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Sample records for address potential pitfalls

  1. Potential Pitfalls in microRNA Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Pauline; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally influence a wide range of cellular processes such as the host response to viral infection, innate immunity, cell cycle progression, migration and apoptosis through the inhibition of target mRNA translation. Due to the growing number of microRNAs and identification of their functional roles, miRNA profiling of many different sample types has become more expansive, especially with relevance to disease signatures. Here, we address some of the advantages and potential pitfalls of the currently available methods for miRNA expression profiling. Some of the topics discussed include isomiRNAs, comparison of different profiling platforms, normalization strategies and issues with regard to sample preparation and experimental analyses. PMID:22566380

  2. Pitfalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triffet, Terry

    1990-01-01

    Though potentially of great benefit to the nation, the experience of the workshop participants and their discussions with Sea Grant and Land Grant officials make it clear that the Space Grant Program must avoid certain pitfalls of the past and present if it is to be successful. The most important of these are listed and briefly discussed.

  3. Lung cancer cytology: potential pitfalls and mimics - a review

    PubMed Central

    Idowu, Michael O; Powers, Celeste N

    2010-01-01

    Cytology is increasingly being used in the evaluation of lung lesions. There are several potential pitfalls and mimics encountered in the evaluation of respiratory cytology specimens, making interpretation of respiratory cytology challenging. Familiarity with the mimics and the pitfalls is essential in avoiding a misdiagnosis because a false positive or false negative diagnosis may have significant management implications. This article focuses on the main classification of primary lung carcinoma - small cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma - with potential mimics discussed under each tumor category. We have attempted to separate pitfalls from common potential mimics and have suggested general rules when such pitfalls are encountered. PMID:20490328

  4. CD-ROM: Potential and Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreiss, L. Jack; Bashir, Shahzad

    1990-01-01

    Examines issues surrounding CD-ROM as an organizational information management tool: (1) the CD-ROM market; (2) pitfalls, including compatibility, effect on existing information systems, fear of obsolescence, protection of sensitive information, and lack of successful role models; and (3) factors that will fuel growth, including greater…

  5. YouTube: Educational Potentials and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Troy; Cuthrell, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    The instructional potential of video technology in the classroom is promising, especially in light of the 21st Century Learning Framework (Siegle, 2009). Studies show positive gains in student outcomes as a result of the integration of video technology in instruction. This article explores potential uses of YouTube as an instructional aid in…

  6. Imaging of facial nerve schwannomas: diagnostic pearls and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Mundada, Pravin; Purohit, Bela Satish; Kumar, Tahira Sultana; Tan, Tiong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are uncommon in the facial nerve and account for less than 1% of tumors of temporal bone. They can involve one or more than one segment of the facial nerve. The clinical presentations and the imaging appearances of facial nerve schwannomas are influenced by the topographical anatomy of the facial nerve and vary according to the segment(s) they involve. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging features of facial nerve schwannomas according to their various anatomical locations and also reviews the pertinent differential diagnoses and potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26712680

  7. Potential pitfalls of strain rate imaging: angle dependency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, P. L.; Greenberg, N. L.; Drinko, J.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Strain Rate Imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic technique that allows for the real-time determination of myocardial SR, which may be used for the early and accurate detection of coronary artery disease. We sought to study whether SR is affected by scan line alignment in a computer simulation and an in vivo experiment. Through the computer simulation and the in vivo experiment we generated and validated safe scanning sectors within the ultrasound scan sector and showed that while SRI will be an extremely valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease there are potential pitfalls for the unwary clinician. Only after accounting for these affects due to angle dependency, can clinicians utilize SRI's potential as a valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease.

  8. Pitfalls and Potentials of Crowd Science: a Meta-Analysis of Contextual Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klippel, A.; Sparks, K.; Wallgrün, J. O.

    2015-08-01

    Crowd science is becoming an integral part of research in many disciplines. The research discussed in this paper lies at the intersection of spatial and behavioral sciences, two of the greatest beneficiaries of crowd science. As a young methodological development, crowd science needs attention from the perspective of a rigorous evaluation of the data collected to explore potentials as well as limitations (pitfalls). Our research has addressed a variety of contextual effects on the validity of crowdsourced data such as cultural, linguistic, regional, as well as methodological differences that we will discuss here in light of semantics.

  9. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Potential and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation. Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical value of this technology is unknown. In this paper, I review the potential benefits and pitfalls associated with dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization in preclinical research and its translation to renal patients. PMID:26973539

  10. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Potential and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation. Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical value of this technology is unknown. In this paper, I review the potential benefits and pitfalls associated with dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization in preclinical research and its translation to renal patients. PMID:26973539

  11. Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: Promise and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihyoun; Chatterjee, Dev Kumar; Lee, Min Hyuk; Krishnan, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles’ potential clinical applications. PMID:24556077

  12. Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: promise and potential pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyoun; Chatterjee, Dev Kumar; Lee, Min Hyuk; Krishnan, Sunil

    2014-05-28

    Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles' potential clinical applications. PMID:24556077

  13. Cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma: a neoplasm with potential pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Narciss

    2009-03-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare neoplasm. Cutaneous AS is the most common form of AS. The epithelioid variant of the disease, however, is a rare entity. This subset can histologically mimic non-vascular neoplasms and impose serious challenges in reaching the correct diagnosis. We present five patients with cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma (EAS); in none, the clinical diagnosis included a vascular lesion. Three patients had history of breast conservation surgery with/without radiation therapy. Other patients had no previous radiation, and there was no lymphedema in any of the cases. The histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens by hematoxylin and eosin method was not suggestive of a malignant vascular neoplasm initially and the differential diagnoses included carcinoma, malignant melanoma and atypical lymphoid infiltrate. Only after performing immunohistochemical studies that included vascular markers, a definitive diagnosis was possible. Some cases showed unusual histopathological features. Cutaneous EAS is a rare variant of cutaneous AS that can mimic a variety of more common, non-vascular neoplasms, creating a major pitfall in the diagnosis. A careful and thorough histopathological examination and a high index of suspicion, along with appropriate immunohistochemical evaluation, can help reach a correct diagnosis and provide optimal patient care. PMID:19220634

  14. Venous Intravasation: A Potential Pitfall of Confirmatory Hysterosalpingogram Following Essure Hysteroscopic Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Michael C.; Shim, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Indications for hysterosalpingography (HSG) include evaluation of infertility, spontaneous abortions, postoperative evaluation of tubal ligation, pre-myomectomy evaluation, and more recently, evaluation of tubal occlusion after placement of the Essure Permanent Birth Control System. Here we report a case of venous intravasation during a routine post-Essure HSG, a phenomenon in which contrast transits from the uterine cavity, through the myometrium, and directly into draining pelvic veins. Venous intravasation is a potential pitfall in interpretation of HSGs. PMID:23378884

  15. Clinical Observations About the Potential Benefits and Pitfalls of Between-Session Contacts with Borderline Patients.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) has a reputation for being a challenging disorder to treat due to the nature of the illness. With the development of evidence-based treatments, therapists are becoming more skilled at successfully helping this cohort of patients. A common factor associated with all validated treatments for BPD is the active involvement of therapists. For example, DBT is one treatment where therapists are expected to be available to patients for coaching outside of sessions. However, understanding the benefits and pitfalls associated with therapists' accessibility in between sessions is relevant to any treatment with intersession contact. In this article, three benefits of intersession contact are described: to generalize the use of skills, to improve understanding of the patient's needs, and to facilitate an alliance. This article also addresses the pitfalls of therapists being so accessible to patients. Both the benefits and pitfalls of intersession contact are illustrated using case vignettes. Assessing the function served by a patient's contact in between sessions is an important way to determine whether such contact is a productive part of treatment. Recommendations are provided to avoid detrimental outcomes for both the therapist (therapist burnout) and the patient. PMID:27603746

  16. Potential pitfalls of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rongxue; Lin, Guigao; Li, Jinming

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a novel technique named the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas)9 system has been rapidly developed. This genome editing tool has improved our ability tremendously with respect to exploring the pathogenesis of diseases and correcting disease mutations, as well as phenotypes. With a short guide RNA, Cas9 can be precisely directed to target sites, and functions as an endonuclease to efficiently produce breaks in DNA double strands. Over the past 30 years, CRISPR has evolved from the 'curious sequences of unknown biological function' into a promising genome editing tool. As a result of the incessant development in the CRISPR/Cas9 system, Cas9 co-expressed with custom guide RNAs has been successfully used in a variety of cells and organisms. This genome editing technology can also be applied to synthetic biology, functional genomic screening, transcriptional modulation and gene therapy. However, although CRISPR/Cas9 has a broad range of action in science, there are several aspects that affect its efficiency and specificity, including Cas9 activity, target site selection and short guide RNA design, delivery methods, off-target effects and the incidence of homology-directed repair. In the present review, we highlight the factors that affect the utilization of CRISPR/Cas9, as well as possible strategies for handling any problems. Addressing these issues will allow us to take better advantage of this technique. In addition, we also review the history and rapid development of the CRISPR/Cas system from the time of its initial discovery in 2012. PMID:26535798

  17. Automation of soil flux chamber measurements: potentials and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-03-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the wider application of automated chambers for soil greenhouse gas (GHG) flux measurements, several of them commercially available. However, few studies addressed the challenges associated with operating these systems. In this contribution we compared two commercial soil GHG chamber systems - the LI-8100A Automated Soil CO2 Flux System and the greenhouse gas monitoring system AGPS. From April until August 2014, the two systems monitored in parallel soil respiration (SR) fluxes at a recently harvested poplar (Populus) plantation, which provided a bare field situation directly after the harvest as well as a closed canopy later on. For the bare field situation (15 April-30 June 2014), the cumulated average SR obtained from the unfiltered data sets of the LI-8100A and the AGPS were 520 and 433 g CO2 m-2 respectively. For the closed canopy phase (1 July-31 August 2014), which was characterized by a higher soil moisture content, the cumulated average SR estimates were not significantly different with 507 and 501 g CO2 m-2 for the AGPS and the LI-8100A respectively. Flux quality control and filtering did not significantly alter the results obtained by the LI-8100A, whereas the AGPS SR estimates were reduced by at least 20 %. The main reasons for the observed differences in the performance of the two systems were (i) a lower data coverage provided by the AGPS due to technical problems; (ii) incomplete headspace mixing in the AGPS chambers; (iii) lateral soil CO2 diffusion below the collars during AGPS chamber measurements; and (iv) a possible overestimation of nighttime SR fluxes by the LI-8100A. Additionally, increased root growth was observed within the LI-8100A collars but not within the AGPS collars, which might have also contributed to the observed differences. In contrast to the LI-8100A, the AGPS had the gas sample inlets installed inside the collars and not the chambers. This unique design feature enabled for the first

  18. Automation of soil flux chamber measurements: potentials and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, C.-M.; Kammann, C.; Ceulemans, R.

    2015-09-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the wider application of automated chambers for soil greenhouse gas (GHG) flux measurements, several of them commercially available. However, only few studies addressed the difficulties and challenges associated with operating these systems. In this contribution we compared two commercial soil GHG chamber systems-the LI-8100A Automated Soil CO2 Flux System and the Greenhouse Gas Monitoring System AGPS. From April 2014 until August 2014, the two systems monitored in parallel soil respiration (SR) fluxes at a recently harvested poplar plantation, which provided a bare field situation directly after the harvest as well as a closed canopy later on. For the bare field situation (15 April-30 June 2014), the cumulated average SR obtained from the unfiltered datasets of the LI-8100A and the AGPS were 520 and 433 g CO2 m-2, respectively. For the closed canopy phase (01 July-31 August 2014), which was characterized by a higher soil moisture content, the cumulated average SR estimates were not significantly different with 507 and 501 g CO2 m-2 for the AGPS and the LI-8100A, respectively. Flux quality control and filtering did not significantly alter the results obtained by the LI-8100A, whereas the AGPS SR estimates were reduced by at least 20 %. The main reasons for the observed differences in the performance of the two systems were (i) a lower data coverage provided by the AGPS due to technical problems; (ii) incomplete headspace mixing in the AGPS chambers; (iii) lateral soil CO2 diffusion below the collars during AGPS chamber measurements; (iv) increased root growth within the LI-8100A collars; and (v) a possible overestimation of nighttime SR fluxes by the LI-8100A. In contrast to the LI-8100A, the AGPS had the gas sample inlets installed inside the collars and not the chambers. This unique design feature enabled for the first time the detection of disturbed chamber measurements during nights with a stratified atmosphere

  19. Thermography Applied to Interfacial Phenomena, Potentials and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, M.; Sefiane, K.

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a non-intrusive method for temperature measurement. Its ability to produce two-dimensional temperature images makes it a powerful tool for investigating systems exhibiting spatial variation of temperature. IR temperature measurements are almost always surface measurements; the technique has therefore found use in obtaining interfacial temperatures, primarily in heat and mass transfer investigations. The reasons for the technique's limited uptake likely stems from the requirement of accurate material emissivity data and the large number of potential sources of error. This chapter provides an overview of the underlying theory of radiative heat transfer. Key considerations and problems in the application of IR thermography are discussed with reference to some examples of recent successful applications.

  20. DNA barcoding in animal species: progress, potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Waugh, John

    2007-02-01

    Despite 250 years of work in systematics, the majority of species remains to be identified. Rising extinction rates and the need for increased biological monitoring lend urgency to this task. DNA sequencing, with key sequences serving as a "barcode", has therefore been proposed as a technology that might expedite species identification. In particular, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene has been employed as a possible DNA marker for species and a number of studies in a variety of taxa have accordingly been carried out to examine its efficacy. In general, these studies demonstrate that DNA barcoding resolves most species, although some taxa have proved intractable. In some studies, barcoding provided a means of highlighting potential cryptic, synonymous or extinct species as well as matching adults with immature specimens. Higher taxa, however, have not been resolved as accurately as species. Nonetheless, DNA barcoding appears to offer a means of identifying species and may become a standard tool. PMID:17226815

  1. Pharmacogenetics: progress, pitfalls and clinical potential for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Steve E; Hingorani, Aroon

    2006-02-01

    Much has been written about the potential of pharmacogenetic testing to inform therapy based on an individual's genetic makeup, and to decide the most effective choice of available drugs, or to avoid dangerous side effects. Currently, there is little hard data for either in the field of cardiovascular disease. The usual approach has been opportunistic use of drug trials in unrelated patients, and to look for differences in response or outcome by "candidate gene" genotype, for example genes coding for drug metabolising enzymes (activators and metabolisers), and enzymes and receptors involved in lipid metabolism, adrenergic response, etc. As with all association studies, initially promising results have often failed the test of replication in larger studies, and the relationship between the CETP Taq-I variant and response to statins has now been disproved. The strongest data to date is the report [Chasman, D.I., Posada, D., Subrahmanyan, L., Cook, N.R., Stanton Jr., V.P., Ridker, P.M., 2004. Pharmacogenetic study of statin therapy and cholesterol reduction. J. Am. Med. Assoc. 291, 2821-2827] of a poorer cholesterol-lowering response to Pravastatin in the 7% of patients carrying a certain haplotype of the HMG CoA reductase gene (14% fall versus 19%), but if this is overcome simply by a higher dose, it is of little clinical relevance. Currently, the best example of avoiding side effects is determining genotype at the CYP2C9 locus with respect of warfarin treatment, since carriers for functional variants (>20% of the population) require lower doses for optimal anticoagulation, and homozygotes, although rare, may well experience serious bleeding if given a usual dose. The full potential of this field will only be realised with much further work. PMID:16359930

  2. Measuring Hospital-Wide Mortality-Pitfalls and Potential.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Simon J; Goldmann, Don A; Perla, Rocco J; Parry, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Risk-adjusted hospital-wide mortality has been proposed as a key indicator of system-level quality. Several risk-adjusted measures are available, and one-the hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) - is publicly reported in a number of countries, but not in the United States. This paper reviews potential uses of such measures. We conclude that available methods are not suitable for interhospital comparisons or rankings and should not be used for pay-for-performance or value-based purchasing/payment. Hospital-wide mortality is a relatively imprecise, crude measure of quality, but disaggregation into condition- and service-line-specific mortality can facilitate targeted improvement efforts. If tracked over time, both observed and expected mortality rates should be monitored to ensure that apparent improvement is not due to increasing expected mortality, which could reflect changes in case mix or coding. Risk-adjusted mortality can be used as an initial signal that a hospital's mortality rate is significantly higher than statistically expected, prompting further inquiry. PMID:25103495

  3. Pharmacogenetics in drug regulation: promise, potential and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic factors operate at pharmacokinetic as well as pharmacodynamic levels—the two components of the dose–response curve of a drug. Polymorphisms in drug metabolizing enzymes, transporters and/or pharmacological targets of drugs may profoundly influence the dose–response relationship between individuals. For some drugs, although retrospective data from case studies suggests that these polymorphisms are frequently associated with adverse drug reactions or failure of efficacy, the clinical utility of such data remains unproven. There is, therefore, an urgent need for prospective data to determine whether pre-treatment genotyping can improve therapy. Various regulatory guidelines already recommend exploration of the role of genetic factors when investigating a drug for its pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, dose–response relationship and drug interaction potential. Arising from the global heterogeneity in the frequency of variant alleles, regulatory guidelines also require the sponsors to provide additional information, usually pharmacogenetic bridging data, to determine whether data from one ethnic population can be extrapolated to another. At present, sponsors explore pharmacogenetic influences in early clinical pharmacokinetic studies but rarely do they carry the findings forward when designing dose–response studies or pivotal studies. When appropriate, regulatory authorities include genotype-specific recommendations in the prescribing information. Sometimes, this may include the need to adjust a dose in some genotypes under specific circumstances. Detailed references to pharmacogenetics in prescribing information and pharmacogenetically based prescribing in routine therapeutics will require robust prospective data from well-designed studies. With greater integration of pharmacogenetics in drug development, regulatory authorities expect to receive more detailed genetic data. This is likely to complicate the drug evaluation process as well as

  4. Potential Pitfalls Related to Space-Based Lidar Remote Sensing of the Earth with an Emphasis on Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Spiers, Gary D.; Frehlich, Rod G.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A collection of issues is discussed that are potential pitfalls, if handled incorrectly, for earth-orbiting lidar remote sensing instruments. These issues arise due to the long target ranges, high lidar-to-target relative velocities, low signal levels, use of laser scanners, and other unique aspects of using lasers in earth orbit. Consequences of misunderstanding these topics range from minor inconvenience to improper calibration to total failure. We will focus on wind measurement using coherent detection Doppler lidar, but many of the potential pitfalls apply also to noncoherent lidar wind measurement, and to measurement of parameters other than wind. Each area will be identified as to its applicability.

  5. Uterine doughnut in early proliferating phase: potential pitfall in gastrointestinal bleeding studies.

    PubMed

    Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Ilgan, Seyfettin; Arslan, Nuri; Ozguven, Mehmet

    2003-12-01

    A 41-year-old woman with rectal bleeding was referred to our department for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding study. She was in early post-menstrual period and had stable vital signs. A GI bleeding study with Tc-99m SC revealed uterine blush in the pelvis. The shape of activity and quick fading excluded a GI bleeding. To rule out an intermittent bleeding, patient underwent a second bleeding study with Tc-99m RBC. Serial images showed uterine "doughnut" in the pelvis. The activity neither changed in shape nor showed distal movement with time excluding a GI hemorrhage. Uterus in early proliferating phase could be a potential pitfall in GI bleeding studies. PMID:14971611

  6. Technical hints and potential pitfalls in modified radical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leyre; Sancho, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Modified radical neck dissection (MRND) is often performed in conjunction with total thyroidectomy for the management of thyroid cancer. Prevention of postoperative sequelae after MRND is closely dependent on the avoidance of technical mistakes that may lead to significant complications and long-term morbidity. A thorough technical discussion with emphasis on potential pitfalls is made of the most relevant steps of MRND using the extrafascial approach: fascial dissection, approach to the accessory nerve, posterior limits, upper internal jugular vein (IJV), transverse cervical vessels, thoracic duct and compartment V dissection. Some anatomical hints are emphasized to help the novice surgeon to develop a refined surgical technique, the key to an uneventful postoperative course. PMID:25083480

  7. The potential for entomophagy to address undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Luc; Nadeau, Isaac; Franklin, Frank; Dunkel, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The use of insects as food for humans has the potential to substantially reduce undernutrition worldwide. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 805 million people are undernourished, with a total food energy deficit of 67.6 billion kcal/day (84 kcal/day/person). Calculations in this article suggest that this deficit could theoretically be reduced or eliminated through edible insect rearing, utilizing organic side streams as feed, on 15,586 to 92,976 ha. PMID:25401273

  8. Satellite Remote Sensing of Particulate Matter Air Quality: Progress, Potential and Pitfalls (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite Remote Sensing of Particulate Matter Air Quality: Progress, Potential and Pitfalls Abstract. Fine or respirable particles with particle aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) affect visibility, change cloud properties, reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation, affect human health and are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. These particles are injected into the atmosphere either as primary emissions or form into the atmosphere by gas to particle conversion. There are various sources of PM2.5 including emissions from automobiles, industrial exhaust, and agricultural fires. In 2006, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) made the standards stringent by changing the 24-hr averaged PM2.5 mass values from 65µgm-3 to 35µgm-3. This was primarily based on epidemiological studies that showed the long term health benefits of making the PM2.5 standards stringent. Typically PM2.5 mass concentration is measured from surface monitors and in the United States there are nearly 1000 such filter based daily and 600 contiguous stations managed by federal, state, local, and tribal agencies. Worldwide, there are few PM2.5 ground monitors since they are expensive to purchase, maintain and operate. Satellite remote sensing therefore provides a viable method for monitoring PM2.5 from space. Although, there are several hundred satellites currently in orbit and not all of them are suited for PM2.5 air quality assessments. Typically multi-spectral reflected solar radiation measurements from space-borne sensors are converted to aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a measure of the column (surface to top of atmosphere) integrated extinction (absorption plus scattering). This column AOD (usually at 550 nm) is often converted to PM2.5 mass near the ground using various techniques. In this presentation we discuss the progress over the last decade on assessing PM2.5 from satellites; outline the potential and discuss the various pitfalls that one encounters. We

  9. Potential Pitfalls in Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement for Bleeding Rectal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Sakib, S M Nazmus; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Jawed, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    In patients with portal hypertension, bleeding from rectal varices is rare. However, it can be life-threatening. We report a case of massive bleeding from large rectal varices in a 59-year-old man with alcoholic cirrhosis. Emergent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement was performed following failed local endoscopic therapy. Despite normalization of the portosystemic pressure gradient, the patient had another episode of massive bleeding on the following day. Embolization of the rectal varices via TIPS successfully stopped the bleeding. After the procedure, rapid decompensation of the cirrhosis led to severe encephalopathy, and death was observed. Although TIPSs have been reported to be useful in controlling bleeding from rectal varices, our case illustrates the potential pitfalls in using this technique in the treatment of rectal variceal bleeding. TIPSs may not be always successful in controlling massive bleeding from large rectal varices, even after normalization of portal hypertension. TIPSs can also be associated with life-threatening complications that may lead to early mortality. PMID:26464566

  10. Qualifying stem cell sources: how to overcome potential pitfalls in regenerative medicine?

    PubMed

    Reinke, Simon; Dienelt, Anke; Blankenstein, Antje; Duda, Georg N; Geissler, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to replace lost cells and to restore damaged tissues and organs by either tissue-engineering approaches or stimulation of endogenous processes. Due to their biological properties, stem cells promise to be an effective source for such strategies. Especially adult multipotent stem cells (ASCs) are believed to be applicable in a broad range of therapies for the treatment of multifactorial diseases or age-related degeneration, although the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying their regenerative function are often hardly described. Moreover, in some demanding clinical situations their efficiency remains limited. Thus, a basic understanding of ASCs regenerative function, their complex interplay with their microenvironment and how compromising conditions interfere with their efficiency is mandatory for any regenerative strategy. Concerning this matter, the impact of patient-specific constraints are often underestimated in research projects and their influence on the study results disregarded. Thus, researchers are urgently depending on well-characterized tissue samples or cells that are connected with corresponding donor information, such as secondary diseases, medication. Here, we outline principle pitfalls during experimental studies using human samples, and describe a potential strategy to overcome these challenges by establishing a core unit for cell and tissue harvesting. This facility aims to bridge the gap between clinic and research laboratories by the provision of a direct link to the clinical operating theatres. Such a strategy clearly supports basic and clinical research in the conduct of their studies and supplies highly characterized human samples together with the corresponding donor information. PMID:24919850

  11. Iodine-131 uptake in inflammatory lung disease: a potential pitfall in treatment of thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschl, R.C.; Choy, D.H.; Gandevia, B.

    1988-05-01

    A mixed differentiated thyroid carcinoma was found in a small asymptomatic nodule in a 44-yr-old woman with recurrent chest infections and bronchiectasis. After total thyroidectomy and 162 mCi (6 GBq) radioiodine ablation there was uptake in the thyroid remnant and in both lungs, interpreted as lung metastases. In 2 years she received further three 162 mCi (6 GBq) doses of /sup 131/I, as scans showed very similar lung activity. Another scan, during thyroxin suppression, showed again activity in the lungs. A 47-yr-old male patient with similar respiratory disease and no history of thyroid disorder volunteered to undergo radioiodine scan while on triiodothyronine suppression. His scan, too, showed concentration in the lungs. The female patient died 7 years after the diagnosis of lung thyroid metastases was made. No metastasis was found at autopsy. Radioiodine lung uptake may occur in patients with chronic inflammatory lung disease, presenting a potential diagnostic pitfall in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

  12. Autoantibodies in a Three-Year-Old Girl with Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Jafarpour, Zahra; Babaei, Amir Hossein; Pourabbas, Bahman; Geramizadeh, Bita; Dashti, Anahita Sanaei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a life-threatening parasitic infection, is endemic in the Mediterranean region. Diagnosis of VL is based on epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory findings. However, sometimes, clinical features and laboratory findings overlap with those of autoimmune diseases. In some cases, autoantibodies are detected in patients with VL and this could be a potential diagnostic pitfall. In this study, we have reported on a three-year-old girl from a VL-endemic area in Iran, who presented with prolonged fever and splenomegaly. Bone marrow examination, serologic tests, and the molecular PCR assay were performed; however, results were inconclusive. The levels of anti-double stranded DNA, cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody, and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody were elevated and, at the end, splenic biopsy was performed. The splenic tissue PCR test detected the DNA of Leishmania infantum. The patient's condition improved with anti-Leishmania therapy, and the autoantibodies disappeared within the following four months. Clinical presentations and laboratory findings of VL and autoimmune diseases may overlap in some patients. PMID:27418985

  13. Autoantibodies in a Three-Year-Old Girl with Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Jafarpour, Zahra; Pourabbas, Bahman; Geramizadeh, Bita; Dashti, Anahita Sanaei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a life-threatening parasitic infection, is endemic in the Mediterranean region. Diagnosis of VL is based on epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory findings. However, sometimes, clinical features and laboratory findings overlap with those of autoimmune diseases. In some cases, autoantibodies are detected in patients with VL and this could be a potential diagnostic pitfall. In this study, we have reported on a three-year-old girl from a VL-endemic area in Iran, who presented with prolonged fever and splenomegaly. Bone marrow examination, serologic tests, and the molecular PCR assay were performed; however, results were inconclusive. The levels of anti-double stranded DNA, cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody, and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody were elevated and, at the end, splenic biopsy was performed. The splenic tissue PCR test detected the DNA of Leishmania infantum. The patient's condition improved with anti-Leishmania therapy, and the autoantibodies disappeared within the following four months. Clinical presentations and laboratory findings of VL and autoimmune diseases may overlap in some patients. PMID:27418985

  14. Toward improved model structures for analyzing priming: potential pitfalls of using bulk turnover time.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Katerina; Koven, Charles D; Riley, William J; Torn, Margaret S

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations result in increased plant carbon inputs to soil that can accelerate the decomposition of native soil organic matter, an effect known as priming. Consequently, it is important to understand and quantify the priming effect for future predictions of carbon-climate feedbacks. There are potential pitfalls, however, when representing this complex system with a simple, first-order model. Here, we show that a multi-pool soil carbon model can match the change in bulk turnover time calculated from overall respiration and carbon stocks (a one-pool approach) at elevated CO2 , without a change in decomposition rate constants of individual pools (i.e., without priming). Therefore, the priming effect cannot be quantified using a one-pool model alone, and even a two-pool model may be inadequate, depending on the effect size as well as the distribution of soil organic carbon and turnover times. In addition to standard measurements of carbon stocks and CO2 fluxes, we argue that quantifying the fate of new plant inputs requires isotopic tracers and microbial measurements. Our results offer insights into modeling and interpreting priming from observations. PMID:26182905

  15. Potential and pitfalls of eukaryotic metagenome skimming: a test case for lichens.

    PubMed

    Greshake, Bastian; Zehr, Simonida; Dal Grande, Francesco; Meiser, Anjuli; Schmitt, Imke; Ebersberger, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    Whole-genome shotgun sequencing of multispecies communities using only a single library layout is commonly used to assess taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial assemblages. Here, we investigate to what extent such metagenome skimming approaches are applicable for in-depth genomic characterizations of eukaryotic communities, for example lichens. We address how to best assemble a particular eukaryotic metagenome skimming data, what pitfalls can occur, and what genome quality can be expected from these data. To facilitate a project-specific benchmarking, we introduce the concept of twin sets, simulated data resembling the outcome of a particular metagenome sequencing study. We show that the quality of genome reconstructions depends essentially on assembler choice. Individual tools, including the metagenome assemblers Omega and MetaVelvet, are surprisingly sensitive to low and uneven coverages. In combination with the routine of assembly parameter choice to optimize the assembly N50 size, these tools can preclude an entire genome from the assembly. In contrast, MIRA, an all-purpose overlap assembler, and SPAdes, a multisized de Bruijn graph assembler, facilitate a comprehensive view on the individual genomes across a wide range of coverage ratios. Testing assemblers on a real-world metagenome skimming data from the lichen Lasallia pustulata demonstrates the applicability of twin sets for guiding method selection. Furthermore, it reveals that the assembly outcome for the photobiont Trebouxia sp. falls behind the a priori expectation given the simulations. Although the underlying reasons remain still unclear, this highlights that further studies on this organism require special attention during sequence data generation and downstream analysis. PMID:26345272

  16. Evaluating and interpreting cross-taxon congruence: Potential pitfalls and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioria, Margherita; Bacaro, Giovanni; Feehan, John

    2011-05-01

    Characterizing the relationship between different taxonomic groups is critical to identify potential surrogates for biodiversity. Previous studies have shown that cross-taxa relationships are generally weak and/or inconsistent. The difficulties in finding predictive patterns have often been attributed to the spatial and temporal scales of these studies and on the differences in the measure used to evaluate such relationships (species richness versus composition). However, the choice of the analytical approach used to evaluate cross-taxon congruence inevitably represents a major source of variation. Here, we described the use of a range of methods that can be used to comprehensively assess cross-taxa relationships. To do so, we used data for two taxonomic groups, wetland plants and water beetles, collected from 54 farmland ponds in Ireland. Specifically, we used the Pearson correlation and rarefaction curves to analyse patterns in species richness, while Mantel tests, Procrustes analysis, and co-correspondence analysis were used to evaluate congruence in species composition. We compared the results of these analyses and we described some of the potential pitfalls associated with the use of each of these statistical approaches. Cross-taxon congruence was moderate to strong, depending on the choice of the analytical approach, on the nature of the response variable, and on local and environmental conditions. Our findings indicate that multiple approaches and measures of community structure are required for a comprehensive assessment of cross-taxa relationships. In particular, we showed that selection of surrogate taxa in conservation planning should not be based on a single statistic expressing the degree of correlation in species richness or composition. Potential solutions to the analytical issues associated with the assessment of cross-taxon congruence are provided and the implications of our findings in the selection of surrogates for biodiversity are discussed.

  17. Total sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer – A case report featuring technical details and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Melich, George; Weber, Michael; Stein, Barry; Minutolo, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo O.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Total sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer is controversial. However, recent publications suggest encouraging outcomes with high sacral resections. We present the first case report describing technical aspects, potential pitfalls and treatment of complications associated with total sacrectomy performed as a treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. PRESENTATION OF CASE A fifty-three year old man was previously treated at another institution with a low anterior resection (LAR) followed by chemo-radiation and left liver tri-segmentectomy for metastatic rectal cancer. Three years following the LAR, the patient developed a recurrence at the site of colorectal anastomosis, manifesting clinically as a contained perforation, forming a recto-cutaneous fistula through the sacrum. Abdomino-perineal resection (APR) and complete sacrectomy were performed using an anterior–posterior approach with posterior spinal instrumented fusion and pelvic fixation using iliac crest bone graft. Left sided vertical rectus abdominis muscle flap and right sided gracilis muscle flap were used for hardware coverage and to fill the pelvic defect. One year after the resection, the patient remains disease free and has regained the ability to move his lower limbs against gravity. DISCUSSION The case described in this report features some formidable challenges due to the previous surgeries for metastatic disease, and the presence of a recto-sacral cutaneous fistula. An approach with careful surgical planning including considerationof peri-operative embolization is vital for a successful outcome of the operation. A high degree of suspicion for pseudo-aneurysms formation due infection or dislodgement of metallic coils is necessary in the postoperative phase. CONCLUSION Total sacrectomy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer with acceptable short-term outcomes is possible.A detailed explanation to the patient of the possible complications and expectations including the concept of a

  18. On the Hydrologic Adjustment of Climate-Model Projections: The Potential Pitfall of Potential Evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, Paul C.; Dunne, Krista A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologic models often are applied to adjust projections of hydroclimatic change that come from climate models. Such adjustment includes climate-bias correction, spatial refinement ("downscaling"), and consideration of the roles of hydrologic processes that were neglected in the climate model. Described herein is a quantitative analysis of the effects of hydrologic adjustment on the projections of runoff change associated with projected twenty-first-century climate change. In a case study including three climate models and 10 river basins in the contiguous United States, the authors find that relative (i.e., fractional or percentage) runoff change computed with hydrologic adjustment more often than not was less positive (or, equivalently, more negative) than what was projected by the climate models. The dominant contributor to this decrease in runoff was a ubiquitous change in runoff (median -11%) caused by the hydrologic model’s apparent amplification of the climate-model-implied growth in potential evapotranspiration. Analysis suggests that the hydrologic model, on the basis of the empirical, temperature-based modified Jensen–Haise formula, calculates a change in potential evapotranspiration that is typically 3 times the change implied by the climate models, which explicitly track surface energy budgets. In comparison with the amplification of potential evapotranspiration, central tendencies of other contributions from hydrologic adjustment (spatial refinement, climate-bias adjustment, and process refinement) were relatively small. The authors’ findings highlight the need for caution when projecting changes in potential evapotranspiration for use in hydrologic models or drought indices to evaluate climate-change impacts on water.

  19. On the hydrologic adjustment of climate-model projections: The potential pitfall of potential evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.; Dunne, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologic models often are applied to adjust projections of hydroclimatic change that come from climate models. Such adjustment includes climate-bias correction, spatial refinement ("downscaling"), and consideration of the roles of hydrologic processes that were neglected in the climate model. Described herein is a quantitative analysis of the effects of hydrologic adjustment on the projections of runoff change associated with projected twenty-first-century climate change. In a case study including three climate models and 10 river basins in the contiguous United States, the authors find that relative (i.e., fractional or percentage) runoff change computed with hydrologic adjustment more often than not was less positive (or, equivalently, more negative) than what was projected by the climate models. The dominant contributor to this decrease in runoff was a ubiquitous change in runoff (median 211%) caused by the hydrologic model's apparent amplification of the climate-model-implied growth in potential evapotranspiration. Analysis suggests that the hydrologic model, on the basis of the empirical, temperature-based modified Jensen-Haise formula, calculates a change in potential evapotranspiration that is typically 3 times the change implied by the climate models, which explicitly track surface energy budgets. In comparison with the amplification of potential evapotranspiration, central tendencies of other contributions from hydrologic adjustment (spatial refinement, climate-bias adjustment, and process refinement) were relatively small. The authors' findings highlight the need for caution when projecting changes in potential evapotranspiration for use in hydrologic models or drought indices to evaluate climatechange impacts on water. Copyright ?? 2011, Paper 15-001; 35,952 words, 3 Figures, 0 Animations, 1 Tables.

  20. Positive Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how Cahokia middle and high school students conduct inquiry-based science through a pitfall trap experiment. In a collaborative effort, students designed and conducted pitfall trap investigations that combined their interest in the natural world with their love of technology. The students set up their own experiments to…

  1. Visible and Invisible Trends in Black Men's Health: Pitfalls and Promises for Addressing Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Inequities in Health.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Keon L; Ray, Rashawn; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Shetty, Shivan; Baker, Elizabeth A; Elder, Keith; Griffith, Derek M

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been growing interest in improving black men's health and the health disparities affecting them. Yet, the health of black men consistently ranks lowest across nearly all groups in the United States. Evidence on the health and social causes of morbidity and mortality among black men has been narrowly concentrated on public health problems (e.g., violence, prostate cancer, and HIV/AIDS) and determinants of health (e.g., education and male gender socialization). This limited focus omits age-specific leading causes of death and other social determinants of health, such as discrimination, segregation, access to health care, employment, and income. This review discusses the leading causes of death for black men and the associated risk factors, as well as identifies gaps in the literature and presents a racialized and gendered framework to guide efforts to address the persistent inequities in health affecting black men. PMID:26989830

  2. Phosphodiesterase-4 modulation as a potential therapeutic for cognitive loss in pathological and non-pathological aging: possibilities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Rolf T; Zhang, Han-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a super family of 11 enzyme families responsible for the hydrolysis of the intracellular secondary messengers cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). PDE4, in particular, is highly expressed in brain regions involved with regulation of memory, anxiety, and depression, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens. Senescence has been shown to result in extreme dysregulation of the cAMP pathway in various brain regions. Thus, as a critical controller of intracellular cAMP levels, PDE4 may be a potential target for the treatment of senescence-related cognitive disorders, which could be pathological and/or non-pathological in origin. While there is great potential in the development of novel PDE4 inhibitors for treatment of senescent-cognition impairment, there are also currently many pitfalls that need to be overcome. PDE4 has four subfamilies (PDE4A, B, C, and D) that are differentially expressed throughout the brain and body, as well as at least 25 splice variants derived from alternative splicing and multiple promoter sites. PDE4 subtypes have been shown to have differential effects on behavior, and cAMP itself has also been shown to play a contrasting role in behavior in different brain regions. This review will focus on what is currently understood about PDE4 in aging, the potential for PDE4 modulation as a cognitive therapy, and current pitfalls and limitations that need to be overcome in the PDE4 field. Overall, furthering our understanding of this incredibly complex pathway may one day assist with the development of novel therapeutics for both pathological and non-pathological cognitive disorders associated with senescence. PMID:25159075

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in bipartite medial cuneiform – a potential pitfall in diagnosis of midfoot injuries: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Ilan; Dheer, Sachin; Zoga, Adam C; Raikin, Steven M; Morrison, William B

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The bipartite medial cuneiform is an uncommon developmental osseous variant in the midfoot. To our knowledge, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) characteristics of a non-symptomatic bipartite medial cuneiform have not been described in the orthopaedic literature. It is important for orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons, musculoskeletal radiologists, and for podiatrists to identify this osseous variant as it may be mistakenly diagnosed as a fracture or not recognized as a source of non-traumatic or traumatic foot pain, which may sometimes even require surgical treatment. Case presentations In this report, we describe the characteristics of three cases of bipartite medial cuneiform on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and contrast its appearance to that of a medial cuneiform fracture. Conclusion A bipartite medial cuneiform is a rare developmental anomaly of the midfoot and may be the source of midfoot pain. Knowledge about its characteristic appearance on magnetic resonance imaging is important because it is a potential pitfall in diagnosis of midfoot injuries. PMID:18700977

  4. Linear Augmentation for Stabilizing Stationary Solutions: Potential Pitfalls and Their Application

    PubMed Central

    Karnatak, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    Linear augmentation has recently been shown to be effective in targeting desired stationary solutions, suppressing bistablity, in regulating the dynamics of drive response systems and in controlling the dynamics of hidden attractors. The simplicity of the procedure is the main highlight of this scheme but questions related to its general applicability still need to be addressed. Focusing on the issue of targeting stationary solutions, this work demonstrates instances where the scheme fails to stabilize the required solutions and leads to other complicated dynamical scenarios. Examples from conservative as well as dissipative systems are presented in this regard and important applications in dissipative predator—prey systems are discussed, which include preventative measures to avoid potentially catastrophic dynamical transitions in these systems. PMID:26544879

  5. Potential and pitfalls in establishing the provenance of Earth-related samples in forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, Barry G; Kemp, Simon J; Hodgkinson, Emily H; Riding, James B; Vane, Christopher H; Poulton, Catherine; Freeborough, Katy

    2006-07-01

    Earth scientists are often asked to establish or constrain the likely provenance of very small quantities of earth-related material as part of a forensic investigation. We tested the independent and collective interpretations of four experts with differing analytical skills in the prediction of sample provenance for three samples from different environmental settings. The methods used were X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, the assessment of pollen assemblages, and structural characterization of organic matter at the molecular level. Independent interpretations were less accurate than those where multiple techniques were combined. Collective interpretation was very effective in the assessment of provenance for two of the three sites where the mineralogy and plant communities were distinctive. At the other site, although the mineralogical analysis correctly identified the Triassic mudstone soil parent material, Carboniferous spores from domestic coal were initially interpreted as deriving directly from bedrock. Such an interpretation could be a common pitfall owing to anthropogenic redistribution of material such as coal. PMID:16882228

  6. The human gut mycobiome: pitfalls and potentials--a mycologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Suhr, Mallory J; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2015-01-01

    We have entered the Age of the Microbiome, with new studies appearing constantly and whole journals devoted to the human microbiome. While bacteria outnumber other gut microbes by orders of magnitude, eukaryotes are consistently found in the human gut and are represented primarily by the fungi. Compiling 36 studies 1917-2015 we found at least 267 distinct fungal taxa have been reported from the human gut, and seemingly every new study includes one or more fungi not previously described from this niche. This diversity, while impressive, is illusory. If we examine gut fungi, we will quickly observe a division between a small number of commonly detected species (Candida yeasts, Saccharomyces and yeasts in the Dipodascaceae, and Malassezia species) and a long tail of taxa that have been reported only once. Furthermore, an investigation into the ecology of these rare species reveals that many of them are incapable of colonization or long-term persistence in the gut. This paper examines what we know and have yet to learn about the fungal component of the gut microbiome, or "mycobiome", and an overview of methods. We address the potential of the field while introducing some caveats and argue for the necessity of including mycologists in mycobiome studies. PMID:26354806

  7. Web-based interventions for behavior change and self-management: potential, pitfalls, and progress.

    PubMed

    Murray, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The potential advantages of using the Internet to deliver self-care and behavior-change programs are well recognized. An aging population combined with the increasing prevalence of long-term conditions and more effective medical interventions place financial strain on all health care systems. Web-based interventions have the potential to combine the tailored approach of face-to-face interventions with the scalability of public health interventions that have low marginal costs per additional user. From a patient perspective, Web-based interventions can be highly attractive because they are convenient, easily accessible, and can maintain anonymity/privacy. Recognition of this potential has led to research in developing and evaluating Web-based interventions for self-management of long-term conditions and behavior change. Numerous systematic reviews have confirmed the effectiveness of some Web-based interventions, but a number of unanswered questions still remain. This paper reviews the progress made in developing and evaluating Web-based interventions and considers three challenging areas: equity, effectiveness, and implementation. The impact of Web-based interventions on health inequalities remains unclear. Although some have argued that such interventions can increase access to underserved communities, there is evidence to suggest that reliance on Web-based interventions may exacerbate health inequalities by excluding those on the "wrong" side of the digital divide. Although most systematic reviews have found a positive effect on outcomes of interest, effect sizes tend to be small and not all interventions are successful. Further work is needed to determine why some interventions work and others do not. This includes considering the "active ingredients" or mechanism of action of these complex interventions and the context in which they are used. Are there certain demographic, psychological, or clinical factors that promote or inhibit success? Are some behaviors or

  8. Vascular injuries after minor blunt upper extremity trauma: pitfalls in the recognition and diagnosis of potential "near miss" injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bravman, Jonathan T; Ipaktchi, Kyros; Biffl, Walter L; Stahel, Philip F

    2008-01-01

    Background Low energy trauma to the upper extremity is rarely associated with a significant vascular injury. Due to the low incidence, a high level of suspicion combined with appropriate diagnostic algorithms are mandatory for early recognition and timely management of these potentially detrimental injuries. Methods Review of the pertinent literature, supported by the presentation of two representative "near miss" case examples. Results A major diagnostic pitfall is represented by the insidious presentation of significant upper extremity arterial injuries with intact pulses and normal capillary refill distal to the injury site, due to collateral perfusion. Thus, severe vascular injuries may easily be missed or neglected at the upper extremity, leading to a long-term adverse outcome with the potential need for a surgical amputation. Conclusion The present review article provides an outline of the diagnostic challenges related to these rare vascular injuries and emphasizes the necessity for a high level of suspicion, even in the absence of a significant penetrating or high-velocity trauma mechanism. PMID:19032757

  9. Hematogones With Lambda Light Chain Restriction in a 4-Year-Old Boy With Burkitt Lymphoma: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Tesha; Li, Shiyong; Bergsagel, Daniel J; Weinzierl, Elizabeth; Bunting, Silvia T

    2016-05-01

    Hematogones are immature normal B cell precursors with a characteristic immunophenotype profile on flow cytometry that typically do not express surface immunoglobulin light chains. In this report, we describe a case in which the hematogones exhibit light chain restriction. Our patient was a 4-year-old boy with a complicated medical history involving treatment for a presumed bilateral Wilms tumor of the kidney that on later resection was diagnosed as Burkitt lymphoma. Flow cytometry analysis of his bone marrow revealed a small distinct population of cells expressing dim cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD22, CD38, dim CD58, human leukocyte antigen-D related (HLA-DR), and dim CD45, which are characteristic of hematogones. These cells, however, demonstrated dim surface immunoglobulin lambda light-chain restriction. Molecular study results for immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light-chain gene rearrangements were negative. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential pitfalls of working up bone marrow for involvement by B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:27069035

  10. NSE/αNAE positivity in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: revisiting a potential cytochemical diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Tyagi, S

    2014-01-01

    Cytochemical staining for leukemia typing is declining in hematology laboratories, but the use of flow cytometry may not be possible in some settings. Aberrant cytochemical nonspecific esterase/α-naphthyl acetate esterase (NSE/αNAE) positive B-lymphoblasts can cause confusion with monoblasts, a potentially dangerous pitfall. This unusual cytochemical NSE/αNAE positivity had been associated with relatively poorer outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the era prior to the advent of routine multicolor flow cytometric immunophenotyping. We reviewed morphological, cytochemical and flow-cytometric data from five cases of B-lineage ALL that showed NSE/αNAE positivity and were diagnosed definitively using multi-parametric flow cytometric immunophenotypic analysis. Diffuse or dot-like (localized) strong cytochemical NSE/αNAE activity was detected in all cases and all showed one or more features of high risk disease. The number of NSE/αNAE positive blasts in the marrow varied from 10 to 75%. The morphological differential diagnoses included T-lymphoid lineage ALL and acute monoblastic leukemia (AML-M5). Flow cytometric data revealed B-lineage antigens and the absence of monocytic or other myeloid markers resolved the diagnosis. These cases underscore the importance of immunophenotyping in all cases of suspected ALL regardless of the cytochemical findings. Although the numbers are small, the association with high risk disease observed in all five of our cases may corroborate the previously reported poor prognostic value of such aberrant cytochemical staining. PMID:23957699

  11. Hematogones With Lambda Light Chain Restriction in a 4-Year-Old Boy With Burkitt Lymphoma: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Guillory, Tesha; Li, Shiyong; Bergsagel, Daniel J.; Weinzierl, Elizabeth; Bunting, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Hematogones are immature normal B cell precursors with a characteristic immunophenotype profile on flow cytometry that typically do not express surface immunoglobulin light chains. In this report, we describe a case in which the hematogones exhibit light chain restriction. Our patient was a 4-year-old boy with a complicated medical history involving treatment for a presumed bilateral Wilms tumor of the kidney that on later resection was diagnosed as Burkitt lymphoma. Flow cytometry analysis of his bone marrow revealed a small distinct population of cells expressing dim cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD22, CD38, dim CD58, human leukocyte antigen–D related (HLA-DR), and dim CD45, which are characteristic of hematogones. These cells, however, demonstrated dim surface immunoglobulin lambda light-chain restriction. Molecular study results for immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light-chain gene rearrangements were negative. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential pitfalls of working up bone marrow for involvement by B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:27069035

  12. Pronominal Address in German: Rules, Anarchy and Embarrassment Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretzenbacher, Heinz L.; Clyne, Michael; Schupbach, Doris

    2006-01-01

    Choice of address forms, a socially crucial feature in German communication, is context-dependent on situations (a) where the unmarked form of address is "du" (T), (b) where it is "Sie" (V), and (c) where the two systems (a and b) coexist. The first two situations are, apart from their fuzzy edges, rather clearcut. The third situation, however,…

  13. Appearance of hyperostosis frontalis interna on indium-111 leukocyte scans: potential diagnostic pitfall

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, J.L.; Jackson, D.E. Jr.; Carretta, R.

    1986-04-01

    The appearance of hyperostosis frontalis interna on an (/sup 111/In)leukocyte scan is reported. Recognition of the potential for normal accumulation of 111In-labeled white blood cells within this common process involving the skull is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis.

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cells for the treatment of stroke: the potential and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fenggang; Li, Yingying; Morshead, Cindi M

    2013-09-01

    The extraordinary discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has led to the very real possibility that patient-specific cell therapy can be realized. The potential to develop cell replacement therapies outside the ethical and legal limitations, has initiated a new era of hope for regenerative strategies to treat human neurological disease including stroke. In this article, we will review and compare the current approaches to derive iPSCs from different somatic cells, and the induction into neuronal phenotypes, considering the advantages and disadvantages to the methodologies of derivation. We will highlight the work relating to the use of iPSC-based therapies in models of stroke and their potential use in clinical trials. Finally, we will consider future directions and areas of exploration which may promote the realization of iPSC-based cell replacement strategies for the treatment of stroke. PMID:23895059

  15. Cockroach allergy and allergen-specific immunotherapy in asthma: Potential and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bassirpour, Gillian; Zoratti, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide a summary and discussion of cockroach allergy and clinical trials of cockroach allergen immunotherapy. Recent findings Cockroach allergen exposure among sensitized children is increasingly recognized as a key factor contributing to asthma morbidity. Recent trials suggest that cockroach immunotherapy has promise as a treatment strategy with studies demonstrating immunomodulatory and clinical effects. However, a few obstacles need to be overcome to realize the full potential of this treatment modality as cockroach allergic patients often exhibit complex sensitization patterns to multiple cockroach-associated proteins and an immunodominant allergen has not been identified. These factors have made it difficult to produce standardized cockroach allergen extracts that are potent and provide the broad allergen profiles needed for optimal treatment. There have been important advances in the identification and cloning of cockroach allergens and several strategies are being developed to provide therapeutic cockroach allergen products with enhanced clinical efficacy. Summary Allergen immunotherapy has the capability of modulating the immune response to cockroach allergen and has potential as a valuable treatment modality. Further studies of the clinical efficacy along with the development of improved therapeutic products are needed to advance our knowledge and realize the full potential of this promising therapy. PMID:25144264

  16. Venous Intravasation as a Complication and Potential Pitfall During Hysterosalpingography: Re-Emerging Study with a Novel Classification

    PubMed Central

    Dusak, Abdurrahim; Soydinc, Hatice E.; Onder, Hakan; Ekinci, Faysal; Görük, Neval Y.; Hamidi, Cihat; Bilici, Aslan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Presently, hysterosalpingography (HSG) is used as a means to evaluate women with infertility and repetitive pregnancy loss. Venous intravasation is a complication and potential pitfall during HSG and analogous procedures including hysteroscopy. The aim of our study was to assess the venous intravasation and to obtain critical information for more secure and more accurate procedures. In particular, the primary goal of the present study was to compare HSG without and with intravasation to identify differences seen on HSG and to assess the predisposing factors of intravasation. The secondary goal was to describe clinical- and imaging-based novel classification of intravasation. Materials and Methods: This study included a patient cohort of 569 patients who underwent HSG between 2008 and 2011 at our center in the absence (control group) or presence (study group) of intravasation. Intravasation classified from level 0 (no intravasation) to level 3 (severe intravasation) was compared with preprocedural (demographic and clinical) and procedural (HSG) data. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) statistical software. Results: Of the 569 patients undergoing HSG, 528 showed no intravasation and 41 (7.2%) patients showed intravasation when associated with preprocedural (leukocytes, menometrorrhagia, secondary infertility, ectopic pregnancy, abortus, polycystic ovaries, endometriosis, and interventions) and procedural (pain, scheduling, endometrial-uterine nature, and spillage) parameters. Moreover, intravasation was lower in women with smooth endometrium, triangular uterus, and homogeneous peritoneal spillage. No association was found between age, tubal patency, increased pressure, and intravasation. Conclusions: Using a novel classification method, intravasation can be observed in women during HSG and associates with preprocedural and procedural predisposing factors in subsumed conditions. This classification method will be useful

  17. Managing the potential and pitfalls during clinical translation of emerging stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Main, Heather; Munsie, Megan; O'Connor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    We are moving into a new era of stem cell research where many possibilities for treatment of degenerative, chronic and/or fatal diseases and injuries are becoming primed for clinical trial. These reports have led millions of people worldwide to hope that regenerative medicine is about to revolutionise biomedicine: either through transplantation of cells grown in the laboratory, or by finding ways to stimulate a patient's intrinsic stem cells to repair diseased and damaged organs. While major contributions of stem cells to drug discovery, safety and efficacy testing, as well as modelling 'diseases in a dish' are also expected, it is the in vivo use of stem cells that has captured the general public's attention. However, public misconceptions of stem cell potential and applications can leave patients vulnerable to the influences of profit driven entities selling unproven treatments without solid scientific basis or appropriate clinical testing or follow up. This review provides a brief history of stem cell clinical translation together with an overview of the properties, potential, and current clinical application of various stem cell types. In doing so it presents a clearer picture of the inherent risks and opportunities associated with stem cell research translation, and thus offers a framework to help realise invested expectations more quickly, safely and effectively. PMID:24949190

  18. Chromogranin A - unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Gut, Paweł; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  19. Managing the potential and pitfalls during clinical translation of emerging stem cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We are moving into a new era of stem cell research where many possibilities for treatment of degenerative, chronic and/or fatal diseases and injuries are becoming primed for clinical trial. These reports have led millions of people worldwide to hope that regenerative medicine is about to revolutionise biomedicine: either through transplantation of cells grown in the laboratory, or by finding ways to stimulate a patient’s intrinsic stem cells to repair diseased and damaged organs. While major contributions of stem cells to drug discovery, safety and efficacy testing, as well as modelling ‘diseases in a dish’ are also expected, it is the in vivo use of stem cells that has captured the general public’s attention. However, public misconceptions of stem cell potential and applications can leave patients vulnerable to the influences of profit driven entities selling unproven treatments without solid scientific basis or appropriate clinical testing or follow up. This review provides a brief history of stem cell clinical translation together with an overview of the properties, potential, and current clinical application of various stem cell types. In doing so it presents a clearer picture of the inherent risks and opportunities associated with stem cell research translation, and thus offers a framework to help realise invested expectations more quickly, safely and effectively. PMID:24949190

  20. Chromogranin A – unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  1. Mapping environmental injustices: pitfalls and potential of geographic information systems in assessing environmental health and equity.

    PubMed Central

    Maantay, Juliana

    2002-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been used increasingly to map instances of environmental injustice, the disproportionate exposure of certain populations to environmental hazards. Some of the technical and analytic difficulties of mapping environmental injustice are outlined in this article, along with suggestions for using GIS to better assess and predict environmental health and equity. I examine 13 GIS-based environmental equity studies conducted within the past decade and use a study of noxious land use locations in the Bronx, New York, to illustrate and evaluate the differences in two common methods of determining exposure extent and the characteristics of proximate populations. Unresolved issues in mapping environmental equity and health include lack of comprehensive hazards databases; the inadequacy of current exposure indices; the need to develop realistic methodologies for determining the geographic extent of exposure and the characteristics of the affected populations; and the paucity and insufficiency of health assessment data. GIS have great potential to help us understand the spatial relationship between pollution and health. Refinements in exposure indices; the use of dispersion modeling and advanced proximity analysis; the application of neighborhood-scale analysis; and the consideration of other factors such as zoning and planning policies will enable more conclusive findings. The environmental equity studies reviewed in this article found a disproportionate environmental burden based on race and/or income. It is critical now to demonstrate correspondence between environmental burdens and adverse health impacts--to show the disproportionate effects of pollution rather than just the disproportionate distribution of pollution sources. PMID:11929725

  2. Mapping environmental injustices: pitfalls and potential of geographic information systems in assessing environmental health and equity.

    PubMed

    Maantay, Juliana

    2002-04-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been used increasingly to map instances of environmental injustice, the disproportionate exposure of certain populations to environmental hazards. Some of the technical and analytic difficulties of mapping environmental injustice are outlined in this article, along with suggestions for using GIS to better assess and predict environmental health and equity. I examine 13 GIS-based environmental equity studies conducted within the past decade and use a study of noxious land use locations in the Bronx, New York, to illustrate and evaluate the differences in two common methods of determining exposure extent and the characteristics of proximate populations. Unresolved issues in mapping environmental equity and health include lack of comprehensive hazards databases; the inadequacy of current exposure indices; the need to develop realistic methodologies for determining the geographic extent of exposure and the characteristics of the affected populations; and the paucity and insufficiency of health assessment data. GIS have great potential to help us understand the spatial relationship between pollution and health. Refinements in exposure indices; the use of dispersion modeling and advanced proximity analysis; the application of neighborhood-scale analysis; and the consideration of other factors such as zoning and planning policies will enable more conclusive findings. The environmental equity studies reviewed in this article found a disproportionate environmental burden based on race and/or income. It is critical now to demonstrate correspondence between environmental burdens and adverse health impacts--to show the disproportionate effects of pollution rather than just the disproportionate distribution of pollution sources. PMID:11929725

  3. Exploring Pandora's Box: Potential and Pitfalls of Low Coverage Genome Surveys for Evolutionary Biology

    PubMed Central

    Leese, Florian; Mayer, Christoph; Agrawal, Shobhit; Dambach, Johannes; Dietz, Lars; Doemel, Jana S.; Goodall-Copstake, William P.; Held, Christoph; Jackson, Jennifer A.; Lampert, Kathrin P.; Linse, Katrin; Macher, Jan N.; Nolzen, Jennifer; Raupach, Michael J.; Rivera, Nicole T.; Schubart, Christoph D.; Striewski, Sebastian; Tollrian, Ralph; Sands, Chester J.

    2012-01-01

    High throughput sequencing technologies are revolutionizing genetic research. With this “rise of the machines”, genomic sequences can be obtained even for unknown genomes within a short time and for reasonable costs. This has enabled evolutionary biologists studying genetically unexplored species to identify molecular markers or genomic regions of interest (e.g. micro- and minisatellites, mitochondrial and nuclear genes) by sequencing only a fraction of the genome. However, when using such datasets from non-model species, it is possible that DNA from non-target contaminant species such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or other eukaryotic organisms may complicate the interpretation of the results. In this study we analysed 14 genomic pyrosequencing libraries of aquatic non-model taxa from four major evolutionary lineages. We quantified the amount of suitable micro- and minisatellites, mitochondrial genomes, known nuclear genes and transposable elements and searched for contamination from various sources using bioinformatic approaches. Our results show that in all sequence libraries with estimated coverage of about 0.02–25%, many appropriate micro- and minisatellites, mitochondrial gene sequences and nuclear genes from different KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways could be identified and characterized. These can serve as markers for phylogenetic and population genetic analyses. A central finding of our study is that several genomic libraries suffered from different biases owing to non-target DNA or mobile elements. In particular, viruses, bacteria or eukaryote endosymbionts contributed significantly (up to 10%) to some of the libraries analysed. If not identified as such, genetic markers developed from high-throughput sequencing data for non-model organisms may bias evolutionary studies or fail completely in experimental tests. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the enormous potential of low-coverage genome survey sequences and suggests

  4. A study of potential numerical pitfalls in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoux, Vincent; Ozell, Benoît; Bonenfant, Éric; Després, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of numerical errors caused by the floating point representation of real numbers in a GPU-based Monte Carlo code used for dose calculation in radiation oncology, and to identify situations where this type of error arises. The program used as a benchmark was bGPUMCD. Three tests were performed on the code, which was divided into three functional components: energy accumulation, particle tracking and physical interactions. First, the impact of single-precision calculations was assessed for each functional component. Second, a GPU-specific compilation option that reduces execution time as well as precision was examined. Third, a specific function used for tracking and potentially more sensitive to precision errors was tested by comparing it to a very high-precision implementation. Numerical errors were found in two components of the program. Because of the energy accumulation process, a few voxels surrounding a radiation source end up with a lower computed dose than they should. The tracking system contained a series of operations that abnormally amplify rounding errors in some situations. This resulted in some rare instances (less than 0.1%) of computed distances that are exceedingly far from what they should have been. Most errors detected had no significant effects on the result of a simulation due to its random nature, either because they cancel each other out or because they only affect a small fraction of particles. The results of this work can be extended to other types of GPU-based programs and be used as guidelines to avoid numerical errors on the GPU computing platform.

  5. Recurrent Mastoiditis Mimics IgG4 Related Disease: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Vikram; Zane, Nicolas A; Kraft, Stefan; Stone, John H; Faquin, William C

    2016-09-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized entity that causes progressive fibrosis and formation of mass lesions. IgG4-RD can be diagnosed histologically by its hallmarks of storiform fibrosis, prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, and obliterative phlebitis, accompanied by the infiltration of excessive numbers of IgG4-positive plasma cells as well as elevations in serum IgG4 concentrations. A recent publication reported a case of IgG4-RD in the mastoid sinus, representing a new anatomic location for this disease. We report two additional cases of IgG4-RD occurring in the mastoid and causing clinical mastoiditis. The presenting symptoms were varied-tinnitus, hearing loss, and cranial nerve palsies. All three cases showed a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, storiform type fibrosis as well as elevated numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells. The three patients responded to immunosuppressive therapy that included steroids and Rituximab. We further investigated 162 consecutive mastoiditis cases at our institution in order to determine the frequency of IgG4-RD as a previously unrecognized cause of mastoiditis. Within this latter cohort we identified nine cases of mastoiditis that had two of the histologic features of IgG4-RD, specifically storiform fibrosis and a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Two of these cases showed >50 IgG4-positive plasma cells per high-power field with IgG4-IgG ratio of >40 %, thus fulfilling histological criteria for IgG4-RD. However, both were due to severe acute or chronic infection. In conclusion, we reaffirm IgG4 related mastoiditis as a distinct but uncommon cause of recurrent mastoiditis. The diagnosis of IgG4-related mastoiditis should be rendered with caution, and only after the exclusion of potential mimickers, particularly infection. PMID:27091207

  6. Relationships between Endocrine Traits and Life Histories in Wild Animals: Insights, Problems, and Potential Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Dantzer, Ben; Westrick, Sarah E; van Kesteren, Freya

    2016-08-01

    The endocrine mechanisms causing variation and plasticity in life history traits (e.g., development time, mass at birth/hatching, rate of postnatal growth, age or size at sexual maturity, litter or clutch size, annual survival, and lifespan) or fitness (annual or lifetime reproductive success) have recently garnered considerable interest. We review three issues facing studies that quantify relationships between endocrine traits and life histories or measures of fitness and describe possible solutions using insights from evolutionary ecology. We focus in particular on the steroid hormones glucocorticoids that are involved in the vertebrate neuroendocrine stress response. First, context-dependent associations between endocrine traits and life histories or fitness are widespread, and therefore, it is important to quantify how intrinsic or extrinsic factors modify these relationships. Second, studies in evolutionary endocrinology may aspire to quantify patterns of natural selection on endocrine traits, but this may not tell us how they influence fitness. Studies that also identify the actual targets of selection that the endocrine traits are influencing will be very useful. Third, environmental or intrinsic factors can cause co-variance between endocrine traits and life histories or fitness. This is problematic for interpreting the potential evolutionary consequences of selection on endocrine traits, but it can also produce divergent answers for relationships between endocrine traits and life histories or fitness depending upon whether the data are analyzed in an among- or within-year framework. Future long-term studies following uniquely marked individuals over their lifetime (longitudinal individual-based approach) in combination with experimental manipulations of the endocrine traits or environmental factors influencing both endocrine traits and life histories or fitness may help to produce new insights in evolutionary endocrinology despite these issues. This is an

  7. Pitfalls and Promises: The Use of Secondary Data Analysis in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the use of secondary data analysis in educational research. It addresses some of the promises and potential pitfalls that influence its use and explores a possible role for the secondary analysis of numeric data in the "new" political arithmetic tradition of social research. Secondary data analysis is a relatively under-used…

  8. Uptake of 18F-DCFPyL in Paget’s Disease of Bone, an Important Potential Pitfall in Clinical Interpretation of PSMA PET Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Deville, Curtiland; Paller, Channing; Cho, Steve Y.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Pomper, Martin G.; Ross, Ashley E.; Gorin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging is an emerging technique for evaluating patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in a variety of clinical contexts. As with any new imaging modality, there are interpretive pitfalls that are beginning to be recognized. In this image report, we describe the findings in a 63-year-old male with biochemically recurrent PCa after radical prostatectomy who was imaged with 18F-DCFPyL, a small molecule inhibitor of PSMA. Diffuse radiotracer uptake was noted throughout the sacrum, corresponding to imaging findings on contrast-enhanced CT, bone scan, and pelvic MRI consistent with Paget’s disease of bone. The uptake of 18F-DCFPyL in Paget’s disease is most likely due to hyperemia and increased radiotracer delivery. In light of the overlap in patients affected by PCa and Paget’s, it is important for nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists interpreting PSMA PET/CT scans to be aware of the potential for this diagnostic pitfall. Correlation to findings on conventional imaging such as diagnostic CT and bone scan can help confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26807444

  9. MRI imaging of displaced meniscal tears: Report of a case highlighting new potential pitfalls of the MRI signs

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Abhishek; Brar, Rahat; Rana, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be an excellent imaging tool for meniscal injuries. Various MRI signs have been described to detect displaced meniscal injuries, specifically the bucket-handle tears. Although these signs are quite helpful in diagnosing meniscal tears, various pitfalls have also been reported for these signs. Double anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sign refers to presence of a linear hypointense soft tissue anterior to the ACL, which represented the flipped bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Disproportional posterior horn and flipped meniscus signs represent asymmetrically thickened horns of the menisci due to overlying displaced meniscal fragments. We report a case wherein MRI of the knee showed tear and displacement of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and vastus medialis complex, medial collateral ligament (MCL), and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) mimicking these signs. To our knowledge, internally displaced MPFL and MCLs have not been described as mimics for displaced meniscal fragments. PMID:25114394

  10. A subset of solitary fibrous tumors express nuclear PAX8 and PAX2: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Andrew S; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Smith, Steven C; Robinson, Dan R; Wu, Yi-Mi; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; McHugh, Jonathan B; Greenson, Joel K; Kunju, Lakshmi P

    2016-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), a mesenchymal neoplasm with widespread anatomic distribution, can be diagnostically challenging in limited samples. We recently encountered an aspirate of a pancreatic mass, incorrectly interpreted as metastatic renal cell carcinoma based on strong PAX8 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). After resection, morphologic features with additional IHC (CD34 positivity) correctly identified this lesion as a SFT. PAX8 and PAX2 are commonly used as renal tumor markers; however, no series has investigated PAX8 or PAX2 expression in SFT. IHC for PAX8 and PAX2 was performed on 41 SFTs (biopsy and resections) from varying sites. Eight were histologically malignant and eight were recurrences of previous resections. PAX8 staining was observed at least focally in 26.8% (11 of 41) SFT cases; additionally, PAX2 was positive in 12.2% (5 of 41 cases) of SFTs. For PAX8 and PAX2 positive cases 45.6% and 40%, respectively, showed diffuse expression. No correlation was found between PAX8/PAX2 positivity and age, tumor size, site, malignancy, or recurrence. In conclusion, a substantial minority of SFTs express PAX8 and PAX2 via IHC. This presents a diagnostic pitfall when evaluating possible metastases from the kidney, particularly when primary tumors show sarcomatoid or spindle cell morphologies. PMID:26404914

  11. Acquisition and analysis of cardiovascular signals on smartphones: potential, pitfalls and perspectives: by the Task Force of the e-Cardiology Working Group of European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bruining, Nico; Caiani, Enrico; Chronaki, Catherine; Guzik, Przemyslaw; van der Velde, Enno

    2014-11-01

    Smartphones, mobile applications ('apps'), social media, analytics, and the cloud are profoundly changing the practice of medicine and the way health decisions are made. With the constant progress of technology, the measurement of vital signals becomes easier, cheaper, and practically a standard approach in clinical practice. The interest in measuring vital signals goes beyond medical professionals to the general public, patients, informal caregivers, and healthy individuals, who frequently lack any formal medical training. On smartphone platforms such as iOS and Android, a proliferation of health or medical 'apps' acquire and analyse a variety of vital signs through embedded sensors, interconnected devices or peripherals utilising on occasion analytics and social media. Smartphone vendors compete with traditional medical device manufacturers in the grey area between health care, wellness, and fitness, as US and EU regulatory bodies are setting and revising rules for these new technologies. On the other hand, in the absence of robust validation results, clinicians are hesitant to trust measurements by apps or recommend specific apps to their patients, partly also due to lack of a cost reimbursement policy. This review focuses on the acquisition and analysis on smartphones of three important vital signs in the cardiovascular and respiratory field as well as in rehabilitation i.e. heart or pulse rate, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation. The potential, pitfalls, and perspectives on mobile devices and smartphone apps for health management by patients and healthy individuals are discussed. PMID:25354948

  12. Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Cowlin, S. C.; Heimiller, D.; Bilello, D.; Renne, D.

    2008-01-01

    This analysis explores the technical potential of photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP) to address energy poverty in Africa through a geographic information system (GIS) screening of solar resource data developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  13. Putting the matter in organic matter: citizen science and water quality monitoring - the potential, pitfalls and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollymore, A. J.; Haines, M.; Johnson, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    By opening up the scientific process to the public at large, citizen science projects can dramatically increase the reach of a science program, and be potential tools for communicating the process and importance of scientific research. These reasons, and the relatively low resources necessary for many projects, make this an increasingly popular approach in an era where funding by government organizations for research is increasingly limited. Applying citizen science to projects involving environmental issues such as water can also serve the greater community. However, the success of these projects in delivering on their promise of scientific outreach and community education, as well as robust scientific data, is not a given. We discuss the potential of these types of projects when applied to water-related issues, as well as lessons learned through our own experience in implementing a citizen-driven water quality monitoring project in Metro Vancouver, British Columbia.

  14. Anastomoses of the Ovarian and Uterine Arteries: A Potential Pitfall and Cause of Failure of Uterine Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, Matthew; Nicholson, Anthony; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2000-09-15

    Four women with symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated by uterine artery embolization (UAE). In all cases both uterine arteries were embolized via a single femoral puncture with polyvinyl alcohol using a selective catheter technique. In three cases, the ovarian artery was not visible on the initial angiogram before embolization, but appeared after the second uterine artery had been treated. In one case of clinical failure following UAE, a repeat angiogram demonstrated filling of the fibroids from the ovarian artery. Anastomoses between uterine and ovarian arteries may cause problems for radiologists performing UAE and are a potential cause of treatment failure.

  15. Potential pitfalls of modelling ribosomal RNA data in phylogenetic tree reconstruction: Evidence from case studies in the Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Failure to account for covariation patterns in helical regions of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes has the potential to misdirect the estimation of the phylogenetic signal of the data. Furthermore, the extremes of length variation among taxa, combined with regional substitution rate variation can mislead the alignment of rRNA sequences and thus distort subsequent tree reconstructions. However, recent developments in phylogenetic methodology now allow a comprehensive integration of secondary structures in alignment and tree reconstruction analyses based on rRNA sequences, which has been shown to correct some of these problems. Here, we explore the potentials of RNA substitution models and the interactions of specific model setups with the inherent pattern of covariation in rRNA stems and substitution rate variation among loop regions. Results We found an explicit impact of RNA substitution models on tree reconstruction analyses. The application of specific RNA models in tree reconstructions is hampered by interaction between the appropriate modelling of covarying sites in stem regions, and excessive homoplasy in some loop regions. RNA models often failed to recover reasonable trees when single-stranded regions are excessively homoplastic, because these regions contribute a greater proportion of the data when covarying sites are essentially downweighted. In this context, the RNA6A model outperformed all other models, including the more parametrized RNA7 and RNA16 models. Conclusions Our results depict a trade-off between increased accuracy in estimation of interdependencies in helical regions with the risk of magnifying positions lacking phylogenetic signal. We can therefore conclude that caution is warranted when applying rRNA covariation models, and suggest that loop regions be independently screened for phylogenetic signal, and eliminated when they are indistinguishable from random noise. In addition to covariation and homoplasy, other factors, like non

  16. TH-C-BRF-01: The Promise and Potential Pitfalls of Deformable Image Registration in Clinical Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, K; Oldham, M; Cai, J; Pouliot, J

    2014-06-15

    Accurate and robust deformable image registration (DIR) is a key enabling technique in the clinical realization of two approaches for advancing radiation therapy treatment efficacy: adaptive radiation therapy and treatment response assessment. Currently there are a wide variety of DIR methods including the categories of splines, optical/diffusion, free-form, and biomechanical algorithms. All methods aim to translate information between image sets (including multi-modal data) in the presence of spatial deformation of tissues. However, recent research has shown that different DIR algorithms can yield substantially different results for the same reference deformation, and that DIR performance can be site and application dependent. As a result, errors can occur, and subsequent patient treatment can be compromised. There is a clear need for greater understanding of appropriate use of DIR techniques, as well as effective methods of validation, evaluation, and improvement. In this session, we will review the state-of-the-art concerning DIR development, clinical application, and performance evaluation. Novel DIR methods and evaluating technologies will be reviewed. Learning Objectives: To understand the underlying principles and physics of current DIR techniques To explore potential clinical applications and areas of high impact for DIR To investigate sources of uncertainty, appropriate usage, and methods for validating and evaluating DIR performance.

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of SALL4 in hepatocellular carcinoma, a potential pitfall in the differential diagnosis of yolk sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Katz, Betina; Chaux, Alcides; Sharma, Rajni; Munari, Enrico; Faraj, Sheila F; Illei, Peter B; Torbenson, Michael; Netto, George J

    2013-07-01

    SALL4 is a transcription factor that serves as a marker of yolk sac tumor. Yolk sac tumor and hepatocellular carcinoma share histologic, serologic, and immunohistochemical features. Previous studies have shown lack of SALL4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting utility in this differential diagnosis. Sixty-nine samples of hepatocellular carcinoma were retrieved from surgical pathology archives and used to construct 9 tissue microarrays. A germ cell tumor tissue microarray containing 10 yolk sac tumors was used for comparison. Extent, intensity, and pattern of nuclear SALL4 expression were assessed in each spot. Mean percentage of expression was calculated for each tumor and used during analysis. Optimal discriminatory extent of expression cutoff was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Other potential discriminatory markers including Hep Par1 were also evaluated. Forty-six percent (32/69) of hepatocellular carcinoma and all yolk sac tumors revealed at least focal expression of SALL4. A unique punctuate/clumped pattern of nuclear staining was present in 94% (30/32) of hepatocellular carcinoma, whereas all yolk sac tumors displayed a diffuse finely granular nuclear staining pattern. A 25% extent of SALL4 expression cutoff was found to be optimal for the distinction of yolk sac tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma yielding a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 92.8%, and a positive predictive value of 66.6% for yolk sac tumor diagnosis. The addition of Hep Par1 increased the specificity (99%) and positive predictive value (90%). This is the first report of SALL4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma. Our finding should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and yolk sac tumor. The unique punctuate/clumped pattern seen in hepatocellular carcinoma cases could be of further discriminatory value. PMID:23347651

  18. Seven PC Purchasing Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    1997-01-01

    Explores how to avoid common pitfalls when schools purchase computer equipment. Purchasing tips are provided in the areas of choosing multiple platforms, buying the cheapest model available, choosing a proprietary design, falling for untested technology, purchasing systems that are not upgradable, ignoring extended warranties, and failing to plan…

  19. PACS pitfalls and bottlenecks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. K.; Lou, Shyhliang A.; Wong, Albert W. K.

    1997-05-01

    PACS pitfalls are mostly created from human error, whereas bottlenecks are due to imperfect design in either the PACS or image acquisition devices. These drawbacks can only be realized through accumulated clinical experience. Pitfalls due to human error are often initiated at imaging acquisition devices and at workstations. Three major errors at the acquisition devices are entering wrong input parameters, stopping an image transmission process improperly, and incorrect patient positioning. The error occurring most often at the workstation happens when the user enters too many key strokes or clicks the mouse too often before the workstation can respond. Other pitfalls at the workstation unrelated to human error are missing location markers in a CT or MR scout view, images displayed with unsuitable look-up-tables, and white boarders in CR images due to x-ray collimation. Pitfalls created due to human intervention can be minimized by a better quality assurance program and periodic in-service training, and by interfacing image acquisition devices to the HIS/RIS. Bottlenecks affecting the PACS operation include network contention; CR, CT, and MR images stacked up at acquisition devices; slow response from workstations; and long delays for image retrieval from the long term archive. Bottlenecks can be alleviated by improving the system architecture, re- configuring the networks, and streamlining operational procedures through a gradual understanding of the clinical environment. We have identified most of the pitfalls and bottlenecks discussed above in our hospital-integrated PACS based on the past two years of clinical experience. This paper categorizes some of these problems, illustrates their effect on PACS operations, and suggests methods for circumventing them.

  20. A Washington Perspective on Women and Networking: The Power and the Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Madeleine F.

    1982-01-01

    Describes two successful, institutionalized networking programs of the American Council on Education. Discusses the potential benefits and pitfalls of networking especially as they apply to women. (RC)

  1. The Challenges and Potential of Nuclear Energy for Addressing Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Son H.; Edmonds, James A.

    2007-10-24

    The response to climate change and the stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations has major implications for the global energy system. Stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations requires a peak and an indefinite decline of global CO2 emissions. Nuclear energy, along with other technologies, has the potential to contribute to the growing demand for energy without emitting CO2. Nuclear energy is of particular interest because of its global prevalence and its current significant contribution, nearly 20%, to the world’s electricity supply. We have investigated the value of nuclear energy in addressing climate change, and have explored the potential challenges for the rapid and large-scale expansion of nuclear energy as a response to climate change. The scope of this study is long-term and the modeling time frame extends out a century because the nature of nuclear energy and climate change dictate that perspective. Our results indicate that the value of the nuclear technology option for addressing climate change is denominated in trillions of dollars. Several-fold increases to the value of the nuclear option can be expected if there is limited availability of competing carbon-free technologies, particularly fossil-fuel based technologies that can capture and sequester carbon. Challenges for the expanded global use of nuclear energy include the global capacity for nuclear construction, proliferation, uranium availability, and waste disposal. While the economic costs of nuclear fuel and power are important, non-economic issues transcend the issues of costs. In this regard, advanced nuclear technologies and new vision for the global use of nuclear energy are important considerations for the future of nuclear power and climate change.

  2. Evaluating and Addressing Potential Hazards of Fuel Tanks Surviving Atmospheric Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Robert L.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to ensure reentering spacecraft do not pose an undue risk to the Earth's population it is important to design satellites and rocket bodies with end of life considerations in mind. In addition to considering the possible consequences of deorbiting a vehicle, consideration must also be given to the possible risks associated with a vehicle failing to become operational or reach its intended orbit. Based on recovered space debris and numerous reentry survivability analyses, fuel tanks are of particular concern in both of these considerations. Most spacecraft utilize some type of fuel tank as part of their propulsion system. These fuel tanks are most often constructed using stainless steel or titanium and are filled with potentially hazardous substances such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. For a vehicle which has reached its scheduled end of mission the contents of the tanks are typically depleted. In this scenario the use of stainless steel and titanium results in the tanks posing a risk to people and property do to the high melting point and large heat of ablation of these materials leading to likely survival of the tank during reentry. If a large portion of the fuel is not depleted prior to reentry, there is the added risk of hazardous substance being released when the tank impact the ground. This paper presents a discussion of proactive methods which have been utilized by NASA satellite projects to address the risks associated with fuel tanks reentering the atmosphere. In particular it will address the design of a demiseable fuel tank as well as the evaluation of off the shelf designs which are selected to burst during reentry.

  3. Evaluating and Addressing Potential Hazards of Fuel Tanks Surviving Atmospheric Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Johnson, N. L.

    2012-01-01

    In order to ensure reentering spacecraft do not pose an undue risk to the Earth's population, it is important to design satellites and rocket bodies with end-of-life considerations in mind. In addition to the possible consequences of deorbiting a vehicle, consideration must be given to the possible risks associated with a vehicle failing to become operational or to reach its intended orbit. Based on recovered space debris and numerous reentry survivability analyses, fuel tanks are of particular concern in both of these considerations. Most spacecraft utilize some type of fuel tank as part of their propulsion systems. These fuel tanks are most often constructed using stainless steel or titanium and are filled with potentially hazardous substances such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. For a vehicle that has reached its scheduled end-of mission, the contents of the tanks are typically depleted. In this scenario, the likely survival of a stainless steel or titanium tank during reentry poses a risk to people and property due to the high melting point and large heat-of-ablation of these materials. If a large portion of the fuel is not depleted prior to reentry, there is the added risk of a hazardous substance being released when the tank impacts the ground. This paper presents a discussion of proactive methods that have been utilized by NASA satellite projects to address the risks associated with fuel tanks reentering the atmosphere. In particular, it will address the design of a demiseable fuel tank, as well as the evaluation of fuel tank designs, which are selected based on whether they burst during reentry.

  4. Addressing potential local adaptation in species distribution models: implications for conservation under climate change.

    PubMed

    Hällfors, Maria Helena; Liao, Jishan; Dzurisin, Jason; Grundel, Ralph; Hyvärinen, Marko; Towle, Kevin; Wu, Grace C; Hellmann, Jessica J

    2016-06-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) have been criticized for involving assumptions that ignore or categorize many ecologically relevant factors such as dispersal ability and biotic interactions. Another potential source of model error is the assumption that species are ecologically uniform in their climatic tolerances across their range. Typically, SDMs treat a species as a single entity, although populations of many species differ due to local adaptation or other genetic differentiation. Not taking local adaptation into account may lead to incorrect range prediction and therefore misplaced conservation efforts. A constraint is that we often do not know the degree to which populations are locally adapted. Lacking experimental evidence, we still can evaluate niche differentiation within a species' range to promote better conservation decisions. We explore possible conservation implications of making type I or type II errors in this context. For each of two species, we construct three separate Max-Ent models, one considering the species as a single population and two of disjunct populations. Principal component analyses and response curves indicate different climate characteristics in the current environments of the populations. Model projections into future climates indicate minimal overlap between areas predicted to be climatically suitable by the whole species vs. population-based models. We present a workflow for addressing uncertainty surrounding local adaptation in SDM application and illustrate the value of conducting population-based models to compare with whole-species models. These comparisons might result in more cautious management actions when alternative range outcomes are considered. PMID:27509755

  5. Addressing potential local adaptation in species distribution models: implications for conservation under climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hällfors, Maria Helena; Liao, Jishan; Dzurisin, Jason D. K.; Grundel, Ralph; Hyvärinen, Marko; Towle, Kevin; Wu, Grace C.; Hellmann, Jessica J.

    2016-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) have been criticized for involving assumptions that ignore or categorize many ecologically relevant factors such as dispersal ability and biotic interactions. Another potential source of model error is the assumption that species are ecologically uniform in their climatic tolerances across their range. Typically, SDMs to treat a species as a single entity, although populations of many species differ due to local adaptation or other genetic differentiation. Not taking local adaptation into account, may lead to incorrect range prediction and therefore misplaced conservation efforts. A constraint is that we often do not know the degree to which populations are locally adapted, however. Lacking experimental evidence, we still can evaluate niche differentiation within a species' range to promote better conservation decisions. We explore possible conservation implications of making type I or type II errors in this context. For each of two species, we construct three separate MaxEnt models, one considering the species as a single population and two of disjunct populations. PCA analyses and response curves indicate different climate characteristics in the current environments of the populations. Model projections into future climates indicate minimal overlap between areas predicted to be climatically suitable by the whole species versus population-based models. We present a workflow for addressing uncertainty surrounding local adaptation in SDM application and illustrate the value of conducting population-based models to compare with whole-species models. These comparisons might result in more cautious management actions when alternative range outcomes are considered.

  6. 42 CFR 137.160 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address...-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Conflicts of Interest § 137.160 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest? Yes, self-Governance Tribes participating in...

  7. 42 CFR 137.160 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address...-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Conflicts of Interest § 137.160 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest? Yes, self-Governance Tribes participating in...

  8. 42 CFR 137.160 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address...-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Conflicts of Interest § 137.160 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest? Yes, self-Governance Tribes participating in...

  9. 42 CFR 137.160 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address...-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Conflicts of Interest § 137.160 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest? Yes, self-Governance Tribes participating in...

  10. 42 CFR 137.160 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address...-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Conflicts of Interest § 137.160 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to address potential conflicts of interest? Yes, self-Governance Tribes participating in...

  11. Pitfalls in developmental diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Illingworth, R S

    1987-01-01

    I have never seen a paper or chapter of a book devoted to pitfalls and mistakes in developmental diagnosis. This paper is designed to try to fill the gap. It concerns the avoidance of mistakes in developmental diagnosis and is based entirely on mistakes that I have made myself and now learned to try to avoid and on mistakes that I have seen, most of them repeatedly. I have made no mention of mistakes that could theoretically be made but that I have not personally seen. I believe that most assessment errors are due to overconfidence and to the view that developmental diagnosis is easy. Many other mistakes are due to reliance on purely objective tests with consequent omission of a detailed history and physical examination, so that factors that profoundly affect development but are not directly related to the child's mental endowment are not weighed up before an opinion is reached. PMID:2444167

  12. Addressing vaccine hesitancy: The potential value of commercial and social marketing principles and practices.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Glen J; Gellin, Bruce G; MacDonald, Noni E; Butler, Robb

    2015-08-14

    Many countries and communities are dealing with groups and growing numbers of individuals who are delaying or refusing recommended vaccinations for themselves or their children. This has created a need for immunization programs to find approaches and strategies to address vaccine hesitancy. An important source of useful approaches and strategies is found in the frameworks, practices, and principles used by commercial and social marketers, many of which have been used by immunization programs. This review examines how social and commercial marketing principles and practices can be used to help address vaccine hesitancy. It provides an introduction to key marketing and social marketing concepts, identifies some of the major challenges to applying commercial and social marketing approaches to immunization programs, illustrates how immunization advocates and programs can use marketing and social marketing approaches to address vaccine hesitancy, and identifies some of the lessons that commercial and non-immunization sectors have learned that may have relevance for immunization. While the use of commercial and social marketing practices and principles does not guarantee success, the evidence, lessons learned, and applications to date indicate that they have considerable value in fostering vaccine acceptance. PMID:25900132

  13. Introduction: what are the issues in addressing the allergenic potential of genetically modified foods?

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Dean D

    2003-01-01

    There is growing concern among the general public and the scientific community regarding the potential toxicity of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The use of biotechnology to enhance pest resistance or nutritional value has raised a number of fundamental questions including the consequences of insertion of reporter genes, the spread of resistance genes to surrounding plants, and the use of suicide genes to prohibit reuse of seed from engineered plants. Of particular interest is the ability of proteins from GMOs to elicit potentially harmful immunologic responses, including allergic hypersensitivity. The lack of information of the potential toxicity of these products suggests a need to identify the critical issues and research needs regarding these materials and to develop testing strategies to examine the allergenicity of these compounds. PMID:12826482

  14. Introduction: what are the issues in addressing the allergenic potential of genetically modified foods?

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Dean D

    2003-06-01

    There is growing concern among the general public and the scientific community regarding the potential toxicity of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The use of biotechnology to enhance pest resistance or nutritional value has raised a number of fundamental questions including the consequences of insertion of reporter genes, the spread of resistance genes to surrounding plants, and the use of suicide genes to prohibit reuse of seed from engineered plants. Of particular interest is the ability of proteins from GMOs to elicit potentially harmful immunologic responses, including allergic hypersensitivity. The lack of information of the potential toxicity of these products suggests a need to identify the critical issues and research needs regarding these materials and to develop testing strategies to examine the allergenicity of these compounds. PMID:12826482

  15. Identifying and addressing potential conflict of interest: a professional medical organization's code of ethics.

    PubMed

    Heim, Lori

    2010-01-01

    The new Consumer Alliance agreement between the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and The Coca-Cola Company provides a valuable opportunity to illustrate AAFP's adherence to its ethical foundation, demonstrate the AAFP's commitment to serving physicians and the public, and maintain the trust Americans put in their family physicians and the organization that represents them. Throughout the development of this program, as well as in all business interactions, the AAFP consistently addresses possible conflict of interest openly and directly, sharing with our members and the public exactly what measures we take to ensure that, in fact, no unethical conduct or breach of trust would--or will in the future--occur. In this case, the AAFP saw a public health and education need that was both unmet and undermined by the barrage of marketing messages and confusing information, and acted to fill that need. In so doing, the AAFP hewed to its high ethical standards, its core values, and its mission in the decisions made and the actions that followed. PMID:20644192

  16. REVIEW OF THE POTENTIAL OF NUCLEAR HYDROGEN FOR ADDRESSING ENERGY SECURITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien

    2010-06-01

    Nuclear energy has the potential to exert a major positive impact on energy security and climate change by coupling it to the transportation sector, primarily through hydrogen production. In the short term, this coupling will provide carbon-free hydrogen for upgrading increasingly lower quality petroleum resources such as oil sands, offsetting carbon emissions associated with steam methane reforming. In the intermediate term, nuclear hydrogen will be needed for large-scale production of infrastructure-compatible synthetic liquid fuels. In the long term, there is great potential for the use of hydrogen as a direct vehicle fuel, most likely in the form of light-duty pluggable hybrid hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. This paper presents a review of the potential benefits of large-scale nuclear hydrogen production for energy security (i.e. displacing imported petroleum) and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Lifecycle benefits of nuclear energy in this context are presented, with reference to recent major publications on this topic. The status of US and international nuclear hydrogen research programs are discussed. Industry progress toward consumer-grade hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are also be examined.

  17. Pitfalls in penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, A B

    2003-08-01

    In Western Europe the most frequent cause of multiple injuries is blunt trauma. Only few of us have experience with penetrating trauma, without exception far less than in the USA or South-Africa. In Rotterdam, the Erasmus Medical Centre is a level I trauma centre, situated directly in the town centre. All penetrating traumas are directly presented to our emergency department by a well organized ambulance service supported by a mobile medical team if necessary. The delay with scoop and run principles is very short for these cases, resulting in severely injured reaching the hospital alive in increasing frequency. Although the basic principles of trauma care according to the guidelines of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) (1-2) are the same for blunt and penetrating trauma with regard to priorities, diagnostics and primary therapy, there are some pitfalls in the strategy of management in penetrating trauma one should be aware of. Simple algorithms can be helpful, especially in case of limited experience (3). In case of life-saving procedures, the principles of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) must be followed (4-5). This approach is somewhat different from "traditional" surgical treatment. In the Ist phase prompt interventions by emergency thoracotomy and laparotomy are carried out, with only two goals to achieve: surgical control of haemorrhage and contamination. After temporary life-saving procedures, the 2nd phase is characterized by intensive care treatment, dealing with hypothermia, metabolic acidosis and clotting disturbances. Finally in the 3rd phase, within 6-24 hours, definitive surgical care takes place. In this overview, penetrating injuries of neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities will be outlined. Penetrating cranial injuries, as a neurosurgical emergency with poor prognosis, are not discussed. History and physical examination remain the corner stones of good medical praxis. In a work-up according to ATLS principles airway, breathing and circulation

  18. Evaluation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis potential for addressing radiological threats from a distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, I.; Serrano, J.; Moros, J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2014-06-01

    Although radioactive materials are nowadays valuable tools in nearly all fields of modern science and technology, the dangers stemming from the uncontrolled use of ionizing radiation are more than evident. Since preparedness is a key issue to face the risks of a radiation dispersal event, development of rapid and efficient monitoring technologies to control the contamination caused by radioactive materials is of crucial interest. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) exhibits appealing features for this application. This research focuses on the assessment of LIBS potential for the in-situ fingerprinting and identification of radioactive material surrogates from a safe distance. LIBS selectivity and sensitivity to detect a variety of radioactive surrogates, namely 59Co, 88Sr, 130Ba, 133Cs, 193Ir and 238U, on the surface of common urban materials at a distance of 30 m have been evaluated. The performance of the technique for nuclear forensics has been also studied on different model scenarios. Findings have revealed the difficulties to detect and to identify the analytes depending on the surface being interrogated. However, as demonstrated, LIBS shows potential enough for prompt and accurate gathering of essential evidence at a number of sites after the release, either accidental or intentional, of radioactive material. The capability of standoff analysis confers to LIBS unique advantages in terms of fast and safe inspection of forensic scenarios. The identity of the radioactive surrogates is easily assigned from a distance and the sensitivity to their detection is in the range of a few hundreds of ng per square centimeter.

  19. Addressing geographic variability in the comparative toxicity potential of copper and nickel in soils.

    PubMed

    Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Rosenbaum, Ralph K; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2013-04-01

    Comparative toxicity potentials (CTP), in life cycle impact assessment also known as characterization factors (CF), of copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) were calculated for a global set of 760 soils. An accessibility factor (ACF) that takes into account the role of the reactive, solid-phase metal pool in the soil was introduced into the definition of CTP. Geographic differences in fate, accessibility, bioavailability, and terrestrial toxicity were assessed by combining the USEtox characterization model, empirical regression models, and terrestrial biotic ligand models. The median CTPs for Cu and Ni with 95% geographic variability intervals are 1.4 × 10(3) (1.7 × 10(2) to 2.0 × 10(4)) and 1.7 × 10(3) (2.1 × 10(2) to 1.1 × 10(4)) m(3)/kg · day, respectively. The geographic variability of 3.5 orders of magnitude in the CTP of Cu is mainly associated with the variability in soil organic carbon and pH. They largely influence the fate and bioavailability of Cu in soils. In contrast, the geographic variability of 3 orders of magnitude in the CTP of Ni can mainly be explained by differences in pore water concentration of magnesium (Mg(2+)). Mg(2+) competes with Ni(2+) for binding to biotic ligands, influencing the toxicity. Our findings stress the importance of dealing with geographic variability in the calculation of CTPs for terrestrial ecotoxicity of metals. PMID:23445085

  20. Information technology in health care: addressing promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Health information technology (HIT) and electronic medical records systems are receiving much attention in health care though only a relatively small number of health care organizations and providers have embraced the technology. This article introduces important concepts and definitions and provides the risk manager with key elements to consider when incorporating HIT principles into a proactive risk management program. A checklist is offered to assist in the assessment of electronic records systems. PMID:20200873

  1. Potential of low-temperature anaerobic digestion to address current environmental concerns on swine production.

    PubMed

    Massé, D I; Masse, L; Xia, Y; Gilbert, Y

    2010-04-01

    Environmental issues associated with swine production are becoming a major concern among the general public and are thus an important challenge for the swine industry. There is now a renewed interest in environmental biotechnologies that can minimize the impact of swine production and add value to livestock by-products. An anaerobic biotechnology called psychrophilic anaerobic digestion (PAD) in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) has been developed at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. This very stable biotechnology recovers usable energy, stabilizes and deodorizes manure, and increases the availability of plant nutrients. Experimental results indicated that PAD of swine manure slurry at 15 to 25 degrees C in intermittently fed SBR reduces the pollution potential of manure by removing up to 90% of the soluble chemical oxygen demand. The process performs well under intermittent feeding, once to 3 times a week, and without external mixing. Bioreactor feeding activities can thus be easily integrated into the routine manure removal procedures in the barn, with minimal interference with other farm operations and use of existing manure-handling equipment. Process stability was not affected by the presence of antibiotics in manure. The PAD process was efficient in eliminating populations of zoonotic pathogens and parasites present in raw livestock manure slurries. Psychrophilic anaerobic digestion in SBR could also be used for swine mortality disposal. The addition of swine carcasses, at loading rates representing up to 8 times the normal mortality rates on commercial farms, did not affect the stability of SBR. No operational problems were related to the formation of foam and scum. The biotechnology was successfully operated at semi-industrial and full commercial scales. Biogas production rate exceeded 0.20 L of methane per gram of total chemical oxygen demand fed to the SBR. The biogas was of excellent quality, with a methane concentration ranging from 70 to 80%. The

  2. Pitfalls in Persuasion: How Do Users Experience Persuasive Techniques in a Web Service?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segerståhl, Katarina; Kotro, Tanja; Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila, Kaisa

    Persuasive technologies are designed by utilizing a variety of interactive techniques that are believed to promote target behaviors. This paper describes a field study in which the aim was to discover possible pitfalls of persuasion, i.e., situations in which persuasive techniques do not function as expected. The study investigated persuasive functionality of a web service targeting weight loss. A qualitative online questionnaire was distributed through the web service and a total of 291 responses were extracted for interpretative analysis. The Persuasive Systems Design model (PSD) was used for supporting systematic analysis of persuasive functionality. Pitfalls were identified through situations that evoked negative user experiences. The primary pitfalls discovered were associated with manual logging of eating and exercise behaviors, appropriateness of suggestions and source credibility issues related to social facilitation. These pitfalls, when recognized, can be addressed in design by applying functional and facilitative persuasive techniques in meaningful combinations.

  3. Potentials and pitfalls using high affinity radioligands in PET and SPET determinations on regional drug induced D2 receptor occupancy--a simulation study based on experimental data.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H; Farde, L

    2001-10-01

    The D2 dopamine receptor density ranges from 0.2 to 40 nM among human brain regions. For high density regions radioligands like [(11)C]raclopride provide accurate and reliable estimates of the receptor density. In research on neuropsychiatric disorders there is, however, a growing need for quantitative approaches that accurately measure D2 dopamine receptor occupancy induced by drugs or endogenous dopamine in regions with low receptor density. The new high affinity radioligands [(11)C]FLB 457 and [(123)I]epidepride have been shown to provide a signal for extrasriatal D2 dopamine receptor populations in the human brain in vivo. Initial observations indicate, however, that the time required to reach equilibrium is dependent on receptor density. Ratio analyses may thus not be readily used for comparisons among different brain regions. The aim of the present simulation study was to examine commonly used approaches for calculation of drug induced D2 dopamine receptor occupancy among regions with widely different receptor density. The input functions and the rate constants of [(11)C]FLB 457 and the reference ligand [(11)C]raclopride were first used in a simulation estimating the effect of receptor density on equilibrium time. In a second step we examined how errors produced by inaccurate determination of the binding potential parameter propagate to calculations of drug induced receptor occupancy. The simulations showed a marked effect of receptor density on equilibrium time for [(11)C]FLB 457, but not for [(11)C]raclopride. For [(11)C]FLB 457, a receptor density above about 7 nM caused the time of equilibrium to fall beyond time of data acquisition (1 h). The use of preequilibrium data caused the peak equilibrium and the end time ratio approaches but not the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) approach to underestimate the binding potential and thus also the drug occupancy calculated for high-density regions. The study supports the use of ratio and SRTM analyses in

  4. Modeling emission from the first explosions: pitfalls and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee; Whalen, Daniel J; Frey, Lucille H

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the explosions of the population III stars have the potential to teach us much about the formation and evolution of these zero metallicity objects. But to reach this potential, we must tie the observed emission to and explosion model. This requires accurate light-curve/spectral calculations. Here we discuss many of the pitfalls and problems involved in such calculations, presenting some preliminary results from radiation-hydrodynamics calculations.

  5. MHealth: promise and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Levin, David

    2012-01-01

    Mobile healthcare presents many opportunities to improve the value of healthcare for providers, patients, and payers. It will play a critical role in the move from volume- to value-based care and in enhancing patient engagement and empowerment. Developments in the broader consumer market portend and drive the eventual adoption and impact of mHealth. Substantial barriers exist and must be addressed, including device management, privacy and security, data quality, workflow integration, interface design, and overall resistance to change in healthcare. Organizations would be wise to pay close attention to this rapidly developing area. However, they should resist the temptation to "just do something" and instead adopt a strategic approach that includes carefully determining the value proposition of each opportunity and embracing full life-cycle management. PMID:23330301

  6. Potential pitfalls in the nuclear medicine imaging: Experimental models to evaluate the effect of natural products on the radiolabeling of blood constituents, bioavailability of radiopharmaceutical and on the survival of Escherichia coli strains submitted to the treatment with stannous ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Scheila F.; Brito, Lavínia C.; Souza, Deise E.; Bernardo, Luciana C.; Oliveira, Joelma F.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2006-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) allows studies of physiological or pathological processes. Red blood cells labeled with technetium-99m ( 99mTc-RBC) are used as a radiopharmaceutical in several evaluations. The radiolabeling efficiency and bioavailability of radiopharmaceuticals can be altered by natural/synthetic drugs and may induce pitfalls in the analysis of the nuclear medicine imaging. The labeling with 99mTc requires a reducing agent and stannous chloride (SnCl 2) is widely utilized. However, SnCl 2 presents a citotoxic and/or genotoxic potential in Escherichia coli ( E. coli) strains. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of aqueous extracts of Baccharis genistelloides (BG), Terminalia chebula (TC), Maytenus ilicifolia (MI), Cassia angustifolia (CA) and Equisetum arvense (EA) on (i) radiolabeling of blood constituents, (ii) bioavailability of sodium pertechnetate(Na 99mTcO 4) radiopharmaceutical, (iii) survival of E. coli. In vitro labeling of RBC was performed with blood ( Wistar rats) incubated with each extract, SnCl 2 and Na 99mTcO 4. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) were isolated, another aliquots precipitated and soluble (SF) and insoluble (IF) fractions isolated and counted. In the bioavailability of Na 99mTcO 4, Wistar rats were treated (7 days) with aqueous extract or with 0.9%NaCl, the radiopharmaceutical was administered, the animals sacrificed, the organs isolated, weighted and radioactivity counted. To evaluate the effect on the bacterial survival, E. coli was treated with: (a) SnCl 2; (b) 0.9% NaCl; (c) vegetal extract; or (d) SnCl 2 and vegetal extract. Radiolabeling efficiency showed a significantly decrease (ANOVA/Tukey post-test, p<0.05) after treatment with BG, TC, MI and CA extracts. The bioavailability results showed that the uptake of Na 99mTcO 4 was altered significantly (unpaired t-student test, p<0.05) in blood, lungs (CA/TC extracts), bone, heart, ovary (EA /TC), spleen, kidney (TC) , pancreas, thyroid

  7. A Tutorial Review of Functional Connectivity Analysis Methods and Their Interpretational Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bastos, André M; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activity may provide a mechanism for dynamic network coordination. Rhythmic neuronal interactions can be quantified using multiple metrics, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. This tutorial will review and summarize current analysis methods used in the field of invasive and non-invasive electrophysiology to study the dynamic connections between neuronal populations. First, we review metrics for functional connectivity, including coherence, phase synchronization, phase-slope index, and Granger causality, with the specific aim to provide an intuition for how these metrics work, as well as their quantitative definition. Next, we highlight a number of interpretational caveats and common pitfalls that can arise when performing functional connectivity analysis, including the common reference problem, the signal to noise ratio problem, the volume conduction problem, the common input problem, and the sample size bias problem. These pitfalls will be illustrated by presenting a set of MATLAB-scripts, which can be executed by the reader to simulate each of these potential problems. We discuss how these issues can be addressed using current methods. PMID:26778976

  8. A Tutorial Review of Functional Connectivity Analysis Methods and Their Interpretational Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, André M.; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activity may provide a mechanism for dynamic network coordination. Rhythmic neuronal interactions can be quantified using multiple metrics, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. This tutorial will review and summarize current analysis methods used in the field of invasive and non-invasive electrophysiology to study the dynamic connections between neuronal populations. First, we review metrics for functional connectivity, including coherence, phase synchronization, phase-slope index, and Granger causality, with the specific aim to provide an intuition for how these metrics work, as well as their quantitative definition. Next, we highlight a number of interpretational caveats and common pitfalls that can arise when performing functional connectivity analysis, including the common reference problem, the signal to noise ratio problem, the volume conduction problem, the common input problem, and the sample size bias problem. These pitfalls will be illustrated by presenting a set of MATLAB-scripts, which can be executed by the reader to simulate each of these potential problems. We discuss how these issues can be addressed using current methods. PMID:26778976

  9. Windfalls and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Edge, Michael D.; Gorroochurn, Prakash; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2013-01-01

    Association mapping can be viewed as an application of population genetics and evolutionary biology to the problem of identifying genes causally connected to phenotypes. However, some population-genetic principles important to the design and analysis of association studies have not been widely understood or have even been generally misunderstood. Some of these principles underlie techniques that can aid in the discovery of genetic variants that influence phenotypes (‘windfalls’), whereas others can interfere with study design or interpretation of results (‘pitfalls’). Here, considering examples involving genetic variant discovery, linkage disequilibrium, power to detect associations, population stratification and genotype imputation, we address misunderstandings in the application of population genetics to association studies, and we illuminate how some surprising results in association contexts can be easily explained when considered from evolutionary and population-genetic perspectives. Through our examples, we argue that population-genetic thinking—which takes a theoretical view of the evolutionary forces that guide the emergence and propagation of genetic variants—substantially informs the design and interpretation of genetic association studies. In particular, population-genetic thinking sheds light on genetic confounding, on the relationships between association signals of typed markers and causal variants, and on the advantages and disadvantages of particular strategies for measuring genetic variation in association studies. PMID:24481204

  10. Secondary Education Systemic Issues: Addressing Possible Contributors to a Leak in the Science Education Pipeline and Potential Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Hollie

    2005-06-01

    To maintain the legacy of cutting edge scientific innovation in the United States our country must address the many pressing issues facing science education today. One of the most important issues relating to science education is the under-representation of African Americans and Hispanics in the science, technology, and engineering workforce. Foreshadowing such under-representation in the workforce are the disproportionately low rates of African American and Hispanic students attaining college degrees in science and related fields. Evidence suggests disparate systemic factors in secondary science education are contributing to disproportionately low numbers of African American and Hispanic students in the science education pipeline. The present paper embarks on a critical analysis of the issue by elucidating some of the systemic factors within secondary education that contribute to the leak in the science education pipeline. In addition, this review offers a synthesis and explication of some of the policies and programs being implemented to address disparate systemic factors in secondary schools. Finally, recommendations are offered regarding potential mechanisms by which disparities may be alleviated.

  11. Antimicrobial food packaging: potential and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Bhanu; Keshwani, Anu; Kharkwal, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays food preservation, quality maintenance, and safety are major growing concerns of the food industry. It is evident that over time consumers’ demand for natural and safe food products with stringent regulations to prevent food-borne infectious diseases. Antimicrobial packaging which is thought to be a subset of active packaging and controlled release packaging is one such promising technology which effectively impregnates the antimicrobial into the food packaging film material and subsequently delivers it over the stipulated period of time to kill the pathogenic microorganisms affecting food products thereby increasing the shelf life to severe folds. This paper presents a picture of the recent research on antimicrobial agents that are aimed at enhancing and improving food quality and safety by reduction of pathogen growth and extension of shelf life, in a form of a comprehensive review. Examination of the available antimicrobial packaging technologies is also presented along with their significant impact on food safety. This article entails various antimicrobial agents for commercial applications, as well as the difference between the use of antimicrobials under laboratory scale and real time applications. Development of resistance amongst microorganisms is considered as a future implication of antimicrobials with an aim to come up with actual efficacies in extension of shelf life as well as reduction in bacterial growth through the upcoming and promising use of antimicrobials in food packaging for the forthcoming research down the line. PMID:26136740

  12. Assessing anhedonia in depression: Potentials and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Sproule, Beth A; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2016-06-01

    The resurgence of interest in anhedonia within major depression has been fuelled by clinical trials demonstrating its utility in predicting antidepressant response as well as recent conceptualizations focused on the role and manifestation of anhedonia in depression. Historically, anhedonia has been understood as a "loss of pleasure", yet neuropsychological and neurobiological studies reveal a multifaceted reconceptualization that emphasizes different facets of hedonic function, including desire, effort/motivation, anticipation and consummatory pleasure. To ensure generalizability across studies, evaluation of the available subjective and objective methods to assess anhedonia is necessary. The majority of research regarding anhedonia and its neurobiological underpinnings comes from preclinical research, which uses primary reward (e.g. food) to probe hedonic responding. In contrast, behavioural studies in humans primarily use secondary reward (e.g. money) to measure many aspects of reward responding, including delay discounting, response bias, prediction error, probabilistic reversal learning, effort, anticipation and consummatory pleasure. The development of subjective scales to measure anhedonia has also increased in the last decade. This review will assess the current methodology to measure anhedonia, with a focus on scales and behavioural tasks in humans. Limitations of current work and recommendations for future studies are discussed. PMID:26959336

  13. Raman Hyperspectral Imaging of Microfossils: Potential Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Olcott Marshall, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Initially, Raman spectroscopy was a specialized technique used by vibrational spectroscopists; however, due to rapid advancements in instrumentation and imaging techniques over the last few decades, Raman spectrometers are widely available at many institutions, allowing Raman spectroscopy to become a widespread analytical tool in mineralogy and other geological sciences. Hyperspectral imaging, in particular, has become popular due to the fact that Raman spectroscopy can quickly delineate crystallographic and compositional differences in 2-D and 3-D at the micron scale. Although this rapid growth of applications to the Earth sciences has provided great insight across the geological sciences, the ease of application as the instruments become increasingly automated combined with nonspecialists using this techique has resulted in the propagation of errors and misunderstandings throughout the field. For example, the literature now includes misassigned vibration modes, inappropriate spectral processing techniques, confocal depth of laser penetration incorrectly estimated into opaque crystalline solids, and a misconstrued understanding of the anisotropic nature of sp2 carbons. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy—Raman imaging—Confocal Raman spectroscopy—Disordered sp2 carbons—Hematite—Microfossils. Astrobiology 13, 920–931. PMID:24088070

  14. The Virtual Library: Pitfalls, Promises, and Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooks, Dana

    1993-01-01

    Discusses components of the emerging virtual library. Highlights include adopting technology to enhance library services; navigation problems; shared resources and services; costs; implementation challenges, including library instruction programs; control over intellectual content; technical design issues; and a brief overview of current virtual…

  15. Microstructure Informed Tractography: Pitfalls and Open Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Daducci, Alessandro; Dal Palú, Alessandro; Descoteaux, Maxime; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    One of the major limitations of diffusion MRI tractography is that the fiber tracts recovered by existing algorithms are not truly quantitative. Local techniques for estimating more quantitative features of the tissue microstructure exist, but their combination with tractography has always been considered intractable. Recent advances in local and global modeling made it possible to fill this gap and a number of promising techniques for microstructure informed tractography have been suggested, opening new and exciting perspectives for the quantification of brain connectivity. The ease-of-use of the proposed solutions made it very attractive for researchers to include such advanced methods in their analyses; however, this apparent simplicity should not hide some critical open questions raised by the complexity of these very high-dimensional problems, otherwise some fundamental issues may be pushed into the background. The aim of this article is to raise awareness in the diffusion MRI community, notably researchers working on brain connectivity, about some potential pitfalls and modeling choices that make the interpretation of the outcomes from these novel techniques rather cumbersome. Through a series of experiments on synthetic and real data, we illustrate practical situations where erroneous and severely biased conclusions may be drawn about the connectivity if these pitfalls are overlooked, like the presence of partial/missing/duplicate fibers or the critical importance of the diffusion model adopted. Microstructure informed tractography is a young but very promising technology, and by acknowledging its current limitations as done in this paper, we hope our observations will trigger further research in this direction and new ideas for truly quantitative and biologically meaningful analyses of the connectivity. PMID:27375412

  16. Microstructure Informed Tractography: Pitfalls and Open Challenges.

    PubMed

    Daducci, Alessandro; Dal Palú, Alessandro; Descoteaux, Maxime; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    One of the major limitations of diffusion MRI tractography is that the fiber tracts recovered by existing algorithms are not truly quantitative. Local techniques for estimating more quantitative features of the tissue microstructure exist, but their combination with tractography has always been considered intractable. Recent advances in local and global modeling made it possible to fill this gap and a number of promising techniques for microstructure informed tractography have been suggested, opening new and exciting perspectives for the quantification of brain connectivity. The ease-of-use of the proposed solutions made it very attractive for researchers to include such advanced methods in their analyses; however, this apparent simplicity should not hide some critical open questions raised by the complexity of these very high-dimensional problems, otherwise some fundamental issues may be pushed into the background. The aim of this article is to raise awareness in the diffusion MRI community, notably researchers working on brain connectivity, about some potential pitfalls and modeling choices that make the interpretation of the outcomes from these novel techniques rather cumbersome. Through a series of experiments on synthetic and real data, we illustrate practical situations where erroneous and severely biased conclusions may be drawn about the connectivity if these pitfalls are overlooked, like the presence of partial/missing/duplicate fibers or the critical importance of the diffusion model adopted. Microstructure informed tractography is a young but very promising technology, and by acknowledging its current limitations as done in this paper, we hope our observations will trigger further research in this direction and new ideas for truly quantitative and biologically meaningful analyses of the connectivity. PMID:27375412

  17. Pitfall in MR imaging of lymphadenopathy after lymphangiography.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, K A; Ellis, J H; Baker, D E; Borello, J A; Glazer, G M

    1986-12-01

    In two patients examined with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after lymphangiography, opacified pelvic lymph nodes could not be distinguished from subcutaneous or retroperitoneal fat because of the short T1 and long T2 relaxation times of lymphangiographic contrast media. Opacified nodes removed from one patient had relaxation times similar to those of fat. Thus, assessment of lymphadenopathy with MR imaging should be performed before lymphangiography to obviate this potential pitfall. PMID:3024208

  18. Measurement and monitoring needs, capabilities and potential for addressing reduced emissions from deforestation and forest degradation under REDD+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Hansen, Matthew; Houghton, Richard A.; Walker, Wayne; Laporte, Nadine; Busch, Jonah

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the state of measurement and monitoring capabilities for forests in the context of REDD+ needs, with a focus on what is currently possible, where improvements are needed, and what capabilities will be advanced in the near-term with new technologies already under development. We summarize the role of remote sensing (both satellite and aircraft) for observational monitoring of forests, including measuring changes in their current and past extent for setting baselines, their carbon stock density for estimating emissions in areas that are deforested or degraded, and their regrowth dynamics following disturbance. We emphasize the synergistic role of integrating field inventory measurements with remote sensing for best practices in monitoring, reporting and verification. We also address the potential of remote sensing for enforcing safeguards on conservation of natural forests and biodiversity. We argue that capabilities exist now to meet operational needs for REDD+ measurement, reporting, and verification and reference levels. For some other areas of importance for REDD+, such as safeguards for natural forests and biodiversity, monitoring capabilities are approaching operational in the near term. For all REDD+ needs, measurement capabilities will rapidly advance in the next few years as a result of new technology as well as advances in capacity building both within and outside of the tropical forest nations on which REDD+ is primarily focused.

  19. Pitfalls in archaeoastronomy: with examples from Mesoamerica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, U.

    The kinds of pitfalls to be treated in this paper have been grouped into three categories: uncritical postulation of astronomical links, overinterpretation of alignments, and ethnocentric application of recent European concepts of space and time.

  20. Using demographic data to better interpret pitfall trap catches

    PubMed Central

    Matalin, Andrey V.; Makarov, Kirill V.

    2011-01-01

    assessment of the migratory/residential status of particular carabid species are potential ways of increasing the reliability of pitfall trap information. PMID:21738415

  1. Potential effects of the introduction of the discrete address beacon system data link on air/ground information transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    This study of Aviation Safety Reporting System reports suggests that benefits should accure from implementation of discrete address beacon system data link. The phase enhanced terminal information system service is expected to provide better terminal information than present systems by improving currency and accuracy. In the exchange of air traffic control messages, discrete address insures that only the intended recipient receives and acts on a specific message. Visual displays and printer copy of messages should mitigate many of the reported problems associated with voice communications. The problems that remain unaffected include error in addressing the intended recipient and messages whose content is wrong but are otherwise correct as to format and reasonableness.

  2. Avoiding legal pitfalls in surrogacy arrangements.

    PubMed

    James, Summer; Chilvers, Rebecca; Havemann, Dara; Phelps, John Y

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this article is to discuss the legal pitfalls that reproductive endocrinologists face when participating in gestational surrogacy contracts. This paper was composed using Westlaw and LexisNexis commercial legal search engines to perform a review of statutes and cases pertaining to gestational surrogacy. The search results demonstrated that in the absence of suitable preparation, there is significant potential for litigation while participating in gestational agreements. Providers caring for gestational carriers have been named as parties in lawsuits for failure to provide psychological screening, failure to screen for infectious disease and participation in gestational contracts that are not compliant with state law. There is great disparity in state laws and court rulings pertaining to gestational agreements. When legal disputes arise, individual state laws and court rulings are controlling over the Uniform Parentage Act. Likewise, recommendations by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine do not supersede state laws. The failure to abide by individual state laws unnecessarily exposes reproductive endocrinologists and their IVF facilities to potential litigation. In order to lessen exposure to litigation, an understanding of individual state legislation or historical court rulings is advised. PMID:21050815

  3. Common Pitfalls in Exposure and Response Prevention (EX/RP) for OCD

    PubMed Central

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Williams, Monnica T.; Malcoun, Emily; Yadin, Elna; Foa, Edna B.

    2012-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a highly debilitating disorder. Fortunately there are treatments that help the majority of OCD sufferers. The behavioral treatment with the most empirical support for its efficacy is exposure and response prevention (EX/RP). Over the years in our supervision meetings and in our clinical practice we have noted a number of relatively common therapist pitfalls that decrease the effectiveness of EX/RP. These pitfalls include not encouraging patients to approach the most distressing situations, doing imaginal exposure when in vivo is called for (and vice versa), encouraging distraction during exposure, providing reassurance, failing to address the core fear, ineffective handling of mental compulsions, and difficulty working with close others in the patient’s life. In the current article we describe these common pitfalls and how to avoid them. PMID:22924159

  4. Principles and pitfalls of nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Kimura, J

    1984-10-01

    This report reviews the fundamental principles and the changing concepts of nerve stimulation techniques, and discusses the proper application of these techniques in the differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. Nerve conduction studies help delineate the extent and distribution of the neural lesion and distinguish two major categories of peripheral nerve disease: demyelination and axonal degeneration. Although the method is based on simple principles, pitfalls abound in practice. Variability in nerve conduction measurement may result from temperature change, variations among nerve segments, and the effects of age. Other sources of error include excessive spread of stimulation current, anomalous innervation, temporal dispersion, and inaccuracy of surface measurement. Unlike a bipolar derivation, which selectively records near-field potentials, a referential recording may give rise to stationary far-field peaks from a moving source. Overlooking this possibility can lead to an incorrect interpretation of findings. Conventional nerve conduction studies deal primarily with measurements of the distal nerve segments in an extremity. More recent techniques are applicable to less accessible anatomical regions, as illustrated by elicitation of the blink reflex, F wave, and H reflex, and the use of the inching technique. Other methods used to assess special aspects of nerve conduction include the ischemic test and studies of slow-conducting fibers. PMID:6093680

  5. Smart Sensors: Advantages and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Paddy James

    For almost 50 years, silicon sensors have been on the market. There have been many examples of success stories for simple silicon sensors, such as the Hall plate and photo-diode. These have found mass-market applications. The development of micromachining techniques brought pressure sensors and accelerometers into the market and later the gyroscope. These have also achieved mass-market. The remaining issue is how far to integrate. Many of the devices on the market use a simple sensor with external electronics or read-out electronics in the same package (system-in-a-package). However, there are also many examples of fully integrated sensors (smart sensors) where the whole system is integrated into a single chip. If the application and the device technology permit this, there can be many advantages. A broader look at sensors shows a wealth of integrated devices. The critical issues are reliability and packaging if these devices are to find the applications. A number of silicon sensors and actuators have shown great commercial success, but still many more have to find their way out of the laboratory. This paper will examine the development of the technologies, some of the success stories and the opportunities for integrated Microsystems as well as the pitfalls.

  6. TU-D-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT II: Challenges ' Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z; Yin, F; Cho, J

    2014-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been effective treatment for the management of various diseases, which often delivers high radiation dose in a single or a few fractions. SBRT therefore demands precise treatment delivery to the tumor while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Recent developments in image guidance enable target localization with increased accuracy. With such improvements in localization, image-guided SBRT has been widely adopted into clinical practice. In SBRT, high radiation dose is generally delivered with small fields. Therefore, it is crucial to accurately measure dosimetric data for the small fields during commissioning. In addition, image-guided SBRT demands accurate image localization to ensure safety and quality of patient care. Lately, the reports of AAPM TG 142 and TG 104 have been published and added recommendations for imaging devices that are integrated with the linear accelerator for SBRT. Furthermore, various challenges and potential pitfalls lie in the clinical implementation of image-guided SBRT. In this lecture, these challenges and pitfalls of image-guided SBRT will be illustrated and discussed from dosimetric, technical and clinical perspectives.Being a promising technique, image-guided SBRT has shown great potentials, and will lead to more accurate and safer SBRT treatments. Learning Objectives: To understand dosimetric challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major clinical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major technical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT.

  7. Bed bug (Heteroptera: Cimicidae) attraction to pitfall traps baited with carbon dioxide, heat, and chemical lure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlu; Gibb, Timothy; Bennett, Gary W; McKnight, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), heat, and chemical lure (1-octen-3-ol and L-lactic acid) were tested as attractants for bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L. (Heteroptera: Cimicidae), by using pitfall traps. Both CO2 and heat were attractive to bed bugs. CO2 was significantly more attractive to bed bugs than heat. Traps baited with chemical lure attracted more bed bugs but at a statistically nonsignificant level. In small arena studies (56 by 44 cm), pitfall traps baited with CO2 or heat trapped 79.8 +/- 6.7 and 51.6 +/- 0.9% (mean +/- SEM) of the bed bugs after 6 h, respectively. Traps baited with CO2 + heat, CO, + chemical lure, or CO2 + heat + chemical lure captured > or = 86.7% of the bed bugs after 6 h, indicating baited pitfall traps were highly effective in attracting and capturing bed bugs from a short distance. In 3.1- by 1.8-m environmental chambers, a pitfall trap baited with CO, + heat + chemical lure trapped 57.3 +/- 6.4% of the bed bugs overnight. The pitfall trap was further tested in four bed bug-infested apartments to determine its efficacy in detecting light bed bug infestations. Visual inspections found an average of 12.0 +/- 5.4 bed bugs per apartment. The bed bugs that were found by visual inspections were hand-removed during inspections. A pitfall trap baited with CO2 and chemical lure was subsequently placed in each apartment with an average of 15.0 +/- 6.4 bed bugs collected per trap by the next morning. We conclude that baited pitfall traps are potentially effective tools for evaluating bed bug control programs and detecting early bed bug infestations. PMID:19736771

  8. Fluorescent Proteins in Cellular Organelles: Serious Pitfalls and Some Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been powerful tools for cell biologists for over 15 years. The large variety of FPs available rarely comes with an instruction manual or a warning label. The potential pitfalls of the use of FPs in cellular organelles represent a significant concern for investigators. FPs generally did not evolve in the often distinctive physicochemical environments of subcellular organelles. In organelles, FPs can misfold, go dark, and even distort organelle morphology. In this minireview, we describe the issues associated with FPs in organelles and provide solutions to enable investigators to better exploit FP technology in cells. PMID:23971632

  9. Addressing the stimulant treatment gap: A call to investigate the therapeutic benefits potential of cannabinoids for crack-cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Benedikt; Kuganesan, Sharan; Gallassi, Andrea; Malcher-Lopes, Renato; van den Brink, Wim; Wood, Evan

    2015-12-01

    Crack-cocaine use is prevalent in numerous countries, yet concentrated primarily - largely within urban contexts - in the Northern and Southern regions of the Americas. It is associated with a variety of behavioral, physical and mental health and social problems which gravely affect users and their environments. Few evidence-based treatments for crack-cocaine use exist and are available to users in the reality of street drug use. Numerous pharmacological treatments have been investigated but with largely disappointing results. An important therapeutic potential for crack-cocaine use may rest in cannabinoids, which have recently seen a general resurgence for varied possible therapeutic usages for different neurological diseases. Distinct potential therapeutic benefits for crack-cocaine use and common related adverse symptoms may come specifically from cannabidiol (CBD) - one of the numerous cannabinoid components found in cannabis - with its demonstrated anxiolytic, anti-psychotic, anti-convulsant effects and potential benefits for sleep and appetite problems. The possible therapeutic prospects of cannabinoids are corroborated by observational studies from different contexts documenting crack-cocaine users' 'self-medication' efforts towards coping with crack-cocaine-related problems, including withdrawal and craving, impulsivity and paranoia. Cannabinoid therapeutics offer further benefits of being available in multiple formulations, are low in adverse risk potential, and may easily be offered in community-based settings which may add to their feasibility as interventions for - predominantly marginalized - crack-cocaine user populations. Supported by the dearth of current therapeutic options for crack-cocaine use, we are advocating for the implementation of a rigorous research program investigating the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabinoids for crack-cocaine use. Given the high prevalence of this grave substance use problem in the Americas, opportunities for

  10. Gold(I) biscarbene complexes derived from vascular-disrupting combretastatin A-4 address different targets and show antimetastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Julienne K; Biersack, Bernhard; Kalie, Hussein; Andronache, Ion C; Kaps, Leonard; Schuppan, Detlef; Sasse, Florenz; Schobert, Rainer

    2014-06-01

    Gold N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes are an emerging class of anticancer drugs. We present a series of gold(I) biscarbene complexes with NHC ligands derived from the plant metabolite combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) that retain its vascular-disrupting effect, yet address different cellular and protein targets. Unlike CA-4, these complexes did not interfere with tubulin, but with the actin cytoskeleton of endothelial and cancer cells. For the highly metastatic 518A2 melanoma cell line this effect was accompanied by a marked accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and a suppression of active prometastatic matrix metalloproteinase-2. Despite these mechanistic differences the complexes were as strongly antivascular as CA-4 both in vitro in tube formation assays with human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and in vivo as to blood vessel disruption in the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken eggs. The antiproliferative effect of the new gold biscarbene complexes in a panel of six human cancer cell lines was impressive, with low sub-micromolar IC50 values (72 h) even against CA-4-refractory HT-29 colon and multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. In preliminary studies with a mouse melanoma xenograft model the complexes led to significant decreases in tumor volume while being very well tolerated. PMID:24648184

  11. Pitfalls and Success of Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendon, Marie Egbert

    This report discusses the pitfalls and success of distance learning programs. The report covers instructional alternatives of telecourse, linked courses, computer-aided learning, correspondence courses, and audio/video instruction. Sixteen concerns for distance learning programs are identified; for example: (1) registration procedures for distance…

  12. Addressing potential role of magnesium dyshomeostasis to improve treatment efficacy for epilepsy: A reexamination of the literature.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Katie E; Shytle, R Douglas; Frontera, Alfred T; Soble, Jason R; Schoenberg, Mike R

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg(2+) ) is an abundant mineral in the body serving many biochemical functions. Magnesium supplementation has been shown to raise seizure threshold in animal and human studies, but the etiological contribution of magnesium deficiency to the onset and maintenance of epilepsy, as well as the degree to which it impacts antiepileptic drug efficacy, remains poorly understood. This may be due, at least in part, to the inherent limitations of commonly used serum levels as a measure of functional magnesium status, as well as insufficient data regarding relative bioavailabilities of various magnesium salts and chelates for use with humans. To date, 1 randomized clinical trial has been conducted assessing Mg(2+) supplementation in epilepsy, and findings yielded promising results. Yet a notable dearth in the literature remains, and more studies are needed. To better understand the potential role of magnesium deficiency as a causal factor in epilepsy, more convenient and accurate measurement methods should to be developed and employed in randomized, controlled trials of oral magnesium supplementation in epilepsy. Findings from such studies have the potential to facilitate far-reaching clinical and economic improvements in epilepsy treatment standards. PMID:26313363

  13. Addressing the Potential Need for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting After Free Tissue Transfer for Breast Reconstruction: An Algorithmic Approach.

    PubMed

    Maher, Janae L; Mahabir, Raman C; Roehl, Kendall R

    2015-08-01

    The number one cause of death in American women is heart disease. Studies have clearly shown the superiority of internal mammary artery (IMA) grafts for coronary revascularization over other conduits or intracoronary techniques. Our goal was to design an algorithm for recipient vessel selection in patients undergoing free tissue transfer breast reconstruction.A review of the literature was performed to identify potential evidence to contribute to a best-practice guideline. The lack of high-level evidence led us to create a guideline based on a workgroup consensus, expert opinion, cadaveric studies, and case reports.As we operate on older patient populations, the need for IMA use for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) after autologous breast reconstruction may arise more frequently. We discuss the current literature regarding recipient vessel choices and level of recipient vessel harvest in free flap breast reconstruction to help continually evolve the practices of our specialty to the potential future needs of our patients. We also present a best-practice decision algorithm for vessel selection and harvest, as well as a sample case of CABG using the left IMA 35 days after previous autologous breast reconstruction using the left IMA.As the number of patients we operate on who may later require their IMA for CABG increases, so too must our understanding of the implications of our selection of recipient vessels for free autologous breast reconstruction. PMID:26165568

  14. Addressing Potential Cumulative Impacts of Development on Threatened Species: The Case of the Endangered Black-Throated Finch

    PubMed Central

    Vanderduys, Eric Peter; Reside, April E.; Grice, Anthony; Rechetelo, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Where threatened biodiversity is adversely affected by development, policies often state that "no net loss" should be the goal and biodiversity offsetting is one mechanism available to achieve this. However, developments are often approved on an ad hoc basis and cumulative impacts are not sufficiently examined. We demonstrate the potential for serious threat to an endangered subspecies when multiple developments are planned. We modelled the distribution of the black-throated finch (Poephila cincta cincta) using bioclimatic data and Queensland's Regional Ecosystem classification. We overlaid granted, extant extractive and exploratory mining tenures within the known and modelled ranges of black-throated finches to examine the level of incipient threat to this subspecies in central Queensland, Australia. Our models indicate that more than half of the remaining P. cincta cincta habitat is currently under extractive or exploratory tenure. Therefore, insufficient habitat exists to offset all potential development so "no net loss" is not possible. This has implications for future conservation of this and similarly distributed species and for resource development planning, especially the use of legislated offsets for biodiversity protection. PMID:26934622

  15. Addressing Potential Cumulative Impacts of Development on Threatened Species: The Case of the Endangered Black-Throated Finch.

    PubMed

    Vanderduys, Eric Peter; Reside, April E; Grice, Anthony; Rechetelo, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Where threatened biodiversity is adversely affected by development, policies often state that "no net loss" should be the goal and biodiversity offsetting is one mechanism available to achieve this. However, developments are often approved on an ad hoc basis and cumulative impacts are not sufficiently examined. We demonstrate the potential for serious threat to an endangered subspecies when multiple developments are planned. We modelled the distribution of the black-throated finch (Poephila cincta cincta) using bioclimatic data and Queensland's Regional Ecosystem classification. We overlaid granted, extant extractive and exploratory mining tenures within the known and modelled ranges of black-throated finches to examine the level of incipient threat to this subspecies in central Queensland, Australia. Our models indicate that more than half of the remaining P. cincta cincta habitat is currently under extractive or exploratory tenure. Therefore, insufficient habitat exists to offset all potential development so "no net loss" is not possible. This has implications for future conservation of this and similarly distributed species and for resource development planning, especially the use of legislated offsets for biodiversity protection. PMID:26934622

  16. Pitfalls and limitations in translation from biomarker discovery to clinical utility in predictive and personalised medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Since the emergence of the so-called omics technology, thousands of putative biomarkers have been identified and published, which have dramatically increased the opportunities for developing more effective therapeutics. These opportunities can have profound benefits for patients and for the economics of healthcare. However, the transfer of biomarkers from discovery to clinical practice is still a process filled with lots of pitfalls and limitations, mostly limited by structural and scientific factors. To become a clinically approved test, a potential biomarker should be confirmed and validated using hundreds of specimens and should be reproducible, specific and sensitive. Besides the lack of quality in biomarker validation, a number of other key issues can be identified and should be addressed. Therefore, the aim of this article is to discuss a series of interpretative and practical issues that need to be understood and resolved before potential biomarkers become a clinically approved test or are already on the diagnostic market. Some of these issues are shortly discussed here. PMID:23442211

  17. The Union County Hydrogeology Project: Addressing Potential Imbalances by Integrating Science and Communities in Northeastern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Podzemny, B.; Peacock, G.; Yuhas, A.; Williams, S.; Yuhas, E.

    2013-12-01

    The area around the town of Clayton, in northeastern New Mexico, was not a declared groundwater basin until September of 2005. In the years leading up to 2005, battles over groundwater use and attempts to stop drilling of additional water wells for irrigation and stock use led to multiple lawsuits in the community. Because there were no regulations in place and the geology of the area had not been studied in a hydrologic framework since the 1960s, there was no basic information for decisions to be made with regards to drilling new wells and use of groundwater, leading to the potential for severe imbalances in groundwater recharge versus usage in the region. In 2006, the Northeast Soil and Water Conservation District (NESWCD), based in Clayton, decided that a large scale hydrogeology project was needed to help develop community guidelines for groundwater development. In 2010, Zeigler Geologic Consulting and the NM Bureau of Geology partnered with the NESWCD to help develop this project. The Union County Hydrogeology Project (UCHP) is unique in that this project was initially undertaken by members of the community who developed a program of biannual static water level measurements in wells across the county. In addition, the project has support from the majority of land owners in Union County and the scientists working on the project have worked closely with local community leaders to integrate this large project into everyday activities. Community integration efforts include presenting data at the Annual Producers Meeting and at the county fair, as well as other regional conferences on water use and development. Previous assumptions were that the primary aquifers being utilized were the Tertiary Ogallala Formation and the Upper Cretaceous Dakota Group. However, evaluation of surface bedrock exposures and well cuttings from petroleum exploration wells drilled in eastern Union County demonstrate that the subsurface geology is more complex than might be expected. This

  18. Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines for Rhabdomyosarcoma Research: Utility and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, Ashley R. P.; Jones, Rosanne; Crose, Lisa E. S.; Belyea, Brian C.; Barr, Frederic G.; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite intergroup clinical trials conducted in Europe and North America, outcomes for high risk patients with this disease have not significantly improved in the last several decades, and survival of metastatic or relapsed disease remains extremely poor. Accrual into new clinical trials is slow and difficult, so in vitro cell-line research and in vivo xenograft models present an attractive alternative for preclinical research for this cancer type. Currently, 30 commonly used human RMS cell lines exist, with differing origins, karyotypes, histologies, and methods of validation. Selecting an appropriate cell line for RMS research has important implications for outcomes. There are also potential pitfalls in using certain cell lines including contamination with murine stromal cells, cross-contamination between cell lines, discordance between the cell line and its associated original tumor, imposter cell lines, and nomenclature errors that result in the circulation of two or more presumed unique cell lines that are actually from the same origin. These pitfalls can be avoided by testing for species-specific isoenzymes, microarray analysis, assays for subtype-specific fusion products, and short tandem repeat analysis. PMID:23882450

  19. Pitfalls in diagnosing diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Peters, Edgar J

    2016-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a diabetic foot infection is made based on clinical symptoms and signs, we also use blood laboratory, microbiological and radiological studies to make treatment decisions. All of these diagnostic studies have pitfalls that can lead to a delay in diagnosis. Such delays will likely lead to further tissue damage and to a higher chance of amputation. One of these pitfalls is that some clinicians rely on microbiological, rather than clinical data, to diagnose infection. Though subjective by nature, clinical signs predict outcome of foot infections accurately. Another pitfall is that microbiological data can be misleading. All wounds harbour microorganisms; therefore, a positive wound culture does not mean that a wound is infected. Furthermore, the outcome of cultures of wound swabs does not correlate well with culture results of tissue biopsies. Therapy guidance by wound swab will likely lead to overtreatment of non-pathogenic organisms. Genotyping might have a role in identifying previously unrecognized (combinations of) pathogens in diabetic foot infection, bacteria in sessile phenotype and non-culturable pathogens, e.g. in cases where antibiotics have already been administered. One more pitfall is that the diagnosis of osteomyelitis remains difficult. Although the result of percutaneous bone biopsy is the reference standard for osteomyelitis, some other diagnostic modalities can aid in the diagnosis. A combination of several of these diagnostic tests is probably a good strategy to achieve a higher diagnostic accuracy. Relying on a single test will likely lead to misidentification of patients with osteomyelitis with associated overtreatment and undertreatment. PMID:26813617

  20. Pitfalls of cholescintigraphy. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Strickler, S.; Park, H.M.

    1982-12-01

    A /sup 99m/Tc PIPIDA scan was performed in a young auto accident victim who had a transient rise in serum bilirubin level. Initially, the stasis of activity in the right ureter was mistaken for activity in the common bile duct. Misinterpretation of biliary imaging studies can be prevented with awareness of pitfalls and readiness to obtain delayed images and additional images in different projections.

  1. Avoiding common pitfalls when clustering biological data.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Tom; Qi, Zhijie; Naegle, Kristen M

    2016-01-01

    Clustering is an unsupervised learning method, which groups data points based on similarity, and is used to reveal the underlying structure of data. This computational approach is essential to understanding and visualizing the complex data that are acquired in high-throughput multidimensional biological experiments. Clustering enables researchers to make biological inferences for further experiments. Although a powerful technique, inappropriate application can lead biological researchers to waste resources and time in experimental follow-up. We review common pitfalls identified from the published molecular biology literature and present methods to avoid them. Commonly encountered pitfalls relate to the high-dimensional nature of biological data from high-throughput experiments, the failure to consider more than one clustering method for a given problem, and the difficulty in determining whether clustering has produced meaningful results. We present concrete examples of problems and solutions (clustering results) in the form of toy problems and real biological data for these issues. We also discuss ensemble clustering as an easy-to-implement method that enables the exploration of multiple clustering solutions and improves robustness of clustering solutions. Increased awareness of common clustering pitfalls will help researchers avoid overinterpreting or misinterpreting the results and missing valuable insights when clustering biological data. PMID:27303057

  2. Exploring the potential for using results-based financing to address non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The burden of disease due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is rising in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and funding for global health is increasingly limited. As a large contributor of development assistance for health, the US government has the potential to influence overall trends in NCDs. Results-based financing (RBF) has been proposed as a strategy to increase aid effectiveness and efficiency through incentives for positive performance and results in health programs, but its potential for addressing NCDs has not been explored. Methods Qualitative methods including literature review and key informant interviews were used to identify promising RBF mechanisms for addressing NCDs in resource-limited settings. Eight key informants identified by area of expertise participated in semi-structured interviews. Results The majority of RBF schemes to date have been applied to maternal and child health. Evidence from existing RBF programs suggests that RBF principles can be applied to health programs for NCDs. Several options were identified for US involvement with RBF for NCDs. Conclusion There is potential for the US to have a significant impact on NCDs in LMICs through a comprehensive RBF strategy for global health. RBF mechanisms should be tested for use in NCD programs through pilot programs incorporating robust impact evaluations. PMID:23368959

  3. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system. PMID:23487896

  4. 3D detection of colonic polyps by CT colonography: accuracy, pitfalls, and solutions by adjunct 2D workup.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S A; Ernst, A S; Beer, M; Juchems, M S

    2015-10-01

    Computed tomography colonography (CTC) enables evaluation of the colon with minimal invasiveness. In spite of advances in multidetector CT (MDCT) technology and advanced software features, including electronic bowel cleansing (digital removal and tagging of fluid and debris), a number of potential pitfalls in the evaluation of the 3D volumetric dataset persist. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the strengths and potential pitfalls in the detection of colorectal polyps using CTC via a primary three-dimensional (3D) approach for evaluation. PMID:26220124

  5. Procedures for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to characterize potential health risk from trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater at Beale Air Force Base in California

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T; Daniels, J I; Hall, L C

    1999-09-01

    This study was designed to accomplish two objectives. The first was to provide to the US Air Force and the regulatory community quantitative procedures that they might want to consider using for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to better characterize potential health risk. Such methods could be used at sites where populations may now or in the future be faced with using groundwater contaminated with low concentrations of the chemical trichloroethylene (TCE). The second was to illustrate and explain the application of these procedures with respect to available data for TCE in ground water beneath an inactive landfill site that is undergoing remediation at Beale Air Force Base in California. The results from this illustration provide more detail than the more traditional conservative deterministic, screening-level calculations of risk, also computed for purposes of comparison. Application of the procedures described in this report can lead to more reasonable and equitable risk-acceptability criteria for potentially exposed populations at specific sites.

  6. Mastering methodological pitfalls for surviving the metagenomic jungle.

    PubMed

    Delmont, Tom O; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M

    2013-08-01

    Metagenomics is a culture- and PCR-independent approach that is now widely exploited for directly studying microbial evolution, microbial ecology, and developing biotechnologies. Observations and discoveries are critically dependent on DNA extraction methods, sequencing technologies, and bioinformatics tools. The potential pitfalls need to be understood and, to some degree, mastered if the resulting data are to survive scrutiny. In particular, methodological variations appear to affect results from different ecosystems differently, thus increasing the risk of biological and ecological misinterpretation. Part of the difficulty is derived from the lack of knowledge concerning the true microbial diversity and because no approach can guarantee accessing microorganisms in the same proportion in which they exist in the environment. However, the variation between different approaches (e.g. DNA extraction techniques, sequence annotation systems) can be used to evaluate whether observations are meaningful. These methodological variations can be integrated into the error analysis before comparing microbial communities. PMID:23757040

  7. The Head-fixed Behaving Rat—Procedures and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Cornelius; Hentschke, Harald; Butovas, Sergejus; Haiss, Florent; Stüttgen, Maik C; Gerdjikov, Todor V; Bergner, Caroline G; Waiblinger, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes experimental techniques with head-fixed, operantly conditioned rodents that allow the control of stimulus presentation and tracking of motor output at hitherto unprecedented levels of spatio-temporal precision. Experimental procedures for the surgery and behavioral training are presented. We place particular emphasis on potential pitfalls using these procedures in order to assist investigators who intend to engage in this type of experiment. We argue that head-fixed rodent models, by allowing the combination of methodologies from molecular manipulations, intracellular electrophysiology, and imaging to behavioral measurements, will be instrumental in combining insights into the functional neuronal organization at different levels of observation. Provided viable behavioral methods are implemented, model systems based on rodents will be complementary to current primate models—the latter providing highest comparability with the human brain, while the former offer hugely advanced methodologies on the lower levels of organization, for example, genetic alterations, intracellular electrophysiology, and imaging. PMID:20954892

  8. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  9. Avoiding Title V permitting pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Laswell, D.L.

    1993-04-01

    Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments requires states to implement new air operating permit programs. States have a great deal of flexibility in developing their permit programs. Industry should work now to ensure that state programs contain the favorable aspects of the federal regulations and do not contain more stringent requirements that are not required under the Clean Air Act. This article outlines areas of the permit program that have the potential to handicap industry`s ability to expand.

  10. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  11. Pitfalls of Personal Development Plans--The User Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grohnert, Therese; Beausaert, Simon; Segers, Mien

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate which pitfalls users of personal development plans (PDPs) perceive in business and governmental organisations with mandatory PDP use. Hundred and thirty-one written statements of PDP users across three Dutch organisations were analysed and categorised into nine pitfalls. Next to an overall lack of use and…

  12. International Telepathology: Promises and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Navid; Riben, Michael; Evans, Andrew J; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Innovative technologies for digital imaging and telecommunications are changing the way we deliver health care. Telepathology collaborations are one example of how delivering remote pathology services to patients can benefit from leveraging this change. Over the years, several academic and commercial teleconsultation networks have been established. Herein, we review the landscape of these international telepathology efforts and highlight key supportive factors and potential barriers to successful cross-border collaborations. Important features of successful international telepathology programs include efficient workflows, dedicated information technology staff, continuous maintenance, financial incentives, ensuring that all involved stakeholders are satisfied, and value-added clinical benefit to patient care. Factors that plague such telepathology operations include legal/regulatory issues, sustainability, and cultural and environmental issues. Pathologists, vendors and laboratory accreditation agencies will need to embrace and capitalize on this new paradigm of international telepathology accordingly. PMID:27101287

  13. Pitfalls of Insulin Pump Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients’ visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. PMID:25355713

  14. Opening addresses.

    PubMed

    Chukudebelu, W O; Lucas, A O; Ransome-kuti, O; Akinla, O; Obayi, G U

    1988-01-01

    The theme of the 3rd International Conference of the Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria (SOGON) held October 26, 1986 in Enugu was maternal morbidity and mortality in Africa. The opening addresses emphasize the high maternal mortality rate in Africa and SOGON's dedication to promoting women's health and welfare. In order to reduce maternal mortality, the scope of this problem must be made evident by gathering accurate mortality rates through maternity care monitoring and auditing. Governments, health professionals, educators, behavioral scientists, and communication specialists have a responsibility to improve maternal health services in this country. By making the population aware of this problem through education, measures can be taken to reduce the presently high maternal mortality rates. Nigerian women are physically unprepared for childbirth; therefore, balanced diets and disease prevention should be promoted. Since about 40% of deliveries are unmanaged, training for traditional birth attendants should be provided. Furthermore, family planning programs should discourage teenage pregnancies, encourage birth spacing and small families, and promote the use of family planning techniques among men. The problem of child bearing and rearing accompanied by hard work should also be investigated. For practices to change so that maternal mortality rates can be reduced, attitudes must be changed such that the current rates are viewed as unacceptable. PMID:12179275

  15. Bioinformatics in proteomics: application, terminology, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Jan C; Prokudin, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Bioinformatics applies data mining, i.e., modern computer-based statistics, to biomedical data. It leverages on machine learning approaches, such as artificial neural networks, decision trees and clustering algorithms, and is ideally suited for handling huge data amounts. In this article, we review the analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics, starting with common pre-processing steps and using single decision trees and decision tree ensembles for classification. Special emphasis is put on the pitfall of overfitting, i.e., of generating too complex single decision trees. Finally, we discuss the pros and cons of the two different decision tree usages. PMID:15237926

  16. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  17. A model of integrated health care in a poverty-impacted community in New York City: Importance of early detection and addressing potential barriers to intervention implementation.

    PubMed

    Acri, Mary C; Bornheimer, Lindsay A; O'Brien, Kyle; Sezer, Sara; Little, Virna; Cleek, Andrew F; McKay, Mary M

    2016-04-01

    Disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) are chronic, impairing, and costly behavioral health conditions that are four times more prevalent among children of color living in impoverished communities as compared to the general population. This disparity is largely due to the increased exposure to stressors related to low socioeconomic status including community violence, unstable housing, under supported schools, substance abuse, and limited support systems. However, despite high rates and greater need, there is a considerably lower rate of mental health service utilization among these youth. Accordingly, the current study aims to describe a unique model of integrated health care for ethnically diverse youth living in a New York City borough. With an emphasis on addressing possible barriers to implementation, integrated models for children have the potential to prevent ongoing mental health problems through early detection and intervention. PMID:27070372

  18. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  19. Presidential address.

    PubMed

    Vohra, U

    1993-07-01

    The Secretary of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare serves as Chair of the Executive Council of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay. She addressed its 35th convocation in 1993. Global population stands at 5.43 billion and increases by about 90 million people each year. 84 million of these new people are born in developing countries. India contributes 17 million new people annually. The annual population growth rate in India is about 2%. Its population size will probably surpass 1 billion by the 2000. High population growth rates are a leading obstacle to socioeconomic development in developing countries. Governments of many developing countries recognize this problem and have expanded their family planning programs to stabilize population growth. Asian countries that have done so and have completed the fertility transition include China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Burma, Malaysia, North Korea, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam have not yet completed the transition. Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Nepal, and Pakistan are half-way through the transition. High population growth rates put pressure on land by fragmenting finite land resources, increasing the number of landless laborers and unemployment, and by causing considerable rural-urban migration. All these factors bring about social stress and burden civic services. India has reduced its total fertility rate from 5.2 to 3.9 between 1971 and 1991. Some Indian states have already achieved replacement fertility. Considerable disparity in socioeconomic development exists among states and districts. For example, the states of Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh have female literacy rates lower than 27%, while that for Kerala is 87%. Overall, infant mortality has fallen from 110 to 80 between 1981 and 1990. In Uttar Pradesh, it has fallen from 150 to 98, while it is at 17 in Kerala. India needs innovative approaches to increase contraceptive prevalence rates

  20. Imaging Spectrum and Pitfalls of 11C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomography in a Series of Patients with Intracranial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kubota, Kazoo

    2016-01-01

    11C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of 11C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological 11C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during 11C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of 11C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of 11C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses. PMID:27134530

  1. Imaging Spectrum and Pitfalls of (11)C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomography in a Series of Patients with Intracranial Lesions.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kubota, Kazoo

    2016-01-01

    (11)C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of (11)C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological (11)C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during (11)C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of (11)C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of (11)C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses. PMID:27134530

  2. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  3. Procedures for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to characterize potential health risk from trichloroethylene contaminated ground water at Beale Air Force Base in California

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J I; Bogen, K T; Hall, L C

    1999-10-05

    Conservative deterministic, screening-level calculations of exposure and risk commonly are used in quantitative assessments of potential human-health consequences from contaminants in environmental media. However, these calculations generally are based on multiple upper-bound point estimates of input parameters, particularly for exposure attributes, and can therefore produce results for decision makers that actually overstate the need for costly remediation. Alternatively, a more informative and quantitative characterization of health risk can be obtained by quantifying uncertainty and variability in exposure. This process is illustrated in this report for a hypothetical population at a specific site at Beale Air Force Base in California, where there is trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated ground water and a potential for future residential use. When uncertainty and variability in exposure were addressed jointly for this case, the 95th-percentile upper-bound value of individual excess lifetime cancer risk was a factor approaching 10 lower than the most conservative deterministic estimate. Additionally, the probability of more than zero additional cases of cancer can be estimated, and in this case it is less than 0.5 for a hypothetical future residential population of up to 26,900 individuals present for any 7.6-y interval of a 70-y time period. Clearly, the results from application of this probabilistic approach can provide reasonable and equitable risk-acceptability criteria for a contaminated site.

  4. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes—Pitfalls and Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rashmi B.; Groop, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex disease that is caused by a complex interplay between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. While the major environmental factors, diet and activity level, are well known, identification of the genetic factors has been a challenge. However, recent years have seen an explosion of genetic variants in risk and protection of T2D due to the technical development that has allowed genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing. Today, more than 120 variants have been convincingly replicated for association with T2D and many more with diabetes-related traits. Still, these variants only explain a small proportion of the total heritability of T2D. In this review, we address the possibilities to elucidate the genetic landscape of T2D as well as discuss pitfalls with current strategies to identify the elusive unknown heritability including the possibility that our definition of diabetes and its subgroups is imprecise and thereby makes the identification of genetic causes difficult. PMID:25774817

  5. Massively Multiplayer Online Games as Living Laboratories: Opportunities and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducheneaut, Nicolas

    The digital nature of online games makes them particularly amenable to large-scale, automated data collection and analysis; so researchers have begun to use them as living laboratories to test or refine the existing theories of human behavior. On the basis of several years of intensive data collection in several massively multiplayer online games, this chapter addresses three problems concerning validity and generalizability that must be taken into account. First, each game has a set of laws that steer player behavior, thereby introducing confounding factors that have to be taken into account by the researcher. Second, games attract skewed samples of players, and players may adopt transformed personalities inside the game world, which puts into question the validity of extending findings from observations in the digital realm into the physical one. Third, the lack of a clear boundary defining the "game space," illustrated by the many websites and forums for popular games, raises the question of whether online games themselves capture the totality of the user's experience. The problematic mapping between "real-world" behaviors and those in online games presents research opportunities as well as pitfalls that need to be avoided.

  6. Experimental phasing: best practice and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Airlie J.; Read, Randy J.

    2010-01-01

    Developments in protein crystal structure determination by experimental phasing are reviewed, emphasizing the theoretical continuum between experimental phasing, density modification, model building and refinement. Traditional notions of the composition of the substructure and the best coefficients for map generation are discussed. Pitfalls such as determining the enantiomorph, identifying centrosymmetry (or pseudo-symmetry) in the substructure and crystal twinning are discussed in detail. An appendix introduces com­bined real–imaginary log-likelihood gradient map coefficients for SAD phasing and their use for substructure completion as implemented in the software Phaser. Supplementary material includes animated probabilistic Harker diagrams showing how maximum-likelihood-based phasing methods can be used to refine parameters in the case of SIR and MIR; it is hoped that these will be useful for those teaching best practice in experimental phasing methods. PMID:20382999

  7. Cannulation Strategies and Pitfalls in Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandani, Mahesh; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Abu Saleh, Walid K.; Ramlawi, Basel

    2016-01-01

    For any given cardiac surgery, there are two invasive components: the surgical approach and the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. The standard approach for cardiac surgery is the median sternotomy, which offers unrestricted access to the thoracic organs—the heart, lung, and major vessels. However, it carries a long list of potential complications such as wound infection, brachial plexus palsies, respiratory dysfunction, and an unpleasant-looking scar. The cardiopulmonary bypass component also carries potential complications such as end-organ dysfunction, coagulopathy, hemodilution, bleeding, and blood transfusion requirement. Furthermore, the aortic manipulation during cannulation and cross clamping increases the risk of dissection, arterial embolization, and stroke. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is an iconic event in the history of cardiothoracic medicine and has become a widely adapted approach as it minimizes many of the inconvenient side effects associated with the median sternotomy and bypass circuit placement. This type of surgery requires the use of novel perfusion strategies, especially in patients who hold the highest potential for postoperative morbidity. Cannulation techniques are a fundamental element in minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and there are numerous cannulation procedures for each type of minimally invasive operation. In this review, we will highlight the strategies and pitfalls associated with a minimally invasive cannulation. PMID:27127556

  8. Pitfalls of mechanical ventilation in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Bunburaphong, Thananchai

    2014-01-01

    Pitfalls in the respiratory care and mechanical ventilation for patients continue to prevail in intensive care unit (ICU) or in some hospital wards in Thailand. There are two reasons that explain this phenomenon. Firstly, there are no professional respiratory therapists in Thailand. Secondly, most caregivers do not possess the adequate knowledge and skills requiredfor respiratory care and for initiating, maintaining and weaning patients off mechanical ventilation. Physicians and nurses have to practice in respiratory care and mechanical ventilation without participating in adequate training during their undergraduate studies and postgraduate training. In reality, physicians pay almost no attention to respiratory care. They leave the respiratory toilet, ventilator changes and monitoring of the patients to nurses who have many other tasks to attend to. To solve this problem will require restructuring of the Thai healthcare system. The Parliament will need to pass a "Respiratory Therapy Profession Act" to certify "respiratory therapists " as a new, registered health profession. The Office of the Civil Service Commission has to take the responsibility for creating the job title and a job description for respiratory therapists. Academic institutes have to provide training courses in respiratory therapy and grant appropriate levels of diplomas or certificates in respiratory therapy. Did actics and clinical skills required for respiratory care have to be sufficiently integrated into the curricula for medical students as well as nursing students. Physicians and nurses need to master their skills and acquired appropriate knowledge in respiratory care and mechanical ventilation until we can assure the necessary number of registered or certified respiratory therapists here in Thailand to help avoid such pitfalls. PMID:24855857

  9. The Pleasures and the Pitfalls of Plant Science Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Classroom plant activities have long been inexpensive, easy to do, and fun for students, and have become more central to biology teaching. Introduces some plant science activities and their pleasures and pitfalls. (ASK)

  10. Pitfalls in Using Electrophysiological Studies to Diagnose Neuromuscular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Yong Seo; Cho, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    Electrodiagnostic testing is used widely for the full characterization of neuromuscular disorders and for providing unique information on the processes underlying the pathology of peripheral nerves and muscles. However, such testing should be considered as an extension of anamnesis and physical examination, not as pathognomonic of a specific disease entity. There are many pitfalls that could lead to erroneous interpretation of electrophysiological study results when the studies are not performed properly or if they are performed in the presence of anatomical aberrations. The diagnostic reliability of electrodiagnostic studies can be improved and the associated pitfalls overcome if the physician is familiar with all of those possible pitfalls. In this article we discuss the most common and important pitfalls associated with electrodiagnostic medicine. PMID:22523508

  11. Magnetic resonance thermometry: Methodology, pitfalls and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lukas; Oberacker, Eva; Paul, Katharina; Ji, Yiyi; Oezerdem, Celal; Ghadjar, Pirus; Thieme, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Clinically established thermal therapies such as thermoablative approaches or adjuvant hyperthermia treatment rely on accurate thermal dose information for the evaluation and adaptation of the thermal therapy. Intratumoural temperature measurements have been correlated successfully with clinical end points. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most suitable technique for non-invasive thermometry avoiding complications related to invasive temperature measurements. Since the advent of MR thermometry two decades ago, numerous MR thermometry techniques have been developed, continuously increasing accuracy and robustness for in vivo applications. While this progress was primarily focused on relative temperature mapping, current and future efforts will likely close the gap towards quantitative temperature readings. These efforts are essential to benchmark thermal therapy efficiency, to understand temperature-related biophysical and physiological processes and to use these insights to set new landmarks for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. With that in mind, this review summarises and discusses advances in MR thermometry, providing practical considerations, pitfalls and technical obstacles constraining temperature measurement accuracy, spatial and temporal resolution in vivo. Established approaches and current trends in thermal therapy hardware are surveyed with respect to potential benefits for MR thermometry. PMID:26708630

  12. Pitfalls in the measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests.

    PubMed

    Koulouri, Olympia; Moran, Carla; Halsall, David; Chatterjee, Krishna; Gurnell, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Thyroid function tests (TFTs) are amongst the most commonly requested laboratory investigations in both primary and secondary care. Fortunately, most TFTs are straightforward to interpret and confirm the clinical impression of euthyroidism, hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. However, in an important subgroup of patients the results of TFTs can seem confusing, either by virtue of being discordant with the clinical picture or because they appear incongruent with each other [e.g. raised thyroid hormones (TH), but with non-suppressed thyrotropin (TSH); raised TSH, but with normal TH]. In such cases, it is important first to revisit the clinical context, and to consider potential confounding factors, including alterations in normal physiology (e.g. pregnancy), intercurrent (non-thyroidal) illness, and medication usage (e.g. thyroxine, amiodarone, heparin). Once these have been excluded, laboratory artefacts in commonly used TSH or TH immunoassays should be screened for, thus avoiding unnecessary further investigation and/or treatment in cases where there is assay interference. In the remainder, consideration should be given to screening for rare genetic and acquired disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis [e.g. resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH), thyrotropinoma (TSHoma)]. Here, we discuss the main pitfalls in the measurement and interpretation of TFTs, and propose a structured algorithm for the investigation and management of patients with anomalous/discordant TFTs. PMID:24275187

  13. Molecular testing in oncology: problems, pitfalls and progress.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Cathal P; Taylor, Sarah E; O'Leary, John J; Finn, Stephen P

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer and the development of molecular diagnostics based on this knowledge have done much to progress the fields of oncology and pathology. Technological developments such as Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and multiplex assays have made feasible the widespread adoption of molecular diagnostics for clinical use. While these developments and advances carry much promise, there are pitfalls to implementing this testing. Choosing appropriate biomarkers is a vital first step for clinical use and being able to understand the complex relationship between predictive and prognostic biomarkers is a crucial component of this. Testing for standard of care biomarkers is not straightforward, one must choose carefully between clinical trial assays, assays that analyse the same biological phenomenon or surrogate biomarkers. Sample heterogeneity and population specific difference is assays may skew results and must be controlled for at the assay design stage. At a technical level, NGS has the potential to revolutionise laboratory practice and approaches to cancer treatment. However, use of this technology requires careful planning and implementation if one is to avoid technical and ethical quagmires. Finally, with FDA regulation of companion diagnostics one may be limited to therapy specific assays. PMID:24472389

  14. Avoiding numerical pitfalls in social force models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Gerta; Treml, Franz; Gödel, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The social force model of Helbing and Molnár is one of the best known approaches to simulate pedestrian motion, a collective phenomenon with nonlinear dynamics. It is based on the idea that the Newtonian laws of motion mostly carry over to pedestrian motion so that human trajectories can be computed by solving a set of ordinary differential equations for velocity and acceleration. The beauty and simplicity of this ansatz are strong reasons for its wide spread. However, the numerical implementation is not without pitfalls. Oscillations, collisions, and instabilities occur even for very small step sizes. Classic solution ideas from molecular dynamics do not apply to the problem because the system is not Hamiltonian despite its source of inspiration. Looking at the model through the eyes of a mathematician, however, we realize that the right hand side of the differential equation is nondifferentiable and even discontinuous at critical locations. This produces undesirable behavior in the exact solution and, at best, severe loss of accuracy in efficient numerical schemes even in short range simulations. We suggest a very simple mollified version of the social force model that conserves the desired dynamic properties of the original many-body system but elegantly and cost efficiently resolves several of the issues concerning stability and numerical resolution.

  15. Setting dietary intake levels: problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Russell, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    Recommended dietary intake levels are the nutrient standards used in designing food assistance programmes, institutional feeding programmes, counselling and teaching. In the USA, the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) are the basis for setting the poverty threshold and food stamp allotments. In the 1990s, a new paradigm was put forth for estimating nutrient requirements and recommended intake levels. This considered the level of nutrient needed for normal body functioning (versus the amount needed to prevent a deficiency state from occurring). An estimated average requirement (EAR), an RDA and a tolerable upper intake level (UL) were determined for most nutrients. In setting forth these nutrient intake levels (dietary reference intakes, DRIs), a number of data challenges were encountered. For example, it was recognized that for most nutrients there was an absence of dose-response data, and few chronic human or animal studies had been undertaken. In considering how to revise nutrient intake recommendations for populations in the future, the following pitfalls must be overcome: (1) invalid assumption that a threshold level for a requirement will hold for all nutrients; (2) lack of uniform criteria for the selection of the endpoints used (need for evidence-based review, consideration of comparative risk); (3) invalid extrapolations to children for many nutrients; (4) lack of information on variability of responses, and interactions with other nutrients; and (5) lack of understanding in the community of how to use the various DRI numbers. PMID:17913222

  16. Pitfalls in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondogianni, Ph; Papathanasiou, N.; Giannopoulou, Ch

    2011-09-01

    PET with 2-[fluorine 18] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG), has been a clinical tool for the evaluation of various cancers providing valuable metabolic information clinically helpful in the diagnosis, initial staging, therapy monitoring and restaging. However, FDG is not specific for neoplastic processes. Unless anatomic correlation is available to delineate normal structures, pathologic sites of FDG accumulation can easily be confused with normal physiological uptake, leading to false-positive or false-negative findings. Coregistration of PET scans (functional and morphologic information) with computed tomographic (CT) scans (anatomic information) using a combined PET-CT scanner improves the overall sensitivity and specificity of information provided by PET or CT alone. In this paper, we discuss the probable causes of false negative images and pitfalls due to technical reasons, inflammatory processes or benign lesions as well as the utility of PET-CT in differentiating malignant from inflammatory and benign processes, since in some cases such differentiation cannot be made, with certainty, using FDG PET alone.

  17. Core biopsies of the breast: diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Megha; Reddy, Sriharshan J; Nanavidekar, Manjiri; Russo, John P; Russo, Armand V; Pathak, Ram

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide. In this review article, the authors compare and contrast the incidence of breast cancer, and the inherent differences in the United States (US) and India in screening techniques used for diagnosing breast cancer. In spite of these differences, core biopsies of the breast are common for diagnosis of breast cancer in both countries. The authors describe "Best Practices" in the reporting and processing of core biopsies and in the analysis of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (Her2/neu). The pitfalls in the diagnosis of fibroepithelial lesions of the breast on core biopsy are discussed, as also the significance of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast (PASH) is discussed in core biopsy. In this review, the management and diagnosis of flat epithelial atypia and radiation atypia are elaborated and the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in papillary lesions, phyllodes tumor, and complex sclerosing lesions (radial scars) is illustrated. Rarer lesions such as mucinous and histiocytoid carcinoma are also discussed. PMID:22234089

  18. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology. PMID:27325223

  19. Avoiding numerical pitfalls in social force models.

    PubMed

    Köster, Gerta; Treml, Franz; Gödel, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The social force model of Helbing and Molnár is one of the best known approaches to simulate pedestrian motion, a collective phenomenon with nonlinear dynamics. It is based on the idea that the Newtonian laws of motion mostly carry over to pedestrian motion so that human trajectories can be computed by solving a set of ordinary differential equations for velocity and acceleration. The beauty and simplicity of this ansatz are strong reasons for its wide spread. However, the numerical implementation is not without pitfalls. Oscillations, collisions, and instabilities occur even for very small step sizes. Classic solution ideas from molecular dynamics do not apply to the problem because the system is not Hamiltonian despite its source of inspiration. Looking at the model through the eyes of a mathematician, however, we realize that the right hand side of the differential equation is nondifferentiable and even discontinuous at critical locations. This produces undesirable behavior in the exact solution and, at best, severe loss of accuracy in efficient numerical schemes even in short range simulations. We suggest a very simple mollified version of the social force model that conserves the desired dynamic properties of the original many-body system but elegantly and cost efficiently resolves several of the issues concerning stability and numerical resolution. PMID:23848804

  20. Potential pitfall of DMSA scintigraphy in patients with ureteral duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.; Snow, B.; Taylor, A. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    A 5-wk-old male presented with radiographic findings of a duplicated collecting system. A (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA scan was requested to evaluate cortical function. Images obtained immediately. postinjection showed activity restricted to the upper poles; in contrast, delayed images at 4 hr showed activity in the bladder and throughout both kidneys. Catheterizing the patient drained the activity from the bladder but had little effect on the refluxed renal activity. The early (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA images were critical in making the proper interpretation. Technetium-99m DMSA is excreted into the urine and this fact needs to be considered when interpreting scans of patients with possible reflux or obstruction. When DMSA scans are obtained in pediatric patients with possible reflux, catheterization prior to the study and early images prior to the appearance of DMSA in the collecting system are recommended.

  1. Becoming a Principal in Indonesia: Possibility, Pitfalls and Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumintono, Bambang; Sheyoputri, Elslee Y. A.; Jiang, Na; Misbach, Ifa H.; Jumintono

    2015-01-01

    The preparation and development of school leaders is now considered to be fundamental to school and system improvement. In the pursuit of educational change and reform, the leadership of the principal is deemed to be of critical importance. This qualitative study is part of a large scale research project that is exploring principal preparation and…

  2. Syringomatous Structures in Extramammary Paget Disease: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, Anastasia M; Hayes, Malcolm M; Stewart, Colin J R; Plaza, Jose A; Michal, Michal; Kerl, Katrin; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2016-09-01

    Primary extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a form of intraepithelial adenocarcinoma. Different morphological changes may accompany EMPD, including the presence of syringoma-like structures. The authors report 10 cases of EMPD, all of which manifested syringoma-like structures within the dermis both in areas involved by the carcinoma and beyond, including at the margins of the excisions. All patients were women, whose ages ranged from 49 to 93 years (median 75 years). The possible pathogenesis of the syringoma-like lesions is discussed. Awareness of these structures in vulvectomy specimens for EMPD is important to prevent misinterpretation of the syringoma-like lesions as an invasive component of the EMPD. PMID:26863060

  3. Digital Development in Rural Areas: Potentials and Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malecki, Edward J.

    2003-01-01

    Data on rural-urban differences in access to telecommunications technology suggest that the U.S. "digital divide" is diminishing. However, major shortcomings in telecommunications infrastructure persist in rural America, and more serious barriers to rural development are related to human capital shortages. These may be resolved in some rural areas…

  4. Herbicide-resistant crop biotechnology: potential and pitfalls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide-resistant crops are an important agricultural biotechnology that can enable farmers to effectively control weeds without harming their crops. Glyphosate-resistant (i.e. Roundup Ready) crops have been the most commercially successful varieties of herbicide-resistant crops and have been plan...

  5. Future of computing technology in physics - the potentials and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, A.E.

    1984-02-01

    The impact of the developments of modern digital computers is discussed, especially with respect to physics research in the future. The effects of large data processing capability and increasing rates at which data can be acquired and processed are considered. (GHT)

  6. Measuring Thermokarst Subsidence Using InSAR: Potential and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A. C.; Gusmeroli, A.; Zebker, H. A.; Zhang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thawing of ice-rich permafrost results in irregular, depressed landforms known as thermokarst terrain. The significant subsidence leading to thermokarst features can expand lakes, drain lakes, accelerate thaw, disturb the soil column, and promote erosion. Consequently, it affects many permafrost-region processes including vegetation succession, hydrology, and carbon storage and cycling. Many remote sensing studies identify thermokarst landforms and catalog their ever-changing areas. Yet the intrinsic dynamic thermokarst process, namely surface subsidence, remains a challenge to map and is seldom examined using remote sensing methods. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that uses a time-series of satellite SAR images to measure cm-level land surface deformation. We demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of space-borne InSAR data to map thermokarst subsidence at a site located near Prudhoe Bay, on the North Slope of Alaska. A pipeline access road was constructed at this site in the 1970s, and is likely to have triggered the thawing of the region's permafrost, causing subsequent expansion of thermokarst-landform terrain. Our InSAR analysis using ALOS PALSAR images reveals that the thermokarst landforms in this region have undergone up to 10 cm of surface subsidence each summer from 2007 to 2010. This pilot study demonstrates the application of InSAR to map localized mass movement in permafrost terrain. We also illustrate how the effectiveness and accuracy of InSAR measurements are limited by several factors such as loss of interferometric coherence due to fast changes of ground surface conditions, spatial and temporal resolutions of InSAR data, and difficulty separating long-term and seasonal deformation signals.

  7. The Potential, Pitfalls and Promise of Computerized Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry, Bill; Griffith, Leonard; McHenry, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Imagine administering an online standardized test to an entire class of 11th-grade students when, halfway through the exam, the server holding the test hits a snag and throws everyone offline. Imagine another scenario in which an elementary school has very few computers so teachers must bus their students to the local high school for a timed test.…

  8. Regenerative Pulmonary Medicine: Potential and Promise, Pitfalls and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Anversa, Piero; Perrella, Mark A.; Kourembanas, Stella; Choi, Augustine M. K.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Lung disease is an increasing public health problem worldwide. According to the American Lung Association, more than 400,000 people die of lung diseases in the United States each year, which accounts for one in every six deaths overall. These staggering figures translate into a cost of more than $100 billion per year [1]. Even more concerning is the fact that in many chronic lung diseases, we have no therapeutic interventions with which to arrest or reverse the pathobiology of these destructive processes, or to restore functional lung tissue. Thus, we treat patients’ symptoms, but the underlying diseases continue to progress. In these circumstances, our therapeutic options ultimately turn to lung transplantation once diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis, and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) become end-stage. Lung transplantation is a life-prolonging procedure for many patients; however, there is a shortage of available donor lungs, and, even when transplanted, the average survival for adult lung recipients is approximately 5–6 years [2]. Recipients are vulnerable to transplant-related diseases, such as bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, which limits long-term survival in many patients [2],[3]. Thus, there is a desperate need for new and innovative therapies for a number of chronic lung diseases, including diseases that develop after lung transplantation. PMID:22435680

  9. Ovarian signet-ring stromal tumor: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Kachko, Leonid; Mazor, Moshe; Piura, Benjamin

    2008-04-01

    Signet-ring stromal tumor is a rare ovarian neoplasm with only 10 reported cases in the literature. We report an unusual case of ovarian signet-ring stromal tumor in a 69-year-old woman who presented with right adnexal mass and underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The diagnosis was based on histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopy characteristics. The main significance is to differentiate this benign tumor from the highly malignant Krukenberg tumor, and this differential diagnosis is discussed. PMID:18417676

  10. Adding value to grafted watermelon: Novel benefits and potential pitfalls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grafted watermelons are commonly used in Asia and areas of Europe but are not widely used in the United States. The traditional reason for grafting watermelons has been for resistance to soil borne diseases such as Fusarium. We began to explore novel benefits which might make grafted watermelons m...

  11. Intracarotid Delivery of Drugs: The Potential and the Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shailendra; Meyers, Phillip M.; Ornstein, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    The major efforts to selectively deliver drugs to the brain in the last decade have relied on smart molecular techniques to penetrate the blood brain barrier while intraarterial drug delivery has drawn relatively little attention. In the last decade there have been rapid advances in endovascular techniques. Modern endovascular procedures can permit highly targeted drug delivery by intracarotid route. Intracarotid drug delivery can be the primary route of drug delivery or it could be used to facilitate the delivery of smart-neuropharmaceuticals. There have been few attempts to systematically understand the kinetics of intracarotid drugs. Anecdotal data suggests that intracarotid drug delivery is effective in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm, thromboembolic strokes, and neoplasms. Neuroanesthesiologists are frequently involved in the care of such high-risk patients. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the applications of intracarotid drug delivery and the unusual kinetics of intracarotid drugs. PMID:18719453

  12. Integrating Neuropsychology and School Psychology: Potential and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Paul B.; Plotts, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    The neurological basis of learning disabilities (LD), and other handicapping conditions commonly found in school-age children, makes the integration of neuropsychology and school psychology plausible. However, there has been longstanding debate over the required level of education, training, supervision, and credentialing needed for the practice…

  13. Nano(Q)SAR: Challenges, pitfalls and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tantra, Ratna; Oksel, Ceyda; Puzyn, Tomasz; Wang, Jian; Robinson, Kenneth N; Wang, Xue Z; Ma, Cai Y; Wilkins, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Regulation for nanomaterials is urgently needed, and the drive to adopt an intelligent testing strategy is evident. Such a strategy will not only provide economic benefits but will also reduce moral and ethical concerns arising from animal testing. For regulatory purposes, such an approach is promoted by REACH, particularly the use of quantitative structure-activity relationships [(Q)SAR] as a tool for the categorisation of compounds according to their physicochemical and toxicological properties. In addition to compounds, (Q)SAR has also been applied to nanomaterials in the form of nano(Q)SAR. Although (Q)SAR in chemicals is well established, nano(Q)SAR is still in early stages of development and its successful uptake is far from reality. This article aims to identify some of the pitfalls and challenges associated with nano-(Q)SARs in relation to the categorisation of nanomaterials. Our findings show clear gaps in the research framework that must be addressed if we are to have reliable predictions from such models. Three major barriers were identified: the need to improve quality of experimental data in which the models are developed from, the need to have practical guidelines for the development of the nano(Q)SAR models and the need to standardise and harmonise activities for the purpose of regulation. Of these three, the first, i.e. the need to improve data quality requires immediate attention, as it underpins activities associated with the latter two. It should be noted that the usefulness of data in the context of nano-(Q)SAR modelling is not only about the quantity of data but also about the quality, consistency and accessibility of those data. PMID:25211549

  14. Evaluating programs that address ideological issues: ethical and practical considerations for practitioners and evaluators.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Lisa D; Fagen, Michael C; Neiger, Brad L

    2014-03-01

    There are important practical and ethical considerations for organizations in conducting their own, or commissioning external, evaluations and for both practitioners and evaluators, when assessing programs built on strongly held ideological or philosophical approaches. Assessing whether programs "work" has strong political, financial, and/or moral implications, particularly when expending public dollars, and may challenge objectivity about a particular program or approach. Using a case study of the evaluation of a school-based abstinence-until-marriage program, this article discusses the challenges, lessons learned, and ethical responsibilities regarding decisions about evaluation, specifically associated with ideologically driven programs. Organizations should consider various stakeholders and views associated with their program to help identify potential pitfalls in evaluation. Once identified, the program or agency needs to carefully consider its answers to two key questions: Do they want the answer and are they willing to modify the program? Having decided to evaluate, the choice of evaluator is critical to assuring that ethical principles are maintained and potential skepticism or criticism of findings can be addressed appropriately. The relationship between program and evaluator, including agreements about ownership and eventual publication and/or promotion of data, should be addressed at the outset. Programs and organizations should consider, at the outset, their ethical responsibility when findings are not expected or desired. Ultimately, agencies, organizations, and programs have an ethical responsibility to use their data to provide health promotion programs, whether ideologically founded or not, that appropriately and effectively address the problems they seek to solve. PMID:24532788

  15. Doing Independent Overseas Fieldwork 1: Practicalities and Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an information guide about planning independent, human and physical geography fieldwork overseas and highlights potential problems that can occur. Includes a bibliography of essential information sources and addresses. (CMK)

  16. Pitfalls and optimal approaches to diagnose melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Paul Vijay; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar; Tipre, Meghan; Leader, Mark; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2016-06-01

    Melioidosis is a severe and fatal infectious disease in the tropics and subtropics. It presents as a febrile illness with protean manifestation ranging from chronic localized infection to acute fulminant septicemia with dissemination of infection to multiple organs characterized by abscesses. Pneumonia is the most common clinical presentation. Because of the wide range of clinical presentations, physicians may often misdiagnose and mistreat the disease for tuberculosis, pneumonia or other pyogenic infections. The purpose of this paper is to present common pitfalls in diagnosis and provide optimal approaches to enable early diagnosis and prompt treatment of melioidosis. Melioidosis may occur beyond the boundaries of endemic areas. There is no pathognomonic feature specific to a diagnosis of melioidosis. In endemic areas, physicians need to expand the diagnostic work-up to include melioidosis when confronted with clinical scenarios of pyrexia of unknown origin, progressive pneumonia or sepsis. Radiological imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic workup. Knowledge of the modes of transmission and risk factors will add support in clinically suspected cases to initiate therapy. In situations of clinically highly probable or possible cases where laboratory bacteriological confirmation is not possible, applying evidence-based criteria and empirical treatment with antimicrobials is recommended. It is of prime importance that patients undergo the full course of antimicrobial therapy to avoid relapse and recurrence. Early diagnosis and appropriate management is crucial in reducing serious complications leading to high mortality, and in preventing recurrences of the disease. Thus, there is a crucial need for promoting awareness among physicians at all levels and for improved diagnostic microbiology services. Further, the need for making the disease notifiable and/or initiating melioidosis registries in endemic countries appears to be compelling. PMID:27262061

  17. All-on-4® Implant Treatment: Common Pitfalls and Methods to Overcome Them.

    PubMed

    Holtzclaw, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Although highly successful in terms of both short- and long-term survival rates, All-on-4®-style dental implant treatment is a multistep process with many potential complications. Beyond reports of survival rates for dental implants and the final prostheses, the dental literature is relatively devoid of information regarding obstacles and pitfalls associated with All-on-4-style dental implant treatment. In the current article, the author describes common issues that he has encountered before, during, and after All-on-4-style dental implant treatment of more than 500 arches and discusses methods for overcoming these obstacles. PMID:27548398

  18. MRI Measurements of Iron Load in Transfusion-Dependent Patients: Implementation, Challenges, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charles T; St Pierre, Tim G

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has played a key role in studies of iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients, providing insights into the relations among liver and cardiac iron loading, iron chelator dose, and morbidity. Currently, there is rapid uptake of these methods into routine clinical practice as part of the management strategy for iron overload in regularly transfused patients. Given the manifold methods of data acquisition and analysis, there are several potential pitfalls that may result in inappropriate decision making. Herein, we review the challenges of establishing suitable MRI techniques for tissue iron measurement in regularly transfused patients. PMID:26713769

  19. Pitfalls to avoid when introducing a cultural competency training initiative.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J

    2010-06-01

    OBJECTIVES In an effort to provide preventive advice, this paper aims to acknowledge what has not worked with regard to cultural competency initiatives. A successful cultural competency training initiative should have lasting impact on its participants in terms of long-term, ideally permanent changes to attitudes, knowledge and skills resulting in the provision of optimum care, regardless of a patient's cultural background. Legal mandates mean there is an assumed need for cultural competency curricula and training programmes for medical students and postgraduate medical trainees. However, policy and practice have bypassed 'proof' that such programmes are effective and result in better patient care. Often only positive results are reported, which may minimise the difficulties involved in programme implementation. METHODS Utilising the example of a cultural competency initiative introduced into a postgraduate general surgery training programme, this paper discusses mistakes that were made during the implementation phase, particularly with regard to underestimating potential resistance by the trainees. Also presented are the lessons learned and efforts that were made to mitigate the problems that arose. None of what is discussed in this paper is new. However, the literature often does not discuss in detail the difficulties that can be or have been faced and how these obstacles can be adequately mitigated. CONCLUSIONS The glow of cultural competency training initiatives is fading in the light of higher expectations for an evidence base prior to acknowledgement that their introduction has had a positive impact. For these initiatives to advance, there needs to be a clear understanding of terms utilised, buy-in and a long-term commitment at both individual and organisational levels, and use of standardised and validated tools to measure outcomes. An understanding of potential pitfalls can help to advance cultural competency training to the next level, namely, a solid

  20. How to avoid the ten most frequent EMS pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.

    1982-04-19

    It pays to do your homework before investing in an energy management system if you want to avoid the 10 most common pitfalls listed by users, consultants, and manufacturers as: oversimplification, improper maintenance, failure to involve operating personnel, inaccurate savings estimates, failure to include monitoring capability, incompetent or fradulent firms, improper load control, not allowing for a de-bugging period, failure to include manual override, and software problems. The article describes how each of these pitfalls can lead to poor decisions and poor results. (DCK)

  1. RAT AND HUMAN VISUAL-EVOKED POTENTIALS RECORDED UNDER COMPARABLE CONDITIONS: A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS TO ADDRESS THE ISSUE OF PREDICTING HUMAN NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A search was undertaken for contributions of sustained and transient visual elements to the rat visual-evoked potential (VEP) using procedures similar to those used in humans (Hudnell et al., in preparation). voked potentials were recorded following either pattern-reversal or pat...

  2. Pitfalls in statistical landslide susceptibility modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Boris; Vorpahl, Peter; Märker, Michael; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2010-05-01

    The use of statistical methods is a well-established approach to predict landslide occurrence probabilities and to assess landslide susceptibility. This is achieved by applying statistical methods relating historical landslide inventories to topographic indices as predictor variables. In our contribution, we compare several new and powerful methods developed in machine learning and well-established in landscape ecology and macroecology for predicting the distribution of shallow landslides in tropical mountain rainforests in southern Ecuador (among others: boosted regression trees, multivariate adaptive regression splines, maximum entropy). Although these methods are powerful, we think it is necessary to follow a basic set of guidelines to avoid some pitfalls regarding data sampling, predictor selection, and model quality assessment, especially if a comparison of different models is contemplated. We therefore suggest to apply a novel toolbox to evaluate approaches to the statistical modelling of landslide susceptibility. Additionally, we propose some methods to open the "black box" as an inherent part of machine learning methods in order to achieve further explanatory insights into preparatory factors that control landslides. Sampling of training data should be guided by hypotheses regarding processes that lead to slope failure taking into account their respective spatial scales. This approach leads to the selection of a set of candidate predictor variables considered on adequate spatial scales. This set should be checked for multicollinearity in order to facilitate model response curve interpretation. Model quality assesses how well a model is able to reproduce independent observations of its response variable. This includes criteria to evaluate different aspects of model performance, i.e. model discrimination, model calibration, and model refinement. In order to assess a possible violation of the assumption of independency in the training samples or a possible

  3. A comparison of pitfall traps with bait traps for studying leaf litter ant communities.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Strazanac, J; Butler, L

    2001-06-01

    A comparison of pitfall traps with bait traps for sampling leaf litter ants was studied in oak-dominated mixed forests during 1995-1997. A total of 31,732 ants were collected from pitfall traps and 54,694 ants were collected from bait traps. They belonged to four subfamilies, 17 genera, and 32 species. Bait traps caught 29 species, whereas pitfall traps caught 31 species. Bait traps attracted one species not found in pitfall traps, but missed three of the species collected with pitfall traps. Collections from the two sampling methods showed differences in species richness, relative abundance, diversity, and species accumulation curves. Pitfall traps caught significantly more ant species per plot than did bait traps. The ant species diversity obtained from pitfall traps was higher than that from bait traps. Bait traps took a much longer time to complete an estimate of species richness than did pitfall traps. Little information was added to pitfall trapping results by the bait trapping method. The results suggested that the pitfall trapping method is superior to the bait trapping method for leaf litter ant studies. Species accumulation curves showed that sampling of 2,192+/-532 ants from six plots by pitfall traps provided a good estimation of ant species richness under the conditions of this study. PMID:11425034

  4. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Imaging in Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Esmail, Abdulredha A H; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Navalkissoor, Shaunak; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Fogelman, Ignac

    2015-09-01

    Several different techniques, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging modalities are commonly used in nuclear medicine for studies of endocrine organs. Nuclear medicine is used in the management of benign and malignant thyroid, parathyroid, and neuroendocrine disorders. Thus, it is essential to acknowledge pitfalls and the limitations of nuclear medicine imaging for accurate diagnosis and patient management. PMID:26278855

  5. Five pitfalls of work redesign in acute care.

    PubMed

    Seago, J A

    1997-10-01

    During work redesign in nursing units, five common pitfalls can emerge: moving too fast, failing to involve major stakeholders, discounting bargaining unit contracts, separating training classes and not defining desired outcomes. Suggestions on how to avoid these problems are given. PMID:9369723

  6. Proposal Pitfalls Plaguing Researchers: Can Technical Communicators Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemanski, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The facts bear out that the odds are against most scientific researchers and scholars--especially those just starting out--in their attempts to win funding for their research projects through their grant proposals. In this article, the author takes a close look at some of the proposal-related problems and pitfalls that have historically challenged…

  7. REVIEW ARTICLE: EIT reconstruction algorithms: pitfalls, challenges and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionheart, William R. B.

    2004-02-01

    We review developments, issues and challenges in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for the 4th Conference on Biomedical Applications of Electrical Impedance Tomography, held at Manchester in 2003. We focus on the necessity for three-dimensional data collection and reconstruction, efficient solution of the forward problem, and both present and future reconstruction algorithms. We also suggest common pitfalls or 'inverse crimes' to avoid.

  8. Cases on Global E-Learning Practices: Successes and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Ramesh C., Ed.; Mishra, Sanjaya, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Cases on Global E-Learning Practices: Successes and Pitfalls" looks into global practices of e-learning, examining the successes and failures of e-learning professionals. It provides a judicious mix of practical experiences and research in the form of case studies. Written by experts from all over the globe, this book shows how to design…

  9. E-Content Development for Languages: Success Factors and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Paepe, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the success factors and pitfalls in development of e-content for languages. The factors discussed draw on several years of experience in developing and implementing 95% distance courses for Dutch as a second language in the adult education sector in Flanders and on PhD research at VUB. The CEFR [Common European Framework of…

  10. The Pitfalls and Triumphs of Launching a Charter School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Linda; Levine, Mark

    1996-01-01

    A principal of a charter school in Colorado Springs, Colorado, recounts the triumphs and pitfalls of the school's first year. The school charter lacked a clear-cut avenue for making changes. Intending to create a parent-run school, the founding board (themselves parents) made drastic curricular changes without consulting other parents. Passionate…

  11. Morphological identification of animal hairs: Myths and misconceptions, possibilities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Tridico, S R; Houck, M M; Kirkbride, K Paul; Smith, M E; Yates, B C

    2014-05-01

    The examination of hair collected from crime scenes is an important and highly informative discipline relevant to many forensic investigations. However, the forensic identification of animal (non-human) hairs requires different skill sets and competencies to those required for human hair comparisons. The aim of this is paper is not only to highlight the intrinsic differences between forensic human hair comparison and forensic animal hair identification, but also discuss the utility and reliability of the two in the context of possibilities and pitfalls. It also addresses and dispels some of the more popular myths and misconceptions surrounding the microscopical examination of animal hairs. Furthermore, future directions of this discipline are explored through the proposal of recommendations for minimum standards for the morphological identification of animal hairs and the significance of the newly developed guidelines by SWGWILD is discussed. PMID:24685685

  12. Awards and Addresses Summary

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Each year at the annual ASHG meeting, addresses are given in honor of the society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these addresses is given below. On the next pages, we have printed the Presidential Address and the addresses for the William Allan Award. The other addresses, accompanied by pictures of the speakers, can be found at www.ashg.org.

  13. Three-piece Inflatable Penile Prosthesis: Surgical Techniques and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Al-Enezi, Ahmad; Al-Khadhari, Sulaiman; Al-Shaiji, Tariq F.

    2011-01-01

    Penile prosthesis surgery plays a vital role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). As far as outcome is concerned, it is one of the most rewarding procedures for both patients and surgeons. We describe our surgical technique for implantation of the three-piece inflatable penile prosthesis and point out the major surgical pitfalls accompanying this procedure and their specific management. The psychological outcome of penile prosthesis surgery is also discussed. Different surgical approaches are available when performing the procedure. A number of procedure-related problems can be encountered and a thorough knowledge of these is of paramount importance. Penile prosthesis surgery has a favorable psychological outcome. Surgery for implantation of an inflatable penile prosthesis is a rewarding procedure, with a high yield of patient satisfaction. Urologists should have thorough understanding of the surgical pitfalls peculiar to this procedure and their management. PMID:22413049

  14. Herpetological Monitoring Using a Pitfall Trapping Design in Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert; Stokes, Drew; Rochester, Carlton; Brehme, Cheryl; Hathaway, Stacie; Case, Ted

    2008-01-01

    The steps necessary to conduct a pitfall trapping survey for small terrestrial vertebrates are presented. Descriptions of the materials needed and the methods to build trapping equipment from raw materials are discussed. Recommended data collection techniques are given along with suggested data fields. Animal specimen processing procedures, including toe- and scale-clipping, are described for lizards, snakes, frogs, and salamanders. Methods are presented for conducting vegetation surveys that can be used to classify the environment associated with each pitfall trap array. Techniques for data storage and presentation are given based on commonly use computer applications. As with any study, much consideration should be given to the study design and methods before beginning any data collection effort.

  15. Mainstreaming: The Promise and the Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Paul

    1982-01-01

    Hails the potential that mainstreaming of the handicapped holds for developing individual potential and enhancing equal educational opportunity, but cautions that extensive retraining of staff and diversification of teaching strategies will be necessary if adequate implementation of Public Law 94-142 is to be achieved. (GC)

  16. [Suture foreign body reaction as a mammographic pitfall].

    PubMed

    Plagborg, G J; Andersen, H K

    2000-02-14

    A mammographic pitfall is presented. After lumpectomy owing to cancer in the breast a woman developed an immediate allergic reaction presumably caused by the subcutaneous sutures (vicryl). After adjuvant irradiation the breast became swollen and mammography gave suspicion of a recurrent breast cancer. Surgical excision was performed and examination of the biopsy specimen showed a foreign body reaction to the suture material with fibrosis and eosinophilia. PMID:10740437

  17. The short stem: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, S D; Patel, R M

    2013-11-01

    Conventional uncemented femoral implants provide dependable long-term fixation in patients with a wide range of functional requirements. Yet challenges associated with proximal-distal femoral dimensional mismatch, preservation of bone stock, and minimally invasive approaches have led to exploration into alternative implant designs. Short stem designs focusing on a stable metaphyseal fit have emerged to address these issues in total hip replacement (THR). Uncemented metaphyseal-engaging short stem implants are stable and are associated with proximal bone remodeling closer to the metaphysis when compared with conventional stems and they also have comparable clinical performances. Short stem metaphyseal-engaging implants can meet the goals of a successful THR, including tolerating a high level of patient function, as well as durable fixation. PMID:24187354

  18. Pitfalls in establishing the diagnosis of deep venous thrombophlebitis by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Seabold, J.E.; Conrad, G.R.; Kimball, D.A.; Ponto, J.A.; Bricker, J.A.

    1988-07-01

    Forty-seven /sup 111/In-platelet scintigraphs (In-PS) were analyzed retrospectively to identify sources of diagnostic error and to optimize the diagnostic criteria for active deep venous thrombophlebitis (DVT). The results of In-PS were compared with contrast venography, additional diagnostic studies, and clinical outcome. Three patterns of platelet localization emerged as the best predictors of active DVT: (a) focal or (b) linear 4-hr localization, or (c) an asymmetric blood-pool pattern on 4-hr imaging that evolved into a focal or linear pattern by 16 to 24 hr. All false-positive studies had abnormal patterns confined to the inguinal region at 24 hr. All patients with false-negative studies had received heparin between 4 and 24 hr. The potential pitfalls encountered in the evaluation of the iliac, femoral, and popliteal veins are reviewed and the importance of delayed imaging in selected cases is emphasized.

  19. Promises and pitfalls of first trimester sonographic markers in the detection of fetal aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    First trimester sonographic markers are the only markers achieving detection rates above 50% in the prenatal detection of fetal aneuploidy. Although potentially they are the best markers, some concerns have arisen about its clinical application. Pitfalls may be due to inability to examine the markers, incorrect assessment, or incorrect interpretation of the findings. Markers may be unable to be examined due to maternal (maternal body habitus, previous surgery) or fetal reasons (incompatible fetal position or fetal movements). Causes of incorrect interpretation may be insufficient image magnification, incorrect caliper placement (nuchal translucency), incorrect insonation angle (nasal bone), venous contamination (ductus venosus), or arterial contamination (tricuspid regurgitation), among others. Venous contamination in ductus venosus waveforms may mimic an abnormal blood flow when it is normal, and the opposite can also occur. Finally, incorrect interpretation of a substantially increased nuchal translucency may lead to a false impression of an ominous fetal prognosis or may be confounded with a cystic hygroma. PMID:19097037

  20. Judging whether a patient is actually improving: more pitfalls from the science of human perception.

    PubMed

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Dickinson, Victoria M

    2012-09-01

    Fallible human judgment may lead clinicians to make mistakes when assessing whether a patient is improving following treatment. This article provides a narrative review of selected studies in psychology that describe errors that potentially apply when a physician assesses a patient's response to treatment. Comprehension may be distorted by subjective preconceptions (lack of double blinding). Recall may fail through memory lapses (unwanted forgetfulness) and tacit assumptions (automatic imputation). Evaluations may be further compromised due to the effects of random chance (regression to the mean). Expression may be swayed by unjustified overconfidence following conformist groupthink (group polarization). An awareness of these five pitfalls may help clinicians avoid some errors in medical care when determining whether a patient is improving. PMID:22592355

  1. Payoffs and Pitfalls of a Minority Outreach Program: An Alaskan Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanks, C. L.; Fowell, S. J.; Wartes, D.; Owens, G.

    2004-12-01

    The Rural Alaska Honors Institute (RAHI) is a summer bridging program for college-bound high school students from remote Alaskan communities. In the 20+ years since its initiation, more than 50% of RAHI graduates eventually obtained post-secondary degrees. The success of the RAHI program provides insights into how an outreach program can achieve its goals and avoid potential pitfalls. Instrumental to the success of the RAHI program are: longevity; small size (40-45 students per summer); support from the Alaska Native community; academic rigor; aggressive recruiting; establishment of a sense of community amongst participants; and individual mentoring and support. Potential pitfalls include: overextending the program to include too many students; failure to maintain academic rigor in all courses; recruitment of students and staff who do not embrace the program's methods and goals; and attempts to evaluate the program on the basis of short-term results. Alaska Natives in Geosciences introduces college-bound Alaska Native students to the geosciences by teaching a college-level introductory geoscience class as a RAHI elective. By collaborating with RAHI, Alaska Natives in Geosciences takes advantage of RAHI's effective recruitment efforts and proven mentoring program. However, maintaining scientific rigor has been difficult due to large differences in the students' scientific backgrounds, the demands of other courses in the RAHI program and the brevity of the summer session. Immediate post-course survey responses suggest that many RAHI students thought the geoscience class was interesting but too difficult and much too time-consuming. However, surveys of RAHI geoscience students a year later suggest that many found the course a very positive experience. An unanticipated result was that RAHI students who did not take the class also gained some insight into the geosciences.

  2. An address geocoding solution for Chinese cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehu; Ma, Haoming; Li, Qi

    2006-10-01

    We introduce the challenges of address geocoding for Chinese cities and present a potential solution along with a prototype system that deal with these challenges by combining and extending current geocoding solutions developed for United States and Japan. The proposed solution starts by separating city addresses into "standard" addresses which meet a predefined address model and non-standard ones. The standard addresses are stored in a structured relational database in their normalized forms, while a selected portion of the non-standard addresses are stored as aliases to the standard addresses. An in-memory address index is then constructed from the address database and serves as the basis for real-time address matching. Test results were obtained from two trials conducted in the city Beijing. On average 80% matching rate were achieved. Possible improvements to the current design are also discussed.

  3. Opioid prescribing pitfalls: medicolegal and regulatory issues

    PubMed Central

    Jammal, Walid; Gown, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inappropriate opioid prescribing can lead to patient harm as well as a medicolegal risk to prescribers. Prescribers need to be familiar with the indications, contraindications and harms associated with opioids. When prescribing opioids, doctors must be aware of their clinical, ethical and legal responsibilities, particularly the legislative requirements in their state. Failure to comply with these can result in disciplinary action. To avoid potential conflict with differing state regulations on opioid prescribing, doctors should advise patients to get their prescription dispensed in the same state in which it was written. PMID:26843712

  4. Progress and pitfalls in Shigella vaccine research

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Eileen M.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Fasano, Alessio; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Myron M.

    2013-01-01

    Renewed awareness of the significant morbidity and mortality that Shigella causes among young children in developing countries combined with technological innovations in vaccinology has led to the development of novel vaccine strategies in the past five years. Along with advancement of classical vaccines in clinical trials and new sophisticated measurements of immunological responses, much new data has been produced lending promise to the potential for production of safe and effective Shigella vaccines. Herein we review the recent progress in Shigella vaccine development within the framework of persistent obstacles. PMID:23419287

  5. Cultural Diversity in Nursing Education: Perils, Pitfalls, and Pearls

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Hedi; Schim, Stephanie; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diversity in the classroom challenges nursing educators to identify issues that complicate teaching (perils), analyze barriers for themselves and their students (pitfalls), and select new strategies for working with nontraditional students (pearls). This article identifies concerns arising from attitudes and values within nursing and common approaches to diversity education, and then discusses key issues in nursing education that relate to human nature, culture, faculty workload, and student demographics. Finally, some strategies are proposed for increasing the effectiveness of professional preparation with diverse students through a focus on culturally congruent education and development of faculty cultural competence. PMID:20143759

  6. [Pitfalls in the diagnosis of occult elbow fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Courvoisier, A; Calvelli, N; Bourgeois, E; Eid, A; Griffet, J

    2016-08-01

    Elbow injuries are frequent but occult fractures are difficult to diagnose on x-rays. However, any delay in the diagnosis may severely impair the prognosis of some fractures. Simple tips may help the clinician read x-rays properly and avoid the classical pitfalls of elbow injuries in children. The chronology of appearance of ossification nuclei around the elbow is important to distinguish normal features from abnormality. Drawing simple geometric constructions on the x-rays may clarify most occult elbow fractures in children. PMID:27345552

  7. Artifacts and pitfalls in shoulder magnetic resonance imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Gustavo Felix; Macedo, Tulio Augusto Alves

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of shoulder lesions, in many cases becoming the method of choice. However, anatomical variations, artifacts and the particularity of the method may be a source of pitfalls, especially for less experienced radiologists. In order to avoid false-positive and false-negative results, the authors carried out a compilation of imaging findings that may simulate injury. It is the authors’ intention to provide a useful, consistent and comprehensive reference for both beginner residents and skilled radiologists who work with musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging, allowing for them to develop more precise reports and helping them to avoid making mistakes. PMID:26379323

  8. Avoiding pitfalls in simulating real-time computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The software simulation of a computer target system on a computer host system, known as an interpretive computer simulator (ICS), functionally models and implements the action of the target hardware. For an ICS to function as efficiently as possible and to avoid certain pitfalls in designing an ICS, it is important that the details of the hardware architectural design of both the target and the host computers be known. This paper discusses both host selection considerations and ICS design features that, without proper consideration, could make the resulting ICS too slow to use or too costly to maintain and expand.

  9. The seven common pitfalls of customer service in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Rene T

    2015-01-01

    Operating simultaneously like a repair shop, prison, and hotel, hospitals are prone to seven common pitfalls in customer service. Patient care is often fragmented, inscrutable, inflexible, insensitive, reactive, myopic, and unsafe. Hospitals are vying to be more high-tech, rather than high-touch even though staff engagement with patients rather than facilities and equipment strongly influence patient satisfaction. Unless processes, policies, and people are made customer-centered, the high quality of the hospital's human and hardware resources will not translate into high patient satisfaction and patient loyalty. PMID:26058286

  10. Principles and Pitfalls: a Guide to Death Certification

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Erin G.; Reed, Kurt D.

    2015-01-01

    Death certificates serve the critical functions of providing documentation for legal/administrative purposes and vital statistics for epidemiologic/health policy purposes. In order to satisfy these functions, it is important that death certificates be filled out completely, accurately, and promptly. The high error rate in death certification has been documented in multiple prior studies, as has the effectiveness of educational training interventions at mitigating errors. The following guide to death certification is intended to illustrate some basic principles and common pitfalls in electronic death registration with the goal of improving death certification accuracy. PMID:26185270

  11. Epidemiological designs for vaccine safety assessment: methods and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Nick

    2012-09-01

    Three commonly used designs for vaccine safety assessment post licensure are cohort, case-control and self-controlled case series. These methods are often used with routine health databases and immunisation registries. This paper considers the issues that may arise when designing an epidemiological study, such as understanding the vaccine safety question, case definition and finding, limitations of data sources, uncontrolled confounding, and pitfalls that apply to the individual designs. The example of MMR and autism, where all three designs have been used, is presented to help consider these issues. PMID:21985898

  12. Grant-Writing Pearls and Pitfalls: Maximizing Funding Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jeffrey C; Pynnonen, Melissa A; St John, Maie; Rosenthal, Eben L; Couch, Marion E; Schmalbach, Cecelia E

    2016-02-01

    This invited article reviews the grant process to include the following objectives: (1) to provide an understanding of otolaryngology funding mechanisms in the context of career progression; (2) to outline key components of a well-written grant; (3) to highlight vital members of a successful research team, with emphasis on the mentor-mentee relationship; and (4) to clarify grant scoring with emphasis on common pitfalls to avoid. Current otolaryngology funding mechanisms and up-to-date resources are provided. The review is aimed to assist otolaryngology residents, faculty new to the grant process, as well as experienced researchers striving to improve their grant review scores. PMID:26626133

  13. Whole-body FDG PET-MR oncologic imaging: pitfalls in clinical interpretation related to inaccurate MR-based attenuation correction.

    PubMed

    Attenberger, Ulrike; Catana, Ciprian; Chandarana, Hersh; Catalano, Onofrio A; Friedman, Kent; Schonberg, Stefan A; Thrall, James; Salvatore, Marco; Rosen, Bruce R; Guimaraes, Alexander R

    2015-08-01

    Simultaneous data collection for positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) is now a reality. While the full benefits of concurrently acquiring PET and MR data and the potential added clinical value are still being evaluated, initial studies have identified several important potential pitfalls in the interpretation of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/MRI in oncologic whole-body imaging, the majority of which being related to the errors in the attenuation maps created from the MR data. The purpose of this article was to present such pitfalls and artifacts using case examples, describe their etiology, and discuss strategies to overcome them. Using a case-based approach, we will illustrate artifacts related to (1) Inaccurate bone tissue segmentation; (2) Inaccurate air cavities segmentation; (3) Motion-induced misregistration; (4) RF coils in the PET field of view; (5) B0 field inhomogeneity; (6) B1 field inhomogeneity; (7) Metallic implants; (8) MR contrast agents. PMID:26025348

  14. De novo myocardial regeneration: advances and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Haider, Khawaja Husnain; Buccini, Stephanie; Ahmed, Rafeeq P H; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2010-12-15

    The capability of adult tissue-derived stem cells for cardiogenesis has been extensively studied in experimental animals and clinical studies for treatment of postischemic cardiomyopathy. The less-than-anticipated improvement in the heart function in most clinical studies with skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow cells has warranted a search for alternative sources of stem cells. Despite their multilineage differentiation potential, ethical issues, teratogenicity, and tissue rejection are main obstacles in developing clinically feasible methods for embryonic stem cell transplantation into patients. A decade-long research on embryonic stem cells has paved the way for discovery of alternative approaches for generating pluripotent stem cells. Genetic manipulation of somatic cells for pluripotency genes reprograms the cells to pluripotent status. Efforts are currently focused to make reprogramming protocols safer for clinical applications of the reprogrammed cells. We summarize the advancements and complicating features of stem cell therapy and discuss the decade-and-a-half-long efforts made by stem cell researchers for moving the field from bench to the bedside as an adjunct therapy or as an alternative to the contemporary therapeutic modalities for routine clinical application. The review also provides a special focus on the advancements made in the field of somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:20695792

  15. Pitfalls of CITES implementation in Nepal: a policy gap analysis.

    PubMed

    Dongol, Yogesh; Heinen, Joel T

    2012-08-01

    Implementation of policy involves multiple agencies operating at multiple levels in facilitating processes and actions to accomplish desired results. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was developed and implemented to regulate and control international wildlife trade, but violations of the agreement are widespread and growing worldwide, including in Nepal. This study attempts to understand how domestic CITES policies are translated into action and what effect actions and processes have on compliance. In doing so, this study provides insights into the implementation and enforcement pitfalls of national legislation that explain CITES violations in Nepal. Primarily, we used 26 key informants interviews to learn opinions of experts, and the grounded theory approach for further qualitative data analysis. In addition, we used Najman's (1995) policy implementation analysis framework to explain gaps. Many interrelated variables in the content of the policy, commitment and capacity of the agencies, the roles of clients and coalitions and contextual issues were observed. Variables that emerged suggest pitfalls in the regulatory policy represented by low probability of detection, arrest and punishment. Moreover, redistributive policies in buffer zones of protected areas are needed into perpetuity to benefit locals. Also, conservation organizations' support for building public and political salience is imperative. PMID:22706477

  16. Pitfalls of CITES Implementation in Nepal: A Policy Gap Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongol, Yogesh; Heinen, Joel T.

    2012-08-01

    Implementation of policy involves multiple agencies operating at multiple levels in facilitating processes and actions to accomplish desired results. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was developed and implemented to regulate and control international wildlife trade, but violations of the agreement are widespread and growing worldwide, including in Nepal. This study attempts to understand how domestic CITES policies are translated into action and what effect actions and processes have on compliance. In doing so, this study provides insights into the implementation and enforcement pitfalls of national legislation that explain CITES violations in Nepal. Primarily, we used 26 key informants interviews to learn opinions of experts, and the grounded theory approach for further qualitative data analysis. In addition, we used Najman's (1995) policy implementation analysis framework to explain gaps. Many interrelated variables in the content of the policy, commitment and capacity of the agencies, the roles of clients and coalitions and contextual issues were observed. Variables that emerged suggest pitfalls in the regulatory policy represented by low probability of detection, arrest and punishment. Moreover, redistributive policies in buffer zones of protected areas are needed into perpetuity to benefit locals. Also, conservation organizations' support for building public and political salience is imperative.

  17. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  18. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  19. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  20. Address of the President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Frederic W.

    1976-01-01

    The president of the Association of American Colleges addresses at the 62nd annual meeting the theme of the conference: "Looking to the Future--Liberal Education in a Radically Changing Society." Contributions to be made by AAC are examined. (LBH)

  1. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  2. Space sciences - Keynote address

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Joseph K.

    1990-01-01

    The present status and projected future developments of the NASA Space Science and Applications Program are addressed. Emphasis is given to biochemistry experiments that are planned for the Space Station. Projects for the late 1990s which will study the sun, the earth's magnetosphere, and the geosphere are briefly discussed.

  3. Broadband wide-angle dispersion measurements: Instrumental setup, alignment, and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Farhang, A.; Abasahl, B.; Dutta-Gupta, S.; Lovera, A.; Martin, O. J. F.; Mandracci, P.; Descrovi, E.

    2013-03-15

    The construction, alignment, and performance of a setup for broadband wide-angle dispersion measurements, with emphasis on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements, are presented in comprehensive detail. In contrast with most SPR instruments working with a monochromatic source, this setup takes advantage of a broadband/white light source and has full capability for automated angle vs. wavelength dispersion measurements for any arbitrary nanostructure array. A cylindrical prism is used rather than a triangular one in order to mitigate refraction induced effects and allow for such measurements. Although seemingly simple, this instrument requires use of many non-trivial methods in order to achieve proper alignment over all angles of incidence. Here we describe the alignment procedure for such a setup, the pitfalls introduced from the finite beam width incident onto the cylindrical prism, and deviations in the reflected/transmitted beam resulting from the finite thickness of the sample substrate. We address every one of these issues and provide experimental evidences on the success of this instrument and the alignment procedure used.

  4. Philosophical pitfalls in cosmetic surgery: a case of rhinoplasty during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hilhorst, M T

    2002-12-01

    In the process of deciding to undergo cosmetic surgery for aesthetic reasons, people may err in various ways. Adolescents in particular run the risk of making errors, and both parents and surgeons have special moral responsibilities to avoid disappointments. Parents should face a number of moral issues; if they fail to do so, surgeons have a moral if not legal responsibility, to raise these issues and take a moral stand. In this paper, a number of pitfalls are specified from a philosophical perspective. A request for surgery should not be granted if patients do not meet the standards required for stable decision making and a balanced judgment, and particularly in those case where patients fail to understand the assumptions--in terms of human values--underlying the surgical intervention. Assessments of competence should go beyond formal conceptions of autonomy, and should, as will be shown, be made on an individual basis. Substantive questions of personal identity and identity formation, within the context of often rapid psychosocial development and emotional turmoil peculiar to adolescents, should be addressed. The key to the moral evaluation of this surgery therefore lies primarily in a patient's life story. PMID:12817599

  5. Individual therapy for couple problems: perspectives and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Gurman, Alan S; Burton, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Despite the demonstrated efficacy of conjoint couple therapy, many clients seeking help for couple problems ultimately find themselves in individual therapy for these concerns. Individual therapy for couple problems (ITCP) may evolve from a partner's refusal of conjoint therapy or from the treatment format preferences of either the client or therapist. Having acknowledged the role of partner refusals, we offer some perspectives about the idiosyncratic personal factors and professional background factors that may lead therapists to provide ITCP and discuss the significant pitfalls in its practice. We emphasize five central areas of concern in the ongoing practice of ITCP: structural constraints on change; therapist side-taking and the therapeutic alliance; inaccurate assessments based on individual client reports; therapeutic focus; and ethical issues relevant to both attending and nonattending partners. We conclude by urging that this very important but largely neglected topic be paid greater attention in psychotherapy research, training and continuing education. PMID:24773422

  6. [Cardiology online: impact and pitfalls of Internet medical news].

    PubMed

    Wood, Shelley M; Topol, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago, the main sources for physicians seeking information on new procedures, drugs, or devices were meetings and medical journals. The dawn of the Internet radically transformed how news and information is delivered and absorbed, beginning with the launch of online journals back in the mid-1990s. A decade and a half later, physicians can learn about new innovations the moment they are made public, and they can get that news from their phones and tablets, their Twitter or Facebook accounts, or via their favorite blog or medical news web site. Along with the clear advantages of accessing new medical information any time of day comes the need for physicians to be aware of the pitfalls of online medical content and to have a heightened sense of responsibility when it comes to integrating information gleaned online into their medical practices. PMID:22322467

  7. Chemometrics applied to vibrational spectroscopy: overview, challenges and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Chemometric multivariate calibration methods are rapidly impacting quantitative infrared spectroscopy in many positive ways. The combination of vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics has been used by industry for quality control and process monitoring. The growth of these methods has been phenomenal in the past decade. Yet, as with any new technology, there are growing pains. The methods are so powerful at finding correlations in the data, that when used without great care they can readily yield results that are not valid for the analysis of future unknown samples. In this paper, the power of the multivariate calibration methods is discussed while pointing out common pitfalls and some remaining challenges that may slow the implementation of chemometrics in research and industry.

  8. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Satish K; Heriot, Alexander G; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-06-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed. PMID:27247536

  9. Disseminated adenovirus infection in an immunocompromised host. Pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Landry, M L; Fong, C K; Neddermann, K; Solomon, L; Hsiung, G D

    1987-09-01

    In this report, a bone marrow transplant recipient with rapidly fatal gastroenteritis is presented. The presence of intranuclear inclusions on postmortem light microscopic examination of liver, lung, and small bowel tissue was considered diagnostic of cytomegalovirus infection. However, electron microscopic examination of liver tissue demonstrated adenovirus infection. This was confirmed by isolation of an adenovirus type 2 with unusual laboratory features from liver, lung, colon contents, serum, esophageal swab, and oral ulcerations. Results of a complement fixation test for antibodies to adenovirus performed on postmortem serum samples were negative, and a titer of 1:4 was noted for antibody against cytomegalovirus. This case illustrates the diagnostic pitfalls that may be encountered in establishing a specific viral diagnosis in severely ill patients. PMID:2821806

  10. The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction: pitfalls, parameters and prospects.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of neuroaesthetic studies on prose fiction. This is in contrast to the very many impressive studies that have been conducted in recent times on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music and dance. Why might this be the case, what are its causes and, of greatest importance, how can it best be resolved? In this article, the pitfalls, parameters and prospects of a neuroaesthetics of prose fiction will be explored. The article itself is part critical review, part methodological proposal and part opinion paper. Its aim is simple: to stimulate, excite and energize thinking in the discipline as to how prose fiction might be fully integrated in the canon of neuroaesthetics and to point to opportunities where neuroimaging studies on literary discourse processing might be conducted in collaborative work bringing humanists and scientists together. PMID:26283953

  11. The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction: pitfalls, parameters and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of neuroaesthetic studies on prose fiction. This is in contrast to the very many impressive studies that have been conducted in recent times on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music and dance. Why might this be the case, what are its causes and, of greatest importance, how can it best be resolved? In this article, the pitfalls, parameters and prospects of a neuroaesthetics of prose fiction will be explored. The article itself is part critical review, part methodological proposal and part opinion paper. Its aim is simple: to stimulate, excite and energize thinking in the discipline as to how prose fiction might be fully integrated in the canon of neuroaesthetics and to point to opportunities where neuroimaging studies on literary discourse processing might be conducted in collaborative work bringing humanists and scientists together. PMID:26283953

  12. Merits and Pitfalls of Currently Used Diagnostic Tools in Mycetoma

    PubMed Central

    van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; Fahal, Ahmed H.; Goodfellow, Michael; Mahgoub, El Sheikh; Welsh, Oliverio; Zijlstra, Ed E.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of mycetoma depends on the causative organism and since many organisms, both actinomycetes (actinomycetoma) and fungi (eumycetoma), are capable of producing mycetoma, an accurate diagnosis is crucial. Currently, multiple diagnostic tools are used to determine the extent of infections and to identify the causative agents of mycetoma. These include various imaging, cytological, histopathological, serological, and culture techniques; phenotypic characterisation; and molecular diagnostics. In this review, we summarize these techniques and identify their merits and pitfalls in the identification of the causative agents of mycetoma and the extent of the disease. We also emphasize the fact that there is no ideal diagnostic tool available to identify the causative agents and that future research should focus on the development of new and reliable diagnostic tools. PMID:24992636

  13. Multi-criteria decision analysis: Limitations, pitfalls, and practical difficulties

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, Edouard

    2003-02-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics women's figure skating competition is used as a case study to illustrate some of the limitations, pitfalls, and practical difficulties of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA). The paper compares several widely used models for synthesizing the multiple attributes into a single aggregate value. The various MCDA models can provide conflicting rankings of the alternatives for a common set of information even under states of certainty. Analysts involved in MCDA need to deal with the following challenging tasks: (1) selecting an appropriate analysis method, and (2) properly interpreting the results. An additional trap is the availability of software tools that implement specific MCDA models that can beguile the user with quantitative scores. These conclusions are independent of the decision domain and they should help foster better MCDA practices in many fields including systems engineering trade studies.

  14. Scrum and Global Delivery: Pitfalls and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadun, Cristiano

    Two trends are becoming widespread in software development work—agile development processes and global delivery, both promising sizable benefits in productivity, capacity and so on. Combining the two is a highly attractive possibility, even more so in fast-paced and constrained commercial software engineering projects. However, a degree of conflict exists between the assumptions underlying the two ideas, leading to pitfalls and challenges in agile/distributed projects which are new, both with respect to traditional development and agile or distributed efforts adopted separately. Succeeding in commercial agile/distributed projects implies recognizing these new challenges, proactively planning for them, and actively put in place solutions and methods to overcome them. This chapter illustrates some of the typical challenges that were met during real-world commercial projects, and how they were solved.

  15. Avoiding the pitfalls of adaptive management implementation in Swedish silviculture.

    PubMed

    Rist, Lucy; Felton, Adam; Mårald, Erland; Samuelsson, Lars; Lundmark, Tomas; Rosvall, Ola

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing demand for alternatives to Sweden's current dominant silvicultural system, driven by a desire to raise biomass production, meet environmental goals and mitigate climate change. However, moving towards diversified forest management that deviates from well established silvicultural practices carries many uncertainties and risks. Adaptive management is often suggested as an effective means of managing in the context of such complexities. Yet there has been scepticism over its appropriateness in cases characterised by large spatial extents, extended temporal scales and complex land ownership-characteristics typical of Swedish forestry. Drawing on published research, including a new paradigm for adaptive management, we indicate how common pitfalls can be avoided during implementation. We indicate the investment, infrastructure, and considerations necessary to benefit from adaptive management. In doing so, we show how this approach could offer a pragmatic operational model for managing the uncertainties, risks and obstacles associated with new silvicultural systems and the challenges facing Swedish forestry. PMID:26744049

  16. Clinical and Biochemical Pitfalls in the Diagnosis of Peroxisomal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Klouwer, Femke C C; Huffnagel, Irene C; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Waterham, Hans R; Wanders, Ronald J A; Engelen, Marc; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomal disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetic metabolic disorders, caused by a defect in peroxisome biogenesis or a deficiency of a single peroxisomal enzyme. The peroxisomal disorders include the Zellweger spectrum disorders, the rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata spectrum disorders, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and multiple single enzyme deficiencies. There are several core phenotypes caused by peroxisomal dysfunction that clinicians can recognize. The diagnosis is suggested by biochemical testing in blood and urine and confirmed by functional assays in cultured skin fibroblasts, followed by mutation analysis. This review describes the phenotype of the main peroxisomal disorders and possible pitfalls in (laboratory) diagnosis to aid clinicians in the recognition of this group of diseases. PMID:27089543

  17. Clinical pitfalls in diagnosis of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Serretta, Vincenzo; Scalici Gesolfo, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Current global economic crisis imposes healthcare system to reduce unnecessary investigations and increase early detection of tumors, to decrease the costs of an advanced disease. Several diagnostic pitfalls may occur dealing with bladder cancer (BC), particularly in nonmuscle-invasive (NMIBC) one. Hematuria, the commonest sign in NMIBC, is often underestimated. Urinary cytology is highly specific for high-grade tumors, but has a low sensitivity for low-grade BC, is operator dependent, and not always obtainable in clinical practice. Numerous urinary tests are available to ameliorate the accuracy of cytology, but none of them is routinly used in urological practice. Ultrasound could hardly detect a small bladder tumor, especially if located in the bladder neck or in the anterior wall. Computed tomography (CT) is widely adopted as an alternative to conventional urography, but its usefulness in patients with hematuria is still debated. MRI has a higher accuracy than CT for staging BC and evaluate the bladder-wall invasion. A negative cystoscopy cannot exclude Tis and should be accompanied by urinary cytology in patients with suspected Tis or high-risk NMIBC; however, new techniques such as narrow band imaging (NBI) and photodynamic (PDD) increase the detection rate of BC and flat lesions. Nearly half of all diagnostic resections present omission of muscle in the specimen or its mention in the pathology report, which is associated with an increased mortality. An adequate muscle sampling during endoscopic resection is mandatory, particularly in patients with high-grade disease. Recognition of pitfalls in diagnosis and management of BC represents the first step for a correct approach. PMID:26481718

  18. Excerpts from keynote address

    SciTech Connect

    Creel, G.C.

    1995-06-01

    Excerpts from the keynote principally address emissions issues in the fossil power industry as related to heat rate improvements. Stack emissions of both sulfur and nitrogen oxides are discussed, and a number of examples are given: (1) PEPCO`s Potomac River Station, and (2) Morgantown station`s NOX reduction efforts. Circulating water emissions are also briefly discussed, as are O & M costs of emission controls.

  19. Holographic content addressable storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas; Reyes, George

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a Holographic Content Addressable Storage (HCAS) architecture. The HCAS systems consists of a DMD (Digital Micromirror Array) as the input Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), a CMOS (Complementary Metal-oxide Semiconductor) sensor as the output photodetector and a photorefractive crystal as the recording media. The HCAS system is capable of performing optical correlation of an input image/feature against massive reference data set stored in the holographic memory. Detailed system analysis will be reported in this paper.

  20. Pitfalls in the use of whole slide imaging for the diagnosis of central nervous system tumors: A pilot study in surgical neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Pekmezci, Melike; Uysal, Sanem Pinar; Orhan, Yelda; Tihan, Tarik; Lee, Han Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI) finds increasingly higher value in everyday surgical pathology in addition to its well-established use for educational and research purposes. However, its diagnostic utility, especially in subspecialty settings such as neuropathology, is not fully validated. Neuropathology practice is unique with smaller overall tissue size and frequent need for high-power evaluation. In addition, tumor grade is an integral part of the initial diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of primary pathology diagnosis of surgical neuropathology specimens using WSI. Materials and Methods: We reviewed consecutive surgical neuropathology cases diagnosed in our institution during a 2-month period and identified a single diagnostic slide, which was scanned at 40× magnification. Two neuropathologists who were blinded to the original diagnoses reviewed the whole slide image and rendered a diagnosis including tumor grade when applicable. They reviewed the single diagnostic slide after a wash-out period. Intra- and inter-observer discrepancies, as well as reasons for discrepancies, were evaluated. Results: The concordance rates were 94.9% and 88% for two neuropathologists. Two critical issues leading to discrepancies were identified: (1) identification of mitoses and (2) recognition of nuclear details. Conclusions: Given the current study is exclusively for surgical neuropathology cases, an all-encompassing conclusion about the utility of WSI for diagnostic purposes may not be available. Nevertheless, pathologists should be aware of the potential pitfalls due to identification of mitotic figures and nuclear details. We recommend independent validation for each subspecialty of pathology to identify subspecialty-specific concerns, so they can be properly addressed. PMID:27217975

  1. Musculoskeletal pitfalls and pseudotumours in the pelvis: a pictorial review for body imagers

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh, S; Didier, R; Fung, A; Panicek, D M; Coakley, F V

    2014-01-01

    Many musculoskeletal abnormalities in the pelvis are first seen by body imagers while reviewing pelvic cross-sectional studies, and some of these abnormalities may mimic malignancy or another aggressive process. This article describes nine musculoskeletal pseudotumours and interpretative pitfalls that may be seen on CT, MRI and ultrasound imaging of the pelvis. Awareness of these pitfalls and pseudotumours may help avoid misdiagnosis and prevent inappropriate intervention or management. PMID:25096891

  2. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  3. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  4. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), "Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities-Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015", we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  5. Methods for Addressing Uncertainty and Variability to Characterize Potential Health Risk from Trichloroethylene-Contaminated Ground Water at Beale Air Force Base in California:Integration of Uncertainty and Variability in Pharmacokinetics and Dose-Response

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T

    2001-05-24

    Traditional estimates of health risk are typically inflated, particularly if cancer is the dominant endpoint and there is fundamental uncertainty as to mechanism(s) of action. Risk is more realistically characterized if it accounts for joint uncertainty and interindividual variability within a systematic probabilistic framework to integrate the joint effects on risk of distributed parameters of all (linear as well as nonlinear) risk-extrapolation models involved. Such a framework was used to characterize risks to potential future residents posed by trichloroethylene (TCE) in ground water at an inactive landfill site on Beale Air Force Base in California. Variability and uncertainty were addressed in exposure-route-specific estimates of applied dose, in pharmacokinetically based estimates of route-specific metabolized fractions of absorbed TCE, and in corresponding biologically effective doses estimated under a genotoxic/linear (MA{sub G}) vs. a cytotoxic/nonlinear (MA{sub c}) mechanistic assumption for TCE-induced cancer. Increased risk conditional on effective dose was estimated under MA{sub G} based on seven rodent-bioassay data sets, and under MA{sub c} based on mouse hepatotoxicity data. Mean and upper-bound estimates of combined risk calculated by the unified approach were <10{sup -6} and 10{sup -4}, respectively, while corresponding estimates based on traditional deterministic methods were >10{sup -5} and 10{sup -4}, respectively. It was estimated that no TCE-related harm is likely to occur due to any plausible residential exposure scenario involving the site. The systematic probabilistic framework illustrated is particularly suited to characterizing risks that involve uncertain and/or diverse mechanisms of action.

  6. Methods for Addressing Uncertainty and Variability to Characterize Potential Health Risk From Trichloroethylene-Contaminated Ground Water Beale Air Force Base in California: Integration of Uncertainty and Variability in Pharmacokinetics and Dose-Response

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K.T.

    1999-09-29

    Traditional estimates of health risk are typically inflated, particularly if cancer is the dominant endpoint and there is fundamental uncertainty as to mechanism(s) of action. Risk is more realistically characterized if it accounts for joint uncertainty and interindividual variability after applying a unified probabilistic approach to the distributed parameters of all (linear as well as nonlinear) risk-extrapolation models involved. Such an approach was applied to characterize risks to potential future residents posed by trichloroethylene (TCE) in ground water at an inactive landfill site on Beale Air Force Base in California. Variability and uncertainty were addressed in exposure-route-specific estimates of applied dose, in pharmacokinetically based estimates of route-specific metabolized fractions of absorbed TCE, and in corresponding biologically effective doses estimated under a genotoxic/linear (MA{sub g}) vs. a cytotoxic/nonlinear (MA{sub c}) mechanistic assumption for TCE-induced cancer. Increased risk conditional on effective dose was estimated under MA{sub G} based on seven rodent-bioassay data sets, and under MA, based on mouse hepatotoxicity data. Mean and upper-bound estimates of combined risk calculated by the unified approach were <10{sup -6} and <10{sup -4}, respectively, while corresponding estimates based on traditional deterministic methods were >10{sup -5} and >10{sup -4}, respectively. It was estimated that no TCE-related harm is likely occur due any plausible residential exposure scenario involving the site. The unified approach illustrated is particularly suited to characterizing risks that involve uncertain and/or diverse mechanisms of action.

  7. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  8. Bax: Addressed to kill.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Manon, Stéphen

    2011-09-01

    The pro-apoptototic protein Bax (Bcl-2 Associated protein X) plays a central role in the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. In healthy mammalian cells, Bax is essentially cytosolic and inactive. Following a death signal, the protein is translocated to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it promotes a permeabilization that favors the release of different apoptogenic factors, such as cytochrome c. The regulation of Bax translocation is associated to conformational changes that are under the control of different factors. The evidences showing the involvement of different Bax domains in its mitochondrial localization are presented. The interactions between Bax and its different partners are described in relation to their ability to promote (or prevent) Bax conformational changes leading to mitochondrial addressing and to the acquisition of the capacity to permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:21641962

  9. The pitfalls of field trials in fish vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, H

    1997-01-01

    Field trials are essential for accurately assessing the worth of a vaccine under actual conditions of use. Compared with the laboratory, the dynamics of the host, pathogen, and environment in a production setting can produce both subtle and dramatic differences on the performance of the vaccine and the immune response. Because of this, field trials are conducted by manufacturers in vaccine development and are required by many national regulatory agencies to evaluate safety and/or efficacy before granting vaccine licenses. Aquaculture producers, veterinarians and fish health professionals can use field trials to analyse the cost-benefit of a vaccination programme for a facility, or to compare competitive products. Vaccine field trials are more than merely using the products in the field. Small efficacy effects can result in considerable cost reductions to the fish farmer. Proper field trial design, conduct and analysis is critical to detecting these effects. However, field trials are also fraught with many pitfalls that can result in failure or misleading conclusions. The discussion regarding possible pitfalls of vaccine field trials in aquaculture is divided into two parts: 1) the art and 2) the science of successful field trials. The art of successful field trials involves dealing with the "people" aspect which is necessary for initial and continuing compliance. Meticulous planning is essential, including a written protocol to which everyone agrees by signature. The bottom line to the art of field trials is anticipation and discussion of all possible eventualities together with constant communication with the farmer and site supervisor. The science of successful fields trials involves anticipating and realizing the logistical and statistical difficulties in design and implementation. Problems often encountered are: lack of stated quantifiable purpose; low power of the test due to inherent small sample size, large variation and small margin of effect; lack of

  10. Magnetic content addressable memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenye

    Content Addressable Memories are designed with comparison circuits built into every bit cell. This parallel structure can increase the speed of searching from O(n) (as with Random Access Memories) to O(1), where n is the number of entries being searched. The high cost in hardware limits the application of CAM within situations where higher searching speed is extremely desired. Spintronics technology can build non-volatile Magnetic RAM with only one device for one bit cell. There are various technologies involved, like Magnetic Tunnel Junctions, off-easy-axis programming method, Synthetic Anti-Ferromagnetic tri-layers, Domain Wall displacement, Spin Transfer Torque tri-layers and etc. With them, particularly the Tunnel Magneto-Resistance variation in MTJ due to difference in magnetization polarity of the two magnets, Magnetic CAM can be developed with reduced hardware cost. And this is demonstrated by the discussion in this dissertation. Six MCAM designs are discussed. In the first design, comparand (C), local information (S) and their complements are stored into 4 MTJs connected in XOR gate pattern. The other five designs have one or two stacks for both information storage and comparison, and full TMR ratio can be taken advantage of. Two challenges for the five are specifically programming C without changing S and selectively programming a cell out of an array. The solutions to specific programming are: by confining the programming field for C in a ring structure design; by using field programming and spin polarized current programming respectively for C and S in the SAF+DW and SAF+STT tri-layer design; by making use of the difference in thresholds between direct mode and toggle mode switching in the SAF+SAF design. The problem of selective programming is addressed by off-easy-axis method and by including SAF tri-layers. Cell with STT tri-layers for both C and S can completely avoid the problems of specific and selective programming, but subject to the limit of

  11. Perils, pitfalls, and benefits of a surgeon as a health system employee: the contracting process.

    PubMed

    Graebner, Nancy K

    2011-06-01

    One would be hard pressed today to find a general surgeon or subspecialty-trained general surgeon who has not been approached by a health system to discuss employment. The majority of physicians find these initial discussions with a hospital administrator daunting at best regardless of whether they are just finishing residency or fellowship training or have had many successful years of private practice under their belt. Just as real estate has the mantra of "location, location, location," I would suggest that physician employment by a health system should have the mantra of "relationship, relationship, relationship." The following tips provide guidance on how to better understand the potential perils, pitfalls, and benefits of specific content sections of a standard template employment agreement between a health system and a physician. Physicians should review, understand, and be ready to engage in dialogue with the hospital administrator before involving attorneys. My experience is that if the dialogue begins with the attorneys representing each party, the opportunity to fully develop a partnership relationship between the parties is either lost or at minimum severely delayed in its development. PMID:21679630

  12. Percutaneous Transpedicular Fixation: Technical tips and Pitfalls of Sextant and Pathfinder Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed Salah Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The efficacy of the operative techniques, possible benefits as well as pitfalls and limitations of the techniques are discussed. Potential drawbacks are also detected. Purpose This study aims to report indications, techniques, and our experience with the use of the Sextant and PathFinder percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation systems. Overview of Literature Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion is a novel technique. Successful percutaneous placement of pedicle screws requires surgical skill and experience because of lack of anatomic surface landmarks. Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous placement of pedicle screws is effective. Many systems are now available. Methods We conducted a prospective operative and postoperative analysis of 40 patients with absolute indication for thoracic or lumbar instability between January 2009 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with the Sextant (group A) and PathFinder (group B) systems under fluoroscopic guidance. Operative techniques are discussed and the results compared. Results Percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation minimizes the morbidity associated with open techniques without compromising the quality of fixation. A total of 190 screws were inserted. There was no additional morbidity. Postoperative computed tomography images and plain X-rays were analyzed. Reduction of visual analog scale scores of back pain was evident. Conclusions Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous pedicular screws are feasible and can be safely done. Current systems allow multi-segmental fixation with significantly less difficulties. The described techniques have acceptable intra- and postoperative complication rates, and overall sufficient pain control with early mobilization of patients. PMID:26949466

  13. Data Science Careers: A Sampling of Successful Strategies, Pitfalls, and Persistent Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocks, K. I.; Duerr, R.; Wyborn, L. A.; Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    Data Scientists do not have a single career trajectory or preparatory pathway. Successful data scientists have come from domain sciences, computer science, library science, and other diverse fields. They have worked up from entry-level staff positions, have started as academics with doctoral degrees, and have established themselves as management professionals. They have positions in government, industry, academia, and NGO's, and their responsibilities range from highly specialized, to generalists, to high-level leadership. This presents a potentially confusing landscape for students interested in the field: how to decide among the varied options to have the best chance at fulfilling employment? What are the mistakes to avoid? Many established data scientist, both old-timers and early career professionals, expressed interest in presenting in this session but were unable to justify using their one AGU abstract for something other than their funded projects. As the session chairs we interviewed them, plus our extended network of colleagues, to ask for their best advice on what was most critical to their success in their current position, what pitfalls to avoid, what ongoing challenges they see, and what advice they would give themselves, if they could do it all over again starting now. Here we consolidate those interviews with our own perspectives to present some of the common themes and standout advice.

  14. Pitfalls and Limitations of SPECT, PET, and Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, James R

    2015-09-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are widely accepted to be a very safe class of drugs, with very few adverse reactions and unexpected biodistributions. However, problems can arise because of technical issues in manufacture or reconstitution, patient preparation, or drug administration. This review presents highlights of issues that have arisen in the newer classes of radiopharmaceuticals in the last 20 years and expands the scope of the previous report to include PET and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Variations in the "quality" of the eluate of a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc generator remain a major issue. Several of the newer (99m)Tc tracers require a heating step in preparation that can also lead to unacceptably low radiochemical purity. Radiolytic breakdown can be a problem with all classes of radiopharmaceuticals. Many of the newer radiopharmaceuticals localize by receptor- or transporter-mediated processes and thus can be affected by other drugs, making patient preparation more important than ever. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals may require coadministration of radioprotectant regimens, such as the use of lysine-arginine infusions with radiopeptide therapy. Extravasation can have serious consequences with therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Adverse reactions to newer radiopharmaceuticals remain rare, though may increase because of coadministration of agents such as contrast media. However, there is known to be underreporting of minor adverse reactions. Knowledge of the pitfalls that can occur with radiopharmaceuticals is important in the interpretation of nuclear medicine images and optimal patient care. PMID:26278857

  15. Ischaemic conditioning: pitfalls on the path to clinical translation

    PubMed Central

    Przyklenk, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel adjuvant strategies capable of attenuating myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury and reducing infarct size remains a major, unmet clinical need. A wealth of preclinical evidence has established that ischaemic ‘conditioning’ is profoundly cardioprotective, and has positioned the phenomenon (in particular, the paradigms of postconditioning and remote conditioning) as the most promising and potent candidate for clinical translation identified to date. However, despite this preclinical consensus, current phase II trials have been plagued by heterogeneity, and the outcomes of recent meta-analyses have largely failed to confirm significant benefit. As a result, the path to clinical application has been perceived as ‘disappointing’ and ‘frustrating’. The goal of the current review is to discuss the pitfalls that may be stalling the successful clinical translation of ischaemic conditioning, with an emphasis on concerns regarding: (i) appropriate clinical study design and (ii) the choice of the ‘right’ preclinical models to facilitate clinical translation. PMID:25560903

  16. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Renal Imaging in Adults.

    PubMed

    Keramida, Georgia; James, Jacqueline M; Prescott, Mary C; Peters, Adrien Michael

    2015-09-01

    To understand pitfalls and limitations in adult renography, it is necessary to understand firstly the physiology of the kidney, especially the magnitude and control of renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and tubular fluid flow rate, and secondly the pharmacokinetics and renal handling of the three most often used tracers, Tc-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), Tc-99m-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Tc-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The kidneys may be imaged dynamically with Tc-99m-MAG3 or Tc-99m-DTPA, with or without diuretic challenge, or by static imaging with Tc-99m-DMSA. Protocols are different according to whether the kidney is native or transplanted. Quantitative analysis of dynamic data includes measurement of renal vascularity (important for the transplanted kidney), absolute tracer clearance rates, differential renal function (DRF) and response to diuretic challenge. Static image reveals functional renal parenchymal damage, both focal and global, is useful in the clinical management of obstructive uropathy, renal stone disease and hypertension (under angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition), and is the preferred technique for determining DRF. Diagnosis based on morphological appearances is important in transplant management. Even though nuclear medicine is now in the era of hybrid imaging, renal imaging remains an important subspecialty in nuclear medicine and requires a sound basing in applied physiology, the classical supporting discipline of nuclear medicine. PMID:26278854

  17. Pitfalls of adrenal imaging with chemical shift MRI.

    PubMed

    Schieda, N; Al Dandan, O; Kielar, A Z; Flood, T A; McInnes, M D F; Siegelman, E S

    2014-11-01

    Chemical shift (CS) MRI of the adrenal glands exploits the different precessional frequencies of fat and water protons to differentiate the intracytoplasmic lipid-containing adrenal adenoma from other adrenal lesions. The purpose of this review is to illustrate both technical and interpretive pitfalls of adrenal imaging with CS MRI and emphasize the importance of adherence to strict technical specifications and errors that may occur when other imaging features and clinical factors are not incorporated into the diagnosis. When performed properly, the specificity of CS MRI for the diagnosis of adrenal adenoma is over 90%. Sampling the in-phase and opposed-phase echoes in the correct order and during the same breath-hold are essential requirements, and using the first echo pair is preferred, if possible. CS MRI characterizes more adrenal adenomas then unenhanced CT but may be non-diagnostic in a proportion of lipid-poor adenomas; CT washout studies may be able to diagnose these lipid-poor adenomas. Other primary and secondary adrenal tumours and supra-renal disease entities may contain lipid or gross fat and mimic adenoma or myelolipoma. Heterogeneity within an adrenal lesion that contains intracytoplasmic lipid could be due to myelolipoma, lipomatous metaplasia of adenoma, or collision tumour. Correlation with previous imaging, other imaging features, clinical history, and laboratory investigations can minimize interpretive errors. PMID:25062926

  18. Diagnostics of eosinophilic esophagitis: Clinical, endoscopic, and histologic pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is currently defined as an immune-mediated chronic esophageal disorder that is diagnosed using both clinical and pathologic information. A series of consensus diagnostic guidelines for EoE have brought a measure of consistency to the field, but in practice the diagnosis of EoE can be challenging. Typical clinical symptoms of EoE, including dysphagia, heartburn, and chest pain, can overlap with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which itself is a common indication for performing endoscopic evaluation. The endoscopic findings of EoE, such as esophageal rings, strictures, linear furrows, and white exudates are not specific. Esophageal eosinophilia, the histologic hallmark of EoE, is also not pathognomonic and can be seen in a range of conditions. Further complicating the diagnosis of EoE is the newly recognized entity of proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), a condition that must be excluded prior to confirming a diagnosis of EoE. This paper will review the current diagnostic criteria for EoE, and discuss multiple clinical, endoscopic, and histologic pitfalls in making the diagnosis of EoE. PMID:24603380

  19. Pitfalls in the biological diagnosis of common hemoglobin disorders.

    PubMed

    Wajcman, Henri; Moradkhani, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    In West-European countries, hemoglobin disorders are no more rare diseases. Programs for diagnosis of heterozygous carriers have been established to prevent cases with major sickle cell disease or thalassemias. These studies have been done essentially by high performance liquid chromatography on cation-exchange columns and electrophoresis (mostly capillary electrophoresis). They have been done through systematic population studies or premarital diagnosis. We describe in this work the frequent or rare pitfalls encountered, which led to false negative or positive diagnosis both in the field of sickle cell disease and thalassemias. In the absence of a well identified hemoglobin disorder in the proband's family, it is a rule that the use of a single test is insufficient to identify formally HbS. The presence of HbS could also be masked by another hemoglobin abnormality. The sole measurement of HbA2 level is insufficient to characterize a thalassemic trait: this level needs always to be interpreted considering RBC parameters and iron metabolic status. In difficult cases, the definitive answer may require a family study and/or a molecular genetic characterization. PMID:26489811

  20. Computed Tomography Angiography in Microsurgery: Indications, Clinical Utility, and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gordon K.; Fox, Paige M.; Riboh, Jonathan; Hsu, Charles; Saber, Sepideh; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Chang, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) can be used to obtain 3-dimensional vascular images and soft-tissue definition. The goal of this study was to evaluate the reliability, usefulness, and pitfalls of CTA in preoperative planning of microvascular reconstructive surgery. Methods: A retrospective review of patients who obtained preoperative CTA in preparation for planned microvascular reconstruction was performed over a 5-year period (2001–2005). The influence of CTA on the original operative plan was assessed for each patient, and CTA results were correlated to the operative findings. Results: Computed tomographic angiography was performed on 94 patients in preparation for microvascular reconstruction. In 48 patients (51%), vascular abnormalities were noted on CTA. Intraoperative findings correlated with CTA results in 97% of cases. In 42 patients (45%), abnormal CTA findings influenced the original operative plan, such as the choice of vessels, side of harvest, or nature of the reconstruction (local flap instead of free tissue transfer). Technical difficulties in performing CTA were encountered in 5 patients (5%) in whom interference from external fixation devices was the main cause. Conclusions: This large study of CTA obtained for preoperative planning of reconstructive microsurgery at both donor and recipient sites study demonstrates that CTA is safe and highly accurate. Computed tomographic angiography can alter the surgeon's reconstructive plan when abnormalities are noted preoperatively and consequently improve results by decreasing vascular complication rates. The use of CTA should be considered for cases of microsurgical reconstruction where the vascular anatomy may be questionable. PMID:24023972

  1. Promises and Pitfalls of High-Throughput Biological Assays.

    PubMed

    Finak, Greg; Gottardo, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses some of the pitfalls encountered when performing biomedical research involving high-throughput "omics" data and presents some strategies and guidelines that researchers should follow when undertaking such studies. We discuss common errors in experimental design and data analysis that lead to irreproducible and non-replicable research and provide some guidelines to avoid these common mistakes so that researchers may have confidence in study outcomes, even if the results are negative. We discuss the importance of ranking and prespecifying hypotheses, performing power analysis, careful experimental design, and preplanning of statistical analyses in order to avoid the "fishing expedition" data analysis strategy, which is doomed to fail. The impact of multiple testing on false-positive rates is discussed, particularly in the context of the analysis of high-throughput data, and methods to correct for it are presented, as well as approaches to detect and correct for experimental biases and batch effects, which often plague high-throughput assays. We highlight the importance of sharing data and analysis code to facilitate reproducibility and present tools and software that are appropriate for this purpose. PMID:27115636

  2. Pitfalls in staging uterine neoplasm with imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Kinkel, K

    2006-01-01

    This review analyzes current pitfalls in pretreatment staging of endometrial and cervical carcinoma with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on a critical review of the literature. Technical, patient, and tumor-related characteristics were analyzed to improve further staging of uterine neoplasm with MRI. For endometrial carcinoma staging, contrast-enhanced dynamic imaging appears essential to avoid false-positive findings for deep myometrial invasion by better delineating tumor from normal myometrium. However, leiomyomas, adenomyosis, and grade 3 tumors provide difficulties in staging for pathologists and radiologists. Slice orientation perpendicular to the long axis of the cervical channel might improve false-negative findings for deep stromal invasion on T2-weighted images in endometrial and cervical cancer. Contrast-enhanced sequences do not improve diagnosis of parametrial or vaginal invasion in cervical cancer. Assessment of lymph node invasion by any imaging modality has limited sensitivity in detecting lymph node metastasis smaller than 5 mm. Knowledge of diagnostic criteria is critical to avoid false-negative findings for bladder wall invasion. Higher spatial resolution with dedicated multichannel pelvic phase array coils, smaller fields of view and section thickness, and careful comparison of T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced sequences are strategies that might avoid misinterpretation of pelvic MRI in staging uterine neoplasm. PMID:16333697

  3. Pitfall Traps and Mini-Winkler Extractor as Complementary Methods to Sample Soil Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A C; Batistella, D A; Battirola, L D; Marques, M I

    2016-02-01

    We compared abundance, species richness, and capture efficiency with pitfall traps and mini-Winkler extractors to examine their use as complementary methods for sampling soil Coleoptera during dry (2010) and high water seasons (2011) in three areas, including inundated and non-inundated regions, in the Pantanal of Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil. We paired treatments with two 10 × 10 m plots in inundated and non-inundated locations that were repeated three times in each location for a total of 18 plots. In each plot, we used nine pitfall traps and collected 2 m(2) of leaf litter and surface soil samples with mini-Winkler extractors. We collected a total of 4260 adult beetles comprising 36 families, 113 genera, and 505 species. Most were caught in pitfalls (69%) and the remainder in the mini-Winkler extractors (31%). Each method provided distinct information about the beetle community: 252 species were captured only in pitfall traps, 147 using only the mini-Winkler extractors, and these methods shared another 106 species. Pitfall and mini-Winkler contribute in different ways for the sampling of the soil beetle community, and so they should be considered complementary for a more thorough assessment of community diversity. PMID:26493175

  4. Addressing failures in exascale computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Abraham, Jacob A.; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, Jim; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, William; Chien, Andrew A.; Coteus, Paul; Debardeleben, Nathan A.; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Saverio, Fazzari; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Robert; Stearly, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on “Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing” held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system; and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia; and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  5. Light addressable photoelectrochemical cyanide sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Myung, N.; Sun, Y.

    1996-03-15

    A sensor is demonstrated that is capable of spatial discrimination of cyanide with use of only a single stationary sensing element. Different spatial regions of the sensing element are light activated to reveal the solution cyanide concentration only at the point of illumination. In this light addressable photoelectrochemical (LAP) sensor the sensing element consists of an n-CdSe electrode immersed in solution, with the open-circuit potential determined under illumination. In alkaline ferro-ferri-cyanide solution, the open-circuit photopotential is highly responsive to cyanide, with a linear response of (120 mV) log [KCN]. LAP detection with a spatial resolution of {+-}1 mm for cyanide detection is demonstrated. The response is almost linear for 0.001-0.100 m cyanide with a resolution of 5 mV. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert; Abraham, Jacob; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, J.; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, Bill; Chien, Andrew; Coteus, Paul; DeBardeleben, Nathan; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Fazzari, Saverio; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Rob; Stearley, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on Addressing failures in exascale computing' held in Park City, Utah, 4-11 August 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system, discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system, and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia, and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  7. Regulatory Models and the Environment: Practice, Pitfalls, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, K. John; Graham, Judith A.; McKone, Thomas; Whipple, Chris

    2008-06-01

    Computational models support environmental regulatory activities by providing the regulator an ability to evaluate available knowledge, assess alternative regulations, and provide a framework to assess compliance. But all models face inherent uncertainties, because human and natural systems are always more complex and heterogeneous than can be captured in a model. Here we provide a summary discussion of the activities, findings, and recommendations of the National Research Council's Committee on Regulatory Environmental Models, a committee funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency to provide guidance on the use of computational models in the regulatory process. Modeling is a difficult enterprise even outside of the potentially adversarial regulatory environment. The demands grow when the regulatory requirements for accountability, transparency, public accessibility, and technical rigor are added to the challenges. Moreover, models cannot be validated (declared true) but instead should be evaluated with regard to their suitability as tools to address a specific question. The committee concluded that these characteristics make evaluation of a regulatory model more complex than simply comparing measurement data with model results. Evaluation also must balance the need for a model to be accurate with the need for a model to be reproducible, transparent, and useful for the regulatory decision at hand. Meeting these needs requires model evaluation to be applied over the"life cycle" of a regulatory model with an approach that includes different forms of peer review, uncertainty analysis, and extrapolation methods than for non-regulatory models.

  8. Dermatoscopic pitfalls in differentiating pigmented Spitz naevi from cutaneous melanomas.

    PubMed

    Argenziano, G; Scalvenzi, M; Staibano, S; Brunetti, B; Piccolo, D; Delfino, M; De Rosa, G; Soyer, H P

    1999-11-01

    Epiluminescence microscopy (ELM, skin surface microscopy, dermoscopy, dermatoscopy) is a valuable method for improving the diagnostic accuracy in pigmented skin lesions. Specific ELM criteria are already recognized for differentiating pigmented Spitz naevi (PSN) from cutaneous melanomas (CM). Our purpose was to describe the ELM appearance of a series of PSN with emphasis on PSN and CM with overlapping features. Thirty-six consecutive patients with PSN, and three cases of CM (selected from a larger database) exhibiting ELM 'spitzoid' features, were evaluated clinically, dermatoscopically and histopathologically. Most PSN (27 of 36; 75%) displayed two typical ELM patterns, namely, the starburst (19 of 36; 53%) or the globular pattern (eight of 36; 22%), which were correlated to different histopathological findings. In nine of 36 (25%) PSN, atypical ELM features which are more commonly seen in CM were observed. These PSN with an atypical pattern were characterized by an uneven distribution of colours and structures, and an irregular diffuse pigmentation resembling blue-white veil or irregular extensions (black blotches). These atypical lesions mostly occurred in children and showed no history of growth. In contrast, in three examples of CM, the typical ELM criteria of malignancy were less recognizable and either the characteristic starburst or globular pattern usually seen in PSN was present. These three lesions occurred in adults and had a recent history of change in colour, shape or size. The overlap in ELM features of some PSN and CM represents a major diagnostic pitfall when ELM examination is considered alone. In these atypical cases, clinical history including the age of the patient may be the only clue to enable a correct diagnosis. PMID:10583158

  9. Androgens and doping tests: genetic variation and pit-falls

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Anders; Ekström, Lena

    2012-01-01

    The large variation in disposition known for most drugs is also true for anabolic androgenic steroids. Genetic factors are probably the single most important cause of this variation. Further, there are reasons to believe that there is a corresponding variation in efficacy of doping agents. Doped individuals employ a large variety of doping strategies in respect of choice of substance, dose, dose interval, duration of treatment and use of other drugs for enforcement of effects or correction of side effects. Metabolic steps up-stream and down-stream of testosterone are genetically variable and contribute substantially to the variation in disposition of testosterone, the most common doping agent in sports and in society. Large inter- and intra-ethnic variation in testosterone glucuronidation and excretion is described as well as the pit-falls in evaluation of testosterone doping test results. The hydrolysis and bioactivation of testosterone enanthate is also genetically variable yielding a 2–3 fold variation in excretion rate and serum concentration, thereby implicating a substantial variation in ‘efficacy’ of testosterone. Given this situation it is logical to adopt the new findings in the doping control programme. The population based cut-off level for the testosterone : epitestosterone ratio should be replaced by a Bayesian interpretation of consecutive tests in the same individual. When combined with the above genetic information the sensitivity of the test is considerably improved. The combination of the three approaches should reduce the rate of falsely negative or positive results and the number of expensive follow-up tests, stipulated by the World Anti-Doping Agency. PMID:22506612

  10. Acute aortic syndrome-pitfalls on gated and non-gated CT scan.

    PubMed

    Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Sayyed, Farhina; Puppala, Sapna

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a life-threatening condition which includes aortic dissection (AD), penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU) and intramural hematoma (IMH). Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of this condition and for further clinical follow-up. It is important for radiologists to be aware of common pitfalls in cardiac-gated and non-gated CT in diagnosing AAS. They should also be wary of common mimics of AAS which may make a significant difference towards management of these patients. In this review, we present from our practice some of the common pitfalls and mimics of AAS on MDCT. PMID:27220654

  11. 2014 ASHG Awards and Addresses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Each year at the annual meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG), addresses are given in honor of The Society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these addresses is given below. On the following pages, we have printed the presidential address and the addresses for the William Allan Award, the Curt Stern Award, and the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award. Webcasts of these addresses, as well as those of many other presentations, can be found at http://www.ashg.org.

  12. 2013 ASHG Awards and Addresses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Each year at the annual meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG), addresses are given in honor of The Society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these addresses is given below. On the following pages, we have printed the Presidential Address and the addresses for the William Allan Award, the Curt Stern Award, and the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award. Webcasts of these addresses, as well as those of many other presentations, can be found at http://www.ashg.org.

  13. Geochemical databases: minding the pitfalls to avoid the pratfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, S. L.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2011-12-01

    The field of geochemistry has been revolutionized in recent years by the advent of databases (PetDB, GEOROC, NAVDAT, etc). A decade ago, a geochemical synthesis required major time investments in order to compile relatively small amounts of fragmented data from large numbers of publications, Now virtually all of the published data on nearly any solid Earth topic can be downloaded to nearly any desktop computer with a few mouse clicks. Most solid Earth talks at international meetings show data compilations from these databases. Applications of the data are playing an increasingly important role in shaping our thinking about the Earth. They have changed some fundamental ideas about the compositional structure of the Earth (for example, showing that the Earth's "trace element depleted upper mantle" is not so depleted in trace elements). This abundance of riches also poses new risks. Until recently, important details associated with data publication (adequate metadata and quality control information) were given low priority, even in major journals. The online databases preserve whatever has been published, irrespective of quality. "Bad data" arises from many causes, here are a few. Some are associated with sample processing, including incomplete dissolution of refractory trace minerals, or inhomogeneous powders, or contamination of key elements during preparation (for example, this was a problem for lead when gasoline was leaded, and for niobium when tungsten-carbide mills were used to powder samples). Poor analytical quality is a continual problem (for example, when elemental abundances are at near background levels for an analytical method). Errors in published data tables (more common than you think) become bad data in the databases. The accepted values of interlaboratory standards change with time, while the published data based on old values stay the same. Thus the pitfalls associated with the new data accessibility are dangerous in the hands of the inexperienced

  14. Pitfalls of Establishing DNA Barcoding Systems in Protists: The Cryptophyceae as a Test Case

    PubMed Central

    Hoef-Emden, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a preferrably short and highly variable region of DNA supposed to facilitate a rapid identification of species. In many protistan lineages, a lack of species-specific morphological characters hampers an identification of species by light or electron microscopy, and difficulties to perform mating experiments in laboratory cultures also do not allow for an identification of biological species. Thus, testing candidate barcode markers as well as establishment of accurately working species identification systems are more challenging than in multicellular organisms. In cryptic species complexes the performance of a potential barcode marker can not be monitored using morphological characters as a feedback, but an inappropriate choice of DNA region may result in artifactual species trees for several reasons. Therefore a priori knowledge of the systematics of a group is required. In addition to identification of known species, methods for an automatic delimitation of species with DNA barcodes have been proposed. The Cryptophyceae provide a mixture of systematically well characterized as well as badly characterized groups and are used in this study to test the suitability of some of the methods for protists. As species identification method the performance of blast in searches against badly to well-sampled reference databases has been tested with COI-5P and 5′-partial LSU rDNA (domains A to D of the nuclear LSU rRNA gene). In addition the performance of two different methods for automatic species delimitation, fixed thresholds of genetic divergence and the general mixed Yule-coalescent model (GMYC), have been examined. The study demonstrates some pitfalls of barcoding methods that have to be taken care of. Also a best-practice approach towards establishing a DNA barcode system in protists is proposed. PMID:22970104

  15. Pitfalls in Fractal Time Series Analysis: fMRI BOLD as an Exemplary Case

    PubMed Central

    Eke, Andras; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Mukli, Peter; Nagy, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    This article will be positioned on our previous work demonstrating the importance of adhering to a carefully selected set of criteria when choosing the suitable method from those available ensuring its adequate performance when applied to real temporal signals, such as fMRI BOLD, to evaluate one important facet of their behavior, fractality. Earlier, we have reviewed on a range of monofractal tools and evaluated their performance. Given the advance in the fractal field, in this article we will discuss the most widely used implementations of multifractal analyses, too. Our recommended flowchart for the fractal characterization of spontaneous, low frequency fluctuations in fMRI BOLD will be used as the framework for this article to make certain that it will provide a hands-on experience for the reader in handling the perplexed issues of fractal analysis. The reason why this particular signal modality and its fractal analysis has been chosen was due to its high impact on today’s neuroscience given it had powerfully emerged as a new way of interpreting the complex functioning of the brain (see “intrinsic activity”). The reader will first be presented with the basic concepts of mono and multifractal time series analyses, followed by some of the most relevant implementations, characterization by numerical approaches. The notion of the dichotomy of fractional Gaussian noise and fractional Brownian motion signal classes and their impact on fractal time series analyses will be thoroughly discussed as the central theme of our application strategy. Sources of pitfalls and way how to avoid them will be identified followed by a demonstration on fractal studies of fMRI BOLD taken from the literature and that of our own in an attempt to consolidate the best practice in fractal analysis of empirical fMRI BOLD signals mapped throughout the brain as an exemplary case of potentially wide interest. PMID:23227008

  16. Wnt signaling during tooth replacement in zebrafish (Danio rerio): pitfalls and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Huysseune, Ann; Soenens, Mieke; Elderweirdt, Fien

    2014-01-01

    The canonical (β-catenin dependent) Wnt signaling pathway has emerged as a likely candidate for regulating tooth replacement in continuously renewing dentitions. So far, the involvement of canonical Wnt signaling has been experimentally demonstrated predominantly in amniotes. These studies tend to show stimulation of tooth formation by activation of the Wnt pathway, and inhibition of tooth formation when blocking the pathway. Here, we report a strong and dynamic expression of the soluble Wnt inhibitor dickkopf1 (dkk1) in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) tooth germs, suggesting an active repression of Wnt signaling during morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of a tooth, and derepression of Wnt signaling during start of replacement tooth formation. To further analyse the role of Wnt signaling, we used different gain-of-function approaches. These yielded disjunct results, yet none of them indicating enhanced tooth replacement. Thus, masterblind (mbl) mutants, defective in axin1, mimic overexpression of Wnt, but display a normally patterned dentition in which teeth are replaced at the appropriate times and positions. Activating the pathway with LiCl had variable outcomes, either resulting in the absence, or the delayed formation, of first-generation teeth, or yielding a regular dentition with normal replacement, but no supernumerary teeth or accelerated tooth replacement. The failure so far to influence tooth replacement in the zebrafish by perturbing Wnt signaling is discussed in the light of (i) potential technical pitfalls related to dose- or time-dependency, (ii) the complexity of the canonical Wnt pathway, and (iii) species-specific differences in the nature and activity of pathway components. Finally, we emphasize the importance of in-depth knowledge of the wild-type pattern for reliable interpretations. It is hoped that our analysis can be inspiring to critically assess and elucidate the role of Wnt signaling in tooth development in polyphyodonts. PMID

  17. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging in coma survivors: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Tshibanda, Luaba; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Galanaud, Damien; Boly, Mélanie; Laureys, Steven; Puybasset, Louis

    2009-01-01

    The status of comatose patient is currently established on the basis of the patient-exhibited behaviors. Clinical assessment is subjective and, in 40% of patients, fails to distinguish vegetative state (VS) from minimally conscious states (MCS). The technologic advances of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have dramatically improved our understanding of these altered states of consciousness. The role of neuroimaging in coma survivors has increased beyond the simple evaluation of morphological abnormalities. The development of 1H-MR spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provide opportunity to evaluate processes that cannot be approached by current morphologic MRI sequences. They offer potentially unique insights into the histopathology of VS and MCS. The MRS is a powerful noninvasive imaging technique that enables the in vivo quantification of certain chemical compound or metabolites as N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Choline (Cho), and Creatine (Cr). These biomarkers explore neuronal integrity (NAA), cell membrane turnover (Cho), and cell energetic function (Cr). DTI is an effective and proved quantitative method for evaluating tissue integrity at microscopic level. It provides information about the microstructure and the architecture of tissues, especially the white matter. Various physical parameters can be extracted from this sequence: the fractional anisotropy (FA), a marker of white matter integrity; mean diffusivity (MD); and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) which can differentiate cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. The most prominent findings with MRS and DTI performed in traumatic brain-injured (TBI) patients in subacute phase are the reduction of the NAA/Cr ratio in posterior pons and the decrease of mean infratentorial and supratentorial FA except in posterior pons that enables to predict unfavorable outcome at 1 year from TBI with up to 86% sensitivity and 97% specificity. This review will focus on the interest of comatose patients MRI

  18. Wnt signaling during tooth replacement in zebrafish (Danio rerio): pitfalls and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Huysseune, Ann; Soenens, Mieke; Elderweirdt, Fien

    2014-01-01

    The canonical (β-catenin dependent) Wnt signaling pathway has emerged as a likely candidate for regulating tooth replacement in continuously renewing dentitions. So far, the involvement of canonical Wnt signaling has been experimentally demonstrated predominantly in amniotes. These studies tend to show stimulation of tooth formation by activation of the Wnt pathway, and inhibition of tooth formation when blocking the pathway. Here, we report a strong and dynamic expression of the soluble Wnt inhibitor dickkopf1 (dkk1) in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) tooth germs, suggesting an active repression of Wnt signaling during morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of a tooth, and derepression of Wnt signaling during start of replacement tooth formation. To further analyse the role of Wnt signaling, we used different gain-of-function approaches. These yielded disjunct results, yet none of them indicating enhanced tooth replacement. Thus, masterblind (mbl) mutants, defective in axin1, mimic overexpression of Wnt, but display a normally patterned dentition in which teeth are replaced at the appropriate times and positions. Activating the pathway with LiCl had variable outcomes, either resulting in the absence, or the delayed formation, of first-generation teeth, or yielding a regular dentition with normal replacement, but no supernumerary teeth or accelerated tooth replacement. The failure so far to influence tooth replacement in the zebrafish by perturbing Wnt signaling is discussed in the light of (i) potential technical pitfalls related to dose- or time-dependency, (ii) the complexity of the canonical Wnt pathway, and (iii) species-specific differences in the nature and activity of pathway components. Finally, we emphasize the importance of in-depth knowledge of the wild-type pattern for reliable interpretations. It is hoped that our analysis can be inspiring to critically assess and elucidate the role of Wnt signaling in tooth development in polyphyodonts. PMID

  19. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications. PMID:21193369

  20. Gender: addressing a critical focus.

    PubMed

    Thornton, L; Wegner, M N

    1995-01-01

    The definition of gender was addressed at the Fourth World Conference on Women (Beijing, China). After extensive debate, the definition developed by the UN Population Fund in 1995 was adopted: "a set of qualities and behaviors expected from a female or male by society." The sustainability of family planning (FP) programs depends on acknowledgment of the role gender plays in contraceptive decision-making and use. For example, programs must consider the fact that women in many cultures do not make FP decisions without the consent of their spouse. AVSC is examining providers' gender-based ideas about clients and the effects of these views on the quality of reproductive health services. Questions such as how service providers can encourage joint responsibility for contraception without requiring spousal consent or how they can make men feel comfortable about using a male method in a society where FP is considered a woman's issue are being discussed. Also relevant is how service providers can discuss sexual matters openly with female clients in cultures that do not allow women to enjoy their sexuality. Another concern is the potential for physical violence to a client as a result of the provision of FP services. PMID:12294397

  1. Learning to Teach with Two Mentors: Revisiting the "Two-Worlds Pitfall" in Student Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Avetisian, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Research on learning to teach repeatedly cites the disjuncture in teaching practices promoted across universities and K-12 schools. Much of the literature that is focused on this "two-worlds pitfall" (Feiman-Nemser & Buchmann, 1985) describes the influence of cooperating teachers' more traditional teaching practices on teacher candidates'…

  2. Analysis of Factors Enhancing Pitfall in Research and Teaching of the Nigerian University System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Tafida; Umar, Kasim; Paul, Chima

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses factors enhancing pitfall in research and teaching in the Nigerian university system. Using data generated from secondary sources, it was found that so many factors are responsible for the constant decay in teaching and research in the Nigerian universities. The paper however found from literature that the high rate of pitfalls…

  3. The Pitfalls of Mobile Devices in Learning: A Different View and Implications for Pedagogical Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Yu-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Studies have been devoted to the design, implementation, and evaluation of mobile learning in practice. A common issue among students' responses toward this type of learning concerns the pitfalls of mobile devices, including small screen, limited input options, and low computational power. As a result, mobile devices are not always perceived by…

  4. Efficient sampling of ground-dwelling arthropods using pitfall traps in arid steppes.

    PubMed

    Cheli, Germán H; Corley, Juan C

    2010-01-01

    Pitfall trapping is probably the most frequently used method for sampling ground-dwelling arthropods. While the capture of specimens in pitfall traps largely depends on the number of individuals in the sampled area, trap design and trapping effort for a given environment, can also affect sampling success. The aim of this study was to determine the best pitfall trapping design for collecting ground-dwelling arthropods in the wind-blown and cold arid steppe areas of Patagonia. We tested four designs of traps, six types of preservative and different times of activation as well as the quantity of traps. Both preservation attributes and sampling efficiency differed between different trap designs and fluids compared. We conclude that in order to obtain reliable data on the structure of a community of ground-dwelling arthropods in Patagonia, at least three pitfall traps per experimental unit are required. In addition, traps should be opened for a minimum of 10 days filled with 300 ml of 30% ethylene glycol. We also suggested the use of a simple trap design (i. e. without funnel or roof). We believe these findings will contribute to more appropriate sampling of the ground dwelling fauna of Patagonia as well as other arid areas, leading to more reliable diversity studies. PMID:21271057

  5. Two new planthopper species (Hemiptera, Fulgoroidea, Caliscelidae) collected in pitfall traps in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Chmurova, Lucia; Webb, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of planthoppers in the family Caliscelidae (Hemiptera: Fulgoroidea) are described from Zambia, i.e., Afronaso spinosa sp. n. and Calampocus zambiaensis sp. n. All specimens are flightless males and nearly all were collected from baited pitfall traps (except for one specimen collected from a yellow pan trap), suggesting that they live near to or on the ground. PMID:27615842

  6. Empathy and Social-Emotional Learning: Pitfalls and Touchstones for School-Based Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Bruce; DesRoches, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This chapter identifies three common pitfalls in the use of the concept of empathy in formal social-emotional learning interventions: (1) not distinguishing between affective and cognitive empathy ("equivocation"); (2) overestimating the role of the imagination in empathizing ("Piaget's fallacy"); and (3) not accommodating the developmental and…

  7. The Pitfalls of Valenced Labels and the Benefits of Properly Calibrated Psychological Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, James K.; Fincham, Frank D.

    2012-01-01

    Replies to comments by Sonja Lyubomirsky (see record 2012-27130-008), Riva Guiseppe (see record 2012-27130-009), and Alan S. Waterman (see record 2012-27130-010) on the original article by McNulty and Fincham (see record 2011-15476-001) regarding the pitfalls of valenced labels and the benefits of properly calibrated psychological flexibility.

  8. Who's the Boss?: The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Collaborative Administration for Untenured WPAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schell, Eileen E.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes scholarship on administrative leadership styles. Describes the writing program co-directorship model the author and a colleague developed at a Southern public university, and offers a critical analysis of both the possibilities and pitfalls of collaborative administration for untenured writing program administrators. Points out ways in…

  9. Benefits and Pitfalls: Simple Guidelines for the Use of Social Networking Tools in K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The article will outline a framework for the use of social networking tools in K-12 education framed around four thought provoking questions: 1) what are the benefits and pitfalls of using social networking tools in P-12 education, 2) how do we plan effectively for the use of social networking tool, 3) what role does professional development play…

  10. Rewards & pitfalls of using treating pressure analysis for evaluating fracture design

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    Analyzing pressures during a fracture treatment provides insight into the hydraulic fracturing process, and is widely used today. In this paper, case histories are reviewed and guidelines are presented to identify pitfalls and establish strategies in pressure-analysis methods and procedures.

  11. Burn prevention mechanisms and outcomes: pitfalls, failures and successes.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Costagliola, Michel; Hayek, Shady N

    2009-03-01

    -risk groups. Depending on the population of the country, burns prevention could be a national programme. This can ensure sufficient funds are available and lead to proper coordination of district, regional, and tertiary care centres. It could also provide for compulsory reporting of all burn admissions to a central registry, and these data could be used to evaluate strategies and prevention programmes that should be directed at behavioural and environmental changes which can be easily adopted into lifestyle. Particularly in LMICs, the emphasis in burn prevention should be by advocating change from harmful cultural practices. This needs to be done with care and sensitivity. The present review is a summary of what has already been accomplished in terms of burn prevention highlighting some of the successes but above all the numerous pitfalls and failures. Recognizing these failures is the first step towards development of more effective burn prevention strategies particularly in LMICs in which burn injury remains endemic and associated with a high mortality rate. Burn prevention is not easy, but easy or not, we have no options; burns must be prevented. PMID:18926639

  12. Channel representation in physically based models coupling groundwater and surface water: pitfalls and how to avoid them.

    PubMed

    Käser, Daniel; Graf, Tobias; Cochand, Fabien; McLaren, Rob; Therrien, René; Brunner, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Recent models that couple three-dimensional subsurface flow with two-dimensional overland flow are valuable tools for quantifying complex groundwater/stream interactions and for evaluating their influence on watershed processes. For the modeler who is used to defining streams as a boundary condition, the representation of channels in integrated models raises a number of conceptual and technical issues. These models are far more sensitive to channel topography than conventional groundwater models. On all spatial scales, both the topography of a channel and its connection with the floodplain are important. For example, the geometry of river banks influences bank storage and overbank flooding; the slope of the river is a primary control on the behavior of a catchment; and at the finer scale bedform characteristics affect hyporheic exchange. Accurate data on streambed topography, however, are seldom available, and the spatial resolution of digital elevation models is typically too coarse in river environments, resulting in unrealistic or undulating streambeds. Modelers therefore perform some kind of manual yet often cumbersome correction to the available topography. In this context, the paper identifies some common pitfalls, and provides guidance to overcome these. Both aspects of topographic representation and mesh discretization are addressed. Additionally, two tutorials are provided to illustrate: (1) the interpolation of channel cross-sectional data and (2) the refinement of a mesh along a stream in areas of high topographic variability. PMID:24417289

  13. Common pitfalls of stem cell differentiation: a guide to improving protocols for neurodegenerative disease models and research.

    PubMed

    Engel, Martin; Do-Ha, Dzung; Muñoz, Sonia Sanz; Ooi, Lezanne

    2016-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells have revolutionized cellular neuroscience, providing the opportunity to model neurological diseases and test potential therapeutics in a pre-clinical setting. The power of these models has been widely discussed, but the potential pitfalls of stem cell differentiation in this research are less well described. We have analyzed the literature that describes differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into three neural cell types that are commonly used to study diseases, including forebrain cholinergic neurons for Alzheimer's disease, midbrain dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease and cortical astrocytes for neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Published protocols for differentiation vary widely in the reported efficiency of target cell generation. Additionally, characterization of the cells by expression profile and functionality differs between studies and is often insufficient, leading to highly variable protocol outcomes. We have synthesized this information into a simple methodology that can be followed when performing or assessing differentiation techniques. Finally we propose three considerations for future research, including the use of physiological O2 conditions, three-dimensional co-culture systems and microfluidics to control feeding cycles and growth factor gradients. Following these guidelines will help researchers to ensure that robust and meaningful data is generated, enabling the full potential of stem cell differentiation for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:27154043

  14. E-Mentoring in Physical Education: Promises and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cothran, Donetta; McCaughtry, Nate; Faust, Roberta; Garn, Alex; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Martin, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Mentoring can be a critical component of teachers' professional development and retention, yet logistical and fiscal challenges often limit the amount of contact a protege can have with a mentor teacher. This investigation explored a school district initiative to address this need for more mentor interaction by supplementing traditional…

  15. Multidimensional Assessment of Criminal Recidivism: Problems, Pitfalls, and Proposed Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vrieze, Scott I.; Grove, William M.

    2010-01-01

    All states have statutes in place to civilly commit individuals at high risk for violence. The authors address difficulties in assessing such risk but use as an example the task of predicting sexual violence recidivism; the principles espoused here generalize to predicting all violence. As part of the commitment process, mental health…

  16. Hb lepore/β0-thalassaemia with α+-thalassaemia interactions, a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Alauddin, Hafiza; Mohamad Nasir, Suziana; Ahadon, Madzlifah; Raja Sabudin, Raja Zahratul Azma; Ithnin, Azlin; Hussin, Noor Hamidah; Alias, Hamidah; Loh, C-Khai; Abdul Latiff, Zarina; Abdul Murad, Nor Azian; Othman, Ainoon

    2015-12-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Lepore is a variant Hb consisting of two α-globin and two δβ-globin chains. In a heterozygote, it is associated with clinical findings of thalassaemia minor, but interactions with other haemoglobinopathies can lead to various clinical phenotypes and pose diagnostic challenges. We reported a pair of siblings from a Malay family, who presented with pallor and hepatosplenomegaly at the ages of 21 months and 14 months old. The red cell indices and peripheral blood smears of both patients showed features of thalassaemia intermedia. Other laboratory investigations of the patients showed conflicting results. However, laboratory investigation results of the parents had led to a presumptive diagnosis of compound heterozygote Hb Lepore/β-thalassaemia and co-inheritance α+-thalassaemia (-α3.7). Hb Lepore has rarely been detected in Southeast Asian countries, particularly in Malaysia. These two cases highlight the importance of family studies for accurate diagnosis, hence appropriate clinical management and genetic counseling. PMID:26712677

  17. RNA interference in parasitic helminths: current situation, potential pitfalls and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Geldhof, P; Visser, A; Clark, D; Saunders, G; Britton, C; Gilleard, J; Berriman, M; Knox, D

    2007-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an invaluable tool for the functional analysis of genes in a wide variety of organisms including the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Recently, attempts have been made to apply this technology to parasitic helminths of animals and plants with variable success. Gene knockdown has been reported for Schistosoma mansoni by soaking or electroporating different life-stages in dsRNA. Similar approaches have been tested on parasitic nematodes which clearly showed that, under certain conditions, it was possible to interfere with gene expression. However, despite these successes, the current utility of this technology in parasite research is questionable. First, problems have arisen with the specificity of RNAi. Treatment of the parasites with dsRNA resulted, in many cases, in non-specific effects. Second, the current RNAi methods have a limited efficiency and effects are sometimes difficult to reproduce. This was especially the case in strongylid parasites where only a small number of genes were susceptible to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. The future application of RNAi in parasite functional genomics will greatly depend on how we can overcome these difficulties. Optimization of the dsRNA delivery methods and in vitro culture conditions will be the major challenges. PMID:17201997

  18. Hepatic PEComa: a potential pitfall in the evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hadi Mohammad; Katz, Steven C; Libbey, N Peter; Somasundar, Ponnandai S

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour (PEComa) of the liver is very uncommon and may be overlooked in the clinical and histological differential diagnosis of a liver tumour. We report the case of an incidentally discovered liver mass suspicious for hepatocellular carcinoma, which on biopsy was suggestive of a pseudocyst but after resection was found to be hepatic PEComa with some of the usual characteristics of this neoplasm as well as several less familiar features. We have also reviewed cases of hepatic PEComa from the literature in order to provide insight into recognising possible PEComa preoperatively and assessing its risk of malignancy after diagnosis. PMID:24907216

  19. The Hf-Nd isotope record of Archean seawater: potential and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehmann, Sebastian; Bau, Michael; Münker, Carsten; Elis Hoffmann, J.; Marquez, J. Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are Precambrian marine chemical sediments that may be used as archives of the trace element and isotope compositions of ancient seawater. Comparable to hydrogenetic FeMn crusts which are archives of modern seawater, a recent study [1] successfully used the Neoarchean Temagami BIF to study the (de)coupled Hf-Nd systematics of Late Archean seawater. Here, we evaluate the best approach to discriminate effects of syn- or postdepositional processes (e.g. detrital contamination, metamorphic or hydrothermal overprint) of the pristine seawater signature. To step further back in time we report Hf-Nd isotope and trace element data of pure Si- and Fe-rich layers from the Eoarchean ~3.75 Ga Isua BIF (Greenland) and the Mesoarchean ~3.25 Ga Fig Tree BIF (Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa) and compare them to data for the Neoarchean ~2.70 Ga Temagami BIF (Canada). To evaluate the effect of syn- or postdepositional processes on the Nd isotopic budget, shale-normalised REY (rare earths and yttrium) patterns of each particular sample should be compared with those of modern seawater and other Archean marine precipitates. Positive La, Gd and Y anomalies (i.e. super-chondritc Y/Ho ratios) and enrichments of HREE over LREE indicate a pristine seawater-derived REY (including Sm and Nd) composition in a BIF sample. Zr/Hf ratios serve as a perfect tool to distinguish seawater Hf from detrital Hf, because both particle-reactive, geochemical twins behave similar during igneous processes, but show a strong decoupling in aqueous solutions, leading to non-chondritic Zr/Hf [2]. Information about open system behaviour of the Hf-Nd systems during metamorphic events can be evaluated by an isochron approach. In contrast to the lower greenschist facies Temagami BIF with its well-defined Nd and Hf isochrons yielding an accurate depositional age [1], errorchrons derived from the data from the Isua and Barberton BIFs, respectively, yield unrealistically young ages. This strongly suggests open system behaviour of both isotope systems during (amphibolite facies) metamorphic events. Strong post-depositional disturbance of Hf-Nd isotopic systems is also shown by inital isotope compositions: Isua BIFs yield ɛNd(3.75Ga) from -299.5 to +39.7 and ɛHf(3.75Ga) values from -1242.3 to +1093.9 and Fig Tree BIFs exhibit ɛNd(3.25Ga) from -6.7 to +4.8 and ɛHf(3.25Ga) from -313.0 to +105.6. Therefore, the Isua and Barberton BIFs studied and probably many other high grade metamorphic units are poor archives of the Hf-Nd isotopic composition of ambient seawater, despite their pristine trace element signatures. Only BIFs that show the combination of ultrapurity (i.e. absence of any aluminosilicate detritus), with seawater-like REY patterns, non-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios and accurate isochron ages, may provide reliable information about the Hf-Nd isotopic distribution in Archean seawater. References: [1] Viehmann et al. (2014) Geology. doi: 10.1130/G35014.1 [2] Bau (1996) Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 123, pp. 323-333.

  20. Sclerosing paraganglioma of the carotid body: a potential pitfall of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Santi, Raffaella; Franchi, Alessandro; Saladino, Valeria; Trovati, Massimo; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Squadrelli-Saraceno, Massimo; Nesi, Gabriella

    2015-06-01

    Paragangliomas (PGs) of the head and neck region are typically benign, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumours. At times, they may exhibit unusual histological features, such as prominent stromal sclerosis (sclerosing PG), which may raise concerns of malignancy. We describe a case of sclerosing PG of the carotid body, emphasizing the value of immunohistochemical stains for differential diagnosis. A 43-year-old woman presented with a painless lump on the neck. A magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a hypervascular lesion of the carotid body, which was surgically excised. Grossly, the lesion measured 1.8 cm at maximum diameter. On microscopic examination, irregular nests and tiny bundles of neoplastic cells were found between thick bands of fibrous tissue. Focal nuclear cytomegaly and marked pleomorphism were noted. Neoplastic cells proved to be immunoreactive for chromogranin, synaptophysin and neuron specific enolase, but negative for cytokeratins, smooth muscle actin and CD34. Ultrastructurally, numerous mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum structures and endocrine granules were seen in the cytoplasm of the tumour cells. On consideration of the above-mentioned clinico-pathological and ultrastructural findings a diagnosis of sclerosing PG was established. Sclerosing PG is a rare entity which may mimic a malignant neoplasm. The recognition of this unusual morphological variant of PG, together with appropriate immunostains, leads to the correct diagnosis. PMID:25194351

  1. Rectal variceal bleeding treated by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. Potentials and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Godil, A; McCracken, J D

    1997-09-01

    Bleeding from anorectal varices can be massive and life threatening. Prompt differentiation between hemorrhoids and anorectal varices is crucial in treating these patients. Many different treatments are available for bleeding anorectal varices, but none has proved efficacy. We report a case of successful transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in controlling massive rectal variceal bleeding in an elderly patient with primary biliary cirrhosis and portal hypertension. After TIPS, rapid decompensation of liver function and encephalopathy developed and led to her death. Although TIPS may be effective in controlling acute life-threatening bleeding from anorectal varices, it can be associated with life-threatening complications. PMID:9412951

  2. Modeling the elastic energy of alloys: Potential pitfalls of continuum treatments.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Arvind; Ratsch, Christian; Smereka, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Some issues that arise when modeling elastic energy for binary alloys are discussed within the context of a Keating model and density-functional calculations. The Keating model is a simplified atomistic formulation based on modeling elastic interactions of a binary alloy with harmonic springs whose equilibrium length is species dependent. It is demonstrated that the continuum limit for the strain field are the usual equations of linear elasticity for alloys and that they correctly capture the coarse-grained behavior of the displacement field. In addition, it is established that Euler-Lagrange equation of the continuum limit of the elastic energy will yield the same strain field equation. This is the same energy functional that is often used to model elastic effects in binary alloys. However, a direct calculation of the elastic energy atomistic model reveals that the continuum expression for the elastic energy is both qualitatively and quantitatively incorrect. This is because it does not take atomistic scale compositional nonuniformity into account. Importantly, this result also shows that finely mixed alloys tend to have more elastic energy than segregated systems, which is the exact opposite of predictions made by some continuum theories. It is also shown that for strained thin films the traditionally used effective misfit for alloys systematically underestimate the strain energy. In some models, this drawback is handled by including an elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing, which is characterized in terms of the continuum concentration. The direct calculation of the atomistic model reveals that this approach suffers serious difficulties. It is demonstrated that elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing is nonisotropic and scale dependent. It is also shown that such effects are present in density-functional theory calculations for the Si-Ge system. This work demonstrates that it is critical to include the microscopic arrangements in any elastic model to achieve even qualitatively correct behavior. PMID:26764702

  3. Egg donor pregnancy: a potential pitfall in DNA genotyping diagnosis of hydatidiform moles.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei

    2014-09-01

    A 34-yr-old woman presented with missed abortion at 10 wk of estimated clinical gestational age and underwent dilation and curettage. Gross and microscopic evaluation of the uterine contents revealed the presence of mildly hydropic, dysmorphic chorionic villi, with occasional trophoblastic pseudo-inclusions. The morphologic features raised the suspicion for partial hydatidiform mole, and DNA genotyping was performed using the AmpFlSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification system. The chorionic villous tissue showed unique alleles - not present in the maternal decidual tissue - at 12 of the 15 short tandem repeat loci, and 8 loci showed 2 unique alleles, suggesting a diandric, paternal-only genome. In contrast, p57 immunohistochemistry demonstrated a normal staining pattern with positive nuclear staining in villous stromal cells and cytotrophoblasts. Review of the patient's medical records revealed that the pregnancy was conceived through in vitro fertilization with egg donor embryos, explaining the presence of unexpected alleles simulating a dispermic complete mole on DNA genotyping. This is the first case report illustrating that an egg donor pregnancy may mimic a complete hydatidiform mole on DNA genotyping. PMID:25083967

  4. Cytopathologic characteristics of SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma: A potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Allison, Derek B; Bishop, Justin A; Ali, Syed Z

    2016-08-01

    Tumors of the head and neck are extremely diverse and a subset are poorly differentiated and difficult to classify. Recently, a new entity has been described with rhabdoid and/or plasmacytoid cytologic features and a characteristic genetic signature-inactivation of the SMARCB1 (INI-1) tumor suppressor gene. To date, only 16 cases of SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma have been described, and there are currently no reports of the cytopathologic features by fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology. A case of a 77-year-old man who presented with a posterior ethmoid sinus lesion with invasion into the skull base and bone was reported. FNA cytology of a right retropharyngeal lymph node revealed relatively monomorphic, loosely cohesive clusters of plasmacytoid cells with occasional nucleoli, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions, and mitotic figures in a background of necrosis and absence of overt squamous or glandular differentiation. A diagnosis of metastatic myoepithelial carcinoma was made; however, retrospectively, the surgical excision showed loss of the SMARCB1 (INI-1) tumor suppressor gene by immunohistochemistry. In summary, the cytomorphologic features of SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma are relatively nonspecific and overlap with other regional tumors, including myoepithelial neoplasms. As a result, this entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a plasmacytoid tumor arising in the sinonasal tract by FNA cytology. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:700-703. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27177850

  5. The Potentials and Pitfalls of Microarrays in Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Focus on Human Filarial Infections.

    PubMed

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Ahuno, Samuel Terkper

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from expression microarrays enables deeper understanding of the molecular signatures of infectious diseases. It provides rapid and accurate information on how infections affect the clustering of gene expression profiles, pathways and networks that are transcriptionally active during various infection states compared to conventional diagnostic methods, which primarily focus on single genes or proteins. Thus, microarray technologies offer advantages in understanding host-parasite interactions associated with filarial infections. More importantly, the use of these technologies can aid diagnostics and helps translate current genomic research into effective treatment and interventions for filarial infections. Studying immune responses via microarray following infection can yield insight into genetic pathways and networks that can have a profound influence on the development of anti-parasitic vaccines. PMID:27600086

  6. Potential pitfalls in MALDI-TOF MS analysis of abiotically synthesized RNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Burcar, Bradley T; Cassidy, Lauren M; Moriarty, Elizabeth M; Joshi, Prakash C; Coari, Kristin M; McGown, Linda B

    2013-06-01

    Demonstration of the abiotic polymerization of ribonucleotides under conditions consistent with conditions that may have existed on the prebiotic Earth is an important goal in "RNA world" research. Recent reports of abiotic RNA polymerization with and without catalysis rely on techniques such as HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and MALDI-TOF MS to analyze the reaction products. It is essential to understand the limitations of these techniques in order to accurately interpret the results of these analyses. In particular, techniques that rely on mass for peak identification may not be able to distinguish between a single, linear RNA oligomer and stable aggregates of smaller linear and/or cyclic RNA molecules. In the case of MALDI-TOF MS, additional complications may arise from formation of salt adducts and MALDI matrix complexes. This is especially true for abiotic RNA polymerization reactions because the concentration of longer RNA chains can be quite low and RNA, as a polyelectrolyte, is highly susceptible to adduct formation and aggregation. Here we focus on MALDI-TOF MS analysis of abiotic polymerization products of imidazole-activated AMP in the presence and absence of montmorillonite clay as a catalyst. A low molecular weight oligonucleotide standard designed for use in MALDI-TOF MS and a 3'-5' polyadenosine monophosphate reference standard were also run for comparison and calibration. Clay-catalyzed reaction products of activated GMP and UMP were also examined. The results illustrate the ambiguities associated with assignment of m/z values in MALDI mass spectra and the need for accurate calibration of mass spectra and careful sample preparation to minimize the formation of adducts and other complications arising from the MALDI process. PMID:23793938

  7. Detecting directional coupling in the human epileptic brain: Limitations and potential pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterhage, Hannes; Mormann, Florian; Wagner, Tobias; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    We study directional relationships—in the driver-responder sense—in networks of coupled nonlinear oscillators using a phase modeling approach. Specifically, we focus on the identification of drivers in clusters with varying levels of synchrony, mimicking dynamical interactions between the seizure generating region (epileptic focus) and other brain structures. We demonstrate numerically that such an identification is not always possible in a reliable manner. Using the same analysis techniques as in model systems, we study multichannel electroencephalographic recordings from two patients suffering from focal epilepsy. Our findings demonstrate that—depending on the degree of intracluster synchrony—certain subsystems can spuriously appear to be driving others, which should be taken into account when analyzing field data with unknown underlying dynamics.

  8. Practical Paediatric Psychopharmacological Prescribing in Autism: The Potential and the Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gringras, Paul

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the evidence behind two approaches to psychopharmacological management in children with autism: selecting and treating target symptoms or treatment or curing the primary social impairment underlying autism. The effectiveness of stimulants, antidepressants, melatonin, naltrexone, fenfluramine, and secretin is appraised. The…

  9. Cutaneous Collision Tumor Associated With Porocarcinomatous and Angiosarcomatous Components: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Parra-Medina, Rafael; Melo-Uribe, Mario A; Messa-Botero, Oscar; Morales, Samuel D

    2016-09-01

    Sarcomatoid eccrine porocarcinoma (SEP) is a very rare malignancy including epithelial and mesenchymal components exhibiting pleomorphic cells, nuclear hyperchromasia, and high mitotic activity in both elements. To date, only 6 cases of this uncommon neoplasm have been reported, corresponding to women over 70 years of age with ulcerated skin lesions. The authors describe the first sarcomatoid eccrine porocarcinoma in a 75-year-old male patient with a right hallux lesion, presenting a collision tumor with a mixed population of epithelial cells and a spindle cell angiosarcomatous mesenchymal component each expressing distinct and nonoverlapping morphologic and immunohistochemical features of epithelial and mesenchymal differentiation. PMID:27307184

  10. Lost in a Giant Database: The Potentials and Pitfalls of Secondary Analysis for Deaf Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluwin, T. N.; Morris, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary research or archival research is the analysis of data collected by another person or agency. It offers several advantages, including reduced cost, a less time-consuming research process, and access to larger populations and thus greater generalizability. At the same time, it offers several limitations, including the fact that the…

  11. Structured Peer Group Supervision for Novice Consultants: Procedures, Pitfalls, and Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Daniel S.; Nebbergall, Allison J.; Salmon, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Supervision is considered a keystone instructional tool in school psychology and has been argued to be an essential feature of effective consultation training. However, descriptive data suggest that supervision is not always incorporated as part of consultation training. In this article the application of a structured peer group supervision (SPGS)…

  12. Paget Disease: A Potential Pitfall in PSMA PET for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blazak, John Kenneth; Thomas, Paul

    2016-09-01

    We present a case of an 81-year-old man with multifocal Paget disease found on bone scan that was performed for incidentally diagnosed prostate cancer. The subsequent Ga-PSMA (HBED-CC) PET scan also displayed increased uptake in the same distribution. Multiple known tumors display increased Ga-PSMA uptake due to neovasculature. We postulate that increased Ga-PSMA uptake within the pagetoid bone relates to neovascularity known to occur in Paget disease. Such pagetic uptake could result in false-positive studies for bone metastases, particularly in the setting of less typical Paget disease. PMID:27405026

  13. Occupying Youth Development: The Pitfalls and Potential of Literacy Policies and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeller-Berkman, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This column explores the intersection between adolescent literacy policies and the field of youth development. The crisis framing of young people used in literacy policy documents has come to "occupy" the field of youth development in an all hands on deck approach to remediate young people who are considered "behind." At the same time, there are…

  14. Regeneration of cartilage and bone by defined subsets of mesenchymal stromal cells--potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Aicher, Wilhelm K; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Hart, Melanie; Rolauffs, Bernd; Badke, Andreas; Klein, Gerd

    2011-04-30

    Mesenchymal stromal cells, also referred to as mesenchymal stem cells, can be obtained from various tissues. Today the main source for isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells in mammals is the bone marrow. Mesenchymal stromal cells play an important role in tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Moreover, they provide the cellular and humoral basis for many processes of tissue regeneration and wound healing in infancy, adolescence and adulthood as well. There is increasing evidence that mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and other sources including term placenta or adipose tissue are not a homogenous cell population. Only a restricted number of appropriate stem cells markers have been explored so far. But routine preparations of mesenchymal stromal cells contain phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets of stromal cells. Knowledge on the phenotypical characteristics and the functional consequences of such subsets will not only extend our understanding of stem cell biology, but might allow to develop improved regimen for regenerative medicine and wound healing and novel protocols for tissue engineering as well. In this review we will discuss novel strategies for regenerative medicine by specific selection or separation of subsets of mesenchymal stromal cells in the context of osteogenesis and bone regeneration. Mesenchymal stromal cells, which express the specific cell adhesion molecule CD146, also known as MCAM or MUC18, are prone for bone repair. Other cell surface proteins may allow the selection of chondrogenic, myogenic, adipogenic or other pre-determined subsets of mesenchymal stromal cells for improved regenerative applications as well. PMID:21184789

  15. Breast Carcinoma With Unrecognized Neuroendocrine Differentiation Metastasizing to the Pancreas: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Lene; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2016-08-01

    The current World Health Organization classification recognizes 3 subtypes of breast carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. Their reported prevalence is highly variable, ranging from <1% to up to 20% of all breast carcinomas. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who underwent lumpectomy with a postoperative diagnosis of invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Six weeks after lumpectomy, pancreatic biopsies showed tumor cells with neuroendocrine features. The first immunohistochemical panel showed positivity for synaptophysin and cytokeratins, raising suspicion of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. However, a second panel revealed positivity for estrogen receptors and GATA3. On review of the lumpectomy specimen, a significant neuroendocrine component was found, leading to the final diagnosis of breast carcinoma with neuroendocrine features metastasizing to the pancreas. Neuroendocrine markers are not routinely analyzed in breast tumors. Hence, metastases from breast carcinomas with unrecognized neuroendocrine features may lead to false diagnoses of primary neuroendocrine tumors at different metastatic sites, such as the pancreas. PMID:26912472

  16. A novel adipose-specific gene deletion model demonstrates potential pitfalls of existing methods.

    PubMed

    Mullican, Shannon E; Tomaru, Takuya; Gaddis, Christine A; Peed, Lindsey C; Sundaram, Anand; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-specific gene deletion in mice is crucial in determining gene function in adipocyte homeostasis and the development of obesity. We noted 100% mortality when the Hdac3 gene was conditionally deleted using Fabp4-Cre mice, the most commonly used model of adipose-targeted Cre recombinase. However, this surprising result was not reproduced using other models of adipose targeting of Cre, including a novel Retn-Cre mouse. These findings underscore the need for caution when interpreting data obtained using Fabp4-Cre mice and should encourage the use of additional or alternative adipose-targeting Cre mouse models before drawing conclusions about in vivo adipocyte-specific functions. PMID:23192980

  17. Potential Pitfalls in MALDI-TOF MS Analysis of Abiotically Synthesized RNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcar, Bradley T.; Cassidy, Lauren M.; Moriarty, Elizabeth M.; Joshi, Prakash C.; Coari, Kristin M.; McGown, Linda B.

    2013-06-01

    Demonstration of the abiotic polymerization of ribonucleotides under conditions consistent with conditions that may have existed on the prebiotic Earth is an important goal in "RNA world" research. Recent reports of abiotic RNA polymerization with and without catalysis rely on techniques such as HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and MALDI-TOF MS to analyze the reaction products. It is essential to understand the limitations of these techniques in order to accurately interpret the results of these analyses. In particular, techniques that rely on mass for peak identification may not be able to distinguish between a single, linear RNA oligomer and stable aggregates of smaller linear and/or cyclic RNA molecules. In the case of MALDI-TOF MS, additional complications may arise from formation of salt adducts and MALDI matrix complexes. This is especially true for abiotic RNA polymerization reactions because the concentration of longer RNA chains can be quite low and RNA, as a polyelectrolyte, is highly susceptible to adduct formation and aggregation. Here we focus on MALDI-TOF MS analysis of abiotic polymerization products of imidazole-activated AMP in the presence and absence of montmorillonite clay as a catalyst. A low molecular weight oligonucleotide standard designed for use in MALDI-TOF MS and a 3'-5' polyadenosine monophosphate reference standard were also run for comparison and calibration. Clay-catalyzed reaction products of activated GMP and UMP were also examined. The results illustrate the ambiguities associated with assignment of m/z values in MALDI mass spectra and the need for accurate calibration of mass spectra and careful sample preparation to minimize the formation of adducts and other complications arising from the MALDI process.

  18. Social Media Use and Social Connectedness in Adolescents: The Positives and the Potential Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kelly A.; Ryan, Tracii; Gray, DeLeon L.; McInerney, Dennis M.; Waters, Lea

    2014-01-01

    As social media use is rising among adolescents, the issue of whether this use leads to positive or negative outcomes warrants greater understanding. This article critically reviews the literature related to this important topic. Specifically, we examine how social media use affects social connectedness in terms of three elements of adolescent…

  19. Multi-Point E-Conferencing with Initial Teacher Training Students in England: Pitfalls and Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Nick

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on attempts to initiate multi-point e-conferencing between English teacher education students on school placements, their host teachers and their university tutors. A sociocultural perspective is adopted in analysing the project, using the metaphor of a "professional knowledge landscape" [Clandinin, D. J., & Connelly, F. M.…

  20. Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid pulsation artifacts on low-field magnetic resonance imaging: Potential pitfall in diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ogbole, Godwin I.; Soneye, Mayowa A.; Okorie, Chinonye N.; Sammet, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation artifact can pose a diagnostic problem in fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) appearing as intraventricular hyperintensity. The extent of this challenge among radiologists in Africa using low-field MRI systems is relatively sparsely documented in the literature. The purpose of this study was to identify the presence and frequency of ventricular CSF pulsation artifact (VCSFA) on FLAIR axial brain images with a low-field MR system. Materials and Methods: FLAIR axial images were obtained on a low-field 0.3T unit (6000 ms/108 ms/2 [repetition time/echo time/excitations], inversion time = 1700 ms, field of view = 28 cm, matrix = 195 × 256, and 6 mm contiguous sections). Two experienced radiologists independently rated VCSFA in the lateral, third, and fourth ventricles in 202 consecutive patients (age range 1–100 years) referred for brain MR for various indications. We reviewed the pattern of artifacts, to determine its relationship to age, gender, and third ventricular size. Results: The low-field FLAIR MR brain images of 33 patients (16.3%) showed VCSFA in at least one ventricular cavity. The fourth ventricle was the most common site of VCSFA (n = 10), followed by the third ventricle (n = 8) and the lateral ventricles (n = 7). Eight patients had VCSFA in multiple locations, one of them in all ventricles. A smaller third ventricular size and, to a lesser extent, younger age was significantly associated with VCSFA. CSF Pulsation of VCSFA did not occur across the brain parenchyma in the phase encoding direction. Conclusion: VCSFA may mimic pathology on low-field axial FLAIR brain images and are more common in young patients with smaller ventricular size. Although these artifacts are less frequently observed at lower magnetic field strengths, their recognition on low-field MRI systems is important in avoiding a misdiagnosis. PMID:27185981

  1. Motion Analysis of 100 Mediastinal Lymph Nodes: Potential Pitfalls in Treatment Planning and Adaptive Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Pantarotto, Jason R.; Piet, Anna H.M.; Vincent, Andrew; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: The motion of mediastinal lymph nodes may undermine local control with involved-field radiotherapy. We studied patterns of nodal and tumor motion in 41 patients with lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography planning scans were retrospectively evaluated to identify patients with clearly visible mediastinal lymph nodes. One hundred nodes from 14 patients with Stage I and 27 patients with Stage III were manually contoured in all 4D computed tomography respiratory phases. Motion was derived from changes in the nodal center-of-mass position. Primary tumors were also delineated in all phases for 16 patients with Stage III disease. Statistical analysis included a multivariate mixed-effects model of grouped data. Results: Average 3D nodal motion during quiet breathing was 0.68 cm (range, 0.17-1.64 cm); 77% moved greater than 0.5 cm, and 10% moved greater than 1.0 cm. Motion was greatest in the lower mediastinum (p = 0.002), and nodes measuring 2 cm or greater in diameter showed motion similar to that in smaller nodes. In 11 of 16 patients studied, at least one node moved more than the corresponding primary tumor. No association between 3D primary tumor motion and nodal motion was observed. For mobile primary tumors, phase offsets between the primary tumor and nodes of two or more and three or more phases were observed for 33% and 12% of nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Mediastinal nodal motion is common, with phase offsets seen between the primary tumor and different nodes in the same patient. Patient-specific information is needed to ensure geometric coverage, and adaptive strategies based solely on the primary tumor may be misleading.

  2. Potential pitfalls associated with testing of enzyme preparations in the Salmonella/microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luigi; Crebelli, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    The effect of a sample of food enzyme preparations on S9 activity was evaluated in bacterial mutation assays with the Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 using benzo(a)pyrene, 2-aminoanthracene and 2-aminofluorene as model compounds. Under the experimental conditions applied, Aspergillus oryzae protease and porcine pancreas trypsin, applied at low non-toxic doses, proved to effectively inhibit the metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene by Aroclor induced rat liver 9, while the activation of 2-aminoanthracene and 2-aminofluorene was only marginally affected. The tolerance of metabolic activation of 2-aminoanthracene to the presence of proteolytic enzymes, compared to the strong inhibition elicited on the metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene, points to the involvement of different components of liver S9 in their biotransformation. Overall, data indicate that the use of 2-aminoanthracene as positive control in the Ames test can give a misleading indication of S9 proficiency, and thus it should be used with caution or in conjunction with other chemicals, especially in the testing of crude enzyme preparations in which proteases may be present as minor components. PMID:27330008

  3. Potential pitfalls of relying on hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production to identify Salmonella in feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella can be difficult to assess and isolate in poultry feed due to stress, uneven distribution and poor growth. Previous studies have shown that several strains of Salmonella can be affected by environmental changes, resulting in H2S-negative colonies. This is a major concern, as H2S productio...

  4. Annual Research Review: Hoarding Disorder-- Potential Benefits and Pitfalls of a New Mental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mataix-Cols, David; Pertusa, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background: The inclusion of a new mental disorder in the nomenclature is not a trivial matter. Many have highlighted the risks of an ever-increasing number of mental disorders and of overpathologizing human behaviour. Given the proposed inclusion of a new hoarding disorder (HD) in DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,…

  5. Rotational artifact in phase imaging of cardiac scans: potential pitfalls in diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Getchell, J.; Foster, J.E.; Salzman, L.; Plehn, J.

    1987-10-01

    In the past few years, we have occasionally observed linear bands in the phase images of gated cardiac blood-pool scans along the interventricular septum region among patients with normal septal motions. Our retrospective study investigated the cause of out-of-phase bands of 12 patients. We documented through review of cines, computer analysis of gated cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy data, and correlation with echocardiograms that this phenomenon was artifact introduced by rotational movements of the heart. It is important for nuclear physicians to recognize this rotational artifact on the phase analysis image in order to avoid the erroneous misdiagnosis of wall motion abnormalities of the septum.

  6. Dried blood spots analysis with mass spectrometry: Potentials and pitfalls in therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Marina Venzon; Charão, Mariele Feiffer; Linden, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) relays in the availability of specialized laboratory assays, usually available in reference centers that are not accessible to all patients. In this context, there is a growing interest in the use of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, usually obtained from finger pricks, which allows simple and cost-effective logistics in many settings, particularly in Developing Countries. The use of DBS assays to estimate plasma concentrations is highly dependent on the hematocrit of the blood, as well as the particular characteristics of the measured analyte. DBS assays require specific validation assays, most of them are related to hematocrit effects. In the present manuscript, the application of mass spectrometric assays for determination of drugs for TDM purposes in the last ten years is reviewed, as well as the particular validation assays for new DBS methods. PMID:27179588

  7. Modern high spatial resolution approaches to crustal evolution studies - pitfalls and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Developments in analytical techniques for in situ geochronology and isotope geochemistry over the past few decades have contributed greatly to our understanding of the processes of Precambrian crustal evolution, plate tectonics, the development of Earth's hydrosphere and atmosphere and conditions for the development of life on Earth. The further back in time we go, however, the more complex the geology, requiring that we unravel and/or try to see through multiple phases of disturbance. Such geological complexity complicates interpretation and can lead to conflicting viewpoints on such key questions as when plate tectonics began on Earth, when it evolved to a process essentially similar to that of today and the nature and habitability of a potentially pre-plate tectonic Earth in the Hadean. This presentation will review, with case studies, some of the crucial aspects of applying and interpreting high spatial resolution in situ methods and some of the potential pitfalls. Obtaining accurate and precise geochronology is an essential first step in any study of Precambrian geology, whether it is the primary goal or provides a supporting framework to other diverse applications. To this end, high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and laser ablation inductiively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), typically combined with relevant imaging methods such as cathode luminescence (CL) are widely used to investigate the U-Pb systematics of complex zircon. In general precision is merely an analytical hurdle that we are good (and continually getting better) at clearing, but accuracy commonly contains not just an analytical element (e.g. calibration of standards) but also a considerable subjective element in order to unravel the commonly polyphase evolution of early Precambrian zircon. Examples of such problematic interpretations from the Neoarchean Lewisian Complex of northwest Scotland and the Paleoarchean Napier Complex of Antarctica will be

  8. Temperature effects on pitfall catches of epigeal arthropods: a model and method for bias correction.

    PubMed

    Saska, Pavel; van der Werf, Wopke; Hemerik, Lia; Luff, Martin L; Hatten, Timothy D; Honek, Alois; Pocock, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Carabids and other epigeal arthropods make important contributions to biodiversity, food webs and biocontrol of invertebrate pests and weeds. Pitfall trapping is widely used for sampling carabid populations, but this technique yields biased estimates of abundance ('activity-density') because individual activity - which is affected by climatic factors - affects the rate of catch. To date, the impact of temperature on pitfall catches, while suspected to be large, has not been quantified, and no method is available to account for it. This lack of knowledge and the unavailability of a method for bias correction affect the confidence that can be placed on results of ecological field studies based on pitfall data.Here, we develop a simple model for the effect of temperature, assuming a constant proportional change in the rate of catch per °C change in temperature, r, consistent with an exponential Q10 response to temperature. We fit this model to 38 time series of pitfall catches and accompanying temperature records from the literature, using first differences and other detrending methods to account for seasonality. We use meta-analysis to assess consistency of the estimated parameter r among studies.The mean rate of increase in total catch across data sets was 0·0863 ± 0·0058 per °C of maximum temperature and 0·0497 ± 0·0107 per °C of minimum temperature. Multiple regression analyses of 19 data sets showed that temperature is the key climatic variable affecting total catch. Relationships between temperature and catch were also identified at species level. Correction for temperature bias had substantial effects on seasonal trends of carabid catches.Synthesis and Applications. The effect of temperature on pitfall catches is shown here to be substantial and worthy of consideration when interpreting results of pitfall trapping. The exponential model can be used both for effect estimation and for bias correction of observed data. Correcting for temperature

  9. Addressing case specific biogas plant tasks: industry oriented methane yields derived from 5L Automatic Methane Potential Test Systems in batch or semi-continuous tests using realistic inocula, substrate particle sizes and organic loading.

    PubMed

    Kolbl, Sabina; Paloczi, Attila; Panjan, Jože; Stres, Blaž

    2014-02-01

    The primary aim of the study was to develop and validate an in-house upscale of Automatic Methane Potential Test System II for studying real-time inocula and real-scale substrates in batch, codigestion and enzyme enhanced hydrolysis experiments, in addition to semi-continuous operation of the developed equipment and experiments testing inoculum functional quality. The successful upscale to 5L enabled comparison of different process configurations in shorter preparation times with acceptable accuracy and high-through put intended for industrial decision making. The adoption of the same scales, equipment and methodologies in batch and semi-continuous tests mirroring those at full scale biogas plants resulted in matching methane yields between the two laboratory tests and full-scale, confirming thus the increased decision making value of the approach for industrial operations. PMID:24368269

  10. Pitfalls and artifacts using the D-SPECT dedicated cardiac camera.

    PubMed

    Allie, Rayjanah; Hutton, Brian F; Prvulovich, Elizabeth; Bomanji, Jamshed; Michopoulou, Sofia; Ben-Haim, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is a well-established and widely used imaging technique for the assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Pitfalls and artifacts associated with conventional gamma cameras are well known, and the ways to avoid and correct them have been described. In recent years solid-state detector dedicated cardiac cameras were introduced and have been shown to offer improved accuracy in addition to new imaging protocols and novel applications. The purpose of this manuscript is to familiarize the readers with the causes and effects of technical, patient-related, and operator-related pitfalls and artifacts associated with the D-SPECT dedicated cardiac camera with solid-state detectors. The manuscript offers guidance on how to avoid these factors, how to detect them, and how to correct better for them, providing high-quality diagnostic images. PMID:26403143

  11. Does diffusion MRI tell us anything about the white matter? An overview of methods and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Lauren J.; Pasternak, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    One key pitfall in diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) clinical neuroimaging research is the challenge of understanding and interpreting the results of a complex analysis pipeline. The sophisticated algorithms employed by the analysis software, combined with the relatively non-specific nature of many diffusion measurements, lead to challenges in interpretation of the results. This paper is aimed at an intended audience of clinical researchers who are learning about dMRI or trying to interpret dMRI results, and who may be wondering “Does dMRI tell us anything about the white matter?” We present a critical review of dMRI methods and measures used in clinical neuroimaging research, focusing on the most commonly used analysis methods and the most commonly reported measures. We describe important pitfalls in every section, and provide extensive references for the reader interested in more detail. PMID:25278106

  12. Effects of pitfall trap preservative on collections of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCravy, K.W.; Willand, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of six pitfall trap preservatives (5% acetic acid solution, distilled water, 70% ethanol, 50% ethylene glycol solution, 50% propylene glycol solution, and 10% saline solution) on collections of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) were studied in a west-central Illinois deciduous forest from May to October 2005. A total of 819 carabids, representing 33 species and 19 genera, were collected. Saline produced significantly fewer captures than did acetic acid, ethanol, ethylene glycol, and propylene glycol, while distilled water produced significantly fewer captures than did acetic acid. Significant associations between numbers of captures and treatment were seen in four species: Amphasia interstitialis (Say), Calathus opaculus LeConte, Chlaenius nemoralis Say, and Cyclotrachelus sodalis (LeConte). Results of this study suggest that type of preservative used can have substantial effects on abundance and species composition of carabids collected in pitfall traps.

  13. Pitfalls and Pearls of Wisdom in 18F-FDG PET Imaging of Tumors.

    PubMed

    Britton, Tracey; Robinson, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    (18)F-FDG PET imaging of tumors has pitfalls and pearls of wisdom that begin at the point of scheduling and continue through the patient interview, the resting phase, the scan itself, and the image review. Interviewing the patient at the time of scheduling, followed by placing a reminder phone call shortly before the appointment, can save a nuclear medicine department the financial loss of wasted doses and missed appointment slots in the schedule. The pitfalls and pearls of wisdom in tumor imaging are ever changing, and the technologist is in a constant state of inquiry about the patient's disease process and ability to comply. Consideration of each item on the worksheets in this article affects every scan. On completing this article, the reader will be able to identify questions that should be asked in the scheduling and preinjection patient interviews, interpret the answers to those questions, determine how the images may be affected, and adapt the scan. PMID:27102663

  14. Pitfalls of haplotype phasing from amplicon-based long-read sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Laver, Thomas W.; Caswell, Richard C.; Moore, Karen A.; Poschmann, Jeremie; Johnson, Matthew B.; Owens, Martina M.; Ellard, Sian; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H.; Weedon, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    The long-read sequencers from Pacific Bioscience (PacBio) and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) offer the opportunity to phase mutations multiple kilobases apart directly from sequencing reads. In this study, we used long-range PCR with ONT and PacBio sequencing to phase two variants 9 kb apart in the RET gene. We also re-analysed data from a recent paper which had apparently successfully used ONT to phase clinically important haplotypes at the CYP2D6 and HLA loci. From these analyses, we demonstrate PCR-chimera formation during PCR amplification and reference alignment bias are pitfalls that need to be considered when attempting to phase variants using amplicon-based long-read sequencing technologies. These methodological pitfalls need to be avoided if the opportunities provided by long-read sequencers are to be fully exploited. PMID:26883533

  15. ROI, Pitfalls and Best Practices with an Enterprise Smart Card Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Philip

    This paper will describe the highlights of the ActivIdentity sponsored Datamonitor study into Return On Investment (ROI) when implementing smart cards in the enterprise in the following areas: physical and logical access convergence, remote access when replacing OTP tokens and Enterprise Single Sign-On. It also provides additional information about the pitfalls to avoid when implementing smart cards and describes best practices for deployment.

  16. Common and uncommon pitfalls in pancreatic imaging: it is not always cancer.

    PubMed

    Vernuccio, F; Borhani, A A; Dioguardi Burgio, M; Midiri, M; Furlan, A; Brancatelli, G

    2016-02-01

    Despite advances in multimodality imaging of pancreas, there is still overlap between imaging findings of several pancreatic/peripancreatic disease processes. Pancreatic and peripancreatic non-neoplastic entities may mimic primary pancreatic neoplasms on ultrasound, CT, and MRI. On the other hand, primary pancreatic cancer may be overlooked on imaging because of technical and inherent factors. The purpose of this pictorial review is to describe and illustrate pancreatic imaging pitfalls and highlight the basic radiological features for proper differential diagnosis. PMID:26867910

  17. Surgery of the ear and the lateral skull base: pitfalls and complications

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Bernhard; Dlugaiczyk, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Surgery of the ear and the lateral skull base is a fascinating, yet challenging field in otorhinolaryngology. A thorough knowledge of the associated complications and pitfalls is indispensable for the surgeon, not only to provide the best possible care to his patients, but also to further improve his surgical skills. Following a summary about general aspects in pre-, intra-and postoperative care of patients with disorders of the ear/lateral skull base, this article covers the most common pitfalls and complications in stapes surgery, cochlear implantation and surgery of vestibular schwannomas and jugulotympanal paragangliomas. Based on these exemplary procedures, basic “dos and don’ts” of skull base surgery are explained, which the reader can easily transfer to other disorders. Special emphasis is laid on functional aspects, such as hearing, balance and facial nerve function. Furthermore, the topics of infection, bleeding, skull base defects, quality of life and indication for revision surgery are discussed. An open communication about complications and pitfalls in ear/lateral skull base surgery among surgeons is a prerequisite for the further advancement of this fascinating field in ENT surgery. This article is meant to be a contribution to this process. PMID:24403973

  18. Active Search on Carcasses versus Pitfall Traps: a Comparison of Sampling Methods.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, N I; Camina, R; Visciarelli, E C; Centeno, N D

    2016-04-01

    The study of insect succession in cadavers and the classification of arthropods have mostly been done by placing a carcass in a cage, protected from vertebrate scavengers, which is then visited periodically. An alternative is to use specific traps. Few studies on carrion ecology and forensic entomology involving the carcasses of large vertebrates have employed pitfall traps. The aims of this study were to compare both sampling methods (active search on a carcass and pitfall trapping) for each coleopteran family, and to establish whether there is a discrepancy (underestimation and/or overestimation) in the presence of each family by either method. A great discrepancy was found for almost all families with some of them being more abundant in samples obtained through active search on carcasses and others in samples from traps, whereas two families did not show any bias towards a given sampling method. The fact that families may be underestimated or overestimated by the type of sampling technique highlights the importance of combining both methods, active search on carcasses and pitfall traps, in order to obtain more complete information on decomposition, carrion habitat and cadaveric families or species. Furthermore, a hypothesis advanced on the reasons for the underestimation by either sampling method showing biases towards certain families. Information about the sampling techniques indicating which would be more appropriate to detect or find a particular family is provided. PMID:26732526

  19. Addressing problems of employee performance.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee performance problems are essentially of 2 kinds: those that are motivational in origin and those resulting from skill deficiencies. Both kinds of problems are the province of the department manager. Performance problems differ from problems of conduct in that traditional disciplinary processes ordinarily do not apply. Rather, performance problems are addressed through educational and remedial processes. The manager has a basic responsibility in ensuring that everything reasonable is done to help each employee succeed. There are a number of steps the manager can take to address employee performance problems. PMID:21537142

  20. Conducting systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine: common pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Wider, Barbara; Boddy, Kate

    2009-12-01

    Systematic reviews (SRs) are considered the best tools for summarizing the evidence for or against the effectiveness of health care interventions. The principles and methods of SRs apply equally to both, mainstream and complementary/alternative medicine (CAM). Certain challenges are, however, more commonly encountered in CAM or even specific to it; this article is aimed at raising awareness of these among systematic reviewers. When searching for literature, specific issues relating to specialist databases, indexing, access, foreign language studies, and certain forms of publication bias need to be considered. Researchers also need to be aware of the difficulties of comparing CAM studies and address the variability between studies. CAM modalities are highly diversified and great variations exist in the standardization of herbal products and other dietary supplements. Individualization of treatment as well as different classifications of disease and different diagnostic methods need to be addressed. Expectation bias is high in CAM, and finding appropriate controls and blinding are often challenging. It is important that these issues are taken into account early on in the planning stages of an SR so that proper consideration can be given to the search strategies, inclusion/exclusion criteria and methods of analysis with the overall aim of reducing bias. PMID:19942632

  1. Technical Advances and Pitfalls in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E.; Liao, Jay J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) is the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) based on level 1 evidence. Technical advances in radiotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of HNSCC, with the most tangible gain being a reduction in long term morbidity. However, these benefits come with a serious and sobering price. Today, there is a greater chance of missing the target/tumor due to uncertainties in target volume definition by the clinician that is demanded by the highly conformal planning process involved with IMRT. Unless this is urgently addressed, our patients would be better served with the historically practiced non conformal radiotherapy, than IMRT which promises lesser morbidity. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) ensures the level of set up accuracy warranted to deliver a highly conformal treatment plan and should be utilized with IMRT, where feasible. Proton therapy has a theoretical physical advantage over photon therapy due to a lack of “exit dose”. However, clinical data supporting the routine use of this technology for HNSCC are currently sparse. The purpose of this article is to review the literature, discuss the salient issues and make recommendations that address the gaps in knowledge. PMID:22701482

  2. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  3. Communities Address Barriers to Connectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Anne

    1996-01-01

    Rural areas lag behind urban areas in access to information technologies. Public institutions play a critical role in extending the benefits of information technologies to those who would not otherwise have access. The most successful rural telecommunications plans address barriers to use, such as unawareness of the benefits, technophobia, the…

  4. Keynote Address: Rev. Mark Massa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massa, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Rev. Mark S. Massa, S.J., is the dean and professor of Church history at the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College. He was invited to give a keynote to begin the third Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference (CHEC), cosponsored by Boston College and Fordham University. Fr. Massa's address posed critical questions about…

  5. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  6. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  7. Chemical Address Tags of Fluorescent Bioimaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Shedden, Kerby; Rosania, Gus R.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical address tags can be defined as specific structural features shared by a set of bioimaging probes having a predictable influence on cell-associated visual signals obtained from these probes. Here, using a large image dataset acquired with a high content screening instrument, machine vision and cheminformatics analysis have been applied to reveal chemical address tags. With a combinatorial library of fluorescent molecules, fluorescence signal intensity, spectral, and spatial features characterizing each one of the probes' visual signals were extracted from images acquired with the three different excitation and emission channels of the imaging instrument. With multivariate regression, the additive contribution from each one of the different building blocks of the bioimaging probes towards each measured, cell-associated image-based feature was calculated. In this manner, variations in the chemical features of the molecules were associated with the resulting staining patterns, facilitating quantitative, objective analysis of chemical address tags. Hierarchical clustering and paired image-cheminformatics analysis revealed key structure-property relationships amongst many building blocks of the fluorescent molecules. The results point to different chemical modifications of the bioimaging probes that can exert similar (or different) effects on the probes' visual signals. Inspection of the clustered structures suggests intramolecular charge migration or partial charge distribution as potential mechanistic determinants of chemical address tag behavior. PMID:20104576

  8. Can ecosystem-scale translocations mitigate the impact of climate change on terrestrial biodiversity? Promises, pitfalls, and possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Stéphane; Case, Bradley S.; Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Waterhouse, Benjamin R.; Wratten, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Because ecological interactions are the first components of the ecosystem to be impacted by climate change, future forms of threatened-species and ecosystem management should aim at conserving complete, functioning communities rather than single charismatic species. A possible way forward is the deployment of ecosystem-scale translocation (EST), where above- and below-ground elements of a functioning terrestrial ecosystem (including vegetation and topsoil) are carefully collected and moved together. Small-scale attempts at such practice have been made for the purpose of ecological restoration. By moving larger subsets of functioning ecosystems from climatically unstable regions to more stable ones, EST could provide a practical means to conserve mature and complex ecosystems threatened by climate change. However, there are a number of challenges associated with EST in the context of climate change mitigation, in particular the choice of donor and receptor sites. With the aim of fostering discussion and debate about the EST concept, we  1) outline the possible promises and pitfalls of EST in mitigating the impact of climate change on terrestrial biodiversity and 2) use a GIS-based approach to illustrate how  potential source and receptor sites, where EST could be trialed and evaluated globally, could be identified. PMID:26989475

  9. Pitfalls and Limitations of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Urinary Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2015-01-01

    Adequately selecting a therapeutic approach for bladder cancer depends on accurate grading and staging. Substantial inaccuracy of clinical staging with bimanual examination, cystoscopy, and transurethral resection of bladder tumor has facilitated the increasing utility of magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate bladder cancer. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging technique. The high tissue contrast between cancers and surrounding tissues on DWI is derived from the difference of water molecules motion. DWI is potentially a useful tool for the detection, characterization, and staging of bladder cancers; it can also monitor posttreatment response and provide information on predicting tumor biophysical behaviors. Despite advancements in DWI techniques and the use of quantitative analysis to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient values, there are some inherent limitations in DWI interpretation related to relatively poor spatial resolution, lack of cancer specificity, and lack of standardized image acquisition protocols and data analysis procedures that restrict the application of DWI and reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient values. In addition, inadequate bladder distension, artifacts, thinness of bladder wall, cancerous mimickers of normal bladder wall and benign lesions, and variations in the manifestation of bladder cancer may interfere with diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Recognition of these pitfalls and limitations can minimize their impact on image interpretation, and carefully applying the analyzed results and combining with pathologic grading and staging to clinical practice can contribute to the selection of an adequate treatment method to improve patient care. PMID:26055180

  10. Concussion management in US college football: progress and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Kroshus, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the frequency and severity of concussions from sport is an important issue in public health currently addressed by a multifaceted approach. Given the large number of participants and the comparatively high risk of injury, American football is an important sport to consider when examining concussion management practices. Focusing on American football at the collegiate level, this manuscript describes current research regarding concussion epidemiology, policy, implementation of clinical diagnosis, management and return-to-play standards and athlete concussion education. Although American collegiate sports leagues have put forth concussion-related policies in recent years, the implementation of these policies and related effects on athlete concussion education, clinical management of concussion and ultimately athlete health outcomes are not well understood. Additional research is needed. PMID:27064258

  11. Infrared imaging of the crime scene: possibilities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Gerda J; Hoveling, Richelle J M; Roos, Martin; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2013-09-01

    All objects radiate infrared energy invisible to the human eye, which can be imaged by infrared cameras, visualizing differences in temperature and/or emissivity of objects. Infrared imaging is an emerging technique for forensic investigators. The rapid, nondestructive, and noncontact features of infrared imaging indicate its suitability for many forensic applications, ranging from the estimation of time of death to the detection of blood stains on dark backgrounds. This paper provides an overview of the principles and instrumentation involved in infrared imaging. Difficulties concerning the image interpretation due to different radiation sources and different emissivity values within a scene are addressed. Finally, reported forensic applications are reviewed and supported by practical illustrations. When introduced in forensic casework, infrared imaging can help investigators to detect, to visualize, and to identify useful evidence nondestructively. PMID:23919285

  12. The pitfalls of bioterrorism preparedness: the anthrax and smallpox experiences.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Hillel W; Gould, Robert M; Sidel, Victor W

    2004-10-01

    Bioterrorism preparedness programs have contributed to death, illness, and waste of public health resources without evidence of benefit. Several deaths and many serious illnesses have resulted from the smallpox vaccination program; yet there is no clear evidence that a threat of smallpox exposure ever existed. The anthrax spores released in 2001 have been linked to secret US military laboratories-the resultant illnesses and deaths might not have occurred if those laboratories were not in operation. The present expansion of bioterrorism preparedness programs will continue to squander health resources, increase the dangers of accidental or purposeful release of dangerous pathogens, and further undermine efforts to enforce international treaties to ban biological and chemical weapons. The public health community should acknowledge the substantial harm that bioterrorism preparedness has already caused and develop mechanisms to increase our public health resources and to allocate them to address the world's real health needs. PMID:15451727

  13. Current challenges and pitfalls in the pharmacological treatment of depression

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Velea, O; Gheorghe, IR; Truţescu, CI; Purcărea, VL

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of depression obliges needs an individual assessment, the psychopharmacological approach involving a biopsychosocial analysis for each individual case. The rebalancing of the depressive patient, seen as a return to a normal level of psychosocial functioning and reduced risk of relapse is achieved with a prompt and constant support of specialized teams. Treatment should include psychopharmacological and psychosocial approaches, the results being interrelated and contributing to the prognosis of the disorder. Progress in clinical and pharmacological research, vivid dynamics of socio-economic environment, the complexity of diagnostic evaluation and the need for an interdisciplinary approach may cause difficulties in addressing the depressive patient and the ethical controversies. The aim of this paper is to present a brief analysis of challenges encountered in the present psychiatric practice, starting from the heterogeneity of depressive manifestations and finishing with the prioritization of interventional forms. PMID:25866576

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction graft harvesting: pitfalls and tips.

    PubMed

    McGuire, David A; Hendricks, Stephen D

    2007-12-01

    Surgical treatment for anterior cruciate ligament deficiency has relied predominantly on reconstruction with autografts. Grafts taken from patients' own central third of their patellar tendon, bone-patellar tendon bone, or one or more of the hamstring tendons, semitendinosus, and gracilis, constitute the majority of grafts used for these purposes. Although there is no single graft option that clearly outperforms another, an abundance of articles replete with complications associated with harvest and use are available from peer-reviewed journals. It is these complications and their prevention that will be addressed in the following chapter. The idea in mind is that the reader might adopt these techniques to improve their patient outcomes by minimizing, or eliminating, the ongoing problems that such complications produce. PMID:18004217

  15. Multidimensional Assessment of Criminal Recidivism: Problems, Pitfalls, and Proposed Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Vrieze, Scott I.; Grove, William M.

    2010-01-01

    All states have statutes in place to commit civilly individuals at high risk for violence. This note addresses difficulties in assessing such risk, but uses as an example the task of predicting sexual violence recidivism; the principles espoused here generalize to predicting all violence. As part of commitment process, mental health professionals, who are often psychologists, evaluate an individual’s risk of sexual recidivism. It is common for professionals conducting these risk assessments to use several actuarial risk prediction instruments (i.e., psychological tests). These tests rarely agree closely in the risk figures they provide. Serious epistemological and psychometric problems in the multivariate assessment of recidivism risk are pointed out. Sound psychometric, or in some cases heuristic, solutions to these problems are proffered, in hope of improving clinical practice. We focus on how to make these tests’ outputs commensurable, and discuss various ways to combine them in coherent, justifiable, fashions. PMID:20528065

  16. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: pitfalls in the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Guibas, George V; Tsabouri, Sophia; Makris, Michael; Priftis, Kostas N

    2014-11-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) represents the severe end of the spectrum of gastrointestinal food hypersensitivity; its acute episodes can culminate in severe dehydration and hypovolemic shock, and its chronic form entails considerable morbidity associated with feeding difficulty and failure to thrive. Nevertheless, awareness for this syndrome remains rather low. Many factors hamper the establishment of FPIES diagnosis. Such factors pertain to the pathophysiological mechanism of the syndrome, causal food proteins, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, differential diagnosis considerations, and prevailing perceptions which may require critical appraisal. Throughout this review, we will present and discuss these issues and put the focus on factors that could lead to under-diagnosis of FPIES, cause numerous acute episodes, and substantially increase the diseases morbidity and financial burden. We will also address other issues that are clinically relevant to FPIES. PMID:24853552

  17. [Difficulties and pitfalls in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Marcondes, José Antonio Miguel; Barcellos, Cristiano Roberto Grimaldi; Rocha, Michelle Patrocínio

    2011-02-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome is one of the most common endocrinopathies, affecting approximately 7% of women of reproductive age. Although it was described in 1935, only in 1990 was published the first Consensus regarding it its diagnosis. Today, the syndrome is also considered a cardiovascular risk factor, with a high prevalence of metabolic disorders. Reflecting this new vision of the syndrome, several documents, including Consensus, Statement and Guidelines have been published, addressing different aspects of the syndrome. This review is an analysis of documents obtained through a survey in the PubMed database, using the keywords "polycystic ovary syndrome", "hyperandrogenism" and "hirsutism", separately, taking as limiting the term Type of Article (Practice Guideline, Consensus Development Conference, Guideline) without limitation of time, language and age, having been selected only those documents prepared under the sponsorship of Medical Entities and with more than one author. PMID:21468515

  18. Current challenges and pitfalls in the pharmacological treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Popa-Velea, O; Gheorghe, I R; Truţescu, C I; Purcărea, V L

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of depression obliges needs an individual assessment, the psychopharmacological approach involving a biopsychosocial analysis for each individual case. The rebalancing of the depressive patient, seen as a return to a normal level of psychosocial functioning and reduced risk of relapse is achieved with a prompt and constant support of specialized teams. Treatment should include psychopharmacological and psychosocial approaches, the results being interrelated and contributing to the prognosis of the disorder. Progress in clinical and pharmacological research, vivid dynamics of socio-economic environment, the complexity of diagnostic evaluation and the need for an interdisciplinary approach may cause difficulties in addressing the depressive patient and the ethical controversies. The aim of this paper is to present a brief analysis of challenges encountered in the present psychiatric practice, starting from the heterogeneity of depressive manifestations and finishing with the prioritization of interventional forms. PMID:25866576

  19. Caring for patients with chronic pain: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Debono, David J; Hoeksema, Laura J; Hobbs, Raymond D

    2013-08-01

    Chronic, nonmalignant pain is a substantial public health problem in the United States. Research over the past 2 decades has defined chronic pain by using a "biopsychosocial model" that considers a patient's biology and psychological makeup in the context of his or her social and cultural milieu. Whereas this model addresses the pathology of chronic pain, it also places many demands on the physician, who is expected to assess and manage chronic pain safely and successfully. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that opioids can be effective in the management of chronic pain, but there has also been a rise in opioid-related overdoses and deaths. Clinicians should be aware of assessment tools that may be used to evaluate the risk of opioid abuse. A basic understanding of chronic pain pathophysiology and a uniform approach to patient care can satisfy the needs of both patients and physicians. PMID:23918913

  20. Innovative Legal Approaches to Address Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pomeranz, Jennifer L; Teret, Stephen P; Sugarman, Stephen D; Rutkow, Lainie; Brownell, Kelly D

    2009-01-01

    Context: The law is a powerful public health tool with considerable potential to address the obesity issue. Scientific advances, gaps in the current regulatory environment, and new ways of conceptualizing rights and responsibilities offer a foundation for legal innovation. Methods: This article connects developments in public health and nutrition with legal advances to define promising avenues for preventing obesity through the application of the law. Findings: Two sets of approaches are defined: (1) direct application of the law to factors known to contribute to obesity and (2) original and innovative legal solutions that address the weak regulatory stance of government and the ineffectiveness of existing policies used to control obesity. Specific legal strategies are discussed for limiting children's food marketing, confronting the potential addictive properties of food, compelling industry speech, increasing government speech, regulating conduct, using tort litigation, applying nuisance law as a litigation strategy, and considering performance-based regulation as an alternative to typical regulatory actions. Finally, preemption is an overriding issue and can play both a facilitative and a hindering role in obesity policy. Conclusions: Legal solutions are immediately available to the government to address obesity and should be considered at the federal, state, and local levels. New and innovative legal solutions represent opportunities to take the law in creative directions and to link legal, nutrition, and public health communities in constructive ways. PMID:19298420

  1. Applying Machine Learning to Facilitate Autism Diagnostics: Pitfalls and Promises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bone, Daniel; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Black, Matthew P.; Lee, Chi-Chun; Audhkhasi, Kartik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning has immense potential to enhance diagnostic and intervention research in the behavioral sciences, and may be especially useful in investigations involving the highly prevalent and heterogeneous syndrome of autism spectrum disorder. However, use of machine learning in the absence of clinical domain expertise can be tenuous and lead…

  2. Democratising Turkey through Student-Centred Pedagogy: Opportunities and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altinyelken, Hülya Kosar

    2015-01-01

    Global reform talk on pedagogy has been converging around student-centred pedagogy (SCP) in recent decades. One of the significant appeals of this pedagogical model is its democratisation potentials. This article seeks to empirically study SCP's role in democratising learning and promoting social democratisation by taking the case of Turkey, a…

  3. Automated categorization of bioacoustic signals: Avoiding perceptual pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deecke, Volker B.; Janik, Vincent M.

    2005-04-01

    Dividing a species acoustic repertoire into biologically relevant categories presents a widespread problem in the study of animal sound communication. Such categorization is fundamental to any attempt to compare repertoires between contexts, individuals, populations or species. Automated procedures allow rapid, repeatable and objective categorization, however, in the past they have often performed poorly at detecting biologically meaningful sound classes. Arguably this is because automated methods have often failed to address the nonlinearities of animal sound perception and a method that incorporates dynamic time warping and an adaptive resonance theory (ART) neural network to avoid some of the problems is presented here. The method was tested on 104 randomly chosen whistles recorded from four captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). This data set includes known biologically meaningful categories in the form of 42 distinctive stereotyped whistles produced when each individual was kept in isolation. The automated procedure correctly grouped all but two of the stereotyped whistles into their respective categories, and thus performed as good as human observers. However, compared to humans, the automated system provided finer categorization of the remaining non-stereotyped whistles. These results suggest that this methodology provides a repeatable and objective means of splitting bioacoustic signals into biologically meaningful categories.

  4. Strategies to reduce pitfalls in measuring blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Badeli, Hamidreza; Assadi, Farahnak

    2014-03-01

    Errors in blood pressure (BP) measurement are common in the clinical practice. Inaccurate measurements of BP may lead to misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment of hypertension. The preferred method of BP measurement in the clinical setting is auscultation, using the first and the fifth Korotkoff sounds. However, the use of mercury sphygmomanometer is declining. Automated oscillometric devices are an acceptable alternative method of BP measurements if the proper cuff size is used. Aneroid devices are suitable, but they require frequent calibration. There is increasing evidence that home readings predict cardiovascular events and are particularly useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. At 24 h ambulatory monitoring is also useful for diagnosing white-coat hypertension and resistance hypertension. There is increasing evidence that lack of nocturnal BP dipping during the night may be associated with increased cardiovascular event. This report attempts to address the need for accurate BP measurements in children and adolescents by reducing human and equipment errors and providing clinicians with the accurate measurement of BP, which is essential to classify individuals, to ascertain BP-related CV risks and to guide management. PMID:24791186

  5. Pitfalls in radiology informatics when deploying an enterprise solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsköld, L.; Wintell, M.; Lundberg, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the Region Vastra Gotaland (VGR), Sweden, sharing of data from 4 PACS system has been done through the Radiology Information Infrastructure that where deployed in 2007, and during 2008 and 2009 also including the information obtained from three different RIS systems installed in the region. The RIS information stored in the Radiology Information Infrastructure is Structured Reports (SR) objects that derivatives from the regional information model. In practice, the Enterprise solution now offers new ways of social collaboration through information sharing within a region. Interoperability was developed according to the IHE mission, i.e. applying standards such as digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) and Health Level 7 (HL7) to address specific clinical communication needs and support optimal patient care. Applying standards and information has shown to be suitable for interoperability, but not appropriate for implementing social collaboration i.e. first and second opinion, as there is no user services related to the standards. The need for social interaction leads to a common negotiated interface and in contrary with interoperability the approach will be a common defined semantic model. Radiology informatics is the glue between the technical standards, information models,semantics, social ruleworks and regulations used within radiology and their customers to share information and services.

  6. Homemade diets: attributes, pitfalls, and a call for action.

    PubMed

    Remillard, Rebecca L

    2008-08-01

    At one time, it was estimated that the majority of dogs and cats in the United States received 90% or more of their nutrition from complete and balanced commercially prepared foods, and this estimate was reaffirmed in a 2004 survey. However, 4 years and several pet food and treat recalls later, fewer pet owners are feeding commercial pet food products exclusively and more are asking questions and looking for alternatives. As in any market-driven economy, there are many more alternative diets and food products available today from which pet owners may select. A difficult to measure but growing number of clients are feeding homemade diets that provide 100% of their pet's nutrition, while a larger number are feeding a combination of products, treats, and home prepared meals. Most practitioners can attest to this increase in their client's interest in homemade meals and to having insufficient knowledge to assist them. At a time when motivated clients are considering homemade for their pets as an alternative, veterinarians are less than adequately versed in canine and feline nutrition and dietary options. The article addresses the two most important health issues concerning pet owners and veterinarians about homemade diets: nutritional integrity and food safety. PMID:18656841

  7. Effectiveness and biases of Winkler litter extraction and pitfall trapping for collecting ground-dwelling ants in northern temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Kaloyan; Keiper, Joe

    2009-12-01

    The sampling efficiency of pitfall traps and Winkler litter extraction in northern deciduous forests was compared using ants. Both techniques are among the most common methods used to measure the diversity of organisms active on the forest floor. During 2005-2006, 90 Winkler and 180 pitfall trap samples from urban forest fragments in northeastern Ohio obtained 9,203 ants representing 31 species. Winklers captured all 31 species, whereas pitfall traps collected a total of 24 species. Winkler samples accumulated species more rapidly than did pitfall traps and had greater total species richness and higher abundance of ants recorded. Consistent with other studies, Winkler sampling was found to catch a greater number of smaller ants, whereas pitfall trapping caught a greater number of large-bodied ants. According to estimates of expected species richness, the combination of the two sampling techniques allowed for the collection of approximately 90% of the ants expected in the surveyed area. Site variation had little effect on the inherent differences in sampling efficacy between the two methods. Either technique adequately collected samples for broad comparisons and documentation of the more typical and representative ant fauna, but Winkler extraction exhibited the advantage of a more complete inventory. The application of both techniques should be considered if the aims of a study require estimation of community properties, such as relative abundance. PMID:20021769

  8. Pitfalls in the management of acute adrenocortical insufficiency: discussion paper.

    PubMed Central

    Waise, A; Young, R J

    1989-01-01

    In patients with acute adrenocortical insufficiency prompt recognition and treatment may be life-saving. Treatment should be initiated immediately before confirmation of the diagnosis. As shown by these case reports, junior staff on acute medical and surgical services, to whom these patients usually first present, may not appreciate that (a) hyponatraemia and hyperkalaemia, in the absence of renal failure, should immediately suggest the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency and (b) treatment should precede confirmation of the diagnosis. Attempts to correct hyperkalaemia due to adrenocortical insufficiency with insulin and infusions of dextrose is inappropriate and potentially dangerous but seems to be a not unusual mistake. PMID:2614769

  9. Immune biomarkers: the promises and pitfalls of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Willis, Joanna C D; Lord, Graham M

    2015-05-01

    Substantial progress in molecular immunology, coupled with an increasing focus on translational research and an enthusiasm for personalized medicine, has resulted in a rapid expansion in the field of immune biomarkers in recent years. In this Science and Society article, we provide a conceptual overview of the field and discuss the progress that has been made so far, as well as the future potential in the context of the scientific, logistical, financial, legal and ethical framework within which this research is being carried out and translated into clinical use. PMID:25814400

  10. Nanoscale content-addressable memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bryan (Inventor); Principe, Jose C. (Inventor); Fortes, Jose (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A combined content addressable memory device and memory interface is provided. The combined device and interface includes one or more one molecular wire crossbar memories having spaced-apart key nanowires, spaced-apart value nanowires adjacent to the key nanowires, and configurable switches between the key nanowires and the value nanowires. The combination further includes a key microwire-nanowire grid (key MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart key nanowires, and a value microwire-nanowire grid (value MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart value nanowires. A key or value MNGs selects multiple nanowires for a given key or value.

  11. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  12. Identifying and Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Kestenbaum, Lori A.; Feemster, Kristen A.

    2015-01-01

    In the 20th century, the introduction of multiple vaccines significantly reduced childhood morbidity, mortality, and disease outbreaks. Despite, and perhaps because of, their public health impact, an increasing number of parents and patients are choosing to delay or refuse vaccines. These individuals are described as vaccine hesitant. This phenomenon has developed due to the confluence of multiple social, cultural, political and personal factors. As immunization programs continue to expand, understanding and addressing vaccine hesitancy will be crucial to their successful implementation. This review explores the history of vaccine hesitancy, its causes, and suggested approaches for reducing hesitancy and strengthening vaccine acceptance. PMID:25875982

  13. Identifying and addressing vaccine hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Kestenbaum, Lori A; Feemster, Kristen A

    2015-04-01

    In the 20th century, the introduction of multiple vaccines significantly reduced childhood morbidity, mortality, and disease outbreaks. Despite, and perhaps because of, their public health impact, an increasing number of parents and patients are choosing to delay or refuse vaccines. These individuals are described as "vaccine hesitant." This phenomenon has developed due to the confluence of multiple social, cultural, political, and personal factors. As immunization programs continue to expand, understanding and addressing vaccine hesitancy will be crucial to their successful implementation. This review explores the history of vaccine hesitancy, its causes, and suggested approaches for reducing hesitancy and strengthening vaccine acceptance. PMID:25875982

  14. Transcranial magnetic motor-evoked potentials in scoliosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Glassman, S D; Zhang, Y P; Shields, C B; Johnson, J R; Linden, R D

    1995-10-01

    Spinal cord monitoring using SSEPs is an accepted adjunct in the surgical correction of spinal deformities, but does not directly assess motor function. Motor-evoked potentials have been introduced in an effort to meet this important need. In this series of 18 patients, the feasibility of intraoperative monitoring using transcranial magnetic motor-evoked potentials is documented. The potential value of this neurophysiologic monitoring technique, as well as the pitfalls in interpretation, are reviewed. PMID:8584459

  15. Hemodynamic stroke: A rare pitfall in cranio cervical junction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Jan Frederick; Slotty, Philipp; El Khatib, Mustafa; Bostelmann, Richard; Hänggi, Daniel; Steiger, Hans Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Surgical C1C2-stabilization may be complicated by arterial-arterial embolism or arterial injury. Another potential complication is hemodynamic stroke. The latter might be induced in patients with poor posterior fossa collateralization (risk factor 1) when the vertebral artery (VA) is compressed during reduction (risk factor 2). We report a clinical case where this rare situation occurred: A 72-year old patient was undergoing C1C2-stabilization for subluxation due to rheumatoid arthritis. Preoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) had shown poor collaterals in the posterior fossa. Furthermore, intraoperative Doppler ultrasound (US) detected unilateral VA occlusion during reduction. It appeared to be a high-risk situation for hemodynamic stroke. Surgical inspection of the VA found osteofibrous compressing elements. Arterial decompression was performed resulting in the normal flow as detected by US. Subsequently, C1C2-stabilization could be realized. The clinical and radiological outcome was very favorable. In C1C2-stabilization precise analysis of preoperative CTA and intraoperative US are important to detect risk factors of hemodynamic stroke. Using these data may prevent this rare, but potentially life-threatening complication. PMID:25336834

  16. Pitfalls in the dipolar model for the neocortical EEG sources.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jorge J; Ogawa, Takeshi; Goto, Takakuni; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Evans, Alan; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-08-01

    For about six decades, primary current sources of the electroencephalogram (EEG) have been assumed dipolar in nature. In this study, we used electrophysiological recordings from anesthetized Wistar rats undergoing repeated whisker deflections to revise the biophysical foundations of the EEG dipolar model. In a first experiment, we performed three-dimensional recordings of extracellular potentials from a large portion of the barrel field to estimate intracortical multipolar moments generated either by single spiking neurons (i.e., pyramidal cells, PC; spiny stellate cells, SS) or by populations of them while experiencing synchronized postsynaptic potentials. As expected, backpropagating spikes along PC dendrites caused dipolar field components larger in the direction perpendicular to the cortical surface (49.7 ± 22.0 nA·mm). In agreement with the fact that SS cells have "close-field" configurations, their dipolar moment at any direction was negligible. Surprisingly, monopolar field components were detectable both at the level of single units (i.e., -11.7 ± 3.4 nA for PC) and at the mesoscopic level of mixed neuronal populations receiving extended synaptic inputs within either a cortical column (-0.44 ± 0.20 μA) or a 2.5-m(3)-voxel volume (-3.32 ± 1.20 μA). To evaluate the relationship between the macroscopically defined EEG equivalent dipole and the mesoscopic intracortical multipolar moments, we performed concurrent recordings of high-resolution skull EEG and laminar local field potentials. From this second experiment, we estimated the time-varying EEG equivalent dipole for the entire barrel field using either a multiple dipole fitting or a distributed type of EEG inverse solution. We demonstrated that mesoscopic multipolar components are altogether absorbed by any equivalent dipole in both types of inverse solutions. We conclude that the primary current sources of the EEG in the neocortex of rodents are not precisely represented by a single equivalent

  17. Bayesian Modeling of Population Variability -- Practical Guidance and Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Corwin L. Atwood

    2008-05-01

    With the advent of easy-to-use open-source software for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation, hierarchical Bayesian analysis is gaining in popularity. This paper presents practical guidance for hierarchical Bayes analysis of typical problems in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The guidance is related to choosing parameterizations that accelerate convergence of the MCMC sampling and to illustrating the potential sensitivity of the results to the functional form chosen for the first-stage prior. This latter issue has significant ramifications because the mean of the average population variability curve (PVC) from hierarchical Bayes (or the mean of the point estimate distribution from empirical Bayes) can be very sensitive to this choice in cases where variability is large. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the issues discussed.

  18. Self-acquired patient images: the promises and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Damanpour, Shadi; Srivastava, Divya; Nijhawan, Rajiv I

    2016-03-01

    Self-acquired patient images, also known as selfies, are increasingly utilized in the practice of dermatology; however, research on their utility is somewhat limited. While the implementation of selfies has yet to be universally accepted, their role in triage appears to be especially useful. The potential for reducing office wait times, expediting referrals, and providing dermatologic services to patients with limited access to care is promising. In addition, as technology advances, the number of smartphone applications related to dermatology that are available to the general public has risen exponentially. With appropriate standardization, regulation, and confidentiality measures, these tools can be feasible adjuncts in clinical practice, dermatologic surgery, and teledermatology. Selfies likely will have a large role in dermatologic practice and delivery in the future. PMID:26963112

  19. Multisite Pacing for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: Promise and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Antonios P; Behar, Jonathan M; Claridge, Simon; Jackson, Tom; Sohal, Manav; Rinaldi, Christopher Aldo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces the morbidity and mortality of patients with symptomatic heart failure and intraventricular conduction delay. However, its clinical outcomes are non-uniform and up to one third of treated patients are subsequently classified as non-responders. Multisite pacing (MSP), i.e. stimulating the myocardium from multiple locations, has emerged as a potential therapeutic option in patients requiring CRT. The rationale for MSP is based on the hypothesis that increasing the pacing locations in the left ventricle results in a more physiologic and coordinated myocardial systole. MSP can be achieved by additional leads in the right or left ventricle but this can lead to high battery drain and more frequent generator replacements. Multipolar left ventricular leads can deliver pacing at multiple sites, and therefore, a single lead can be used for MSP. However, the optimal programming settings and the outcomes of this approach remain yet to be determined. PMID:27216844

  20. Social networking for nurse education: Possibilities, perils and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we consider the potential and implications of using social networking sites such as Facebook® in nurse education. The concept of social networking and the use of Facebook will be explored, as will the theoretical constructs specific to the use of online technology and Web 2.0 tools. Theories around Communities of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000), Communities of Practice (Wenger, 1998), Activity Theory (Daniels, Cole, & Wertsch, 2007) and Actor-Network theory (Latour, 1997) will be briefly explored, as will the work of Vygotsky (1978), as applies to the social aspects of learning. Boundary issues, such as if and how faculty and students should or could be connected via social networking sites will also be explored. PMID:25267140

  1. Social networking for nurse education: Possibilities, perils and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

    2014-03-11

    Abstract In this paper, we consider the potential and implications of using social networking sites such as Facebook® in nurse education. The concept of social networking and the use of Facebook will be explored, as will the theoretical constructs specific to the use of online technology and web 2.0 tools. Theories around Communities of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson & Archer 2000), Communities of Practice (Wenger 1998), Activity Theory (Daniels, Cole & Wertsch 2007) and Actor Network Theory (Latour 1997) will be briefly explored, as will the work of Vygotsky (1978), as applies to the social aspects of learning. Boundary issues, such as if and how faculty and students should or could be connected via social networking sites will also be explored. PMID:24611647

  2. FDG PET-CT of gynecologic cancers: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Hima B; Kraeft, Jessica J; Schorge, John O; Scott, James A; Lee, Susanna I

    2015-10-01

    FDG PET-CT plays an important role in treatment planning and in prognosis assessment of gynecologic cancer patients. Detection of hypermetabolic tissue with FDG PET, when combined with the high spatial resolution of CT, results in improved cancer detection and localization not afforded by either modality independently. This article is a primer for a radiologist performing PET-CT on gynecologic cancer patients and includes the imaging protocol, normal pattern of FDG distribution in the female pelvis and the lymph node drainage pathways from the gynecologic organs. Clinically relevant imaging findings that should be included in the report are discussed. Case examples illustrate how potential errors in exam interpretation can be avoided by concurrently performing a high-quality diagnostic CT with the FDG PET scan and by analyzing both the stand-alone and the fusion images. PMID:25680500

  3. Applying Machine Learning to Facilitate Autism Diagnostics: Pitfalls and promises

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Daniel; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Black, Matthew P.; Lee, Chi-Chun; Audhkhasi, Kartik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning has immense potential to enhance diagnostic and intervention research in the behavioral sciences, and may be especially useful in investigations involving the highly prevalent and heterogeneous syndrome of autism spectrum disorder. However, use of machine learning in the absence of clinical domain expertise can be tenuous and lead to misinformed conclusions. To illustrate this concern, the current paper critically evaluates and attempts to reproduce results from two studies (Wall et al., 2012a; Wall et al., 2012b) that claim to drastically reduce time to diagnose autism using machine learning. Our failure to generate comparable findings to those reported by Wall and colleagues using larger and more balanced data underscores several conceptual and methodological problems associated with these studies. We conclude with proposed best-practices when using machine learning in autism research, and highlight some especially promising areas for collaborative work at the intersection of computational and behavioral science. PMID:25294649

  4. Epithelioid haemangioendothelioma of the lung: clinical and pathological pitfalls.

    PubMed

    van Kasteren, M E; van der Wurff, A A; Palmen, F M; Dolman, A; Miseré, J F

    1995-09-01

    In 1973, a 10 year old boy presented with numerous bilateral lung nodules, diagnosed as histiocytosis X by open lung biopsy. The patient was treated with prednisone until 1984. In 1993, he developed severe pain in the neck. A biopsy of the spine revealed the same tumour morphology as was seen in the lung in 1973. Immunohistological examination of the former and present biopsy led to the definitive diagnosis of epithelioid haemangioendothelioma of the lung with metastases to spine and liver. Epithelioid haemangioendothelioma of the lung is a rare soft tissue tumour of vascular origin, readily mistaken for carcinoma or, as in this case, histiocytosis. The tumour has an intermediate malignant potential. Although metastases of epithelioid haemangioendothelioma of the lung are well-known, metastatic spread to bones, as in our case, has not previously been mentioned in the literature. PMID:8575593

  5. Industry Support of Medical Research: Important Opportunity or Treacherous Pitfall?

    PubMed

    Tierney, William M; Meslin, Eric M; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    Pharmaceutical and device manufacturers fund more than half of the medical research in the U.S. Research funding by for-profit companies has increased over the past 20 years, while federal funding has declined. Research funding from for-profit medical companies is seen as tainted by many academicians because of potential biases and prior misbehavior by both investigators and companies. Yet NIH is encouraging partnerships between the public and private sectors to enhance scientific discovery. There are instances, such as methods for improving drug adherence and post-marketing drug surveillance, where the interests of academician researchers and industry could be aligned. We provide examples of ethically performed industry-funded research and a set of principles and benchmarks for ethically credible academic-industry partnerships that could allow academic researchers, for-profit companies, and the public to benefit. PMID:26307387

  6. Safety and pitfalls in frozen elephant trunk implantation.

    PubMed

    Damberg, Anneke; Schälte, Gereon; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Hoffman, Andras

    2013-09-01

    The frozen elephant trunk (FET) procedure, or open stent grafting, is a tool for the combined open and endovascular treatment via a median sternotomy of extensive aortic disease involving both aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. The technique aims to stabilize the maximum extent of the thoracic aorta in one step, with the goal of either rendering a secondary intervention to the downstream aorta unnecessary or producing an easy landing zone for secondary thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) or open surgery. Even though large case series have reported good results, we still have no conclusive evidence as to which patients and what kind of pathologies benefit from this technique. The surgical sequences described for total arch replacement with the FET procedure are just as varied as the associated devices and indications. This article focuses on important perioperative and surgical aspects, as well as potential complications during FET procedures. PMID:24109583

  7. Prospects and pitfalls in whole genome association studies

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Robert W; Evans, David M; Cardon, Lon R

    2005-01-01

    Recent large-scale studies of common genetic variation throughout the human genome are making it feasible to conduct whole genome studies of genotype–phenotype associations. Such studies have the potential to uncover novel contributors to common complex traits and thus lead to insights into the aetiology of multifactorial phenotypes. Despite this promise, it is important to recognize that the availability of genetic markers and the ability to assay them at realistic cost does not guarantee success of this approach. There are a number of practical issues that require close attention, some forms of allelic architecture are not readily amenable to the association approach with even the most rigorous design, and doubtless new hurdles will emerge as the studies begin. Here we discuss the promise and current challenges of the whole genome approach, and raise some issues to consider in interpreting the results of the first whole genome studies. PMID:16096108

  8. Sweating the small stuff: pitfalls in the use of radiation detection instruments.

    PubMed

    Prekeges, Jennifer Lynne

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear medicine technologists use nonimaging radiation detection instruments on a daily basis and routinely assess their performance in several ways. These instruments are simple to operate compared with imaging instruments but are also susceptible to misuse. After reviewing the theoretic basis for common mistakes and the importance of routine quality control, this continuing education article discusses pitfalls in the operation of dose calibrators, survey meters, scintillation detectors, and semiconductors. The article also reviews quality control procedures and ways in which these can be performed incorrectly. The goal of the article is to help technologists to spot and correct problems before they lead to errant results. PMID:24627414

  9. [Evaluation of a 20 years' experience of colo-anal anastomoses. Indications, results and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Hautefeuille, P; Saab, M; Valleur, P

    1991-01-01

    Seventy nine anastomoses were performed over a 20 year period. Indications included 68 rectal adenocarcinomas and 11 benign lesions. There was no operative mortality. Anastomotic leak was the main cause of morbidity: 12 clinical (15%) and 4 radiological leaks. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival was 70%, 7 local recurrences (10%) were observed; 6 were Dukes C and 1 Dukes B. Functional results were assessed in 61 patients. They were considered to be excellent in 35 (57%), good in 24 (39%) and bad in 2 (4%). Six failures were noted: 3 technical, 1 oncologic and 2 functional. Pitfalls of coloanal anastomosis are discussed. PMID:2064292

  10. Rotational kinematics of a particle in rectilinear motion: Perceptions and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, Vijay A.

    2012-08-01

    Rectilinear motion of a particle with constant velocity is one of the simplest situations one can envisage in mechanics. We discuss the rotational kinematics associated with this motion and find that they are of pedagogical relevance. We have constructed a small inventory consisting of conceptual multiple-choice questions after consultation with content experts and feedback from students. This inventory was administered to a group of physics teachers and the responses reveal interesting misconceptions harbored even by teachers. A brief discussion of the pitfalls and instructional implications is carried out.

  11. Affinity proteomics to study endogenous protein complexes: Pointers, pitfalls, preferences and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Molloy, Kelly R.; Taylor, Martin S.; Domanski, Michal; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting and studying cellular systems requires the ability to specifically isolate distinct proteins along with the co-assembled constituents of their associated complexes. Affinity capture techniques leverage high affinity, high specificity reagents to target and capture proteins of interest along with specifically associated proteins from cell extracts. Affinity capture coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analyses has enabled the isolation and characterization of a wide range of endogenous protein complexes. Here, we outline effective procedures for the affinity capture of protein complexes, highlighting best practices and common pitfalls. PMID:25757543

  12. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Left Atrial Mechanics: Function, History, Novel Techniques, Advantages, and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Leischik, Roman; Littwitz, Henning; Dworrak, Birgit; Garg, Pankaj; Zhu, Meihua; Sahn, David J.; Horlitz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) functional analysis has an established role in assessing left ventricular diastolic function. The current standard echocardiographic parameters used to study left ventricular diastolic function include pulsed-wave Doppler mitral inflow analysis, tissue Doppler imaging measurements, and LA dimension estimation. However, the above-mentioned parameters do not directly quantify LA performance. Deformation studies using strain and strain-rate imaging to assess LA function were validated in previous research, but this technique is not currently used in routine clinical practice. This review discusses the history, importance, and pitfalls of strain technology for the analysis of LA mechanics. PMID:26236735

  13. MR spectroscopy in children: protocols and pitfalls in non-tumorous brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jacques F

    2016-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) delivers information about cell content and metabolism in a noninvasive manner. The diagnostic strength of MRS lies in its evaluation of pathologies in combination with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRS in children has been most widely used to evaluate brain conditions like tumors, infections, metabolic diseases or learning disabilities and especially in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. This article reviews some basic theoretical considerations, routine procedures, protocols and pitfalls and will illustrate the range of spectrum alterations occurring in some non-tumorous pediatric brain pathologies. PMID:27233789

  14. Can artificial parthenogenesis sidestep ethical pitfalls in human therapeutic cloning? An historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Fangerau, H

    2005-12-01

    The aim of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct tissue that has been lost or pathologically altered. Therapeutic cloning seems to offer a method of achieving this aim; however, the ethical debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning is highly controversial. Artificial parthenogenesis-obtaining embryos from unfertilised eggs-seems to offer a way to sidestep these ethical pitfalls. Jacques Loeb (1859-1924), the founding father of artificial parthenogenesis, faced negative public opinion when he published his research in 1899. His research, the public's response to his findings, and his ethical foundations serve as an historical argument both for the communication of science and compromise in biological research. PMID:16319240

  15. Can artificial parthenogenesis sidestep ethical pitfalls in human therapeutic cloning? An historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fangerau, H

    2005-01-01

    The aim of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct tissue that has been lost or pathologically altered. Therapeutic cloning seems to offer a method of achieving this aim; however, the ethical debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning is highly controversial. Artificial parthenogenesis—obtaining embryos from unfertilised eggs—seems to offer a way to sidestep these ethical pitfalls. Jacques Loeb (1859–1924), the founding father of artificial parthogenesis, faced negative public opinion when he published his research in 1899. His research, the public's response to his findings, and his ethical foundations serve as an historical argument both for the communication of science and compromise in biological research. PMID:16319240

  16. How is environmental conflict addressed by SIA?

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, C.J.

    2010-09-15

    The fields of Environmental Conflict Management (ECM), Environmental Conflict Resolution (ECR), and Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) have become well established; however, as yet there has not been much use of Social Impact Assessment (SIA) to manage environmental conflicts. ECM, ECR and PCIA are mainly undertaken when problems are advanced or, more likely, have run their course (post-conflict). This paper examines how conflict is addressed by SIA and whether there is potential to develop it for more proactive assessment of conflicts (pre-conflict or while things develop). SIA has the potential to identify and clarify the cause(s) of environmental and natural resources conflicts, and could possibly enable some avoidance or early mitigation. A promising approach may be for 'conflict-aware' SIA to watch for critical conflict stages or thresholds and to monitor stakeholders. Effective conflict-aware SIA might also significantly contribute to efforts to achieve sustainable development.

  17. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  18. Bedaquiline for the treatment of resistant tuberculosis: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Ashish Kumar; Dahiya, Neha

    2014-07-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is hindered by limited efficacy and significant toxicity of second-line drugs. The need for new therapeutic options is critical to combat the global MDR-TB epidemic. Bedaquiline is a novel oral diarylquinoline approved by Food and Drug administration (FDA) for the treatment of adults with pulmonary MDR-TB on the basis of Phase IIb trial data under the provisions of the accelerated approval regulations for serious or life-threatening conditions. The FDA advisory committee members voted unanimously on efficacy data based on surrogate measures, however they were split on the issues of safety of bedaquiline. Main safety concerns include QT interval prolongation, hepatic related adverse events, and excess mortality in bedaquiline treated patients. While bedaquiline approval is a story of many firsts and certainly a welcome addition to the existing arsenal of anti-TB agents, a cautiously optimistic approach is required to assess the risk benefit profile of the drug. Acceleration of further Phase III trials and clinical studies is imperative, as is timely analysis of emerging data on the real world use of the drug. This mini review outlines the clinical pharmacology of bedaquiline highlighting the potential promises and challenges that implicate the risk benefit profile of drug. PMID:24841672

  19. Irrigation scheduling: advantages and pitfalls of plant-based methods.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hamlyn G

    2004-11-01

    This paper reviews the various methods available for irrigation scheduling, contrasting traditional water-balance and soil moisture-based approaches with those based on sensing of the plant response to water deficits. The main plant-based methods for irrigation scheduling, including those based on direct or indirect measurement of plant water status and those based on plant physiological responses to drought, are outlined and evaluated. Specific plant-based methods include the use of dendrometry, fruit gauges, and other tissue water content sensors, while measurements of growth, sap flow, and stomatal conductance are also outlined. Recent advances, especially in the use of infrared thermometry and thermography for the study of stomatal conductance changes, are highlighted. The relative suitabilities of different approaches for specific crop and climatic situations are discussed, with the aim of indicating the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches, and highlighting their suitability over different spatial and temporal scales. The potential of soil- and plant-based systems for automated irrigation control using various scheduling techniques is also discussed. PMID:15286143

  20. Design of clinical trials in sepsis: problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Finch, R G

    1998-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis has been studied intensively in recent years and a variety of opportunities for therapeutic intervention have been identified. A number of biological products including endotoxin antibodies, cytokine inhibitors and receptor antagonists have been evaluated after the failure of pharmacological doses of steroids to influence survival in septic shock. Despite a number of large, international multi-centre studies, the therapeutic promise of these various interventions remains unfulfilled. These trials have largely been conducted in intensive care units in a heterogeneous population of patients with various entry criteria and end-points of response. While the clinical trial must remain the standard for assessing safety and efficacy of new interventions there are opportunities to improve on the design, execution and analysis of these studies. Factors such as the appropriateness of antibiotic therapy, the adequacy of medical and surgical management, and the issue of withdrawal or withholding of life support are discussed in relation to these studies. Furthermore the role of an independent scientific extramural review committee is stressed, particularly in relation to the impact of confounding events of an unforeseen nature. The potential for improving the quality of the analyses of clinical trials of sepsis is illustrated by a recently completed study of the efficacy of a murine monoclonal antibody to human tumour necrosis factor-alpha. PMID:9511091

  1. Characterizing the food environment: Pitfalls and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Vernez Moudon, Anne; Drewnowski, Adam; Duncan, Glen E; Hurvitz, Philip M; Saelens, Brian E; Scharnhorst, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess a county population’s exposure to different types of food sources reported to affect both diet quality and obesity rates. Design: Food permit records obtained from the local health department served to establish the full census of food stores and restaurants. Employing prior categorization schemes which classified the relative healthfulness of food sources based on establishment type (i.e. supermarkets versus convenience stores, or full-service versus fast food restaurants), food establishments were assigned to the healthy, unhealthy, or undetermined groups. Setting: King County, WA. Subjects: Full census of food sources. Results: According to all categorization schemes, most food establishments in King County fell into the unhealthy and undetermined groups. The use of the food permit data showed that large stores, which included supermarkets as healthy food establishments, contained a sizeable number of bakery/delis, fish/meat, ethnic and standard quick service restaurants, and coffee shops, all food sources that, when housed in a separate venue or owned by a different business establishment, were classified as either unhealthy or of undetermined value to health. Conclusions: To fully assess the potential health effects of exposure to the extant food environment, future research would need to establish the health value of foods in the many such common establishments as individually owned grocery stores and ethnic food stores and restaurants. Within- venue exposure to foods should also be investigated. PMID:23570695

  2. Studying protein-protein interactions: progress, pitfalls and solutions.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sheri; Malacrida, Beatrice; Kiely, Maeve; Kiely, Patrick A

    2016-08-15

    Signalling proteins are intrinsic to all biological processes and interact with each other in tightly regulated and orchestrated signalling complexes and pathways. Characterization of protein binding can help to elucidate protein function within signalling pathways. This information is vital for researchers to gain a more comprehensive knowledge of cellular networks which can then be used to develop new therapeutic strategies for disease. However, studying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) can be challenging as the interactions can be extremely transient downstream of specific environmental cues. There are many powerful techniques currently available to identify and confirm PPIs. Choosing the most appropriate range of techniques merits serious consideration. The aim of this review is to provide a starting point for researchers embarking on a PPI study. We provide an overview and point of reference for some of the many methods available to identify interactions from in silico analysis and large scale screening tools through to the methods used to validate potential PPIs. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and we also provide a workflow chart to highlight the main experimental questions to consider when planning cell lysis to maximize experimental success. PMID:27528744

  3. Increasing clinical presence of mobile communication technology: avoiding the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, Akila; Gibb, Alan P; Brady, Richard R W

    2011-10-01

    Mobile communication technologies are employed in many diverse areas of healthcare delivery to provide improved quality and efficiency of communication and facilitate increased rapidity of data or information transfer. Mobile phones enable healthcare professionals to possess a portable platform from which to provide many healthcare-related applications and are a popular means to directly communicate with colleagues and patients. As involvement of mobile communication technology in healthcare delivery continues to rapidly expand, there are also important considerations of relevance to patient safety and security as a result. Here, we review the previous evidence of reported clinical risks associated with mobile communication technology, such as electromagnetic interference, confidentiality and data security, distraction/noise, infection control, and cross contamination. In conclusion, although mobile phones provide much putative potential improvement to healthcare delivery, further evaluation and research are required to both inform and protect health professionals and users of such technology in the healthcare environment and provide the evidence base to support the provision of clear and comprehensive guidelines. PMID:21780941

  4. Proteomic analysis of Plasmodium in the mosquito: progress and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    WASS, M. N.; STANWAY, R.; BLAGBOROUGH, A. M.; LAL, K.; PRIETO, J. H.; RAINE, D.; STERNBERG, M. J. E.; TALMAN, A. M.; TOMLEY, F.; YATES, J.; SINDEN, R. E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we discuss proteomic analyses of whole cell preparations of the mosquito stages of malaria parasite development (i.e. gametocytes, microgamete, ookinete, oocyst and sporozoite) of Plasmodium berghei. We also include critiques of the proteomes of two cell fractions from the purified ookinete, namely the micronemes and cell surface. Whereas we summarise key biological interpretations of the data, we also try to identify key methodological constraints we have met, only some of which we were able to resolve. Recognising the need to translate the potential of current genome sequencing into functional understanding, we report our efforts to develop more powerful combinations of methods for the in silico prediction of protein function and location. We have applied this analysis to the proteome of the male gamete, a cell whose very simple structural organisation facilitated interpretation of data. Some of the in silico predictions made have now been supported by ongoing protein tagging and genetic knockout studies. We hope this discussion may assist future studies. PMID:22336136

  5. Addressing Risks to Advance Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Iltis, Ana S.; Misra, Sahana; Dunn, Laura B.; Brown, Gregory K.; Campbell, Amy; Earll, Sarah A.; Glowinski, Anne; Hadley, Whitney B.; Pies, Ronald; DuBois, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Risk communication and management are essential to the ethical conduct of research, yet addressing risks may be time consuming for investigators and institutional review boards (IRBs) may reject study designs that appear too risky. This can discourage needed research, particularly in higher risk protocols or those enrolling potentially vulnerable individuals, such as those with some level of suicidality. Improved mechanisms for addressing research risks may facilitate much needed psychiatric research. This article provides mental health researchers with practical approaches to: 1) identify and define various intrinsic research risks; 2) communicate these risks to others (e.g., potential participants, regulatory bodies, society); 3) manage these risks during the course of a study; and 4) justify the risks. Methods As part of a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded scientific meeting series, a public conference and a closed-session expert panel meeting were held on managing and disclosing risks in mental health clinical trials. The expert panel reviewed the literature with a focus on empirical studies and developed recommendations for best practices and further research on managing and disclosing risks in mental health clinical trials. IRB review was not required because there were no human subjects. The NIMH played no role in developing or reviewing the manuscript. Results Challenges, current data, practical strategies, and topics for future research are addressed for each of four key areas pertaining to management and disclosure of risks in clinical trials: identifying and defining risks, communicating risks, managing risks during studies, and justifying research risks. Conclusions Empirical data on risk communication, managing risks, and the benefits of research can support the ethical conduct of mental health research and may help investigators better conceptualize and confront risks and to gain IRB approval. PMID:24173618

  6. Pitfalls in brain death diagnosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ruess, Daniel; Rieger, Bernhard; Goldbrunner, Roland; Schlacke, Hans-Peter

    2013-05-01

    Although there are distinct guidelines in nearly all countries, a reliable secure assessment of brain death in cases with open head injury can be challenging. We present a case of a 32-year-old man with severe head injury after intracranial penetration of a grindstone fragment. As the injury led to destruction of nearly the whole greater wing of the right sphenoid bone and parts of the right orbit, the examination of brainstem reflexes and the confirmation of brain death was unfeasible. On day 2, all clinical criteria of brain death (coma, absence of brainstem reflexes, apnea) were fulfilled. In addition, there was an extinction of brainstem auditory (BAEP) and cerebral (N20) components of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials, while electroencephalogram (EEG) activity was still present. In the following days, a persisting EEG activity was obtained. Thus, an irreversible loss of whole brain functions could not be proved. As the patient had agreed to organ donation in case of brain death several years ago, ancillary methods to test the cessation of cerebral blood flow were mandatory. However, in this patient these methods turned out either to be doubtful or unavailable. For example, values of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography are not reliable in cases with open head injury. Due to a progressive septic state, time was running out to get the radiopharmaceutical agent for a cerebral scintigraphy (delivery time about 7 days, as the radiopharmaceutical agent was not in stock). Referring to the actual German guidelines, we had no legitimating indication for a cerebral angiography. Finally, the patient died of sepsis. We discuss the widening of the German guidelines in assessing brain death with the fast and low-risk method of cerebral computed tomography-angiography (CTA) to confirm diagnosis of brain death. PMID:22899230

  7. 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome: diagnostic challenges and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Antic, Darko A; Vukovic, Vojin M; Milosevic Feenstra, Jelena D; Kralovics, Robert; Bogdanovic, Andrija D; Dencic Fekete, Marija S; Mihaljevic, Biljana S

    2016-01-01

    8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome (EMS) is a very rare clinicopathological entity which is characterized by the appearance of a myeloproliferative neoplasm in the bone marrow, peripheral lymphadenopathy, usually caused by T or B lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and a reciprocal translocation involving chromosome 8p11. Herein we describe a 22-year-old male patient with unusual clinical presentation of EMS. Namely, he initially presented with prolonged epistaxis. Complete blood count showed elevated hemoglobin (17.7g/dl), thrombocytopenia (98x109/l) and leukocytosis (57x109/l). Bone marrow aspirate and biopsy findings corresponded with the presence of a myeloproliferative neoplasm while cytogenetic analysis revealed t(8;13)(p11q12). After that ZMYM2-FGFR1 in-frame fusion was confirmed at the molecular level. Immediately after establishing the diagnosis of a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) generalized lymphadenopathy was developed. Histopathologic examination of lymph node sample confirmed the diagnosis of a T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma without bone marrow involvement. Four cycles of Hyper CVAD chemotherapy were administered with complete morphological and cytogenetic remission. Four weeks after evaluation, patient developed peripheral blood monocytosis and eosinophilia without bone marrow criteria for acute leukemia. Cytogenetic analysis showed t(8;13) accompanied by complex numerical and structural aberrations. The patient underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) from HLA matched sister and he subsequently achieved complete remission. In conclusion, patients with MPN and translocations involving chromosome 8 need to be carefully evaluated for EMS. However, having in mind the very aggressive clinical course of EMS allo-SCT is the only potential curative option. PMID:27569099

  8. Development of the National Health Information Systems in Botswana: Pitfalls, prospects and lessons

    PubMed Central

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin D. C.; Hill, Philip C.; Barnett, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies evaluating development of health information systems in developing countries are limited. Most of the available studies are based on pilot projects or cross-sectional studies. We took a longitudinal approach to analysing the development of Botswana’s health information systems. Objectives: We aimed to: (i) trace the development of the national health information systems in Botswana (ii) identify pitfalls during development and prospects that could be maximized to strengthen the system; and (iii) draw lessons for Botswana and other countries working on establishing or improving their health information systems. Methods: This article is based on data collected through document analysis and key informant interviews with policy makers, senior managers and staff of the Ministry of Health and senior officers from various stakeholder organizations. Results: Lack of central coordination, weak leadership, weak policy and regulatory frameworks, and inadequate resources limited development of the national health information systems in Botswana. Lack of attention to issues of organizational structure is one of the major pitfalls. Conclusion: The ongoing reorganization of the Ministry of Health provides opportunity to reposition the health information system function. The current efforts including development of the health information management policy and plan could enhance the health information management system. PMID:26392841

  9. Pitfalls in [18F]FDG PET imaging in gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hernandez Pampaloni, Miguel; Facchetti, Luca; Nardo, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the leading causes of cancer in women and they represent about 10 to 20% of all solid tumors. During the past few decades, technological advancements in the detection and staging have gained a pivotal role in all oncological processes, including the gynecological ones. Beyond ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that are conventionally used for anatomical imaging, [18F]FDG imaging and its hybrid further development as PET/CT has become a crucial tool due of its ability to combine functional metabolic and anatomic information, and the ability to image the entire whole body in a single examination. Since the introduction of integrated hybrid PET/CT systems into clinical practice the accurate analysis of the images has detected a number of limitations and pitfalls. The purpose of this review was to describe in detail the different pitfalls related to the use of [18F]FDG PET/CT in the gynecological malignancies, providing imaging examples and discussing possible ways to avoid misinterpretations. PMID:26937887

  10. Addressing the water budget with SMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Y. H.; AlBitar, A.; Tomer, S. K.; Merlin, O.; Pellarin, T.

    2012-12-01

    SMOS, a L Band radiometer using aperture synthesis to achieve a good spatial resolution, was successfully launched on November 2, 2009. It was developed and made under the leadership of the European Space Agency (ESA) as an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission. It is a joint program with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France and the Centro para el Desarrollo Teccnologico Industrial (CDTI) in Spain. SMOS carries a single payload, an L band 2D interferometric,radiometer in the 1400-1427 MHz h protected band. This wavelength penetrates well through the vegetation and the atmosphere is almost transparent enabling to infer both soil moisture and vegetation water content. SMOS achieves an unprecedented spatial resolution of 50 km at L-band maximum (43 km on average) with multi angular-dual polarized (or fully polarized) brightness temperatures over the globe and with a revisit time smaller than 3 days. SMOS as been now acquiring data for almost 2 years. The data quality exceeds what was expected, showing very good sensitivity and stability. The data is however very much impaired by man made emission in the protected band, leading to degraded measurements in several areas including parts of Europe and of China. However, many different international teams are now addressing cal val activities in various parts of the world, with notably large field campaigns either on the long time scale or over specific targets to address the specific issues. In parallel different teams are now starting addressing data use in various fields including hydrology. It requires coupling with other models and or disaggregation to address soil moisture distribution over watersheds. Significant new results were obtained for floods and drought events, together with new potential applications in terms of precipitation monitoring This paper thus gives an overview of the science goals of the SMOS mission, a description of its main elements, and a taste of the first results including

  11. Pearls and pitfalls in interpretation of abdominal and pelvic PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Blake, Michael A; Singh, Ajay; Setty, Bindu N; Slattery, James; Kalra, Mannudeep; Maher, Michael M; Sahani, Dushyant V; Fischman, Alan J; Mueller, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    The interpretation of images obtained in the abdomen and pelvis can be challenging, and the coregistration of positron emission tomographic (PET) and computed tomographic (CT) scans may be especially valuable in the evaluation of these anatomic areas. PET-CT represents a major technologic advance, consisting of generally complementary modalities whose combined strength tends to overcome their respective weaknesses. However, this combined functional-structural imaging approach raises a number of controversial questions and presents some unique interpretative challenges. Accurate PET-CT scan interpretation requires awareness of the various pitfalls associated with the imaging components, both individually and in combination. The results of recent PET-CT studies have been very encouraging, but larger prospective studies will be needed to establish optimal hybrid scanning protocols. Applying sound imaging principles, paying attention to detail, and staying abreast of advances in this exciting new modality are necessary for harnessing the full diagnostic power of abdominopelvic PET-CT. PMID:16973768

  12. The Copenhagen Neuroaesthetics Conference: prospects and pitfalls for an emerging field.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Marcos; Pearce, Marcus T

    2011-06-01

    Neuroaesthetics is a young field of research concerned primarily with the neural basis of cognitive and affective processes engaged when an individual takes an aesthetic or artistic approach towards a work of art, a non-artistic object or a natural phenomenon. In September 2009, the Copenhagen Neuroaesthetics Conference brought together leading researchers in the field to present and discuss current advances. We summarize some of the principal themes of the conference, placing neuroaesthetics in a historical context and discussing its scope and relation to other disciplines. We also identify what we believe to be the key outstanding questions, the main pitfalls and challenges faced by the field, and some promising avenues for future research. PMID:21334125

  13. Common Pitfalls in Nanotechnology: Lessons Learned from NCI’s Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Crist, Rachael M.; Grossman, Jennifer Hall; Patri, Anil K.; Stern, Stephan T.; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A.; Adiseshaiah, Pavan P.; Clogston, Jeffrey D.; McNeil, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory’s (NCL) unique set-up has allowed our lab to handle and test a variety of nanoparticle platforms intended for the delivery of cancer therapeutics and/or imaging contrast agents. Over the last six years, the NCL has characterized more than 250 different nanomaterials from more than 75 different investigators. These submitted nanomaterials stem from a range of backgrounds and experiences, including government, academia and industry. This has given the NCL a unique and valuable opportunity to observe trends in nanoparticle safety and biocompatibility, as well as note some of the common mistakes and oversights of nanoformulation. While not exhaustive, this article aims to share some of the most common pitfalls observed by the NCL as they relate to nanoparticle synthesis, purification, characterization and analysis. PMID:22772974

  14. On the Molecular Modeling of Dilute Ternary Systems in Compressible Media. Formal Results and thermodynamic Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Chialvo, Sebastian; Simonson, J Michael {Mike}

    2009-01-01

    Truncated series expansions for the species partial molar fugacity coefficients in ternary dilute systems are derived for the systematic study of mixed solutes in highly compressible media. Then, explicit molecularbased expressions for the expansion coefficients are drawn in terms of direct and total correlation function integrals associated with the actual microstructure of the reference infinite dilute system. Finally, these selfconsistent formal expressions are used (a) to derive the corresponding expressions for special systems, (b) to highlight, and discuss with examples from the literature, some frequent pitfalls in the molecular modeling of these mixtures leading to serious thermodynamic inconsistencies, and (c) to illustrate how the proposed expressions reduce exactly, in the zero-density limit, to those for the partial molar properties of mixtures obeying the 1st-order truncated virial equation of state.

  15. The Challenge of Reproducibility and Accuracy in Nutrition Research: Resources and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Barbara C; Kuszak, Adam J; Williamson, John S; Hopp, D Craig; Betz, Joseph M

    2016-03-01

    Inconsistent and contradictory results from nutrition studies conducted by different investigators continue to emerge, in part because of the inherent variability of natural products, as well as the unknown and therefore uncontrolled variables in study populations and experimental designs. Given these challenges inherent in nutrition research, it is critical for the progress of the field that researchers strive to minimize variability within studies and enhance comparability between studies by optimizing the characterization, control, and reporting of products, reagents, and model systems used, as well as the rigor and reporting of experimental designs, protocols, and data analysis. Here we describe some recent developments relevant to research on plant-derived products used in nutrition research, highlight some resources for optimizing the characterization and reporting of research using these products, and describe some of the pitfalls that may be avoided by adherence to these recommendations. PMID:26980822

  16. Performing renography in children with antenatally detected pelvi-ureteric junction stenosis: errors, pitfalls, controversies.

    PubMed

    Piepsz, A; Sixt, R; Gordon, I

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work is to present to the reader the practical experience of three clinicians having actively participated to the publication of the guidelines on renography in children. The present publication should be considered as a practical guide. We have underlined good practice, obvious errors to avoid, common pitfalls which might be overlooked, some items for which more than one reasonable solution exists and finally a few controversial points, for which there is still no agreement and no solid evidence to resolve these issues. This paper is only focused on the aspects of acquisition and processing and will not cover the clinical aspects, namely the interpretation of the renogram in terms of renal obstruction or, more precisely, in terms of risk of renal deterioration. PMID:20823803

  17. Conducting interdisciplinary research to promote healthy and safe employment in health care: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Slatin, Craig; Galizzi, Monica; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Mawn, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Due to the complexity of human health, emphasis is increasingly being placed on the need for and conduct of multidisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary health research. Yet many academic and research organizations--and the discipline-specific associations and journals--may not yet be prepared to adopt changes necessary to optimally support interdisciplinary work. This article presents an ongoing interdisciplinary research project's efforts to investigate mechanisms and pathways that lead to occupational health disparities among healthcare workers. It describes the promises and pitfalls encountered during the research,and outlines effective strategies that emerged as a result. Lessons learned include: conflict resolution regarding theoretical and methodological differences; establishing a sense of intellectual ownership of the research, as well as guidelines for multiple authorship; and development and utilization of protocols, communication systems, and tools. This experience suggests a need for the establishment of supportive structures and processes to promote successful interdisciplinary research. PMID:15147650

  18. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in an 11-year-old girl: diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kano, Gen; Nakamura, Keiko; Sakamoto, Izumi

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare chronic lung disease that is difficult to diagnose due to non-specific clinical findings. Little is known about the pathogenesis of PVOD. Reported herein is the case of an 11-year-old girl who initially presented with 'bat-wing' shadows on chest radiography. This finding, coupled with prominent hemosiderosis in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, initially led to a misdiagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis. Oral prednisolone dramatically improved signs and symptoms initially, but her condition then gradually deteriorated during maintenance therapy with corticosteroids and other immunosuppressants. PVOD was suspected but not confirmed owing to a lack of hallmark radiographic findings and contraindications for lung biopsy. Three years later, while arranging for lung transplantation, the patient experienced sudden onset of fatal massive pulmonary edema. PVOD was confirmed at autopsy. This case provides insights regarding an unfamiliar presentation of PVOD and may help physicians to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:24548200

  19. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural submarine geohazards (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, volcanic island flank collapses) are geological phenomena originating at or below the seafloor leading to a situation of risk for off-shore and on-shore structures and the coastal population. Addressing submarine geohazards means understanding their spatial and temporal variability, the pre-conditioning factors, their triggers, and the physical processes that control their evolution. Such scientific endeavour is nowadays considered by a large sector of the international scientific community as an obligation in order to contribute to the mitigation of the potentially destructive societal effects of submarine geohazards. The study of submarine geohazards requires a multi-disciplinary scientific approach: geohazards must be studied through their geological record; active processes must be monitored; geohazard evolution must be modelled. Ultimately, the information must be used for the assessment of vulnerability, risk analysis, and development of mitigation strategies. In contrast with the terrestrial environment, the oceanic environment is rather hostile to widespread and fast application of high-resolution remote sensing techniques, accessibility for visual inspection, sampling and installation of monitoring stations. Scientific Drilling through the IODP (including the related pre site-survey investigations, sampling, logging and in situ measurements capability, and as a platform for deployment of long term observatories at the surface and down-hole) can be viewed as the centre of gravity of an international, coordinated, multi-disciplinary scientific approach to address submarine geohazards. The IODP Initial Science Plan expiring in 2013 does not address openly geohazards among the program scientific objectives. Hazards are referred to mainly in relation to earthquakes and initiatives towards the understanding of seismogenesis. Notably, the only drilling initiative presently under way is the

  20. Addressing HIV stigma in protected medical settings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Lin, Chunqing; Wu, Zunyou

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the implementation of universal precaution (UP) plays a role in reducing HIV stigma. In this study we investigate the efficacy of a stigma reduction intervention on UP compliance and explore whether UP compliance could potentially influence HIV stigma reduction in medical settings. A randomized controlled intervention trial was conducted in two provinces of China with 1760 healthcare service providers recruited from 40 county-level hospitals. Longitudinal analyses included data collection at baseline, 6-, and 12-month follow-up assessments. Using a hierarchical modeling approach, we estimated the intervention effect for each provider’s UP compliance and its potential mediating role on HIV stigma with the bootstrapping method. A significant intervention effect on UP compliance was observed at both the 6- and 12-month follow-up assessments. The intervention effect on provider avoidance intent was partially mediated by the provider’s own UP compliance at the two follow-up points. This study provides evidence that UP compliance should be part of HIV stigma reduction programs, especially in resource-restrained countries. Findings suggest that a protected work environment may be necessary but not sufficient to address HIV stigma in medical settings. PMID:26608559

  1. Addressing HIV stigma in protected medical settings.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Lin, Chunqing; Wu, Zunyou

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the implementation of universal precaution (UP) plays a role in reducing HIV stigma. In this study we investigate the efficacy of a stigma reduction intervention on UP compliance and explore whether UP compliance could potentially influence HIV stigma reduction in medical settings. A randomized controlled intervention trial was conducted in two provinces of China with 1760 healthcare service providers recruited from 40 county-level hospitals. Longitudinal analyses included data collection at baseline, 6-, and 12-month follow-up assessments. Using a hierarchical modeling approach, we estimated the intervention effect for each provider's UP compliance and its potential mediating role on HIV stigma with the bootstrapping method. A significant intervention effect on UP compliance was observed at both the 6- and 12-month follow-up assessments. The intervention effect on provider avoidance intent was partially mediated by the provider's own UP compliance at the two follow-up points. This study provides evidence that UP compliance should be part of HIV stigma reduction programs, especially in resource-restrained countries. Findings suggest that a protected work environment may be necessary but not sufficient to address HIV stigma in medical settings. PMID:26608559

  2. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural submarine geohazards (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, volcanic island flank collapses) are geological phenomena originating at or below the seafloor leading to a situation of risk for off-shore and on-shore structures and the coastal population. Addressing submarine geohazards means understanding their spatial and temporal variability, the pre-conditioning factors, their triggers, and the physical processes that control their evolution. Such scientific endeavour is nowadays considered by a large sector of the international scientific community as an obligation in order to contribute to the mitigation of the potentially destructive societal effects of submarine geohazards. The study of submarine geohazards requires a multi-disciplinary scientific approach: geohazards must be studied through their geological record; active processes must be monitored; geohazard evolution must be modelled. Ultimately, the information must be used for the assessment of vulnerability, risk analysis, and development of mitigation strategies. In contrast with the terrestrial environment, the oceanic environment is rather hostile to widespread and fast application of high-resolution remote sensing techniques, accessibility for visual inspection, sampling and installation of monitoring stations. Scientific Drilling through the IODP (including the related pre site-survey investigations, sampling, logging and in situ measurements capability, and as a platform for deployment of long term observatories at the surface and down-hole) can be viewed as the centre of gravity of an international, coordinated, multi-disciplinary scientific approach to address submarine geohazards. The IODP Initial Science Plan expiring in 2013 does not address openly geohazards among the program scientific objectives. Hazards are referred to mainly in relation to earthquakes and initiatives towards the understanding of seismogenesis. Notably, the only drilling initiative presently under way is the

  3. 32 CFR 516.7 - Mailing addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Mailing addresses. 516.7 Section 516.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION General § 516.7 Mailing addresses. Mailing addresses for organizations referenced...

  4. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  5. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  6. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  7. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  8. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  9. 47 CFR 13.10 - Licensee address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensee address. 13.10 Section 13.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS General § 13.10 Licensee address. In accordance with § 1.923 of this chapter all applications must specify an address where...

  10. CCCC Chair's Address: Representing Ourselves, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the text of the author's address at the fifty-ninth annual convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) in March 2008. In her address, the author picks up strands of previous Chairs' addresses and weaves them through the fabric of her remarks. What she hopes will give sheen to the fabric is her…

  11. 75 FR 49813 - Change of Address

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... COMMISSION 11 CFR Parts 9405, 9407, 9409, 9410, 9420, and 9428 Change of Address AGENCY: United States... Assistance Commission (EAC) is amending its regulations to reflect a change of address for its headquarters. This technical amendment is a nomenclature change that updates and corrects the address for...

  12. 32 CFR 516.7 - Mailing addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mailing addresses. 516.7 Section 516.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION General § 516.7 Mailing addresses. Mailing addresses for organizations referenced...

  13. OPENING ADDRESS: Heterostructures in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmeiss, Hermann G.

    1996-01-01

    value in putting together the program and suggesting speakers and potential participants. Moreover, I should like to thank Mrs. Medborg, Dr. Olajos, Dr. Mats Kleverman and in particular Dr. Ask who took care of all time-consuming negotiations and details. Without their help, the Symposium would not be what it is. The Nobel Foundation, the Nobel Committee for Physics, the Nobel Institute of Physics and the local organisers hope that you will enjoy the Symposium and I promise you, we will all do our best to make your stay as pleasant as possible and this Symposium a success. Once again welcome to Arild and the Symposium!

  14. QIN. Promise and pitfalls of quantitative imaging in oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Brenda F.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Mountz, James M.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Ryan, Christopher W.; Graham, Michael M.; Buatti, John M.; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Eikman, Edward A.; Kumar, Virendra; Forster, Kenneth M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Lieberman, Frank S.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative imaging using CT, MRI, and PET modalities will play an increasingly important role in the design of oncology trials addressing molecularly targeted, personalized therapies. The advent of molecularly targeted therapies, exemplified by antiangiogenic drugs, creates new complexities in the assessment of response. The Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) addresses the need for imaging modalities which can accurately and reproducibly measure not just change in tumor size, but changes in relevant metabolic parameters, modulation of relevant signaling pathways, drug delivery to tumor, and differentiation of apoptotic cell death from other changes in tumor volume. This article provides an overview of the applications of quantitative imaging to phase 0 through phase 3 oncology trials. We describe the use of a range of quantitative imaging modalities in specific tumor types including malignant gliomas, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, lymphoma, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and sarcoma. In the concluding section, we discuss potential constraints on clinical trials using quantitative imaging, including complexity of trial conduct, impact on subject recruitment, incremental costs, and institutional barriers. Strategies for overcoming these constraints are presented. PMID:22898682

  15. Pesticides and reduced-risk insecticides, native bees and pantropical stingless bees: pitfalls and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Wagner F; Smagghe, Guy; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2015-08-01

    Although invertebrates generally have a low public profile, the honey bee, Apis mellifera L., is a flagship species whose popularity likely derives from the products it provides and its perceived ecological services. Therefore, the raging debate regarding honey bee decline has surpassed the realm of beekeepers, academia, industry and regulatory agencies and now also encompasses non-governmental agencies, media, fiction writers and the general public. The early interest and concern about honey bee colony collapse disorder (CCD) soon shifted to the bigger issue of pollinator decline, with a focus on the potential involvement of pesticides in such a phenomenon. Pesticides were previously recognised as the potential culprits of the reported declines, particularly the neonicotinoid insecticides owing to their widespread and peculiar use in agriculture. However, the evidence for the potential pivotal role of these neonicotinoids in honey bee decline remains a matter of debate, with an increased recognition of the multifactorial nature of the problem and the lack of a direct association between the noted decline and neonicotinoid use. The focus on the decline of honey bee populations subsequently spread to other species, and bumblebees became another matter of concern, particularly in Europe and the United States. Other bee species, ones that are particularly important in other regions of the world, remain the object of little concern (unjustifiably so). Furthermore, the continuous focus on neonicotinoids is also in need of revision, as the current evidence suggests that a broad spectrum of compounds deserve attention. Here we address both shortcomings. PMID:25892651

  16. Addressing social resistance in emerging security technologies.

    PubMed

    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In their efforts to enhance the safety and security of citizens, governments and law enforcement agencies look to scientists and engineers to produce modern methods for preventing, detecting, and prosecuting criminal activities. Whole body scanners, lie detection technologies, biometrics, etc., are all being developed for incorporation into the criminal justice apparatus. Yet despite their purported security benefits these technologies often evoke social resistance. Concerns over privacy, ethics, and function-creep appear repeatedly in analyses of these technologies. It is argued here that scientists and engineers continue to pay insufficient attention to this resistance; acknowledging the presence of these social concerns yet failing to meaningfully address them. In so doing they place at risk the very technologies and techniques they are seeking to develop, for socially controversial security technologies face restrictions and in some cases outright banning. By identifying sources of potential social resistance early in the research and design process, scientists can both engage with the public in meaningful debate and modify their security technologies before deployment so as to minimize social resistance and enhance uptake. PMID:23970863

  17. Addressing social resistance in emerging security technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In their efforts to enhance the safety and security of citizens, governments and law enforcement agencies look to scientists and engineers to produce modern methods for preventing, detecting, and prosecuting criminal activities. Whole body scanners, lie detection technologies, biometrics, etc., are all being developed for incorporation into the criminal justice apparatus.1 Yet despite their purported security benefits these technologies often evoke social resistance. Concerns over privacy, ethics, and function-creep appear repeatedly in analyses of these technologies. It is argued here that scientists and engineers continue to pay insufficient attention to this resistance; acknowledging the presence of these social concerns yet failing to meaningfully address them. In so doing they place at risk the very technologies and techniques they are seeking to develop, for socially controversial security technologies face restrictions and in some cases outright banning. By identifying sources of potential social resistance early in the research and design process, scientists can both engage with the public in meaningful debate and modify their security technologies before deployment so as to minimize social resistance and enhance uptake. PMID:23970863

  18. Highlights and pitfalls of 20 years of application of computerised glow curve analysis to thermoluminescence research and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y S; Moscovitch, M

    2013-01-01

    The technical and dosimetric aspects of computerised glow curve analysis are described in detail including a review of the current 'state-of-the-achieved' in applications to environmental and personal dosimetry, clinical dosimetry, quality control, characterisation of new materials, continuing characterisation of 'old' materials, heavy charged particle dosimetry, mixed field n-gamma dosimetry, X-ray dosimetry and other aspects of thermoluminescence dosimetry. Fearless emphasis is placed on 'pitfalls' as well as successes. PMID:22987121

  19. Some Uses of Computers in Rhetoric and Public Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clevenger, Theodore, Jr.

    1969-01-01

    The author discusses the impact of the "computer revolution" on the field of rhetoric and public address in terms of the potential applications of computer methods to rhetorical problems. He first discusses the computer as a very fast calculator, giving the example of a study that probably would not have been undertaken if the calculations had had…

  20. SEER 2008 Keynote Address: The Importance of Evaluation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinch, Katherine J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the keynote address given by Katherine J. Pinch at the 2008 Annual Symposium on Experiential Education Research (SEER). Pinch discusses the importance of evaluation research and argues that the realm of evaluation is where the margins of research and practice have the potential to intersect with the greatest ease. She…

  1. A Breath of Fresh Air: Addressing Indoor Air Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution refers to "chemical, biological, and physical contamination of indoor air," which may result in adverse health effects (OECD 2003). The causes, sources, and types of indoor air pollutants will be addressed in this article, as well as health effects and how to reduce exposure. Learning more about potential pollutants in home…

  2. Effects of Bait Presence and Type of Preservative Fluid on Ground and Carrion Beetle Samples Collected by Pitfall Trapping.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michal; Baranovská, Eliška; Jakubec, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    Pitfall trapping is a sampling technique frequently used by entomologists around the world. However, there exist sampling biases linked to particular trapping designs, which require investigation. In this study, we compared the effects of the type of preservative fluid (propylene glycol or formaldehyde) and the presence of fish bait in pitfall traps on the number of specimens (individuals) collected, the species richness, and the species composition of carabid (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and silphid (Coleoptera: Silphidae) beetle assemblages. Traps containing propylene glycol collected a substantially higher number of individuals of both taxa and a higher number of silphid species compared with traps containing formaldehyde. The use of fish bait in the traps increased the number of individuals collected and the number of species collected for silphid beetles but had no effect on the collection parameters for carabids. The species composition of the carabid assemblages was minimally affected by the presence of fish bait or the type of preservative fluid, whereas the fish bait had a substantial effect on the species composition of silphids. The silphid species that feed directly on vertebrate carcasses were almost completely absent in the nonbaited traps. The results suggest that pitfall traps baited with fish and containing propylene glycol as a preservative fluid are optimal for the simultaneous sampling of carabid and silphid beetles, which both provide important ecosystem services (e.g., predation of pests and decomposition of vertebrate carcasses) and are therefore interesting for ecological research. PMID:27260789

  3. Novel Duplicate Address Detection with Hash Function.

    PubMed

    Song, GuangJia; Ji, ZhenZhou

    2016-01-01

    Duplicate address detection (DAD) is an important component of the address resolution protocol (ARP) and the neighbor discovery protocol (NDP). DAD determines whether an IP address is in conflict with other nodes. In traditional DAD, the target address to be detected is broadcast through the network, which provides convenience for malicious nodes to attack. A malicious node can send a spoofing reply to prevent the address configuration of a normal node, and thus, a denial-of-service attack is launched. This study proposes a hash method to hide the target address in DAD, which prevents an attack node from launching destination attacks. If the address of a normal node is identical to the detection address, then its hash value should be the same as the "Hash_64" field in the neighboring solicitation message. Consequently, DAD can be successfully completed. This process is called DAD-h. Simulation results indicate that address configuration using DAD-h has a considerably higher success rate when under attack compared with traditional DAD. Comparative analysis shows that DAD-h does not require third-party devices and considerable computing resources; it also provides a lightweight security resolution. PMID:26991901

  4. Novel Duplicate Address Detection with Hash Function

    PubMed Central

    Song, GuangJia; Ji, ZhenZhou

    2016-01-01

    Duplicate address detection (DAD) is an important component of the address resolution protocol (ARP) and the neighbor discovery protocol (NDP). DAD determines whether an IP address is in conflict with other nodes. In traditional DAD, the target address to be detected is broadcast through the network, which provides convenience for malicious nodes to attack. A malicious node can send a spoofing reply to prevent the address configuration of a normal node, and thus, a denial-of-service attack is launched. This study proposes a hash method to hide the target address in DAD, which prevents an attack node from launching destination attacks. If the address of a normal node is identical to the detection address, then its hash value should be the same as the “Hash_64” field in the neighboring solicitation message. Consequently, DAD can be successfully completed. This process is called DAD-h. Simulation results indicate that address configuration using DAD-h has a considerably higher success rate when under attack compared with traditional DAD. Comparative analysis shows that DAD-h does not require third-party devices and considerable computing resources; it also provides a lightweight security resolution. PMID:26991901

  5. Addressing the Skills Gap in Saudi Arabia: Does Vocational Education Address the Needs of Private Sector Employers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baqadir, Abdullah; Patrick, Fiona; Burns, George

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the findings of data drawn from doctoral research on the extent to which recent changes in vocational training have addressed a perceived skills gap between the needs of private sector employers and potential workers in Saudi Arabia. While the Saudi government has made efforts to enhance the quality of vocational education,…

  6. 16 CFR 0.2 - Official address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official address. 0.2 Section 0.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.2 Official address. The principal office of the Commission is at Washington, DC. All communications to...

  7. 40 CFR 374.6 - Addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Addresses. 374.6 Section 374.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS PRIOR NOTICE OF CITIZEN SUITS § 374.6 Addresses. Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200...

  8. 16 CFR 0.2 - Official address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official address. 0.2 Section 0.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.2... 20580, unless otherwise specifically directed. The Commission's Web site address is www.ftc.gov....

  9. 16 CFR 0.2 - Official address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official address. 0.2 Section 0.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.2... 20580, unless otherwise specifically directed. The Commission's Web site address is www.ftc.gov....

  10. 10 CFR 218.34 - Addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Addresses. 218.34 Section 218.34 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Procedures § 218.34 Addresses. All..., Economic Regulatory Administration, Department of Energy, 2000 M Street, NW., Washington, DC 20461, and...

  11. History Forum Addresses Creation/Evolution Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweinsberg, John

    1997-01-01

    A series of programs entitled Creationism and Evolution: The History of a Controversy was presented at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The controversy was addressed from an historical and sociological, rather than a scientific perspective. Speakers addressed the evolution of scientific creationism, ancient texts versus sedimentary rocks…

  12. Public Address Systems. Specifications - Installation - Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Fred M.

    Provisions for public address in new construction of campus buildings (specifications, installations, and operation of public address systems), are discussed in non-technical terms. Consideration is given to microphones, amplifiers, loudspeakers and the placement and operation of various different combinations. (FS)

  13. 40 CFR 80.174 - Addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Addresses. 80.174 Section 80.174... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.174 Addresses. (a) The detergent additive sample required under § 80.161(b)(2) shall be sent to: Manager, Fuels and Technical Analysis Group,...

  14. 7 CFR 1730.3 - RUS addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false RUS addresses. 1730.3 Section 1730.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC SYSTEM OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE General § 1730.3 RUS addresses. (a) Persons wishing to obtain forms referred to in this part...

  15. Forms of Address in Chilean Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kelley; Michnowicz, Jim

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation examines possible social and linguistic factors that influence forms of address used in Chilean Spanish with various interlocutors. A characteristic of the Spanish of Chile is the use of a variety of forms of address for the second person singular, "tu", "vos", and "usted", with corresponding verb conjugations (Lipski…

  16. 40 CFR 374.6 - Addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Addresses. 374.6 Section 374.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS PRIOR NOTICE OF CITIZEN SUITS § 374.6 Addresses. Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200...

  17. 34 CFR 674.44 - Address searches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Address searches. 674.44 Section 674.44 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Due Diligence § 674.44 Address searches. (a) If...

  18. 34 CFR 674.44 - Address searches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Address searches. 674.44 Section 674.44 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Due Diligence § 674.44 Address searches. (a) If...

  19. 34 CFR 674.44 - Address searches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Address searches. 674.44 Section 674.44 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Due Diligence § 674.44 Address searches. (a) If...

  20. 34 CFR 674.44 - Address searches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Address searches. 674.44 Section 674.44 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Due Diligence § 674.44 Address searches. (a) If...

  1. 34 CFR 674.44 - Address searches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Address searches. 674.44 Section 674.44 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Due Diligence § 674.44 Address searches. (a) If...

  2. Image compression using address-vector quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, Nasser M.; Feng, Yushu

    1990-12-01

    A novel vector quantization scheme, the address-vector quantizer (A-VQ), is proposed which exploits the interblock correlation by encoding a group of blocks together using an address-codebook (AC). The AC is a set of address-codevectors (ACVs), each representing a combination of addresses or indices. Each element of the ACV is an address of an entry in the LBG-codebook, representing a vector-quantized block. The AC consists of an active (addressable) region and an inactive (nonaddressable) region. During encoding the ACVs in the AC are reordered adaptively to bring the most probable ACVs into the active region. When encoding an ACV, the active region is checked, and if such an address combination exists, its index is transmitted to the receiver. Otherwise, the address of each block is transmitted individually. The SNR of the images encoded by the A-VQ method is the same as that of a memoryless vector quantizer, but the bit rate is by a factor of approximately two.

  3. Approaches for Resolving Dynamic IP Addressing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foo, Schubert; Hui, Siu Cheung; Yip, See Wai; He, Yulan

    1997-01-01

    A problem with dynamic Internet protocol (IP) addressing arises when the Internet connection is through an Internet provider since the IP address is allocated only at connection time. This article examines a number of online and offline methods for resolving the problem. Suggests dynamic domain name system (DNS) and directory service look-up are…

  4. Tradition and Change in Swedish Address Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Stephen A.

    In most European languages, choice of address form classifies the relation between speakers. The first theoretical framework for analyzing address form usage was established by Brown and Gilman (1960) in their investigation of the semantics of pronoun use in a wide variety of Indo-European languages, which concluded that Europeans use the informal…

  5. 7 CFR 504.5 - Address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Address. 504.5 Section 504.5 Agriculture Regulations... USER FEES § 504.5 Address. Deposits of and requests for microbial patent cultures should be directed to.... University St., Peoria, Illinois 61604; (309) 685-4011....

  6. 7 CFR 504.5 - Address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Address. 504.5 Section 504.5 Agriculture Regulations... USER FEES § 504.5 Address. Deposits of and requests for microbial patent cultures should be directed to.... University St., Peoria, Illinois 61604; (309) 685-4011....

  7. 7 CFR 504.5 - Address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Address. 504.5 Section 504.5 Agriculture Regulations... USER FEES § 504.5 Address. Deposits of and requests for microbial patent cultures should be directed to.... University St., Peoria, Illinois 61604; (309) 685-4011....

  8. 7 CFR 504.5 - Address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Address. 504.5 Section 504.5 Agriculture Regulations... USER FEES § 504.5 Address. Deposits of and requests for microbial patent cultures should be directed to.... University St., Peoria, Illinois 61604; (309) 685-4011....

  9. 7 CFR 504.5 - Address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Address. 504.5 Section 504.5 Agriculture Regulations... USER FEES § 504.5 Address. Deposits of and requests for microbial patent cultures should be directed to.... University St., Peoria, Illinois 61604; (309) 685-4011....

  10. 25 CFR 2.14 - Record address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Record address. 2.14 Section 2.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES AND PRACTICE APPEALS FROM ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS § 2.14 Record address. (a) Every interested party who files a document in connection with an...

  11. 25 CFR 2.14 - Record address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Record address. 2.14 Section 2.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES AND PRACTICE APPEALS FROM ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS § 2.14 Record address. (a) Every interested party who files a document in connection with an...

  12. Can ecosystem-scale translocations mitigate the impact of climate change on terrestrial biodiversity? Promises, pitfalls, and possibilities: Ecosystem-scale translocations.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Stéphane; Case, Bradley S; Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Waterhouse, Benjamin R; Wratten, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Because ecological interactions are the first components of the ecosystem to be impacted by climate change, future forms of threatened-species and ecosystem management should aim at conserving complete, functioning communities rather than single charismatic species. A possible way forward is the deployment of ecosystem-scale translocation (EST), where above- and below-ground elements of a functioning terrestrial ecosystem (including vegetation and topsoil) are carefully collected and moved together. Small-scale attempts at such practice have been made for the purpose of ecological restoration. By moving larger subsets of functioning ecosystems from climatically unstable regions to more stable ones, EST could provide a practical means to conserve mature and complex ecosystems threatened by climate change. However, there are a number of challenges associated with EST in the context of climate change mitigation, in particular the choice of donor and receptor sites. With the aim of fostering discussion and debate about the EST concept, we  1) outline the possible promises and pitfalls of EST in mitigating the impact of climate change on terrestrial biodiversity and 2) use a GIS-based approach to illustrate how  potential source and receptor sites, where EST could be trialed and evaluated globally, could be identified. PMID:26989475

  13. Pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment of alveolar echinococcosis: a sentinel case series

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, M; Mickan, C; Weber, TF; Junghanss, T

    2015-01-01

    Background Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a neglected zoonosis presenting with focal liver lesions (FLL) with a wide range of imaging patterns resembling benign as well as malignant FLLs. Complementary serology and histopathology may be misleading. Objective The objective of our study is to highlight pitfalls leading to wrong diagnoses and harmful interventions in patients with AE. Design This retrospective sentinel case series analyses diagnostic and treatment data of patients with confirmed AE. Results 80 patients treated between 1999 and 2014 were included in the study. In 26/80 patients treatment decisions were based on a wrong diagnosis. AE was mistaken for cystic echinococcosis (CE) in 12/26 patients followed by cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCA) in 5/26 patients; 61/80 patients had predominantly infiltrative liver lesions and 19/80 patients had a predominantly pseudocystic radiological presentation. Serology correctly differentiated between Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus in 53/80 patients. Histopathology reports attributed the right Echinococcus species in 25/58 patients but failed to differentiate E. multilocularis from E. granulosus in 25/58 patients. Although contraindicated in AE 8/25 patients treated surgically had instillation of a protoscolicidal agent intraoperatively. One of the eight patients developed toxic cholangitis and liver failure and died 1 year after liver transplantation. Conclusions Misclassification of AE leads to a critical delay in growth inhibiting benzimidazole treatment, surgical overtreatment and bares the risk of liver failure if protoscolicidal agents are instilled in AE pseudocysts. PMID:26462284

  14. White-eyed blowout fracture: Diagnostic pitfalls and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yew, Ching Ching; Shaari, Ramizu; Rahman, Shaifulizan Abdul; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-09-01

    White-eyed blowout fracture was first termed by Jordan et al. in individuals sustaining a blow to the periocular area and presenting with ocular symptoms, although with minimal soft tissue signs of trauma. It is often found in pure orbital floor blowout fractures among paediatric patients, and it could manifest as a linear or hinge-like trapdoor deformity. Unlike the more common open orbital blowout fractures with distinct diagnostic clinical signs, white-eyed blowout fractures are rarer and their diagnoses can be easily missed, subsequently costing an optimal time window for surgical intervention. This is critical as better outcomes are found with earlier release of entrapments. This report describes a case of a white-eyed blowout fracture in a 10-year-old child faced with its diagnostic challenges. The current literature review discusses the types of fracture pattern, signs and symptoms, mechanism of action, as well as timing of surgery. In view of the common complication of persistent diplopia, clinical pitfalls in achieving this diagnosis are emphasized to prevent any delay of treatment. Current literature evidences are weighted towards urgent surgical intervention, as positive outcomes are found to correlate with earlier release of entrapments. PMID:25986667

  15. Protein crystallography for aspiring crystallographers or how to avoid pitfalls and traps in macromolecular structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank now approaches 100 000, with the vast majority of them determined by crystallographic methods. Thousands of papers describing such structures have been published in the scientific literature, and 20 Nobel Prizes in chemistry or medicine have been awarded for discoveries based on macromolecular crystallography. New hardware and software tools have made crystallography appear to be an almost routine (but still far from being analytical) technique and many structures are now being determined by scientists with very limited experience in the practical aspects of the field. However, this apparent ease is sometimes illusory and proper procedures need to be followed to maintain high standards of structure quality. In addition, many noncrystallographers may have problems with the critical evaluation and interpretation of structural results published in the scientific literature. The present review provides an outline of the technical aspects of crystallography for less experienced practitioners, as well as information that might be useful for users of macromolecular structures, aiming to show them how to interpret (but not overinterpret) the information present in the coordinate files and in their description. A discussion of the extent of information that can be gleaned from the atomic coordinates of structures solved at different resolution is provided, as well as problems and pitfalls encountered in structure determination and interpretation. PMID:24034303

  16. Use of automated medication adherence monitoring in bipolar disorder research: pitfalls, pragmatics, and possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Johnny; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Cassidy, Kristin A.; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Medication nonadherence occurs in 20–60% of persons with bipolar disorder (BD) and is associated with serious negative outcomes, including relapse, hospitalization, incarceration, suicide and high healthcare costs. Various strategies have been developed to measure adherence in BD. This descriptive paper summarizes challenges and workable strategies using electronic medication monitoring in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) in patients with BD. Methods: Descriptive data from 57 nonadherent individuals with BD enrolled in a prospective RCT evaluating a novel customized adherence intervention versus control were analyzed. Analyses focused on whole group data and did not assess intervention effects. Adherence was assessed with the self-reported Tablets Routine Questionnaire and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Results: The majority of participants were women (74%), African American (69%), with type I BD (77%). Practical limitations of MEMS included misuse in conjunction with pill minders, polypharmacy, cost, failure to bring to research visits, losing the device, and the device impacting baseline measurement. The advantages were more precise measurement, less biased recall, and collecting data from past time periods for missed interim visits. Conclusions: Automated devices such as MEMS can assist investigators in evaluating adherence in patients with BD. Knowing the anticipated pitfalls allows study teams to implement preemptive procedures for successful implementation in BD adherence studies and can help pave the way for future refinements as automated adherence assessment technologies become more sophisticated and readily available. PMID:26240747

  17. A double-edged sword: Benefits and pitfalls of heterogeneous punishment in evolutionary inspection games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-06-01

    As a simple model for criminal behavior, the traditional two-strategy inspection game yields counterintuitive results that fail to describe empirical data. The latter shows that crime is often recurrent, and that crime rates do not respond linearly to mitigation attempts. A more apt model entails ordinary people who neither commit nor sanction crime as the third strategy besides the criminals and punishers. Since ordinary people free-ride on the sanctioning efforts of punishers, they may introduce cyclic dominance that enables the coexistence of all three competing strategies. In this setup ordinary individuals become the biggest impediment to crime abatement. We therefore also consider heterogeneous punisher strategies, which seek to reduce their investment into fighting crime in order to attain a more competitive payoff. We show that this diversity of punishment leads to an explosion of complexity in the system, where the benefits and pitfalls of criminal behavior are revealed in the most unexpected ways. Due to the raise and fall of different alliances no less than six consecutive phase transitions occur in dependence on solely the temptation to succumb to criminal behavior, leading the population from ordinary people-dominated across punisher-dominated to crime-dominated phases, yet always failing to abolish crime completely.

  18. Ethanol fuel improves pitfall traps through rapid sinking and death of captured orthopterans.

    PubMed

    Szinwelski, N; Yotoko, K S C; Solar, R; Seleme, L R; Sperber, C F

    2013-08-01

    The choice of killing solutions for pitfall traps can influence sampling and is highly dependent on the objectives of each study. It is becoming increasingly common, however, and is more environmentally friendly, to use the same organisms to extract information for different kinds of studies. The killing solution should, therefore, be able to sample local active organisms, as well as maintain the integrity of their organs, tissues, and macromolecules. In a previous work, we showed that using ethanol fuel as a killing solution maintains the integrity of the specimens and enhances the Orthoptera richness and abundance of samples. In the current study, we evaluated two explanations for this pattern. We set up a field experiment to test whether ethanol fuel is attractive for orthopterans, and we investigated in the laboratory whether individuals of Gryllus sp. sink or die faster in ethanol fuel than in other killing solutions. Our results allowed us to refute the hypotheses of attraction caused by ethanol fuel and showed that the higher sampling efficiency of ethanol fuel is directly linked to the specimens sinking and dying faster than in other killing solutions. Thus, in addition to taxonomic, anatomical, and molecular studies, we recommend ethanol fuel for sampling organisms active in the litter in ecological studies. PMID:23905739

  19. Allometry in damselfly ornamental and genital traits: solving some pitfalls of allometry and sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Aguilar, A; López-Valenzuela, A; Brunel, O

    2010-12-01

    Static allometry of sexually selected traits has been the subject of intense research recently. However, some pitfalls for this kind of research are: (a) the functions of sexual traits are largely unknown; (b) more than one body size indicator must be measured; and, (c) allometry must be examined under different environmental circumstances to see whether allometric values change. Using Hetaerina americana damselflies, we investigated the type of allometry exhibited by a wing red spot and aedeagal width. These traits are positively selected during pre-copulatory male-male contests and post-copulatory female stimulation, respectively. As body size indicators, we used wing length and head width. It has been documented that expression of both sexual traits varies throughout the year. Thus, allometry was examined in different times of the year. We also investigated the allometry of aedeagal width and vaginal width at the zone where female stimulation takes place. We found no clear pattern of any allometric relationship for male and female traits and for both body size indicators at all times sampled. Our results contrast with patterns of negative allometry exhibited by genital traits in other animals. PMID:20938802

  20. A double-edged sword: Benefits and pitfalls of heterogeneous punishment in evolutionary inspection games

    PubMed Central

    Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-01-01

    As a simple model for criminal behavior, the traditional two-strategy inspection game yields counterintuitive results that fail to describe empirical data. The latter shows that crime is often recurrent, and that crime rates do not respond linearly to mitigation attempts. A more apt model entails ordinary people who neither commit nor sanction crime as the third strategy besides the criminals and punishers. Since ordinary people free-ride on the sanctioning efforts of punishers, they may introduce cyclic dominance that enables the coexistence of all three competing strategies. In this setup ordinary individuals become the biggest impediment to crime abatement. We therefore also consider heterogeneous punisher strategies, which seek to reduce their investment into fighting crime in order to attain a more competitive payoff. We show that this diversity of punishment leads to an explosion of complexity in the system, where the benefits and pitfalls of criminal behavior are revealed in the most unexpected ways. Due to the raise and fall of different alliances no less than six consecutive phase transitions occur in dependence on solely the temptation to succumb to criminal behavior, leading the population from ordinary people-dominated across punisher-dominated to crime-dominated phases, yet always failing to abolish crime completely. PMID:26046673