bridge functions when a capacitor is discharged causing current to flow through the narrow bridge. As this happens, a plasma forms due to the high current densities and ohmic heating, which launches the parylene flyer that impacts a high explosive pellet producing detonation. Unlike traditional measurements, x-ray phase contrast imaging can see ``inside'' the process providing unique information with nanosecond time resolution and micrometer spatial resolution. The team performed experiments on the IMPULSE system at the Advanced Photon Source to obtain high resolution, in situ images of this process in real-time. From these images, researchers can examine the formation of the plasma instabilities and their interaction with the flyer, determine the flyer velocity, and obtain crucial information on the spatial distribution of mass and density gradients in the plasma and flyer.

  20. Source signature and elastic waves in a half-space under a momentary shear line impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziv, Moche

    2003-03-01

    The transient deformation of an elastic half-space under a line-concentrated impulsive vector shear load applied momentarily is disclosed in this paper. While in an earlier work, the author gave an analytical-numerical method for the solution to this transient boundary-value problem, here, the resultant response of the half-space is presented and interpreted. In particular, a probe is set up for the kinematics of the source signature and wave fronts, both explicitly revealed in the strained half-space by the solution method. The source signature is the imprint of the spatiotemporal configuration of the excitation source in the resultant response. Fourteen wave fronts exist behind the precursor shear wave S: four concentric cylindrical, eight plane, and two relativistic cylindrical initiated at propagating centres that are located on the stationary boundaries of the solution domain. A snapshot of the stressed half-space reveals that none of the 14 wave fronts fully extend laterally. Instead, each is enclosed within point bounds. These wave arresting points and the two propagating centres of the relativistic waves constitute the source signature. The obtained 14 wave fronts are further combined into 11 disparate wave fronts that are grouped into four categories: an axis of symmetry wave - so named here by reason of being a wave front that is contiguous to the axis of symmetry, three body waves, five surface waves and two inhibitor waves - so named here by reason that beyond them the material motion dies out. Of the three body waves, the first is an unloading shear wave, the second is a diffracted wave and the third is a reflected longitudinal two-branch wave. Of the two inhibitor waves, the first is a two-joint relativistic wave, while the second is a two-branch wave. The wave system, however, is not the same for all the dependent variables; a wave front that appears in the behaviour of one dependent variable may not exist in the behaviour of another. It is evident

  1. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  2. Helicopter impulsive noise: Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  3. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanisms is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanisms of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory/experiment are suggested.

  4. Addressing sources of uncertainty in a global terrestrial carbon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exbrayat, J.; Pitman, A. J.; Zhang, Q.; Abramowitz, G.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Several sources of uncertainty exist in the parameterization of the land carbon cycle in current Earth System Models (ESMs). For example, recently implemented interactions between the carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles lead to diverse changes in land-atmosphere C fluxes simulated by different models. Further, although soil organic matter decomposition is commonly parameterized as a first-order decay process, the formulation of the microbial response to changes in soil moisture and soil temperature varies tremendously between models. Here, we examine the sensitivity of historical land-atmosphere C fluxes simulated by an ESM to these two major sources of uncertainty. We implement three soil moisture (SMRF) and three soil temperature (STRF) respiration functions in the CABLE-CASA-CNP land biogeochemical component of the coarse resolution CSIRO Mk3L climate model. Simulations are undertaken using three degrees of biogeochemical nutrient limitation: C-only, C and N, and C and N and P. We first bring all 27 possible combinations of a SMRF with a STRF and a biogeochemical mode to a steady-state in their biogeochemical pools. Then, transient historical (1850-2005) simulations are driven by prescribed atmospheric CO2 concentrations used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Similarly to some previously published results, representing N and P limitation on primary production reduces the global land carbon sink while some regions become net C sources over the historical period (1850-2005). However, the uncertainty due to the SMRFs and STRFs does not decrease relative to the inter-annual variability in net uptake when N and P limitations are added. Differences in the SMRFs and STRFs and their effect on the soil C balance can also change the sign of some regional sinks. We show that this response is mostly driven by the pool size achieved at the end of the spin-up procedure. Further, there exists a six-fold range in the level

  5. Method for enhancing low frequency output of impulsive type seismic energy sources and its application to a seismic energy source for use while drilling

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P; Stokes, Robert H; Glowka, David A

    2014-12-02

    A method for operating an impulsive type seismic energy source in a firing sequence having at least two actuations for each seismic impulse to be generated by the source. The actuations have a time delay between them related to a selected energy frequency peak of the source output. One example of the method is used for generating seismic signals in a wellbore and includes discharging electric current through a spark gap disposed in the wellbore in at least one firing sequence. The sequence includes at least two actuations of the spark gap separated by an amount of time selected to cause acoustic energy resulting from the actuations to have peak amplitude at a selected frequency.

  6. Silicon oxynitride films deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering using nitrous oxide as a single-source precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hänninen, Tuomas Schmidt, Susann; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2015-09-15

    Silicon oxynitride thin films were synthesized by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering of silicon in argon/nitrous oxide plasmas. Nitrous oxide was employed as a single-source precursor supplying oxygen and nitrogen for the film growth. The films were characterized by elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, scanning electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Results show that the films are silicon rich, amorphous, and exhibit a random chemical bonding structure. The optical properties with the refractive index and the extinction coefficient correlate with the film elemental composition, showing decreasing values with increasing film oxygen and nitrogen content. The total percentage of oxygen and nitrogen in the films is controlled by adjusting the gas flow ratio in the deposition processes. Furthermore, it is shown that the film oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio can be tailored by the high power impulse magnetron sputtering-specific parameters pulse frequency and energy per pulse.

  7. Instantaneous Impulses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Describes an experiment that extends Newton's instantaneous-impulse method of orbital analysis to a graphical method of orbit determination. Discusses the experiment's usefulness for teaching both horizontal projectile motion and instantaneous impulse. (WRM)

  8. Adopting Open Source Software to Address Software Risks during the Scientific Data Life Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinay, S.; Downs, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Software enables the creation, management, storage, distribution, discovery, and use of scientific data throughout the data lifecycle. However, the capabilities offered by software also present risks for the stewardship of scientific data, since future access to digital data is dependent on the use of software. From operating systems to applications for analyzing data, the dependence of data on software presents challenges for the stewardship of scientific data. Adopting open source software provides opportunities to address some of the proprietary risks of data dependence on software. For example, in some cases, open source software can be deployed to avoid licensing restrictions for using, modifying, and transferring proprietary software. The availability of the source code of open source software also enables the inclusion of modifications, which may be contributed by various community members who are addressing similar issues. Likewise, an active community that is maintaining open source software can be a valuable source of help, providing an opportunity to collaborate to address common issues facing adopters. As part of the effort to meet the challenges of software dependence for scientific data stewardship, risks from software dependence have been identified that exist during various times of the data lifecycle. The identification of these risks should enable the development of plans for mitigating software dependencies, where applicable, using open source software, and to improve understanding of software dependency risks for scientific data and how they can be reduced during the data life cycle.

  9. A new impulsive seismic shear wave source for near-surface (0-30 m) seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of elastic moduli and fluid content in shallow (0-30 m) natural soils below artificial flood containment structures can be particularly useful in levee monitoring as well as seismic hazard studies. Shear wave moduli may be estimated from horizontally polarized, shear wave experiments. However, long profiles (>10 km) with dense receiver and shot spacings (<1m) cannot be collected efficiently using currently available shear wave sources. We develop a new, inexpensive, shear wave source for collecting fast, shot gathers over large acquisition sites. In particular, gas-charged, organic-rich sediments comprising most lower-delta sedimentary facies, greatly attenuate compressional body-waves. On the other hand, SH waves are relatively insensitive to pore-fluid moduli and can improve resolution. We develop a recoil device (Jolly, 1956) into a single-user, light-weight (<20 kg), impulsive, ground-surface-coupled SH wave generator, which is capable of working at rates of several hundred shotpoints per day. Older impulsive methods rely on hammer blows to ground-planted stationary targets. Our source is coupled to the ground with steel spikes and the powder charge can be detonated mechanically or electronically. Electrical fuses show repeatability in start times of < 50 microseconds. The barrel and shell-holder exceed required thicknesses to ensure complete safety during use. The breach confines a black-powder, 12-gauge shotgun shell, loaded with inert, environmentally safe ballast. In urban settings, produced heat and sound are confined by a detached, exterior cover. A moderate 2.5 g black-powder charge generates seismic amplitudes equivalent to three 4-kg sledge-hammer blows. We test this device to elucidate near subsurface sediment properties at former levee breach sites in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Our radio-telemetric seismic acquisition system uses an in-house landstreamer, consisting of 14-Hz horizontal component geophones, coupled to steel plates

  10. Study of the Helicon Source Operation in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molvig, Kim; Batishchev, Oleg

    2003-01-01

    During this research period the following models of the VASIMR helicon discharge have been further developed and applied to analyze the on-going VX- 10 ASPL experiment: A) 1D semi-analytical model for a mixed-collisional propellant flow B) OD power and balance model for the whole helicon discharge In this particular research period we have concentrated on the MW-level performance of the VASIMR helicon source. Favorable high-power scaling and reduced ionization costs were obtained, and presented at the VASIMR NASA review in the Fall '02. This Grant is continuation of the previous NAG9-1224 award. The research results are summarized in 14 publications; they were presented as 20+ talks at the major International Conferences and scientific seminars at the leading Academic and Research Institutions. The reported results allowed helicon discharge characterization, understanding of the several experimental observations, and helped to make predictions and propose structural modifications for the advanced VASIMR helicon source operation.

  11. In Situ Investigation of the Dynamic Response of Energetic Materials using IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Kyle

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical and chemical response of energetic materials is controlled by spatial heterogeneity and crystalline mechanics that evolve during impact. Traditional methods use continuum measurements to infer the microstructure response whereas advances in synchrotron capabilities and diagnostics are providing new, unique opportunities to interrogate materials in real time and in situ. Recently the IMPULSE team has performed experiments on a gas-gun system (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) using single X-ray bunch phase contrast imaging (PCI) and Laue diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to examine shock-induced phenomena in energetic materials and other inert, molecular analogues. The low absorption of molecular materials maximizes x-ray beam penetration, allowing measurements in transmission using the brilliance currently available at APS Sector 32. The transmission geometry enables exciting possibilities for observing both average lattice response and spatially heterogeneous, continuum response (2 um spatial resolution, 60 ps exposure, 153 ns frame-rate) in energetic materials ranging from single crystals to plastic bonded composites. This capability provides a means for linking mechanics with detonation initiation by resolving deformation mechanisms such as compaction, void collapse and jetting, cracking, dislocation-mediated plasticity and phase transformation. Representative data will be presented and discussed to illustrate current progress and future directions for this new technology.

  12. In situ investigation of the dynamic response of energetic materials using IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, K. J.; Jensen, B. J.; Iverson, A. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Carlson, C. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Thompson, D. G.; Fezzaa, K.; Hooks, D. E.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical and chemical response of energetic materials is controlled by a convolution of deformation mechanisms that span length scales and evolve during impact. Traditional methods use continuum measurements to infer the microstructural response whereas advances in synchrotron capabilities and diagnostics are providing new, unique opportunities to interrogate materials in real time and in situ. Experiments have been performed on a new gas-gun system (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) using single X-ray bunch phase contrast imaging (PCI) and Laue diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The low absorption of molecular materials maximizes x-ray beam penetration, allowing measurements in transmission using the brilliance currently available at APS Sector 32. The transmission geometry makes it possible to observe both average lattice response and spatially heterogeneous, continuum response (1-4 um spatial resolution over ~2 × 2 mm area, 80 ps exposure, 153 ns frame-rate) in energetic materials ranging from single crystals to plastic-bonded composites. The current work describes our progress developing and using these diagnostics to observe deformation mechanisms relevant to explosives and the first experiments performed with explosives on IMPULSE at APS.

  13. Comparing the health impacts of different sources of energy. Keynote address

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Assessing health impacts of different energy sources requires synthesis of research results from any different disciplines into a rational framework. Information is often scanty; qualitatively different risks, or energy systems with substantially different end uses, must be put on a common footing. Historically institutional constraints have inhibited agencies from making incisive comparisons necessary for formulating energy policy; this has exacerbated public controversy over appropriate energy sources. Risk assessment methods reviewed include examples drawn from work of the Biomedical and Environmental Assessment Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere. Uncertainty over the mechanism and size of air pollution health damage is addressed through a probabilistic health-damage function, using sulfate-particle exposure as an indicator. This facilitates intercomparison through analysis of each step in the whole fuel cycle between a typical coal and nuclear powerplant. Occupational health impacts, a significant fraction of overall damage, are illustrated by accident trends in coal mining. In broadening comparisons to include new technologies, one must include the impact of manufacturing the energy-producing device as part of an expanded fuel cycle, via input/output methods. Throughout the analysis, uncertainties must be made explicit in the results, including uncertainty of data and uncertainty in choice of appropriate models and methods. No single method of comparative risk assessment is fully satisfactory; each has its limitations. One needs to compare several methods if decision-making is to be realistic.

  14. Peut-on amplifier des impulsions à dérive de fréquence dans un amplificateur paramétrique pompé par une source multimode spectralement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugonnot, E.; Somekh, M.; Rouyer, Cl.; Freysz, E.

    2004-11-01

    Lorsque l'on amplifie une impulsion à dérive de fréquence avec un amplificateur paramétrique pompé par une source multimode spectralement, l'impulsion amplifiée présente un bruit important en amplitude et en phase. Nous montrons théoriquement que le bruit en amplitude peut être considérablement réduit en amplifiant, au cours de multiples passages, une impulsion de courte durée par une impulsion pompe de durée beaucoup plus grande. Cependant de tir à tir, le bruit en amplitude de l'impulsion amplifiée rend très délicat l'utilisation d'un tel système.

  15. Observation of Energy Dependent Charge States in Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle Events with ACE SEPICA and Implications on Source Conditions and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Moebius, E.; Difabio, R.; Klecker, B.; Kartavykh, J.; Mason, G.; Droege, W.; Kucharek, H.; Popecki, M.

    2008-05-01

    The ionic charge states of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events provide information both about the plasma environment of the flare site and the propagation process of the energetic particles. We have performed a survey of the charge state behavior for impulsive flare-related SEP events with ACE SEPICA from 1998 through 2000. This event set has been selected by eliminating all CME and shock-related events, out of which two thirds showed a short time injection with recognizable energy dispersion, an independent sign for impulsive events. However, all events in this survey also showed a strong energy dependence of the ionic charge state of heavy ions, most pronounced for iron. Based on the finding that this energy dependence is very similar for all events with and without obvious injection, we then expanded the database to all events with a charge state increase for iron by at least 2.5 units, within the energy range from 0.06 to 0.54 Mev/nuc. For the combined set of 34 impulsive events we find that the source temperature is constrained by the lowest energy charge state to 1-3 million K. In combination with models on interplanetary propagation, including scattering, convection and adiabatic deceleration, a systematic study of the observed Fe charge state behavior is consistent with a range of mean free path lengths of 0.1 - 1 AU for these energetic particles. Further implications on the propagation and acceleration conditions are discussed.

  16. Impulse-based methods for fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cortez, R.

    1995-05-01

    A Lagrangian numerical method based on impulse variables is analyzed. A relation between impulse vectors and vortex dipoles with a prescribed dipole moment is presented. This relation is used to adapt the high-accuracy cutoff functions of vortex methods for use in impulse-based methods. A source of error in the long-time implementation of the impulse method is explained and two techniques for avoiding this error are presented. An application of impulse methods to the motion of a fluid surrounded by an elastic membrane is presented.

  17. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  18. Citing Internet Addresses: A How-To Guide for Referencing Online Sources in Student Bibliographies. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Tim

    This paper provides easy-to-understand guidelines for citing online information in student bibliographies. Citation structure and examples are provided for each type of Internet source. Guidelines are included for the following Internet sources: electronic mail; Gopher; File Transfer Protocol (FTP); Telnet; World Wide Web; Usenet Newsgroups;…

  19. Methods for addressing noise and error in controlled source electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, Kristopher

    Controlled source electromagnetic geophysical surveys are excellent ways to obtain information about the conductivity structure of the earth, with applications including hydrocarbon and mining prospecting, hydrogeophysical detection and monitoring, and civil and archaeological studies. Invariably, however, various types of noise and errors obscure signal for desired targets, making interpretation difficult. In the case of time-lapse surveys, the magnitude of the measured difference is often on the order of the noise. Complex conductivity effects distort the measurements, leading to incorrect inversion results. This work develops a method for extracting signal from noisy electromagnetic data sets from both time- and frequency-domain surveys using a novel application of the equivalent source technique. It improves data contaminated by uncorrelated random noise, such as that due to receiver coil misalignment and location errors in time-domain EM surveys, and can remove static shifts in the observed electric field amplitude data due to near-surface geologic features in frequency-domain EM surveys. The equivalent source method can either be applied individually to data from each measured time-gate or frequency, or simultaneously to data from all times or frequencies measured. The method can be used in addition to traditional processing techniques and requires little user input. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated through application to single-survey and time-lapsed noisy time- and frequency-domain EM data, both synthetically generated and collected in the field. The presence of low-frequency (≤ 1 kHz) polarization effects in earth porous materials noticeably increases the amplitude and decreases the phase of measured electromagnetic fields in frequency-domain surveys. By analyzing the sensitivity of cross-well EM measurements to the in-phase and quadrature conductivities, the contribution of the quadrature conductivity (directly associated with the low

  20. Preparation of diamond-like carbon films using reactive Ar/CH4 high power impulse magnetron sputtering system with negative pulse voltage source for substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Kamata, Hikaru

    2016-04-01

    Diamond-like carbon films were prepared using a reactive Ar/CH4 high-power impulse magnetron sputtering system with a negative pulse voltage source for the substrate, changing the CH4 fraction up to 15% in the total pressure range from 0.3 to 2 Pa. The magnitude of the negative pulse voltage for the substrate was also varied up to about 500 V. The hardness of films monotonically increased with increasing magnitude of the negative pulse voltage. The films with hardnesses between 16.5 and 23 GPa were prepared at total pressures less than 0.5 Pa and CH4 fractions less than 10% by applying an appropriate negative pulse voltage of 300-400 V. In X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the area ratio C-C sp3/(C-C sp2 + C-C sp3) in the C 1s core level was higher than 30% at pressures less than 0.5 Pa and CH4 fractions less than 15%. On the other hand, the films with hardnesses between 5 and 10 GPa were prepared with a relatively high growth rate at the partial pressures of CH4 higher than 0.1 Pa. However, the observation of the photoluminescence background in Raman spectroscopy indicated a relatively high hydrogen content.

  1. Impulse powerful UV-radiation source pumped by the sublight ionization waves for the bacteriological disinfection of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiouguine, Igor V.; Kostiouchenko, S. V.; Koudryavtsev, N. N.; Vasilyak, Leonid M.; Yakimenko, A. V.

    1993-11-01

    The bacteriological disinfective action of UV-radiation is well known. The pioneer work on UV-radiation used for bacteriological disinfection of waste water was made in 1910. Because of the high cost and low living time of the UV-radiation sources, the alternative technique for waste water purification by chlorine introducing was spread out. During the second stage of the UV purification development, beginning in approximately 1970, the interest for bacteriological cleaning of water, increased again. Two reasons were responsible for this event: first, the significant improvement of technology and design of UV-bacteriological purificators, and second, recognition of the serious danger of chlorine compounds introduced into water under purification because of the toxicity of these compounds. Further investigations gave excellent results in the creation and industrial applications of UV- bacteriological purificators. Now we can see a rapid development of industrial technology in UV-purification of drinking and waste waters.

  2. Repetitive, plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter development

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Patterson, P.E.; Roose, L.D.; Crowe, W.

    1992-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source, and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to short the falling portion of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700-kV is the design goal). Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. Both sources are plasma switched impulse transmitters using a Hydrogen-thyratron based modulator, an oil-filled Blumlein (of two types), a peaking (or shorting) switch and a wideband TEM horn. Powers exceeding one-gigawatt are routinely generated. This technology appears to be extendable to at least 10-gigawatts. The frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn antennas. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed dish antennas have been employed. A detailed overview of the UWB Transmitters along with measured radiated electric field strengths will be presented.

  3. Repetitive, plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter development

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Patterson, P.E.; Roose, L.D.; Crowe, W.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source, and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond ImPulsE Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to short the falling portion of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700-kV is the design goal). Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. Both sources are plasma switched impulse transmitters using a Hydrogen-thyratron based modulator, an oil-filled Blumlein (of two types), a peaking (or shorting) switch and a wideband TEM horn. Powers exceeding one-gigawatt are routinely generated. This technology appears to be extendable to at least 10-gigawatts. The frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn antennas. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed dish antennas have been employed. A detailed overview of the UWB Transmitters along with measured radiated electric field strengths will be presented.

  4. [Affective disorders and impulsivity].

    PubMed

    Belzeaux, R; Correard, N; Mazzola-Pomietto, P; Adida, M; Cermolacce, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and important phenomenon in mood disorders. Impulse control disorders, as defined in DSM, are more frequent in mood disorders especially in Bipolar Disorder type I, and are associated with a more severe course of illness. Dimensional studies demonstrate that impulsivity is a core manifestation of bipolar disorder both as state- and trait-dependent markers in patients. Comorbid substance use disorders are often associated with a higher level of impulsivity whereas the relation between suicidal behaviors and higher impulsivity remains uncertain. Moreover, neuropsychological tests were used to study correlation between clinical impulsivity and laboratory measurements of impulsivity. Level of correlation remains weak and several explanations are proposed in the literature.

  5. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  6. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  7. Adolescents' Clothing Purchase Motivations, Information Sources, and Store Selection Criteria: A Comparison of Male/Female and Impulse/Nonimpulse Shoppers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen-Yu, Jessie H.; Seock, Yoo-Kyoung

    2002-01-01

    Male (n=69) and female (n=68) adolescents spent similar amounts on clothing with similar conformity, sexual attractiveness, and recognition motivations. Females shopped significantly more often and were more influenced by friends and magazines. There were significant differences between impulse buyers and others in shopping frequency, expenditure,…

  8. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  9. Barratt Impulsivity and Neural Regulation of Physiological Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Hu, Jianping; Wu, Po-Lun; Chao, Herta H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Theories of personality have posited an increased arousal response to external stimulation in impulsive individuals. However, there is a dearth of studies addressing the neural basis of this association. Methods We recorded skin conductance in 26 individuals who were assessed with Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and performed a stop signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging data were processed and modeled with Statistical Parametric Mapping. We used linear regressions to examine correlations between impulsivity and skin conductance response (SCR) to salient events, identify the neural substrates of arousal regulation, and examine the relationship between the regulatory mechanism and impulsivity. Results Across subjects, higher impulsivity is associated with greater SCR to stop trials. Activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) negatively correlated to and Granger caused skin conductance time course. Furthermore, higher impulsivity is associated with a lesser strength of Granger causality of vmPFC activity on skin conductance, consistent with diminished control of physiological arousal to external stimulation. When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women. Conclusions Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women. More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control. PMID:26079873

  10. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  11. Rethinking Impulsivity in Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klonsky, E. David; May, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits,…

  12. Rethinking impulsivity in suicide.

    PubMed

    Klonsky, E David; May, Alexis

    2010-12-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits, (2) 1,296 college students, and (3) 399 high school students. In sample 1, contrary to traditional models of suicide risk, a unidimensional measure of impulsivity failed to distinguish attempters from ideators-only. In samples 2 and 3, which were administered a multidimensional measure of impulsivity (i.e., the UPPS impulsive behavior scale; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001), different impulsivity-related traits characterized attempters and ideators-only. Whereas both attempters and ideators-only exhibited high urgency (the tendency to act impulsive in the face of negative emotions), only attempters exhibited poor premeditation (a diminished ability to think through the consequences of one's actions). Neither attempters nor ideators-only exhibited high sensation seeking or lack of perseverance. Future research should continue to distinguish impulsivity-related traits that predict suicide ideation from those that predict suicide attempts, and models of suicide risk should be revised accordingly. PMID:21198330

  13. Impulsiveness in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Here, the authors investigate the relationship between impulsiveness and exposure to head trauma in a large group of active professional fighters. Fighters tended to report less impulsiveness than did non-fighting control respondents. Overall, greater fight exposure was associated with higher levels of a specific form of impulsiveness, although there were differences between mixed martial arts fighters and boxers. Fight exposure was associated with reduction in volume of certain brain structures, and these changes were also associated with impulsiveness patterns. Longitudinal studies of professional fighters are important to understand the risk for neuropsychiatric problems. PMID:24515676

  14. Irresistible impulse: psychiatric viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Weil, F

    1989-01-01

    The responses of the psychiatric profession to the legal criteria applied to irresistible impulse in cases of psychotic offenders are examined. An illustrative case, and its legal consequences, support the desirability of the psychiatric approach.

  15. Global threat reduction initiative efforts to address transportation challenges associated with the recovery of disused radioactive sealed sources - 10460

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, Julie; Abeyta, Cristy L; Griffin, Justin M; Matzke, James L; Pearson, Michael W; Cuthbertson, Abigail; Rawl, Richard; Singley, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Proper disposition of disused radioactive sources is essential for their safe and secure management and necessary to preclude their use in malicious activities. Without affordable, timely transportation options, disused sealed sources remain in storage at hundreds of sites throughout the country and around the world. While secure storage is a temporary measure, the longer sources remain disused or unwanted the chances increase that they will become unsecured or abandoned. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Off-Site Source Recovery Project (GTRIlOSRP), recovers thousands of disused and unwanted sealed sources annually as part of GTRl's larger mission to reduce and protect high risk nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Faced with decreasing availability of certified transportation containers to support movement of disused and unwanted neutron- and beta/gamma-emitting radioactive sealed sources, GTRIlOSRP has initiated actions to ensure the continued success of the project in timely recovery and management of sealed radioactive sources. Efforts described in this paper to enhance transportation capabilities include: {sm_bullet} Addition of authorized content to existing and planned Type B containers to support the movement of non-special form and other Type B-quantity sealed sources; {sm_bullet} Procurement of vendor services for the design, development, testing and certification of a new Type B container to support transportation of irradiators, teletherapy heads or sources removed from these devices using remote handling capabilities such as the IAEA portable hot cell facility; {sm_bullet} Expansion of shielded Type A container inventory for transportation of gamma-emitting sources in activity ranges requiring use of shielding for conformity with transportation requirements; {sm_bullet} Approval of the S300 Type A fissile container for transport of Pu-239 sealed sources internationally; {sm_bullet} Technology transfer of field

  16. Impulsivity and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Zians, Jim; Grant, Igor; Patterson, Thomas L

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between methamphetamine (meth) use and impulsivity in a sample of 385 HIV-negative heterosexually identified meth users. Participants who scored highest on a self-report measure of impulsivity were compared with those who scored lower in terms of background characteristics, meth use patterns, use of alcohol and other illicit drugs, sexual risk behavior, and psychiatric health variables. Methamphetamine users in the high impulsivity group were younger, less educated, used larger quantities of meth, were more likely to be binge users, had a larger number of sexual partners, engaged in more unprotected vaginal and oral sex, and scored higher on the Beck Depression Inventory as compared with those in the low impulsivity group. In a logistic regression analysis, Beck depression was the factor that best distinguished between meth users who scored high and those who scored low on impulsivity. Neurophysiological pathways that may underlie the relationship between impulsivity and meth use are discussed. PMID:16135337

  17. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far.

  18. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far. PMID:1842469

  19. Difference in described indications of medicines among drug information sources in India: An issue urgently to be addressed

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harmanjit; Mohan, Prafull; Kumar, Ritesh; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Drug information can be obtained from various sources such as National Formularies, drug package inserts (PI), other sources such as Monthly Index of Medical Specialities (MIMS), Current Index of Medical Specialities, and the information available with the regulators. Any variation in the information available in different sources can promote irrational drug use. In this study, we assessed this variation in a sample of commonly used drugs. Materials and Methods: Fifty commonly used drugs were analyzed for any variation (both quantitative and qualitative) in information on indications as mentioned in commonly used drug information sources such as Central Drugs and Standards Control Organization (CDSCO) website, National Formulary of India (NFI), MIMS, and PI of medicines. Results: We observed a variation in average number of indications per drugs given in CDSCO (2.2 ± 0.25), NFI (3.51 ± 0.42), MIMS (2.98 ± 0.29), and PI (3.18 ± 3.52). The CDSCO and NFI did not contain information about indication for 10 and 17 drugs, respectively, while MIMS and PI contained information about all the selected drugs. A subset analysis was done for 24 such drugs which were mentioned in all the four sources and it was found that NFI had listed the maximum number of indications per drug (3.79 ± 0.53), followed by PI (3.08 ± 0.44), MIMS (3.04 ± 0.51), and CDSCO website (2.66 ± 0.37) and this difference was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.02). We also observed some gross qualitative variation regarding drug information given in different sources. Conclusion: Variation exists in the quantity and quality of information available on indications about drugs available in various sources. Necessary steps need to be taken to harmonize drug information available across various sources so as to provide reliable and uniform drug information thereby promoting rational drug use. PMID:27003979

  20. Impulse Magnetic Fields Generated by Electrostatic Discharges in Protoplanetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunyi, I.; Guba, P.; Roth, L. E.; Timko, M.

    2002-01-01

    We examine quantitative aspects associated with the hypothesis of nebular lightnings as a source of impulse magnetic fields. Our findings support our previous accretion model in which a presence of impulse magnetic fields was of a key necessity. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Optically measured explosive impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew M.; McNesby, Kevin L.

    2014-06-01

    An experimental technique is investigated to optically measure the explosive impulse produced by laboratory-scale spherical charges detonated in air. Explosive impulse has historically been calculated from temporal pressure measurements obtained via piezoelectric transducers. The presented technique instead combines schlieren flow visualization and high-speed digital imaging to optically measure explosive impulse. Prior to an explosive event, schlieren system calibration is performed using known light-ray refractions and resulting digital image intensities. Explosive charges are detonated in the test section of a schlieren system and imaged by a high-speed digital camera in pseudo-streak mode. Spatiotemporal schlieren intensity maps are converted using an Abel deconvolution, Rankine-Hugoniot jump equations, ideal gas law, triangular temperature decay profile, and Schardin's standard photometric technique to yield spatiotemporal pressure maps. Temporal integration of individual pixel pressure profiles over the positive pressure duration of the shock wave yields the explosive impulse generated for a given radial standoff. Calculated explosive impulses are shown to exhibit good agreement between optically derived values and pencil gage pressure transducers.

  2. The Willie Lomans of a Market Society: Addressing Political-Economic Sources of Suffering in Pastoral Counseling.

    PubMed

    LaMothe, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    This article focuses on the culture of state-corporate capitalism as a source of psychological suffering for some people who seek the aid of pastoral counselors. An underlying premise of this article and, more particularly, the work of pastoral counseling comes from Frantz Fanon's view that the aims of psychotherapy are (a) 'to 'consciousnessize' [the patient's] unconscious, to no longer be tempted by a hallucinatory lactification', and (b) 'to enable [the patient] to choose an action with respect to the real source of the conflict, i.e., the social structure'. An aim of pastoral counseling, then, is to facilitate recognition of a person's sources of suffering so that s/he can decide how to respond. By contrast, it is argued that a pastoral counselor, in leaving a client unaware that his/her suffering is partially the result of a capitalistic culture, fosters hermeneutical mystification, and the patient is not able to choose an action directed toward a major source of his/her depression. PMID:26227939

  3. The Willie Lomans of a Market Society: Addressing Political-Economic Sources of Suffering in Pastoral Counseling.

    PubMed

    LaMothe, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    This article focuses on the culture of state-corporate capitalism as a source of psychological suffering for some people who seek the aid of pastoral counselors. An underlying premise of this article and, more particularly, the work of pastoral counseling comes from Frantz Fanon's view that the aims of psychotherapy are (a) 'to 'consciousnessize' [the patient's] unconscious, to no longer be tempted by a hallucinatory lactification', and (b) 'to enable [the patient] to choose an action with respect to the real source of the conflict, i.e., the social structure'. An aim of pastoral counseling, then, is to facilitate recognition of a person's sources of suffering so that s/he can decide how to respond. By contrast, it is argued that a pastoral counselor, in leaving a client unaware that his/her suffering is partially the result of a capitalistic culture, fosters hermeneutical mystification, and the patient is not able to choose an action directed toward a major source of his/her depression.

  4. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists.2 These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams,3 energy bar charts,4 electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and animations.5 However, instructors have limited choices when they want to help their students understand impulse and momentum. One of the only available options is the impulse-momentum bar chart.6 The bar charts can effectively show the magnitude of the momentum as well as help students understand conservation of momentum, but they do not easily show the actual direction. This paper highlights a new representation instructors can use to help their students with momentum and impulse—the impulse-momentum diagram (IMD).

  5. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  6. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  7. Dissecting Impulsivity and its Relationships to Drug Addictions

    PubMed Central

    Ashenhurst, James R.; Cervantes, M. Catalina; James, Alexander S.; Groman, Stephanie M.; Pennington, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Addictions are often characterized as forms of impulsive behavior. That said, it is often noted that impulsivity is a multidimensional construct, spanning several psychological domains. This review describes the relationship between varieties of impulsivity and addiction-related behaviors, the nature of the causal relationship between the two and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that promote impulsive behaviors. We conclude that the available data strongly supports the notion that impulsivity is both a risk factor for, and a consequence of, drug and alcohol consumption. While the evidence indicating that subtypes of impulsive behavior are uniquely informative – either biologically or with respect to their relationships to addictions – is convincing, multiple lines of study link “distinct” subtypes of impulsivity to low dopamine D2 receptor function and perturbed serotonergic transmission, revealing shared mechanisms between the subtypes. Therefore, a common biological framework involving monoaminergic transmitters in key frontostriatal circuits may link multiple forms of impulsivity to drug self-administration and addiction-related behaviors. Further dissection of these relationships is needed before the next phase of genetic and genomic discovery will be able to reveal the biological sources of the vulnerability for addiction indexed by impulsivity. PMID:24654857

  8. Impulsive noise of printers: measurement metrics and their subjective correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Terrence; Otto, Norman; Bray, Wade; Stephan, Mike

    2005-09-01

    In the office and home computing environments, printer impulsive noise has become a significant contributor to user perceived quality or lack thereof, and can affect the user's comfort level and ability to concentrate. Understanding and quantifying meaningful metrics for printer impulsivity is becoming an increasingly important goal for printer manufacturers. Several methods exist in international standards for measuring the impulsivity of noise. For information technology equipment (ITE), the method for detection of impulsive noise is provided in ECMA-74 and ISO 7779. However, there is a general acknowledgement that the current standard method of determining impulsivity by simply measuring A-weighted sound pressure level (SPL) with the impulsive time weighting, I, applied is inadequate to characterize impulsive noise and ultimately to predict user satisfaction and acceptance. In recent years, there has been a variety of new measurement methods evaluated for impulsive noise for both environmental and machinery noise. This paper reviews several of the available metrics, applies the metrics to several printer impulsive noise sources, and makes an initial assessment of their correlation to the subjective impressions of users. It is a review and continuation of the work presented at InterNoise 2005 (Baird, Bray, and Otto).

  9. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  10. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  11. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion.

  12. [Obsession-impulsion infanticide].

    PubMed

    Gourévitch, Michel

    2006-01-01

    In 1836, the case-history of a young mother, the victim of a phobia of the impulsion to murder her infant. Esquirol considers her case as one of homocidial monomania, and classifies her among psychotic patients who have actually killed.

  13. Irresistible impulse: legal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Borichansky, L

    1989-01-01

    The legal point of view concerning irresistible impulse as an exemption from criminal liability is discussed. A defendant who pleads that at the time of committing an illegal act he was suffering from a mental disease must prove to the court that his version is the most possible one.

  14. Steep front short duration low voltage impulse performance of distribution transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, L.M.; Veverka, E.F.; McConnell, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive literature search of steep front short duration (SFSD) impulse sources, their characteristics and effect on power system equipment has led to the specification of a test program to evaluate key apparatus and insulations. Distribution transformers, although not overly susceptible to impulse damage, have been selected as one of the candidate apparatus for low and high voltage SFSD impulse tests. This paper covers the low voltage SFSD impulse response of conventional oil insulated shell form and core form distribution transformers.

  15. Attentional blink and impulsiveness: evidence for higher functional impulsivity in non-blinkers compared to blinkers.

    PubMed

    Troche, Stefan J; Rammsayer, Thomas H

    2013-08-01

    The attentional blink (AB) represents a fundamental limit of information processing. About 5-10 % of all subjects, however, do not show the AB. Because of the low base rate of these so-called non-blinkers, studies on mechanisms underlying non-blinkers' absent AB are extremely scant. The few existent studies found non-blinkers to be faster and more efficient in information processing compared to blinkers. A personality trait that has been linked previously to speed and efficiency of information processing as well as to the magnitude of the AB is impulsivity. Therefore, the present study investigated whether 15 non-blinkers and 15 blinkers differed from each other in functional and/or dysfunctional impulsivity. To obtain a better understanding of the underlying processing mechanisms, the P300 component in the event-related potential was recorded during performance on the AB task. Our results indicated higher functional impulsivity in non-blinkers compared to blinkers but no differences between the two groups in dysfunctional impulsivity. As indicated by shorter P300 latency, non-blinkers processed information faster than blinkers after the AB period but slower during the AB period. These speed effects, however, were not associated with functional impulsivity. Thus, impulsivity and speed of information processing appear to represent two rather independent sources for non-blinkers' absent AB.

  16. Modification to EPA Method 1623 to address a unique seasonal matrix effect encountered in some U.S. source waters.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Nancy J; Villegas, Leah Fohl; Eldred, Bradley J; Gaynor, Deborah H; Warden, Paul S; Pepich, Barry V

    2008-12-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1623 is designed to detect and determine concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in water through concentration, immuno-magnetic separation (IMS), and immuno-fluorescence assay with microscopic examination. A seasonal interference with the method was observed in some municipal source waters collected from reservoirs and as reported to Shaw Environmental, Inc. in the summers of 2005, 2006, and 2007. This interference, which was not confined to a single region of the nation, caused clumping of the IMS beads during the acid dissociation of the IMS procedure in Method 1623. This effect lowered method recoveries for both Cryptosporidium and Giardia; however, the effect was more pronounced for Giardia. A heat dissociation technique (Ware et al., (2003) J. Microbiol. Methods 55, 575-583) was shown to be a viable option for samples which demonstrate the clumping matrix effect and improved Giardia recoveries in partially clumped samples. The heat dissociation application holds promise for fully clumped samples and warrants further investigation.

  17. Addressing Hydro-economic Modeling Limitations - A Limited Foresight Sacramento Valley Model and an Open-source Modeling Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harou, J. J.; Hansen, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    Increased scarcity of world water resources is inevitable given the limited supply and increased human pressures. The idea that "some scarcity is optimal" must be accepted for rational resource use and infrastructure management decisions to be made. Hydro-economic systems models are unique at representing the overlap of economic drivers, socio-political forces and distributed water resource systems. They demonstrate the tangible benefits of cooperation and integrated flexible system management. Further improvement of models, quality control practices and software will be needed for these academic policy tools to become accepted into mainstream water resource practice. Promising features include: calibration methods, limited foresight optimization formulations, linked simulation-optimization approaches (e.g. embedding pre-existing calibrated simulation models), spatial groundwater models, stream-aquifer interactions and stream routing, etc.. Conventional user-friendly decision support systems helped spread simulation models on a massive scale. Hydro-economic models must also find a means to facilitate construction, distribution and use. Some of these issues and model features are illustrated with a hydro-economic optimization model of the Sacramento Valley. Carry-over storage value functions are used to limit hydrologic foresight of the multi- period optimization model. Pumping costs are included in the formulation by tracking regional piezometric head of groundwater sub-basins. To help build and maintain this type of network model, an open-source water management modeling software platform is described and initial project work is discussed. The objective is to generically facilitate the connection of models, such as those developed in a modeling environment (GAMS, MatLab, Octave, "), to a geographic user interface (drag and drop node-link network) and a database (topology, parameters and time series). These features aim to incrementally move hydro- economic models

  18. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  19. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  20. A review of impulsive phase phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review is given of impulsive phase phenomena in support of the models used to compute the energies of the different components of the flares under study. The observational characteristics of the impulsive phase are discussed as well as the evidence for multi-thermal or non-thermal phenomena. The significance of time delays between hard X-rays and microwaves is discussed in terms of electron beams and Alfven waves, two-step acceleration, and secondary bursts at large distances from the primary source. Observations indicating the occurrence of chromospheric evaporation, coronal explosions, and thermal conduction fronts are reviewed briefly, followed by the gamma ray and neutron results. Finally, a preferred flare scenario and energy source are presented involving the interactions in a complex of magnetic loops with the consequent reconnection and electron acceleration.

  1. The Hydraulic Ram (Or Impulse) Pump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic impulse pump utilizes a fraction of the momentum of a flowing stream to lift a small portion of that water to a higher level. There it may be accumulated in an elevated cistern to provide sufficient water for several families, for the pump works 24 h a day with no additional source of energy. The operation of the pump is described,…

  2. The hydraulic ram (or impulse) pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Allan

    2014-03-01

    The hydraulic impulse pump utilizes a fraction of the momentum of a flowing stream to lift a small portion of that water to a higher level. There it may be accumulated in an elevated cistern to provide sufficient water for several families, for the pump works 24 h a day with no additional source of energy. The operation of the pump is described, along with a working demonstration model constructed from plastic waste pipe and fittings.

  3. Addressing Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Greg; Helmig, Mary; Kaplan, Bill; Kosch, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Four camp directors discuss how the September 11 tragedy and current world events will affect their camps. They describe how they are addressing safety concerns, working with parents, cooperating with outside agencies, hiring and screening international staff, and revising emergency plans. Camps must continue to offer community and support to…

  4. Impulsive phase transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Bely-Dubau, Francoise; Brown, John C.; Dulk, George A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Enome, Shinzo; Gabriel, Alan H.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Melrose, Donald; Neidig, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    The transport of nonthermal electrons is explored. The thick-target electron beam model, in which electrons are presumed to be accelerated in the corona and typically thermalized primarily in the chromosphere and photosphere, is supported by observations throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. At the highest energies, the anisotropy of gamma-ray emission above 10 MeV clearly indicates that these photons are emitted by anisotropically-directed particles. The timing of this high-energy gamma-radiation with respect to lower-energy hard X-radiation implies that the energetic particles have short life-times. For collisional energy loss, this means that they are stopped in the chromosphere or below. Stereoscopic (two-spacecraft) observations at hard X-ray energies (up to 350 keV) imply that these lower-energy (but certainly nonthermal) electrons are also stopped deep in the chromosphere. Hard X-ray images show that, in spatially resolved flares whose radiation consists of impulsive bursts, the impulsive phase starts with X-radiation that comes mostly from the foot-points of coronal loops whose coronal component is outlined by microwaves.

  5. An overview of Sandia National Laboratories' plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter program

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source technology and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting depending on how the UWB frequency components are generated. ne frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond impulse Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to sharpen the trailing edge of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700- kV is the design goal). Since the frequency spectra are identical between sources with sharpened leading or trailing edges, alternatively, one can use parallel switches to short the pulse at its peak voltage. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn. antennas with special high voltage feed adapters. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed, dish antennas have been employed. An overview of the UWB transmitters, including design and operation of the modulators, the PFN'S, the pulse sharpening switches and the antennas will be presented.

  6. An overview of Sandia National Laboratories' plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. S.; Rinehart, L. F.; Buttram, M. T.; Aurand, J. F.

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source technology and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting depending on how the UWB frequency components are generated. The frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond Impulse Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to sharpen the trailing edge of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700-kV is the design goal). Since the frequency spectra are identical between sources with sharpened leading or trailing edges, alternatively, one can use parallel switches to short the pulse at its peak voltage. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn antennas with special high voltage feed adapters. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed, dish antennas have been employed. An overview of the UWB transmitters, including design and operation of the modulators, the PFN'S, the pulse sharpening switches and the antennas will be presented.

  7. An overview of Sandia National Laboratories` plasma switched, gigawatt, ultra-wideband impulse transmitter program

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.S.; Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Aurand, J.F.

    1992-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed several repetitive, ultra-wideband (UWB), impulse transmitters to address impulse source technology and to support experimental applications. The sources fall into two different classes, pulse peaking and pulse shorting depending on how the UWB frequency components are generated. ne frequency spectrum of the radiated pulse from these sources include the spectrum of 100-MHz to 3-GHz. Depending upon the source, repetitive operation from single shot to 5-kHz (1-kHz nominal) has been obtained with excellent reliability and repeatability. SNIPER (Sub-Nanosecond impulse Radiator) is a source which uses an oil peaking switch to obtain a fast risetime (250-pS) pulse of 2-nS duration. The output voltage ranges between few tens of kilovolts to 250-kV. EMBL (EnantioMorphic Blumlein) is a similar device (presently under development) which uses a gas switch to sharpen the trailing edge of a 2-nS pulse to approximately 100-pS. To date, an output voltage of approximately 600-kV has been obtained (700- kV is the design goal). Since the frequency spectra are identical between sources with sharpened leading or trailing edges, alternatively, one can use parallel switches to short the pulse at its peak voltage. The pulse is generated externally and then injected into the antenna. Due to the high powers involved and the need to radiate a broad spectrum of frequencies, Sandia has concentrated on TEM horn. antennas with special high voltage feed adapters. Several TEM horns have been built and used during this program. In those cases where higher gains are desired for the higher frequencies, TEM horn-fed, dish antennas have been employed. An overview of the UWB transmitters, including design and operation of the modulators, the PFN`S, the pulse sharpening switches and the antennas will be presented.

  8. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  9. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system. PMID:23487896

  10. Attenuation of high-level impulses by earmuffs.

    PubMed

    Zera, Jan; Mlynski, Rafal

    2007-10-01

    Attenuation of high-level acoustic impulses (noise reduction) by various types of earmuffs was measured using a laboratory source of type A impulses and an artificial test fixture compatible with the ISO 4869-3 standard. The measurements were made for impulses of peak sound-pressure levels (SPLs) from 150 to 170 dB. The rise time and A duration of the impulses depended on their SPL and were within a range of 12-400 mus (rise time) and 0.4-1.1 ms (A duration). The results showed that earmuff peak level attenuation increases by about 10 dB when the impulse's rise time and the A duration are reduced. The results also demonstrated that the signals under the earmuff cup have a longer rise and A duration than the original impulses recorded outside the earmuff. Results of the measurements were used to check the validity of various hearing damage risk criteria that specify the maximum permissible exposure to impulse noise. The present data lead to the conclusion that procedures in which hearing damage risk is assessed only from signal attenuation, without taking into consideration changes in the signal waveform under the earmuff, tend to underestimate the risk of hearing damage. PMID:17902846

  11. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  12. Impulse control in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, G W

    1974-05-01

    Pigeons were given a small, immediate food reinforcement for pecking a key, and a larger, delayed reinforcement for not pecking this key. Most subjects pecked the key on more than 95% of trials. However, when pecking a differently colored key at an earlier time prevented this option from becoming available, three of 10 subjects consistently pecked it, thereby forcing themselves to wait for the larger reward. They did not peck the earlier key when it did not prevent this option. This is an experimental example of psychological impulse and a learnable device to control it. Although only a minority of the subjects learned it, the fact that such learning is possible at all argues for a theory of delayed reward that can predict change of preference as a function of elapsing time.

  13. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  14. Elegant impulser developed for flat beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-26

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project [1]. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF [2, 3]. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. Circuit parameters of the retrofit to the diode region [4] have been included to provide the controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, screening techniques revealing the weakest circuit component, and the resulting output of the injector.

  15. Family Routine Moderates the Relation between Child Impulsivity and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanza, H. Isabella; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Although child impulsivity is associated with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, few studies have examined whether family processes moderate this association. To address this gap, we tested whether child-reported family routine moderated the relation between child hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI) and ODD symptoms among a sample of…

  16. Qualifying an impulse digitizer for measurements in HV impulse tests

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, T.R. ); Kuffel, J. . Research Div.); Malewski, R. ); Schon, K. )

    1990-07-01

    Working groups are presently engaged in preparing a standard on digital recorders for measurement in HV impulse tests. This paper shows how the main tests described in the proposed standard can be applied towards qualifying an impulse digitizer for HV Impulse measurements. Experimental results from the application of these techniques to different digitizers are presented. A major problem in using digital recorders in HV laboratories is electromagnetic interference. Previous low frequency measurements have indicated that high frequencies can be a problem and this paper reports some measurements at high frequencies. The consequences of these measurements for electromagnetic compatibility are discussed.

  17. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  18. Comparison of different combined treatment processes to address the source water with high concentration of natural organic matter during snowmelt period.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiaojian; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Yani; Liu, Shuming; Chen, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The source water in one forest region of the Northeast China had very high natural organic matter (NOM) concentration and heavy color during snowmelt period. The efficiency of five combined treatment processes was compared to address the high concentration of NOM and the mechanisms were also analyzed. Conventional treatment can hardly remove dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the source water. KMnO4 pre-oxidization could improve the DOC removal to 22.0%. Post activated carbon adsorption improved the DOC removal of conventional treatment to 28.8%. The non-sufficient NOM removal could be attributed to the dominance of large molecular weight organic matters in raw water, which cannot be adsorbed by the micropore upon activated carbon. O3+activated carbon treatment are another available technology for eliminating the color and UV254 in water. However, its performance of DOC removal was only 36.4%, which could not satisfy the requirement for organic matter. The limited ozone dosage is not sufficient to mineralize the high concentration of NOM. Magnetic ion-exchange resin combined with conventional treatment could remove 96.2% of color, 96.0% of UV254 and 87.1% of DOC, enabling effluents to meet the drinking water quality standard. The high removal efficiency could be explained by the negative charge on the surface of NOM which benefits the static adsorption of NOM on the anion exchange resin. The results indicated that magnetic ion-exchange resin combined with conventional treatment is the best available technology to remove high concentration of NOM.

  19. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  20. Convocation address.

    PubMed

    Ghatowar, P S

    1993-07-01

    The Union Deputy Minister of Health and Family Welfare in India addressed the 35th convocation of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay in 1993. Officials in developing countries have been concerned about population growth for more than 30 years and have instituted policies to reduce population growth. In the 1960s, population growth in developing countries was around 2.5%, but today it is about 2%. Despite this decline, the world will have 1 billion more individuals by the year 2001. 95% of these new people will be born in developing countries. India's population size is so great that India does not have the time to wait for development to reduce population growth. Population needs to be viewed as an integrated part of overall development, since it is linked to poverty, illiteracy, environmental damage, gender issues, and reproductive health. Despite a large population size, India has made some important advancements in health and family planning. For example, India has reduced population growth (to 2.14% annually between 1981-1991), infant mortality, and its birth rate. It has increased the contraceptive use rate and life expectancy. Its southern states have been more successful at achieving demographic goals than have the northern states. India needs to implement efforts to improve living conditions, to change attitudes and perceptions about small families and contraception, and to promote family planning acceptance earlier among young couples. Improvement of living conditions is especially important in India, since almost 33% of the people live in poverty. India needs to invest in nutrition, health, and education. The mass media and nongovernmental organizations need to create population awareness and demand for family planning services. Improvement in women's status accelerates fertility decline, as has happened in Kerala State. The government needs to facilitate generation of jobs. Community participation is needed for India to achieve

  1. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  2. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  3. Open-loop dereverberation of multichannel room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bowon; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark A.; Goudeseune, Camille

    2003-04-01

    We are developing the audio display for a CAVE-type virtual reality theater, a 3-m cube with displays covering all six rigid faces. The user's headgear continuously reports ear positions so headphones would be possible, but we nevertheless prefer loudspeakers because this enhances the sense of total immersion. Because sounds produced at the loudspeakers are distorted by the room impulse responses, we therefore face the problem of controlling the sound at the listener's two ears. Our proposed solution consists of open-loop acoustic point control, i.e., dereverberation. The room impulse responses from each loudspeaker to each ear of the listener are inverted using multichannel inversion methods, to create exactly the desired sound field at the listener's ears. Because the actual room impulse responses cannot be measured in real time (as the listener walks around), instead the impulse responses simulated by the image-source method is used. A new evaluation criterion is proposed to quantitatively evaluate both the simulation and the open-loop dereverberation. The actual impulse responses used for this evaluation are measured with a starter pistol, since this best approximates the point source assumed by the image-source method.

  4. Laboratory behavioral measures of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Donald M; Mathias, Charles W; Marsh, Dawn M; Jagar, Ashley A

    2005-02-01

    Previous research and theory have conceptualized impulsivity as a multifaceted construct that requires multiple modes of measurement for accurate assessment. This article describes a software package that includes four paradigms for measuring multiple and unique aspects of impulsivity. Specifically, four tasks are described: (1) the two choice impulsivity paradigm, (2) the single key impulsivity paradigm, (3) the GoStop impulsivity paradigm, and (4) the time paradigm. These tasks measure processes related to the capacity to tolerate delay for reward, to inhibit an already initiated response, and to estimate the passage of time. These processes have been found to be important to the understanding of impulsive behaviors. The programs are flexible and allow the experimenter to manipulate a number of parameters related to delay-reward contingencies, timing, performance feedback/payment, and data output variables. Manipulation of these parameters makes the paradigms scalable to a wide range of ability levels and appropriate for samples ranging from children to adults. The four paradigms in this software package are available at no cost and can be obtained by contacting the corresponding author.

  5. Impulsivity, Risk Taking, and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ana A.; Odum, Amy. L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported Motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with Present Hedonism and negatively correlated with Future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported Non-Planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with Fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective. PMID:22542458

  6. Impulsivity, risk taking, and timing.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ana A; Odum, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with present hedonism and negatively correlated with future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported non-planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective.

  7. Dopamine-Agonists and Impulsivity in Parkinson’s Disease: Impulsive Choices vs. Impulsive Actions

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E.; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J.; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2014-01-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 (15)O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action. PMID:24038587

  8. Suppression of radiating harmonics Electro-Impulse Deicing (EIDI) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieve, Peter; Ng, James; Fiedberg, Robert

    1991-10-01

    The electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of two different configurations of electromagnetic deicing systems is discussed. Both Electro-Impulse Deicing (EIDI) and Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing Strip (EDS) are investigated. With EIDI, rigid coils are mounted behind the wing; while with EDS, the impulse coils are built thin and flexible with printed circuit board technology. An important consideration in the certification of electromagnetic impulse deicing systems is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). When the capacitor bank discharges, a large current pulse travels down a transmission line to the coil. The coil is one source of radiation. Another source is the cabling and connections to the coil. In work conducted for the FAA in 1988, it was found that excessive electromagnetic emissions resulted from the operation of a Low Voltage Electro-Impulse Deicer (LVEID) in conjunction with a composite wing. The goal of this project was to investigate and develop techniques for controlling emissions without the benefit of shielding. In this study it was determined that both EIDI and EDS could be brought within the RTCA/DO-160B standards through proper shielding and termination of the pulse power cable. An alternative topology of EDS with the impulse coil on the wing exterior surface did not meet the standard.

  9. 33 CFR 183.586 - Pressure impulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prior to testing. (c) Mount the tank on a test platform. (d) Fill the tank to capacity with water. (e) Cap and seal each opening in the tank. (f) Apply 25,000 cycles of pressure impulse at the rate of no... regulated source of air, inert gas, or water. (g) Perform the static pressure test under § 183.580....

  10. 33 CFR 183.586 - Pressure impulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prior to testing. (c) Mount the tank on a test platform. (d) Fill the tank to capacity with water. (e) Cap and seal each opening in the tank. (f) Apply 25,000 cycles of pressure impulse at the rate of no... regulated source of air, inert gas, or water. (g) Perform the static pressure test under § 183.580....

  11. 33 CFR 183.586 - Pressure impulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... prior to testing. (c) Mount the tank on a test platform. (d) Fill the tank to capacity with water. (e) Cap and seal each opening in the tank. (f) Apply 25,000 cycles of pressure impulse at the rate of no... regulated source of air, inert gas, or water. (g) Perform the static pressure test under § 183.580....

  12. 33 CFR 183.586 - Pressure impulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prior to testing. (c) Mount the tank on a test platform. (d) Fill the tank to capacity with water. (e) Cap and seal each opening in the tank. (f) Apply 25,000 cycles of pressure impulse at the rate of no... regulated source of air, inert gas, or water. (g) Perform the static pressure test under § 183.580....

  13. Mission maps for use in the choice of specific impulse for manned Mars missions

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.; Olson, T.S.; Siahpush, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The choice of engine concept for the initial manned missions to Mars should be driven by what can be feasibly built and flight qualified in the near term, and by the level of engine performance that is required for these missions. This paper addresses how mission requirements affect the choice of specific impulse, and consequently what values of the specific impulse best serve these missions. Broad mission surveys and sensitivity studies were performed to determine the specific impulse values that allow for fast transfer times and wide launch windows. We find that a specific impulse of around 1000 to 1200 sec is sufficient. Choosing an engine concept that has a higher specific impulse value is not justified for these missions because the modest reduction in propellant requirements and further widening of the launch windows does not compensate for the substantially greater technical risk. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Electron acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.; Benz, A.O.; Treumann, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of the hard X-ray, microwave, and type III and DCIM (decimetric)radio bursts associated with the 1978 December 4 solar flare have been used to study the physical parameters relevant to the acceleration and propagation of energetic electrons during the impulsive phase of a solar flare. The hard X-ray observations were made with the X-ray spectrometer aboard the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The radio spectra in metric and decimetric bands were recorded with the radiospectrograph located at Durnten, near Zurich, Switzerland. The microwave observations were made at the Sagamore Hill and Bern observatories. The three metric type III bursts coincided with the three most prominent hard X-ray peaks. This is the fist time a clear one-to-one association between single type III bursts and hard X-ray peaks has been established. The average delay of the type III bursts with respect to the X-ray peaks was 0.5 s. The harder the X-ray spectrum, the higher was the drift rate of the associated type III burst. The characteristic electron energies inferred from the drift rate are of the order of 70 keV. The observed increase in the high-frequency cutoff of the metric type III bursts during the impulsive phase has been examined in terms of the decreasing altitude of the electron acceleration/injection region, the increasing hardness of the electron spectrum, and the decreasing acceleration time. A pulsating decimetric continuum (DCIM) was also found to be present during and before the impulsive phase. The DCIM source seems to coincide spatially with the electron acceleration region and the (projected) origin of the associated type II shock.ction region.

  15. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  16. Demonstrating Sound Impulses in Pipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymer, M. G.; Micklavzina, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple, direct method to demonstrate the effects of the boundary conditions on sound impulse reflections in pipes. A graphical display of the results can be made using a pipe, cork, small hammer, microphone, and fast recording electronics. Explains the principles involved. (LZ)

  17. Characteristics of Impulsive Suicide Attempts and Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Thomas R.; Swann, Alan C.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Examined impulsive suicide attempts within a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts among adolescents and young adults. Impulsive attempts were more likely among those who had been in a physical fight and less likely among those who were depressed. Findings suggest inadequate control of aggressive impulses as a…

  18. Adolescent Impulsivity: Findings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2005-01-01

    Impulsivity is central to several psychopathological states in adolescence. However, there is little consensus concerning the definition of impulsivity and its core dimensions. In response to this lack of consensus, Whiteside and Lynam (2001, "Pers. Individ. Differ." 30, 669-689) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, which is able to…

  19. Adolescent impulsivity and soft drink consumption: The role of parental regulation.

    PubMed

    Melbye, Elisabeth L; Bergh, Ingunn H; Hausken, Solveig E S; Sleddens, Ester F C; Glavin, Kari; Lien, Nanna; Bjelland, Mona

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the process in which impulsivity might influence soft drink consumption in adolescents, addressing potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulation regarding unhealthy eating. A cross-sectional survey was performed among 440 13-15-year-olds in Eastern Norway. The survey questionnaire included measures of impulsivity, six types of maternal and paternal regulation (as perceived by the adolescents), and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Parallel multiple-mediator analyses were performed to reveal potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulatory behaviors on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. Separate models were run for maternal and paternal regulation. Results from our model analyses (both maternal and paternal models) indicated that all the six measured parental regulatory behaviors jointly acted as mediators on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. However, only perceived maternal and paternal legitimacy of regulation showed a unique contribution to the mediated effect. This finding suggests that adolescents' perception of parental legitimate authority is of particular importance in explaining the relationship between impulsivity and unhealthy eating behaviors in adolescents. Future nutrition interventions targeting adolescents and their parents should take personal factors such as adolescents' level of impulsivity into account. Ultimately; what may be an appropriate approach to impulsive individuals and their parents may diverge from what may be an appropriate approach to less impulsive individuals and their parents.

  20. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Underlying Dimensions and Their Relation With Impulsivity Facets.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates a significant relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and impulsivity (Kotler, Julian, Efront, and Amir, J Nerv Ment Dis 189:162-167, 2001; Ledgerwood and Petry, J Trauma Stress 19:411-416, 2006). The present study assessed relations between PTSD symptom clusters and impulsivity subscales in an effort to assess the specific impulsivity component most related to PTSD's alterations in arousal/reactivity and alterations in mood/cognitions symptoms. In the current study, the PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition, and the UPPS Impulsivity Scale were administered to a sample of 412 nonclinical subjects with a trauma history. Results indicated that PTSD's alterations in arousal/reactivity and mood/cognition factors were most related to impulsivity's sensation-seeking tendency compared with other impulsivity components. Results highlight the importance of assessing and addressing (1) sensation-seeking tendencies and (2) urges to act impulsively when experiencing negative affect in trauma treatment. Furthermore, it is possible that sensation-seeking tendencies are primarily driving the comorbidity between PTSD and certain impulsive behaviors. PMID:26558499

  1. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    heart function. Presented is the first use of transthoracic ARFI imaging in a serial study of heart failure in a porcine model. Results demonstrate the ability of transthoracic ARFI to image cyclically-varying stiffness changes in healthy and infarcted myocardium under good B-mode imaging conditions at depths in the range of 3-5 cm. Challenging imaging scenarios such as deep regions of interest, vigorous lateral motion and stable, reverberant clutter are analyzed and discussed. Results are then presented from the first study of clinical feasibility of transthoracic cardiac ARFI imaging. At the Duke University Medical Center, healthy volunteers and patients having magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed apical infarcts were enrolled for the study. The number of patients who met the inclusion criteria in this preliminary clinical trial was low, but results showed that the limitations seen in animal studies were not overcome by allowing transmit power levels to exceed the FDA mechanical index (MI) limit. The results suggested the primary source of image degradation was clutter rather than lack of radiation force. Additionally, the transthoracic method applied in its present form was not shown capable of tracking propagating ARFI-induced shear waves in the myocardium. Under current instrumentation and processing methods, results of these studies support feasibility for transthoracic ARFI in high-quality B-Mode imaging conditions. Transthoracic ARFI was not shown sensitive to infarct or to tracking heart failure in the presence of clutter and signal decorrelation. This work does provide evidence that transthoracic ARFI imaging is a safe non-invasive tool, but clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool will need to be addressed by further development to overcome current challenges and increase robustness to sources of image degradation.

  2. Impulse generation by detonation tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia Ann

    Impulse generation with gaseous detonation requires conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. This conversion process is well understood in rocket engines where the high pressure combustion products expand through a nozzle generating high velocity exhaust gases. The propulsion community is now focusing on advanced concepts that utilize non-traditional forms of combustion like detonation. Such a device is called a pulse detonation engine in which laboratory tests have proven that thrust can be achieved through continuous cyclic operation. Because of poor performance of straight detonation tubes compared to conventional propulsion systems and the success of using nozzles on rocket engines, the effect of nozzles on detonation tubes is being investigated. Although previous studies of detonation tube nozzles have suggested substantial benefits, up to now there has been no systematic investigations over a range of operating conditions and nozzle configurations. As a result, no models predicting the impulse when nozzles are used exist. This lack of data has severely limited the development and evaluation of models and simulations of nozzles on pulse detonation engines. The first experimental investigation measuring impulse by gaseous detonation in plain tubes and tubes with nozzles operating in varying environment pressures is presented. Converging, diverging, and converging-diverging nozzles were tested to determine the effect of divergence angle, nozzle length, and volumetric fill fraction on impulse. The largest increases in specific impulse, 72% at an environment pressure of 100 kPa and 43% at an environment pressure of 1.4 kPa, were measured with the largest diverging nozzle tested that had a 12° half angle and was 0.6 m long. Two regimes of nozzle operation that depend on the environment pressure are responsible for these increases and were first observed from these data. To augment this experimental investigation, all data in the literature regarding

  3. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  4. Neurophysiological markers of multiple facets of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Neal, Lauren B; Gable, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    Human behavior is influenced by three core personality systems: approach, avoidance, and supervisory control. The supervisory control system is inversely related to impulsivity. Although past research has related some aspects of impulsivity to frontal hemispheric asymmetry, impulsivity as a multi-faceted construct has not been studied in relation with frontal asymmetry. In addition, past work has potentially confounded impulsivity with approach-motivation. In the current study, greater relative left frontal activity was related to multiple facets of impulsivity: negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and positive urgency. Regressing both positive and negative urgency on frontal asymmetry revealed that approach-related positive urgency related to greater left frontal activity, but withdrawal-related negative urgency marginally related to greater right frontal activity. These results suggest that impulsivity, independent of affective valence, relates to greater left frontal activity. When controlling for trait approach motivation, the relationship between impulsivity and left frontal activity is unchanged.

  5. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level. PMID:27514985

  6. Application of survival statistics to the impulsive fragmentation of ductile rings

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The current study addressed the problem of predicting fragment size distributions resulting from the tensile fracture of impulsive loaded bodies. Theory was restricted to one-dimensional bodies subjected to uniform loading. A rigorous treatment of the statistics of dynamic fragmentation has been attempted using concepts of survival statistics and incorporated here through the relation derived by Johnson and Mehl and Avrami. Physical concepts are introduced through the assumption of a uniform nucleation rate of fracture and the propagation of stress-relief waves governed by the tensile response of an ideally ductile material. An analytic distribution curve was derived for ductile fracture and compared with the fragmentation data of Wesenberg and Sagartz on aluminum rings. The analytic expression was found to provide a good representation of the data although further experimental work in this area is strongly needed. The present analysis and resulting fragment size distribution expressions are fairly complex even for the very simple geometry and loading conditions considered. Direct application of the method to more complicated fragmentation events would probably be difficult. Perhaps the greatest value of the present type of analysis will be the insight that it provides on the statistical nature of impulse fragmentation - hopefully a source of fresh ideas for computational models currently under development.

  7. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level.

  8. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level. PMID:27514985

  9. A neurogenetic approach to impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-12-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity.

  10. A Neurogenetic Approach to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity. PMID:19012655

  11. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.; Maetzler, C.; Ohki, K.; Saba, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    A set of 22 simple, impulsive solar flares, identified in the OSO-5 hard X-ray data, were analyzed together with coincident microwave and meterwave radio observations. The rise times and fall times of the X-ray bursts are found to be highly correlated and effectively equal, strongly suggesting a flare energizing mechanism that is reversible. The good time resolution available for these observations reveals that the microwave emission is influenced by an additional process, evident in the tendency of the microwave emission to peak later and decay more slowly than the symmetric X-ray bursts. Meterwave emission is observed in coincidence with the 5 events which show the strongest time correlation between the X-ray and microwave burst structure. This meterwave emission is characterized by U-burst radiation, indicating confinement of the flare source.

  12. The value of impulsivity to define subgroups of addicted individuals differing in personality dysfunction, craving, psychosocial adjustment, and wellbeing: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Pilatti, Angelina; Lozano, Oscar; Martínez-González, José M; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    High impulsivity is common to substance and gambling addictions. Despite these commonalities, there is still substantial heterogeneity on impulsivity levels within these diagnostic groups, and variations in impulsive levels predict higher severity of symptoms and poorer outcomes. We addressed the question of whether impulsivity scores can yield empirically driven subgroups of addicted individuals that will exhibit different clinical presentations and outcomes. We applied latent class analysis (LCA) to trait (UPPS-P impulsive behavior scale) and cognitive impulsivity (Stroop and d2 tests) scores in three predominantly male addiction diagnostic groups: Cocaine with Personality Disorders, Cocaine Non-comorbid, and Gambling and analyzed the usefulness of the resulting subgroups to differentiate personality beliefs and relevant outcomes: Craving, psychosocial adjustment, and quality of life. In accordance with impulsivity scores, the three addiction diagnostic groups are best represented as two separate classes: Class 1 characterized by greater trait impulsivity and poorer cognitive impulsivity performance and Class 2 characterized by lower trait impulsivity and better cognitive impulsivity performance. The two empirically derived classes showed significant differences on personality features and outcome variables (Class 1 exhibited greater personality dysfunction and worse clinical outcomes), whereas conventional diagnostic groups showed non-significant differences on most of these measures. Trait and cognitive impulsivity scores differentiate subgroups of addicted individuals with more versus less severe personality features and clinical outcomes.

  13. The value of impulsivity to define subgroups of addicted individuals differing in personality dysfunction, craving, psychosocial adjustment, and wellbeing: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Pilatti, Angelina; Lozano, Oscar; Martínez-González, José M; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    High impulsivity is common to substance and gambling addictions. Despite these commonalities, there is still substantial heterogeneity on impulsivity levels within these diagnostic groups, and variations in impulsive levels predict higher severity of symptoms and poorer outcomes. We addressed the question of whether impulsivity scores can yield empirically driven subgroups of addicted individuals that will exhibit different clinical presentations and outcomes. We applied latent class analysis (LCA) to trait (UPPS-P impulsive behavior scale) and cognitive impulsivity (Stroop and d2 tests) scores in three predominantly male addiction diagnostic groups: Cocaine with Personality Disorders, Cocaine Non-comorbid, and Gambling and analyzed the usefulness of the resulting subgroups to differentiate personality beliefs and relevant outcomes: Craving, psychosocial adjustment, and quality of life. In accordance with impulsivity scores, the three addiction diagnostic groups are best represented as two separate classes: Class 1 characterized by greater trait impulsivity and poorer cognitive impulsivity performance and Class 2 characterized by lower trait impulsivity and better cognitive impulsivity performance. The two empirically derived classes showed significant differences on personality features and outcome variables (Class 1 exhibited greater personality dysfunction and worse clinical outcomes), whereas conventional diagnostic groups showed non-significant differences on most of these measures. Trait and cognitive impulsivity scores differentiate subgroups of addicted individuals with more versus less severe personality features and clinical outcomes. PMID:24014137

  14. Red palm oil as a source of beta-carotene in a school biscuit used to address vitamin A deficiency in primary school children.

    PubMed

    van Stuijvenberg, M E; Faber, M; Dhansay, M A; Lombard, C J; Vorster, N; Benadé, A J

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a biscuit with red palm oil as a source of beta-carotene was compared with the effect of a biscuit with beta-carotene from a synthetic source on the vitamin A status of primary school children in a randomised controlled trial. Children aged 5-11 years (n = 265) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) placebo biscuit; (2) biscuit with synthetic beta-carotene as a vitamin A fortificant; and (3) biscuit with red palm oil as a source of beta-carotene. The two non-placebo biscuits were designed to provide 34% of the RDA for vitamin A per serving (4 x 15 g biscuits). The biscuits were distributed daily during the school week and compliance was closely monitored and recorded. Children were assessed at baseline and after 6 months of intervention. Mean serum retinol in all three groups increased significantly compared to baseline (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of low serum retinol levels (< 20 micrograms/dL) dropped from 50 to 24.4% in the control group, from 48.2 to 16.9% in the synthetic beta-carotene group, and from 50.6 to 22.8% in the red palm oil group. There was no significant treatment effect compared to the control group in either the synthetic beta-carotene or red palm oil group. The increase in the control group was probably due to a school feeding scheme (providing 33% of the RDA for vitamin A) introduced during the latter part of the study. Our results were thus confounded and the 'true' effect of the red palm oil biscuit on vitamin A status could not be established. The study has, however, shown that red palm oil can be incorporated in a biscuit and that the end product with regard to taste and appearance was well accepted by the school children. A follow-up study in a school where there is no school feeding is indicated.

  15. Performance analysis of GPS receivers in impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Amin, Moeness

    2005-06-01

    The use of GPS has broadened to include mounting on or inside manned or autonomous vehicles which makes it subject to interference generated from motor emissions. Many sources of interference are typically modeled as impulsive noise whose characteristics may vary in terms of power, pulse width, and pulse occurrences. In this paper, we examine the effect of impulsive noise on GPS delay lock loops (DLL). We consider the DLL for the GPS Coarse Acquisition code (C/A), which is used in civilian applications, but also needed in military GPS receivers to perform signal acquisition and tracking. We focus on the statistics of the noise components of the early, late, punctual correlators, which contribute to the discriminator error. The discriminator noise components are produced from the correlation between the impulsive noise and the early, late and punctual reference C/A code. Due to long time averaging, these components assume Gaussian distributions. The discriminator error variance is derived, incorporating the front-end precorrelation filter. It is shown that the synchronization error variance is significantly affected by the power of the received impulsive noise, the precorrelation filter, and the sample rate.

  16. Brain structure correlates of emotion-based rash impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Muhlert, N.; Lawrence, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    Negative urgency (the tendency to engage in rash, ill-considered action in response to intense negative emotions), is a personality trait that has been linked to problematic involvement in several risky and impulsive behaviours, and to various forms of disinhibitory psychopathology, but its neurobiological correlates are poorly understood. Here, we explored whether inter-individual variation in levels of trait negative urgency was associated with inter-individual variation in regional grey matter volumes. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in a sample (n = 152) of healthy participants, we found that smaller volumes of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and right temporal pole, regions previously linked to emotion appraisal, emotion regulation and emotion-based decision-making, were associated with higher levels of trait negative urgency. When controlling for other impulsivity linked personality traits (sensation seeking, lack of planning/perseverance) and negative emotionality per se (neuroticism), these associations remained, and an additional relationship was found between higher levels of trait negative urgency and smaller volumes of the left ventral striatum. This latter finding mirrors recent VBM findings in an animal model of impulsivity. Our findings offer novel insight into the brain structure correlates of one key source of inter-individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:25957991

  17. Periodic components of hand acceleration/deceleration impulses during telemanipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.

    1994-01-01

    Responsiveness is the ability of a telemanipulator to recreate user trajectories and impedance in time and space. For trajectory production, a key determinant of responsiveness is the ability of the system to accept user inputs, which are forces on the master handle generated by user hand acceleration/deceleration (a/d) impulses, and translate them into slave arm acceleration/deceleration. This paper presents observations of master controller a/d impulses during completion of a simple target acquisition task. Power spectral density functions (PSDF`s) calculated from hand controller a/d impulses were used to assess impulse waveform. The relative contributions of frequency intervals ranging up to 25 Hz for three spatially different versions of the task were used to determine which frequencies were most important. The highest relative power was observed in frequencies between 1 Hz and 6 Hz. The key frequencies related to task difficulty were in the range from 2 Hz to 8 Hz. the results provide clues to the source of the performance inhibition.

  18. Impulsivity and sexual assault in college men.

    PubMed

    Mouilso, Emily R; Calhoun, Karen S; Rosenbloom, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Although impulsivity has been consistently linked to perpetration of sexual aggression, results lack clarity because they do not account for the substantial heterogeneity associated with the construct. The UPPS-P model (Lynam, Smith, Whiteside, & Cyders, 2006), which was proposed to clarify the multidimensional nature of impulsivity, has yet to be applied to sexual aggression. We measured UPPS-P Impulsivity in a sample of male college students who also self-reported on perpetration of sexual aggression. As predicted, impulsivity distinguished perpetrators from nonperpetrators. Perpetrators scored higher than non-perpetrators on Negative Urgency, Positive Urgency, and lack of Premeditation. Results suggest that the impulsivity traits most relevant to sexual aggression are the tendency to act impulsively when experiencing intense emotions (Positive and Negative Urgency) and lack of forethought and planning (lack of Premeditation). PMID:23862308

  19. Impulse gage development for the 100-200 ktap range

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.C.; Naumann, W.J. . Advanced Technologies Div.)

    1990-07-31

    Special effects underground test (UGT) material response and source diagnostics data require impulse gages that can be used in the 50--150 ktap range and have equilibrated from electrical and mechanical noise sources within 0.001 s. Such gages were designed, analyzed, and tested under this program. One- and two-dimensional stress propagation calculations were performed and predictions were developed for deformation of the gage specimen cup. These predictions were conservative when compared to gas gun test results. The response of the gage will equilibrate within 5% to its final value within 300 {mu}sec. The impulse delivered to the gages for these tests exceeded 250 ktap. The code and experimental results provides a basis for confidence in the operability of the gage in an actual UGT environment.

  20. Cotton buds, momentum, and impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ed; Nuñez, Jover; Guirit, Alfredo; van Huis, Cor

    2000-01-01

    Here is a simple experiment demonstrating impulse and momentum that was picked up from a Japanese presenter at a physics teacher conference held in Cebu City. We have not been able to trace the experiment farther and have never seen it in print. After student-author Nuñez demonstrated it during an exam on conducting demonstrations, we converted the qualitative idea into a quanitative experiment and even discovered some possibilities for student research. The lab is also suitable as homework, since it uses universally available "equipment" — cotton buds (swabs), drinking straws, and a ruler.

  1. Motor inhibition, reflection impulsivity, and trait impulsivity in pathological skin picking.

    PubMed

    Snorrason, Ívar; Smári, Jakob; Ólafsson, Ragnar P

    2011-09-01

    Pathological skin picking (PSP) is often recognized as an impulse control disorder. The current study sought to investigate the relationship between PSP and different forms of impulsivity. University students that met criteria for PSP (n = 55) and university students without history of PSP (n = 55) answered a multidimensional impulsivity questionnaire (the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale) and completed 2 neurocognitive tasks that assess impulsivity (the Stop Signal Task and the Information Sampling Task). The PSP group scored significantly higher than the control group on the negative and positive urgency subscales of the UPPS, but the groups did not differ on other subscales or the neurocognitive tasks. Logistic regression demonstrated that the urgency scales added to the prediction of PSP after negative affect and other forms of impulsivity were adjusted for. The results indicate that PSP sufferers are characterized by emotion-based impulsivity and do not appear to be impulsive in other ways. PMID:21658533

  2. Approximate controllability of nonlinear impulsive differential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Mahmudov, N. I.; Kim, J. H.

    2007-08-01

    Many practical systems in physical and biological sciences have impulsive dynamical be- haviours during the evolution process which can be modeled by impulsive differential equations. This paper studies the approximate controllability issue for nonlinear impulsive differential and neutral functional differential equations in Hilbert spaces. Based on the semigroup theory and fixed point approach, sufficient conditions for approximate controllability of impulsive differential and neutral functional differential equations are established. Finally, two examples are presented to illustrate the utility of the proposed result. The results improve some recent results.

  3. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  4. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  5. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  6. Cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in post-bariatric surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Gruner-Labitzke, Kerstin; Köhler, Hinrich; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Initial evidence that cognitive function improves after bariatric surgery exists. The post-surgery increase in cognitive control might correspond with a decrease of impulsive symptoms after surgery. The present study investigated cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in patients with substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery by using a comparative cross-sectional design. Fifty post-bariatric surgery patients (postBS group) who had significant percent weight loss (M = 75.94, SD = 18.09) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (body mass index, BMI Mpost = 30.54 kg/m2, SDpost = 5.14) were compared with 50 age and gender matched bariatric surgery candidates (preBS group; BMI Mpre = 48.01 kg/m2, SDpre = 6.56). To measure cognitive function the following computer-assisted behavioral tasks were utilized: Iowa Gambling Task, Tower of Hanoi, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test-Part B, and Corsi Block Tapping Test. Impulsive symptoms and behaviors were assessed using impulsivity questionnaires and a structured interview for impulse control disorders (ICDs). No group differences were found with regard to performance-based cognitive control, self-reported impulsive symptoms, and ICDs. The results indicate that the general tendency to react impulsively does not differ between pre-surgery and post-surgery patients. The question of whether nonfood-related impulsivity in morbidly obese patients changes post-surgery should be addressed in longitudinal studies given that impulsive symptoms can be considered potential targets for pre- as well post-surgery interventions. PMID:25566164

  7. Cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in post-bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Gruner-Labitzke, Kerstin; Köhler, Hinrich; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Initial evidence that cognitive function improves after bariatric surgery exists. The post-surgery increase in cognitive control might correspond with a decrease of impulsive symptoms after surgery. The present study investigated cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in patients with substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery by using a comparative cross-sectional design. Fifty post-bariatric surgery patients (postBS group) who had significant percent weight loss (M = 75.94, SD = 18.09) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (body mass index, BMI M post = 30.54 kg/m(2), SDpost = 5.14) were compared with 50 age and gender matched bariatric surgery candidates (preBS group; BMI M pre = 48.01 kg/m(2), SDpre = 6.56). To measure cognitive function the following computer-assisted behavioral tasks were utilized: Iowa Gambling Task, Tower of Hanoi, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test-Part B, and Corsi Block Tapping Test. Impulsive symptoms and behaviors were assessed using impulsivity questionnaires and a structured interview for impulse control disorders (ICDs). No group differences were found with regard to performance-based cognitive control, self-reported impulsive symptoms, and ICDs. The results indicate that the general tendency to react impulsively does not differ between pre-surgery and post-surgery patients. The question of whether nonfood-related impulsivity in morbidly obese patients changes post-surgery should be addressed in longitudinal studies given that impulsive symptoms can be considered potential targets for pre- as well post-surgery interventions. PMID:25566164

  8. Reliability and Validity of Measures of Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action in Smokers Trying to Quit

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Danielle E.; Bold, Krysten W.; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M.; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G.; Chapman, Gretchen B.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are non-smokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to post-quit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from pre-quit to three weeks post-quit was moderated by achievement of seven-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least one day in the first two weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified seven-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks post-quit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of inter-correlation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. PMID:26751623

  9. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  10. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  11. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  12. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  13. Semicontinuity of attractors for impulsive dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonotto, E. M.; Bortolan, M. C.; Collegari, R.; Czaja, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of collective tube conditions which assures a suitable behaviour for a family of dynamical systems close to impulsive sets. Using the collective tube conditions, we develop the theory of upper and lower semicontinuity of global attractors for a family of impulsive dynamical systems.

  14. Covert Suicidal Impulses in Maternally Deprived Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; Lubin, Harriet

    This paper discusses the development of suicidal impulses in children who have lost their mothers due to abandonment or death. The paper is based on two psychoanalytic case studies, in which the children were in therapy when the first suicidal impulses emerged. A pattern is described in which bereaved children's intense wishes to have their…

  15. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  16. Impulsivity and Psychoeducational Intervention in Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ronald T.

    1980-01-01

    Two psychoeducational procedures were investigated for their effects on impulsivity in 120 hyperactive children in two groups: those receiving stimulant drug therapy and those not receiving stimulant drug therapy. Results indicated that the use of psychoeducational treatment approaches are of value in altering the impulsive responses of…

  17. Impulsivity: Self-Report and Performance Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, E.; Harbison, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The present study assessed the relationship between impulsivity as measured by the Matching Familiar Figures test (MFF) and by the impulsivity (IMP) factor derived from the Junior Eysenck Personality Inventory (JEPI) items identified by S. N. Bennet in 1973. (Author/RK)

  18. Assessing impulsivity changes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Delbeuck, Xavier; Billieux, Joël; d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Anne-Claude Juillerat; Van der Linden, Martial

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive behaviors are common in brain-damaged patients including those with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale assessing changes on 4 different dimensions of impulsivity, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking, arising in the course of a neurodegenerative disease. To this end, caregivers of 83 probable AD patients completed a short questionnaire adapted from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the data were performed and revealed that a model with 4 distinct but related latent variables corresponding to 4 different dimensions of impulsivity fit the data best. Furthermore, the results showed that lack of perseverance, followed by lack of premeditation and urgency, increased after the onset of the disease, whereas sensation seeking decreased. Overall, the multifaceted nature of impulsivity was confirmed in a sample of AD patients, whose caregivers reported significant changes regarding each facet of impulsivity. Consequently, the short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale opens up interesting prospects for a better comprehension of behavioral symptoms of dementia. PMID:18580596

  19. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  20. Impulsive phenomena, the impulsive character (der Triebhafte Charakter) and DSM personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Perry, J Christopher; Körner, Annett C

    2011-10-01

    Impulsive phenomena have frequently been associated with personality disorders, beginning with Reich's description of the impulsive-character (Reich, 1925/1975). However, questions remain regarding the cooccurrence of a wide variety of impulsive phenomena and whether an underlying structure influences the differential association of impulses to individual personality disorders. Adults entering residential treatment for treatment-refractory disorders were interviewed about their lifetime histories of 33 impulse items, following independent diagnostic interviews. Factor analysis suggested 12 underlying dimensions of impulsive phenomena, explaining 68% of the variance. Borderline and antisocial PDs had the highest impulse scores, followed by self-defeating, narcissistic, depressive, and passive-aggressive PDs. Schizoid, avoidant, obsessive-compulsive, and dependent types were negatively associated with impulsive phenomena. Individuals with the highest impulse scores showed higher levels of borderline, antisocial and either self-defeating or passive-aggressive personality pathology, and were characterized by high Neuroticism and Openness and low Agreeableness on the NEO-FFI. Personality disorders and the NEO-FFI personality traits both predicted unique variance in impulsive phenomena, with the former predominating. Our findings bear striking similarities to Reich's (1925/1975) descriptions of the impulsive character.

  1. Impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of discrete-time delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wu-Hua; Lu, Xiaomei; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates the problems of impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of discrete-time delayed neural networks (DDNNs). Two types of DDNNs with stabilizing impulses are studied. By introducing the time-varying Lyapunov functional to capture the dynamical characteristics of discrete-time impulsive delayed neural networks (DIDNNs) and by using a convex combination technique, new exponential stability criteria are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. The stability criteria for DIDNNs are independent of the size of time delay but rely on the lengths of impulsive intervals. With the newly obtained stability results, sufficient conditions on the existence of linear-state feedback impulsive controllers are derived. Moreover, a novel impulsive synchronization scheme for two identical DDNNs is proposed. The novel impulsive synchronization scheme allows synchronizing two identical DDNNs with unknown delays. Simulation results are given to validate the effectiveness of the proposed criteria of impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of DDNNs. Finally, an application of the obtained impulsive synchronization result for two identical chaotic DDNNs to a secure communication scheme is presented.

  2. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  3. Successful restrained eating and trait impulsiveness.

    PubMed

    van Koningsbruggen, Guido M; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Aarts, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Restrained eaters with high scores on the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS) are more successful than low scorers in regulating their food intake. According to the theory of temptation-elicited goal activation (Fishbach, Friedman, & Kruglanski, 2003), they have become successful because, due to earlier repeated instances of successful self-control, they formed an associative link between temptations and thoughts of dieting. It is unclear, however, why they should have been more successful in earlier attempts at self-control than their unsuccessful counterparts. We examined whether trait impulsiveness plays a role by investigating the associations between dietary restraint, trait impulsiveness, and PSRS. Results showed that the interaction between dietary restraint and impulsiveness predicted dieting success: A lower level of impulsiveness was associated with greater dieting success among restrained eaters. These results suggest that restrained eaters who are less impulsive are more likely to become successful restrained eaters as identified with the PSRS.

  4. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  5. The Subthalamic Nucleus, Limbic Function, and Impulse Control.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P Justin; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    It has been well documented that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) to address some of the disabling motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) can evoke unintended effects, especially on non-motor behavior. This observation has catalyzed more than a decade of research concentrated on establishing trends and identifying potential mechanisms for these non-motor effects. While many issues remain unresolved, the collective result of many research studies and clinical observations has been a general recognition of the role of the STN in mediating limbic function. In particular, the STN has been implicated in impulse control and the related construct of valence processing. A better understanding of STN involvement in these phenomena could have important implications for treating impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs affect up to 40% of PD patients on dopamine agonist therapy and approximately 15% of PD patients overall. ICDs have been reported to be associated with STN DBS. In this paper we will focus on impulse control and review pre-clinical, clinical, behavioral, imaging, and electrophysiological studies pertaining to the limbic function of the STN.

  6. Solar impulsive energetic electron events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua

    The Sun is capable of accelerating ions from ~ tens of keV up to tens of GeV and electrons from ~ tens of eV up to hundreds of MeVs in transient events such as flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The energized particles escaping into the interplanetary medium are referred to as Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. The great majority of SEP events are impulsive SEP events that are dominated by ~1-100 keV electrons and ~MeV/nucleon ion emissions, with enhanced 3 He/ 4 He ratios up to 10 4 times the coronal values (also called electron/ 3 He-rich SEP events). This thesis is focused on solar impulsive energetic electron events, the electron part of impulsive SEP events, using electron observations from the 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument (3DP) on the WIND spacecraft near the Earth. First, I present the first comprehensive statistical study of solar energetic electron events over almost one solar cycle. I find that the occurrence rate of solar electron events shows a strong solar-cycle variation; after correction for the background effect, the estimated occurrence frequency exhibits a good power-law distribution, and the estimated occurrence rate near the Earth is ~1000/year at solar maximum and ~30/year at solar minimum for the instrumental sensitivity (~2.9×10^-4 (cm 2 s str eV) -1 for the 40 keV channel) of WIND/3DP, about one order of magnitude larger than the observed occurrence rate. Solar energetic electron events have a one-to-one association with type III radio bursts and a poor association with flares, but a close association with 3 He- rich ion emissions. These 3 He-rich electron events also have a poor association with flares but a close (~ 60%) association with west-limb CMEs. Then I present two case studies: one investigating the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and type III radio emissions, and the second studying the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and 3 He- rich ions. For both

  7. [Cross-correlation as a method for discriminating impulses on multineuronal recordings].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, A V; Galashina, A G

    1989-01-01

    Impulses series, singled out from multineuronal activity by means of amplitude discriminator, were analyzed by creating crosscorrelation histograms. The authors consider that in studying of net brain activity with crosscorrelation method of analysis "window" discrimination of impulses series in multineuronal record is a quite correct method and may be used along with discrimination of spikes by form. It is shown that the size of the "window", used for singling out of separate impulses series, is not a determining parameter in search of temporal dependence in the activity of the investigated cells, as final discrimination of the impulses of dependently acting neuronal pairs occurs at the level of the crosscorrelation method itself. The step of the analysis under the use of crosscorrelation method is of decisive significance for revealing of direct interconnections between neurones in the cases when these connections are masked on histograms with wide peaks reflecting the influences of common sources, on the recorded cells.

  8. Growth function for human response to large-amplitude impulse noise.

    PubMed

    Schomer, P D

    1978-12-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the use of C-weighted day/night level for the assessment of impulse noise such as the noise resulting from sonic boom, blast noise (artillery, armor, demolition, etc.) and other large-amplitude impulse sources. One remaining question pertaining to the use of C-weighting has been the growth function for human response to impulse noise. This question arises because work by Kryter and by Young using peak values and/or small amplitudes exhibited growth functions of 6--7dB for a doubling of annoyance, while the growth function for human response to common sources (planes, vehicles, etc.) increases by about 10 dB for a doubling of annoyance. Kyter's and Young's data are reanalyzed herein by using C-weighting and by including only large-amplitude data. This reanalysis results in a growth function for human response to impulse noise which increases by about 10 dB for a doubling of annoyance. This equality of growth function between common A-weighted noise and C-weighted impulse noise further supports the use of C-weighted day/night level for assessment of sonic boom, blast noise, or other large-amplitude impulse noises having similar spectral content. PMID:739098

  9. Effects of Impulsive Pile-Driving Exposure on Fishes.

    PubMed

    Casper, Brandon M; Carlson, Thomas J; Halvorsen, Michele B; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-01-01

    Six species of fishes were tested under aquatic far-field, plane-wave acoustic conditions to answer several key questions regarding the effects of exposure to impulsive pile driving. The issues addressed included which sound levels lead to the onset of barotrauma injuries, how these levels differ between fishes with different types of swim bladders, the recovery from barotrauma injuries, and the potential effects exposure might have on the auditory system. The results demonstrate that the current interim criteria for pile-driving sound exposures are 20 dB or more below the actual sound levels that result in the onset of physiological effects on fishes.

  10. Asymptotic stability of delayed stochastic genetic regulatory networks with impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Raja, R.; Anthoni, S. Marshal

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, the asymptotic stability analysis problem is considered for a class of delayed stochastic genetic regulatory networks with impulses. Based on the Lyapunov stability technique and stochastic analysis theory, stability criteria are proposed in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMI). It is shown that the addressed stochastic genetic regulatory networks are globally asymptotically stable if four LMIs are feasible, where the feasibility of LMIs can be readily checked by Matlab LMI toolbox. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed result.

  11. Effects of Impulsive Pile-Driving Exposure on Fishes.

    PubMed

    Casper, Brandon M; Carlson, Thomas J; Halvorsen, Michele B; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-01-01

    Six species of fishes were tested under aquatic far-field, plane-wave acoustic conditions to answer several key questions regarding the effects of exposure to impulsive pile driving. The issues addressed included which sound levels lead to the onset of barotrauma injuries, how these levels differ between fishes with different types of swim bladders, the recovery from barotrauma injuries, and the potential effects exposure might have on the auditory system. The results demonstrate that the current interim criteria for pile-driving sound exposures are 20 dB or more below the actual sound levels that result in the onset of physiological effects on fishes. PMID:26610952

  12. Effects of cannabis on impulsivity: a systematic review of neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Wrege, Johannes; Schmidt, Andre; Walter, Anna; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for specific effects of cannabis on impulsivity, disinhibition and motor control. The review had a specific focus on neuroimaging findings associated with acute and chronic use of the drug and covers literature published up until May 2012. Seventeen studies were identified, of which 13 met the inclusion criteria; three studies investigated acute effects of cannabis (1 fMRI, 2 PET), while six studies investigated non-acute functional effects (4 fMRI, 2 PET), and four studies investigated structural alterations. Functional imaging studies of impulsivity studies suggest that prefrontal blood flow is lower in chronic cannabis users than in controls. Studies of acute administration of THC or marijuana report increased brain metabolism in several brain regions during impulsivity tasks. Structural imaging studies of cannabis users found differences in reduced prefrontal volumes and white matter integrity that might mediate the abnormal impulsivity and mood observed in marijuana users. To address the question whether impulsivity as a trait precedes cannabis consumption or whether cannabis aggravates impulsivity and discontinuation of usage more longitudinal study designs are warranted.

  13. Effects of Cannabis on Impulsivity: A Systematic Review of Neuroimaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wrege, Johannes; Schmidt, André; Walter, Anna; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Lang, Undine E.; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for specific effects of cannabis on impulsivity, disinhibition and motor control. The review had a specific focus on neuroimaging findings associated with acute and chronic use of the drug and covers literature published up until May 2012. Seventeen studies were identified, of which 13 met the inclusion criteria; three studies investigated acute effects of cannabis (1 fMRI, 2 PET), while six studies investigated non-acute functional effects (4 fMRI, 2 PET), and four studies investigated structural alterations. Functional imaging studies of impulsivity studies suggest that prefrontal blood flow is lower in chronic cannabis users than in controls. Studies of acute administration of THC or marijuana report increased brain metabolism in several brain regions during impulsivity tasks. Structural imaging studies of cannabis users found differences in reduced prefrontal volumes and white matter integrity that might mediate the abnormal impulsivity and mood observed in marijuana users. To address the question whether impulsivity as a trait precedes cannabis consumption or whether cannabis aggravates impulsivity and discontinuation of usage more longitudinal study designs are warranted. PMID:23829358

  14. Behavioral Impulsivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Amitai; McKay, Dean

    2016-09-01

    Background Grassi et al. (2015) collected data to examine impulsivity in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to nonpsychiatric controls. Their aim was to examine whether OCD may be fully captured by the behavioral addiction model, using the prototypical mechanism underlying drug addiction as their framework. Based on their findings, Grassi et al. concluded that OCD shares behavioral components with addictions, particularly behavioral impulsivity and risky decision making. Furthermore, the authors suggested that this model may be superior to the prevailing psychological model of OCD. Findings We argue that based on the nature of their data as well as the current dominant conceptualization of OCD in the literature, this conclusion is untenable. The authors inferred behavioral impulsivity, whereas their main finding was concerning cognitive impulsivity or difficulties in planning. Such items on the Barratt impulsiveness scale have been shown in other research to overpredict behavioral impulsive tendencies in OCD, where the nature of the condition involves doubting of action and a conservative estimate of how one's cognitions may impact behavior. Conclusions We conclude that similar to drug addiction, compulsive rituals in OCD may be governed by a negative reinforcement mechanism; the available data indicate that OCD does not share the two main components seen in addiction, namely, behavioral impulsivity and risky decision making. PMID:27156379

  15. Impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts in patients treated for alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wojnar, Marcin; Ilgen, Mark A.; Czyz, Ewa; Strobbe, Stephen; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Glass, Jennifer; Brower, Kirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Suicidal behavior has been recognized as an increasing problem among alcohol-dependent subjects. The aim of the study was to identify correlates of impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts among a treated population of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods A total of 154 patients with alcohol dependence consecutively admitted for addiction treatment participated in the study. Suicidal behavior was assessed together with severity of alcohol dependence, childhood abuse, impulsivity, and family history. A stop-signal procedure was used as a behavioral measure of impulsivity. Results and conclusions Lifetime suicide attempts were reported by 43% of patients in alcohol treatment; of which 62% were impulsive. Compared to patients without a suicide attempt, those with a non-impulsive attempt were more likely to have a history of sexual abuse (OR = 7.17), a family history of suicide (OR = 4.09), and higher scores on a personality measure of impulsiveness (OR = 2.27). The only significant factor that distinguished patients with impulsive suicide attempts from patients without a suicide attempt and from patients with a non-impulsive suicide attempt was a higher level of behavioral impulsivity (OR = 1.84 – 2.42). Limitations Retrospective self-report of suicide attempts and family history. Lack of diagnostic measure. PMID:18835498

  16. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of the study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. Stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms were observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  17. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

  18. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  19. Spin Stabilized Impulsively Controlled Missile (SSICM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J. I.; Howell, W. M.

    1985-12-01

    This patent is for the Spin Stabilized Impulsively Controlled Missile (SSICM). SSICM is a missile configuration which employs spin stabilization, nutational motion, and impulsive thrusting, and a body mounted passive or semiactive sensor to achieve very small miss distances against a high speed moving target. SSICM does not contain an autopilot, control surfaces, a control actuation system, nor sensor stabilization gimbals. SSICM spins at a rate sufficient to provide frequency separation between body motions and inertial target motion. Its impulsive thrusters provide near instantaneous changes in lateral velocity, whereas conventional missiles require a significant time delay to achieve lateral acceleration.

  20. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Joutsa, Juho; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2013-01-01

    Of the patients having Parkinson's disease, up to third encounters some degree of impulse control problems and one out of seven suffers from true impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Dopaminergic drugs used in anti-Parkinson therapy, especially dopamine agonists, increase the risk of these disorders. Impulse control disorders are associated with a relatively more active dopamine-mediated neurotransmission of the mesolimbic and mesocortical system. Discontinuation of dopamine agonist medication can thus be considered as the first line treatment of these disorders. PMID:24397147

  1. Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An engine is disclosed, including a controllable output plasma generator, a controllable heater for selectably raising a temperature of the plasma connected to an outlet of the plasma generator, and a nozzle connected to an outlet of the heater, through which heated plasma is discharged to provide thrust. In one embodiment, the source of plasma is a helicon generator. In one embodiment, the heater is an ion cyclotron resonator. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a radially diverging magnetic field disposed on a discharge side of the heater so that helically travelling particles in the beater exit the heater at high axial velocity. A particular embodiment includes control circuits for selectably directing a portion of radio frequency power from an RF generator to the helicon generator and to the cyclotron resonator so that the thrust output and the specific impulse of the engine can be selectively controlled. A method of propelling a vehicle is also disclosed. The method includes generating a plasma, heating said plasma, and discharging the heated plasma through a nozzle. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a diverging magnetic field. In this embodiment, the heating is performed by applying a radio frequency electro magnetic field to the plasma at the ion cyclotron frequency in an axially polarized DC magnetic field.

  2. Reward drive and rash impulsiveness as dimensions of impulsivity: implications for substance misuse.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Sharon; Gullo, Matthew J; Loxton, Natalie J

    2004-09-01

    One of the primary personality dimensions or traits that has consistently been linked to substance abuse is impulsivity. However, impulsivity is not a homogenous construct and although many of the measures of impulsivity are correlated, the most recent review of published factor analytic studies has proposed two independent dimensions of impulsivity: reward sensitivity, reflecting one of the primary dimension of J. A. Gray's personality theory, and rash impulsiveness. These two facets of impulsivity derived from the field of personality research parallel recent developments in the neurosciences where changes in the incentive value of rewarding substances has been linked to alterations in neural substrates involved in reward seeking and with a diminished capacity to inhibit behavior due to chronic drug exposure. In this paper, we propose a model that integrates the findings from research into individual differences with recent models of neural substrates implicated in the development of substance misuse.

  3. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  4. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2005-04-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period. This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered. The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  5. Behavioral Measures of Impulsivity and the Law

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Charles W.; Marsh-Richard, Dawn M.; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    The General Theory of Crime proposes that crime is explained by the combination of situational opportunity and lack of self-control. Impulsivity is one of the important components of self-control. Because behavioral measures of impulsivity are becoming more commonly utilized to assess forensic populations, this manuscript provides an overview of three current behavioral measures. In doing so, an example of their application is provided using a group of individuals likely to come into contact with the legal system: adolescents with Conduct Disorder. Earlier age of onset of Conduct Disorder symptoms has been shown to be an important predictor of the persistence of poor outcomes into adulthood including participation in criminal activities. This study found differential behavioral profiles across distinct measures of impulsivity by those with childhood- versus adolescent-onset Conduct Disorder. Legal implications for defining behavioral deficits using behavioral measures of impulsivity and their current limitations are discussed. PMID:19039792

  6. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  7. Extending the impulse response in order to reduce errors due to impulse noise and signal fading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Joseph A.; Rolls, Andrew J.; Sirisena, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    A finite impulse response (FIR) digital smearing filter was designed to produce maximum intersymbol interference and maximum extension of the impulse response of the signal in a noiseless binary channel. A matched FIR desmearing filter at the receiver then reduced the intersymbol interference to zero. Signal fades were simulated by means of 100 percent signal blockage in the channel. Smearing and desmearing filters of length 256, 512, and 1024 were used for these simulations. Results indicate that impulse response extension by means of bit smearing appears to be a useful technique for correcting errors due to impulse noise or signal fading in a binary channel.

  8. Impulsive Social Influence Increases Impulsive Choices on a Temporal Discounting Task in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Curran, Max T.; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E.; Evins, A. Eden

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented) peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment) and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment) choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18–25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence. PMID:24988440

  9. Numerical vorticity creation based on impulse conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, D M; Chorin, A J

    1996-01-01

    The problem of creating solenoidal vortex elements to satisfy no-slip boundary conditions in Lagrangian numerical vortex methods is solved through the use of impulse elements at walls and their subsequent conversion to vortex loops. The algorithm is not uniquely defined, due to the gauge freedom in the definition of impulse; the numerically optimal choice of gauge remains to be determined. Two different choices are discussed, and an application to flow past a sphere is sketched. PMID:11607636

  10. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  11. Response of electroexplosive devices to impulsive waveforms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, L. A.; Menichelli, V. J.

    1971-01-01

    The firing characteristics of insensitive electroexplosive devices to certain impulsive waveforms have been investigated. For these waveforms, energy is delivered in a time short compared to the thermal time constant and therefore cooling plays a negligible role. One waveform is a terminated capacitor discharge wherein the regular discharge of a capacitor is terminated at a preset point. Another is a half-sine wave pulse. The theory, design, and application of both impulsive waveform generators are presented together with certain limited experimental observations.

  12. Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J., LLNL

    1998-04-15

    The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.

  13. Generalized transfers and the nonoptimality of purely radial impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkin, V. I.

    1985-07-01

    A system of variables is proposed that is convenient for the precise formulation of the problem of optimal multiple-impulse transfer between arbitrary nonrectilinear Kepler orbits. The existence of a universal two-impulse transfer with transverse impulses is demonstrated for such orbits. Calculation formulas for these impulses are obtained which generalize the corresponding formulas of two-impulse Hohmann transfer between circular orbits. In addition, a lower-bound estimate is obtained for the characteristic velocity of a one-impulse transfer between orbits having a common point, and the nonoptimality of an arbitrary radial impulse is demonstrated.

  14. Enhanced awakening probability of repetitive impulse sounds.

    PubMed

    Vos, Joos; Houben, Mark M J

    2013-09-01

    In the present study relations between the level of impulse sounds and the observed proportion of behaviorally confirmed awakening reactions were determined. The sounds (shooting sounds, bangs produced by door slamming or by container transshipment, aircraft landings) were presented by means of loudspeakers in the bedrooms of 50 volunteers. The fragments for the impulse sounds consisted of single or multiple events. The sounds were presented during a 6-h period that started 75 min after the subjects wanted to sleep. In order to take account of habituation, each subject participated during 18 nights. At equal indoor A-weighted sound exposure levels, the proportion of awakening for the single impulse sounds was equal to that for the aircraft sounds. The proportion of awakening induced by the multiple impulse sounds, however, was significantly higher. For obtaining the same rate of awakening, the sound level of each of the successive impulses in a fragment had to be about 15-25 dB lower than the level of one single impulse. This level difference was largely independent of the degree of habituation. Various explanations for the enhanced awakening probability are discussed. PMID:23967934

  15. Estimating the impulse response of buried objects from ground-penetrating radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lijn, Fedde; Roth, Friedrich; Verhaegen, Michel

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a novel deconvolution algorithm designed to estimate the impulse response of buried objects based on ground penetrating radar (GPR) signals. The impulse response is a rich source of information about the buried object and therefore very useful for intelligent signal processing of GPR data. For example, it can be used in a target classification scheme to reduce the false alarm rate in demining operations. Estimating the target impulse response from the incident and scattered radar signals is a basic deconvolution problem. However, noise sensitivity and ground dispersion prevent the use of simple deconvolution methods like linear least squares deconvolution. Instead, a new deconvolution algorithm has been developed that computes estimates adhering to a physical impulse response model and that can be characterized by a limited number of parameters. It is shown that the new algorithm is robust with respect to noise and that it can deal with ground dispersion. The general performance of the algorithm has been tested on data generated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The results demonstrate that the algorithm can distinguish between different dielectric and metal targets, making it very suitable for use in a classification scheme. Moreover, since the estimated impulse responses have physical meaning they can be related to target characteristics such as size and material properties. A direct application of this is the estimation of the permittivity of a dielectric target from its impulse response and that of a calibration target.

  16. Relationships between the energetics of impulsive and gradual emissions from solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Crannell, C.J.; Karpen, J.T.; Thomas, R.J.

    1982-02-15

    The gradual soft x-ray emissions associated with a homogeneous set of solar flares have been investigated in the context of a thermal model proposed to explain the impulsive components. The parametric techniques which successfully characterized the hard x-ray and microwave observations are employed in an event-by-event analysis to test for quanitative and correlative relationships between the impulsive and gradual emissions. The results of this investigation are consistent with the hypothesis that the hard x-ray and microwave emissions are produced by bulk heating of a common thermal source. The quantitative relationships require an additional source to explain the soft x-ray observations, consistent with previous results. Correlations between the energetics of the impulsive and gradual emissions, identified in the present work, provide the first clear evidence that their energizing mechanisms are related.

  17. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N.; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D.; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18 seconds using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s interval within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the ‘core control network’ – encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortex, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex – were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness. PMID:21763642

  18. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P

    2011-08-11

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18s using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s intervals within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the 'core control network' - encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortices, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex - were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness.

  19. [Impulsivity and compulsivity in cocaine dependent individuals].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Serrano, María José; Cesar Peraleslópez, José; Moreno-López, Laura; Santos-Ruiz, Ana; Pérez-García, Miguel; Verdejogarcía, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A recent theoretical approach describes addiction as a dynamic behavioural change process on the impulsivity-compulsivity axis. However, on the basis of current evidence, it is still difficult to establish a selective association between the course of addiction and individual transition along this axis. The aim of this study is to categorize each of the individuals in a sample of cocaine-dependent patients (CDI) as mainly impulsive or mainly compulsive, on the basis of their performance in neuropsychological inhibition and perseveration tests, and to test the association between the assigned category and their scores in trait impulsivity, and severity of cocaine addiction (measured by means of self-report assessment tools). A total of 42 CDI and 65 healthy control individuals (HCI) were assessed using the UPPS-P Scale (to explore trait impulsivity), the Stroop and Go/No Go (to assess response inhibition), and Revised-Strategy Application and Probabilistic Reversal tests (to assess response perseveration). Forty-five per cent of the CDIs were classified as compulsive, and this subgroup scored significantly higher than the impulsive group on the UPPS-P dimensions of lack of perseverance and lack of premeditation. A substantial proportion of CDIs can be classified as compulsive. No differences between compulsive and impulsive CDIs were found with regard to severity of exposure to cocaine; however, patients classified as compulsive by means of neuropsychological tasks are less perseverative in the pursuit of long-term objectives and more prone to make under-meditated decisions, as shown by trait impulsivity assessment questionnaires. PMID:22648313

  20. Global robust asymptotic stability of variable-time impulsive BAM neural networks.

    PubMed

    Saylı, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Enes

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the global robust asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point for a more general class of bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with variable time of impulses is addressed. Unlike most existing studies, the case of non-fix time impulses is focused on in the present study. By means of B-equivalence method, which was introduced in Akhmet (2003, 2005, 2009, 2010), Akhmet and Perestyuk (1990) and Akhmet and Turan (2009), we reduce these networks to a fix time impulsive neural networks system. Sufficient conditions ensuring the existence, uniqueness and global robust asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point are obtained by employing an appropriate Lyapunov function and linear matrix inequality (LMI). Finally, we give one illustrative example to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  1. Variable addressability imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala, Kenneth Scott

    The use of variable addressability for creating an optimum human-machine interface is investigated. Current wide field optical systems present more information to the human visual system than it has the capacity to perceive. The axial resolution, and/or the field of view can be increased by minimizing the difference between what the eye can perceive and what the system presents. The variable addressability function was developed through the use of a human factors experiment that characterized the position of the eye during the simulated use of a binocular system. Applying the variable addressability function to a conventional optical design required the development of a new metric for evaluating the expected performance of the variable addressability system. The new metric couples psycho-visual data and traditional optical data in order to specify the required performance of the variable addressability system. A non-linear mapping of the pixels is required in order to have the system work most efficiently with the human visual system, while also compensating for eye motion. The non-linear mapping function, which is the backbone of the variable addressability technique, can be created using optical distortion. The lens and system design is demonstrated in two different spectral bands. One of the designs was fabricated, tested, and assembled into a prototype. Through a second human factors study aimed at measuring performance, the variable addressability prototype was directly compared to a uniform addressability prototype, quantifying the difference in performance for the two prototypes. The human factors results showed that the variable addressability prototype provided better resolution 13% of the time throughout the experiment, but was 15% slower in use than the uniform addressability prototype.

  2. Hydraulic impulse generator and frequency sweep mechanism for borehole applications

    DOEpatents

    Kolle, Jack J.; Marvin, Mark H.; Theimer, Kenneth J.

    2006-11-21

    This invention discloses a valve that generates a hydraulic negative pressure pulse and a frequency modulator for the creation of a powerful, broadband swept impulse seismic signal at the drill bit during drilling operations. The signal can be received at monitoring points on the surface or underground locations using geophones. The time required for the seismic signal to travel from the source to the receiver directly and via reflections is used to calculate seismic velocity and other formation properties near the source and between the source and receiver. This information can be used for vertical seismic profiling of formations drilled, to check the location of the bit, or to detect the presence of abnormal pore pressure ahead of the bit. The hydraulic negative pressure pulse can also be used to enhance drilling and production of wells.

  3. Deriving a dosage-response relationship for community response to high-energy impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1994-01-01

    The inability to systematically predict community response to exposure to sonic booms (and other high energy impulsive sounds) is a major impediment to credible analyses of the environmental effects of supersonic flight operations. Efforts to assess community response to high energy impulsive sounds are limited in at least two important ways. First, a paucity of appropriate empirical data makes it difficult to infer a dosage-response relationship by means similar to those used in the case of general transportation noise. Second, it is unclear how well the 'equal energy hypothesis' (the notion that duration, number, and level of individual events are directly interchangeable determinants of annoyance) applies to some forms of impulsive noise exposure. Some of the issues currently under consideration by a CHABA working group addressing these problems are discussed. These include means for applying information gained in controlled exposure studies about different rates of growth of annoyance with impulsive and non-impulsive sound exposure levels, and strategies for developing a dosage-response relationship in a data-poor area.

  4. Effects of acoustic impulses on hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Gerald; Müller, Reinhard; Heppelmann, Guido; Bache, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    It is well known that acoustic impulses are especially dangerous to the ear. In order to understand the damaging mechanisms involved, cases of acute acoustic trauma in man were systematically collected and documented for many years. When possible, the damaging impulses were recreated and measured, to correlate the impulses with the auditory damage they caused. Detailed pure-tone audiometry up to 16 kHz was used to determine the effects on hearing. Together with epidemiological studies on various occupations, three different damaging mechanisms can be discerned. Relatively long and massive impulses (some explosions, some airbags) often lead to damage at low frequencies, from about 0.5 to 1.5 kHz. The typical notch at about 4 to 6 kHz typically is the result of strong peaks, lasting several milliseconds, or longer. There is another notch at 12 to 14 kHz, characteristic of very short, needle-like impulses that are caused by many hand weapons, toy pistols, and firecrackers. Probable mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Impulsivity, Frontal Lobes and Risk for Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Fulton Timm; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol and substance abuse disorders involve continued use of substances despite negative consequences, i.e. loss of behavioral control of drug use. The frontal cortical areas of brain oversee behavioral control through executive functions. Executive functions include abstract thinking, motivation, planning, attention to tasks and inhibition of impulsive responses. Impulsiveness generally refers to premature, unduly risky, poorly conceived actions. Dysfunctional impulsivity includes deficits in attention, lack of reflection and/or insensitivity to consequences, all of which occur in addiction (Evenden, 1999; (de Wit, 2009). Binge drinking models indicate chronic alcohol damages corticolimbic brain regions (Crews et al., 2000) causing reversal learning deficits indicative of loss of executive function (Obernier et al., 2002b). Genetics and adolescent age are risk factors for alcoholism that coincide with sensitivity to alcohol induced neurotoxicity. Cortical degeneration from alcohol abuse may increase impulsivity contributing to the development, persistence and severity of alcohol use disorders. Interestingly, abstinence results in bursts of neurogenesis and brain regrowth (Crews and Nixon, 2009). Treatments for alcoholism, including naltrexone pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy may work through improving executive functions. This review will examine the relationships between impulsivity and executive function behaviors to changes in cortical structure during alcohol dependence and recovery. PMID:19410598

  6. Auto-programmable impulse neural circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watula, D.; Meador, J.

    1990-01-01

    Impulse neural networks use pulse trains to communicate neuron activation levels. Impulse neural circuits emulate natural neurons at a more detailed level than that typically employed by contemporary neural network implementation methods. An impulse neural circuit which realizes short term memory dynamics is presented. The operation of that circuit is then characterized in terms of pulse frequency modulated signals. Both fixed and programmable synapse circuits for realizing long term memory are also described. The implementation of a simple and useful unsupervised learning law is then presented. The implementation of a differential Hebbian learning rule for a specific mean-frequency signal interpretation is shown to have a straightforward implementation using digital combinational logic with a variation of a previously developed programmable synapse circuit. This circuit is expected to be exploited for simple and straightforward implementation of future auto-adaptive neural circuits.

  7. Using Dual Process Models to Examine Impulsivity Throughout Neural Maturation.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    The multivariate construct of impulsivity is examined through neural systems and connections that comprise the executive functioning system. It is proposed that cognitive and behavioral components of impulsivity can be divided into two distinct groups, mediated by (1) the cognitive control system: deficits in top-down cognitive control processes referred to as action/cognitive impulsivity and (2) the socioemotional system: related to bottom-up affective/motivational processes referred to as affective impulsivity. Examination of impulsivity from a developmental viewpoint can guide future research, potentially enabling the selection of more effective interventions for impulsive individuals, based on the cognitive components requiring improvement. PMID:27186976

  8. Impulse Response from Seismic Interferometry and Earthquake Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, A.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.

    2014-12-01

    We study the Green´s function (GF) retrieval based on the cross-correlation of numerically generated signals and its application to tomographic studies in central Mexico. The GF between two receivers is typically obtained based on the cross-correlation of noise recorded in two stations. Nevertheless, in this research we use large-scale earthquake numerical simulations to construct appropriate signals and optimal linear combinations of the displacements at two stations due to a small number of double-couple sources in a layered media to retrieve the Green´s function between receivers. The impulse response is obtained successfully by applying the cross-correlation, following standard interferometry theory. Additionally, the azimuthal dependence on the cross-correlations as an estimate of the impulse response is discussed using specific source locations. The main objective of our research is to elucidate the applicability of seismic interferometry in order to extend the frequency range and quality of tomographic studies based on observed regional earthquake records and dispersion maps. Thus, we show the results of the GF obtained using the aforementioned procedure in a realistic three-dimensional model of central Mexico, and quantify the discrepancies against the exact numerically computed GF. We conclude that a fair recovery is achieved by inverting velocity profiles at selected stations.

  9. TRANSITION REGION EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.; Raymond, J. C.; Murphy, N. A.; Suleiman, R.; Giordano, S.; Ko, Y.-K.; Ciaravella, A.

    2011-07-10

    There are relatively few observations of UV emission during the impulsive phases of solar flares, so the nature of that emission is poorly known. Photons produced by solar flares can resonantly scatter off atoms and ions in the corona. Based on off-limb measurements by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, we derive the O VI {lambda}1032 luminosities for 29 flares during the impulsive phase and the Ly{alpha} luminosities of 5 flares, and we compare them with X-ray luminosities from GOES measurements. The upper transition region and lower transition region luminosities of the events observed are comparable. They are also comparable to the luminosity of the X-ray emitting gas at the beginning of the flare, but after 10-15 minutes the X-ray luminosity usually dominates. In some cases, we can use Doppler dimming to estimate flow speeds of the O VI emitting gas, and five events show speeds in the 40-80 km s{sup -1} range. The O VI emission could originate in gas evaporating to fill the X-ray flare loops, in heated chromospheric gas at the footpoints, or in heated prominence material in the coronal mass ejection. All three sources may contribute in different events or even in a single event, and the relative timing of UV and X-ray brightness peaks, the flow speeds, and the total O VI luminosity favor each source in one or more events.

  10. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  11. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Inattention, Hyperactivity-Impulsivity, and Reading: Kindergarten to Grade 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebejer, Jane L.; Coventry, William L.; Byrne, Brian; Willcutt, Erik G.; Olson, Richard K.; Corley, Robin; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Twin children from Australia, Scandinavia, and the United States were assessed for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and reading across the first 3 school years. Univariate behavior-genetic analyses indicated substantial heritability for all three variables in all years. Longitudinal analyses showed one genetic source operating across the…

  12. Disentangling impulsiveness, aggressiveness and impulsive aggression: an empirical approach using self-report measures.

    PubMed

    García-Forero, Carlos; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Andrés-Pueyo, Antonio

    2009-06-30

    There is confusion in the literature concerning the concept of impulsive aggression. Based on previous research, we hypothesize that impulsivity and aggression may be related, though not as closely as to consider them the same construct. So, our aim was to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between the impulsivity and aggressiveness constructs when considered as traits. Two widely used questionnaires [Barratt's Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and Aggression Questionnaire-Refined (AQ-R)] were administered to 768 healthy respondents. Product-moment and canonical correlations were then calculated. In addition, a principal components analysis was conducted to explore whether impulsive aggression can be defined phenotypically as the expression of a single trait. The common variance between impulsivity and aggressiveness was never higher than 42%. The principal components analysis reveals that one component is not enough to represent all the variables. In conclusion, our results show that impulsivity and aggressiveness are two separate, although related constructs. This is particularly important in view of the misconceptions in the literature.

  13. Reaction of communities to impulse noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshagiri, B. V.

    1981-01-01

    In order to assess the reaction of communities to impulse noise, a sociological survey was conducted in three communities in Ontario, Canada. The dominant industrial noise in these locations is due to drop forging operations. Nearly 600 completed interviews were recorded. Detailed sound level measurements were carried out in the areas surveyed. The results clearly indicate the extent of adverse reaction to the forging noise. This research has been compared with the reaction of the respondents to traffic noise prevailing in their communities. Regression lines are presented showing the relationship between the percent of people disturbed by the forging noise and the sound level of the impulses.

  14. Impulsive nonconformity in female chat room users.

    PubMed

    Fullwood, Chris; Galbraith, Niall; Morris, Neil

    2006-10-01

    Heavy chat room use has been associated with social isolation, introversion, impulse control problems, and risk taking. Such characteristics form part of the cluster of traits associated with schizotypy. This study used multiple regression to examine the relationship between age, sex, four dimensions of schizotypy, and frequency of reported chat room use. The only significant association with schizotypy was between frequency of chat room use and impulsive nonconformity (IN) in females. These findings may be explained by the increased risk associated with female chat room use.

  15. International comparison of HV impulse measuring systems

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, T.R.; Hughes, R.C.; Lightfoot, H.A.; Schon, K.; Schulte, R.; McKnight, R.; Zhang, Y.X.

    1989-04-01

    Present standards for qualifying HV impulse measuring systems by unit-step-response parameters are complex and difficult to apply and some systems, which have response parameters within the limits of the standards, have unacceptable errors. This paper takes the first step in providing a simplified method based on simultaneous measurements of an HV impulse by a reference system and the system under test. Comparative measurements have been made in four National Laboratories and the relative differences are reported. The results are discussed and the further work which is required is outlined.

  16. Optimal noncoplanar interorbital single-impulse flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirpichnikov, S. N.

    1990-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of finding minimum-fuel orbits for single-impulse transfers between specified noncoplanar boundary Keplerian orbits. In transfers between noncoplanar circular orbits, the Hohmann single-impulse transfer in the initial orbit plane is shown to be globally optimal from the energy standpoint. Approximate optimal solutions are obtained in the practically important case of weakly elliptical boundary orbits with a small angle between the planes. The optimal solutions obtained here can be used as initial approximations when determining real orbits for interorbital and interplanetary flights.

  17. Test-retest reliability of behavioral measures of impulsive choice, impulsive action, and inattention.

    PubMed

    Weafer, Jessica; Baggott, Matthew J; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-12-01

    Behavioral measures of impulsivity are widely used in substance abuse research, yet relatively little attention has been devoted to establishing their psychometric properties, especially their reliability over repeated administration. The current study examined the test-retest reliability of a battery of standardized behavioral impulsivity tasks, including measures of impulsive choice (i.e., delay discounting, probability discounting, and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task), impulsive action (i.e., the stop signal task, the go/no-go task, and commission errors on the continuous performance task), and inattention (i.e., attention lapses on a simple reaction time task and omission errors on the continuous performance task). Healthy adults (n = 128) performed the battery on two separate occasions. Reliability estimates for the individual tasks ranged from moderate to high, with Pearson correlations within the specific impulsivity domains as follows: impulsive choice (r range: .76-.89, ps < .001); impulsive action (r range: .65-.73, ps < .001); and inattention (r range: .38-.42, ps < .001). Additionally, the influence of day-to-day fluctuations in mood, as measured by the Profile of Mood States, was assessed in relation to variability in performance on each of the behavioral tasks. Change in performance on the delay discounting task was significantly associated with change in positive mood and arousal. No other behavioral measures were significantly associated with mood. In sum, the current analysis demonstrates that behavioral measures of impulsivity are reliable measures and thus can be confidently used to assess various facets of impulsivity as intermediate phenotypes for drug abuse. PMID:24099351

  18. Instrumentation impulse-line plugging in coal-liquefaction-process application. [1/2 in. diam. tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, K.R.

    1983-02-01

    Instrumentation impulse line systems in coal liquefaction process applications were studied for the purpose of seeking methods by which the problem of line plugging can be alleviated or eliminated. The emphasis was on purged systems in which approx. 1/2-in.-diam lines carry a purge fluid at a low flow rate (approx. 2 gph or 5 scfm) to provide a pressure transmitting medium between a process solids-bearing liquid and the measuring instrument. Plugging of impulse lines is a maintenance harassment and can cause periods of degraded measurements accuracy in coal liquefaction as well as other important industries, such as petroleum refining. The approach taken in this work was to compile information on purged instrumentation impulse line systems design and operating experience, to formulate and record recommended practices for coal liquefaction processes, and to define possibilities for alternative systems. Sources of information utilized were the personnel of five operating coal liquefaction facilities, applications engineers for suppliers of pressure measurement and flow control equipment, process control engineers in petroleum refining, and the literature. This report includes a description of the purged impulse lines application and problems, a summary of recommended practives for purged impulse line systems in coal liquefaction processes based on a compilation of operating experiences, and a discussion of possibilities for unpurged impulse lines systems which should be experimentally evlauated in process locations which might yield the greatest potential benefit. Also, the study idnetified a development need for a purge fluid flow rate controller to be used in conventional impulse lines.

  19. Analysis of solitary wave impulses in granular chains using ultrasonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Hutchins, D. A.; Akanji, O.; Thomas, P. J.; Davis, L. A. J.; Harput, S.; Gelat, P.; Freear, S.; Saffari, N.

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of broad bandwidth solitary wave impulses, generated within granular chains by narrow bandwidth ultrasonic excitation, is studied in detail. Theoretical predictions are compared to experimental results. It is demonstrated that the observed effects result from a sum of a solitary wave traveling out from the source with a wave that reflects from the far end of the chain. It is shown that this combination, when used with an excitation in the form of a long-duration tone burst, encourages the generation of multiple impulses with a characteristic periodicity. This study shows that the properties of the chain structure and the excitation can be adjusted so as to generate ultrasonic solitary wave impulses with a high amplitude and known frequency content, which are of interest in applications such as biomedical ultrasound.

  20. Impulse noise and acute acoustic trauma in Finnish conscripts. Number of shots fired and safe distances.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, S; Lehtomäki, K M

    1997-01-01

    This prospective study of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) from exposure to impulse noise during compulsory military service focused on three issues the number of shot or explosion impulses that the conscript was exposed to at the time of AAT, distance of injured ear from causal firearm, and the circumstances under which AAT occurred protected ears. The series includes 449 consecutive, verified cases of AAT seen at the Central Military Hospital in Helsinki, Finland, in the period 1989-1993. AAT usually occurred during combat training (87%) as a result of exposure to impulses from small arms (83%). In 41%. AAT was caused by a single shot or detonation impulse. As many as 92% of all AATs occurred within 2 m of the causal firearm. Fourteen percent were wearing hearing protectors when the accident took place, but every third had badly fitting protectors or had neglected safety regulations and used insufficient protection. Of all AATs caused by one noise impulse in protected ears. 83% were attributable to heavy arms and only 14% to small arms. The results of the study suggest that combined use of earmuffs and earplugs in association with a safe distance of over 5 m from the noise source gives adequate protection against AAT. However, for conscripts using certain heavy arms e.g. hazooka. more effective hearing protection should be developed. PMID:9187006

  1. Bright and dark sides of impulsivity: performance of women with high and low trait impulsivity on neuropsychological tasks.

    PubMed

    Perales, Jose C; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Moya, Maribel; Lozano, Oscar; Perez-Garcia, Miguel

    2009-11-01

    We administered a multidimensional measure of trait impulsivity (the UPPS-P impulsivity scale; Cyders et al., 2007) to a nonclinical sample of 155 individuals and selected 32 participants at the two ends of the trait impulsivity continuum: high (HI, n = 15) and low (LI, n = 17) impulsive women. We further tested these extreme groups on neuropsychological measures of motor impulsivity (go/no-go, d2), delay discounting (Now or Later Questionnaire), reflection impulsivity (Matching Familiar Figures Test), self-regulation (Revised-Strategy Application Test), and decision making (Iowa Gambling Task). High-trait-impulsivity women were found to commit more commission errors in the initial stage of the go/no-go task but also to make fewer omission errors in the d2 test than did low-trait-impulsivity women. Both effects can be accounted for by a lower response criterion in impulsive women. On the other hand, measures of delay discounting, reflection impulsivity, self-regulation, and decision making did not yield significant differences between the two groups. This pattern of results supports the idea that trait impulsivity in healthy women is linked to neurocognitive mechanisms involved in response monitoring and inhibition, but not to mechanisms involved in self-regulation or decision making. These findings temper the assumption that impulsivity is the core cause of dysfunctional risky and/or impulsive behavior in psychopathological or neuropsychological profiles. PMID:19358009

  2. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  3. Impulse noise trauma during army weapon firing.

    PubMed

    Munjal, K R; Singh, V P

    1997-04-01

    A 100 infanty personnel firing modern weapons such as the Anti Tank Guided Missile, 106mm Recoiless Gun (RCL), 84mm Rocket Launcher (RL) and 81mm Mortar were studied for the effect of impulse noise on the ear and the evolution of the Temporary Threshold Shift (TTS), Recovery Time (RT) and Permanent Threshold Shift (PTS) was traced. PMID:23119288

  4. Functional impulsivity and reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Luke D; Jackson, Chris J

    2006-02-01

    In this article, we attempt to integrate Dickman's (1990) descriptive concept of Functional Impulsivity (FI) with Gray's (1970, 1991) Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). Specifically, we consider that FI bears great conceptual similarity to Gray's concept of reward-reactivity, which is thought to be caused by the combined effects of a Behavioral Activation System (BAS) and Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). In our first study, we examine the construct validity and structural correlates of FI. Results indicate that FI is related positively to measures of BAS and Extraversion, negatively to measures of BIS and Neuroticism, and is separate from Psychoticism and typical trait Impulsivity, which Dickman calls Dysfunctional Impulsivity (DI). In our second study, we use a go/no-go discrimination task to examine the relationship between FI and response bias under conditions of rewarding and punishing feedback. Results indicate that FI, along with two measures of BAS, predicted the development of a response bias for the rewarded alternative. In comparison, high DI appeared to reflect indifference toward either reward or punishment. We consider how these findings might reconcile the perspectives of Gray and Dickman and help clarify the broader understanding of Impulsivity.

  5. How Many Impulsivities? A Discounting Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2013-01-01

    People discount the value of delayed and uncertain outcomes, and how steeply individuals discount is thought to reflect how impulsive they are. From this perspective, steep discounting of delayed outcomes (which fails to maximize long-term welfare) and shallow discounting of probabilistic outcomes (which fails to adequately take risk into account)…

  6. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying.

    PubMed

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva M; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB-), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered questionnaires concerning symptoms of borderline personality disorder, self-harming behaviors, binge eating and symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In addition, comorbid ICDs were assessed using the SCID-ICD. Results The PB+ and PB- groups did not differ with regard to borderline personality disorder or ADHD symptoms, but both groups reported significantly more symptoms than the HC group. Frequencies of self-harming behaviors did not differ between the three groups. Patients with PB were more often diagnosed with any current ICD (excluding PB) compared to those without PB and the HC group (38.7% vs. 12.9% vs. 12.9%, respectively, p=.017). Discussion Our findings confirm prior research suggesting more impulsive behaviors in patients with and without PB compared to healthy controls. The results of the questionnaire-based assessment indicate that outpatients with PB perceive themselves equally impulsive and self-harm as frequently as inpatients without PB; but they seem to suffer more often from an ICD as assessed by means of an interview.

  7. Arbitration between controlled and impulsive choices.

    PubMed

    Economides, M; Guitart-Masip, M; Kurth-Nelson, Z; Dolan, R J

    2015-04-01

    The impulse to act for immediate reward often conflicts with more deliberate evaluations that support long-term benefit. The neural architecture that negotiates this conflict remains unclear. One account proposes a single neural circuit that evaluates both immediate and delayed outcomes, while another outlines separate impulsive and patient systems that compete for behavioral control. Here we designed a task in which a complex payout structure divorces the immediate value of acting from the overall long-term value, within the same outcome modality. Using model-based fMRI in humans, we demonstrate separate neural representations of immediate and long-term values, with the former tracked in the anterior caudate (AC) and the latter in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Crucially, when subjects' choices were compatible with long-run consequences, value signals in AC were down-weighted and those in vmPFC were enhanced, while the opposite occurred when choice was impulsive. Thus, our data implicate a trade-off in value representation between AC and vmPFC as underlying controlled versus impulsive choice.

  8. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying.

    PubMed

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva M; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB-), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered questionnaires concerning symptoms of borderline personality disorder, self-harming behaviors, binge eating and symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In addition, comorbid ICDs were assessed using the SCID-ICD. Results The PB+ and PB- groups did not differ with regard to borderline personality disorder or ADHD symptoms, but both groups reported significantly more symptoms than the HC group. Frequencies of self-harming behaviors did not differ between the three groups. Patients with PB were more often diagnosed with any current ICD (excluding PB) compared to those without PB and the HC group (38.7% vs. 12.9% vs. 12.9%, respectively, p=.017). Discussion Our findings confirm prior research suggesting more impulsive behaviors in patients with and without PB compared to healthy controls. The results of the questionnaire-based assessment indicate that outpatients with PB perceive themselves equally impulsive and self-harm as frequently as inpatients without PB; but they seem to suffer more often from an ICD as assessed by means of an interview. PMID:27415604

  9. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  10. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ayati, Moosa; Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi; Khaloozadeh, Hamid

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  11. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  12. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  13. Statistical Evidence Suggests that Inattention Drives Hyperactivity/Impulsivity in Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Elena; Groot, Perry; Claassen, Tom; van Hulzen, Kimm J.; Glennon, Jeffrey C.; Franke, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous factor analytic studies consistently support a distinction between two symptom domains of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Both dimensions show high internal consistency and moderate to strong correlations with each other. However, it is not clear what drives this strong correlation. The aim of this paper is to address this issue. Method We applied a sophisticated approach for causal discovery on three independent data sets of scores of the two ADHD dimensions in NeuroIMAGE (total N = 675), ADHD-200 (N = 245), and IMpACT (N = 164), assessed by different raters and instruments, and further used information on gender or a genetic risk haplotype. Results In all data sets we found strong statistical evidence for the same pattern: the clear dependence between hyperactivity/impulsivity symptom level and an established genetic factor (either gender or risk haplotype) vanishes when one conditions upon inattention symptom level. Under reasonable assumptions, e.g., that phenotypes do not cause genotypes, a causal model that is consistent with this pattern contains a causal path from inattention to hyperactivity/impulsivity. Conclusions The robust dependency cancellation observed in three different data sets suggests that inattention is a driving factor for hyperactivity/impulsivity. This causal hypothesis can be further validated in intervention studies. Our model suggests that interventions that affect inattention will also have an effect on the level of hyperactivity/impulsivity. On the other hand, interventions that affect hyperactivity/impulsivity would not change the level of inattention. This causal model may explain earlier findings on heritable factors causing ADHD reported in the study of twins with learning difficulties. PMID:27768717

  14. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  15. Stability analysis of impulsive functional systems of fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamova, Ivanka; Stamov, Gani

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a class of impulsive fractional functional differential systems is investigated. Sufficient conditions for stability of the zero solution are proved, extending the corresponding theory of impulsive functional differential equations. The investigations are carried out by using the comparison principle, coupled with the Lyapunov function method. We apply our results to an impulsive single species model of Lotka-Volterra type.

  16. Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Impulsive-Aggressive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Martin; Long, Nicholas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes complex issues involved in helping impulsive-aggressive youth who are devoid of emotional intelligence. Reviews anatomy of impulsivity and the irrational beliefs used as defense mechanisms by impulsive-aggressive students. Discusses two alternative intervention strategies, Life Space Crisis Intervention techniques and the Self Control…

  17. An Exploration of Taiwanese Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Tendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Lin, Hung-Ming

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine via a questionnaire the personal characteristics and impulsive buying tendencies of 15- to 19-year-old Taiwanese adolescents. Results indicated that the impulsive buying was significantly associated with gender, age, and amount of pocket money available. Females indicated more impulsive buying than did…

  18. The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chuang, Shin-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    This study posits a relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Impulsive Buying Tendency (IBT). A survey of 574 adolescents found that high-EI adolescents manifested less impulsive behavior than did low-EI adolescents, and high-IBT adolescents were more likely to engage in more impulsive buying behavior than were low-IBT adolescents.…

  19. Targeting impulsivity in Parkinson’s disease using atomoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Housden, Charlotte R.; Regenthal, Ralf; Barker, Roger A.; Müller, Ulrich; Rowe, James; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2014-01-01

    Noradrenergic dysfunction may play a significant role in cognition in Parkinson’s disease due to the early degeneration of the locus coeruleus. Converging evidence from patient and animal studies points to the role of noradrenaline in dopaminergically insensitive aspects of the parkinsonian dysexecutive syndrome, yet the direct effects of noradrenergic enhancement have not to date been addressed. Our aim was to directly investigate these, focusing on impulsivity during response inhibition and decision making. To this end, we administered 40 mg atomoxetine, a selective noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor to 25 patients with Parkinson’s disease (12 female /13 male; 64.4 ± 6.9 years old) in a double blind, randomized, placebo controlled design. Patients completed an extensive battery of neuropsychological tests addressing response inhibition, decision-making, attention, planning and verbal short term memory. Atomoxetine improved stopping accuracy on the Stop Signal Task [F(1,19) = 4.51, P = 0.047] and reduced reflection impulsivity [F(1,9) = 7.86, P = 0.02] and risk taking [F(1,9) = 9.2, P = 0.01] in the context of gambling. The drug also conferred effects on performance as a function of its measured blood plasma concentration: it reduced reflection impulsivity during information sampling [adjusted R2 = 0.23, F(1,16) = 5.83, P = 0.03] and improved problem solving on the One Touch Stockings of Cambridge [adjusted R2 = 0.29, F(1,17) = 8.34, P = 0.01]. It also enhanced target sensitivity during sustained attention [F(1,9) = 5.33, P = 0.046]. The results of this exploratory study represent the basis of specific predictions in future investigations on the effects of atomoxetine in Parkinson’s disease and support the hypothesis that targeting noradrenergic dysfunction may represent a new parallel avenue of therapy in some of the cognitive and behavioural deficits seen in the disorder. PMID:24893708

  20. Impulsive personality traits in male pedophiles versus healthy controls: is pedophilia an impulsive-aggressive disorder?

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lisa J; Gans, Sniezyna Watras; McGeoch, Pamela G; Poznansky, Olga; Itskovich, Yelena; Murphy, Sean; Klein, Erik; Cullen, Ken; Galynker, Igor I

    2002-01-01

    Pedophilia is characterized by sexual attraction to prepubescent children. Despite the extensive literature documenting the pervasive and pernicious effects of childhood sexual abuse, there is surprisingly little psychiatric literature on pedophilia and its etiology remains enigmatic. In recent years, the psychiatric literature on the phenomenology, neurobiology, and treatment of impulsive-aggressive disorders has grown significantly. As some investigators have conceptualized pedophilia as an impulsive-aggressive disorder, it is of interest whether recent advances in the study of impulsive-aggressive disorders might shed light on pathological mechanisms underlying pedophilia. In the following study, 20 male subjects with a DSM-IV diagnosis of pedophilia, heterosexual type were recruited from an outpatient facility for sexual offenders and compared to 24 demographically similar control subjects. Groups were compared on three personality instruments--the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II), the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), and the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Impairment-Questionnaire (DAPI-Q)--to assess for select impairment in impulsive-aggressive personality traits. Pedophiles showed severe and pervasive personality impairment relative to controls. Although there was evidence of impulsivity, the findings do not suggest a predominance of impulsive-aggressive traits, and in fact provide evidence of inhibition, passive-aggression, and harm avoidance. The notion of "compulsive-aggression" in pedophilia is proposed.

  1. Impulsive for life? The nature of long-term impulsivity in domestic dogs

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Stefanie; Mills, Daniel; Wright, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsivity occur at a cognitive and/or behavioural level and are associated with differing life outcomes. However there is a lack of empirical evidence to support the long-term stability of these characteristics in non-human animals. This study reports on the stability of convergent measures of impulsivity in domestic dogs assessed more than six years apart. Measures were (1) owner assessment by means of a questionnaire, the validated ‘Dog Impulsivity Assessment Scale’ (DIAS) and (2) dogs’ performance in a delayed reward choice test. Dogs had 15 minutes free access to two food dispensers, one dispensing a piece of food immediately, the other dispensing three pieces after a delay, which increased by one second every other time the dogs sampled it. Maximum delay reached in this task reflects decision making, or cognitive impulsivity, whereas the rate of extra presses on the delayed reward device during the delay can be considered as a measure of motor or behavioural impulsivity. DIAS scores were strongly and significantly correlated across years. The maximum delay reached in the behaviour test was also highly stable, whereas paw pressing rate was uncorrelated between the years. These results demonstrate that cognitive but not motor impulsivity is highly consistent over time in dogs. PMID:24136014

  2. fMRI investigation of response inhibition, emotion, impulsivity, and clinical high-risk behavior in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew R. G.; Benoit, James R. A.; Juhás, Michal; Dametto, Ericson; Tse, Tiffanie T.; MacKay, Marnie; Sen, Bhaskar; Carroll, Alan M.; Hodlevskyy, Oleksandr; Silverstone, Peter H.; Dolcos, Florin; Dursun, Serdar M.; Greenshaw, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High-risk behavior in adolescents is associated with injury, mental health problems, and poor outcomes in later life. Improved understanding of the neurobiology of high-risk behavior and impulsivity shows promise for informing clinical treatment and prevention as well as policy to better address high-risk behavior. We recruited 21 adolescents (age 14–17) with a wide range of high-risk behavior tendencies, including medically high-risk participants recruited from psychiatric clinics. Risk tendencies were assessed using the Adolescent Risk Behavior Screen (ARBS). ARBS risk scores correlated highly (0.78) with impulsivity scores from the Barratt Impulsivity scale (BIS). Participants underwent 4.7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional Go/NoGo task. This task presented an aversive or neutral distractor image simultaneously with each Go or NoGo stimulus. Risk behavior and impulsivity tendencies exhibited similar but not identical associations with fMRI activation patterns in prefrontal brain regions. We interpret these results as reflecting differences in response inhibition, emotional stimulus processing, and emotion regulation in relation to participant risk behavior tendencies and impulsivity levels. The results are consistent with high impulsivity playing an important role in determining high risk tendencies in this sample containing clinically high-risk adolescents. PMID:26483645

  3. Working memory, fluid intelligence, and impulsiveness in heavy media multitaskers.

    PubMed

    Minear, Meredith; Brasher, Faith; McCurdy, Mark; Lewis, Jack; Younggren, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Ophir, Nass, and Wagner (Proceedings of the National Association of Sciences 106:15583-15587, 2009) reported that individuals who routinely engage in multiple forms of media use are actually worse at multitasking, possibly due to difficulties in ignoring irrelevant stimuli, from both external sources and internal representations in memory. Using the media multitasking index (MMI) developed by Ophir et al., we identified heavy media multitaskers (HMMs) and light media multitaskers (LMMs) and tested them on measures of attention, working memory, task switching, and fluid intelligence, as well as self-reported impulsivity and self-control. We found that people who reported engaging in heavy amounts of media multitasking reported being more impulsive and performed more poorly on measures of fluid intelligence than did those who did not frequently engage in media multitasking. However, we could find no evidence to support the contention that HMMs are worse in a multitasking situation such as task switching or that they show any deficits in dealing with irrelevant or distracting information, as compared with LMMs.

  4. An enantiomorphic blumlein impulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Crowe, W.R.; Clark, R.S.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Patterson, P.E.

    1992-01-01

    Working designs exist for 1 GW, 1 kHz ultra-wideband (UWB) sources (e.g. SNIPER). As these generators are pressed to higher peak powers and repetition rates, insulation, energy loss due to stray capacitance, and system efficiency (including power supplies and modulators) become critical issues. The EnantioMorphic (mirror image) BLumlein (EMBL) is a new type of vector inversion transmission line pulser which is designed to alleviate some of these problems. The design goals for EMBL are : >500 kV, {approximately}1 kHz rep-rate and <100 ps risetime in a 50 ohm geometry. In addition to the pulse forming line (PFL), EMBL also requires a high rep-rate modulator, primary switch, and peaking switch which will be described. Empirical design equations for peaking switch performance are included.

  5. An enantiomorphic blumlein impulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, L.F.; Buttram, M.T.; Crowe, W.R.; Clark, R.S.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Patterson, P.E.

    1992-07-01

    Working designs exist for 1 GW, 1 kHz ultra-wideband (UWB) sources (e.g. SNIPER). As these generators are pressed to higher peak powers and repetition rates, insulation, energy loss due to stray capacitance, and system efficiency (including power supplies and modulators) become critical issues. The EnantioMorphic (mirror image) BLumlein (EMBL) is a new type of vector inversion transmission line pulser which is designed to alleviate some of these problems. The design goals for EMBL are : >500 kV, {approximately}1 kHz rep-rate and <100 ps risetime in a 50 ohm geometry. In addition to the pulse forming line (PFL), EMBL also requires a high rep-rate modulator, primary switch, and peaking switch which will be described. Empirical design equations for peaking switch performance are included.

  6. Holographic content addressable storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas; Reyes, George

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a Holographic Content Addressable Storage (HCAS) architecture. The HCAS systems consists of a DMD (Digital Micromirror Array) as the input Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), a CMOS (Complementary Metal-oxide Semiconductor) sensor as the output photodetector and a photorefractive crystal as the recording media. The HCAS system is capable of performing optical correlation of an input image/feature against massive reference data set stored in the holographic memory. Detailed system analysis will be reported in this paper.

  7. Voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching in multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, T. X.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Lou, J.; Liu, M.; Yang, X.; Gao, Y.; Rand, S.; Sun, N. X.

    2012-03-01

    We report on voltage impulse induced reversible bistable magnetization switching in FeGaB/lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multiferroic heterostructures at room temperature. This was realized through strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling between ferroelectric PZT and ferromagnetic FeGaB layer. Two reversible and stable voltage-impulse induced mechanical strain states were obtained in the PZT by applying an electric field impulse with its amplitude smaller than the electric coercive field, which led to reversible voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching. These voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising approach to power efficient bistable magnetization switching that is crucial for information storage.

  8. Obsessive-compulsive disorder, impulse control disorders and drug addiction: common features and potential treatments.

    PubMed

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Oostermeijer, Sanne; Harrison, Ben J; Pantelis, Christos; Yücel, Murat

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts underlying compulsive, impulsive and addictive behaviours overlap, which may help explain why laymen use these expressions interchangeably. Although there has been a large research effort to better characterize and disentangle these behaviours, clinicians and scientists are still unable to clearly differentiate them. Accordingly, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), impulse control disorders (ICD) and substance-related disorders (SUD) overlap on different levels, including phenomenology, co-morbidity, neurocircuitry, neurocognition, neurochemistry and family history. In this review we summarize these issues with particular emphasis on the role of the opioid system in the pathophysiology and treatment of OCD, ICD and SUD. We postulate that with progression and chronicity of OCD, the proportion of the OCD-related behaviours (e.g. checking, washing, ordering and hoarding, among others) that are driven by impulsive 'rash' processes increase as involvement of more ventral striatal circuits becomes prominent. In contrast, as SUD and ICD progress, the proportion of the SUD- and ICD-related behaviours that are driven by compulsive 'habitual' processes increase as involvement of more dorsal striatal circuits become prominent. We are not arguing that, with time, ICD becomes OCD or vice versa. Instead, we are proposing that these disorders may acquire qualities of the other with time. In other words, while patients with ICD/SUD may develop 'compulsive impulsions', patients with OCD may exhibit 'impulsive compulsions'. There are many potential implications of our model. Theoretically, OCD patients exhibiting impulsive or addictive features could be managed with drugs that address the quality of the underlying drives and the involvement of neural systems. For example, agents for the reduction or prevention of relapse of addiction (e.g. heavy drinking), which modulate the cortico-mesolimbic dopamine system through the opioid (e.g. buprenorphine and naltrexone

  9. Different subtypes of impulsivity differentiate uncontrolled eating and dietary restraint.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Margaret A; Morgan, Michael J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-10-01

    The current study explored the relationship between three subtypes of impulsivity (Reflection Impulsivity, Impulsive Choice, and Impulsive Action) and measures of uncontrolled eating (TFEQ-D) and restraint (TFEQ-R). Eighty women classified as scoring higher or lower on TFEQ-D and TFEQ-R completed the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT20), Delay Discounting Task (DDT), a Go No Go task, Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11). To test whether these relationships were affected by enforced controls overeating, half of the participants fasted the night before and ate breakfast in the laboratory before testing and half had no such control. Women scoring higher on the TFEQ-D were significantly more impulsive on the MFFT20 and BIS-11 overall but not on DDT, Go No Go or BART. Women scoring higher on TFEQ-R were significantly less impulsive on the Go No Go task but did not differ on other measures. The eating manipulation modulated responses on the BART and BIS-11 non-planning scale depending on TFEQ-D classification. These results confirm recent data that high scores on TFEQ-D are related to impulsivity, but imply this relates more to Reflection Impulsivity rather than Impulsive Choice or Action. In contrast restrained eating was associated with better inhibitory control. Taken together, these results suggest that subtypes of impulsivity further differentiate uncontrolled eating and restraint, and suggest that a poor ability to reflect on decisions may underlie some aspects of overeating.

  10. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L. L.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  11. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship.

  12. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  13. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive noises.

    PubMed

    Fidell, Sanford; Silvati, Laura; Pearsons, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine people judged the relative annoyance of five variable level signals and 29 impulsive and non-impulsive fixed-level signals in an adaptive paired comparison study. Signals were presented for judgment as heard indoors in a facility capable of accurately reproducing the very low-frequency content of sonic booms. When the annoyance of sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle was compared with that of sounds containing more higher-frequency energy (an aircraft flyover and an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz), the relative rate of growth of annoyance, as expressed in C-weighted SEL units, was nearly 2:1. In other words, to maintain subjective equality of annoyance, each increase in level of sonic booms had to be matched by nearly twice the increase in level of an aircraft flyover or an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of sonic booms accompanied by rattle and of non-impulsive sounds, including both low- (63-Hz octave band of noise) and high-frequency energy (1-kHz octave band of noise and an aircraft flyover), were closer to 1:1. Relative rates of growth of annoyance for sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle and low-frequency sounds (63 Hz) were also about 1:1. These differences in relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive sounds are as plausibly attributed to their relative low-frequency content as to impulsiveness per se. It may therefore be more useful for some purposes to express the annoyance of impulsive signals and other environmental noises containing substantial low-frequency energy in terms of effective (duration-corrected) loudness level rather than commonplace ASEL or CSEL. PMID:11837963

  14. Impulsive action and impulsive choice across substance and behavioral addictions: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2014-11-01

    Substance use disorders are prevalent and debilitating. Certain behavioral syndromes ('behavioral addictions') characterized by repetitive habits, such as gambling disorder, stealing, shopping, and compulsive internet use, may share clinical, co-morbid, and neurobiological parallels with substance addictions. This review considers overlap between substance and behavioral addictions with a particular focus on impulsive action (inability to inhibit motor responses), and impulsive choice (preference for immediate smaller rewards to the detriment of long-term outcomes). We find that acute consumption of drugs with abuse potential is capable of modulating impulsive choice and action, although magnitude and direction of effect appear contingent on baseline function. Many lines of evidence, including findings from meta-analyses, show an association between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice and action. In some instances, elevated impulsive choice and action have been found to predate the development of substance use disorders, perhaps signifying their candidacy as objective vulnerability markers. Research in behavioral addictions is preliminary, and has mostly focused on impulsive action, finding this to be elevated versus controls, similar to that seen in chronic substance use disorders. Only a handful of imaging studies has explored the neural correlates of impulsive action and choice across these disorders. Key areas for future research are highlighted along with potential implications in terms of neurobiological models and treatment. In particular, future work should further explore whether the cognitive deficits identified are state or trait in nature: i.e. are evident before addiction perhaps signaling risk; or are a consequence of repetitive engagement in habitual behavior; and effects of novel agents known to modulate these cognitive abilities on various addictive disorders.

  15. Multidimensional Examination of Impulsivity in Relation to Disordered Gambling

    PubMed Central

    MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D.; Fortune, Erica; Maples, Jessica; Lance, Charles E.; Campbell, W. Keith; Goodie, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity has been consistently associated with pathological gambling (PG), but the diversity of definitions and measures of impulsivity has led to ambiguity with regard to which indices are independently relevant. Toward clarifying this relationship, the current study examined indices from an array of commonly-used impulsivity measures in relation to PG severity in an adult community sample of frequent gamblers (N = 353). These included both survey assessments and behavioral tasks. Using a factor analytic approach, four latent factors were identified among 19 indices and were designated reward sensitivity, punishment sensitivity, delay discounting, and cognitive impulsivity. All four latent variables were positively and independently related to PG severity, albeit at a trend level for cognitive impulsivity in a combined model. These findings reveal four generally independent domains of impulsivity that are related to PG severity, clarify which assessment measures aggregate in each domain, and illustrate the importance of measurement specificity in studying impulsivity in relation to PG and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:24708148

  16. [Anti-impulsivity drugs and their mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Yu; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Higher impulsivity could be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Moreover, poor inhibitory control is observed in several psychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Thus it is preferred that clinical drugs have anti-impulsive effects in addition to the therapeutic effects on the primary disease. At least it is better to use clinical drugs that do not increase impulsivity. We have developed a 3-choice serial reaction time task and examined the effects of clinical drugs on impulsivity in rats using the task. We have found several anti-impulsive drugs (lithium, tandospirone, and milnacipran) and elucidated the mechanism of action in some of these drugs. For example, we demonstrated that milnacipran enhanced the control of impulsive action by activating D1-like receptors in the infralimbic cortex. In this review, we introduce recent advances in this field and suggest future directions to develop anti-impulsive drugs. PMID:25080806

  17. Subjective field study of response to impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Subjects, located outdoors and indoors, judged the noisiness and other subjective noise characteristics of flyovers of two helicopters and a propeller driven airplane as part of a study of the effects of impulsiveness on the subjective response to helicopter noise. In the first experiment, the impulsive characteristics of one helicopter was controlled by varying the main rotor speed while maintaining a constant airspeed in level flight. The second experiment which utilized only the helicopters, included descent and level flight operations. The more impulsive helicopter was consistently judged less noisy than the less impulsive helicopter at equal effective perceived noise levels (EPNL). The ability of EPNL to predict noisiness was not improved by the addition of either of two proposed impulse corrections. A subjective measure of impulsiveness, however, which was not significantly related to the proposed impulse corrections, was found to improve the predictive ability of EPNL.

  18. Adaptive impulsive cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoli; Gan, Luyining; Wu, Zhaoyan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes is investigated. Through introducing proper adaptive strategy into impulsive control scheme, adaptive impulsive controllers are designed for achieving the cluster synchronization. In this adaptive impulsive control scheme, for any given networks, the impulsive gains can adjust themselves to proper values according to the proposed adaptive strategy when the impulsive intervals are fixed. The impulsive instants can be estimated by solving a sequence of maximum value problems when the impulsive gains are fixed. Both community networks without and with coupling delay are considered. Based on the Lyapunov function method and mathematical analysis technique, two synchronization criteria are derived. Several numerical examples are performed to verify the effectiveness of the derived theoretical results.

  19. Impulsivity/sociability and reinforcement in verbal operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gupta, B S; Nagpal, M

    1978-05-01

    The present investigation was designed to study the relationship between impulsivity/sociability and modes of reinforcement in verbal operant conditioning. Two 2x3 randomized block designs, one each for impulsivity and sociability, were replicated ten times. One hundred and twenty undergraduate female students (60 for impulsivity and 60 for sociability) were individually subjected to Taffel's verbal conditioning procedure. When the conditioning scores of high and low scorers on the impulsivity and sociability scales were compared, it was found that under rewarding conditions ('good' and 'buzzer' in respect of sociability and 'good' in respect of impulsivity) the high scorers' score and under punishing conditions ('electric shock') the low scorers' score was the higher of the two. The study also revealed that the high scorers (on the impulsivity scale) conditioned more under rewarding conditions while the low scorers (both on the impulsivity and sociability scales) conditioned more under punishing ones.

  20. A Class of Solvable Impulse Control Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Luis H. R.

    2004-05-15

    We consider a class of stochastic impulse control problems where the controlled process evolves according to a linear, regular, and time homogeneous diffusion. We state a set of easily verifiable sufficient conditions under which the problem is explicitly solvable. We also state an algebraic equation from which the optimal impulse boundary can be determined and, given this threshold, we present the value of the optimal policy interms of the minimal increasing r-excessive mapping for the controlled diffusion. We also consider the comparative static properties of the optimal policy and state a set of typically satisfied conditions under which increased volatility unambiguously increases the value of the optimal policy and expands the continuation region where exercising the irreversible policy is suboptimal. We also illustrate our results explicitly in two models based on geometric Brownian motion.

  1. Thin film eddy current impulse deicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Samuel O.; Zieve, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    Two new styles of electrical impulse deicers has been developed and tested in NASA's Icing Research Tunnel. With the Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing Boot (EDB), a thin and flexible spiral coil is encapsulated between two thicknesses of elastomer. The coil, made by an industrial printed circuit board manufacturer, is bonded to the aluminum aircraft leading edge. A capacitor bank is discharged through the coil. Induced eddy currents repel the coil from the aluminum aircraft structure and shed accumulated ice. A second configuration, the Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing-Strip (EDS) uses an outer metal erosion strip fastened over the coil. Opposite flowing eddy currents repel the strip and create the impulse deicing force. The outer strip serves as a surface for the collection and shedding of ice and does not require any structural properties. The EDS is suitable for composite aircraft structures. Both systems successfully dispelled over 95 percent of the accumulated ice from airfoils over the range of the FAA icing envelope.

  2. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  3. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  4. Globally optimal impulsive transfers via Green's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelrigg, G. A., Jr.

    1984-08-01

    For certain classes of trajectories the cost function (characteristic velocity) can be written as a 'quasilinear' function of the change in state. In the case presented, impulsive transfers between coplanar, coaxial orbits with transfer time and angle unrestricted, Green's theorem can be used to determine the optimal transfer between given terminal states. This is done in a manner which places no restrictions on the number of impulses used and leads to globally optimal results. These results are used to show that the Hohmann transfer and the biparabolic transfer provide global minima in their respective regions. The regions in which monoelliptic and biparabolic trajectories are globally optimal are also defined for elliptic terminal states. The results are applicable to the case in which restrictions are placed on the radius of closest approach or greatest recession from the center of the force field.

  5. Impulse-variability theory: implications for ballistic, multijoint motor skill performance.

    PubMed

    Urbin, M A; Stodden, David F; Fischman, Mark G; Weimar, Wendi H

    2011-01-01

    Impulse-variability theory (R. A. Schmidt, H. N. Zelaznik, B. Hawkins, J. S. Frank, & J. T. Quinn, 1979) accounts for the curvilinear relationship between the magnitude and resulting variability of the muscular forces that influence the success of goal-directed limb movements. The historical roots of impulse-variability theory are reviewed in the 1st part of this article, including the relationship between movement speed and spatial error. The authors then address the relevance of impulse-variability theory for the control of ballistic, multijoint skills, such as throwing, striking, and kicking. These types of skills provide a stark contrast to the relatively simple, minimal degrees of freedom movements that characterized early research. However, the inherent demand for ballistic force generation is a strong parallel between these simple laboratory tasks and multijoint motor skills. Therefore, the authors conclude by recommending experimental procedures for evaluating the adequacy of impulse variability as a theoretical model within the context of ballistic, multijoint motor skill performance.

  6. Refinement and application of acoustic impulse technique to study nozzle transmission characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Brown, W. H.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Tanna, H. K.

    1983-01-01

    An improved acoustic impulse technique was developed and was used to study the transmission characteristics of duct/nozzle systems. To accomplish the above objective, various problems associated with the existing spark-discharge impulse technique were first studied. These included (1) the nonlinear behavior of high intensity pulses, (2) the contamination of the signal with flow noise, (3) low signal-to-noise ratio at high exhaust velocities, and (4) the inability to control or shape the signal generated by the source, specially when multiple spark points were used as the source. The first step to resolve these problems was the replacement of the spark-discharge source with electroacoustic driver(s). These included (1) synthesizing on acoustic impulse with acoustic driver(s) to control and shape the output signal, (2) time domain signal averaging to remove flow noise from the contaminated signal, (3) signal editing to remove unwanted portions of the time history, (4) spectral averaging, and (5) numerical smoothing. The acoustic power measurement technique was improved by taking multiple induct measurements and by a modal decomposition process to account for the contribution of higher order modes in the power computation. The improved acoustic impulse technique was then validated by comparing the results derived by an impedance tube method. The mechanism of acoustic power loss, that occurs when sound is transmitted through nozzle terminations, was investigated. Finally, the refined impulse technique was applied to obtain more accurate results for the acoustic transmission characteristics of a conical nozzle and a multi-lobe multi-tube supressor nozzle.

  7. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  8. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  9. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  10. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  11. Cigarette Cravings, Impulsivity, and the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Stéphane; Tikàsz, Andràs; Dinh-Williams, Laurence Lê-Anh; Bourque, Josiane; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Craving is a core feature of tobacco use disorder as well as a significant predictor of smoking relapse. Studies have shown that appetitive smoking-related stimuli (e.g., someone smoking) trigger significant cravings in smokers impede their self-control capacities and promote drug seeking behavior. In this review, we begin by an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating the neural correlates of smokers to appetitive smoking cues. The literature reveals a complex and vastly distributed neuronal network underlying smokers’ craving response that recruits regions involved in self-referential processing, planning/regulatory processes, emotional responding, attentional biases, and automatic conducts. We then selectively review important factors contributing to the heterogeneity of results that significantly limit the implications of these findings, namely between- (abstinence, smoking expectancies, and self-regulation) and within-studies factors (severity of smoking dependence, sex-differences, motivation to quit, and genetic factors). Remarkably, we found that little to no attention has been devoted to examine the influence of personality traits on the neural correlates of cigarette cravings in fMRI studies. Impulsivity has been linked with craving and relapse in substance and tobacco use, which prompted our research team to examine the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings in an fMRI study. We found that the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings was mediated by fronto-cingulate mechanisms. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking in several psychiatric disorders that are characterized by significant levels of impulsivity, we conclude by identifying psychiatric patients as a target population whose tobacco-smoking habits deserve further behavioral and neuro-imaging investigation. PMID:26441686

  12. Addressing Literacy through Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Steve; Tallal, Paula A.

    2006-01-01

    Brain is the source of all human thoughts, feelings and emotions. Now the mysteries of the human brain are rapidly being elucidated by neuroscience research. For more than 150 years, neuroscience has held that most of the brain's functionality develops during critical periods in early childhood and that once past these critical periods, the window…

  13. Impulsivity, Stimulant Abuse, and Dopamine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    London, E D

    2016-01-01

    The nonmedical use of amphetamine-type stimulants is a worldwide problem, with substantial medical and social consequences. Nonetheless, the identification of a pharmacological treatment for amphetamine use disorder remains elusive. Stimulant users exhibit neurochemical evidence of dopamine-system dysfunction as well as impulsive behaviors that may interfere with the success of treatments for their addiction. This review focuses on the potential role of dopaminergic neurotransmission in impulsivity, both in healthy individuals and chronic stimulant users who meet criteria for methamphetamine dependence. Presented are findings related to the potential contributions of signaling through dopamine D1- and D2-type receptors to self-control impulsivity in methamphetamine- dependent users. The information available points to signaling through striatal D2-type dopamine receptors as a potential therapeutic target for stimulant use disorders, but medications that target D2-type dopamine receptors have not been successful in treating stimulant-use disorders, possibly because D2-type receptors are downregulated. Other means to augment D2-type receptor signaling are therefore under consideration, and one promising approach is the addition of exercise training as an adjunct to behavioral treatment for addiction. PMID:27288074

  14. Impulsive Injection for Compressor Stator Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Flow control using impulsive injection from the suction surface of a stator vane has been applied in a low speed axial compressor. Impulsive injection is shown to significantly reduce separation relative to steady injection for vanes that were induced to separate by an increase in vane stagger angle of 4 degrees. Injected flow was applied to the airfoil suction surface using spanwise slots pitched in the streamwise direction. Injection was limited to the near-hub region, from 10 to 36 percent of span, to affect the dominant loss due to hub leakage flow. Actuation was provided externally using high-speed solenoid valves closely coupled to the vane tip. Variations in injected mass, frequency, and duty cycle are explored. The local corrected total pressure loss across the vane at the lower span region was reduced by over 20 percent. Additionally, low momentum fluid migrating from the hub region toward the tip was effectively suppressed resulting in an overall benefit which reduced corrected area averaged loss through the passage by 4 percent. The injection mass fraction used for impulsive actuation was typically less than 0.1 percent of the compressor through flow.

  15. Cognitive impulsivity in specific learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Mugnaini, Daniele; Dell'Uomo, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    Many studies on cognitive impulsivity in learning disabled children have been criticized for their methodological limitations, and they have not dealt with the different types of learning disability. The aim of this study was to overcome these limitations and to assess if there was a significant cognitive impulsivity in reading disorder and/or spelling disorder by using the 20-item Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFF20). A total of 110 children (second through eighth grades) were recruited from a cohort of children assessed for the first time in a National Health clinic specialized in the study of specific learning disabilities. In all, 30 dyslexic children and 25 children with spelling disorder (all children without an ADHD comorbidity) were compared with 55 children of a control group on the MMF20 (accuracy and time latency). Results showed that the children with reading disorder were less accurate than the children with spelling disability (p<0.05). Both these groups performed less accurately than the control group. Subjects with dyslexia were faster than both the other groups in response time (p<0.05), clearly showing a significantly higher cognitive impulsivity than the other groups. Hence, data seem to confirm the idea that, similar to ADHD children, dyslexic children have impaired frontal/prefrontal functions. Clinical and treatment implications are discussed. PMID:15981139

  16. Impulsive Reconnection in the Sun's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Hinode mission show dramatically that the Sun's atmosphere is filled with explosive activity ranging from chromospheric explosions that reach heights of Mm, to coronal jets that can extend to solar radii, to giant coronal mass ejections (CME) that reach the edge of the heliosphere. The driver for all this activity is believed to be 3D magnetic reconnection. From the large variation observed in the temporal behavior of solar activity, it is clear that reconnection in the corona must take on a variety of distinct forms. The explosive nature of jets and CMEs requires that the reconnection be impulsive in that it stays off until a substantial store of free energy has been accumulated, but then turns on abruptly and stays on until much of this free energy is released. The key question, therefore, is what determines whether the reconnection is impulsive or not. We present some of the latest observations and numerical models of explosive and non-explosive solar activity. We argue that, in order for the reconnection to be impulsive, it must be driven by a quasi-ideal instability. We discuss the generality of our results for understanding 31) reconnection in other contexts.

  17. Impulse noise generated by starter pistols

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Deanna K.; Finan, Donald S.; Soendergaard, Jacob; Flamme, Gregory A.; Murphy, William J.; Lankford, James E.; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes signals generated by .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols in the context of noise-induced hearing loss risk for sports officials and athletes. Design Acoustic comparison of impulses generated from typical .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols firing blanks were made to impulses generated from comparable firearms firing both blanks and live rounds. Acoustic characteristics are described in terms of directionality and distance from the shooter in a simulated outdoor running track. Metrics include peak sound pressure levels (SPL), A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level (LeqA8), and maximum permissible number of individual shots, or maximum permissible exposures (MPE) for the unprotected ear. Results Starter pistols produce peak SPLs above 140 dB. The numbers of MPEs are as few as five for the .22-caliber starter pistol, and somewhat higher (≤25) for the .32-caliber pistol. Conclusion The impulsive sounds produced by starter pistols correspond to MPE numbers that are unacceptably small for unprotected officials and others in the immediate vicinity of the shooter. At the distances included in this study, the risk to athletes appears to be low (when referencing exposure criteria for adults), but the sound associated with the starter pistol will contribute to the athlete’s overall noise exposure. PMID:23373743

  18. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), “Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities—Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015”, we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  19. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), "Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities-Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015", we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  20. Influence of "omnidirectional" loudspeaker directivity on measured room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Knüttel, Tobias; Witew, Ingo B; Vorländer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Measured room impulse responses (RIR) strongly depend on the directivity of the sound source used for the measurement. An analysis method is presented that is capable of pinpointing the influence of the loudspeaker's directivity on a set of RIRs. Taking into account the rotational symmetries of a dodecahedron loudspeaker, it detects the effects that the changing directional pattern induces in the RIR. The analysis of RIRs measured in completely different acoustical environments reveals that the influence of the loudspeaker's directivity can still be observed in the very late part of the RIR-even in very reverberant rooms. These results are presented and the consistency with general room acoustical theory is revised and discussed.

  1. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1 to 100 MeV region is reported with data from the combined observations of experiments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. Most of the events studied are dominated by He, and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. An alternative interpretation is that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the spectrum.

  2. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  3. An optoacoustic point source for acoustic scale model measurements.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Javier Gómez; Pulkki, Ville; Karppinen, Pasi; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-04-01

    A massless acoustic source is proposed for scale model work. This source is generated by focusing a pulsed laser beam to rapidly heat the air at the focal point. This produces an expanding small plasma ball which generates a sonic impulse that may be used as an acoustic point source. Repeatability, frequency response, and directivity of the source were measured to show that it can serve as a massless point source. The impulse response of a rectangular space was determined using this type of source. A good match was found between the predicted and the measured impulse responses of the space.

  4. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  5. Bax: Addressed to kill.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Manon, Stéphen

    2011-09-01

    The pro-apoptototic protein Bax (Bcl-2 Associated protein X) plays a central role in the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. In healthy mammalian cells, Bax is essentially cytosolic and inactive. Following a death signal, the protein is translocated to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it promotes a permeabilization that favors the release of different apoptogenic factors, such as cytochrome c. The regulation of Bax translocation is associated to conformational changes that are under the control of different factors. The evidences showing the involvement of different Bax domains in its mitochondrial localization are presented. The interactions between Bax and its different partners are described in relation to their ability to promote (or prevent) Bax conformational changes leading to mitochondrial addressing and to the acquisition of the capacity to permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:21641962

  6. Conjugate gradient determination of optimal plane changes for a class of three-impulse transfers between noncoplanar circular orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A particular type of three-impulse transfer between two circular orbits is analyzed. The possibility of three plane changes is recognized, and the problem is to optimally distribute these plane changes to minimize the sum of the individual impulses. Numerical difficulties and their solution are discussed. Numerical results obtained from a conjugate gradient technique are presented for both the case where the individual plane changes are unconstrained and for the case where they are constrained. Possibly not unexpectedly, multiple minima are found. The techniques presented could be extended to the finite burn case, but primarily the contents are addressed to preliminary mission design and vehicle sizing.

  7. Impulsivity and Cigarette Craving among Adolescent Daily and Occasional Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Amanda R.; Burris, Jessica L.; Froeliger, Brett; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Impulsivity is a multi-dimensional construct that is robustly related to cigarette smoking. While underlying factors that account for this relation are not well understood, craving has been proposed as a central mechanism linking impulsivity to smoking. In order to further refine our understanding of associations between impulsivity and cigarette craving, the current study examined the association between impulsivity and tonic and cue-elicited craving among a sample of adolescent smokers. We expected trait impulsivity would be positively associated with both tonic and cue-elicited craving, and that this relationship would be stronger among daily vs. occasional smokers. Methods 106 smokers (ages 16–20) completed questionnaires and reported their cigarette craving prior to and immediately following presentation of each of three counterbalanced cue types: (a) in vivo smoking, (b) alcohol, and (c) neutral cue. Results Impulsivity was positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers (β=.38; p=.005), but not occasional smokers (β=.01; p=.95), with a significant impulsivity x smoker group interaction (β=1.31; p=.03). Impulsivity was unrelated to craving following smoking or alcohol cue, regardless of smoker group (all p’s>.16). Conclusions Results suggest a moderated effect in which impulsivity is positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers, but not occasional smokers. Tonic craving may serve as a mechanism linking impulsivity, smoking persistence, and nicotine dependence among daily smokers. PMID:25665916

  8. Impulsivity, risky behaviors and accidents in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Wnorowska, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Podgórska, Anna; Barry, Kristen; Blow, Frederic C; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-03-01

    Impulsivity and alcohol drinking are both considered as important predictors of unintentional as well as intentional injuries. However, relationships of impulsivity with risky behaviors and a history of accidents have not been investigated in alcohol dependence. The aim of this study was to analyze relationships between the frequency of risky behaviors and level of behavioral as well as cognitive impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. By means of Barratt's Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and stop-signal task, the levels of cognitive and behavioral impulsivity among 304 alcohol-dependent patients were measured. Also, patients were asked to answer questions from the Short Inventory of Problems applying to risky behaviors and accidents after alcohol drinking. In addition participants completed a questionnaire to assess frequency of other behaviors from the analyzed spectrum (use of other drugs, driving or aggressive behavior after alcohol drinking). The statistical analysis revealed a significant association between impulsivity and frequency of risky behaviors in alcohol-dependent patients. Individuals with higher scores in BIS behaved more frequently in a risky way and had significantly more accidents after alcohol drinking. The association with risky behaviors was strongest for non-planning and attentional impulsivity subscales, whereas frequency of accidents was particularly associated with motor impulsivity. A multivariate analysis revealed that impulsivity was the most important predictor of risky behaviors, but did not significantly predict a history of accidents. Our study confirms that impulsivity is an important correlate of risky behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals, along with global psychopathology and severity of alcohol dependence.

  9. Relationships of impulsiveness and depressive symptoms in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Topolewska-Wochowska, Aleksandra; Serafin, Piotr; Sadowska-Mazuryk, Joanna; Pupek-Pyzioł, Julia; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms as well as high levels of impulsivity are subjects of special interest in alcohol dependence, as these factors are considered to influence the course of this disorder. However, until now mutual relationships between impulsivity and depression have not been investigated thoroughly in alcohol-dependent patients. Methods By means of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and stop-signal task, levels of impulsivity among 304 alcohol-dependent patients were measured. The stop-signal task was used as a manipulation-free method of estimating the level of behavioral impulsiveness, and the BIS-11 is a self report measure of global as well as cognitive impulsivity. Patients were also asked to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hopelessness Scale (BHS). The results were analyzed in order to examine relationships between impulsiveness and depressive symptoms. Results Statistical analyses revealed significant associations between impulsiveness and severity of depressive symptoms. Individuals with higher scores on the BDI were more impulsive on the BIS-11, whereas patients with higher scores on the BHS were more impulsive on both the stop-signal task and BIS-11. The strongest correlations were found with the attention impulsivity subscale of BIS-11. Adjusting for other variables, a linear regression analysis revealed that cognitive impulsivity was the strongest predictor of depression severity. Limitations The main limitation of the study is a not fully representative sample, with exclusion of patients with active mood disorders Conclusions The results indicate a strong association between depressive symptoms and impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients, and suggest an important distinction between hopelessness and other depressive symptoms. PMID:22030134

  10. The Use of Guided Imagery as an Intervention in Addressing Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Victoria E.; Adamson, Nicole; DeMarco, Carrie; Paylo, Matthew J.; Zoldan, Chelsey A.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents guided imagery as an intervention that can be used to address clients' nonsuicidal self-injurious behaviors. Guided imagery is a behavioral therapy technique that involves the use of positive thoughts or images to regulate negative emotional experiences, and it can be used to prevent and manage impulses to self-injure.…

  11. The utility of rat models of impulsivity in developing pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Catharine A

    2011-01-01

    High levels of impulsive behaviours are a clinically significant symptom in a range of psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, personality disorders, pathological gambling and substance abuse. Although often measured using questionnaire assessments, levels of different types of impulsivity can also be determined using behavioural tests. Rodent analogues of these paradigms have been developed, and similar neural circuitry has been implicated in their performance in both humans and rats. In the current review, the methodology underlying the measurement of different aspects of impulsive action and choice are considered from the viewpoint of drug development, with a focus on the continuous performance task (CPT), stop-signal task (SST), go/no-go and delay-discounting paradigms. Current issues impeding translation between animal and human studies are identified, and comparisons drawn between the acute effects of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic compounds across species. Although the field could benefit from a more systematic determination of different pharmacological agents across paradigms, there are signs of strong concordance between the animal and human data. However, the type of impulsivity measured appears to play a significant role, with the SST and delay discounting providing more consistent effects for dopaminergic drugs, while the CPT and SST show better predictive validity so far for serotonergic and noradrenergic compounds. Based on the available data, it would appear that these impulsivity models could be used more widely to identify potential pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders. Novel targets within the glutamatergic and serotonergic system are also suggested. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21410459

  12. Impulsive choice and response in dopamine agonist-related impulse control behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Valerie; Reynolds, Brady; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Skaljic, Meliha; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Fernandez, Hubert; Potenza, Marc N; Dolan, Raymond J; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Dopaminergic medication-related Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs) such as pathological gambling and compulsive shopping have been reported in Parkinson disease (PD). Hypothesis We hypothesized that dopamine agonists (DAs) would be associated with greater impulsive choice, or greater discounting of delayed rewards, in PD patients with ICDs (PDI). Methods Fourteen PDI patients, 14 PD controls without ICDs and 16 medication-free matched normal controls were tested on (i) the Experiential Discounting Task (EDT), a feedback-based intertemporal choice task, (ii) spatial working memory and (iii) attentional set shifting. The EDT was used to assess impulsivity choice (hyperbolic K-value), reaction time (RT) and decision conflict RT (the RT difference between high conflict and low conflict choices). PDI patients and PD controls were tested on and off DA. Results On the EDT, there was a group by medication interaction effect [F(1,26)=5.62; p=0.03] with pairwise analyses demonstrating that DA status was associated with increased impulsive choice in PDI patients (p=0.02) but not in PD controls (p=0.37). PDI patients also had faster RT compared to PD controls F(1,26)=7.51 p=0.01]. DA status was associated with shorter RT [F(3,24)=8.39, p=0.001] and decision conflict RT [F(1,26)=6.16, p=0.02] in PDI patients but not in PD controls. There were no correlations between different measures of impulsivity. PDI patients on DA had greater spatial working memory impairments compared to PD controls on DA (t=2.13, df=26, p=0.04). Conclusion Greater impulsive choice, faster RT, faster decision conflict RT and executive dysfunction may contribute to ICDs in PD. PMID:19838863

  13. Optical Addressing And Clocking Of RAM's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Alan R.; Nixon, Robert H.; Bergman, Larry A.; Esener, Sadik

    1989-01-01

    Proposed random-access-memory (RAM) addressing system, in which memory linked optically to read/write logic circuits, greatly increases computer operating speed. System - comprises addressing circuits including numerous lasers as signal sources, numerous optical gates including optical detectors associated with memory cells, and holographic element to direct light signals to desired memory-cell locations - applied to high-capacity digital systems, supercomputers, and complex microcircuits.

  14. Self-reported impulsivity, but not behavioral choice or response impulsivity, partially mediates the effect of stress on drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Ansell, Emily B; Reynolds, Brady; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Stress and impulsivity contribute to alcohol use, and stress may also act via impulsivity to increase drinking behavior. Impulsivity represents a multi-faceted construct and self-report and behavioral assessments may effectively capture distinct clinically relevant factors. The present research investigated whether aspects of impulsivity mediate the effect of stress on alcohol use. A community-based sample of 192 men and women was assessed on measures of cumulative stress, alcohol use, self-reported impulsivity, and behavioral choice and response impulsivity. Data were analyzed using regression and bootstrapping techniques to estimate indirect effects of stress on drinking via impulsivity. Cumulative adversity exhibited both direct effects and indirect effects (via self-reported impulsivity) on drinking behavior. Additional models examining specific types of stress indicated direct and indirect effects of trauma and recent life events, and indirect effects of major life events and chronic stressors on drinking behavior. Overall, cumulative stress was associated with increased drinking behavior, and this effect was partially mediated by self-reported impulsivity. Self-reported impulsivity also mediated the effects of different types of stress on drinking behavior. These findings highlight the value of mediation models to examine the pathways through which different types of stress increase drinking behavior. Treatment and prevention strategies should focus on enhancing stress management and self-control.

  15. Differences between Impulsive and Non-Impulsive Suicide Attempts among Individuals Treated in Emergency Rooms of South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Meerae; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Objective A considerable proportion of suicide attempts are the result of sudden desires. Understanding such impulsive suicide attempts is necessary for effective interventions. We evaluated the impulsivity of suicide attempters treated in emergency rooms. The aim of the study was to identify the characteristics of impulsive suicide attempts by comparing these individuals to those who attempted to commit suicide in a non-impulsive manner. Methods This study analyzed suicide attempters who visited the emergency departments of seven selected university hospitals. A total of 269 medical records in which impulsivity of suicide attempt were confirmed were subject to be analyzed. The impulsivity of the suicide attempt was examined using a summative score of items 6 and 15 on the Suicide Intent Scale. Results A total of 48.0% of the participants were impelled by sudden inclinations to attempt suicide. Impulsive attempters were younger, unmarried and less physical illness than non-impulsive attempters, whereas no significant differences were found on psychiatric history and previous suicide history. Impulsive suicide attempters had suicide ideations that were not as severe (χ2=55.33, p<0.001) or intense (t=-8.38, p<0.001) as their counterparts'. Furthermore, medical results of impulsive suicide attempts were better than non-impulsive suicide attempts (t=-3.77, p<0.001). Conclusion The results suggested that a considerable proportion of suicide attempts were the result of sudden inclinations. Impulsive attempts were made in relatively earlier stages of suicide ideation; consequently, they have less intent than non-impulsive attempts. PMID:27482239

  16. [Keynote address: Climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Forrister, D.

    1994-12-31

    Broadly speaking, the climate issue is moving from talk to action both in the United States and internationally. While few nations have adopted strict controls or stiff new taxes, a number of them are developing action plans that are making clear their intention to ramp up activity between now and the year 2000... and beyond. There are sensible, economically efficient strategies to be undertaken in the near term that offer the possibility, in many countries, to avoid more draconian measures. These strategies are by-and-large the same measures that the National Academy of Sciences recommended in a 1991 report called, Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. The author thinks the Academy`s most important policy contribution was how it recommended the nations act in the face of uncertain science and high risks--that cost effective measures are adopted as cheap insurance... just as nations insure against other high risk, low certainty possibilities, like catastrophic health insurance, auto insurance, and fire insurance. This insurance theme is still right. First, the author addresses how the international climate change negotiations are beginning to produce insurance measures. Next, the author will discuss some of the key issues to watch in those negotiations that relate to longer-term insurance. And finally, the author will report on progress in the United States on the climate insurance plan--The President`s Climate Action Plan.

  17. Simulations of impulsive laser scattering of biological protein assemblies: Application to M13 bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Benson, Daryn; Tsen, K.-T.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a theoretical framework, based on a bond-polarizability model, for simulating the impulsive force experienced on a protein or an assembly of proteins from a pulsed light source by coupling the laser electric field to an atomic distortion. The mechanism is impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) where mechanical distortions produce variation in the electronic polarization through atomic displacements similar to vibrational Raman scattering. The magnitude of the impulsive force is determined from the empirical two-body bond-polarizability model and the intensity of the incident light. We apply the method to the M13 bacteriophage protein capsid system by performing several classical molecular-dynamics simulations that include the additional impulsive laser scattering force at various light intensities and pulse widths. The results of the molecular-dynamics simulations are then qualitatively interpreted with a simple harmonic oscillator model driven by ISRS. The intensity of light required to produce damage to the capsid in the simulations was found to be far higher than what was found in recent pulsed laser scattering experiments of M13 phage, suggesting that the observed inactivation of viruses with ultrashort laser pulses involves processes and/or mechanisms not taken into account in the present simulations.

  18. Energetic electrons, Type III radio bursts, and impulsive solar flare X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of impulsive hard X-ray and type III radio bursts made during the maximum of the last solar activity cycle are analyzed. Spectral measurements of 10-68 keV X-rays were made with the University of California (Berkeley) experiment aboard the OGO 5 satellite. About 20% of impulsive hard X-ray bursts are correlated with type III radio bursts, whereas only about 3% of the reported type III radio bursts are correlated with impulsive X-ray bursts. The location of the associated H gamma flare on the solar disk has little effect on the X-ray-type III burst correlation. The magnitude of the X-ray-type III burst correlation increases systematically with an increase in the intensity and starting frequency of the radio burst, the peak energy and hardness of the X-ray burst, and the peak nonthermal emission measure and spectral hardness of the electron spectrum not less than 20 keV inside the X-ray source. Observations are consistent with the electron populations responsible for both the X-ray and type III emissions accelerated in a single acceleration process; they also suggest a flare model where the primary instability causing electron acceleration during the impulsive phase occurs in the corona.

  19. Estimates of auditory risk from outdoor impulse noise. II: Civilian firearms.

    PubMed

    Flamme, Gregory A; Wong, Adam; Liebe, Kevin; Lynd, James

    2009-01-01

    Firearm impulses are common noise exposures in the United States. This study records, describes and analyzes impulses produced outdoors by civilian firearms with respect to the amount of auditory risk they pose to the unprotected listener under various listening conditions. Risk estimates were obtained using three contemporary damage risk criteria (DRC) including a waveform parameter-based approach (peak SPL and B-duration), an energy-based criterion (A-weighted SEL and equivalent continuous level) and a physiological model (AHAAH). Results from these DRC were converted into a number of maximum permissible unprotected exposures to facilitate interpretation. Acoustic characteristics of firearm impulses differed substantially across guns, ammunition, and microphone location. The type of gun, ammunition and the microphone location all significantly affected estimates of auditory risk from firearms. Vast differences in maximum permissible exposures were observed; the rank order of the differences varied with the source of the impulse. Unprotected exposure to firearm noise is not recommended, but people electing to fire a gun without hearing protection should be advised to minimize auditory risk through careful selection of ammunition and shooting environment. Small-caliber guns with long barrels and guns loaded with the least powerful ammunition tend to be associated with the least auditory risk. PMID:19805933

  20. The relationship between impulsivity and suicide among rural youths aged 15-35 years: a case-control psychological autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Li; Jiang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    In China, the gender ratio of suicide rates did not match the Western patterns, which was higher for females than males. However, the rural men were at relatively high risk of suicide in Liaoning province. Impulsivity was an important factor of suicide behaviors, but there was a lack of studies in China. This research aimed to study the relationship between impulsive personality traits and suicidal behavior among Chinese rural youths. Suicides were consecutively sampled from six randomly selected counties in Liaoning Province in China. Between 2005 and 2007, a total of 162 suicide victims were enrolled in the study along with 162 community controls matched for age, gender, and location. The psychological autopsy method was used to collect data from informants knowledgeable about the selected suicide victims and controls. The results showed the suicide victims in the study were more likely to demonstrate dysfunctional impulsivity and less likely to demonstrate functional impulsivity compared with the controls. Mental disorders, acute negative life events, and dysfunctional impulsivity contributed to the risk of suicide; educational and functional impulsivity were protective factors. Suicide prevention efforts in rural China may address impulsivity.

  1. The Relationship between Impulsivity and Suicide Among Rural Youths Aged 15–35 Years: A Case-Control Psychological Autopsy Study1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Li; Jiang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    In China, the gender ratio of suicide rates did not match the Western patterns, which was higher for females than males. However, the rural men were at relatively high risk of suicide in Liaoning province. Impulsivity was an important factor of suicide behaviors, but there was a lack of studies in China. This research aimed to study the relationship between impulsive personality traits and suicidal behavior among Chinese rural youths. Suicides were consecutively sampled from six randomly selected counties in Liaoning Province in China. Between 2005 and 2007, a total of 162 suicide victims were enrolled in the study along with 162 community controls matched for age, gender, and location. The psychological autopsy method was used to collect data from informants knowledgeable about the selected suicide victims and controls. The results showed the suicide victims in the study were more likely to demonstrate dysfunctional impulsivity and less likely to demonstrate functional impulsivity compared with the controls. Mental disorders, acute negative life events and dysfunctional impulsivity contributed to the risk of suicide; educational and functional impulsivity were protective factors. Suicide prevention efforts in rural China may address impulsivity. PMID:26110614

  2. The Role of Reactive Aggression in the Link Between Hyperactive-Impulsive Behaviors and Peer Rejection in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Evans, Spencer C; Fite, Paula J; Hendrickson, Michelle L; Rubens, Sonia L; Mages, Anna K

    2015-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and aggressive behaviors are both associated with peer rejection, but little is known the nature of this association with respect to the two symptom dimensions of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention and different types of aggression. The present study examines the relations between dimensions of ADHD symptomatology, proactive and reactive aggression, and peer rejection in adolescence. Teacher-reported data were obtained for 200 high school students (grades 9-12; 48% female; predominately Latino). In structural equation modeling path analyses, the indirect effects of reactive aggression accounted for the link between hyperactivity-impulsivity and peer rejection. Within the same model, neither inattention nor proactive aggression were associated with peer rejection. These findings suggest that reactive aggression may be a key mechanism through which hyperactive-impulsive behavior is associated with peer rejection. Future research and intervention efforts should address the role of reactive aggression among youth with ADHD symptomatology.

  3. Another clue about particle acceleration in impulsive hard X-ray/microwave bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, David

    1994-01-01

    In a sample of impulsive bursts with rise times less than 30 s, a correlation between burst rise times and the frequency of maximum microwave emission has been found. The immplications for source structure and dynamics are discussed. Previously evidence was found that such bursts are caused by some propagating disturbance such as a shock wave or thermal conduction front. Combining that evidence with the microwave and hard X-ray spectral information suggests that the most rapid bursts are emitted from the most compact and intensely magnetized sources. The most rapid bursts also exhibited the hardest X-ray spectra, as published previously. These facts are important clues to understanding the physical process responsible for impulsive bursts. A model for the bursts is suggested, based on the observations and inferences described.

  4. Optoelectronic signal processing using finite impulse response neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. B. Xavier da Silveira, Paulo Eduardo

    2001-08-01

    This thesis investigates the use of finite impulse response neural network as the computational algorithm for efficient optoelectronic signal processing. The study begins with the analysis and development of different suitable algorithms, followed by the optoelectronic design of single-layer and multi-layer architectures, and it is concluded with the presentation of the results of a successful experimental implementation. First, finite impulse response adaptive filters and neural networks-the algorithmic building blocks-are introduced, followed by a description of finite impulse response neural networks. This introduction is followed by a historical background, describing early optoelectronic implementations of these algorithms. Next, different algorithms capable of temporal back-propagation are derived in detail, including a novel modification to the conventional algorithm, called delayed-feedback back- propagation. Based on these algorithms, different optoelectronic processors making use of adaptive volume holograms and three-dimensional optical processing are developed. Two single-layer architectures are presented: the input delay plane architecture and the output delay plane architecture. By combining them it is possible to implement both forward and backward propagation in two complementary multi-layer architectures: the first making use of the conventional temporal back-propagation and the second making use of delayed feedback back-propagation. Next, emphasis is given to a specific application: the processing of signals from adaptive antenna arrays. This research is initiated by computer simulations of different scenarios with multiple broadband signals and jammers, in planar and circular arrays, studying issues such as the effect of modulator non-linearities to the performance of the array, and the relation between the number of jammers and the final nulling depth. Two sets of simulations are presented: the first set applied to RF antenna arrays and the

  5. Proton hopping: a proposed mechanism for myelinated axon nerve impulses.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B; Tombes, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    Myelinated axon nerve impulses travel 100 times more rapidly than impulses in non-myelinated axons. Increased speed is currently believed to be due to 'hopping' or 'saltatory propagation' along the axon, but the mechanism by which impulses flow has never been adequately explained. We have used modeling approaches to simulate a role for proton hopping in the space between the plasma membrane and myelin sheath as the mechanism of nerve action-potential flow.

  6. Stochastic Impulse Control of Non-Markovian Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Djehiche, Boualem; Hamadene, Said Hdhiri, Ibtissam

    2010-02-15

    We consider a class of stochastic impulse control problems of general stochastic processes i.e. not necessarily Markovian. Under fairly general conditions we establish existence of an optimal impulse control. We also prove existence of combined optimal stochastic and impulse control of a fairly general class of diffusions with random coefficients. Unlike, in the Markovian framework, we cannot apply quasi-variational inequalities techniques. We rather derive the main results using techniques involving reflected BSDEs and the Snell envelope.

  7. Lyapunov Control of Quantum Systems with Impulsive Control Fields

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Jitao

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the Lyapunov control of finite-dimensional quantum systems with impulsive control fields, where the studied quantum systems are governed by the Schrödinger equation. By three different Lyapunov functions and the invariant principle of impulsive systems, we study the convergence of quantum systems with impulsive control fields and propose new results for the mentioned quantum systems in the form of sufficient conditions. Two numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. PMID:23766712

  8. Nerve impulses increase glial intercellular permeability.

    PubMed

    Marrero, H; Orkand, R K

    1996-03-01

    Coordinating the activity of neurons and their satellite glial cells requires mechanisms by which glial cells detect neuronal activity and change their properties as a result. This study monitors the intercellular diffusion of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow (LY), following its injection into glial cells of the frog optic nerve, and demonstrates that nerve impulses increase the permeability of interglial gap junctions. Consequently, the spatial buffer capacity of the neuroglial cell syncytium for potassium, other ions, and small molecules will be enhanced; this may facilitate glial function in maintaining homeostasis of the neuronal microenvironment. PMID:8833199

  9. Impulse absorption by horizontal magnetic granular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Dingxin; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Guijie; Sun, Lingyu

    2016-02-01

    The granular medium is known as a protecting material for shock mitigation. We study the impulse absorption of an alignment of magnetic spheres placed horizontally under a non-uniform magnetic field. The phenomenon of the wave dispersion is presented. This system can absorb 85% ˜ 95% (88% ˜ 98%) of the incident peak force (energy) under the applied magnetic field strength in 0.1 T ˜ 1.0 T. The shock attenuation capacities are enhanced by the increment of field strength. With an intelligent control system, it is conceivable that the magnetic granular chain may offer possibilities in developing adaptive shock protectors.

  10. Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviours in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Averbeck, BB; O’Sullivan, SS; Djamshidian, A

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive compulsive behaviours (ICBs) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are a common and devastating side effect of dopamine replacement therapy. In this review we describe the phenomenology, prevalence and risk factors of these patients. Results of behavioural studies assessing the neuropsychological profile emphasize that the ICBs, which are behavioural addictions, are not hedonically motivated. Rather, other factors such as the inability to cope with uncertainty may be triggering ICBs. New insights from functional imaging studies, strengthening the incentive salience hypothesis are discussed and therapeutic guidelines for the management of ICBs in PD are given. PMID:24313567

  11. The genetic correlation between procrastination and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    The reported genetic correlation of 1.0 between the traits of procrastination and impulsivity (Gustavson, D. E., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. K., & Friedman, N. P. (2014). Psychological Science), which was held to support an evolutionary origin of the relationship between the two traits, was tested in data from two large samples of twins from Australia. A genetic correlation of 0.299 was obtained. It was concluded that, although the presence of a genetic correlation between the two traits was supported, the modest magnitude of the correlation was such as to be consistent with many possible hypotheses, evolutionary and otherwise, about causal relationships between the traits in question. PMID:25431285

  12. The genetic correlation between procrastination and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    The reported genetic correlation of 1.0 between the traits of procrastination and impulsivity (Gustavson, D. E., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. K., & Friedman, N. P. (2014). Psychological Science), which was held to support an evolutionary origin of the relationship between the two traits, was tested in data from two large samples of twins from Australia. A genetic correlation of 0.299 was obtained. It was concluded that, although the presence of a genetic correlation between the two traits was supported, the modest magnitude of the correlation was such as to be consistent with many possible hypotheses, evolutionary and otherwise, about causal relationships between the traits in question.

  13. A Serious Videogame as an Additional Therapy Tool for Training Emotional Regulation and Impulsivity Control in Severe Gambling Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tárrega, Salomé; Castro-Carreras, Laia; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Granero, Roser; Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Santamaría, Juan J.; Forcano, Laura; Steward, Trevor; Menchón, José M.; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gambling disorder (GD) is characterized by a significant lack of self-control and is associated with impulsivity-related personality traits. It is also linked to deficits in emotional regulation and frequently co-occurs with anxiety and depression symptoms. There is also evidence that emotional dysregulation may play a mediatory role between GD and psychopathological symptomatology. Few studies have reported the outcomes of psychological interventions that specifically address these underlying processes. Objectives: To assess the utility of the Playmancer platform, a serious video game, as an additional therapy tool in a CBT intervention for GD, and to estimate pre-post changes in measures of impulsivity, anger expression and psychopathological symptomatology. Method: The sample comprised a single group of 16 male treatment-seeking individuals with severe GD diagnosis. Therapy intervention consisted of 16 group weekly CBT sessions and, concurrently, 10 additional weekly sessions of a serious video game. Pre-post treatment scores on South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), I7 Impulsiveness Questionnaire (I7), State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2 (STAXI-2), Symptom Checklist-Revised (SCL-90-R), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S-T), and Novelty Seeking from the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised (TCI-R) were compared. Results: After the intervention, significant changes were observed in several measures of impulsivity, anger expression and other psychopathological symptoms. Dropout and relapse rates during treatment were similar to those described in the literature for CBT. Conclusion: Complementing CBT interventions for GD with a specific therapy approach like a serious video game might be helpful in addressing certain underlying factors which are usually difficult to change, including impulsivity and anger expression. PMID:26617550

  14. Diagnostics and Impulse Performance of Laser-Ablative Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Sasoh, Akihiro; Mori, Koichi; Anju, Kohei; Suzuki, Koji; Shimono, Masaya; Sawada, Keisuke

    2008-04-28

    Pressure time variations and associated flows induced by pulsed laser ablation were experimentally studied using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and framing Schlieren visualization. The combination of either aluminum or polyacetal target and TEA CO{sub 2} laser pulse were examined. The VISAR measurement resolved that the pressure modulated from the laser power variation in the impulse generation processes. Integrated impulse induced by repetative CO{sub 2} laser pulses was measured using a torsion-type impulse balance. The effect of the ambient pressure was significant. The measured impulse characteristics were closely associated with target surface morphology and fluid dynamics.

  15. Minimum impulse transfers to rotate the line of apsides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phong, Connie; Sweetser, Theodore H.

    2005-01-01

    Transfer between two coplanar orbits can be accomplished via a single impulse if the two orbits intersect. Optimization of a single-impulse transfer, however, is not possible since the transfer orbit is completely constrained by the initial and final orbits. On the other hand, two-impulse transfers are possible between any two terminal orbits. While optimal scenarios are not known for the general two-impulse case, there are various approximate solutions to many special cases. We consider the problem of an inplane rotation of the line of apsides, leaving the size and shape of the orbit unaffected.

  16. Minimum impulse transfers to rotate the line of apsides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phong, Connie; Sweetser, Theodore H.

    2005-01-01

    While an optimal scenario for the general two-impulse transfer between coplanar orbits is not known, there are optimal scenarios for various special cases. We consider in-plane rotations of the line of apsides. Numerical comparisons with a trajectory optimization program support the claim that the optimal deltaV required by two impulses is about half that required by a single impulse, regardless of semi-major axes. We observe that this estimate becomes more conservative with larger angles of rotation and eccentricities, and thus also present a more accurate two-impulse rotation deltaV estimator.

  17. Sleep and Impulsivity in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scullin, Michael K.; Sollinger, Ann B.; Land, Julia; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Zanders, Lavezza; Lee, Raven; Freeman, Alan; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Bliwise, Donald L.; Factor, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Impulsive behavior and poor sleep are important non-motor features of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that negatively impact the quality of life of patients and their families. Previous research suggests a higher level of sleep complaints in PD patients who demonstrate impulsive behaviors, but the nature of the sleep disturbances has yet to be comprehensively tested. Methods Consecutive idiopathic PD patients (N=143) completed the Minnesota Impulse Disorder Interview and a sleep questionnaire that assessed sleep efficiency, excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs symptoms, snoring, dreams/nightmares, and nocturia. Patients were also given a Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale motor examination and they completed cognitive testing. Results Impulsive PD patients endorsed more sleep complaints than non-impulsive PD patients. The group difference was primarily attributable to poor sleep efficiency (e.g., greater nocturnal awakenings), p < .01, and greater daytime sleepiness, p < .01, in the impulsive PD patients. Interestingly, restless legs symptoms were also greater in the impulsive PD patients, p < .05. The results could not be explained by medications or disease severity. Conclusions Poor sleep efficiency, restless legs symptoms, and increased daytime sleepiness are associated with impulsivity in PD. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether sleep disturbances precede impulsivity in PD. PMID:23880026

  18. Impulsive control of a financial model [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jitao; Qiao, Fei; Wu, Qidi

    2005-02-01

    In this Letter, several new theorems on the stability of impulsive control systems are presented. These theorem are then used to find the conditions under which an advertising strategy can be asymptotically control to the equilibrium point by using impulsive control. Given the parameters of the financial model and the impulsive control law, an estimation of the upper bound of the impulse interval is given, i.e., number of advert can been decreased (i.e., can decrease cost) for to obtain the equivalent advertising effect.The result is illustrated to be efficient through a numerical example.

  19. Minimum-fuel multiple-impulse apsidal orbital transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirpichnikov, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of minimum-fuel impulse transfers between specified nonintersecting Keplerian boundary orbits. The qualitative criteria of optimal single-impulse transfer orbits are defined, and multiple-impulse minimum-fuel apsidal transfers are investigated for the case of orbits with a common line of apsides. For circular (coplanar and noncoplanar) boundary orbits, the global optimality of the single-impulse Hohmann transfer in the plane of the initial orbit is demonstrated in the case where the ratio of the initial orbit radius to the final orbit radius does not exceed 4.828.

  20. Genetic association of impulsivity in young adults: a multivariate study

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, S; Narayanan, B; Meda, S A; Gelernter, J; Han, S; Sawyer, B; Aslanzadeh, F; Stevens, M C; Hawkins, K A; Anticevic, A; Potenza, M N; Pearlson, G D

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a heritable, multifaceted construct with clinically relevant links to multiple psychopathologies. We assessed impulsivity in young adult (N~2100) participants in a longitudinal study, using self-report questionnaires and computer-based behavioral tasks. Analysis was restricted to the subset (N=426) who underwent genotyping. Multivariate association between impulsivity measures and single-nucleotide polymorphism data was implemented using parallel independent component analysis (Para-ICA). Pathways associated with multiple genes in components that correlated significantly with impulsivity phenotypes were then identified using a pathway enrichment analysis. Para-ICA revealed two significantly correlated genotype–phenotype component pairs. One impulsivity component included the reward responsiveness subscale and behavioral inhibition scale of the Behavioral-Inhibition System/Behavioral-Activation System scale, and the second impulsivity component included the non-planning subscale of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and the Experiential Discounting Task. Pathway analysis identified processes related to neurogenesis, nervous system signal generation/amplification, neurotransmission and immune response. We identified various genes and gene regulatory pathways associated with empirically derived impulsivity components. Our study suggests that gene networks implicated previously in brain development, neurotransmission and immune response are related to impulsive tendencies and behaviors. PMID:25268255

  1. Theory of microwave and X-ray emission. [application to behavior of nonthermal electrons created at impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takakura, T.

    1973-01-01

    The behaviour of the nonthermal electrons created at the impulsive phase of flares has been deduced from the microwave impulsive bursts and hard X-ray burst by many researchers. There is almost no doubt of the emission mechanisms that radio emissions are due to gyrosynchrotron emission and hard X-rays are collisional bremsstrahlung. However, there remain three controversial problems. One is whether the emission sources of the microwave impulsive burst and hard X-ray burst are common or not. Another is whether the injection of the nonthermal electrons into the source is impulsive or continuous. The other is the relation among the nonthermal electrons, soft X-rays, EUV flash, H-alpha kernels, and white light flares. These three problems are not independent of each other.

  2. Impulsivity and the sexes: measurement and structural invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    PubMed

    Cyders, Melissa A

    2013-02-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five dispositions toward rash action that has shown to have robust and clinically useful relationships among risk-taking outcomes. In the current research, the author examined (a) the psychometric measurement invariance of the UPPS-P across sex, (b) the scale's structural invariance across sex, and (c) whether the five impulsivity traits differentially relate to risk outcomes as a function of sex. In a sample of 1,372 undergraduates, the author found evidence for measurement and invariance across sex: Thus, comparisons of men and women on the UPPS-P can be considered valid. Additionally, although males tend to report higher levels of sensation seeking and positive urgency (and possibly lack of perseverance), the relationships between the UPPS-P traits and risk outcomes were generally invariant across sex. The UPPS-P appears to function comparably across males and females, and mean differences on this scale between the sexes can be thought to reflect trait-level differences. PMID:22096214

  3. Partial sleep deprivation impacts impulsive action but not impulsive decision-making.

    PubMed

    Demos, K E; Hart, C N; Sweet, L H; Mailloux, K A; Trautvetter, J; Williams, S E; Wing, R R; McCaffery, J M

    2016-10-01

    Sleep deprivation may lead to increased impulsivity, however, previous literature has focused on examining effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) rather than the more common condition, partial sleep deprivation (PSD) or 'short sleep'. Moreover, it has been unclear whether PSD impacts impulse-related cognitive processes, and specifically if it differentially affects impulsive action versus impulsive decision-making. We sought to determine if short compared to long sleep (6 vs. 9h/night) impacts impulsive action via behavioral inhibition (Go/No-Go), and/or impulsive decision-making processes of risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task [BART]) and preferences for immediate over delayed rewards (Delay Discounting). In a within-subject design, 34 participants (71% female, mean age=37.0years, SD=10.54) were assigned to four consecutive nights of 6h/night (short sleep) and 9h/night (long sleep) in their own home in random counterbalanced order. Sleep was measured via wrist-worn actigraphs to confirm adherence to the sleep schedules (mean short sleep=5.9h, SD=0.3; mean long sleep=8.6h, SD=0.3, p<0.001). The Go/No-Go, BART, and Delay Discounting tasks were completed following both sleep conditions. Participants had more inhibition errors on the Go/No-Go task after short (mean false alarms=19.79%, SD=14.51) versus long sleep (mean=15.97%, SD=9.51, p=0.039). This effect was strongest in participants reporting longer habitual time in bed (p=0.04). There were no differences in performance following long- versus short-sleep for either delay discounting or the BART (p's>0.4). Overall, these results indicate that four days of PSD diminishes behavioral inhibition abilities, but may not alter impulsive decision-making. These findings contribute to the emerging understanding of how partial sleep deprivation, currently an epidemic, impacts cognitive ability. Future research should continue to explore the connection between PSD and cognitive functions, and ways to minimize the

  4. Partial sleep deprivation impacts impulsive action but not impulsive decision-making.

    PubMed

    Demos, K E; Hart, C N; Sweet, L H; Mailloux, K A; Trautvetter, J; Williams, S E; Wing, R R; McCaffery, J M

    2016-10-01

    Sleep deprivation may lead to increased impulsivity, however, previous literature has focused on examining effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) rather than the more common condition, partial sleep deprivation (PSD) or 'short sleep'. Moreover, it has been unclear whether PSD impacts impulse-related cognitive processes, and specifically if it differentially affects impulsive action versus impulsive decision-making. We sought to determine if short compared to long sleep (6 vs. 9h/night) impacts impulsive action via behavioral inhibition (Go/No-Go), and/or impulsive decision-making processes of risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task [BART]) and preferences for immediate over delayed rewards (Delay Discounting). In a within-subject design, 34 participants (71% female, mean age=37.0years, SD=10.54) were assigned to four consecutive nights of 6h/night (short sleep) and 9h/night (long sleep) in their own home in random counterbalanced order. Sleep was measured via wrist-worn actigraphs to confirm adherence to the sleep schedules (mean short sleep=5.9h, SD=0.3; mean long sleep=8.6h, SD=0.3, p<0.001). The Go/No-Go, BART, and Delay Discounting tasks were completed following both sleep conditions. Participants had more inhibition errors on the Go/No-Go task after short (mean false alarms=19.79%, SD=14.51) versus long sleep (mean=15.97%, SD=9.51, p=0.039). This effect was strongest in participants reporting longer habitual time in bed (p=0.04). There were no differences in performance following long- versus short-sleep for either delay discounting or the BART (p's>0.4). Overall, these results indicate that four days of PSD diminishes behavioral inhibition abilities, but may not alter impulsive decision-making. These findings contribute to the emerging understanding of how partial sleep deprivation, currently an epidemic, impacts cognitive ability. Future research should continue to explore the connection between PSD and cognitive functions, and ways to minimize the

  5. Addressing psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Woody, G E; McLellan, A T; O'Brien, C P; Luborsky, L

    1991-01-01

    Research studies indicate that addressing psychiatric comorbidity can improve treatment for selected groups of substance-abusing patients. However, the chances for implementing the necessary techniques on a large scale are compromised by the absence of professional input and guidance within programs. This is especially true in public programs, which treat some of the most disadvantaged, disturbed, and socially destructive individuals in the entire mental health system. One starting point for upgrading the level of knowledge and training of staff members who work in this large treatment system could be to develop a better and more authoritative information dissemination network. Such a system exists in medicine; physicians are expected to read appropriate journals and to guide their treatment decisions using the data contained in the journals. Standards of practice and methods for modifying current practice are within the tradition of reading new facts, studying old ones, and comparing treatment outcome under different conditions with what is actually being done. No such general system of information-gathering or -sharing exists, particularly in public treatment programs. One of the most flagrant examples of this "educational shortfall" can be found among those methadone programs that adamantly insist on prescribing no more than 30 to 35 mg/day for all patients, in spite of the overwhelming evidence that these dose levels generally are inadequate. In some cases, program directors are unaware of studies that have shown the relationship between dose and outcome. In other cases, they are aware of the studies but do not modify their practices accordingly. This example of inadequate dosing is offered as an example of one situation that could be improved by adherence to a system of authoritative and systematic information dissemination. Many issues in substance abuse treatment do not lend themselves to information dissemination as readily as that of methadone dosing

  6. Trait Impulsivity and Anhedonia: Two Gateways for the Development of Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Houeto, Jean-Luc; Magnard, Robin; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Belin, David; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson's disease (PD) that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with comorbid affective symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits, such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. Thus, we provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical research to better

  7. Low cost impulse compatible wideband antenna

    DOEpatents

    Rosenbury, Erwin T.; Burke, Gerald J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Stever, Robert D.; Governo, George K.; Mullenhoff, Donald J.

    2002-01-01

    An antenna apparatus and method for building the antenna is disclosed. Impulse signals travel through a feed point of the antenna with respect to a ground plane. A geometric fin structure is connected to the feed point, and through a termination resistance to the ground plane. A geometric ridge structure connected to the ground is positioned with respect to the fin in order to receive and radiate electromagnetic energy from the impulse signal at a predetermined impedance and over a predetermined set of frequencies. The fin and ridge can be either a wire or a planar surface. The fin and ridge may be disposed within a radiation cavity such as a horn. The radiation cavity is constructed of stamped and etched metal sheets bent and then soldered together. The fin and ridge are also formed from metal sheets or wires. The fin is attached to the feed point and then to the cavity through a termination resistance. The ridge is attached to the cavity and disposed with respect to the fin in order to achieve a particular set of antenna characteristics.

  8. Force-Time Entropy of Isometric Impulse.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Newell, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The relation between force and temporal variability in discrete impulse production has been viewed as independent (R. A. Schmidt, H. Zelaznik, B. Hawkins, J. S. Frank, & J. T. Quinn, 1979 ) or dependent on the rate of force (L. G. Carlton & K. M. Newell, 1993 ). Two experiments in an isometric single finger force task investigated the joint force-time entropy with (a) fixed time to peak force and different percentages of force level and (b) fixed percentage of force level and different times to peak force. The results showed that the peak force variability increased either with the increment of force level or through a shorter time to peak force that also reduced timing error variability. The peak force entropy and entropy of time to peak force increased on the respective dimension as the parameter conditions approached either maximum force or a minimum rate of force production. The findings show that force error and timing error are dependent but complementary when considered in the same framework with the joint force-time entropy at a minimum in the middle parameter range of discrete impulse.

  9. Parameters Determination of Oscillatory Impulse Current Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Nishimura, Seisuke; Seki, Shingo

    This paper proposes numerical techniques to distil waveform parameters out of digitally measured data of oscillatory impulse current. The first method, to be used for liner circuit, based on a curve-fitting technique in which a smooth analytical curve is defined to fit the noise-superposed measured data. The waveform parameters are derived from the curve. The algorithm is examined its performance using a measured waveform data which is obtained from a circuit composed of linear elements only. It is not rare when impulse current is measured in a circuit with non-linear element, namely an arrester. After carefully observed behaviours of the circuit current when the non-linear element turns on and off, authors developed two algorithms capable to determine the parameters from the recorded data obtained from a circuit having a ZnO arrester. The developed algorithm processed the waveform data generated by TDG which is to be issued in 2009 as a part of IEC 61083-2. The details of the algorithm are to be demonstrated in the paper.

  10. Examining Impulse-Variability in Kicking.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Andrew; Molina, Sergio L; McKibben, Jonathon; Stodden, David F

    2016-07-01

    This study examined variability in kicking speed and spatial accuracy to test the impulse-variability theory prediction of an inverted-U function and the speed-accuracy trade-off. Twenty-eight 18- to 25-year-old adults kicked a playground ball at various percentages (50-100%) of their maximum speed at a wall target. Speed variability and spatial error were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA with built-in polynomial contrasts. Results indicated a significant inverse linear trajectory for speed variability (p < .001, η2= .345) where 50% and 60% maximum speed had significantly higher variability than the 100% condition. A significant quadratic fit was found for spatial error scores of mean radial error (p < .0001, η2 = .474) and subject-centroid radial error (p < .0001, η2 = .453). Findings suggest variability and accuracy of multijoint, ballistic skill performance may not follow the general principles of impulse-variability theory or the speed-accuracy trade-off.

  11. Different subtypes of impulsivity differentiate uncontrolled eating and dietary restraint.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Margaret A; Morgan, Michael J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-10-01

    The current study explored the relationship between three subtypes of impulsivity (Reflection Impulsivity, Impulsive Choice, and Impulsive Action) and measures of uncontrolled eating (TFEQ-D) and restraint (TFEQ-R). Eighty women classified as scoring higher or lower on TFEQ-D and TFEQ-R completed the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT20), Delay Discounting Task (DDT), a Go No Go task, Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11). To test whether these relationships were affected by enforced controls overeating, half of the participants fasted the night before and ate breakfast in the laboratory before testing and half had no such control. Women scoring higher on the TFEQ-D were significantly more impulsive on the MFFT20 and BIS-11 overall but not on DDT, Go No Go or BART. Women scoring higher on TFEQ-R were significantly less impulsive on the Go No Go task but did not differ on other measures. The eating manipulation modulated responses on the BART and BIS-11 non-planning scale depending on TFEQ-D classification. These results confirm recent data that high scores on TFEQ-D are related to impulsivity, but imply this relates more to Reflection Impulsivity rather than Impulsive Choice or Action. In contrast restrained eating was associated with better inhibitory control. Taken together, these results suggest that subtypes of impulsivity further differentiate uncontrolled eating and restraint, and suggest that a poor ability to reflect on decisions may underlie some aspects of overeating. PMID:23702263

  12. 33 CFR 183.586 - Pressure impulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pressure impulse test. 183.586...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Tests § 183.586 Pressure impulse test. A fuel... pressure test under § 183.580. (b) If the tank is non-metallic, fill it to capacity with a gasoline...

  13. Choice Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Mitchell, Marci R.; Wing, Victoria C.; Balodis, Iris M.; Bickel, Warren K.; Fillmore, Mark; Lane, Scott D.; Lejuez, C. W.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Luijten, Maartje; Mathias, Charles W.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Napier, T. Celeste; Reynolds, Brady; Schütz, Christian G.; Setlow, Barry; Sher, Kenneth J.; Swann, Alan C.; Tedford, Stephanie E.; White, Melanie J.; Winstanley, Catharine A.; Yi, Richard; Potenza, Marc N.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background Impulsivity critically relates to many psychiatric disorders. Given the multi-faceted construct that impulsivity represents, defining core aspects of impulsivity is vital for the assessment and understanding of clinical conditions. Choice impulsivity (CI), involving the preferential selection of smaller sooner rewards over larger later rewards, represents one important type of impulsivity. Method The International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) convened to discuss the definition and assessment of CI and provide recommendations regarding measurement across species. Results Commonly used preclinical and clinical CI behavioral tasks are described, and considerations for each task are provided to guide CI task selection. Differences in assessment of CI (self-report, behavioral) and calculating CI indices (e.g., area-under-the-curve, indifference point, steepness of discounting curve) are discussed along with properties of specific behavioral tasks used in preclinical and clinical settings. Conclusions The InSRI group recommends inclusion of measures of CI in human studies examining impulsivity. Animal studies examining impulsivity should also include assessments of CI and these measures should be harmonized in accordance with human studies of the disorders being modeled in the preclinical investigations. The choice of specific CI measures to be included should be based on the goals of the study and existing preclinical and clinical literature using established CI measures. PMID:25867841

  14. Validity of proposed DSM-5 ADHD impulsivity symptoms in children.

    PubMed

    Ünsel Bolat, Gül; Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Bilaç, Öznur; Massuti, Rafael; Uysal Özaslan, Taciser; Bolat, Hilmi; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2016-10-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) working group on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) proposed the inclusion of four new impulsivity symptoms. However, they were not included in DSM-5 due to the lack of sufficient evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the proposed four ADHD impulsivity symptoms with respect to: (a) ADHD factor structure; (b) performance in predicting clinical impairment; (c) specificity for ADHD diagnosis and (d) best symptomatic threshold to predict clinical impairment. The sample comprised 416 children (31 ADHD subjects according to both DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5, 20 ADHD subjects according to just one diagnostic system and 365 controls) from 12 schools. Diagnoses were derived using semi-structured interviews and ADHD rating scales. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that addition of the four new impulsivity items provided a slightly better factor structure if compared to models including only 18 items. Regression analyses showed that only one of the new impulsivity symptoms (impatient) was part of the list of best predictors of impairment. None of the four new impulsivity items was specifically associated with ADHD diagnosis. The best cutoff point in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension for predicting impairment did not change significantly. Overall, our findings suggest that the determination on how to best capture impulsivity dimension as part of the ADHD construct needs more investigation and that there is not enough evidence to include these four assessed impulsivity symptoms as part of the ADHD criteria.

  15. Impulsivity in internet addiction: a comparison with pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae Woo; Choi, Jung-Seok; Shin, Young-Chul; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2012-07-01

    Internet addiction has been considered to be associated with poor impulse control. The aim of this study is to compare the trait impulsivity of those suffering from Internet addiction with that of individuals suffering from pathological gambling. Twenty-seven patients diagnosed with Internet addiction (age: 24.78±4.37 years), 27 patients diagnosed with pathological gambling (age: 25.67±3.97 years), and 27 healthy controls (age: 25.33±2.79 years) were enrolled in this study. All patients were men seeking treatment. Trait impulsivity and the severity of the Internet addiction and pathological gambling were measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the Young's Internet Addiction Test, and the South Oaks Gambling Screen, respectively. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were also administered to all subjects. Our results show that those suffering from Internet addiction showed increased levels of trait impulsivity which were comparable to those of patients diagnosed with pathological gambling. Additionally, the severity of Internet addiction was positively correlated with the level of trait impulsivity in patients with Internet addiction. These results state that Internet addiction can be conceptualized as an impulse control disorder and that trait impulsivity is a marker for vulnerability to Internet addiction.

  16. Impulsivity, Coping, Stress, and Problem Gambling among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Hulsey, C. Duncan

    2002-01-01

    The authors investigated whether coping styles moderated the relationship between (a) impulsivity and stress and (b) stress and gambling behavior and tested whether impulsive persons who use avoidant or emotion-focused coping under high-stress conditions are most likely to gamble. Among 202 university student volunteers, 33% of men but only 3% of…

  17. Temperament and Character Dimensions: Correlates of Impulsivity in Morphine Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Abassi, Moslem; Abolghasemi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the role of temperament and character dimensions on impulsivity in addicts, the purpose of this study was to temperament and character dimensions: correlates of impulsivity in morphine addicts. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine and verify the association of temperament and character dimensions with impulsivity in morphine addicts. Patients and Methods: The research method was descriptive and correlational. The study sample consisted of 120 morphine addicts referred to drug addiction treatment centers in Ardabil city in 2013. The participants were selected through convenience sampling method from 5 centers. We used impulsivity scale as well as temperament and character inventory to collect data. Results: The results showed that significant relationship existed between impulsivity and characteristics such as novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence, persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness, while no significant relationship between impulsivity and self-transcendence was observed. The results of the multiple regression analysis showed that 47% of the impulsivity variance was explained by temperament and character dimensions. Conclusions: These findings suggest that temperament and character dimensions are associated with impulsivity. The findings also have important implications for prevention, pathology, and treatment in the morphine addicts. PMID:26870706

  18. Angular Impulse and Balance Regulation During the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Travis J; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to determine how skilled players regulate linear and angular impulse while maintaining balance during the golf swing. Eleven highly-skilled golf players performed swings with a 6-iron and driver. Components contributing to linear and angular impulse generated by the rear and target legs (resultant horizontal reaction force [RFh], RFh-angle, and moment arm) were quantified and compared across the group and within a player (α = .05). Net angular impulse generated by both the rear and target legs was greater for the driver than the 6-iron. Mechanisms used to regulate angular impulse generation between clubs varied across players and required coordination between the legs. Increases in net angular impulse with a driver involved increases in target leg RFh. Rear leg RFh-angle was maintained between clubs whereas target leg RFh became more aligned with the target line. Net linear impulse perpendicular to the target line remained near zero, preserving balance, while net linear impulse along the target line decreased in magnitude. These results indicate that the net angular impulse was regulated between clubs by coordinating force generation of the rear and target legs while sustaining balance throughout the task. PMID:26958870

  19. Sex Differences in Impulsivity: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Catharine P.; Copping, Lee T.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Men are overrepresented in socially problematic behaviors, such as aggression and criminal behavior, which have been linked to impulsivity. Our review of impulsivity is organized around the tripartite theoretical distinction between reward hypersensitivity, punishment hyposensitivity, and inadequate effortful control. Drawing on evolutionary,…

  20. The effects of heroin administration and drug cues on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Vadhan, Nehal P; Luba, Rachel R; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse. PMID:27062912

  1. Individual Differences in Impulsive Choice and Timing in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtress, Tiffany; Garcia, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsive choice behavior have been linked to a variety of behavioral problems including substance abuse, smoking, gambling, and poor financial decision-making. Given the potential importance of individual differences in impulsive choice as a predictor of behavioral problems, the present study sought to measure the extent…

  2. Spectral analysis of impulse noise for hearing conservation purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Stevin, G.O.

    1982-12-01

    Damage-risk criteria for impulse noise does not presently take the spectrum of the impulse into account; however, it is known that the human auditory system is spectrally tuned. The present paper advocates the extension to impulse noise of the noise dose concept which is widely used for continuous noise. This approach is based upon sound exposure instead of sound pressure. An A-weighting filter or an octave band analysis can then be used to take the spectral content of the impulses into account. The equipment needed for applying these procedures for impulse noise is an integrating sound level meter or a digital Fourier processor. Generalized spectral methods have been evaluated by means of an impulse simulation applied to a mathematical model of the human hearing mechanism. The results of this simulation agree with the most recent experiments on impulse noise and fully support the proposed rating methods. This conclusion must be emphasized as it leads the derivation of a uniform procedure for predicting loudness and damage risk for hearing which is applicable for continuous noise as well as for impulse noise.

  3. Spectral analysis of impulse noise for hearing conservation purposes.

    PubMed

    Stevin, G O

    1982-12-01

    Damage-risk criteria for impulse noise does not presently take the spectrum of the impulse into account; however, it is known that the human auditory system is spectrally tuned. The present paper advocates the extension to impulse noise of the noise dose concept which is widely used for continuous noise. This approach is based upon sound exposure instead of sound pressure. An A-weighting filter or an octave band analysis can then be used to take the spectral content of the impulses into account. The equipment needed for applying these procedures for impulse noise is an integrating sound level meter or a digital Fourier processor. Generalized spectral methods have been evaluated by means of an impulse simulation applied to a mathematical model of the human hearing mechanism. The results of this simulation agree with the most recent experiments on impulse noise and fully support the proposed rating methods. This conclusion must be emphasized as it leads the derivation of a uniform procedure for predicting loudness and damage risk for hearing which is applicable for continuous noise as well as for impulse noise.

  4. Two-meter laser material response impulse measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Karin; Cates, Michael C.

    1988-02-01

    Impulse generated by Excimer Laser Target interactions has been extensively studied at Maxwell Labs. Inc. Results are presented of impulse measurements on aluminum targets using the SDIO/MLI Two Meter Laser operating with KrF as the lasing media. The results of previous MLI impulse measurements using XeF laser media are summarized. The work presented was motivated by earlier impulse measurements also taken on the Two Meter Laser. The data showed much higher impulse to energy ratios than predicted. Additionally, work done elsewhere gave lower I/E values than those found at MLI. The initial MLI impulse studies used a Fotonic gauge as a velocity sensor. As a check on its accuracy, impulse was measured using a simple pendulum; the results agreed with the Fotonic gauge data. A careful investigation of the pendulum experimental technique followed; no problem were found. The S-Cubed ZOOS code was also examined. It is a 1 and 1/2-D code, and only accounts for impulse delivered under the Laser footprint. Additional momentum, however, is provided outside the laser spot via the plasma cloud that results from the laser target interaction.

  5. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related…

  6. Optimum Three Impulse Trajectory Generator with Patched Conic Trajectory Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, M. H.; Pines, S.; Horsewood, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Optimal multi-impulse trajectories were investigated as a nominal about which asymptotic expansion was used to obtain approximations of optimal low thrust trajectories. The work consisted of the analysis and description of an optimal 3-impulse trajectory program. A patched-conic trajectory model was specifically designed for compatibility with the subsequent addition of the low thrust expansion approximation.

  7. Individual differences in impulsivity predict anticipatory eye movements.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Laetitia; de Timary, Philippe; Lefèvre, Phillipe; Missal, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale), which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology. PMID:22046334

  8. Optimal impulsive trajectories for orbital rendezvous between elliptic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ching-Wei

    1992-01-01

    This study uses and extends primer vector theory to obtain a minimum-fuel two or multiple impulse solution for co-planar and non co-planar elliptic-to-elliptic, time-fixed rendezvous. Lawden's conditions for an optimal impulsive trajectory and three additional methods to improve the non-optimal multiple impulse are introduced. To extend a 3-Impulse differential cost function provided by Jezewski and Rozendaal, the general differential cost function for an N-Impulse trajectory is developed. This approach defines the gradient vector for any set of boundary conditions. To determine the number of impulses, times, and locations for multiple-impulse optimal trajectories automatically, a computer program is developed. This software has been thoroughly tested in a wide variety of rendezvous situations. The singularity for a transfer angle of 180 degrees and the singular case of sin I = 0 are also accounted for in the program. Part of this work was accomplished using the Generalized Reduced Gradient method using its associated GRG2 computer code. The effects of inclination between the vehicle and target orbits, the initial positions of the vehicle and target, and the direction of the major axes are considered. Numerical results for several different orbit configurations are produced and discussed. The results are compared with the Hohmann/Hohmann type transfer and/or the optimal, finite, three-impulse transfer.

  9. Matching Alternative Addresses: a Semantic Web Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariannamazi, S.; Karimipour, F.; Hakimpour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of crowd-sourcing or volunteered geographic information (VGI) provides opportunities for authoritatives that deal with geospatial information. Heterogeneity of multiple data sources and inconsistency of data types is a key characteristics of VGI datasets. The expansion of cities resulted in the growing number of POIs in the OpenStreetMap, a well-known VGI source, which causes the datasets to outdate in short periods of time. These changes made to spatial and aspatial attributes of features such as names and addresses might cause confusion or ambiguity in the processes that require feature's literal information like addressing and geocoding. VGI sources neither will conform specific vocabularies nor will remain in a specific schema for a long period of time. As a result, the integration of VGI sources is crucial and inevitable in order to avoid duplication and the waste of resources. Information integration can be used to match features and qualify different annotation alternatives for disambiguation. This study enhances the search capabilities of geospatial tools with applications able to understand user terminology to pursuit an efficient way for finding desired results. Semantic web is a capable tool for developing technologies that deal with lexical and numerical calculations and estimations. There are a vast amount of literal-spatial data representing the capability of linguistic information in knowledge modeling, but these resources need to be harmonized based on Semantic Web standards. The process of making addresses homogenous generates a helpful tool based on spatial data integration and lexical annotation matching and disambiguating.

  10. Impulsivity and Parkinson’s disease: More than just disinhibition☆

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ray, Nicola; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years it has become clear that impulsivity is a complex behaviour composed of different domains and dependent on different neural networks. The proposed pathogenetic mechanisms for the emergence of impulsivity disorders in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) can be broadly separated into three potentially interacting processes: the contribution of premorbid susceptibility to impulsivity, the contribution of the disease itself to the behaviour and the potential contribution of therapeutic agents. Growing evidence suggests that dopamine and the subthalamic nucleus are playing a certain role in the pathophysiology of different aspects of impulsivity. In this review, we summarise the main concepts defining various components of impulsivity both in healthy subjects and patients affected by PD. PMID:21683964

  11. Demonstration scheme for impulse response of various systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadir, Abdul; Ali, Aamir

    2013-03-01

    In linear system theory impulse response of any system is of great significance. It is the impulse response which is helpful in determining the convolution in continuous time system (unit sample response in Digital Signal Processing). The impulse response of simple systems can be calculated from the system differential equation or from the transfer function of the system (by taking the inverse Fourier Transform of transfer function). To the best of author's knowledge there exists no such scheme in the literature so far showing any practical method that can demonstrate the impulse response of a system on the oscilloscope. In this paper the method of demonstrating the impulse response of any linear system to the undergraduate students is presented. The approach is simple and is developed with minimum component count.

  12. Impulsive Pressurization of Neuronal Cells for Traumatic Brain Injury Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruqiang; Lim, Jung Yul

    2011-01-01

    A novel impulsive cell pressurization experiment has been developed using a Kolsky bar device to investigate blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). We demonstrate in this video article how blast TBI-relevant impulsive pressurization is applied to the neuronal cells in vitro. This is achieved by using well-controlled pressure pulse created by a specialized Kolsky bar device, with complete pressure history within the cell pressurization chamber recorded. Pressurized neuronal cells are inspected immediately after pressurization, or further incubated to examine the long-term effects of impulsive pressurization on neurite/axonal outgrowth, neuronal gene expression, apoptosis, etc. We observed that impulsive pressurization at about 2 MPa induces distinct neurite loss relative to unpressurized cells. Our technique provides a novel method to investigate the molecular/cellular mechanisms of blast TBI, via impulsive pressurization of brain cells at well-controlled pressure magnitude and duration. PMID:22005926

  13. A systematic review of impulsivity in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Samantha E

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the current literature that examines impulsivity in individuals with eating disorders (ED). Studies were obtained from Embase, Pubmed and Psycinfo, and were included if they assessed impulsivity in individuals over 18 years of age with an ED diagnosis and published in the last 10 years. The methodological quality of the studies was rated. Twelve studies were included in this review, with methodological quality varying across studies. Findings suggest that impulsivity is best assessed multi-modally, with a combination of self-report, behavioural and physiological measures. In general, impulsivity was found to differentiate individuals with EDs from controls, as well as across diagnostic subtypes. The current findings have important clinical implications for our understanding and treatment of both impulsivity and eating disorders.

  14. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  15. Impulse oscillometry: interpretation and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Scott; Popler, Jonathan; Lesnick, Burton; Eid, Nemr

    2014-09-01

    Simple spirometry and body plethysmography have been routinely used in children aged > 5 years. New techniques based on physiologic concepts that were first described almost 50 years ago are emerging in research and in clinical practice for measuring pulmonary function in children. These techniques have led to an increased understanding of the pediatric lung and respiratory mechanics. Impulse oscillometry (IOS), a simple, noninvasive method using the forced oscillation technique, requires minimal patient cooperation and is suitable for use in both children and adults. This method can be used to assess obstruction in the large and small peripheral airways and has been used to measure bronchodilator response and bronchoprovocation testing. New data suggest that IOS may be useful in predicting loss of asthma control in the pediatric population. This article reviews the clinical applications of IOS, with an emphasis on the pediatric setting, and discusses appropriate coding practices for the clinician. PMID:25180727

  16. On coating adhesion during impulse plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafal; Okrasa, Sebastian; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Składnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The impulse plasma deposition (IPD) technique is the only method of plasma surface engineering (among plasma-based technologies) that allows a synthesis of layers upon a cold unheated substrate and which ensures a good adhesion. This paper presents a study of plasma impacts upon a copper substrate surface during the IPD process. The substrate was exposed to pulsed N2/Al plasma streams during the synthesis of AlN layers. For plasma-material interaction diagnostics, the optical emission spectroscopy method was used. Our results show that interactions of plasma lead to sputtering of the substrate material. It seems that the obtained adhesion of the layers is the result of a complex surface mechanism combined with the effects of pulsed plasma energy impacts upon the unheated substrate. An example of such a result is the value of the critical load for the Al2O3 layer, which was measured by the scratch-test method to be above 40 N.

  17. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  18. Walking Through the Impulse-Momentum Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2013-02-01

    Modern force platforms are handy tools for investigating forces during human motion. Earlier they were very expensive and were mostly used in research laboratories. But now even platforms that can measure in two directions are quite affordable. In this work we used the PASCO 2-Axis Force Platform. The analysis of the data can serve as a nice illustration of qualitative or quantitative use of the impulse-momentum theorem p - p0 = ∫t0t Fdt = I. The most common use of force platforms is to study the force from the base during the push-off period of a vertical jump. I think this is an activity of great value, and I would recommend it. The use of force platforms in teaching is well documented in research literature.1-4

  19. Impulsivity, risky behaviors and accidents in alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Wnorowska, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Podgórska, Anna; Barry, Kristen; Blow, Frederic C.; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity and alcohol drinking are both considered as important predictors of unintentional as well as intentional injuries. However, relationships of impulsivity with risky behaviors and a history of accidents have not been investigated in alcohol dependence. The aim of this study was to analyze relationships between the frequency of risky behaviors and level of behavioral as well as cognitive impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. By means of Barratt’s Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and stop-signal task, the levels of cognitive and behavioral impulsivity among 304 alcohol-dependent patients were measured. Also, patients were asked to answer questions from the Short Inventory of Problems applying to risky behaviors and accidents after alcohol drinking. In addition participants completed a questionnaire to assess frequency of other behaviors from the analyzed spectrum (use of other drugs, driving or aggressive behavior after alcohol drinking). The statistical analysis revealed a significant association between impulsivity and frequency of risky behaviors in alcohol-dependent patients. Individuals with higher scores in BIS behaved more frequently in a risky way and had significantly more accidents after alcohol drinking. The association with risky behaviors was strongest for non-planning and attentional impulsivity subscales, whereas frequency of accidents was particularly associated with motor impulsivity. A multivariate analysis revealed that impulsivity was the most important predictor of risky behaviors, but did not significantly predict a history of accidents. Our study confirms that impulsivity is an important correlate of risky behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals, along with global psychopathology and severity of alcohol dependence. PMID:23246707

  20. Impulsivity and Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: Subtype Classification Using the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    PubMed

    Miller, Drew J; Derefinko, Karen J; Lynam, Donald R; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the classification accuracy of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS) in discriminating several attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes, including predominantly inattentive type (ADHD/I), combined type (ADHD/C), and combined type with behavioral problems (ADHD/ODD), between each other and a non-ADHD control group using logistic regression analyses. The sample consisted of 88 children ranging in age from 9.0 years to 12.8 years, with a mean of 10.9 years. Children were predominantly male (74%) and Caucasian (86%) and in grades 3-7. Results indicated that the UPPS performed well in classifying ADHD subtypes relative to traditional diagnostic measures. In addition, analyses indicated that differences in symptoms between subtypes can be explained by specific pathways to impulsivity. Implications for the assessment of ADHD and conceptual issues are discussed. PMID:21765593

  1. Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ballanger, Benedicte; van Eimeren, Thilo; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hamani, Clement; Boulinguez, Philippe; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Houle, Sylvain; Poon, Yu Yan; Lang, Anthony E.; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In Parkinson disease (PD) patients, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) may contribute to certain impulsive behavior during high-conflict decisions. A neurocomputational model of the basal ganglia has recently been proposed that suggests this behavioral aspect may be related to the role played by the STN in relaying a “hold your horses” signal intended to allow more time to settle on the best option. The aim of the present study was 2-fold: 1) to extend these observations by providing evidence that the STN may influence and prevent the execution of any response even during low-conflict decisions; and 2) to identify the neural correlates of this effect. Methods We measured regional cerebral blood flow during a Go/NoGo and a control (Go) task to study the motor improvement and response inhibition deficits associated with STN-DBS in patients with PD. Results Although it improved Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor ratings and induced a global decrease in reaction time during task performance, STN-DBS impaired response inhibition, as revealed by an increase in commission errors in NoGo trials. These behavioral effects were accompanied by changes in synaptic activity consisting of a reduced activation in the cortical networks responsible for reactive and proactive response inhibition. Interpretation The present results suggest that although it improves motor functions in PD patients, modulation of STN hyperactivity with DBS may tend at the same time to favor the appearance of impulsive behavior by acting on the gating mechanism involved in response initiation. PMID:20035509

  2. Altering risky decision-making: Influence of impulsivity on the neuromodulation of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gordon L F; Lee, Tatia M C

    2016-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) subserves complex cognitive abilities, including risky decision-making; the modulation of this brain area is shown to alter the way people take risks. Yet, neuromodulation of the PFC in relation to risk-taking behavior remains relatively less well-studied. Moreover, the psychological variables that influence such neuromodulation remain poorly understood. To address these issues, 16 participants took part in 3 experimental sessions on separate days. They received: (i) left anodal-right cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS); (ii) left cathodal-right anodal stimulation; or (iii) sham stimulation while they completed two risk-taking tasks. They also measured on several cognitive-affective abilities and personality traits. It was revealed that left cathodal-right anodal stimulation led to significantly reduced risk-taking under a context of haste. The reduction of risk-taking (relative to sham) correlated with state and trait impulsivity, such that the effect was larger in more impulsive individuals. For these individuals, the tDCS effect size was considered to be large (generalized partial η(2) > .17). The effect of prefrontal-neuromodulation in reducing risk-taking was influenced by baseline impulsivity, reflecting a state-dependent effect of neuromodulation on the PFC. The results of this study carry important insights into the use of neuromodulation to alter higher cognition.

  3. Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.; Melott, A. L.; Laird, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ice cores are archives of climate change and possibly large solar proton events (SPEs). Wolff et al. (2012) used a single event, a nitrate peak in the GISP2-H core, which McCracken et al. (2001a) time associated with the poorly quantified 1859 Carrington event, to discredit SPE-produced, impulsive nitrate deposition in polar ice. This is not the ideal test case. We critique the Wolff et al. analysis and demonstrate that the data they used cannot detect impulsive nitrate events because of resolution limitations. We suggest reexamination of the top of the Greenland ice sheet at key intervals over the last two millennia with attention to fine resolution and replicate sampling of multiple species. This will allow further insight into polar depositional processes on a subseasonal scale, including atmospheric sources, transport mechanisms to the ice sheet, postdepositional interactions, and a potential SPE association.

  4. PVDF measurement of soft x ray induced shock and filter debris impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. E.; Lee, L. M.; Hedemann, M. A.; Bauer, F.

    PVDF piezoelectric polymer shock stress sensors have been used to measure the shock and impulse generated by soft X-rays and by filter debris in the SATURN Plasma Radiation Source at Sandia National Laboratories, NM. SATURN was used to generate 30 to 40 kJ, 20-ns duration, line radiation at 2 to 3 keV. Fluence on samples was nominally 40, 200, and 400 kJ/m(sup 2) (1, 5, and 10 cal/cm(sup 2)). Measurements of X-ray induced material shock response exposing both aluminum and PMMA acrylic samples agree well with companion measurements made with single crystal X-cut quartz gauges. Time-of-flight, stress, and impulse produced by Kimfol (polycarbonate/aluminum) filter debris were also measured with the PVDF gauges.

  5. PVDF measurement of soft X-ray induced shock and filter debris impulse. [PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Lee, L.M. ); Hedemann, M.A. ); Bauer, F. )

    1993-01-01

    PVDF piezoelectric polymer shock stress sensors have been used to measure the shock and impulse generated by soft X-rays and by filter debris in the SATURN Plasma Radiation Source at Sandia National Laboratories, NM. SATURN was used to generate 30 to 40 kJ, 20-ns duration, line radiation at 2 to 3 keV. Fluence on samples was nominally 40, 200, and 400 kJ/m[sup 2] (1, 5, and 10 cal/cm[sup 2]). Measurements of X-ray induced material shock response exposing both aluminum and PMMA acrylic samples agree well with companion measurements made with single crystal X-cut quartz gauges. Time-of-flight, stress, and impulse produced by Kimfol (polycarbonate/aluminum) filter debris were also measured with the PVDF gauges.

  6. PVDF measurement of soft X-ray induced shock and filter debris impulse

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Lee, L.M.; Hedemann, M.A.; Bauer, F.

    1993-07-01

    PVDF piezoelectric polymer shock stress sensors have been used to measure the shock and impulse generated by soft X-rays and by filter debris in the SATURN Plasma Radiation Source at Sandia National Laboratories, NM. SATURN was used to generate 30 to 40 kJ, 20-ns duration, line radiation at 2 to 3 keV. Fluence on samples was nominally 40, 200, and 400 kJ/m{sup 2} (1, 5, and 10 cal/cm{sup 2}). Measurements of X-ray induced material shock response exposing both aluminum and PMMA acrylic samples agree well with companion measurements made with single crystal X-cut quartz gauges. Time-of-flight, stress, and impulse produced by Kimfol (polycarbonate/aluminum) filter debris were also measured with the PVDF gauges.

  7. Ionospheric current contribution to the main impulse of a negative sudden impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichare, Geeta; Rawat, Rahul; Bhaskar, Ankush; Pathan, Bashir M.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic field response to a moderate-amplitude negative sudden impulse (SI-) that occurred on 14 May 2009 at 10:30 UT was examined at 97 geomagnetic observatories situated all over the globe. The response signature contains a contribution from magnetospheric as well as ionospheric currents. The main impulse (MI) is defined as the maximum depression in the observed geomagnetic field. It is observed that for low-to-high latitudes, the amplitude of the MI is larger in the afternoon to post-dusk sector than in the dawn-noon sector, indicating asymmetry in the MI amplitude. We estimated the contribution at various observatories due to the Chapman-Ferraro magnetopause currents using the Tsyganenko model (T01) and subtracted this from the observed MI amplitude to obtain the contribution due to ionospheric currents. It is found that the ionospheric currents contribute significantly to the MI amplitude of moderate SI- even at low-to-mid latitudes and that the contribution is in the same direction as that from the magnetopause currents near dusk and in the opposite direction near dawn. The equivalent current vectors reveal a clockwise (anticlockwise) ionospheric current loop in the afternoon (morning) sector during the MI of the negative pressure impulse. This evidences an ionospheric twin-cell-vortex current system (DP2) due to field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with the dusk-to-dawn convection electric field during the MI of an SI-. We also estimated the magnetic field variation due to prompt penetration electric fields, which is found to be very small at low latitudes in the present case. The studied SI- is not associated with shock, and hence no preliminary reverse impulse was evident. In addition, the summer hemisphere reveals larger MI amplitudes than the winter hemisphere, indicating once again the role of ionospheric currents.

  8. Impulsive Seafloor Signals from the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Tan, Y. J.; Tolstoy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Axial Seamount is a hotspot volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge that has erupted three times over the past two decades. The most recent eruption was recorded by a cabled seismic network in the southern half of the summit caldera that has been operated by the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) since November 2014. After five months of increasing seismicity, a 10-hour seismic crisis involving thousands of earthquakes began at 0500 GMT on April 24, 2015 accompanied by ~2 m of deflation in the central caldera (Nooner et al., this meeting). Local seismicity declined rapidly after the eruption, but thousands of impulsive waterborne events were observed across the network starting immediately after the seismic crisis. Over 1500 events per day were recorded on April 25 and 26, decreasing to less than 500 per day after May 1, and ceasing altogether around May 20. Each event comprises a train of three to five consistently spaced arrivals visible on all 3 seismometer channels with a broad frequency content of 10-100 Hz. The timing of arrivals across the network is consistent with water column multiples from a seafloor source to the north. A subset of events has been manually picked and located by modeling travel times of the first three arrivals assuming flat bathymetry at a range of depths between 1500-1800 m and a sound speed of 1.5 km/s. The preliminary locations are clustered around Axial Seamount's northern rift at a distance of 10-15 km from the north rim of the caldera. In July, an OOI cruise discovered fresh pillow lavas up to 100 m thick and 670 m wide, and extending for 7 km along the rift in the same region (Kelley et al., this meeting). The source of the impulsive events is uncertain and could involve gas explosions, bubble collapse, and thermal or mechanical cracking, but their colocation with the fresh lava flow suggests that ocean bottom seismic networks can not only track the faulting and fracturing associated with subsurface magma movements but also the

  9. A centre-triggered magnesium fuelled cathodic arc thruster uses sublimation to deliver a record high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Patrick R. C.; Bilek, Marcela; McKenzie, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The cathodic arc is a high current, low voltage discharge that operates in vacuum and provides a stream of highly ionised plasma from a solid conducting cathode. The high ion velocities, together with the high ionisation fraction and the quasineutrality of the exhaust stream, make the cathodic arc an attractive plasma source for spacecraft propulsion applications. The specific impulse of the cathodic arc thruster is substantially increased when the emission of neutral species is reduced. Here, we demonstrate a reduction of neutral emission by exploiting sublimation in cathode spots and enhanced ionisation of the plasma in short, high-current pulses. This, combined with the enhanced directionality due to the efficient erosion profiles created by centre-triggering, substantially increases the specific impulse. We present experimentally measured specific impulses and jet power efficiencies for titanium and magnesium fuels. Our Mg fuelled source provides the highest reported specific impulse for a gridless ion thruster and is competitive with all flight rated ion thrusters. We present a model based on cathode sublimation and melting at the cathodic arc spot explaining the outstanding performance of the Mg fuelled source. A further significant advantage of an Mg-fuelled thruster is the abundance of Mg in asteroidal material and in space junk, providing an opportunity for utilising these resources in space.

  10. Relations Between Trait Impulsivity, Behavioral Impulsivity, Physiological Arousal, and Risky Sexual Behavior among Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Derefinko, Karen J.; Peters, Jessica R.; Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A.; Walsh, Erin C.; Adams, Zachary W.; Lynam, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined how impulsivity-related traits (negative urgency, sensation seeking, and positive urgency), behavioral measures of risk taking and reward seeking, and physiological reactivity related to three different risky sexual behaviors in sexually active undergraduate men (N = 135). Regression analyses indicated that sensation seeking and behavioral risk-taking predicted unique variance in number of sexual partners. These findings suggest that, for young men, acquisition of new partners is associated with need for excitement and reward and willingness to take risks to meet those needs. Sensation seeking, behavioral risk-taking, and skin conductance reactivity to arousing stimuli was related to ever having engaged in sex with a stranger, indicating that, for men, willingness to have sex with a stranger is related not only to the need for excitement and risk-taking but also with innate responsiveness to arousing environmental triggers. In contrast, regression analyses indicated that young men who were impulsive in the context of negative emotions were less likely to use condoms, suggesting that emotion-based impulsivity may be an important factor in negligent prophylactic use. This study adds to the current understanding of the divergence between the correlates of risky sexual behaviors and may lend utility to the development of individualized HIV prevention programming. PMID:24958252

  11. Midbrain functional connectivity and ventral striatal dopamine D2-type receptors: Link to impulsivity in methamphetamine users

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Milky; Okita, Kyoji; Morales, Angelica M.; Robertson, Chelsea; Dean, Andy C.; Ghahremani, Dara G.; Sabb, Fred; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Bilder, Robert M.; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulant use disorders are associated with deficits in striatal dopamine receptor availability, abnormalities in mesocorticolimbic resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), and impulsivity. In methamphetamine-dependent research participants, impulsivity is correlated negatively with striatal D2-type receptor availability, and mesocorticolimbic RSFC is stronger than in controls. The extent to which these features of methamphetamine dependence are interrelated, however, is unknown. This question was addressed in two studies. In Study 1, 19 methamphetamine-dependent and 26 healthy control subjects underwent [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography to measure ventral striatal dopamine D2-type receptor availability, indexed by binding potential (BPND), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess mesocorticolimbic RSFC, using a midbrain seed. In Study 2, an independent sample of 20 methamphetamine-dependent and 18 control subjects completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in addition to fMRI. Study 1 showed a significant group by ventral striatal BPND interaction effect on RSFC, reflecting a negative relationship between ventral striatal BPND and RSFC between midbrain and striatum, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula in methamphetamine-dependent participants but a positive relationship in the control group. In Study 2, an interaction of group with RSFC on impulsivity was observed. Methamphetamine-dependent participants users exhibited a positive relationship of midbrain RSFC to the left ventral striatum with cognitive impulsivity, whereas a negative relationship was observed in healthy controls. The results indicate that ventral striatal D2-type receptor signaling may affect system-level activity within the mesocorticolimbic system, providing a functional link that may help explain high impulsivity in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. PMID:26830141

  12. Observations on syntactic landmine detection using impulse ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasif, Ahmed O.; Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2011-06-01

    We discuss some results and observations on applying syntactic pattern recognition (SPR) methodology for landmine detection using impulse ground-penetrating radar (GPR). In the SPR approach, the GPR A-scans are first converted into binary-valued strings by inverse filtering, followed by concavity detection to identify the peaks and valleys representing the locations of impedance discontinuities in the return signal. During the training phase, the characteristic binary strings for a particular landmine are found by looking at all the exemplars of that mine and selecting the collection of strings that yield the best detection results on these exemplars. These characteristic strings can be detected very efficiently using finite state machines (FSMs). Finally, the FSM detections are clustered to assign confidence to each detection, and discard sparse detections. Provided that the impulse GPR provides enough resolution in range, the SPR method can be a robust and high-speed solution for landmine detection and classification, because it aims to exploit the impedance discontinuity profile of the target, which is a description of the internal material structure of the target and little affected by external clutter. To evaluate the proposed methodology, the SPR scheme is applied to a set of impulse GPR data taken at a government test site. We suggest that coherent frequency-agile radar may be a better option for the SPR approach, since it addresses some of the drawbacks of a non-coherent impulse GPR caused by internally non-coherent within-channel signals which necessitate non-coherent integration and its attendant longer integration times, and non-coherent adjacent channels which severely limit the ability to do spatial, or at a minimum, cross-range processing if the GPR is in a linear array antenna.

  13. Reducing Aggression and Impulsivity Through School-based Prevention Programs: A Gene by Intervention Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Musci, Rashelle J.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Maher, Brion; Uhl, George R.; Kellam, Sheppard G.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of school-based, universal preventive interventions have been developed to address behavioral and mental health problems. Unfortunately, few have been evaluated within the context of randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up. Even fewer still have examined the potential genetic factors that may drive differential impact of the intervention. In the present analysis, we examine the extent to which the longitudinal effects of two elementary school-based interventions were moderated by the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, which has been linked with aggression and impulsive behaviors. The sample included 678 urban, primarily African American children who were randomly assigned along with their teachers to one of three first grade classrooms conditions: classroom-centered (CC) intervention, Family School Partnership (FSP), or a control condition. Teacher ratings of youth’s aggressive and impulsive behavior were obtained at baseline and in grades 6-12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the BDNF gene were extracted from the genome wide data. Longitudinal latent trait-state error models indicated a significant interaction between a particular profile of the BDNF SNP cluster (46% of sample) and CC intervention on impulsivity (β = −.27, p < .05). A similar interaction was observed for the BDNF SNP cluster and the CC intervention on aggression (β = −.14, p < .05). The results suggest that the impacts of preventive interventions in early elementary school on late adolescent outcomes of impulsivity and aggression can be potentially modified by genetic factors, such as BDNF. However, replication of these results is necessary before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:24178584

  14. Reducing aggression and impulsivity through school-based prevention programs: a gene by intervention interaction.

    PubMed

    Musci, Rashelle J; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Maher, Brion; Uhl, George R; Kellam, Sheppard G; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2014-12-01

    A variety of school-based, universal preventive interventions have been developed to address behavioral and mental health problems. Unfortunately, few have been evaluated within the context of randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up. Even fewer still have examined the potential genetic factors that may drive differential impact of the intervention. In the present analysis, we examine the extent to which the longitudinal effects of two elementary school-based interventions were moderated by the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, which has been linked with aggression and impulsive behaviors. The sample included 678 urban, primarily African American children who were randomly assigned along with their teachers to one of three first grade classroom conditions: classroom-centered (CC) intervention, Family School Partnership (FSP), or a control condition. The teacher ratings of the youth's aggressive and impulsive behavior were obtained at baseline and in grades 6-12. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the BDNF gene were extracted from the genome-wide data. Longitudinal latent trait-state-error models indicated a significant interaction between a particular profile of the BDNF SNP cluster (46 % of sample) and CC intervention on impulsivity (β = -.27, p < .05). A similar interaction was observed for the BDNF SNP cluster and the CC intervention on aggression (β = -.14, p < .05). The results suggest that the impacts of preventive interventions in early elementary school on late adolescent outcomes of impulsivity and aggression can be potentially modified by genetic factors, such as BDNF. However, replication of these results is necessary before firm conclusions can be drawn.

  15. Testosterone Enhances Risk Tolerance without Altering Motor Impulsivity in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Sarah E.; Goings, Sydney P.; Kim, Jessica Y.; Wood, Ruth I.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) increase impulsive and uncontrolled aggressive (‘roid rage) in humans and enhance agonistic behavior in animals. However, the underlying mechanisms for AAS-induced aggression remain unclear. Potential contributing elements include an increase risk-taking and/or motor impulsivity due to AAS. This study addressed the effects of chronic high-dose testosterone on risk tolerance using a risky decision-making task (RDT) and motor impulsivity with a go/no-go task in operant chambers. Male Long-Evans rats were treated for at least 4 weeks with testosterone (7.5mg/kg) or vehicle beginning in late adolescence. Testosterone was used because it is popular among human AAS users. In RDT testing, one lever was paired with delivery of a small “safe” food reward, while the other was paired with a large “risky” reward associated with an increasing risk of footshock (0, 25, 50, 75, 100%) in successive test blocks. Three shock intensities were used: 1.0, 1.2, and 1.4 mA/kg. As shock intensity and risk of shock increased, preference for the lever signifying a large reward significantly declined for both vehicle- and testosterone-treated rats (p<0.05). There was also a significant effect of drug (p<0.05), where testosterone-treated rats showed greater preference for the large reward, compared to vehicle- treated controls. Increased preference for the large reward, despite risk of footshock, is consistent with increased risk tolerance. In go/no-go testing, rats were trained to press a single lever if the go cue was presented (stimulus light) or to refrain from pressing during the no-go cue (tone). There was no effect of testosterone on pre-cue responses, or performance in go and no-go trials. These results suggest that AAS may increase risk-tolerance without altering motor impulsivity. PMID:24485492

  16. Causal Pathways Between Impulsiveness, Cocaine Use Consequences, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Lister, Jamey J.; Ledgerwood, David M.; Lundahl, Leslie H.; Greenwald, Mark K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The present study examined whether lifetime cocaine use consequences mediate the relationship between trait impulsiveness and current depression symptoms among regular cocaine users. Methods Regular cocaine users (N = 108) were assessed using: Barratt Impulsiveness Scale subscales (non-planning, attentional, motor sub-scales) to measure trait impulsiveness; a standardized Drug History and Use Questionnaire to measure cocaine use and related consequences; and Beck Depression Inventory to measure current depression symptoms. Results All impulsiveness subscales were positively associated with an earlier age of first cocaine use, a higher degree of current depression symptoms and a greater number of lifetime cocaine use consequences. In three separate simple mediation tests, lifetime cocaine use consequences partially mediated the relationship between each of the impulsiveness subscales (non-planning: R2 = .42; attentional: R2 = .40; motor: R2 = .24) and current depression symptoms. Separate moderated mediation analyses failed to demonstrate an interaction between lifetime cocaine use and cocaine-related consequences predicting depression symptoms for the mediation models. Conclusions Cocaine-related consequences function in a more nuanced manner than just an outcome of impulsiveness or cocaine use, but as a pathway between trait impulsiveness and current depression symptoms. PMID:25280245

  17. Method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, B.R.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data. It comprises: providing receiving antenna means for receiving an electromagnetic signal. The receiving antenna means receiving impulsive noise; providing noise sensor means for receiving the impulsive noise and placing the noise sensor means so as to receive the impulsive noise that is received by the receiving antenna means and so as to minimize the reception of the electromagnetic signal; simultaneously receiving the electromagnetic signal with the receiving antenna means so as to create a signal record and receiving the impulsive noise with the noise sensor means so as to create a noise record; examining the noise record for occurrences of the impulsive noise by comparing the noise record with a threshold noise value and identifying those instances of time in which the noise record exceeds the threshold; removing those portions of the signal record which are simultaneous with the identified instances in which the noise records exceeds the threshold, wherein the signal record has reduced impulsive noise.

  18. Optimal N-impulse transfer between coplanar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broucke, Roger A.; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.

    1994-11-01

    In the present research we consider the problem of optimal (minimum delta V) time-free N-impulse transfers between any two coplanar orbits, for the cases where N is less than or equal to 4. For the two-impulse maneuver, we develop optimality conditions that lead to a non-linear system of three equations and three unknowns. The solution of this system gives us the bi-impulse transfer with minimum total delta V. For the three-impulse maneuver, we develop a new approach. We use two elliptic transfer orbits that are connected by a negligible impulse applied at an infinite distance from the main body. It is an extension of the bi-ellptic transfer, where the two orbits involved in the transfer are not co-axial. We study in detail and show regions of optimality for the most trivial cases of transfers: between two circular orbits; one circular and one elliptic orbit; two elliptic co-axial orbits. We complete the paper by developing a scheme to reduce the total delta V for some of those maneuvers, by adding a second impulse at infinity, and making it a four-impulse maneuver.

  19. Response of end tidal CO2 pressure to impulse exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Afroundeh, R; Yamanak, R; Arimitsu, T; Lian, C-S; Shirkawa, K; Yunoki, T

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how end tidal CO(2) pressure (PETCO(2)) is controlled in impulse exercise. After pre-exercise at 25 watts for 5 min, impulse exercise for 10 sec with 200 watts followed by post exercise at 25 watts was performed. Ventilation (VE) significantly increased until the end of impulse exercise and significantly re-increased after a sudden decrease. Heart rate (HR) significantly increased until the end of impulse exercise and then decreased to the pre-exercise level. PETCO(2) remained constant during impulse exercise. PETCO(2) significantly increased momentarily after impulse exercise and then significantly decreased to the pre-exercise level. PETCO(2) showed oscillation. The average peak frequency of power spectral density in PETCO(2) appeared at 0.0078 Hz. Cross correlations were obtained after impulse exercise. The peak cross correlations between VE and PETCO(2), HR and PETCO(2), and VE and HR were 0.834 with a time delay of -7 sec, 0.813 with a time delay of 7 sec and 0.701 with a time delay of -15 sec, respectively. We demonstrated that PETCO(2) homeodynamics was interactively maintained by PETCO(2) itself, CO(2) transportation (product of cardiac output and mixed venous CO(2) content) into the lungs by heart pumping and CO(2) elimination by ventilation, and it oscillates as a result of their interactions.

  20. Neural correlates of choice behavior related to impulsivity and venturesomeness.

    PubMed

    Hinvest, Neal S; Elliott, R; McKie, S; Anderson, Ian M

    2011-07-01

    Impulsivity has been associated with several psychiatric disorders including drug addiction and gambling. Impulsive subjects typically have a preference for short-term over long-term rewards and make risky choices. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of self-rated impulsivity and venturesomeness during tasks involving delayed and risky choice. A broader sampling approach was taken by recruiting participants with behaviors that have been linked to impulsivity (gambling N=15, and recreational drug use N=10) and those without these behaviors (N=9). Selection between delayed or probabilistic rewards was associated with activation in fronto-parietal regions in line with previous research. When selecting between delayed rewards, activity within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex correlated positively with impulsivity scores while activity within the orbitofrontal cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and caudate correlated positively with venturesomeness scores. Selection between probabilistic rewards revealed no correlation between scores and regional activations. The results from this study provide targets for future research investigating the neural substrates of impulsivity. They also provide targets for the further investigation into the pathophysiology of addiction and impulse-control disorders.

  1. Alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression: A multiple mediation model.

    PubMed

    Velotti, Patrizia; Garofalo, Carlo; Petrocchi, Chiara; Cavallo, Francesca; Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2016-03-30

    There is a need to better understand the antecedent of aggressive behaviors in order to tailor treatments and reduce the associated damage to the others and the self. Possible mechanisms underlying aggression are poor emotional awareness and emotion dysregulation, as well as impulsivity. Here, we examined the relationships among alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression, comparing a mixed psychiatric sample (N=257) and a community sample (N=617). The clinical sample reported greater levels of alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, trait impulsivity and aggression, than the community sample. Furthermore, in the community sample, emotion dysregulation and impulsivity mediated the relationship (i.e., accounted for the shared variance) between alexithymia and aggression. In the clinical sample, only emotion dysregulation explained the alexithymia-aggression link. In particular, specific dimensions of the emotion dysregulation (i.e., Negative Urgency) and impulsivity constructs (i.e., cognitive and motor impulsivity) played a unique role in explaining these associations. Finally, controlling for depressive symptoms reduced some of the findings involving impulsivity to nonsignificant results. Overall, our findings add to the extant literature attesting to the relevance of alexithymia and emotion dysregulation for understanding aggression, and providing concrete recommendation for the treatment and prevention of aggressive tendencies.

  2. Frequency modulation television analysis: Threshold impulse analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program is developed to calculate the FM threshold impulse rates as a function of the carrier-to-noise ratio for a specified FM system. The system parameters and a vector of 1024 integers, representing the probability density of the modulating voltage, are required as input parameters. The computer program is utilized to calculate threshold impulse rates for twenty-four sets of measured probability data supplied by NASA and for sinusoidal and Gaussian modulating waveforms. As a result of the analysis several conclusions are drawn: (1) The use of preemphasis in an FM television system improves the threshold by reducing the impulse rate. (2) Sinusoidal modulation produces a total impulse rate which is a practical upper bound for the impulse rates of TV signals providing the same peak deviations. (3) As the moment of the FM spectrum about the center frequency of the predetection filter increases, the impulse rate tends to increase. (4) A spectrum having an expected frequency above (below) the center frequency of the predetection filter produces a higher negative (positive) than positive (negative) impulse rate.

  3. Negative emotion-driven impulsivity predicts substance dependence problems.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Bechara, Antoine; Recknor, Emily C; Pérez-García, Miguel

    2007-12-01

    Impulsivity is predominant among users of several drugs of abuse including alcohol, cocaine, and amphetamines, and it is considered a risk factor for later development of alcohol and substance abuse and dependence. However, there is little consensus on how impulsivity should be defined and measured, and there are few studies on the relationship between separate dimensions of impulsivity and substance dependence. We used a multidimensional measure of impulsivity (the UPPS scale) to examine differences between 36 individuals with substance dependence (ISD) and 36 drug-free controls on the dimensions of urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking. In addition, we examined which dimensions of impulsivity better predicted addiction-related problems as measured with the addiction severity index. Results revealed that ISD show high scores on dimensions of urgency, lack of perseverance, and lack of premeditation (effect sizes ranging from 1.10 to 1.96), but not on sensation seeking. Among the different impulsivity dimensions, urgency was the best predictor of severity of medical, employment, alcohol, drug, family/social, legal and psychiatric problems in ISD, explaining 13-48% of the total variance of these indices. Furthermore, urgency scores alone correctly classified 83% of the participants in the ISD group. Urgency is characterized by a tendency to act impulsively in response to negative emotional states. Thus, our results could have important implications for novel treatment approaches for substance dependence focused on emotional regulation. PMID:17629632

  4. Waiting Impulsivity: The Influence of Acute Methylphenidate and Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Chang-Webb, Yee Chien; Morris, Laurel S.; Cooper, Ella; Sethi, Arjun; Baek, Kwangyeol; Grant, Jon; Robbins, Trevor W.; Harrison, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ability to wait and to weigh evidence is critical to behavioral regulation. These behaviors are known as waiting and reflection impulsivity. In Study 1, we examined the effects of methylphenidate, a dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on waiting and reflection impulsivity in healthy young individuals. In study 2, we assessed the role of learning from feedback in disorders of addiction. Methods: We used the recently developed 4-Choice Serial Reaction Time task and the Beads task. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers were tested twice in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial with 20mg methylphenidate. In the second study, we analyzed premature responses as a function of prior feedback in disorders of addiction. Results: Study 1: Methylphenidate was associated with greater waiting impulsivity to a cue predicting reward along with faster responding to target onset without a generalized effect on reaction time or attention. Methylphenidate influenced reflection impulsivity based on baseline impulsivity. Study 2: More premature responses occurred after premature responses in stimulant-dependent subjects. Conclusions: We show that methylphenidate has dissociable effects on waiting and reflection impulsivity. Chronic stimulant exposure impairs learning from prior premature responses, suggesting a failure to learn that premature responding is suboptimal. These findings provide a greater mechanistic understanding of waiting impulsivity. PMID:26136351

  5. Impulsivity and rapid decision-making for reward.

    PubMed

    Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Adam, Robert J; Urner, Maren; van der Leer, Leslie; Bahrami, Bahador; Bays, Paul M; Husain, Masud

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is a feature of many brain disorders. Although often defined as the predisposition to act with an inadequate degree of deliberation, forethought, or control, it has proven difficult to measure. This may in part be due to the fact that it is a multifaceted construct, with impulsive decisions potentially arising as a result of a number of underlying mechanisms. Indeed, a "functional" degree of impulsivity may even promote effective behavior in healthy participants in a way that can be advantageous under certain circumstances. Although many tasks have been developed to study impulsivity, few examine decisions made rapidly, for time-sensitive rewards. In the current study we examine behavior in 59 adults on a manual "Traffic Light" task which requires participants to take risks under time pressure, if they are to maximize reward. We show that behavioral variables that index rapid anticipatory responding in this paradigm are correlated with one, specific self-report measure of impulsivity: "lack of premeditation" on the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Participants who scored more highly on this subscale performed better on the task. Moreover, anticipatory behavior reduced significantly with age (18-79 years), an effect that continued to be upheld after correction for potential age differences in the ability to judge the timing of responses. Based on these findings, we argue that the Traffic Light task provides a parametric method to study one aspect of impulsivity in health and disease: namely, rapid decision-making in pursuit of risky, time-sensitive rewards. PMID:22661960

  6. Voltage-impulse-induced non-volatile ferroelastic switching of ferromagnetic resonance for reconfigurable magnetoelectric microwave devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M; Grazulis, Lawrence; Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy; Nan, Tianxiang; Sun, Nian X; Brown, Gail J

    2013-09-20

    A critical challenge in realizing magnetoelectrics based on reconfigurable microwave devices, which is the ability to switch between distinct ferromagnetic resonances (FMR) in a stable, reversible and energy efficient manner, has been addressed. In particular, a voltage-impulse-induced two-step ferroelastic switching pathway can be used to in situ manipulate the magnetic anisotropy and enable non-volatile FMR tuning in FeCoB/PMN-PT (011) multiferroic heterostructures. PMID:23857709

  7. Knee abduction angular impulses during prolonged running with wedged insoles.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Worobets, Jay T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-07-01

    Wedged insoles may produce immediate effects on knee abduction angular impulses during running; however, it is currently not known whether these knee abduction angular impulse magnitudes are maintained throughout a run when fatigue sets in. If changes occur, this could affect the clinical utility of wedged insoles in treating conditions such as patellofemoral pain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether knee abduction angular impulses are altered during a prolonged run with wedged insoles. It was hypothesized that knee abduction angular impulses would be reduced following a prolonged run with wedged insoles. Nine healthy runners participated. Runners were randomly assigned to either a 6-mm medial wedge condition or a 6-mm lateral wedge condition and then ran continuously overground for 30 min. Knee abduction angular impulses were quantified at 0 and 30 min using a gait analysis procedure. After 2 days, participants returned to perform the same test but with the other wedge type. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate main effects of wedge condition and time and interactions between wedge condition and time (α = 0.05). Paired t-tests were used for post hoc analysis (α = 0.01). No interaction effects (p = 0.958) were found, and knee abduction angular impulses were not significantly different over time (p = 0.384). Lateral wedge conditions produced lesser knee abduction angular impulses than medial conditions at 0 min (difference of 2.79 N m s, p = 0.006) and at 30 min (difference of 2.76 N m s, p < 0.001). It is concluded that significant knee abduction angular impulse changes within wedge conditions do not occur during a 30-min run. Additionally, knee abduction angular impulse differences between wedge conditions are maintained during a 30-min run.

  8. Temperament and Impulsivity Predictors of Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    López-Torrecillas, Francisca; Perales, José C.; Nieto-Ruiz, Ana; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Aims Temperament and impulsivity are powerful predictors of addiction treatment outcomes. However, a comprehensive assessment of these features has not been examined in relation to smoking cessation outcomes. Methods Naturalistic prospective study. Treatment-seeking smokers (n = 140) were recruited as they engaged in an occupational health clinic providing smoking cessation treatment between 2009 and 2013. Participants were assessed at baseline with measures of temperament (Temperament and Character Inventory), trait impulsivity (Barratt Impulsivity Scale), and cognitive impulsivity (Go/No Go, Delay Discounting and Iowa Gambling Task). The outcome measure was treatment status, coded as “dropout” versus “relapse” versus “abstinence” at 3, 6, and 12 months endpoints. Participants were telephonically contacted and reminded of follow-up face to face assessments at each endpoint. The participants that failed to answer the phone calls or self-reported discontinuation of treatment and failed to attend the upcoming follow-up session were coded as dropouts. The participants that self-reported continuing treatment, and successfully attended the upcoming follow-up session were coded as either “relapse” or “abstinence”, based on the results of smoking behavior self-reports cross-validated with co-oximetry hemoglobin levels. Multinomial regression models were conducted to test whether temperament and impulsivity measures predicted dropout and relapse relative to abstinence outcomes. Results Higher scores on temperament dimensions of novelty seeking and reward dependence predicted poorer retention across endpoints, whereas only higher scores on persistence predicted greater relapse. Higher scores on the trait dimension of non-planning impulsivity but not performance on cognitive impulsivity predicted poorer retention. Higher non-planning impulsivity and poorer performance in the Iowa Gambling Task predicted greater relapse at 3 and 6 months and 6 months

  9. Impulsivity in disorders of food and drug misuse

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Tom B.; Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Collins, Phoebe; Mitchell, Simon P.; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests some overlap between the pathological use of food and drugs, yet how impulsivity compares across these different clinical disorders remains unclear. Substance use disorders are commonly characterized by elevated impulsivity, and impulsivity subtypes may show commonalities and differences in various conditions. We hypothesized that obese subjects with binge eating disorder (BED) and abstinent alcohol-dependent cohorts would have relatively more impulsive profiles compared to obese subjects without BED. We also predicted decision impulsivity impairment in obesity with and without BED. Methods Thirty obese subjects with BED, 30 without BED and 30 abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects and age- and gender-matched controls were tested on delay discounting (preference for a smaller immediate reward over a larger delayed reward), reflection impulsivity (rapid decision making prior to evidence accumulation) and motor response inhibition (action cancellation of a prepotent response). Results All three groups had greater delay discounting relative to healthy volunteers. Both Obese subjects without BED and alcohol dependent subjects had impaired motor response inhibition. Only Obese subjects without BED had impaired integration of available information to optimize outcomes over later trials with a cost condition. Conclusions Delay discounting appears to be a common core impairment across disorders of food and drug intake. Unexpectedly, obese subjects without BED showed greater impulsivity than obese subjects with BED. We highlight the dissociability and heterogeneity of impulsivity subtypes and add to the understanding of neurocognitive profiles across disorders involving food and drugs. Our results have therapeutic implications suggesting that disorder-specific patterns of impulsivity could be targeted. PMID:25118940

  10. Alcohol increases impulsivity and abuse liability in heavy drinking women.

    PubMed

    Reed, Stephanie Collins; Levin, Frances R; Evans, Suzette M

    2012-12-01

    Heavy drinking has increased in recent years and has been linked to numerous health-related risks, particularly in women. A number of factors may play a role in exacerbating the risks linked to heavy drinking, such as impulsivity, which itself is related to a number of risky behaviors. The present study investigated the effects of alcohol (0, 0.5, 0.75 g/kg) on impulsivity in female heavy drinkers (n = 23) and female light drinkers (n = 23) using a double-blind, placebo-controlled outpatient design; all women were tested during follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Each session, participants completed a range of tasks including subjective measures of abuse liability, cognitive performance tasks, three behavioral impulsivity tasks, and a risk-taking task. Alcohol increased impulsivity on the Immediate and Delayed Memory Task (IMT and DMT) and Delay Discounting task. Heavy drinkers scored higher on impulsivity self-reports and were more impulsive on the IMT and the GoStop task than light drinkers. The high dose of alcohol further increased impulsive performance on the IMT and DMT in heavy drinkers. There were no group differences or alcohol effects on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. Alcohol increased sedative-like effects more in light drinkers and increased stimulant-like effects and alcohol liking more in heavy drinkers. In summary, female heavy drinkers are less sensitive to the negative effects of alcohol, report more positive effects of alcohol, and are more impulsive than female light drinkers. Moreover, impulsive responding was exacerbated by alcohol drinking among female heavy drinkers, indicating that women who drink at this level are at increased risk for developing alcohol use disorders and engaging in other risky behaviors, particularly after drinking. PMID:23066857

  11. 2015 ASHG Awards and Addresses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Each year at the annual meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG), addresses are given in honor of The Society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these is given below. On the following pages, we have printed the presidential address and the addresses for the William Allan Award, the Curt Stern Award, and the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award. Webcasts of these addresses, as well as those of many other presentations, can be found at http://www.ashg.org.

  12. An Injector for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, T. W.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Chan, A. A.

    1997-11-01

    We present a summary of progress on the development of a plasma injector for NASA's VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) engine. The plasma rocket constrains a flowing plasma in an asymmetric magnetic bottle and exhausts it through a magnetic nozzle to produce thrust. The injector is a plasma source located on the axis of symmetry, forward of the series of coils forming the constraining magnetic field. The injector is intended to produce a well-collimated jet of highly ionized plasma which will enter the central cell of the machine through its forward mirror. The prototype design is based on that of a Lorentz Force Accelerator developed as a thruster by the electric propulsion research group at Princeton. Our investigation focuses on the effects of the rocket's magnetic field on the operation of the injector, the effect of a local magnetic field on the discharge behavior, and the effectiveness of discharge initiation by glow discharge versus initiation by ECRH. We evaluate the performance of this prototype injector by comparing the characteristics of the plasma it inserts into the central cell of the engine with the characteristics called for in the design of the plasma rocket.

  13. Subjective diffuseness of music signals convolved with binaural impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Tronchin, Lamberto; Cocchi, Alessandro; Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2011-07-01

    The spatial impression of sound in a hall can be quantified using sound field factors such as the interaural cross-correlation coefficient (IACC) calculated from binaural impulse response (BIR), henceforth denoted by IACC IR. The subjective diffuseness for the listener is a spatial attribute which depends on factors associated both with the source signal and with the actual sound field, and is quantified using the IACC of the signal received by the listener, henceforth denoted by IACC SR. Therefore, the subjective diffuseness in a given hall may change with the music. The aims of this study are to estimate the IACC SR from the IACC IR and the factors, which is obtained from autocorrelation function (ACF) of music signal, and to evaluate the subjective diffuseness by these factors. First, the relationship between the IACC IR and IACC SR was investigated. Second, subjective diffuseness was measured by a psycho-acoustical experiment. As a result, the IACC SR could be estimated from the IACC IR of the BIR and the effective duration ( τe) from the ACF of music signal. It was found that the effects of BIRs on subjective diffuseness could be evaluated by IACC IR for almost all subjects, while the effects of music signals could be evaluated by the τe and the width of the peak at τ=0 ( Wϕ(0) ) of the ACF.

  14. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1-100 MeV region is reported. Most of the events studied are dominated by He and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. Spectra of H, He-3, O, and Fe have spectral indices that are consistent with a value of about 3.5 above about 2 MeV/amu. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. Alternative interpretations are that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the resulting ion spectrum or that low-energy particles encounter significant additional scattering during transport from the flare.

  15. On the origin of multiply-impulsive emission from solar flares. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    A set of solar hard X-ray bursts observed with the hard X-ray burst spectrometer on board the OSO-5 satellite was analyzed. The multiply-impulsive two stage events were selected on the basis of both morphological characteristics and association with appropriate phenomena at other wavelengths. Coincident radio, soft X-ray, H-alpha interplanetary particle, and magnetographic data were obtained from several observatories, to aid in developing a comprehensive picture of the physical processes underlying these complex bursts. Two classes of multiply impulsive bursts were identified: events whose components spikes apparently originate in one location, and events in which groups of spikes appear to come from separate regions which flare sequentially. The origin of multiplicity in the case of a single source region remains unidentified. Purely impulsive emissions show no sign of betatron acceleration, thus eliminating this mechanisn as a candidate for inducing multiply spiked structure. The majority of the two stage bursts, however, exhibited spectral behavior consistent with the betatron model, for the first few minutes of the second stage. Betatron acceleration thus has been identified as a common second stage phenomenon.

  16. The similarities and differences in impulsivity and cognitive ability among ketamine, methadone, and non-drug users.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong; Su, Dequan; Jiang, Xing; Zhu, Liang; Ye, Haosheng

    2016-09-30

    The study aimed to identify similarities and differences among ketamine, methadone users, and non-drug-using controls, on impulsivity, antisocial personality, and related cognitive abilities. A case-control observational design was used to compare the impulsivity and cognitive function of ketamine users (n = 51), methadone users (n=59), and controls (n=60). Antisocial personality traits and emotion states were also measured. One-way ANOVAs and planned post hoc pair-wise tests were used to analyze the data. Compared to non-drug-using controls, ketamine and methadone users had elevated scores on BIS and Pd scale of the MMPI, poorer performance on 2-back task, Stop-signal task, and Stroop test. Ketamine users performed the worst in the 2-back accuracy and Stop miss rate compared to methadone users and controls. There were no significant differences between the groups on the Iowa Gambling Task. Ketamine users did not show deficits in decision-making but exhibited strong impulsivity, antisocial personality, and poor response inhibition and working memory at levels similar to methadone users. These deficits may reflect vulnerability to addiction. This suggests that future treatment programs for ketamine users could address drug users' impulsive cognition and psychopathic deviance.

  17. The similarities and differences in impulsivity and cognitive ability among ketamine, methadone, and non-drug users.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong; Su, Dequan; Jiang, Xing; Zhu, Liang; Ye, Haosheng

    2016-09-30

    The study aimed to identify similarities and differences among ketamine, methadone users, and non-drug-using controls, on impulsivity, antisocial personality, and related cognitive abilities. A case-control observational design was used to compare the impulsivity and cognitive function of ketamine users (n = 51), methadone users (n=59), and controls (n=60). Antisocial personality traits and emotion states were also measured. One-way ANOVAs and planned post hoc pair-wise tests were used to analyze the data. Compared to non-drug-using controls, ketamine and methadone users had elevated scores on BIS and Pd scale of the MMPI, poorer performance on 2-back task, Stop-signal task, and Stroop test. Ketamine users performed the worst in the 2-back accuracy and Stop miss rate compared to methadone users and controls. There were no significant differences between the groups on the Iowa Gambling Task. Ketamine users did not show deficits in decision-making but exhibited strong impulsivity, antisocial personality, and poor response inhibition and working memory at levels similar to methadone users. These deficits may reflect vulnerability to addiction. This suggests that future treatment programs for ketamine users could address drug users' impulsive cognition and psychopathic deviance. PMID:27376671

  18. Impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; Rein, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; Jacobi, Andrea; Rotter, Andrea; Schütz, Patricia; Hillemacher, Thomas; de Zwaan, Martina

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in a European psychiatric inpatient sample. Two hundred thirty four consecutive psychiatric inpatients (62% female) were examined using a module of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) that has been developed for ICDs (SCID-ICD). In addition to intermittent explosive disorder, pyromania, kleptomania, pathological gambling, and trichotillomania, the proposed ICDs not otherwise specified were assessed, including compulsive buying, nonparaphilic compulsive sexual behavior, pathological internet use, and pathological skin picking. Based on the SCID-ICD, a lifetime ICD rate of 23.5% and a current ICD rate of 18.8% were found. The most frequent ICDs were pathological skin picking (lifetime 7.3%, current 6.8%), compulsive buying (lifetime 6.8%, current 6.0%), and intermittent explosive disorder (lifetime 5.6%, current 3.4%). In contrast, referring to admission diagnoses taken from patients' charts only 3.8% of the inpatients were diagnosed with any current ICD. Individuals with comorbid ICD were significantly younger and had more admission diagnoses other than ICD. The results suggest high rates of ICDs among psychiatric inpatients that remain to be under-diagnosed in clinical routine.

  19. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  20. Personality and Alcohol Use: The Role of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sunny Hyucksun; Hong, Hyokyoung Grace; Jeon, Sae-Mi

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that personality traits associated with impulsivity influence alcohol use during emerging adulthood, yet relatively few studies have examined how distinct facets of impulsivity are associated with alcohol use and abuse. We examine the influence of impulsivity traits on four patterns of alcohol use including frequency of alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, binge drinking, and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in a community sample of young individuals (N = 190). In multivariate regression analyses that controlled for peer and parental alcohol use, psychological distress, and developmental correlates (i.e., college, marriage, employment) in emerging adulthood, we found that urgency and sensation seeking were consistently related to all four constructs of alcohol use. The present study suggests that distinct impulsivity traits may play different roles in escalation of alcohol use and development of AUDs during emerging adulthood. PMID:21955874

  1. Some impulsive rendezvous trajectories and their possible optimality.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Two- and three-impulse trajectories are investigated for fixed-time, fixed-angle rendezvous between vacant circular coplanar orbits, for trip angles less than, or equal to 2 pi in magnitude. For two-impulse trajectories, general features of the characteristic velocity function are outlined. Parameters of the intermediate orbit are reviewed. Attention is given to limiting cases. Computation of the adjoint system helps to define the domain of possible optimality foajectories: it is a closed domain in the trip time, trip angle plane. Waiting periods on terminal orbits are considered. The domain of possible optimality is defined using Lawden's primer vrtory. This domain extends to infinity if the radius ratio of terminal orbits is less than 15.6. Three-impulse trajectories are tried in cases where two-impulse trajectories, with or without cost, have been found nonoptimal. Improvements on the characteristic velocity are thus obtained.

  2. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related and interpersonal-related impulsivity, as observed by teachers, parents, and the students themselves, are distinct, moderately correlated behavioral tendencies. Each demonstrates differentiated relationships with dimensions of childhood temperament, Big Five personality factors, and outcomes, such as sociometric popularity, report card grades, and classroom conduct. Implications for theoretical conceptions of impulsivity as well as for practical applications (e.g., domain-specific interventions) are discussed. PMID:24118714

  3. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  4. The periodic competing Lotka-Volterra model with impulsive effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Chen, Lansun

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of a classical periodic Lotka-Volterra competing system with impulsive effect is investigated. By applying the Floquet theory of linear periodic impulsive equations, some conditions are obtained for the linear stability of the trivial and semi-trivial periodic solutions. It is proved that the system can be permanent if all the trivial and semi-trivial periodic solutions are linearly unstable. We use standard bifurcation theory to show the existence of nontrivial periodic solutions which arise near the semi-trivial periodic solution. As an application, a fish harvest problem is considered. We explain how two competing species, one of which in a periodic environment without impulsive effect would be doomed to extinction, can coexist with suitably periodic impulsive harvesting.

  5. Eyes Wide Shopped: Shopping Situations Trigger Arousal in Impulsive Buyers

    PubMed Central

    Serfas, Benjamin G.; Büttner, Oliver B.; Florack, Arnd

    2014-01-01

    The present study proposes arousal as an important mechanism driving buying impulsiveness. We examined the effect of buying impulsiveness on arousal in non-shopping and shopping contexts. In an eye-tracking experiment, we measured pupil dilation while participants viewed and rated pictures of shopping scenes and non-shopping scenes. The results demonstrated that buying impulsiveness is closely associated with arousal as response to viewing pictures of shopping scenes. This pertained for hedonic shopping situations as well as for utilitarian shopping situations. Importantly, the effect did not emerge for non-shopping scenes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that arousal of impulsive buyers is independent from cognitive evaluation of scenes in the pictures. PMID:25489955

  6. Pinning impulsive directed coupled delayed dynamical network and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chunnan; Wu, Quanjun; Xiang, Lan; Zhou, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to further investigate pinning synchronisation of a complex delayed dynamical network with directionally coupling by a single impulsive controller. By developing the analysis procedure of pinning impulsive stability for undirected coupled dynamical network previously, some simple yet general criteria of pinning impulsive synchronisation for such directed coupled network are derived analytically. It is shown that a single impulsive controller can always pin a given directed coupled network to a desired homogenous solution, including an equilibrium point, a periodic orbit, or a chaotic orbit. Subsequently, the theoretical results are illustrated by a directed small-world complex network which is a cellular neural network (CNN) and a directed scale-free complex network with the well-known Hodgkin-Huxley neuron oscillators. Numerical simulations are finally given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control methodology.

  7. 12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTONDOBLE IMPULSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL, HAND-CONTROLLED GATE VALVE, AND NOZZLE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  8. Analysis on Impulse Characteristics of PDRE with Exhaust Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hong-bo; Weng, Chun-sheng; Lv, Xiao-jing; Li, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The exhaust characteristics related to impulse was investigated in a pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE) by tunable diode laser absorption sensing system. The instantaneous parameters of temperature, velocity and pressure were obtained for exhaust at engine exit. Analysis on impulse characteristics based on control volume of the PDRE was conducted for a single operation circle with experimental results. It was concluded that the impulse (3.26 N·s) achieved by exhaust measurements was in agreement with that (3.09 N·s) by a load cell. The impulse caused by exhaust momentum experienced an extremely sharp ascending, a steep rising and a slow increment in sequence. The exhausts during the sharp ascending and steep rising were under expansion with high mass weighted average temperature (>1266 K), so there was a possible promotion for exhausts utilizing.

  9. 69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and attached General Electric 60 kW exciter generator. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  10. Which dimensions of impulsivity are related to cigarette craving?

    PubMed

    Billieux, Joël; Van der Linden, Martial; Ceschi, Grazia

    2007-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is a very important health problem and represents the largest preventable risk factor for premature death in developed countries. A considerable body of research indicates that impulsivity is a central etiological concept in many theoretical models of tobacco addiction. The aim of this study is to analyse which dimensions of impulsivity are related to cigarette craving. To this end, 40 undergraduate psychology students were screened using the revised Questionnaire on Smoking Urges (QSU-12) and the French adaptation of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS). This scale identifies four distinct components associated with impulsive behaviour: urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking. The results showed that urgency is a significant predictor of tobacco cravings, while depression and anxiety are not. PMID:16997490

  11. Compact And Robust Laser Impulse Measurement Device, With Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kremeyer, Kevin; Lapeyre, John; Hamann, Steven

    2008-04-28

    An impulse measurement device and analysis package was conceived, designed, constructed, tested, and demonstrated to be capable of: measuring nanoNewton-seconds to milliNewton-seconds of impulse due to laser-ablation; being transported as carry-on baggage; set-up and tear-down times of less than an hour; target exchange times of less than two minutes (targets can be ablated at multiple positions for thousands of shots); measurements in air and in vacuum; error of just a few percent; repeatability over a wide range of potential systematic error sources; and time between measurements, including ring-down and analysis, of less than 30 seconds. The instrument consists of a cantilever (i.e. leaf spring), whose time-dependent displacement/oscillation is measured and analyzed to determine the impulse imparted by a laser pulse to a target. These shapes are readily/commercially available, and any target material can be used, provided it can be fashioned in the form of a cantilever, or as a coating/film/tape, suitable for mounting on a cantilever of known geometry. The instrument was calibrated both statically and dynamically, and measurements were performed on brass, steel, and Aluminum, using laser pulses of {approx}7 ns, {approx}500 ps, and {approx}500 fs. The results agree well with those published in the literature, with surface effects, atmosphere, and pre-/post-pulses demonstrating interesting effects and indicating areas for further study. These parameters should be carefully controlled and held constant during a series of measurements. The impulse imparted by ablation due to laser filaments in air was also explored.

  12. Impulsive synchronization of fractional Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weiyuan; Li, Changpin; Wu, Yujiang

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on impulsive synchronization of fractional Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy complex networks. A novel comparison principle is built for the fractional impulsive system. Then a synchronization criterion is established for the fractional T-S fuzzy complex networks by utilizing the comparison principle. The method is also illustrated by applying the fractional T-S fuzzy Rössler's complex networks. PMID:27586628

  13. Characterizing Impulse Radiating Antennas by an Intuitive Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, J.; Peyer, P.; Rauschenbach, P.; Tkac, F.; Zetik, R.

    Referring to UWB-sensor applications and impulse radio, the ideal behavior of impulse radiating antennas will be summarized and some new characteristic functions will be introduced. The time domain Friis-formula will be derived based on normalized guided and free waves. By using the p-norm, a method is introduced to define the characteristic values and functions which can either refer to an antenna or yet the whole transmission chain.

  14. Geodesics in nonexpanding impulsive gravitational waves with Λ, part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sämann, Clemens; Steinbauer, Roland; Lecke, Alexander; Podolský, Jiřˇí

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the geodesics in the entire class of nonexpanding impulsive gravitational waves propagating in an (anti-)de Sitter universe using the distributional form of the metric. Employing a five-dimensional embedding formalism and a general regularisation technique, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the geodesics crossing the wave impulse, leading to a completeness result. We also derive the explicit form of the geodesics, thereby confirming previous results derived in a heuristic approach.

  15. Internal ellipsoidal estimates of reachable set of impulsive control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matviychuk, Oksana G.

    2014-11-18

    A problem of estimating reachable sets of linear impulsive control system with uncertainty in initial data is considered. The impulsive controls in the dynamical system belong to the intersection of a special cone with a generalized ellipsoid both taken in the space of functions of bounded variation. Assume that an ellipsoidal state constraints are imposed. The algorithms for constructing internal ellipsoidal estimates of reachable sets for such control systems and numerical simulation results are given.

  16. Electric and magnetic fields measured during a sudden impulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, S.; Adams, G. J.; Mozer, F. S.

    1974-01-01

    The electric field in the ionosphere and the magnetic field at the earth's surface in the mid-latitude region were both measured during a sudden impulse. Ionospheric conductivities deduced from this data were consistent with expectations, thus suggesting that the fluctuations in the magnetic field at the earth's surface were caused by overhead ionospheric currents that were driven by an electric field associated with the sudden impulse.

  17. Switched impulsive control of the endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol singular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Iman; Shafiee, Masoud; Ibeas, Asier; de la Sen, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a switched and impulsive controller is designed to control the Endocrine Disruptor Diethylstilbestrol mechanism which is usually modeled as a singular system. Then the exponential stabilization property of the proposed switched and impulsive singular model is discussed under matrix inequalities. A design algorithm is given and applied for the physiological process of endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol model to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.

  18. Manipulation of plasma grating by impulsive molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Peifen; Wu, Jian; Zeng, Heping

    2013-11-25

    We experimentally demonstrated that multiphoton-ionization-induced plasma grating in air could be precisely manipulated by impulsive molecular alignment. In the linear region, the impulsively aligned molecules modulated the diffraction efficiency of the plasma grating for a time-delayed femtosecond laser pulse. In the nonlinear region, the third harmonic generation from the plasma grating was either enhanced or suppressed by following the alignment of the molecules.

  19. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates.

    PubMed

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A; Moutoussis, Michael; Voon, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information-gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel-based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision-making deficits.

  20. Response inhibition and its relation to multidimensional impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wilbertz, Tilmann; Deserno, Lorenz; Horstmann, Annette; Neumann, Jane; Villringer, Arno; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Boehler, Carsten N; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a multidimensional construct that has been suggested as a vulnerability factor for several psychiatric disorders, especially addiction disorders. Poor response inhibition may constitute one facet of impulsivity. Trait impulsivity can be assessed by self-report questionnaires such as the widely used Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). However, regarding the multidimensionality of impulsivity different concepts have been proposed, in particular the UPPS self-report questionnaire ('Urgency', 'Lack of Premeditation', 'Lack of Perseverance', 'Sensation Seeking') that is based on a factor analytic approach. The question as to which aspects of trait impulsivity map on individual differences of the behavioral and neural correlates of response inhibition so far remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated 52 healthy individuals that scored either very high or low on the BIS-11 and underwent a reward-modulated Stop-signal task during fMRI. Neither behavioral nor neural differences were observed with respect to high- and low-BIS groups. In contrast, UPPS subdomain Urgency best explained inter-individual variability in SSRT scores and was further negatively correlated to right IFG/aI activation in 'Stop>Go' trials - a key region for response inhibition. Successful response inhibition in rewarded compared to nonrewarded stop trials yielded ventral striatal (VS) activation which might represent a feedback signal. Interestingly, only participants with low Urgency scores were able to use this VS feedback signal for better response inhibition. Our findings indicate that the relationship of impulsivity and response inhibition has to be treated carefully. We propose Urgency as an important subdomain that might be linked to response inhibition as well as to the use of reward-based neural signals. Based on the present results, further studies examining the influence of impulsivity on psychiatric disorders should take into account Urgency as an important

  1. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates

    PubMed Central

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A.; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A.; Moutoussis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information‐gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel‐based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision‐making deficits. PMID:25678093

  2. CATEGORICAL DIAGNOSIS OF EXTREME HYPERACTIVITY, IMPULSIVITY, AND INATTENTION IN VERY YOUNG CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Mary Margaret; Humphreys, Kathryn L

    2016-09-01

    Severe hyperactivity and impulsivity are common reasons for referral to infant mental health services. Past versions of ZERO TO THREE's () diagnostic nosology, the Diagnostic Classification of Mental and Developmental Disorders in Infancy and Early Childhood (DC:0-3), did not address this clinical issue because it had been addressed in other nosologies. These general diagnostic nosologies describe attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but with little attention to developmentally specific aspects of the diagnosis in very young children. Categorical diagnosis related to hyperactivity and impulsivity in very young children warrants careful review of existing literature. Explicit attention must be paid to ensure that categorical diagnoses serve to describe syndromes that cause significant impairment to the family to allow children and families to access effective supports and ensure that behaviors typical of the developmental level are not described as pathologic. This article reviews proposed diagnostic criteria for ADHD and overactivity disorder of toddlerhood as well as the rationale for the criteria and evidence supporting validity and reliability of the diagnoses in very young children. Clinical implications also are presented. PMID:27603932

  3. Dynamic response of graphene to thermal impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingchao; Huang, Xiaopeng; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Jianmei; Wang, Xinwei

    2011-12-01

    A transient molecular dynamics technique is developed to characterize the thermophysical properties of two-dimensional graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). By directly tracking the thermal-relaxation history of a GNR that is heated by a thermal impulse, we are able to determine its thermal diffusivity quickly and accurately. We study the dynamic thermal conductivity of various length GNRs of 1.99 nm width. Quantum correction is applied in all of the temperature calculations and is found to have a critical role in the thermal-transport study of graphene. The calculated specific heat of GNRs agrees well with that of graphite at 300.6 and 692.3 K, showing little effect of the unique graphene structure on its ability to store thermal energy. A strong size effect on GNR's thermal conductivity is observed and its theoretical values for an infinite-length limit are evaluated by data fitting and extrapolation. With infinite length, the 1.99-nm-wide GNR has a thermal conductivity of 149 W m-1 K-1 at 692.3 K, and 317 W m-1 K-1 at 300.6 K. Our study of the temperature distribution and evolution suggests that diffusive transport is dominant in the studied GNRs. Non-Fourier heat conduction is observed at the beginning of the thermal-relaxation procedure. Thermal waves in GNR's in-plane direction are observed only for phonons in the flexural direction (ZA mode). The observed propagation speed (c = 4.6 km s-1) of the thermal wave follows the relation of c=vg/2 (vg is the ZA phonon group velocity). Our thermal-wave study reveals that in graphene, the ZA phonons transfer thermal energy much faster than longitudinal (LA) and transverse (TA) modes. Also, ZA↔ZA energy transfer is much faster than the ZA↔LA/TA phonon energy transfer.

  4. Addressing adolescent pregnancy with legislation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M; Folken, Lori; Seitz, Melody A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a concern among many women's health practitioners. While it is practical and appropriate to work to prevent adolescent pregnancy by educating adolescents in health care clinics, schools and adolescent-friendly community-based organizations, suggesting and supporting legislative efforts to reduce adolescent pregnancy can help address the issue on an even larger scale. This article aims to help nurses better understand current legislation that addresses adolescent pregnancy, and to encourage support of future adolescent pregnancy prevention legislation. PMID:25145716

  5. Addressing adolescent pregnancy with legislation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M; Folken, Lori; Seitz, Melody A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a concern among many women's health practitioners. While it is practical and appropriate to work to prevent adolescent pregnancy by educating adolescents in health care clinics, schools and adolescent-friendly community-based organizations, suggesting and supporting legislative efforts to reduce adolescent pregnancy can help address the issue on an even larger scale. This article aims to help nurses better understand current legislation that addresses adolescent pregnancy, and to encourage support of future adolescent pregnancy prevention legislation.

  6. Remediation tradeoffs addressed with simulated annealing optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L. L., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    Escalation of groundwater remediation costs has encouraged both advances in optimization techniques to balance remediation objectives and economics and development of innovative technologies to expedite source region clean-ups. We present an optimization application building on a pump-and-treat model, yet assuming a prior removal of different portions of the source area to address the evolving management issue of more aggressive source remediation. Separate economic estimates of in-situ thermal remediation are combined with the economic estimates of the subsequent optimal pump-and-treat remediation to observe tradeoff relationships of cost vs. highest remaining contamination levels (hot spot). The simulated annealing algorithm calls the flow and transport model to evaluate the success of a proposed remediation scenario at a U.S.A. Superfund site contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  7. Analysis of impulse signals with Hylaty ELF station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulak, A.; Mlynarczyk, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Kubisz, J.; Michalec, A.

    2012-04-01

    Lighting discharges generate electromagnetic field pulses that propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The attenuation in the ELF range is so small that the pulses originating from strong atmospheric discharges can be observed even several thousand kilometers away from the individual discharge. The recorded waveform depends on the discharge process, the Earth-ionosphere waveguide properties on the source-receiver path, and the transfer function of the receiver. If the distance from the source is known, an inverse method can be used for reconstructing the current moment waveform and the charge moment of the discharge. In order to reconstruct the source parameters from the recorded signal a reliable model of the radio wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide as well as practical signal processing techniques are necessary. We present two methods, both based on analytical formulas. The first method allows for fast calculation of the charge moment of relatively short atmospheric discharges. It is based on peak amplitude measurement of the recorded magnetic component of the ELF EM field and it takes into account the receiver characteristics. The second method, called "inverse channel method" allows reconstructing the complete current moment waveform of strong atmospheric discharges that exhibit the continuing current phase, such as Gigantic Jets and Sprites. The method makes it possible to fully remove from the observed waveform the distortions related to the receiver's impulse response as well as the influence of the Earth-ionosphere propagation channel. Our ELF station is equipped with two magnetic antennas for Bx and By components measurement in the 0.03 to 55 Hz frequency range. ELF Data recording is carried out since 1993, with continuous data acquisition since 2005. The station features low noise level and precise timing. It is battery powered and located in the sparsely populated area, far from major electric power lines, which results in high

  8. Assessing impulsivity in prepubertal male rats: a novel device and method to assess motor and cognitive impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Jorge; Muñoz-Villegas, Patricia; Guerrero-Álvarez, Ángeles; Flores-Ocampo, Paola

    2013-08-01

    The use of animal models in studies of impulsivity has made valuable contributions to our understanding of this behavioral trait as it relates to disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The objective of this work was to develop a paradigm that would make it possible to evaluate both motor and cognitive impulsivity using the same device after a short training period. The operant behavior demanded in this device consists in having rats cross a bridge after receiving a signal to obtain a reward that is available on a goal platform in a Wait-to-Go-signal task, or in crossing a bridge after the animals make a choice between two alternatives in a Delay-discounting task. To test this device and method, a study was conducted using an animal model of dopaminergic dysfunction produced by prenatal alcohol treatment (which has been shown to cause attention deficits and alterations of impulsivity in adult rats). Compared with controls, prepubertal male rats treated prenatally with alcohol showed both higher cognitive and higher motor impulsivity as assessed by the parameters used. Although attention changes proved not to be dependent on prenatal treatment, they were sensitive to the task performed. The device and methods introduced herein thus constitute useful instruments for evaluating impulsivity. Their significant advantages include a short investment in training time, and the ability to assess different types of impulsivity from the vantage point of distinct theoretical perspectives. PMID:23855334

  9. Impulsivity: a discussion of clinical and experimental findings.

    PubMed

    Evenden, J

    1999-01-01

    Impulsivity can often be an important clinical problem in psychiatry and neurology. In psychiatry, the manifestation of impulsive behaviour in syndromes such as personality disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and in substance abuse may be different, and this has led to conflicting definitions. There has also been a tendency to concentrate on the nature of the behavioural manifestation (problems with the law, aggression, drug use, behavioural problems in school) rather than shared psychological processes, and to ignore the fact that impulsivity can also have positive aspects. In a normal population, the personality trait of impulsivity has been analysed using personality inventory questionnaires. Analysis of these data lead to the suggestion that impulsivity as commonly defined and understood may be made up of several independent factors, which may have separate biological bases. These self-rating questionnaires have been complemented by objective tests that are now often computerized, and which have been used in man (e.g. with criminal offenders, children, or patients who have undergone brain surgery). Some of these tests, such as the differential reinforcement of low rates procedure or the delay of reinforcement procedure, have also been used to study impulsivity in animals. Analysis of the behavioural principles of these tests suggests that they too may reflect different aspects of impulsivity. Many different biological systems have been proposed to contribute to the neurobiological basis of impulsivity. The serotonergic neurotransmitter system has recently received the most attention, with evidence of its involvement coming from animal studies as well as from studies in psychiatric patients. The frontal lobes have been proposed to play an important role in regulating impulsivity, although it unclear how specific this is. None of this biological knowledge has yet led to reliable pharmacotherapy for excessive impulsivity and, as yet, there is

  10. Impulsivity: a discussion of clinical and experimental findings.

    PubMed

    Evenden, J

    1999-01-01

    Impulsivity can often be an important clinical problem in psychiatry and neurology. In psychiatry, the manifestation of impulsive behaviour in syndromes such as personality disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and in substance abuse may be different, and this has led to conflicting definitions. There has also been a tendency to concentrate on the nature of the behavioural manifestation (problems with the law, aggression, drug use, behavioural problems in school) rather than shared psychological processes, and to ignore the fact that impulsivity can also have positive aspects. In a normal population, the personality trait of impulsivity has been analysed using personality inventory questionnaires. Analysis of these data lead to the suggestion that impulsivity as commonly defined and understood may be made up of several independent factors, which may have separate biological bases. These self-rating questionnaires have been complemented by objective tests that are now often computerized, and which have been used in man (e.g. with criminal offenders, children, or patients who have undergone brain surgery). Some of these tests, such as the differential reinforcement of low rates procedure or the delay of reinforcement procedure, have also been used to study impulsivity in animals. Analysis of the behavioural principles of these tests suggests that they too may reflect different aspects of impulsivity. Many different biological systems have been proposed to contribute to the neurobiological basis of impulsivity. The serotonergic neurotransmitter system has recently received the most attention, with evidence of its involvement coming from animal studies as well as from studies in psychiatric patients. The frontal lobes have been proposed to play an important role in regulating impulsivity, although it unclear how specific this is. None of this biological knowledge has yet led to reliable pharmacotherapy for excessive impulsivity and, as yet, there is

  11. Observational clues to the energy release process in impulsive solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, David

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the energy release process that produces impulsive bursts of hard X-rays and microwaves during solar flares is discussed, based on new evidence obtained using the method of Crannell et al. (1978). It is shown that the hard X-ray spectral index gamma is negatively correlated with the microwave peak frequency, suggesting a common source for the microwaves and X-rays. The thermal and nonthermal models are compared. It is found that the most straightforward explanations for burst time behavior are shock-wave particle acceleration in the nonthermal model and thermal conduction fronts in the thermal model.

  12. Spectral evolution of multiply-impulsive solar bursts. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hard X-ray and microwave observations of multiply-impulsive solar bursts, identified in the OSO-5 data were analyzed. Spectra in both frequency ranges were used to determine whether or not the source properties change from peak to peak within individual bursts. Two categories of microwave spectral behavior were identified: those events during which the microwave turnover frequency and spectral shape remain the same from peak to peak, and those during which the turnover frequency and spectral shape change significantly. These categories correspond to two classes of multiply-impulsive bursts: those for which the emission can be characterized by a constant magnetic field and therefore a single source region, in which case the multiplicity may be due to modulation of the emission process; and those in which groups of component spikes appear to originate in regions of different magnetic-field strengths, corresponding to separate source regions which flare sequentially. Examples of the latter type of events are presented. The discrete flaring regions are analyzed and their spatial separations estimated.

  13. Failure mechanisms in composite panels subjected to underwater impulsive loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latourte, Félix; Grégoire, David; Zenkert, Dan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2011-08-01

    This work examines the performance of composite panels when subjected to underwater impulsive loads. The scaled fluid-structure experimental methodology developed by Espinosa and co-workers was employed. Failure modes, damage mechanisms and their distributions were identified and quantified for composite monolithic and sandwich panels subjected to typical blast loadings. The temporal evolutions of panel deflection and center deflection histories were obtained from shadow Moiré fringes acquired in real time by means of high speed photography. A linear relationship of zero intercept between peak center deflections versus applied impulse per areal mass was obtained for composite monolithic panels. For composite sandwich panels, the relationship between maximum center deflection versus applied impulse per areal mass was found to be approximately bilinear but with a higher slope. Performance improvement of sandwich versus monolithic composite panels was, therefore, established specially at sufficiently high impulses per areal mass ( I0/ M¯>170 m s -1). Severe failure was observed in solid panels subjected to impulses per areal mass larger than 300 m s -1. Extensive fiber fracture occurred in the center of the panels, where cracks formed a cross pattern through the plate thickness and delamination was very extensive on the sample edges due to bending effects. Similar levels of damage were observed in sandwich panels but at much higher impulses per areal mass. The experimental work reported in this paper encompasses not only characterization of the dynamic performance of monolithic and sandwich panels but also post-mortem characterization by means of both non-destructive and microscopy techniques. The spatial distribution of delamination and matrix cracking were quantified, as a function of applied impulse, in both monolithic and sandwich panels. The extent of core crushing was also quantified in the case of sandwich panels. The quantified variables represent ideal

  14. Self-reported and behavioural impulsivity in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry Allen; Castle, David Jonathan; Gurvich, Caroline; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine how self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are related in anorexia nervosa (AN). METHODS Twenty-four females with AN and 25 healthy controls (HC) participant in the study. Self-reported impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The scale yields three second-order factors: Attentional, motor and non-planning. Behavioural impulsivity was investigated with the continuous performance test (CPT), a computer-based task of sustained attention in which numbers are flashed briefly on screen and participants are required to click the mouse when the same number appears consecutively. The rate of commission and omission errors can be used a measure of behavioural imulsivity. RESULTS AN participants self-reported increased attentional [AN: 20.67 (3.64), HC: 13.88 (2.91), P = 0.001] and reduced motor impulsivity [AN: 11.55 (2.28), HC: 14.08 (2.78), P = 0.002]. The rate of omission or commission errors on the CPT did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). BIS-11 and CPT measures did not significantly correlate, but attentional impulsivity was related to negative mood states in AN (depression: r = 0.52, P = 0.010, anxiety: r = 0.55, P = 0.006, stress: r = 0.57, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION The discrepancy between self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are discussed in terms of perfectionism in AN. Furthermore, it is suggested that improving negative mood states may resolve this inconsistency in AN. PMID:27679774

  15. Self-reported and behavioural impulsivity in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry Allen; Castle, David Jonathan; Gurvich, Caroline; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine how self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are related in anorexia nervosa (AN). METHODS Twenty-four females with AN and 25 healthy controls (HC) participant in the study. Self-reported impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The scale yields three second-order factors: Attentional, motor and non-planning. Behavioural impulsivity was investigated with the continuous performance test (CPT), a computer-based task of sustained attention in which numbers are flashed briefly on screen and participants are required to click the mouse when the same number appears consecutively. The rate of commission and omission errors can be used a measure of behavioural imulsivity. RESULTS AN participants self-reported increased attentional [AN: 20.67 (3.64), HC: 13.88 (2.91), P = 0.001] and reduced motor impulsivity [AN: 11.55 (2.28), HC: 14.08 (2.78), P = 0.002]. The rate of omission or commission errors on the CPT did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). BIS-11 and CPT measures did not significantly correlate, but attentional impulsivity was related to negative mood states in AN (depression: r = 0.52, P = 0.010, anxiety: r = 0.55, P = 0.006, stress: r = 0.57, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION The discrepancy between self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are discussed in terms of perfectionism in AN. Furthermore, it is suggested that improving negative mood states may resolve this inconsistency in AN.

  16. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the field of environmental engineering, modeling tools are playing an ever larger role in addressing air quality issues, including source pollutant emissions, atmospheric dispersion and human exposure risks. More detailed modeling of environmental flows requires tools for c...

  17. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CHALLENGES WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics )CFD) models to address environmental engineering challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant source emissions, atmospheric dispersion and resulting human exposure. CFD simulations ...

  18. Energetic electrons, type III radio bursts, and impulsive solar flare X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.

    1981-08-01

    Observations of impulsive hard X-ray and type III radio bursts made during the maximum of the last solar activity cycle have been analyzed for a statistical study of the relationship between these two solar flare phenomena. Spectral measurements of 10--68 keV X-rays, which covered 7068 hr of observation time and the range 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/ ergs cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ of flux of X-rays > or approx. =20 keV, were made with the University of California (Berkeley) experiment aboard the OGO 5 satellite. The radio data consisted of copies of the original spectral records as well as tabulated data. The principle findings are: (1) about 20% of impulsive hard X-ray bursts are correlated with type III radio bursts; conversely, only approx.3% of the reported type III radio bursts are correlated with impulsive X-rays bursts; (2) the location of the associated H..cap alpha.. flare on the solar disk has little or no effect on the X-ray--type III burst correlation; (3) the magnitude of the X-ray--type III burst correlation increases systematically with the increase in the following quantities: intensity and starting frequency of the type III burst, peak energy flux and spectral hardness of the X-ray burst, and the peak nonthermal emission measure and spectral hardness of the ''instantaneous'' electron spectrum > or approx. =20 keV inside the x-ray source; (4) the observations are consistent with the electron populations responsible for both the X-ray and type III emissions being accelerated in a single acceleration process; (5) the observations suggest a flare model where the primary instability responsible for electron acceleration during the impulsive phase occurs in the corona. The exact location of this instability varies from one flare to another as well as during the impulsive phase of a single flare and determines the hardness of the accelerated electron spectrum and the characteristics of associated X-ray, EUV, optical, and radio emissions.

  19. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the

  20. Impulsive Wave Propagation within Magmatic Conduits with Axial Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Negri Leiva, R. S.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    We implemented Trefftz's method to simulate wave propagation in a fluid-solid system aimed to represent a magmatic conduit. Assuming axial symmetry, a set of multipoles is used to build a complete system of wave functions for both the solid and the fluid. These functions are solutions of the elastodynamic equations that govern the motions in the fluid and the solid, respectively. The conduit can be closed or open and the exterior elastic domain may be unlimited or with an exterior boundary. In order to find the functions coefficients, boundary conditions (null shear and continuity of pressures and normal velocities) are satisfied in the least squares sense. The impulsive nature of the source is considered using Fourier analysis. Despite the simplicity of the formulation our results display a rich variety of behaviors. In fact, for a uniform infinite cylinder we reproduced the analytical solution. Moreover, this approach allows establishing some important effects of conduit geometry, including changes of sections. Lateral effects and bump resonances are well resolved. We compared our numerical calculations with results obtained from experimental simulations of volcanic explosions in which rapid depressurization induces fragmentation of volcanic rocks. These experiments are performed within a shock-tube apparatus at room temperature and various pressures using Argon (Ar) gas, particles and pumice samples of different porosities, from Popocatepetl volcano. The mechanical system is well characterized and the dynamics of the explosive process is monitored with high precision piezoelectric sensors located at the pipe surface. The combination of analytical and experimental approaches is very useful to understand the seismic wave field of volcanic conduit dynamics.

  1. Cytoplasmic molecular delivery with shock waves: importance of impulse.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, T; Hamblin, M R; Doukas, A G

    2000-01-01

    Cell permeabilization using shock waves may be a way of introducing macromolecules and small polar molecules into the cytoplasm, and may have applications in gene therapy and anticancer drug delivery. The pressure profile of a shock wave indicates its energy content, and shock-wave propagation in tissue is associated with cellular displacement, leading to the development of cell deformation. In the present study, three different shock-wave sources were investigated; argon fluoride excimer laser, ruby laser, and shock tube. The duration of the pressure pulse of the shock tube was 100 times longer than the lasers. The uptake of two fluorophores, calcein (molecular weight: 622) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (molecular weight: 71,600), into HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells was investigated. The intracellular fluorescence was measured by a spectrofluorometer, and the cells were examined by confocal fluorescence microscopy. A single shock wave generated by the shock tube delivered both fluorophores into approximately 50% of the cells (p < 0.01), whereas shock waves from the lasers did not. The cell survival fraction was >0.95. Confocal microscopy showed that, in the case of calcein, there was a uniform fluorescence throughout the cell, whereas, in the case of FITC-dextran, the fluorescence was sometimes in the nucleus and at other times not. We conclude that the impulse of the shock wave (i.e., the pressure integrated over time), rather than the peak pressure, was a dominant factor for causing fluorophore uptake into living cells, and that shock waves might have changed the permeability of the nuclear membrane and transferred molecules directly into the nucleus. PMID:11023888

  2. Multi-port, optically addressed RAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Alan R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Bergman, Larry A. (Inventor); Esener, Sadik (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A random access memory addressing system utilizing optical links between memory and the read/write logic circuits comprises addressing circuits including a plurality of light signal sources, a plurality of optical gates including optical detectors associated with the memory cells, and a holographic optical element adapted to reflect and direct the light signals to the desired memory cell locations. More particularly, it is a multi-port, binary computer memory for interfacing with a plurality of computers. There are a plurality of storage cells for containing bits of binary information, the storage cells being disposed at the intersections of a plurality of row conductors and a plurality of column conductors. There is interfacing logic for receiving information from the computers directing access to ones of the storage cells. There are first light sources associated with the interfacing logic for transmitting a first light beam with the access information modulated thereon. First light detectors are associated with the storage cells for receiving the first light beam, for generating an electrical signal containing the access information, and for conducting the electrical signal to the one of the storage cells to which it is directed. There are holographic optical elements for reflecting the first light beam from the first light sources to the first light detectors.

  3. Addressing problems of employee performance.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee performance problems are essentially of 2 kinds: those that are motivational in origin and those resulting from skill deficiencies. Both kinds of problems are the province of the department manager. Performance problems differ from problems of conduct in that traditional disciplinary processes ordinarily do not apply. Rather, performance problems are addressed through educational and remedial processes. The manager has a basic responsibility in ensuring that everything reasonable is done to help each employee succeed. There are a number of steps the manager can take to address employee performance problems.

  4. Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Oliveros, J. C.; Moradi, H.; Donea, A.-C.

    2008-09-01

    On 10 March 2001 the active region NOAA 9368 produced an unusually impulsive solar flare in close proximity to the solar limb. This flare has previously been studied in great detail, with observations classifying it as a type 1 white-light flare with a very hard spectrum in hard X-rays. The flare was also associated with a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection. The flare emission characteristics appeared to closely correspond to previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic signatures produced by the flare that, to date, is the least energetic (in soft X-rays) of the flares known to have generated a detectable acoustic transient. Holographic analysis of the flare shows a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with the impulsive hard X-rays, visible continuum, and radio emission. Time distance diagrams of the seismic waves emanating from the flare region also show faint signatures, mainly in the eastern sector of the active region. The strong spatial coincidence between the seismic source and the impulsive visible continuum emission reinforces the theory that a substantial component of the seismic emission seen is a result of sudden heating of the low photosphere associated with the observed visible continuum emission. Furthermore, the low-altitude magnetic loop structure inferred from potential-field extrapolations in the flaring region suggests that there is a significant anti-correlation between the seismicity of a flare and the height of the magnetic loops that conduct the particle beams from the corona.

  5. Limitations of using dosimeters in impulse noise environments.

    PubMed

    Kardous, Chucri A; Willson, Robert D

    2004-07-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) investigated the capabilities of noise dosimeters to measure personal exposure to impulse noise. The two leading types of commercially available dosimeters were evaluated in terms of their ability to measure and integrate impulses generated from gunfire during live-fire exercises at a law enforcement indoor firing range. Sound measurements were conducted throughout the firing range using dosimeters, sound level meters, and a measurement configuration that consisted of a quarter-inch microphone and a digital audiotape recorder to capture the impulse waveforms. Personal dosimetry was conducted on eight shooters, an observer, and the range master. Peak levels from gunfire reached 163 decibels (dB), exceeding the nominal input limit of the dosimeters. The dosimeters "clipped" the impulses by acting as if the gunfire had a maximum level of 146 dB. In other cases, however, peak levels (e.g., 108 dB) were below the dosimeter input limits, but the dosimeters still showed a peak level of 146 dB. Although NIOSH recommends that sound levels from 80 to 140 dB (A-weighted) be integrated in the calculation of dose and the time-weighted average, our present data suggest this criterion may be inadequate. These results showed that some instruments are incapable of providing accurate measures of impulse sounds because of their electroacoustic limitations.

  6. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-12-10

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  7. Detonation tube impulse in sub-atmospheric environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Marcia A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2005-04-01

    The thrust from a multi-cycle, pulse detonation engine operating at practical flight altitudes will vary with the surrounding environment pressure. We have carried out the first experimental study using a detonation tube hung in a ballistic pendulum arrangement within a large pressure vessel in order to determine the effect that the environment has on the single-cycle impulse. The air pressure inside the vessel surrounding the detonation tube varied between 100 and 1.4 kPa while the initial pressure of the stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen mixture inside the tube varied between 100 and 30 kPa. The original impulse model (Wintenberger et al., Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2002) was modified to predict the observed increase in impulse and blow down time as the environment pressure decreased below one atmosphere. Comparisons between the impulse from detonation tubes and ideal, steady flow rockets indicate incomplete expansion of the detonation tube exhaust, resulting in a 37% difference in impulse at a pressure ratio (ratio of pressure behind the Taylor wave to the environment pressure) of 100.

  8. Impulsivity: four ways five factors are not basic to addiction.

    PubMed

    Gullo, Matthew J; Loxton, Natalie J; Dawe, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Several impulsivity-related models have been applied to understanding the vulnerability to addiction. While there is a growing consensus that impulsivity is multifaceted, debate continues as to the precise number of facets and, more critically, which are most relevant to explaining the addiction-risk profile. In many ways, the current debate mirrors that which took place in the personality literature in the early 1990s (e.g., Eysenck's 'Big Three' versus Costa and McCrae's 'Big Five'). Indeed, many elements of this debate are relevant to the current discussion of the role of impulsivity in addictive behavior. Specifically, 1) the use of factor analysis as an atheoretical 'truth-grinding machine'; 2) whether additional facets add explanatory power over fewer; 3) the delineation of specific neurocognitive pathways from each facet to addictive behaviors, and; 4) the relative merit of 'top-down' versus 'bottom-up' approaches to the understanding of impulsivity. Ultimately, the utility of any model of impulsivity and addiction lies in its heuristic value and ability to integrate evidence from different levels of analysis. Here, we make the case that theoretically-driven, bottom-up models proposing two factors deliver the optimal balance of explanatory power, parsimony, and integration of evidence. PMID:24576666

  9. Impulsivity and apathy in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nihal; Manohar, Sanjay; Husain, Masud

    2013-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) and apathy are recognized as two important neuropsychiatric syndromes associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), but as yet we understand very little about the cognitive mechanisms underlying them. Here, we review emerging findings, from both human and animal studies, that suggest that impulsivity and apathy are opposite extremes of a dopamine-dependent spectrum of motivated decision making. We first argue that there is strong support for a hypodopaminergic state in PD patients with apathy, as well as for an association between dopamine therapy and development of ICDs. However, there is little evidence for a clear dose-response relationship, and great heterogeneity of findings. We argue that dopaminergic state on its own is an insufficient explanation, and suggest instead that there is now substantial evidence that both apathy and impulsivity are in fact multi-dimensional syndromes, with separate, dissociable mechanisms underlying their ‘surface’ manifestations. Some of these mechanisms might be dopamine-dependent. According to this view, individuals diagnosed as impulsive or apathetic may have very different mechanisms underlying their clinical states. We propose that impulsivity and apathy can arise from dissociable deficits in option generation, option selection, action initiation or inhibition and learning. Review of the behavioural and neurobiological evidence leads us to a new conceptual framework that might help understand the variety of functional deficits seen in PD. PMID:23621377

  10. Impulsivity and risk taking in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Reddy, L Felice; Lee, Junghee; Davis, Michael C; Altshuler, Lori; Glahn, David C; Miklowitz, David J; Green, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive risk taking contributes to deleterious outcomes among clinical populations. Indeed, pathological impulsivity and risk taking are common in patients with serious mental illness, and have severe clinical repercussions including novelty seeking, response disinhibition, aggression, and substance abuse. Thus, the current study seeks to examine self-reported impulsivity (Barratt Impulsivity Scale) and performance-based behavioral risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task) in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Participants included 68 individuals with bipolar disorder, 38 with schizophrenia, and 36 healthy controls. Self-reported impulsivity was elevated in the bipolar group compared with schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, who did not differ from each other. On the risk-taking task, schizophrenia patients were significantly more risk averse than the bipolar patients and controls. Aside from the diagnostic group differences, there was a significant effect of antipsychotic (AP) medication within the bipolar group: bipolar patients taking AP medications were more risk averse than those not taking AP medications. This difference in risk taking because of AP medications was not explained by history of psychosis. Similarly, the differences in risk taking between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were not fully explained by AP effects. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:23963117

  11. Dysfunctional inhibitory control and impulsivity in Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Park, Su Mi; Roh, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Jun-Young; Park, Chan-Bin; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Gwak, Ah Reum; Jung, Hee Yeon

    2014-02-28

    The purpose of this study was to explore a psychological profile of Internet addiction (IA) considering impulsivity as a key personality trait and as a key component of neuropsychological functioning. Twenty three subjects with IA (Young's Internet Addiction Test scores=70 or more) and 24 sex-, age-, and intelligence-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Participants filled out a questionnaire about trait impulsivity, the Trait Characteristic Inventory, depression, and anxiety. Next, we administered traditional neuropsychological tests including the Stroop et al. and computerized neuropsychological tests using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. The IA group exhibited more trait impulsivity than the healthy control group. They also scored higher for novelty seeking and harm avoidance. The IA group performed more poorly than the healthy control group in a computerized stop signal test, a test for inhibitory function and impulsivity; no group differences appeared for other neuropsychological tests. The IA group also scored higher for depression and anxiety, and lower for self-directedness and cooperativeness. In conclusion, individuals with IA exhibited impulsivity as a core personality trait and in their neuropsychological functioning. PMID:24370334

  12. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  13. Every Other Day. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiller, Tom

    Schools need to be reoriented and restructured so that what is taught and learned, and the way in which it is taught and learned, are better integrated with young people's real-world experiences. Many indicators suggest that the meaningful aspects of school have been lost in the encounter with modern times. The title of this address--"Every Other…

  14. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  15. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2016-07-12

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  16. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario. PMID:27415258

  17. Can an "impulse response" really be defined for a photoreceiver?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Pelaez, F. Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we examine the validity of the concept of impulse response employed to characterize the time response and the signal-to-noise ratio of p-i-n and similar photodetecting devices. We analyze critically the way in which the formalism of analog linear systems has been extrapolated, by employing results from macroscopic electromagnetic theory such as the Shockley-Ramo theorem or any equivalent approach, to the extreme case of a single-photon detection. We argue that the concept of "response to an optical impulse" is ill-defined in the customary terms it is envisioned in the literature, this is, as an output current pulse having a certain predictable, calculated temporal shape, in response to the detection of an optical "Dirac delta" impulse, conceived in turn as the absorption of a single photon.

  18. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  19. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  20. Three-dimensional, Impulsive Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S Dorfman, et al

    2013-05-03

    Impulsive, local, 3-D reconnection is identified for the first time in a laboratory current sheet. The events observed in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) are characterized by large local gradients in the third direction and cannot be explained by 2-D models. Detailed measurements show that the ejection of flux rope structures from the current sheet plays a key role in these events. By contrast, even though electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range are also observed concurrently with the impulsive behavior, they are not the key physics responsible. A qualitative, 3-D, two-fluid model is proposed to explain the observations. The experimental results may be particularly applicable to space and astrophysical plasmas where impulsive reconnection occurs.

  1. Research of Two Different Impulsive Faults of Rolling Element Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhinong; Xing, Chenghong; Feng, Kun; Gao, Jinji

    2012-05-01

    Fans and pumps are key machines in process industries such as petrochemical and petroleum industries. Their faults can be catastrophic and result in costly downtime. Bearing fault is almost the most common fault of fans and pumps as rolling element bearings are widely used in these machines. Hence, condition monitoring and diagnosis of bearings are important. Two different impulsive faults of bearings have been observed and studied in previous research. The first fault presents very clear impulsive symptom in envelope spectrum, but the bearing can work for a long time. The other fault shows relatively indistinct symptom, but the bearing will break down in a short time. To overcome the problems of inaccurate diagnosis, a combinational approach based on an impulsive energy indicator and traditional enveloping analysis is proposed in this paper. This approach discriminate these two faults well and can support the maintenance decision for the machines with rolling element bearings.

  2. Memory for angry faces, impulsivity, and problematic behavior in adolescence.

    PubMed

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2007-04-01

    Research has shown that cognitive processes like the attribution of hostile intention or angry emotion to others contribute to the development and maintenance of conduct problems. However, the role of memory has been understudied in comparison with attribution biases. The aim of this study was thus to test if a memory bias for angry faces was related to conduct problems in youth. Adolescents from a junior secondary school were presented with angry and happy faces and were later asked to recognize the same faces with a neutral expression. They also completed an impulsivity questionnaire. A teacher assessed their behavior. The results showed that a better recognition of angry faces than happy faces predicted conduct problems and hyperactivity/inattention as reported by the teacher. The memory bias effect was more pronounced for impulsive adolescents. It is suggested that a memory bias for angry faces favors disruptive behavior but that a good ability to control impulses may moderate the negative impact of this bias.

  3. Impulsive Loading of Cellular Media in Sandwich Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Joseph A.; Gazonas, George A.

    2006-07-01

    Motivated by recent efforts to mitigate blast loading using energy-absorbing materials, this paper investigates the uniaxial crushing of cellular media in sandwich construction under impulsive pressure loading. The cellular core is modeled using a rigid, perfectly-plastic, locking idealization, as in previous studies, and the front and back faces are modeled as rigid, with pressure loading applied to the front face and the back face unrestrained. Predictions of this analytical model show excellent agreement with explicit finite element computations, and the model is used to investigate the influence of the mass distribution between the core and the faces. Increasing the mass fraction in the front face is found to increase the impulse required for complete crushing of the cellular core but also to produce undesirable increases in back-face accelerations. Optimal mass distributions are investigated by maximizing the impulse capacity while limiting the back-face accelerations to a specified level.

  4. THz impulse radar for biomedical sensing: nonlinear system behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. R.; Sung, Shijun; Grundfest, W. S.; Taylor, Z. D.

    2014-03-01

    The THz impulse radar is an "RF-inspired" sensor system that has performed remarkably well since its initial development nearly six years ago. It was developed for ex vivo skin-burn imaging, and has since shown great promise in the sensitive detection of hydration levels in soft tissues of several types, such as in vivo corneal and burn samples. An intriguing aspect of the impulse radar is its hybrid architecture which combines the high-peak-power of photoconductive switches with the high-responsivity and -bandwidth (RF and video) of Schottky-diode rectifiers. The result is a very sensitive sensor system in which the post-detection signal-to-noise ratio depends super-linearly on average signal power up to a point where the diode is "turned on" in the forward direction, and then behaves quasi-linearly beyond that point. This paper reports the first nonlinear systems analysis done on the impulse radar using MATLAB.

  5. Neural mechanisms of impulse control in sexually risky adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Diane; Telzer, Eva H.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; Fuligni, Andrew; Galván, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of risky sexual behavior are of public concern. Adolescents contribute disproportionately to negative consequences of risky sexual behavior. However, no research has examined the neural correlates of impulse control and real-world engagement in risky sexual behavior in this population. The aim of the present study was to examine this question. Twenty sexually active adolescents performed an impulse control task during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan and risky sexual behaviors were assessed through self-report. Sexual riskiness ratings were negatively associated with activation in the prefrontal cortex during response inhibition. These results suggest that diminished engagement of impulse control circuitry may contribute to sexual riskiness in adolescents. PMID:23835204

  6. Do different facets of impulsivity predict different types of aggression?

    PubMed

    Derefinko, Karen; DeWall, C Nathan; Metze, Amanda V; Walsh, Erin C; Lynam, Donald R

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relations between impulsivity-related traits (as assessed by the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale) and aggressive behaviors. Results indicated that UPPS-P Lack of Premeditation and Sensation Seeking were important in predicting general violence. In contrast, UPPS-P Urgency was most useful in predicting intimate partner violence. To further explore relations between intimate partner violence and Urgency, a measure of autonomic response to pleasant and aversive stimuli and facets of Neuroticism from the NEO PI-R were used as control variables. Autonomic responsivity was correlated with intimate partner violence at the zero-order level, and predicted significant variance in intimate partner violence in regression equations. However, UPPS-P Urgency was able to account for unique variance in intimate partner violence, above and beyond measures of Neuroticism and arousal. Implications regarding the use of a multifaceted conceptualization of impulsivity in the prediction of different types of violent behavior are discussed. PMID:21259270

  7. Stability of uncertain impulsive complex-variable chaotic systems with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Song

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the robust exponential stabilization of uncertain impulsive complex-variable chaotic delayed systems is considered with parameters perturbation and delayed impulses. It is assumed that the considered complex-variable chaotic systems have bounded parametric uncertainties together with the state variables on the impulses related to the time-varying delays. Based on the theories of adaptive control and impulsive control, some less conservative and easily verified stability criteria are established for a class of complex-variable chaotic delayed systems with delayed impulses. Some numerical simulations are given to validate the effectiveness of the proposed criteria of impulsive stabilization for uncertain complex-variable chaotic delayed systems.

  8. Deficient Event-Related Theta Oscillations in Individuals at Risk for Alcoholism: A Study of Reward Processing and Impulsivity Features

    PubMed Central

    Kamarajan, Chella; Pandey, Ashwini K.; Chorlian, David B.; Manz, Niklas; Stimus, Arthur T.; Anokhin, Andrey P.; Bauer, Lance O.; Kuperman, Samuel; Kramer, John; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Hesselbrock, Victor M.; Porjesz, Bernice

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals at high risk to develop alcoholism often manifest neurocognitive deficits as well as increased impulsivity. Event-related oscillations (EROs) have been used to effectively measure brain (dys)function during cognitive tasks in individuals with alcoholism and related disorders and in those at risk to develop these disorders. The current study examines ERO theta power during reward processing as well as impulsivity in adolescent and young adult subjects at high risk for alcoholism. Methods EROs were recorded during a monetary gambling task (MGT) in 12–25 years old participants (N = 1821; males = 48%) from high risk alcoholic families (HR, N = 1534) and comparison low risk community families (LR, N = 287) from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). Impulsivity scores and prevalence of externalizing diagnoses were also compared between LR and HR groups. Results HR offspring showed lower theta power and decreased current source density (CSD) activity than LR offspring during loss and gain conditions. Younger males had higher theta power than younger females in both groups, while the older HR females showed more theta power than older HR males. Younger subjects showed higher theta power than older subjects in each comparison. Differences in topography (i.e., frontalization) between groups were also observed. Further, HR subjects across gender had higher impulsivity scores and increased prevalence of externalizing disorders compared to LR subjects. Conclusions As theta power during reward processing is found to be lower not only in alcoholics, but also in HR subjects, it is proposed that reduced reward-related theta power, in addition to impulsivity and externalizing features, may be related in a predisposition to develop alcoholism and related disorders. PMID:26580209

  9. Impulsive choice behavior in four strains of rats: evaluation of possible models of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have examined impulsive choice behavior in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) as a possible pre-clinical model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, this strain was not specifically selected for the traits of ADHD and as a result their appropriateness as a model has been questioned. The present study investigated whether SHRs would exhibit impulsive behavior in comparison to their control strain, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In addition, we evaluated a strain that has previously shown high levels of impulsive choice, the Lewis (LEW) rats and compared them with their source strain, Wistar (WIS) rats. In the first phase, rats could choose between a smaller-sooner (SS) reward of 1 pellet after 10 s and a larger-later (LL) reward of 2 pellets after 30 s. Subsequently, the rats were exposed to increases in LL reward magnitude and SS delay. These manipulations were designed to assess sensitivity to magnitude and delay within the choice task to parse out possible differences in using the strains as models of specific deficits associated with ADHD. The SHR and WKY strains did not differ in their choice behavior under either delay or magnitude manipulations. In comparison to WIS, LEW showed deficits in choice behavior in the delay manipulation, and to a lesser extent in the magnitude manipulation. An examination of individual differences indicated that the SHR strain may not be sufficiently homogeneous in their impulsive choice behavior to be considered as a viable model for impulse control disorders such as ADHD. The LEW strain may be worthy of further consideration for their suitability as an animal model.

  10. Impulsive-reflective cognitive style, metacognition, and emotion in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Palladino, P; Poli, P; Masi, G; Marcheschi, M

    1997-02-01

    The study investigated the relationship between reflective or impulsive cognitive style, metacognitive functioning, and depression in young adolescents. Metacognitive functioning (metacognitive knowledge about reading and memory, monitoring of text comprehension) and self-reported depressive feelings were analyzed in a group of subjects who showed a Reflective or Impulsive cognitive style. The sample consisted of 56 junior high-school students (Grades 6, 7, and 8) selected from a larger original group of 61 subjects. We excluded from the original group those with an IQ below 75 on both the Verbal and Performance subscales on the short form of the WISC-R, those reported by teachers to have a severe learning disability, and those that did not complete the test battery due to long absences from school. The reflective-impulsive cognitive style was identified with the Matching Familiar Figures Test-20. Using the median of the distribution for both Latency (17 sec. per item) and Errors (9 errors) on this task, the sample was divided in four partially overlapping subgroups: 16 with Impulsive cognitive style (Latency below the median, Errors above the median), 13 with Reflective cognitive style (Latency above the median, Error below the median), 4 fast and accurate (both scores below the median), and 11 slow and inaccurate (both scores above the median). Twelve subjects with one or both scores coinciding with the critical value (median) were excluded. Analysis showed that subjects with Impulsive cognitive style had significantly lower scores than those with Reflective cognitive style in monitoring of comprehension of text. No differences were found on monitoring by eighth graders, irrespective of cognitive style. No differences between the two groups were found in metacognitive knowledge. Subjects with Impulsive cognitive style had significantly higher scores than subjects with Reflective cognitive style on a self-rating scale for childhood depression, the Children

  11. A Numerical Simulation of Impulses in the Magnetosphere Associated with Substorms: OpenGGCM Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdousi, B.; Raeder, J.

    2015-12-01

    The onset of substorms is still an unsolved problem in Space Physics even though many physical models explaining the substorm process have been proposed. Distinguishing the processes that occur during first 2 minutes of substorm process depends critically on the correct timing of different signals in the plasma sheet and the ionosphere. This has been difficult to accomplish with data alone, since signals are sometimes ambiguous, or they have not been observed at the right locations. To investigate signal propagation paths and signal travel times, we use OpenGGCM global simulation. By launching impulses from various locations in the tail, we investigate the path taken by the waves and the time it takes for different waves to reach the ionosphere. We find that it takes around 60 seconds for waves to travel from 30 RE to the ionosphere, contrary to many previous reports. We also find that the Tamao path is not generally the preferred path for waves originating in the plasma sheet, and that waves travel faster through the lobes. In addition, we find that a point source in the tail around 10-15 RE leads to spread-out signals in the ionosphere, whereas a point source further down in the tail around 20-30 RE leads to more localized signatures in the ionosphere. We also use the same technique to launch impulses in the dayside magnetosphere, and we find it takes less than 1 minute for wave to travel from the dayside to the nightside.

  12. THE LONGITUDINAL TRANSPORT OF ENERGETIC IONS FROM IMPULSIVE SOLAR FLARES IN INTERPLANETARY SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    We present a study of the longitudinal spread of energetic charged particles from a localized instantaneous compact source on the Sun. Our study utilizes a diffusive-transport model for the propagation of energetic ions in interplanetary space. We show that even for very small values of the ratio of perpendicular to parallel diffusion coefficients-a few percent-the particles spread significantly in longitude. Spatial diffusion and adiabatic energy loss of ions in the interplanetary plasma cause impulsive particle events at Earth's orbit to last a few days. In this time, the combination of transport both along and across the local Parker-spiral magnetic field and the longitudinal motion of the magnetic lines of forces rooted at the Sun as it rotates leads to substantial longitudinal transport of the particles. We show that spacecraft separated by as much as 180 Degree-Sign or more may observe events associated with compact solar sources, such as those from impulsive solar flares. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent multi-spacecraft observations.

  13. Strain hardening of metal parts with use of impulse wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, A. V.; Soloviev, D. L.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes a strain hardening method with the use of impulse waves. This method increases energy transfer to the strained material extending its technological capabilities with development of a deep strengthened layer and allowing formation of a heterogeneous hardened structure using plastic deformation. This structure has specified distribution of the hard and soft (visco-plastic) areas. Due to development of the heterogeneous structure in the surface layer created by strain hardening with impulse wave, durability of parts that suffer contact fatigue loading is significantly increased.

  14. Distribution transformer performance when subjected to steep front impulses

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, L.M.; Shaw, J.H. . Thomas A. Edison Technical Center); McConnell, B.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The experimental method and the results of subjecting arrester protected pole type distribution transformers to the combined stresses caused by the conducted steep front impulse and rated 60 Hz voltages are described. Comparisons are drawn between these results and those of similar experiments on unenergized distribution transformers. It is concluded that tank mounted direct connected arresters provide a high degree of protection to these transformers, tank mounted externally gapped or crossarm mounted arresters may not provide sufficient protection; internal transformer insulation system failures caused by the steep front impulse do not necessarily result in immediate catastrophic failures of the transformers.

  15. Addictions and Personality Traits: Impulsivity and Related Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral tendencies that might be captured through self-report measures may provide insight into personality features that are associated with substance addictions. Recently, impulsivity and related constructs, such as sensation-seeking, have been examined to help better understand their relationships with addictions. Here, we review recent findings that show links over developmental epochs between addictive behaviors and impulsivity, sensation-seeking, and other constructs that are theoretically linked. These findings have significant implications for generating improved treatments and interventions aimed at preventing the development of addictive disorders. PMID:24772382

  16. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  17. Family routine moderates the relation between child impulsivity and oppositional defiant disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lanza, H Isabella; Drabick, Deborah A G

    2011-01-01

    Although child impulsivity is associated with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, few studies have examined whether family processes moderate this association. To address this gap, we tested whether child-reported family routine moderated the relation between child hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI) and ODD symptoms among a sample of low-income, urban, ethnic-minority children (N = 87, 51% male). Child HI and ODD symptoms were assessed using parent and teacher reports. HI also was indexed by a laboratory task. Family routine was assessed using child self-report. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that family routine moderated child HI. Among children with higher levels of teacher-reported HI symptoms, lower levels of family routine were associated with higher levels of teacher-reported ODD symptoms compared to children with lower levels of teacher-reported HI symptoms. Children who self-reported higher levels of family routine were rated as low on teacher-reported ODD symptoms, regardless of teacher-reported HI levels. Parent report and laboratory measures of child HI did not produce significant interactions. Lower levels of family routine may confer risk for ODD symptoms among low-income, urban, ethnic-minority children experiencing higher levels of HI.

  18. Investigations of temporal reshaping during filamentary propagation with application to impulsive raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odhner, Johanan

    Femtosecond laser filamentation in gaseous media is a new source of broadband, ultrashort radiation that has the potential for application to many fields of research. In this dissertation filamentation is studied with a view to understanding the underlying physics governing the formation and propagation dynamics of filamentation, as well as to developing a method for vibrational spectroscopy based on the filament-induced impulsive vibrational excitation of molecules in the filamentation region. In pursuit of a better understanding of the underlying physical processes driving filamentation, the development of a new method for characterizing high intensity ultrashort laser pulses is presented, wherein two laser beams generate a transient grating in a noble gas, causing the pulse undergoing filamentation to diffract from the grating. Measuring the spectrum as a function of time delay between the filament and probe beams generates a spectrogram that can be inverted to recover the spectral and temporal phase and amplitude of the filamentary pulse. This technique enables measurement of the filamentary pulse in its native environment, offering a window into the pulse dynamics as a function of propagation distance. The intrinsic pulse shortening observed during filamentation leads to the impulsive excitation of molecular vibrations, which can be used to understand the dynamics of filamentation as well. Combined measurements of the longitudinally-resolved filament Raman spectrum, power spectrum, and fluorescence intensity confirm the propagation dynamics inferred from pulse measurements and show that filamentation provides a viable route to impulsive vibrational spectroscopy at remote distances from the laser source. The technique is applied to thermometry in air and in flames, and an analytical expression is derived to describe the short-time dynamics of the rovibrational wave-packet dispersion experienced by diatomic molecules in the wave of the filament. It is found that

  19. Understanding the role of impulsivity and externalizing psychopathology in alcohol abuse: application of the UPPS impulsive behavior scale.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Stephen P; Lynam, Donald R

    2003-08-01

    The present study explores the relation among 4 personality traits associated with impulsive behavior and alcohol abuse. Personality traits were measured using the 4 subscales of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS; S. P. Whiteside & D. R. Lynam, 2001). The UPPS and measures of psychopathology were administered to clinical samples of alcohol abusers high in antisocial personality traits (AAPD), alcohol abusers low in antisocial personality traits (AA), and a control group (total N = 60). Separate analyses of variance indicated that AAPDs had significant elevations on all 4 UPPS scales, whereas the AAs and controls differed only on the Urgency subscale. However, when controlling for psychopathology, group differences on the UPPS scales disappeared. The results suggest that personality traits related to impulsive behavior are not directly related to alcohol abuse but rather are associated with the elevated levels of psychopathology found in a subtype of alcohol abusers. PMID:12940500

  20. Reply to comment by E. W. Wolff et al. on "Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.; Melott, A. L.; Laird, C. M.

    2016-03-01

    Wolff et al. (2016) comment on Smart et al. (2014) and in doing so concentrate on issues other than the main point. They do not dispute our central assertion, the inadequate resolution of nearly all extant ice cores for detection of impulsive nitrate events (spikes) from any source, including past solar proton events (SPEs). We explain why comparing two short-length cores from other researchers and analyzed by different methods is insufficient for disputing subannual reproducibility, and call for a multiple, fine-resolution, replicate core study to resolve this issue. While acknowledging the creation of nitrate by SPEs and the existence of ice core nitrate spikes detected by others, they present several weak arguments, such as alleged scavenging of nitrate by some unnamed and unmeasured aerosol, and why no enhanced nitrate signal for documenting SPE statistics should be distinguishable in the ice. These are not derived from the main points in our Smart et al. (2014) paper. We address these briefly and show that ionization from the February 1956 SPE was sufficient to produce a winter, likely acidic, nitrate spike at Summit, Greenland. While noting some convergence of interpretation, we show why their claim that nitrate spikes cannot be used for deriving SPE statistics is unproven and why rejection of fine resolution core studies as unreliable is premature.

  1. Amplification of impulsively excited molecular rotational coherence.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Sussman, Benjamin J; Walmsley, Ian A

    2010-05-14

    We propose a scheme for preparation of high-coherence molecular dynamics which are phase stable with respect to ultrashort pulses. We experimentally demonstrate an example of this scheme using a phase-independent, nanosecond-duration, pump pulse to prepare a rotational coherence in molecular hydrogen. This rotational coherence is made phase stable with respect to a separate source of ultrashort pulses by seeding. The coherence is used to generate spectral broadening of femtosecond probe radiation by molecular phase modulation. PMID:20866965

  2. Amplification of impulsively excited molecular rotational coherence.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Sussman, Benjamin J; Walmsley, Ian A

    2010-05-14

    We propose a scheme for preparation of high-coherence molecular dynamics which are phase stable with respect to ultrashort pulses. We experimentally demonstrate an example of this scheme using a phase-independent, nanosecond-duration, pump pulse to prepare a rotational coherence in molecular hydrogen. This rotational coherence is made phase stable with respect to a separate source of ultrashort pulses by seeding. The coherence is used to generate spectral broadening of femtosecond probe radiation by molecular phase modulation.

  3. The relation between the waveguide invariant, multipath impulse response, and ray cycles.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Chris H

    2011-05-01

    The waveguide invariant, β, that manifests itself as interference fringes or "striations" in a plot of frequency vs source-receiver separation, is usually thought of as a modal phenomenon. This paper shows that striations can be explained simply through the variation of the eigenray arrival times with range, in short, the variation of the multipath impulse response. It is possible to calculate β for a number of sound speed profiles analytically and to find what β depends on, why it switches from one value to another, how it depends on source-receiver depth, how it depends on variable bathymetry, and how smooth the sound speed profile needs to be for clear fringes. The analytical findings are confirmed by calculating striation patterns numerically starting from eigenray travel times in various stratified environments. Most importantly the approach throws some light on what can be deduced from β alone and the likelihood and utility of striations in reverberation. PMID:21568390

  4. Time-fixed rendezvous by impulse factoring with an intermediate timing constraint. [for transfer orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Kibler, J. F.; Young, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is presented for factoring a two-impulse orbital transfer into a three- or four-impulse transfer which solves the rendezvous problem and satisfies an intermediate timing constraint. Both the time of rendezvous and the intermediate time of a alinement are formulated as any element of a finite sequence of times. These times are integer multiples of a constant plus an additive constant. The rendezvous condition is an equality constraint, whereas the intermediate alinement is an inequality constraint. The two timing constraints are satisfied by factoring the impulses into collinear parts that vectorially sum to the original impulse and by varying the resultant period differences and the number of revolutions in each orbit. Five different types of solutions arise by considering factoring either or both of the two impulses into two or three parts with a limit for four total impulses. The impulse-factoring technique may be applied to any two-impulse transfer which has distinct orbital periods.

  5. Particle swarm optimization applied to impulsive orbital transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontani, Mauro; Conway, Bruce A.

    2012-05-01

    The particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique is a population-based stochastic method developed in recent years and successfully applied in several fields of research. It mimics the unpredictable motion of bird flocks while searching for food, with the intent of determining the optimal values of the unknown parameters of the problem under consideration. At the end of the process, the best particle (i.e. the best solution with reference to the objective function) is expected to contain the globally optimal values of the unknown parameters. The central idea underlying the method is contained in the formula for velocity updating. This formula includes three terms with stochastic weights. This research applies the particle swarm optimization algorithm to the problem of optimizing impulsive orbital transfers. More specifically, the following problems are considered and solved with the PSO algorithm: (i) determination of the globally optimal two- and three-impulse transfer trajectories between two coplanar circular orbits; (ii) determination of the optimal transfer between two coplanar, elliptic orbits with arbitrary orientation; (iii) determination of the optimal two-impulse transfer between two circular, non-coplanar orbits; (iv) determination of the globally optimal two-impulse transfer between two non-coplanar elliptic orbits. Despite its intuitiveness and simplicity, the particle swarm optimization method proves to be capable of effectively solving the orbital transfer problems of interest with great numerical accuracy.

  6. Relationships among Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Sex, and Music Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study is an investigation of relationships among impulsiveness, locus of control, sex, observed practice behaviors, practice effectiveness, and self-reported practice habits in a sample of 40 college brass players. Practice effectiveness was defined by the amount of change in pretest and posttest performance achievement scores over one…

  7. Method for measuring brash ice thickness with impulse radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinson, C. R.; Dean, A. M., Jr.

    1981-06-01

    A subsurface impulse radar system on board a cutter was used to measure brash ice thickness in the Great Lakes. Manual ice thickness measurements were made in the test area to calibrate the radar data and to determine radar range settings. Radar collected data were recorded on magnetic tape and later played back to a graphic recorder for interpretation.

  8. Bender Gestalt Signs as Indicants of Conceptual Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannigan, Gary G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Sixty children were individually administered the Matching Familiar Figures Test and the Bender Gestalt Test. A significant relationship was found between errors on the Bender Gestalt Test and impulsivity. Specifically, increased or decreased loops, change in angulation, loops for circles, and circles for dots or dots for circles were all…

  9. Vestibulo-ocular reflex and the head impulse test.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Eliana T; Maranhão-Filho, Péricles

    2012-12-01

    The authors highlights the importance of the vestibulo-ocular reflex examination through the head impulse test as a diagnostic method for vestibular dysfunction as well as, and primarily, a bedside semiotic resource capable of differentiating between acute peripheral vestibulopathy and a cerebellar or brainstem infarction in emergency rooms.

  10. The evolutionary development of high specific impulse electric thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Myers, Roger M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric propulsion flight and technology demonstrations conducted primarily by Europe, Japan, China, the U.S., and the USSR are reviewed. Evolutionary mission applications for high specific impulse electric thruster systems are discussed, and the status of arcjet, ion, and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters and associated power processor technologies are summarized.

  11. Developmental role of acetylcholinesterase in impulse control in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Matthew O.; Brock, Alistair J.; Sudwarts, Ari; Teh, Muy-Teck; Combe, Fraser J.; Brennan, Caroline H.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and molecular processes that mediate individual variability in impulsivity, a key behavioral component of many neuropsychiatric disorders, are poorly understood. Zebrafish heterozygous for a nonsense mutation in ache (achesb55/+) showed lower levels of impulsivity in a 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) than wild type and ache+∕+. Assessment of expression of cholinergic (nAChR), serotonergic (5-HT), and dopamine (DR) receptor mRNA in both adult and larval (9 dpf) achesb55/+ revealed significant downregulation of chrna2, chrna5, and drd2 mRNA in achesb55/+ larvae, but no differences in adults. Acute exposure to cholinergic agonist/antagonists had no effect on impulsivity, supporting the hypothesis that behavioral effects observed in adults were due to lasting impact of developmental alterations in cholinergic and dopaminergic signaling. This shows the cross-species role of cholinergic signaling during brain development in impulsivity, and suggests zebrafish may be a useful model for the role of cholinergic pathways as a target for therapeutic advances in addiction medicine. PMID:26528153

  12. Understanding Computation of Impulse Response in Microwave Software Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potrebic, Milka M.; Tosic, Dejan V.; Pejovic, Predrag V.

    2010-01-01

    In modern microwave engineering curricula, the introduction of the many new topics in microwave industrial development, or of software tools for design and simulation, sometimes results in students having an inadequate understanding of the fundamental theory. The terminology for and the explanation of algorithms for calculating impulse response in…

  13. The Relationship between Impulsivity and Eating Behavior in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Allen C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Children (grades 3-5) were given the Matching Familiar Figures (MFF) test, rated on the Behavioral Rating Scale of Self Control, and observed while eating. Behavioral ratings were related to one aspect of obese eating style, with impulsive children exhibiting fewer interruptive behaviors while eating. MFF results did not correlate with eating…

  14. Neural response to reward anticipation is modulated by Gray's impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Dresler, Thomas; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Plichta, Michael M; Heinzel, Sebastian; Polak, Thomas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Breuer, Felix; Jakob, Peter M; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2009-07-15

    According to the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), Gray's dimension of impulsivity, reflecting human trait reward sensitivity, determines the extent to which stimuli activate the Behavioural Approach System (BAS). The potential neural underpinnings of the BAS, however, remain poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the association between Gray's impulsivity as defined by the RST and event-related fMRI BOLD-response to anticipation of reward in twenty healthy human subjects in brain regions previously associated with reward processing. Anticipation of reward during a Monetary Incentive Delay Task elicited activation in key components of the human reward circuitry such as the ventral striatum, the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex. Interindividual differences in Gray's impulsivity accounted for a significant amount of variance of the reward-related BOLD-response in the ventral striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex. Specifically, higher trait reward sensitivity was associated with increased activation in response to cues indicating potential reward. Extending previous evidence, here we show that variance in functional brain activation during anticipation of reward is attributed to interindividual differences regarding Gray's dimension of impulsivity. Thus, trait reward sensitivity contributes to the modulation of responsiveness in major components of the human reward system which thereby display a core property of the BAS. Generally, fostering our understanding of the neural underpinnings of the association of reward-related interindividual differences in affective traits might aid researchers in quest for custom-tailored treatments of psychiatric disorders, further disentangling the complex relationship between personality traits, emotion, and health.

  15. Effects of mood state on impulsivity in pathological buying.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, Jennifer; Darancó, Stefaniá; Moshagen, Morten

    2016-10-30

    Pathological buying is characterized by irrepressible buying behaviour and its negative consequences. A possible mechanism contributing to its development and maintenance is that buying episodes act as a maladaptive strategy to cope with negative emotions. Accordingly, pathological buying has been repeatedly associated with impulsivity, in particular with the tendency to experience strong reactions under negative affect. Relying on an experimental mood induction procedure, the present study tested in a sample of 100 individuals (a) whether individuals with pathological buying symptoms respond more impulsively in the Go/No-Go Task (as a measure of the behavioural inhibition aspect of impulsivity) and (b) whether this association is more pronounced in a negative mood. While controlling for comorbidities, the results show that pathological buying is associated with faster responses and a larger number of commission errors. Moreover, a significant interaction indicated that the association between pathological buying and performance the Go/No-Go Task was stronger in the negative mood condition. The present study thus shows that pathological buying is associated with deficits in the behavioural inhibition component of impulsivity. These deficits are most pronounced when mood is negative; in turn, this provides an explanation for the occurrence of excessive buying episodes following negative affect. PMID:27521976

  16. Chaotifying delayed recurrent neural networks via impulsive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şaylı, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Enes

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, chaotification of delayed recurrent neural networks via chaotically changing moments of impulsive actions is considered. Sufficient conditions for the presence of Li-Yorke chaos with its ingredients proximality, frequent separation, and existence of infinitely many periodic solutions are theoretically proved. Finally, effectiveness of our theoretical results is illustrated by an example with numerical simulations.

  17. Effectiveness of earplugs in high-intensity impulse noise.

    PubMed

    Dancer, A; Grateau, P; Cabanis, A; Barnabé, G; Cagnin, G; Vaillant, T; Lafont, D

    1992-03-01

    The efficiency of different types of earplugs was assessed by means of Békésy audiometry following the exposure of 42 human subjects to weapon impulses. The peak pressure of the impulses ranged from 2.3-27.8 kPa (from 161 to 183-dB peak SPL) and the A-weighted equivalent level (over 8 h) of each exposure ranged from 100-114 dB. All subjects wore earplugs fitted by an experienced individual. The devices tested included one brand of conventional foam earplugs and a number of different models of perforated earplugs, one type of which had been previously shown to provide nonlinear attenuation. Perforated earplugs were tested because they provide better speech communication than conventional passive earplugs, and in the nonlinear case also afford attenuation that increases with the peak pressure of the impulses. The temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) observed in these experiments were very small and indicated no significant hazard for hearing. Well-fitted perforated earplugs seem to be able to protect the ear from infrequent exposures to the high-level impulses produced by small and large weapons while allowing good speech communication, and without impairing the operational capacity of soldiers who must remain aware of their acoustic environment.

  18. Impulsivity moderates the association between racial discrimination and alcohol problems.

    PubMed

    Latzman, Robert D; Chan, Wing Yi; Shishido, Yuri

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol use among university students is a serious public health concern, particularly among minority students who may use alcohol to cope with experiences of racial discrimination. Although the impact of racial discrimination on alcohol use has been well-established, individual differences in factors that may act to either attenuate or exacerbate the negative effects of racial discrimination are largely unknown. One potentially fruitful individual differences trait that has repeatedly been found to predict alcohol problems is the multidimensional personality trait of impulsivity. Nonetheless, the ways in which various aspects of impulsivity interact with racial discrimination is yet unknown. The current study, therefore, examined the joint and interactive contribution of racial discrimination and impulsivity in the prediction of alcohol consumption among racial minority university students. Participants included 336 Black/African-American and Asian/Asian-American university students. Results revealed both racial discrimination and impulsivity to be significantly associated with alcohol problems. Further, individuals' responses to racial discrimination were not uniform. Specifically, the association between racial discrimination and alcohol problems was moderated by lack of Premeditation; racial discrimination was most strongly predictive of alcohol problems for those who reported low level of premeditation. Findings from the present study highlight the importance of investigating risk factors for alcohol problems across multiple levels of the ecology as individual personality traits appear to relate to how one might respond to the experience of racial discrimination.

  19. Motivational Control of Impulsive Behavior Interacts with Choice Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanno, Takayuki; Kurashima, Ryo; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Impulsive behavior has been investigated through choice between a smaller/immediate reinforcer and a larger/delayed reinforcer, or through performance on a differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) schedule. In the present study, we investigated a methodological divergence between these two procedures: in the former procedure, delay is a…

  20. Social influences of competition on impulsive choices in domestic chicks.

    PubMed

    Amita, Hidetoshi; Kawamori, Ai; Matsushima, Toshiya

    2010-04-23

    Social factors involved in the control of impulsiveness were examined in domestic chicks. In binary choices between a large/long-delay option (LL) and a small/short-delay alternative (SS), chicks that had been competitively trained in groups of three individuals showed fewer choices of LL than did those trained in isolation (experiment 1), suggesting that competition causes impulsive choice. In experiment 2, in order to identify the critical factor involved, we tested the effects of perceived competition (coincident feeding without interruption) and scrounging (gaining food without pecking bead) separately. To examine the effects of risk/noise that individual chicks experienced in competition, the food amount varied randomly in trials according to a binomial distribution around the expected mean. Perceived competition primarily contributed to the influence on the impulsive choice, whereas the contribution of scrounging was weaker. Collection risk did not explain the social influences since the perceived competition was not accompanied by actual interruption of the delayed food reward. The risk owing to variable food per se did not cause impulsive choices. Coincident foraging during competition is thought to play a critical role.