Science.gov

Sample records for address problems encountered

  1. Addressing Problems Encountered in Case-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgeon, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    TURF 436 (Case Studies in Turfgrass Management) is the capstone course for turfgrass science majors at the Pennsylvania State University. Students are introduced to problems and complex problematic situations encountered in the management of golf and sports turf and in professional lawn-care operations. Following completion of the orientation case…

  2. Addressing problems of employee performance.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee performance problems are essentially of 2 kinds: those that are motivational in origin and those resulting from skill deficiencies. Both kinds of problems are the province of the department manager. Performance problems differ from problems of conduct in that traditional disciplinary processes ordinarily do not apply. Rather, performance problems are addressed through educational and remedial processes. The manager has a basic responsibility in ensuring that everything reasonable is done to help each employee succeed. There are a number of steps the manager can take to address employee performance problems.

  3. Common Problems of Adolescents Encountered in Schools

    PubMed Central

    McWhinney, Betty D.

    1986-01-01

    Some adolescents present in school with problems of poor academic performance and unacceptable behaviour. A physician's evaluation of such a problem requires a careful history and consideration of emotional factors. A neuro-developmental assessment should reveal a pattern of strengths as well as any areas of delay. Management includes demystifying the problem to the student and counselling parents, as well as providing an explanation to the school staff. Stimulant medication, when the primary problem is one of attention-deficit disorder, can be a useful part of the therapeutic program. Long-term follow up, counselling and support are essential. Working within the school gives the counsellor access to teachers and other staff to ensure that understanding of, and help with, the problem continues. PMID:21267219

  4. Addressing the Challenges Encountered during a Developmental Evaluation: Implications for Evaluation Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poth, Cheryl-Anne; Pinto, Dorothy; Howery, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes three challenges encountered during a developmental evaluation and explains how these were addressed from the evaluators' perspective. The evaluation was conducted to support the implementation of a three-year educational technology leadership project funded by the Alberta provincial government. The developmental evaluation…

  5. Autocheck: Addressing the Problem of Rural Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Guy A.

    This paper describes a project implemented by a social worker from the Glynn County School District in rural Georgia to address transportation problems experienced by students and their families. The project aims to assist families who are unable to keep appointments or attend other important events due to unreliable transportation. A county needs…

  6. Problem Solvers: Solutions--The Inaugural Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dause, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Fourth graders in Miss Dause's and Mrs. Hicks's mathematics classes at South Mountain Elementary School in Dillsburg, Pennsylvania, worked with the data from the Inauagural Address problem that was previously published published in the February 2013 issue of "Teaching Children Mathematics". This activity allowed students to…

  7. Problems encountered during impact calculations using analytic equations of state

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.; Harvey, W.B.

    1997-02-01

    During modeling of the impact of a projectile on a target or other calculations that bring materials together at high velocities, computer simulations of materials being shocked to high pressure and then releasing to low pressure are performed. Depending on the circumstances, the release to low pressure is often accompanied by release to a very low density. Numerical problems leading to very large sound speeds (and thus small time steps) or to negative Lagrangian volumes have been encountered during MESA-2D calculations of this nature. These problems can be traced to the behavior of the equation of state (EOS) in the limit as the density becomes much less than the normal or reference density. Although analytic solutions for expansion isentropes may show acceptable behavior in the low-density limit, numerical solutions can show undesirable behavior. Examples of this undesirable behavior in the low-density regime are given for some simple, analytic equations of state that have closed-form solutions for isentropes. The behavior of three analytic EOSs that are frequently used in MESA-2D calculations are then discussed. These EOSs are the Los Alamos EOS, the MESA polynomial EOS, and a Mie-Gruneisen EOS based on a linear relation between shock and particle velocity. The problems in the low-density region can be corrected for the Los Alamos EOS and the MESA polynomial EOS by the proper choice of EOS coefficients in the expansion region (density less than the reference density). Problems with the Mie-Gruneisen EOS can be corrected if the functional relationship between the Gruneisen parameter ({Tau}) and density differs above and below the reference density.

  8. Evaluating minority retention programs: problems encountered and lessons learned from the Ohio science and engineering alliance.

    PubMed

    White, Jeffry L; Altschuld, James W; Lee, Yi-Fang

    2008-08-01

    The retention rates for African-Americans, Hispanics, and Native-Americans in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are lower than those of White or Asian college students. In response, the National Science Foundation formed statewide partnerships of universities to develop programs to address this disparity. The deliberations and experiences in evaluating one such partnership are retrospectively reviewed. Problems and issues encountered during conceptualization and implementation are presented. Lessons learned from this endeavor should generalize to similar situations and provide guidance for others new to or interested in evaluating STEM retention programs as well as those evaluating collaborative endeavors.

  9. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  10. School Nurses' Perceived Prevalence and Competence to Address Student Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Sharon H.; Connors, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Due to under-identification of student mental health problems and limited specialty mental health providers in schools, school nurses are often faced with identifying and addressing student mental health needs. This exploratory study assessed prevalence and types of student mental health problems encountered by school nurses, as well as their…

  11. Hardware problems encountered in solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, M.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous problems in the design, production, installation, and operation of solar energy systems are discussed. Described are hardware problems, which range from simple to obscure and complex, and their resolution.

  12. Addressing the Curriculum Problem in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bill

    2012-01-01

    How best to understand the curriculum problem in doctoral research education: that is the question that this paper engages. It begins by noting that curriculum as such is little referenced and inadequately theorised in higher education and certainly in doctoral education, and indeed has been described as a "missing term". The paper then reviews a…

  13. Addressing the call-back problem

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, R.

    1985-08-01

    Service recalls or call-backs are one of the costliest and most persistent of service management problems. Although all service industries have call-back problems each time the oilburner breaks down, the customer has what could be a costly inconvenience. Every customer complaint reduces loyalty and makes the industry more and more vulnerable to competition, not just from each other but, from the utilities and the discounters. A customer who gets prompt, capable service will usually stay with his present company and, just as importantly, he stays with fuel oil. If the industry were to place the blame for call-backs on a particular person or area it would probably be in the individual serviceman. The lack of training, lack of motivation, lack of compassion for the customer or lack of company spirit, is discussed.

  14. Emotional Congruence in Learning and Health Encounters in Medicine: Addressing an Aspect of the Hidden Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to draw attention to and provide insights into an area that is of educational significance for clinical teachers, namely the need to acknowledge and respond appropriately to the emotional context of both learning and health encounters in order to improve the outcomes of both. This need has been highlighted by recent calls for more…

  15. Development of countermeasures for medical problems encountered in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Rummel, John D.; Leveton, Lauren; Teeter, Ron

    1992-01-01

    Past experience with piloted space missions is reviewed to develop potential countermeasures to the medical problems associated with a long-duration space flight. Particular attention is given to the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Program, which is aimed at ensuring crew health and safety on Space Shuttle missions; Soviet experience with long-duration space flights; and a variety of countermeasures including physiological, psychological, environmental health, radiation protection, and artificial gravity countermeasures.

  16. Practical problems which women encounter with available contraception in Australia.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, E

    1994-06-01

    Australian women face major difficulties with contraception because of the limited range of choices, the need for meticulous attention to compliance with most available methods and because of cost limitations for a significant minority of the population. The most commonly used methods are oral contraceptive pills and barrier methods, and each has substantial compliance problems which can be minimized with care and counselling. There is an urgent need for a wider range of options in Australia and for good information and publicity about them. Present progress in this direction gives some hope for the near future. PMID:7848207

  17. The Significance of Problems Addressed in Recent Vocational Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.

    1983-01-01

    This article examines the significance of problems addressed in recent vocational education research published in volumes 4 and 5 of the "Journal of Vocational Education Research" and volumes 16 and 17 of the "Journal of Industrial Teacher Education." (SSH)

  18. Mothers' Perceptions of Citizenship, Practices for Developing Citizenship Conscience of Their Children and Problems They Encountered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, A. Figen

    2012-01-01

    Family plays an important role in the development of citizenship awareness of children. The purpose of the present study is to figure out the citizenship perceptions of mothers, their practices for developing citizenship conscience of their children and to explore the problems they have encountered. In this study, critical case sampling method has…

  19. Identifying the Problems That Finnish and Estonian Teachers Encounter in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugaste, Aino; Niikko, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe Finnish and Estonian preschool teachers' thoughts on the problems they encounter in their pedagogical work in the preschool context. The study involved interviews with 80 preschool teachers (40 in each country). The theoretical framework of the study is based on quality as a pedagogical phenomenon, whereby…

  20. Tactics Employed and Problems Encountered by University English Majors in Hong Kong in Using a Dictionary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Alice Yin Wa

    2005-01-01

    Building on the results of a small-scale survey which investigated the general use of dictionaries by university English majors in Hong Kong using a questionnaire survey and their specific use of dictionaries using an error correction task, this article discusses the tactics these students employed and the problems they encountered when using a…

  1. Problems Encountered by Religious Vocational Secondary School and Other Secondary School Students in Physical Education and Sports Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar, Mustafa; Yaman, Menzure Sibel; Hergüner, Gülten

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to determine problems encountered by Religious Vocational Secondary School and other Secondary School students in physical education and sports activities and to compare these problems according to school type and gender. A questionnaire named "Problems encountered in attending to physical education and sports activities"…

  2. Problems encountered in operating salt gradient solar ponds in the Arabian Gulf region

    SciTech Connect

    Hassab, M.A.; Tag, I.A.; Kamal, W.A. ); Al-Noaimi, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper highlights the main problems encountered in operating salt gradient solar ponds in the Arabian Gulf region, characterized by hot, windy, and dusty environment. These problems are excessive erosion of the gradient zone, the formation of sizeable localized convective zones, the deterioration of pond water clarity and the high rates of surface evaporation. These weather-related problems severely impair the pond operation, as they lead to a serious drop in its collection and storage efficiency, and an excessive increase in salt consumption. Experience gained from operating a 1,600 m{sup 2} pond and a small-scale experimental pond is presented.

  3. Can small institutes address some problems facing biomedical researchers?

    PubMed Central

    Sheetz, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    At a time of historically low National Institutes of Health funding rates and many problems with the conduct of research (unfunded mandates, disgruntled reviewers, and rampant paranoia), there is a concern that biomedical research as a profession is waning in the United States (see ”Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws” by Alberts and colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). However, it is wonderful to discover something new and to tackle tough puzzles. If we could focus more of our effort on discussing scientific problems and doing research, then we could be more productive and perhaps happier. One potential solution is to focus efforts on small thematic institutes in the university structure that can provide a stimulating and supportive environment for innovation and exploration. With an open-lab concept, there are economies of scale that can diminish paperwork and costs, while providing greater access to state-of-the-art equipment. Merging multiple disciplines around a common theme can catalyze innovation, and this enables individuals to develop new concepts without giving up the credit they deserve, because it is usually clear who did the work. Small institutes do not solve larger systemic problems but rather enable collective efforts to address the noisome aspects of the system and foster an innovative community effort to address scientific problems. PMID:25360047

  4. Can small institutes address some problems facing biomedical researchers?

    PubMed

    Sheetz, Michael P

    2014-11-01

    At a time of historically low National Institutes of Health funding rates and many problems with the conduct of research (unfunded mandates, disgruntled reviewers, and rampant paranoia), there is a concern that biomedical research as a profession is waning in the United States (see "Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws" by Alberts and colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). However, it is wonderful to discover something new and to tackle tough puzzles. If we could focus more of our effort on discussing scientific problems and doing research, then we could be more productive and perhaps happier. One potential solution is to focus efforts on small thematic institutes in the university structure that can provide a stimulating and supportive environment for innovation and exploration. With an open-lab concept, there are economies of scale that can diminish paperwork and costs, while providing greater access to state-of-the-art equipment. Merging multiple disciplines around a common theme can catalyze innovation, and this enables individuals to develop new concepts without giving up the credit they deserve, because it is usually clear who did the work. Small institutes do not solve larger systemic problems but rather enable collective efforts to address the noisome aspects of the system and foster an innovative community effort to address scientific problems. PMID:25360047

  5. Can small institutes address some problems facing biomedical researchers?

    PubMed

    Sheetz, Michael P

    2014-11-01

    At a time of historically low National Institutes of Health funding rates and many problems with the conduct of research (unfunded mandates, disgruntled reviewers, and rampant paranoia), there is a concern that biomedical research as a profession is waning in the United States (see "Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws" by Alberts and colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). However, it is wonderful to discover something new and to tackle tough puzzles. If we could focus more of our effort on discussing scientific problems and doing research, then we could be more productive and perhaps happier. One potential solution is to focus efforts on small thematic institutes in the university structure that can provide a stimulating and supportive environment for innovation and exploration. With an open-lab concept, there are economies of scale that can diminish paperwork and costs, while providing greater access to state-of-the-art equipment. Merging multiple disciplines around a common theme can catalyze innovation, and this enables individuals to develop new concepts without giving up the credit they deserve, because it is usually clear who did the work. Small institutes do not solve larger systemic problems but rather enable collective efforts to address the noisome aspects of the system and foster an innovative community effort to address scientific problems.

  6. Detection of close encounters and resonances in three-body problems through Levi-Civita regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lega, E.; Guzzo, M.; Froeschlé, C.

    2011-11-01

    The detection and identification of resonances is a key ingredient in the studies of stability of dynamical systems, with important applications for our Solar as well as for extrasolar systems. In this paper we study the detection of resonances and close encounters in the three-body problem using the fast Lyapunov indicator method. In order to investigate the close encounters, we needed to adapt the method to the model and its singularities. Our technical improvement lies in computation of the solutions of the singular variational equations by measuring the divergence of close initial conditions. We have used the Levi-Civita regularization for the integration of the equations of motion. As an application of the method, we show that it provides a correct detection of the tube manifolds related to the Lagrangian point L1 of the Sun-Jupiter system.

  7. Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.; Andersson, O.; Willemsen, A.

    1992-08-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and ``fracturing`` of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

  8. Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A. ); Andersson, O. ); Willemsen, A. )

    1992-08-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and fracturing'' of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

  9. Problems encountered in home health service delivery to persons with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Allen, S M; Fleishman, J

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the problems encountered in delivering home health services to persons with AIDS (PWAs), based on telephone interviews conducted with administrators of 68 home care agencies located in 10 high AIDS prevalence areas nationwide. Lack of adequate insurance mechanisms was cited as a major barrier to serving PWAs. Some respondents indicated a greater potential for stress among staff treating PWAs, given the youth of this population, the intensity of illness manifestations, and the complexity of treatment regimens. Other difficulties that are especially prevalent among PWAs include the absence of informal caregivers, residence in unsafe areas, and patient and family drug abuse. Although many of the reported patient problems are not unique to PWAs, the frequency with which they occur in this population suggests a need for expanded public and private insurance coverage for custodial care, and for expanded availability of AIDS-specific housing, if excessive hospitalization is to be avoided.

  10. Identification of technical problems encountered in the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, D.G.; Epler, J.S.; Rose, R.R.

    1980-03-01

    A review of problems encountered in the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes has been made in support of the technical aspects of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being administered by the Low-Level Waste Management Program Office, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The operating histories of burial sites at six major DOE and five commercial facilities in the US have been examined and several major problems identified. The problems experienced st the sites have been grouped into general categories dealing with site development, waste characterization, operation, and performance evaluation. Based on this grouping of the problem, a number of major technical issues have been identified which should be incorporated into program plans for further research and development. For each technical issue a discussion is presented relating the issue to a particular problem, identifying some recent or current related research, and suggesting further work necessary for resolving the issue. Major technical issues which have been identified include the need for improved water management, further understanding of the effect of chemical and physical parameters on radionuclide migration, more comprehensive waste records, improved programs for performance monitoring and evaluation, development of better predictive capabilities, evaluation of space utilization, and improved management control.

  11. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    interface with the CNS. In 2013, two symposia were held independently to discuss this problem: one was held at the International Neuromodulation Society's 11th World Congress in Berlin and supported by the International Neuromodulation Society1 and the other at the 6th International Neural Engineering conference in San Diego2 and was supported by the NSF. Clearly, the neuromodulation and the neural engineering communities are keen to solve this problem. Experts from the field were assembled to discuss the problems and potential solutions. Although many important points were raised, few emerged as key issues. (1) The ability to access remotely and reliably internal neural signals . Although some of the technological problems have already been solved, this ability to access neural signals is still a significant problem since reliable and robust transcutaneous telemetry systems with large numbers of signals, each with wide bandwidth, are not readily available to researchers. (2) A translation strategy taking basic research to the clinic . The lack of understanding of the biological response to implanted constructs and the inability to monitor the sites and match the mechanical properties of the probe to the neural tissue properties continue to be an unsolved problem. In addition, the low levels of collaboration among neuroscientists, clinicians, patients and other stakeholders throughout different phases of research and development were considered to be significant impediments to progress. (3) Fundamental tools development procedures for neural interfacing . There are many laboratories testing various devices with different sets of criteria, but there is no consensus on the failure modes. The reliability, robustness of metrics and testing standards for such devices have not been established, either in academia or in industry. To start addressing this problem, the FDA has established a laboratory to test the reliability of some neural devices. Although the discussion was mostly

  12. Problems encountered during the use of ammonium-contaminated fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Brugghen, F.W. van der; Gast, C.H.; Berg, J.W. van den

    1996-01-01

    The most extensively used technology for flue gas treatment to reduce NO{sub x}-emission is selective reduction with ammonia, either at 1000{degrees}C in the gas phase (SNCR) or at 350{degrees}C in the presence of a catalyst (SCR). Operational problems that are encountered during application of these processes are mainly caused by the slip of unreacted ammonia through the reaction zone or the catalyst. This ammonia slip can lead to the formation and deposition of ammonium salts in colder parts of the installation. In coal fired boilers contamination of the fly ash with ammonium salts is possible, which can restrict re-use, especially because of the ammonia smell during application. Results will be described of laboratory tests with the preparation of mortars containing fly ash with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg ammonium. Ammonia concentrations were continuously measured in ambient air during concrete mortar preparation and the pouring of concrete floors. Furthermore, the compressive strength and the ammonium content of the hardened concrete were followed. Other tests were carried out at a production facility for sintered artificial gravel. Fly ash with 300 mg/kg ammonium was used during these tests. Effects on working conditions, product quality, ammonia emission and operational problems of the installation were established and will be described.

  13. [Madagascar: esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Descriptive analysis of 12,000 examinations and problems encountered in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Peghini, M; Rajaonarison, P; Pecarrere, J L; Razafindramboa, H; Andriantsoavina, H; Rakotomalala, M; Ramarokoto, N

    1996-01-01

    The experience of the Digestive Endoscopy Center of the Soavinandriana Hospital in Antananarivo provides insight into not only esogastroduodenal disease in Madagascar but also technical problems involved in performing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy in tropical areas. From September 1990 to March 1995 a total of 12000 esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy procedures were performed without complication. The main finding was duodenal ulcer which observed in 3580 cases (29.8% of patients) followed by peptic esophagitis due to gastroesophageal reflux in 555 cases and gastric ulcer in 460 cases. Esophageal cancer was detected in 16 cases and malignant gastroduodenal tumor in 82 cases including 63 adenocarcinomas and 5 digestive lymphomas. Overall 4156 procedures (34.6%) were normal and 1130 procedures (9.4%) were performed to investigate digestive tract hemorrhage. These findings document the high incidence of duodenal ulcer in Madagascar where treatment of this condition is difficult due to the high cost. This study underlines the problems encountered in operating an endoscopy department in tropical areas especially with regard to desinfection of equipment and training of endoscopists.

  14. Comet encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, T. J.; Dessler, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Data from spacecraft encounters with comets and the implications of these data for theoretical models are discussed in a collection of reviews and reports (all published after 1985). Topics addressed include mass loading effects in the unshocked solar wind (particles, waves, and fluctuations), boundaries, the shocked solar wind and the ionosphere, tail phenomena, remote observations at encounter, and dust. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and sample images are provided.

  15. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    interface with the CNS. In 2013, two symposia were held independently to discuss this problem: one was held at the International Neuromodulation Society's 11th World Congress in Berlin and supported by the International Neuromodulation Society1 and the other at the 6th International Neural Engineering conference in San Diego2 and was supported by the NSF. Clearly, the neuromodulation and the neural engineering communities are keen to solve this problem. Experts from the field were assembled to discuss the problems and potential solutions. Although many important points were raised, few emerged as key issues. (1) The ability to access remotely and reliably internal neural signals . Although some of the technological problems have already been solved, this ability to access neural signals is still a significant problem since reliable and robust transcutaneous telemetry systems with large numbers of signals, each with wide bandwidth, are not readily available to researchers. (2) A translation strategy taking basic research to the clinic . The lack of understanding of the biological response to implanted constructs and the inability to monitor the sites and match the mechanical properties of the probe to the neural tissue properties continue to be an unsolved problem. In addition, the low levels of collaboration among neuroscientists, clinicians, patients and other stakeholders throughout different phases of research and development were considered to be significant impediments to progress. (3) Fundamental tools development procedures for neural interfacing . There are many laboratories testing various devices with different sets of criteria, but there is no consensus on the failure modes. The reliability, robustness of metrics and testing standards for such devices have not been established, either in academia or in industry. To start addressing this problem, the FDA has established a laboratory to test the reliability of some neural devices. Although the discussion was mostly

  16. Lunar scout missions: Galileo encounter results and application to scientific problems and exploration requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W.; Belton, M.; Greeley, R.; Pieters, C.; Mcewen, A.; Neukum, G.; Mccord, T.

    1993-01-01

    The Lunar Scout Missions (payload: x-ray fluorescence spectrometer, high-resolution stereocamera, neutron spectrometer, gamma-ray spectrometer, imaging spectrometer, gravity experiment) will provide a global data set for the chemistry, mineralogy, geology, topography, and gravity of the Moon. These data will in turn provide an important baseline for the further scientific exploration of the Moon by all-purpose landers and micro-rovers, and sample return missions from sites shown to be of primary interest from the global orbital data. These data would clearly provide the basis for intelligent selection of sites for the establishment of lunar base sites for long-term scientific and resource exploration and engineering studies. The two recent Galileo encounters with the Moon (December, 1990 and December, 1992) illustrate how modern technology can be applied to significant lunar problems. We emphasize the regional results of the Galileo SSI to show the promise of geologic unit definition and characterization as an example of what can be done with the global coverage to be obtained by the Lunar Scout Missions.

  17. Evidence-Based Practices for Addressing Classroom Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hye-Suk Lee; Lynch, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers of young children can plan proactively so that they avoid some of the serious problem behaviors in the classroom. The strategies presented in this article are part of a problem solving approach to challenging behavior based on the principles of positive behavioral support. Although these methods presented here have research-based…

  18. First steps of laparoscopic surgery in Lubumbashi: problems encountered and preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Arung, Willy; Dinganga, Nathalie; Ngoie, Emmanuel; Odimba, Etienne; Detry, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    For many reasons, laparoscopic surgery has been performed worldwide. Due to logistical constraints its first steps occurred in Lubumbashi only in 2008. The aim of this presentation was to report authors’ ten-month experience of laparoscopic surgery at Lubumbashi Don Bosco Missionary Hospital (LDBMH): problems encountered and preliminary results. The study was a transsectional descriptive work with a convenient sampling. It only took in account patients with abdominal surgical condition who consented to undergo laparoscopic surgery and when logistical constraints of the procedure were found. Independent variables were patients’ demographic parameters, staff, equipments and consumable. Dependent parameters included surgical abdominal diseases, intra-operative circumstances and postoperative short term mortality and morbidity. Between 1stApril 2009 and 28th February 2010, 75 patients underwent laparoscopic surgery at the LDBMH making 1.5% of all abdominal surgical activities performed at this institution. The most performed procedure was appendicectomy for acute appendicitis (64%) followed by exploratory laparoscopy for various abdominal chronic pain (9.3%), adhesiolysis for repeated periods of subacute intestinal obstruction in previously laparotomised patients (9.3%), laparoscopic cholecystectomy for post acute cholecystitis on gall stone (5.3%) and partial colectomy for symptomatic redundant sigmoid colon (2.7%). There were 4% of conversion to laparotomy. Laparoscopic surgery consumed more time than laparotomy, mostly when dealing with appendicitis. However, postoperatively, patients did quite well. There was no death in this series. Nursing care was minimal with early discharge. These results are encouraging to pursue laparoscopic surgery with DRC Government and NGO's supports. PMID:26448805

  19. An Address on the Population Problem: Address to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Robert S.

    In this speech, Robert McNamara examines the background of the world population problem, analyzes its current trends, evaluates the measures available to deal with it, and suggests actions governments and others can take to help solve it. It now appears that significant fertility decline may have begun in developing countries. Data seem to…

  20. Problems Encountered during the Implementations of Resource-Based Teaching in Pre-Service History Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the problems encountered during the resource-based teaching implementations carried out with pre-service history teachers along with their reasons and suggest solutions. The study was a qualitative study using a case study design. The population of the study consisted of 5th grade pre-service history teachers continuing…

  1. An effective way to address global environmental and energy problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, O.; Garelina, S.; Gysev, A.; Zakharyan, R.; Kazaryan, M.; Sachkov, V.

    2015-12-01

    This work scales the present globalism of ecological and energetic problems. The ecological problem is connected with environment pollution by polymeric waste. The energetic problem - with traditional approaches of modern energetic, in particular, use of fossil fuel for energy production and concentration of capacities for ensuring overall performance of global power supply systems that doesn't guarantee a sustainable development of power for long prospect, doesn't provide power safety of the country. The second part of work is devoted to a choice of the most effective solutions of the present global problems. The authors have proposed the plasma-chemical method of the polymer waste processing and developed a schematic diagram of the reactor. The paper contains the results of the theoretical calculation of the polymer waste processing products. The reagents, allowing to obtain hydrogen and other liquid products from polymer waste are selected. It is proposed to use rare elements for increasing the efficiency of hydrogen production from polymer waste. The results of the calculation of the efficiency of hydrogen production from polymer waste using molybdenum are revealed in the paper.

  2. Selective Prevention: Addressing Vulnerability to Problem Drug Use in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Gregor; Gyarmathy, V. Anna; Bo, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Following the 2003 publication of the European Union (EU) Council Recommendations and the 2005-2008 and 2009-2012 EU Drugs Action Plans, increasing attention has been given in EU member states' drug policies to populations that are vulnerable to problem drug use (PDU). Monitoring data reported to the EMCDDA by designated agencies from 30 countries…

  3. How Do Medical Teachers Address the Problem of Transfer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laksov, Klara Bolander; Lonka, Kirsti; Josephson, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Clinical teachers often complain that medical students have forgotten or somehow "lost" knowledge that has been taught at pre-clinical levels at the time of entering the clinical part of education. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, whether transfer of knowledge was identified as a problem by the teaching staff of anatomy and…

  4. Stressed Stream Analysis--Addressing Environmental Problems in Local Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Uses environmental impact analysis as a unifying theme to provide students with real problem-solving experiences without neglecting the principles and theories of the basic scientific disciplines undergirding environmental science. Provides information about stressed stream analysis, which connects environmental impact analysis and Great Lakes…

  5. Dismantling of Radium-226 Coal Level Gauges: Encountered Problems and How to Solve

    SciTech Connect

    Punnachaiya, M.; Nuanjan, P.; Moombansao, K.; Sawangsri, T.; Pruantonsai, P.; Srichom, K.

    2006-07-01

    previously a leakage on inner source housing. Thus, during manufacturing the filled-lead for shielding passed through this small hole and fixed the deformed spring together with the source. The circular surface of inner hole was measured and slowly drilled at a diameter 2.2 cm behind shielding, till the spring and the fixed lead sheet were cut, therefore the source could be finally hammered out. The surface dose rate of coal level gauges before weld cutting was 10-15 mR/hr and the highest dose rate at the position of the weld cutter was 2.5 mR/hr. The total time for each weld cutting and automatic sawing was 2-3 minutes and 1 minute, respectively. The source was individually and safely transferred to store in lead safe box using a 1-meter length tong and a light container with 1 meter length handle. The total time for Ra-226 (70 pieces) dismantling, including the encountered problems and their troubles shooting took 4 days operation in which the total dose obtained by 18 operators were ranged from 1-38 {mu}Sv. The dismantling team safely completed the activities within the effective dose limit for occupational exposure of 20 mSv/year (80 {mu}Sv/day). (authors)

  6. Air toxics risk standards: are we addressing the real problems?

    SciTech Connect

    Laurie Miller; Richard Becker; Ted Cromwell

    2005-06-01

    Cost-effective risk reductions from major stationary emission sources have seen significant progress. EPA and state data demonstrate that their programs have dramatically reduced emissions and risk from these sources. Analyses indicate that the next generation of risk reductions for stationary sources will be provide little risk reduction, but will be much more costly and more challenging from a policy perspective. Facing these tough choices, EPA and state regulators should, with stakeholder input, be developing scientifically driven and cost-effective approaches to provide the public with honest answers and results. Air toxics risk policies and programs must prioritize and address significant remaining air toxics risks, educate and communicate to the public about the decision alternatives, build support for a holistic approach and openly communicate results. 6 refs.

  7. Addressing the Pilot security problem with gLExec

    SciTech Connect

    Sfiligoi, I.; Koeroo, O.; Venekamp, G.; Yocum, D.; Groep, D.; Petravick, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The Grid security mechanisms were designed under the assumption that users would submit their jobs directly to the Grid gatekeepers. Many groups are however starting to use pilot-based infrastructures, where users submit jobs to a centralized queue and are successively transferred to the Grid resources by the pilot infrastructure. While this approach greatly improves the user experience, it does introduce several security and policy issues, the more serious being the lack of system level protection between the users and the inability for Grid sites to apply fine grained authorization policies. One possible solution to the problem is provided by gLExec, a X.509 aware suexec derivative. By using gLExec, the pilot workflow becomes as secure as any traditional one.

  8. Addressing critical astrophysical problems with NASA's small explorer (SMEX) missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Ribas, Ignasi

    The Small Explorer (SMEX) program of NASA was initiated during the late 1980s to provide frequent, cost-effective opportunities to carry out sharply focused and relatively space science missions. The SMEX program together with the Mid-size Explorer (MIDEX) program were timely reactions to the increasingly long development times and cost over-runs for a number of large space missions during the previous decades. SMEX spacecrafts are typically 180 to 250 kg with orbit-averaged power consumptions of 50-200 watts. Frequently innovative or novel technologies and instrumentation are employed to achieve important results. The current cost cap (which includes cost of launch vehicle, development and operations) is 75M (Fiscal Year 2000 US). For comparison, the cost cap of the MIDEX mission is $135M. Both SMEX and MIDEX are solicited Principal Investigator (PI) missions that are peer-reviewed before selection. The SMEX program is supported by the NASA's Office of Space Research (OSS) and a wide spectrum of science is addressed. The themes include Origin and Evolution of Stars and Planets, the Structure and Evolution of the Universe, and the Sun-Earth Connection. Within these major themes, the missions may also focus on fundamental laws of physics as they relate to astrophysics and cosmology. So far, seven SMEX missions have been flown or are approved for flight within one or two years. In this paper, the past, current, and possible future SMEX missions are discussed and evaluated. Some highlights and important scientific returns from the current and approved missions are also included.

  9. The clinical encounter revisited.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami

    2014-04-01

    The patient-physician encounter is the pivotal starting point of any healthcare delivery, but it is subject to multiple process breakdowns and prevalent suboptimal performance. An overview of the techniques and components of a successful encounter valid for every setting and readily applicable is presented, stressing 7 rules: (1) ensuring optimal environment, tools, and teamwork; (2) viewing each encounter not only as a cognitive/biomedical challenge, but also as a personal one, and a learning opportunity; (3) adopting an attitude of curiosity, concentration, compassion, and commitment, and maintaining a systematic, orderly approach; (4) "simple is beautiful"-making the most of the basic clinical data and their many unique advantages; (5) minding "the silent dimension"-being attentive to the patient's identity and emotions; (6) following the "Holy Trinity" of gathering all information, consulting databases/colleagues, and tailoring gained knowledge to the individual patient; and (7) using the encounter as a "window of opportunity" to further the patient's health-not just the major problem, by addressing screening and prevention; promoting health literacy and shared decision-making; and establishing proper follow-up. Barriers to implementation identified can be overcome by continuous educational interventions. A high-quality encounter sets a virtuous cycle of patient-provider interaction and results in increasing satisfaction, adherence, and improved health outcomes.

  10. An issue encountered in solving problems in electricity and magnetism: curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülçiçek, Çağlar; Damlı, Volkan

    2016-11-01

    In physics lectures on electromagnetic theory and mathematical methods, physics teacher candidates have some difficulties with curvilinear coordinate systems. According to our experience, based on both in-class interactions and teacher candidates’ answers in test papers, they do not seem to have understood the variables in curvilinear coordinate systems very well. For this reason, the problems that physics teacher candidates have with variables in curvilinear coordinate systems have been selected as a study subject. The aim of this study is to find the physics teacher candidates’ problems with determining the variables of drawn shapes, and problems with drawing shapes based on given variables in curvilinear coordinate systems. Two different assessment tests were used in the study to achieve this aim. The curvilinear coordinates drawing test (CCDrT) was used to discover their problems related to drawing shapes, and the curvilinear coordinates detection test (CCDeT) was used to find out about problems related to determining variables. According to the findings obtained from both tests, most physics teacher candidates have problems with the ϕ variable, while they have limited problems with the r variable. Questions that are mostly answered wrongly have some common properties, such as value. According to inferential statistics, there is no significant difference between the means of the CCDeT and CCDrT scores. The mean of the CCDeT scores is only 4.63 and the mean of the CCDrT is only 4.66. Briefly, we can say that most physics teacher candidates have problems with drawing a shape using the variables of curvilinear coordinate systems or in determining the variables of drawn shapes. Part of this study was presented at the XI. National Science and Mathematics Education Congress (UFBMEK) in 2014.

  11. Problems encountered in the use of neutron methods for elemental analysis on planetary surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.; Philbin, P.; Moxham, R.; Boynton, G.; Trombka, J.

    1974-01-01

    From experimental studies of gamma rays from fast and thermal neutron reactions in hydrogeneous and non-hydrogeneous, semi-infinite samples and from Monte Carlo calculations on soil of a composition which might typically be encountered on planetary surfaces, it is found that gamma rays from fast or inelastic scattering reactions would dominate the observed spectra. With the exception of gamma rays formed by inelastically scattered neutrons on oxygen, useful spectra would be limited to energies below 3 MeV. Other experiments were performed which show that if a gamma-ray detector were placed within 6 m of an isotopic neutron source in a spacecraft, it would be rendered useless for gamma-ray spectrometry below 3 MeV because of internal activation produced by neutron exposure during space travel. Adequate shielding is not practicable because of the size and weight constraints for planetary missions. Thus, it is required that the source be turned off or removed to a safe distance during non-measurement periods. In view of these results an accelerator or an off-on isotopic source would be desirable for practical gamma-ray spectral analysis on planetary surfaces containing but minor amounts of hydrogen. ?? 1974.

  12. Precipitator electrical problems encountered with 105KVP TRs and sixteen inch plate spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Aa, P.

    1995-12-31

    Research-Cottrell has commissioned more than 100 electrostatic precipitators with 16-inch plate spacing and 105 KVP power supplies. The vast majority operates without incident. Recently, however, several new precipitators had repeated insulator breakage, and one precipitator exhibited control instability. Sparking at the base of the support insulator was the primary cause of the insulator breakage. Radio frequency (RF) noise generation affecting the microprocessor controls was the cause of the instability. Although these problems were nuisances, they did not significantly limit power levels or cause the precipitators to operate below guaranteed emissions levels. Nevertheless, Research-Cottrell undertook a program to develop remedies to these problems, beginning with site visits to each installation experiencing problems, followed by laboratory testing.

  13. Use of the Rasch Model to Solve Data Problems Encountered by the California Assessment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Richard K.

    Four problems faced by the staff of the California Assessment Program (CAP) were solved by applying Rasch scaling techniques: (1) item cultural bias in the Entry Level Test (ELT) given to all first grade pupils; (2) nonlinear regression analysis of the third grade Reading Test scores; (3) comparison of school growth from grades two to three, using…

  14. Elementary Science and Technology Teachers' Views on Problems Encountered in the Instructional Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gecer, Aynur; Ozel, Ruhan

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to explore the problems that teacher have experienced their opinion towards effectives and and functionality of teaching-learning process of Primary Science and Technology curriculum started to be implemented in 2004-2005 academic year in Turkey. The qualitative research design is used in this study. Research data are collected…

  15. Investigation of the Perceived Causes of Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Problems Encountered in School Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Didis, M. Gözde

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates a group of pre-service physics teachers' perceptions about the causes of problems in school experience through the attribution theory. The participants were thirteen pre-service physics teachers from a public university in Turkey. Data were collected through the interviews by requesting the participants to reflect their own…

  16. Problems encountered for food safety with polymer packages: chemical exchange, recycling.

    PubMed

    Vergnaud, J M

    1998-11-13

    When a polymer is in contact with a liquid, generally some matter transfers take place: the liquid enters the polymer, while some additives leave the polymer. This fact is responsible for a reduction in the properties of the polymer and pollution of the liquid food is obtained. However, it is sure that, on account of their outstanding properties, food packages are becoming more and more based on polymers. The process of mass transfers is controlled by transient diffusion, and these theoretical problems are so complex that only numerical models are able to resolve them. New difficult problems appear with the desire of recycling old food packages made of polymers by reusing them as new food packages. Of course, because of the potential contamination brought with this recycled polymer, the package is made of bi-layer or tri-layer films where the reused polymer is located between two virgin polymer layers. As it takes some time for the contaminant to diffuse through the virgin layer, this latter plays the role of a functional barrier to pollution. The various difficulties in the whole problem are considered in succession: the coextrusion of the films where a contaminant transfer already occurs; and the effect of the liquid food which may enhance the diffusion of the contaminant. Various master curves are drawn by using dimensionless numbers, so as to make the results quite general and of use from a practical point of view.

  17. The Detection And Analysis Of Blasting Problems Encountered In A Colliery Using High Speed Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorke, A. J.; Kohler, E. W.

    1987-09-01

    Premature initiation of ANFO (an explosive mixture of Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil) at a large colliery, near Witbank, was first detected from routine high speed films taken of large mid-burden, and overburden blasts. The analysis of these films shows that the rapid migration of very hot gasses through cracks ahead of the blast may have caused the explosive to initiate prematurely. The problem was not seen in the less competent overburden rocks. A less sensitive explosive has been successfully tried. The assessment of these blasts using high speed photography is discussed.

  18. Incorporating Natural Helpers to Address Service Disparities for Young Children with Conduct Problems

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Polakovich, I. David; Niec, Larissa N.; Barnet, Miya L.; Bell, Katrina M.

    2013-01-01

    In response to the high levels of unmet need among historically underserved young children with conduct problems, this paper outlines some of the key issues involved in incorporating natural helpers into the delivery of parenting interventions for the treatment of conduct problems among historically underserved children. Strategies for the selection and training of natural helpers are discussed along with challenges that might be encountered in these processes. Directions for future research are also highlighted. With appropriate selection and training procedures in place, natural helpers may increase the accessibility of services for children and families and foster the reduction of service disparities. PMID:24729649

  19. An Approach for Addressing the Multiple Testing Problem in Social Policy Impact Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2009-01-01

    In social policy evaluations, the multiple testing problem occurs due to the many hypothesis tests that are typically conducted across multiple outcomes and subgroups, which can lead to spurious impact findings. This article discusses a framework for addressing this problem that balances Types I and II errors. The framework involves specifying…

  20. Beating the Odds: Preparing Graduates to Address Gambling-Related Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Rafael J.; Bechtold, Jody; Kim, Yoonmi; Mulvaney, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    As gambling opportunities proliferate, social workers are likely to see clients with gambling-related problems, but they often lack the expertise to address these concerns. This descriptive study assessed the inclusion of content on gambling-related problems in graduate social work curricula. Responses to an online survey from 86 (43.7%) of the…

  1. A Problem-Solving Approach to Addressing Current Global Challenges in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Judith D.; Aspin, David N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper begins with an analysis of global problems shaping education, particularly as they impact upon learning and life chances. In addressing these problems a range of philosophical positions and controversies are considered, including: traditional romantic and institutional views of schooling; and more recent maximalist, neo-liberal,…

  2. Addressing the Missing Instructional Data Problem: Using a Teacher Log to Document Tier 1 Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Alexander; Elliott, Stephen N.; Roach, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Response-to-intervention (RTI) systems posit that Tier 1 consists of high-quality general classroom instruction using evidence-based methods to address the needs of most students. However, data on the extent to which general education teachers provide such instruction are rarely collected. This missing instructional data problem may result in RTI…

  3. Families and Positive Behavior Support: Addressing Problem Behavior in Family Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucyshyn, Joseph M., Ed.; Dunlap, Glen, Ed.; Albin, Richard W., Ed.

    The 19 chapters of this volume address theory, research, and practice concerning positive behavior support with families of children and youth with developmental disabilities and problem behavior. The chapters are: (1) "Positive Behavior Support with Families" (Joseph Lucyshyn and others); (2) "Finding Positive Behavior Support One Piece at a…

  4. Routing and Addressing Problems in Large Metropolitan-Scale Internetworks. ISI Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Gregory G.

    This report discusses some of the problems and limitations in existing internetwork design for the connection of packet-switching networks of different technologies and presents an algorithm that has been shown to be suitable for internetworks of unbounded size. Using a new form of address and a flat routing mechanism called Cartesian routing,…

  5. On Using Meta-Modeling and Multi-Modeling to Address Complex Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Jbara, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Models, created using different modeling techniques, usually serve different purposes and provide unique insights. While each modeling technique might be capable of answering specific questions, complex problems require multiple models interoperating to complement/supplement each other; we call this Multi-Modeling. To address the syntactic and…

  6. Addressing Possible Problems of Validity and Reliability in Qualitative Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rooy, Wilhelmina

    The ways in which potential problems in terms of validity were addressed by a beginning researcher conducting research into teacher attitudes are described. The researcher, a doctoral candidate, studied the beliefs, attitudes, and values of four experienced high school biology teachers. Principles and practices of research were set into place…

  7. How Are 2-Year US Colleges Addressing Student Alcohol Use and Related Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenk, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Toben F.; Erickson, Darin J.; Toomey, Traci L.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of attention and research has been dedicated to addressing alcohol use and related problems among students at 4-year colleges; however, less attention has been given to alcohol-related issues among students at 2-year technical/community colleges. This article describes research that expands on a study by Chiauzzi and…

  8. Exploring the role of Natural Helpers in efforts to address disparities for children with conduct problems

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Polakovich, I. David; Niec, Larissa N.; Barnett, Miya L.; Bell, Katrina M.; Aguilar, Gerardo; Vilca, Jeanette; Abbenante-Honold, Emily S.; Christian, Allison S.; Peer, Samuel O.

    2014-01-01

    The incorporation of natural helpers into services has been suggested as an innovative strategy to address disparities for historically underserved children with conduct problems. In order to inform incorporation efforts, this study examined the perceptions of natural helpers serving one U.S. Latina/o community regarding need for services for children with conduct problems, their reactions to a specific parent training intervention, and the training and support needed to deliver this intervention successfully. Participants identified a need for culturally-responsive services for children with conduct problems, and felt that parent training would be appropriate for the families they serve. Participants further identified specific training and support that they would require in order to deliver parent training with fidelity and effectiveness. Findings support the suggestion that natural helpers have the potential to address service disparities among Latina/o children with conduct problems. Recommendations from natural helpers should guide the development of culturally-adapted preventive interventions that help address existing service disparities. PMID:24910488

  9. The Children's Evaluation of Everyday Social Encounters Questionnaire: Comprehensive Assessment of Children's Social Information Processing and Its Relation to Internalizing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Debora J.; Luebbe, Aaron M.; Swenson, Lance P.; Allwood, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Two studies describe the development of a comprehensive, vignette-based measure of social information processing (SIP) particularly relevant for children with internalizing problems. Study 1 (N = 219 3rd-6th graders) describes the creation of the Children's Evaluation of Everyday Social Encounters Questionnaire (ChEESE-Q) and evidence for its…

  10. Analysis of the Problems Encountered in Education of Teachers and Solution Recommendations in Accordance with the Opinions of Faculty of Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahan, Gülsün

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to put forth the problems encountered in education of teachers and solution recommendations in accordance with the opinions of faculty of education students. Within this framework, the opinions of 182 first grade students from the departments of classroom, social sciences, science and mathematics teaching at Bartin…

  11. African-American women in an alcohol intervention group: addressing personal and political problems.

    PubMed

    Saulnier, C F

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes a qualitative study in which African-American women met in a small group to discuss alcohol and drug problems. The goal was to expand the range of services available by creating an alternative intervention which provided a simultaneous focus on both the personal and the sociopolitical needs of Black women. Results suggest that the dual focus on individual and social issues, and the opportunity to simultaneously address racism, sexism, and classism in an African-American women-only alcohol recovery group was helpful.

  12. Overcoming barriers to addressing education problems with research design: a panel discussion.

    PubMed

    Yarris, Lalena M; Gruppen, Larry D; Hamstra, Stanley J; Anders Ericsson, K; Cook, David A

    2012-12-01

    A plenary panel session at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Education Research in Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success" discussed barriers educators face in imagining, designing, and implementing studies to address educational challenges. This proceedings article presents a general approach to getting started in education research. Four examples of studies from the medical education literature that illustrate a distinct way to approach specific research questions are discussed. The study designs used are applicable to a variety of education research problems in emergency medicine (EM). Potential applications of studies are discussed, as well as effects and lessons learned.

  13. Interpreting Perceived Effectiveness: Understanding and Addressing the Problem of Mean Validity.

    PubMed

    Dillard, James Price; Ha, Yerheen

    2016-09-01

    Research has shown that perceived message effectiveness (PE) correlates reasonably well with indices of actual effectiveness, but little attention has been given to how to interpret mean PE. This article describes the problem of mean validity and presents a research design that can be used to address it. Participants (N = 195) viewed messages that advocated being screened for colorectal cancer. The results showed downward bias in PE among members of the non-target audience (persons younger than 50) and upward bias as the referent for the judgment became more abstract/distant (self vs. persons older than 50 vs. general). The need for more research on mean validity is discussed. For applied researchers, recommendations for preferred indices of PE are offered.

  14. Interpreting Perceived Effectiveness: Understanding and Addressing the Problem of Mean Validity.

    PubMed

    Dillard, James Price; Ha, Yerheen

    2016-09-01

    Research has shown that perceived message effectiveness (PE) correlates reasonably well with indices of actual effectiveness, but little attention has been given to how to interpret mean PE. This article describes the problem of mean validity and presents a research design that can be used to address it. Participants (N = 195) viewed messages that advocated being screened for colorectal cancer. The results showed downward bias in PE among members of the non-target audience (persons younger than 50) and upward bias as the referent for the judgment became more abstract/distant (self vs. persons older than 50 vs. general). The need for more research on mean validity is discussed. For applied researchers, recommendations for preferred indices of PE are offered. PMID:27565189

  15. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; Gallagher, M.; Gayet, J. -F.; Korolev, A.; Kraemer, M.; McFarquhar, G.; Mertes, S.; Moehler, O.; Lance, S.; Lawson, P.; Petters, M. D.; Pratt, K.; Roberts, G.; Rogers, D.; Stetzer, O.; Stith, J.; Strapp, W.; Twohy, C.; Wendisch, M.

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently under review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.

  16. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; et al

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently undermore » review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.« less

  17. Potential effects of the introduction of the discrete address beacon system data link on air/ground information transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    This study of Aviation Safety Reporting System reports suggests that benefits should accure from implementation of discrete address beacon system data link. The phase enhanced terminal information system service is expected to provide better terminal information than present systems by improving currency and accuracy. In the exchange of air traffic control messages, discrete address insures that only the intended recipient receives and acts on a specific message. Visual displays and printer copy of messages should mitigate many of the reported problems associated with voice communications. The problems that remain unaffected include error in addressing the intended recipient and messages whose content is wrong but are otherwise correct as to format and reasonableness.

  18. The Views of the Teachers Related to the Problems the Nursery Class Teachers Encounter in Personnel Services and General Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertör, Eren; Akan, Durdagi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to analyze the problems that the nursery school teachers, who worked in primary schools of Ministry of National Education in Agri city center in 2014-2015 academic years, experience in personnel services and general services according to the views of the teachers. In the direction of this purpose, phenomenology design,…

  19. Activity Theory as a Tool to Address the Problem of Chemistry's Lack of Relevance in Secondary School Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Aalsvoort, Joke

    2004-01-01

    In a previous article, the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary chemical education was analysed using logical positivism as a tool. This article starts with the hypothesis that the problem can be addressed by means of activity theory, one of the important theories within the sociocultural school. The reason for this expectation is…

  20. Vegetation mapping using high resolution MSS (Multispectral Scanner) data: Canopy reflectance and shadow problems encountered and possible solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.; Pinder, J.; Collins, B.S.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    High resolution Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data were acquired for an old field, successional habitat in South Carolina. The instrument used was a Daedalus Model DS-1268 having 1.5 x 1.5 m spatial resolution and 11 spectral bands. The goal was to map the vegetation of the study area and compute standing biomass. Upon examination of the MSS data, it became apparent that additional information would be required to accurately discriminate between the vegetation types because of (1) nonuniformity of canopy reflectance from individual trees due to sun angle and azimuth, and (2) shadows cast by trees. This paper describes the nature of the canopy reflectance problem, methods of removing the effects of shadows in high resolution MSS data, and the computation of biomass for the study area.

  1. Addressing the Spectrum of Adolescent Weight-Related Problems: Engaging Parents and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2007-01-01

    Weight-related problems, including eating disorders, disordered eating, and obesity, are prevalent among adolescents. School and community-based educators and health care providers have an important role to play in the prevention of weight-related problems in youth. This article includes: 1) a brief overview of weight-related problems in…

  2. First Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shauck, Barry

    2005-01-01

    Professional development through the advanced planning of themed exhibitions provides art instructors in Howard County, Maryland, the impetus for many of the ideas that may become artful problems presented to students. In this installment of the series Artful Collaborations, Stacey McKenna and Gino Molfino share their response for the spring 2001…

  3. Problems, solutions and actions: addressing barriers in acute hospital care for indigenous Australians and New Zealanders.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; MacIsaac, Andrew; Cameron, James; Jeremy, Richmond; Mahar, Leo; Anderson, Ian

    2012-10-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease for Indigenous people in Australia and New Zealand is high and reflects the failings of our health care system to meet their needs. Improving the hospital care for Indigenous people is critical in improving health outcomes. This paper provides the results from a facilitated discussion on the disparities in acute hospital care and workforce issues. The workshop was held in Alice Springs, Australia at the second Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference. Critical issues to be addressed include: addressing systemic racism; reconfiguring models of care to address the needs of Indigenous people; cultural competence training for all health professionals; increasing participation of Indigenous people in the health workforce; improving information systems and facilitating communication across the health care sector and with Indigenous communities.

  4. A Case Study of Team-Initiated Problem Solving Addressing Student Behavior in One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Anne W.; Horner, Robert H.; Berry, Dorothy; Sanders, Carol; Bugni, Michelle; Currier, Allison; Potts, Nicky; Newton, J. Stephen; Algozzine, Bob; Algozzine, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) is an approach for organizing school team meetings to improve identification of targeted problems, use of data in the development of solutions, and development of implemented action plans. TIPS has been demonstrated in single-case and randomized controlled trial studies to improve the effectiveness of teams to…

  5. Case studies of unique problems and events encountered during design, construction, and operation of three large commercial-scale fuel ethanol plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes the unique problems and events encountered during the design, construction, start-up, and operation phases of three differently constructed alcohol fuel projects. These projects were awarded cost sharing contracts (Cooperative Agreements) as part of the Department of Energy's effort to expedite ethanol production on a commercial scale. The scope of the projects included final design, economic and financial analysis, market analysis, environmental analysis, facility construction, and plant start-up operation. The three ethanol plants are a 20-million gallon per year (MMGPY) new-construction or grass roots facility; a 60-MMGPY plant constructed using refurbished equipment at a decommissioned ammonia fertilizer facility; and a 10-MMGPY retrofitted brewery. A comparison of the case histories of these projects clearly points out the advantages and disadvantages of each type of design and construction.

  6. Addressing the Intercultural via Task-Based Language Teaching: Possibility or Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A frequent weakness of communicative approaches to foreign language teaching is a neglect of the intercultural dimension. Cultural knowledge is often treated as an addendum which focuses on learning facts about the target country. This article explores whether task-based language teaching (TBLT) can successfully address the intercultural…

  7. Efforts to Empower Teachers in Ethiopia to Address Local Environmental Problems: Achievements and Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalelo, Aklilu

    2009-01-01

    It is believed that the possibilities of integrating environmental issues into the formal and nonformal education programs depend on the capacity of teachers who put such programs into effect. A pilot project, aimed at building the capacity of schools in Ethiopia to address key environmental issues, was initiated in 2004. Among the major…

  8. Portrayal as a Way of Addressing Problems in Communicating Evaluation Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Melvin E.

    Program portrayal is one way of addressing the need for increased descriptive capability in evaluation research. Portrayal supplements traditional reporting by utilizing subjective, anecdotal, or impressionistic information, in an appropriately communicable form, to enrich the description of program transactions, settings, and outcomes. It is…

  9. "Who Are You Calling a Problem?": Addressing Transphobia and Homophobia through School Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loutzenheiser, Lisa W.

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a detailed analysis of two school board-level policies in British Columbia, Canada that address the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and transgender, Two Spirit (LGBQ and TT) youth to demonstrate how the language of the policy holds meaning and re/produces particular knowledges. Rather than offer an analysis that…

  10. A Concept Space Approach to Addressing the Vocabulary Problem in Scientific Information Retrieval: An Experiment on the Worm Community System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Ng, Tobun D.; Martinez, Joanne; Schatz, Bruce R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an algorithmic approach to addressing the vocabulary problem in scientific information retrieval and information sharing, using the molecular biology domain as an example. A cognitive study and a follow-up document retrieval study were conducted using first a conjoined fly-worm thesaurus and then an actual worm database and the conjoined…

  11. Uncommon strategies for a common problem: addressing racism in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Laszloffy, T A; Hardy, K V

    2000-01-01

    Race and racism have a profound effect on our daily lives and the practice of family therapy. Whether individual or institutional level, overt or covert, intentional or unintentional, there are a variety of ways in which racism can infiltrate the therapeutic process. Before therapists can take steps to address racism effectively within the context of family therapy, it is important to attend to the development of their racial awareness and racial sensitivity. These provide the critical foundation upon which specific skills and strategies associated with effectively identifying and responding to racism in therapy are based. This article defines racial awareness and sensitivity and provides suggestions for enhancing both. In the section that follows, three major ways in which racism can infiltrate the therapeutic process are described. Skills and strategies for addressing each of these in family therapy are presented.

  12. Addressing Students' Difficulties with Faraday's Law: A Guided Problem Solving Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuza, Kristina; Almudí, José-Manuel; Leniz, Ane; Guisasola, Jenaro

    2014-01-01

    In traditional teaching, the fundamental concepts of electromagnetic induction are usually quickly analyzed, spending most of the time solving problems in a more or less rote manner. However, physics education research has shown that the fundamental concepts of the electromagnetic induction theory are barely understood by students. This article…

  13. Analysis of Arguments Constructed by First-Year Engineering Students Addressing Electromagnetic Induction Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almudi, Jose Manuel; Ceberio, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the quality of arguments used by first-year engineering university students enrolled in a traditional physics course dealing with electromagnetic induction and related problem solving where they had to assess whether the electromagnetic induction phenomenon would occur. Their conclusions were analyzed for the relevance of the…

  14. Education Technologies in Addressing the Problem of Forming the Socially Active Individual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popova, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the analysis of technological support of the educational process in solving the problem of forming the socially active individual. The authors studied the value of the category "social activity" and analyzed educational technologies that have an impact on its formation. The obtained results gave the possibility…

  15. Addressing the Wicked Problem of Quality in Higher Education: Theoretical Approaches and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Kerri-Lee

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the wicked problem of quality in higher education, arguing for a more robust theorising of the subject at national, institutional and local department level. The focus of the discussion rests on principles for theorising in more rigorous ways about the multidimensional issue of quality. Quality in higher education is proposed…

  16. Addressing Cultural Diversity: Effects of a Problem-Based Intercultural Learning Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busse, Vera; Krause, Ulrike-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores to what extent a problem-based learning unit in combination with cooperative learning and affectively oriented teaching methods facilitates intercultural learning. As part of the study, students reflected on critical incidents, which display misunderstandings or conflicts that arise as a result of cultural differences. In…

  17. Ecosystem services and cooperative fisheries research to address a complex fishery problem

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River represents a complex fishery management problem. Current fishery management goals have to be developed taking into account bi-state commercial, subsistence and recreational fisheries which are valued for different characteristics by a wide range of anglers, as...

  18. Promoting Health by Addressing Basic Needs: Effect of Problem Resolution on Contacting Health Referrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Tess; Kreuter, Matthew W.; Boyum, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Members of vulnerable populations have heightened needs for health services. One advantage of integrating health risk assessment and referrals into social service assistance systems such as 2-1-1 is that such systems help callers resolve problems in other areas (e.g., housing). Callers to 2-1-1 in Missouri (N = 1,090) with at least one behavioral…

  19. Road-traffic injuries: confronting disparities to address a global-health problem.

    PubMed

    Ameratunga, Shanthi; Hijar, Martha; Norton, Robyn

    2006-05-01

    Evidence suggests that the present and projected global burden of road-traffic injuries is disproportionately borne by countries that can least afford to meet the health service, economic, and societal challenges posed. Although the evidence base on which these estimates are made remains somewhat precarious in view of the limited data systems in most low-income and middle-income countries (as per the classification on the World Bank website), these projections highlight the essential need to address road-traffic injuries as a public-health priority. Most well-evaluated effective interventions do not directly focus on efforts to protect vulnerable road users, such as motorcyclists and pedestrians. Yet, these groups comprise the majority of road-traffic victims in low-income and middle-income countries, and consequently, the majority of the road-traffic victims globally. Appropriately responding to these disparities in available evidence and prevention efforts is necessary if we are to comprehensively address this global-health dilemma. PMID:16679167

  20. Scientific problems addressed by the Spektr-UV space project (world space Observatory—Ultraviolet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarchuk, A. A.; Shustov, B. M.; Savanov, I. S.; Sachkov, M. E.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Wiebe, D. Z.; Shematovich, V. I.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.; Ryabchikova, T. A.; Chugai, N. N.; Ivanov, P. B.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Gomez de Castro, A. I.; Lamzin, S. A.; Piskunov, N.; Ayres, T.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Jeffrey, S.; Zwintz, S. K.; Shulyak, D.; Gérard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.; Fossati, L.; Lammer, H.; Werner, K.; Zhilkin, A. G.; Kaigorodov, P. V.; Sichevskii, S. G.; Ustamuich, S.; Kanev, E. N.; Kil'pio, E. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a review of scientific problems and methods of ultraviolet astronomy, focusing on perspective scientific problems (directions) whose solution requires UV space observatories. These include reionization and the history of star formation in the Universe, searches for dark baryonic matter, physical and chemical processes in the interstellar medium and protoplanetary disks, the physics of accretion and outflows in astrophysical objects, from Active Galactic Nuclei to close binary stars, stellar activity (for both low-mass and high-mass stars), and processes occurring in the atmospheres of both planets in the solar system and exoplanets. Technological progress in UV astronomy achieved in recent years is also considered. The well advanced, international, Russian-led Spektr-UV (World Space Observatory—Ultraviolet) project is described in more detail. This project is directed at creating a major space observatory operational in the ultraviolet (115-310 nm). This observatory will provide an effective, and possibly the only, powerful means of observing in this spectral range over the next ten years, and will be an powerful tool for resolving many topical scientific problems.

  1. Dual-Use Partnership Addresses Performance Problems with "Y" Pattern Control Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John W.

    2004-01-01

    A Dual-Use Cooperative Agreement between the Propulsion Test Directorate (PTD) at Stennis Space Center (SSC) and Oceaneering Reflange, Inc. of Houston, TX has produced an improved 'Y' pattern split-body control valve for use in the propulsion test facilities at Stennis Space Center. The split-body, or clamped bonnet technology, provides for a 'cleaner' valve design featuring enhanced performance and increased flow capacity with extended life expectancy. Other points addressed by the partnership include size, weight and costs. Overall size and weight of each valve will be reduced by 50% compared to valves currently in use at SSC. An initial procurement of two 10 inch valves will result in an overall cost reduction of 15% or approximately $50,000 per valve.

  2. Can Go address the multicore issues of today and the manycore problems of tomorrow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binet, Sébastien

    2012-06-01

    Current High Energy and Nuclear Physics (HENP) libraries and frameworks were written before multicore systems became widely deployed and used. From this environment, a 'single-thread' processing model naturally emerged but the implicit assumptions it encouraged are greatly impairing our abilities to scale in a multicore/manycore world. While parallel programming - still in an intensive phase of R&D despite the 30+ years of literature on the subject - is an obvious topic to consider, other issues (build scalability, code clarity, code deployment and ease of coding) are worth investigating when preparing for the manycore era. Moreover, if one wants to use another language than C++, a language better prepared and tailored for expressing concurrency, one also needs to ensure a good and easy reuse of already field-proven libraries. We present the work resulting from such investigations applied to the Go programming language. We first introduce the concurrent programming facilities Go is providing and how its module system addresses the build scalability and dependency hell issues. We then describe the process of leveraging the many (wo)man-years put into scientific Fortran/C/C++ libraries and making them available to the Go ecosystem. The ROOT data analysis framework, the C-BLAS library and the Herwig-6 MonteCarlo generator will be taken as examples. Finally, performances of the tools involved in a small analysis written in Go and using ROOT I/O library will be presented.

  3. Brown Superfund Basic research Program: a multistakeholder partnership addresses real-world problems in contaminated communities.

    PubMed

    Senier, Laura; Hudson, Benjamin; Fort, Sarah; Hoover, Elizabeth; Tillson, Rebecca; Brown, Phil

    2008-07-01

    The NIEHS funds several basic and applied research programs, many of which also require research translation or outreach. This paper reports on a project by the Brown University Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in which outreach and research translation teams collaborated with state regulatory agency personnel and community activists on a legislative initiative to mitigate the financial impacts of living in a contaminated community. The Environmentally Compromised Home Ownership (ECHO) program makes home equity loans of up to $25,000 available to qualified applicants. This collaboration provides a case study in community engagement and demonstrates how research translation and outreach activities that are clearly differentiated yet well-integrated can improve a suite of basic and applied research. Although engaging diverse constituencies can be difficult community-engaged translation and outreach have the potential to make research findings more useful to communities, address some of the social impacts of contamination, and empower stakeholders to pursue their individual and collectively held goals for remediation. The NIEHS has recently renewed its commitment to community-engaged research and advocacy, making this an optimal time to reflect on how basic research programs that engage stakeholders through research translation and outreach can add value to the overall research enterprise. PMID:18677987

  4. Addressing students' difficulties with Faraday's law: A guided problem solving approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, Kristina; Almudí, José-Manuel; Leniz, Ane; Guisasola, Jenaro

    2014-06-01

    In traditional teaching, the fundamental concepts of electromagnetic induction are usually quickly analyzed, spending most of the time solving problems in a more or less rote manner. However, physics education research has shown that the fundamental concepts of the electromagnetic induction theory are barely understood by students. This article proposes an interactive teaching sequence introducing the topic of electromagnetic induction. The sequence has been designed based on contributions from physics education research. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between experimental findings (macroscopic level) and theoretical interpretation (microscopic level). An example of the activities that have been designed will also be presented, describing the implementation context and the corresponding findings. Since implementing the sequence, a considerable number of students have a more satisfactory grasp of the electromagnetic induction explicative model. However, difficulties are manifested in aspects that require a multilevel explanation, referring to deep structures where the system description is better defined.

  5. Addressing the problem of glass thickness variation in the indirect slumping technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Wellnhofer, Christoph; Breunig, Elias; Friedrich, Peter; Winter, Anita

    2015-09-01

    The indirect hot slumping technology is being developed at Max-Planck-Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) for the manufacturing of lightweight astronomical X-ray telescopes. It consists of a thermal shaping process to replicate the figure of a suitable mould into segments of X-ray mirror shells made by glass. Several segments are aligned and mounted into elemental modules, a number of which is then assembled together to form the telescope. To obtain mirror segments of high optical quality, the realization of the slumping thermal cycle itself is of fundamental importance, but also the starting materials, primarily the mould and the glass foils, play a major role. This paper will review the MPE approach in the slumping technology development and will then concentrate on the glass, with particular regards to the problem of thickness variation.

  6. How multiagency partnerships can successfully address large-scale pollution problems: a Hawaii case study.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Mary J

    2003-06-01

    Oceanic circulation patterns deposit significant amounts of marine pollution, including derelict fishing gear from North Pacific Ocean fisheries, in the Hawaiian Archipelago [Mar. Pollut. Bull. 42(12) (2001) 1301]. Management responsibility for these islands and their associated natural resources is shared by several government authorities. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and private industry also have interests in the archipelago. Since the marine debris problem in this region is too large for any single agency to manage, a multiagency marine debris working group (group) was established in 1998 to improve marine debris mitigation in Hawaii. To date, 16 federal, state, and local agencies, working with industry and NGOs, have removed 195 tons of derelict fishing gear from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. This review details the evolution of the partnership, notes its challenges and rewards, and advocates its continued use as an effective resource management tool.

  7. Iron deficiency anemia among children: Addressing a global public health problem within a Canadian context.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Anna; Schauer, Claudia; Zlotkin, Stanley H

    2005-12-01

    Despite current Canadian pre- and perinatal nutrition programs, the prevalence of both iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is very high among young Aboriginal children from Canada's remote north. The major risk factors for IDA include prolonged consumption of evaporated cow's milk, chronic infection and prolonged exclusive breastfeeding. In the present article, the authors discuss IDA as a significant public health problem in Canadian Aboriginal communities. Whereas the prevalence of IDA in Canadian children is between 3.5% and 10.5% in the general population, in two Northern Ontario First Nations communities and one Inuit community, the anemia rate was 36%, with 56% having depleted iron stores. Traditional methods of preventing IDA, including targeted fortification, dietary diversification and supplementation, have not solved the problem. The authors' research group at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, conceived of the strategy of 'home fortification' with 'Sprinkles' - single-dose sachets containing micronutrients in a powder form, which are easily sprinkled onto any foods prepared in the household. In Sprinkles, the iron (ferrous fumarate) is encapsulated within a thin lipid layer to prevent the iron from interacting with food. Sprinkles have been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of anemia in many developing countries. Their use in Aboriginal communities to treat and prevent anemia is described in the present paper. The authors believe that children in Aboriginal communities across Canada would potentially benefit if Sprinkles were incorporated into Health Canada's current distribution system, in combination with a social marketing strategy to encourage their use.

  8. Study of effects of uncertainties of comet and asteroid encounter and contact guidance requirements. Part 2: Tumbling problem studies. [development of navigation and guidance techniques for space rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of determining the rotational motion of a tumbling celestial body of the asteroid type using spacecraft-acquired data is addressed. The rotational motion of the body is modeled by free-Eulerian motion of a triaxial, rigid body and its translational motion with respect, to a nonrotating, observing spacecraft, which is not thrusting, is assumed to be uniform during the time observations are made. The mathematical details which form the basis for a digital simulation of the motion and observations are presented. Two algorithms for determining the motion from observations for the special case of uniform rotational motion are given.

  9. Addressing the issue of cataloging and making chiropractic literature accessible: Part I: Defining the problem.

    PubMed

    Curl, D D; Antovich, T J

    1990-06-01

    Health science journals are a principle source of new knowledge for chiropractors, chiropractic faculty and students. Regrettably, clinically or educationally relevant articles (appearing in the nearly 20,000 journals annually) are often overlooked due to access difficulties. Innovations are needed to assist the reader to select articles relevant to chiropractic and reduce the time spent sorting through the volumes of literature. A review of the literature shows there is a trend toward database management for cataloging and accessibility of other, nonchiropractic, literature. Most notable of these is an endeavor by National Technical Information Service, commonly referred to as MEDLARS (Medline). It is interesting to note that a computer-assisted library database program does not exist on any chiropractic campus. This is in contrast with the trend on campuses of other health care fields. Manual search strategies within the chiropractic literature are time consuming, subject to a high failure rate, and even if the search produces citations, there is no assurance the journal can be accessed unless a chiropractic campus is nearby. Furthermore, difficulties exist when a chiropractic literature search is attempted in any computerized database, e.g., MEDLARS (Medline). Journals/articles that are unique to chiropractic (national, international or on the state level) are not specifically included in these computerized databases. Aside from these difficulties, there exists the problem of finding those articles that contain valid and relevant information from among those that are less valid or informative. PMID:2198323

  10. Activity theory as a tool to address the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary school chemical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aalsvoort, Joke

    In a previous article, the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary chemical education was analysed using logical positivism as a tool. This article starts with the hypothesis that the problem can be addressed by means of activity theory, one of the important theories within the sociocultural school. The reason for this expectation is that, while logical positivism creates a divide between science and society, activity theory offers a model of society in which science and society are related. With the use of this model, a new course for grade nine has been constructed. This results in a confirmation of the hypothesis, at least at a theoretical level. A comparison with the Salters' approach is made in order to demonstrate the relative merits of a mediated way of dealing with the problem of the lack of relevance of chemistry in chemical education.

  11. Cospatial [O III] emission with Herschel and Hubble to address the nebular abundance discrepancy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Robert

    2012-10-01

    There exist planetary nebulae {PNe} whose heavy element C, N, O, and Ne abundances as derived from optical recombination lines {ORLs} are a factor more than 5 higher than those derived from the traditional method based on collisionally excited lines {CELs}. This ratio is called the abundance discrepancy factor {adf}. A promising proposition to explain this long-standing nebular abundance problem posits that these nebulae contain {at least} two distinct regions - one of "normal" electron temperature, Te { 10000 K} and chemical composition { solar} and another of very low Te {< 1000} that is H-deficient, thus having high metal abundances relative to H. The latter component emits strong heavy element ORLs and IR fine-structure {FS} CELs, but essentially no optical/UV CELs. Efforts to directly detect these inclusions in PNe have been unsuccessful to date. However, there is mounting circumstantial evidence for their existence, such as presented in our recent paper that modeled the high-adf PN NGC 6153 using a 3-D photoionization code. The models that included the low Te, H-deficient knots fit most observations far better than did those models without the clumps. It has been shown that the adf varies with position in a PN and is highest close to the central star. The very low Te inclusions must be cooled predominantly by FS mid-IR lines. We propose to use HST archival images to derive [O III] 5007 A flux maps to compare with the [O III] 88 micron fluxes from our Herschel observations of four PNe - NGC 2392, NGC 2440, NGC 6720 and NGC 7009 - all on the largest adf list, to find if the IR line flux relative to the cospatial optical forbidden line flux peaks where the adf peaks.

  12. Data Movement Dominates: Advanced Memory Technology to Address the Real Exascale Power Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Keren

    2014-08-28

    Energy is the fundamental barrier to Exascale supercomputing and is dominated by the cost of moving data from one point to another, not computation. Similarly, performance is dominated by data movement, not computation. The solution to this problem requires three critical technologies: 3D integration, optical chip-to-chip communication, and a new communication model. The central goal of the Sandia led "Data Movement Dominates" project aimed to develop memory systems and new architectures based on these technologies that have the potential to lower the cost of local memory accesses by orders of magnitude and provide substantially more bandwidth. Only through these transformational advances can future systems reach the goals of Exascale computing with a manageable power budgets. The Sandia led team included co-PIs from Columbia University, Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and the University of Maryland. The Columbia effort of Data Movement Dominates focused on developing a physically accurate simulation environment and experimental verification for optically-connected memory (OCM) systems that can enable continued performance scaling through high-bandwidth capacity, energy-efficient bit-rate transparency, and time-of-flight latency. With OCM, memory device parallelism and total capacity can scale to match future high-performance computing requirements without sacrificing data-movement efficiency. When we consider systems with integrated photonics, links to memory can be seamlessly integrated with the interconnection network-in a sense, memory becomes a primary aspect of the interconnection network. At the core of the Columbia effort, toward expanding our understanding of OCM enabled computing we have created an integrated modeling and simulation environment that uniquely integrates the physical behavior of the optical layer. The PhoenxSim suite of design and software tools developed under this effort has enabled the co-design of and performance evaluation photonics-enabled OCM

  13. A roadmap for climate change adaptation in Sweden's forests: addressing wicked problems using adaptive management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rist, L.; Felton, A.; Samuelsson, L.; Marald, E.; Karlsson, B.; Johansson, U.; Rosvall, O.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is expected to have significant direct and indirect effects on forest ecosystems. Forests will have to adapt not only to changes in mean climate variables but also to increased climatic variability and altered disturbance regimes. Rates of change will likely exceed many forests capabilities to naturally adapt and many of today's trees will be exposed to the climates of 2090. In Sweden the effects are already being seen and more severe impacts are expected in the future. Exacerbating the challenge posed by climate change, a large proportion of Sweden's forests are, as a consequence of dominant production goals, greatly simplified and thus potentially more vulnerable to the uncertainties and risks associated with climate change. This simplification also confers reduced adaptive capacity to respond to potential impacts. Furthermore, many adaptation measures themselves carry uncertainties and risks. Future changes and effects are thus uncertain, yet forest managers, policymakers, scientists and other stakeholders must act. Strategies that build social and ecological resilience in the face of multiple interacting unknowns and surprises are needed. Adaptive management aims to collect and integrate knowledge about how a managed system is likely to respond to alternative management schemes and changing environmental conditions within a continuous decision process. There have been suggestions that adaptive management is not well suited to the large complex uncertainties associated with climate change and associated adaptation measures. However, more recently it has been suggested that adaptive management can handle such wicked problems, given adequate resources and a suitable breakdown of the targeted uncertainties. Here we test this hypothesis by evaluating how an adaptive management process could be used to manage the uncertainties and risks associated with securing resilient, biodiverse and productive forests in Sweden in the face of climate change. We

  14. Lattice Boltzmann Methods to Address Fundamental Boiling and Two-Phase Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, Rizwan

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the progress made during the fourth (no cost extension) year of this three-year grant aimed at the development of a consistent Lattice Boltzmann formulation for boiling and two-phase flows. During the first year, a consistent LBM formulation for the simulation of a two-phase water-steam system was developed. Results of initial model validation in a range of thermo-dynamic conditions typical for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) were shown. Progress was made on several fronts during the second year. Most important of these included the simulation of the coalescence of two bubbles including the surface tension effects. Work during the third year focused on the development of a new lattice Boltzmann model, called the artificial interface lattice Boltzmann model (AILB model) for the 3 simulation of two-phase dynamics. The model is based on the principle of free energy minimization and invokes the Gibbs-Duhem equation in the formulation of non-ideal forcing function. This was reported in detail in the last progress report. Part of the efforts during the last (no-cost extension) year were focused on developing a parallel capability for the 2D as well as for the 3D codes developed in this project. This will be reported in the final report. Here we report the work carried out on testing the AILB model for conditions including the thermal effects. A simplified thermal LB model, based on the thermal energy distribution approach, was developed. The simplifications are made after neglecting the viscous heat dissipation and the work done by pressure in the original thermal energy distribution model. Details of the model are presented here, followed by a discussion of the boundary conditions, and then results for some two-phase thermal problems.

  15. Statistical issues encountered in the comparison of health-related quality of life in diseased patients to published general population norms: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Rose, M S; Koshman, M L; Spreng, S; Sheldon, R

    1999-05-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to illustrate the statistical problems encountered when comparing health-related quality of life (HRQL) measured by the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) in a diseased group to general population norms, and (2) to define age- and gender-standardized dichotomous indicator variables for each health concept and show that these indicator variables facilitate comparisons between the diseased sample and the general population. Our "diseased" group consisted of 136 sequentially consenting patients referred to the syncope clinic for assessment and treatment. Participants completed the SF-36 questionnaire before undergoing diagnostic testing. General population norms for the SF-36 are available from the responses of 2474 participants in the National Survey of Functional Health Status, conducted in 1990 in the United States. Comparison of the SF-36 in a diseased sample with general population norms is difficult, owing to skewed and unusual distributions in both groups. In addition, making comparisons within age and gender strata is difficult if the within strata sample size is small. We propose a dichotomous indicator variable for each health concept that classifies an individual as having impaired health if he or she scored lower than the 25th percentile for the appropriate age and gender general population strata. By definition, the prevalence of impaired health in the general population is 25% for all eight health concepts. Comparison between the eight health-concept variables is easy because the population norm is the same for each of them. These indicator variables are age and gender adjusted, so that even if the sample did not have the age and gender distribution as the general population, comparisons can still be made with the value of 25.

  16. Using ecotechnology to address water quality and wetland habitat loss problems in the Mississippi basin: a hierarchical approach.

    PubMed

    Day, John W; Yañéz Arancibia, Alejandro; Mitsch, William J; Lara-Dominguez, Ana Laura; Day, Jason N; Ko, Jae-Young; Lane, Robert; Lindsey, Joel; Lomeli, David Zarate

    2003-12-01

    Human activities are affecting the environment at continental and global scales. An example of this is the Mississippi basin where there has been a large scale loss of wetlands and water quality deterioration over the past century. Wetland and riparian ecosystems have been isolated from rivers and streams. Wetland loss is due both to drainage and reclamation, mainly for agriculture, and to isolation from the river by levees, as in the Mississippi delta. There has been a decline in water quality due to increasing use of fertilizers, enhanced drainage and the loss of wetlands for cleaning water. Water quality has deteriorated throughout the basin and high nitrogen in the Mississippi river is causing a large area of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi delta. Since the causes of these problems are distributed over the basin, the solution also needs to be distributed over the basin. Ecotechnology and ecological engineering offer the only ecologically sound and cost-effective method of solving these problems. Wetlands to promote nitrogen removal, mainly through denitrification but also through burial and plant uptake, offer a sound ecotechnological solution. At the level of the Mississippi basin, changes in farming practices and use of wetlands for nitrogen assimilation can reduce nitrogen levels in the River. There are additional benefits of restoration of wetland and riverine ecosystems, flood control, reduction in public health threats, and enhanced wildlife and fisheries. At the local drainage basin level, the use of river diversions in the Mississippi delta can address both problems of coastal land loss and water quality deterioration. Nitrate levels in diverted river water are rapidly reduced as water flows through coastal watersheds. At the local level, wetlands are being used to treat municipal wastewater. This is a cost-effective method, which results in improved water quality, enhanced wetland productivity and increased accretion. The

  17. Using ecotechnology to address water quality and wetland habitat loss problems in the Mississippi basin: a hierarchical approach.

    PubMed

    Day, John W; Yañéz Arancibia, Alejandro; Mitsch, William J; Lara-Dominguez, Ana Laura; Day, Jason N; Ko, Jae-Young; Lane, Robert; Lindsey, Joel; Lomeli, David Zarate

    2003-12-01

    Human activities are affecting the environment at continental and global scales. An example of this is the Mississippi basin where there has been a large scale loss of wetlands and water quality deterioration over the past century. Wetland and riparian ecosystems have been isolated from rivers and streams. Wetland loss is due both to drainage and reclamation, mainly for agriculture, and to isolation from the river by levees, as in the Mississippi delta. There has been a decline in water quality due to increasing use of fertilizers, enhanced drainage and the loss of wetlands for cleaning water. Water quality has deteriorated throughout the basin and high nitrogen in the Mississippi river is causing a large area of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi delta. Since the causes of these problems are distributed over the basin, the solution also needs to be distributed over the basin. Ecotechnology and ecological engineering offer the only ecologically sound and cost-effective method of solving these problems. Wetlands to promote nitrogen removal, mainly through denitrification but also through burial and plant uptake, offer a sound ecotechnological solution. At the level of the Mississippi basin, changes in farming practices and use of wetlands for nitrogen assimilation can reduce nitrogen levels in the River. There are additional benefits of restoration of wetland and riverine ecosystems, flood control, reduction in public health threats, and enhanced wildlife and fisheries. At the local drainage basin level, the use of river diversions in the Mississippi delta can address both problems of coastal land loss and water quality deterioration. Nitrate levels in diverted river water are rapidly reduced as water flows through coastal watersheds. At the local level, wetlands are being used to treat municipal wastewater. This is a cost-effective method, which results in improved water quality, enhanced wetland productivity and increased accretion. The

  18. Emotions in relation to healthcare encounters affecting self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Räty, Lena; Gustafsson, Barbro

    2006-02-01

    This study identifies emotions in patients with epilepsy as a result of confirming and disconfirming healthcare experiences. A discussion of emotions as a motive for patients' goal-directed actions was a further aim of this study. The critical incident method was used for data collection. Emotions occurring in confirming and disconfirming healthcare encounters were analyzed using the Belief-Desire Theory of Emotions and were categorized as basic, complex, or self-evaluating. Confirming encounters aroused emotions like hope, a feeling of security, joy, relief, and pride, while disconfirming encounters aroused emotions like despair, fear, unrest, resignation, shame, and guilt. The emotions identified in the healthcare encounters were recognized as motives for action. An emotion such as a feeling of security aroused a desire in the patients to strengthen their positive self and motivated them to have a constructive and sympathetic attitude toward the healthcare experience. An emotion such as anger caused patients to strive to maintain their self-respect either by avoiding difficult situations and ignoring the problem (patients with a low self-esteem) or by trying to re-create a positive self-image (patients with a high self-esteem). Healthcare encounters between patient and caregiver considerably affect the patient's emotional status and thereby his or her well-being. The importance of establishing healthcare encounters that evoke positive emotions that strengthen patients' resources must be addressed in future nursing care.

  19. [To encounter oneself, to encounter each other].

    PubMed

    Kogan, A A

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to elucidate the concept of encounter within the realm of psycotherapy, either individual or group, with its inter and intrapersonal connotations. Its importance is emphasized and means for its achievement are suggested. A double course is followed to attain this end: on the one hand, the tracing of the concept in the contemporary philosophic anthropology (the positions of M. Buber and of K. Jaspers are briefly examined) and in the views of several psychotherapists who have placed it as a significant issue in their treatments (the therapists considered are K. Binswanger, C. Rogers, J. L. Moreno and E. Pichon-Rivière), and on the other hand, some clinical means, and very special attitudes, are indicated as particularly favourable for the promotion of that enlargement of subjectivity leading to the encounter of one-self as well as the other person. Some fragments of sessions are presented demonstrating that in general the "how" of the attitude prevailing in the therapeutic relation is more effective than the "what" of the specific technical resources employed. However, some of these are commendable as a more direct way to bring about the experience of encounter. This leads me to psychodrama, with its techniques of the double, the inversion of roles, the mirror, and most of all with the general group sharing that closes the sessions, and to the gestalt methods, which involve in many instances physical contacts with other people, with the precise object of achieving a maximum insight, or, in the already classical expression, awareness, which is basically an encounter with oneself. Implicit in all the above considerations lies the conviction that man must share his existence with others not only for biological reasons; it is an indispensable requirement for his full development as an individual, a requirement for being himself. If one of the goals of psychological treatments is to promote personal growth and proximity to oneself, an

  20. Angry Birds Space Encounter

    NASA Video Gallery

    At NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, a grand opening celebration was held for the new Angry Birds Space Encounter, March 22. Finland-based Rovio Entertainment, the creator of ...

  1. Why Has It Taken So Long to Address the Problems Created by Uranium Mining in the Navajo Nation?

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug

    2016-02-01

    Following the start of uranium mining after World War II, progress toward addressing the hazards it created for workers and nearby communities was slow, taking many decades. This essay asks why it took so long and suggests several factors that might have contributed. PMID:26463258

  2. Why Has It Taken So Long to Address the Problems Created by Uranium Mining in the Navajo Nation?

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug

    2016-02-01

    Following the start of uranium mining after World War II, progress toward addressing the hazards it created for workers and nearby communities was slow, taking many decades. This essay asks why it took so long and suggests several factors that might have contributed.

  3. Indoor Air Quality: Federal and State Actions To Address the Indoor Air Quality Problems of Selected Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrero, Peter F.

    U.S. House of Representative members requested that the General Accounting Office determine what federal and state actions have been taken in addressing indoor air quality (IAQ) concerns raised in certain school, state, and federal buildings within Vermont, Maryland, and the District of Columbia. This report responds to this request and describes…

  4. Identifying and addressing mental health risks and problems in primary care pediatric settings: a model to promote developmental and cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Leandra; Carter, Alice S

    2013-01-01

    Young children, particularly uninsured children of color, suffer from mental health disturbances at rates similar to older children and adults, yet they have higher rates of unmet needs. To address unmet needs, efforts to identify mental health problems in primary care pediatric settings have grown in recent years, thanks in large part to expanded screening efforts. Yet, health disparities in early detection remain. Enhancing understanding of how early childhood mental health problems can be identified and addressed within pediatric settings is an important and growing area of research. The authors draw on theoretical models from public health policy, health psychology, and child development, including health beliefs, help seeking, transtheoretical, motivation to change, and dynamic systems, to better understand and address challenges to and disparities in identifying and addressing mental health problems in pediatric settings. These theories have not previously been applied to early mental health screening and identification efforts. Developmental and sociocultural considerations are highlighted in an effort to address and reduce higher rates of unmet needs among young, uninsured children of color.

  5. Evaluation of Internet-Based Technology for Supporting Self-Care: Problems Encountered by Patients and Caregivers When Using Self-Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia; Boer, Henk; Steehouder, Michaël F; Seydel, Erwin R

    2008-01-01

    Background Prior studies have shown that many patients are interested in Internet-based technology that enables them to control their own care. As a result, innovative eHealth services are evolving rapidly, including self-assessment tools and secure patient-caregiver email communication. It is interesting to explore how these technologies can be used for supporting self-care. Objective The aim of this study was to determine user-centered criteria for successful application of Internet-based technology used in primary care for supporting self-care. Methods We conducted scenario-based tests combined with in-depth interviews among 14 caregivers and 14 patients/consumers to describe the use of various self-care applications and the accompanying user problems. We focused on the user-friendliness of the applications, the quality of care provided by the applications, and the implementation of the applications in practice. Results Problems with the user-friendliness of the self-care applications concerned inadequate navigation structures and search options and lack of feedback features. Patients want to retrieve health information with as little effort as possible; however, the navigation and search functionalities of the applications appeared incapable of handling patients’ health complaints efficiently. Among caregivers, the lack of feedback and documentation possibilities caused inconvenience. Caregivers wanted to know how patients acted on their advice, but the applications did not offer an adequate feedback feature. Quality of care problems were mainly related to insufficient tailoring of information to patients’ needs and to efficiency problems. Patients expected personalized advice to control their state of health, but the applications failed to deliver this. Language (semantics) also appeared as an obstacle to providing appropriate and useful self-care advice. Caregivers doubted the reliability of the computer-generated information and the efficiency and

  6. The virtual network supporting the front lines: addressing emerging behavioral health problems following the tsunami of 2004.

    PubMed

    Reissman, Dori B; Schreiber, Merritt; Klomp, Richard W; Hoover, Michele; Kowalski-Trakofler, Kathleen; Perez, Jon

    2006-10-01

    The devastation wreaked by the 2004 tsunami in the Indian Ocean required extensive multinational and nongovernmental relief efforts to address the massive loss of infrastructure, people, and society. This article addresses approaches to behavioral incident management from a process perspective, through the lens of one official stateside channel of emergency operations. The process highlights the formation and connectivity of multidisciplinary teams that virtually supported the efforts of a seven-person, on-scene, behavioral health team aboard the USNS Mercy as part of Operation Unified Assistance in the Indian Ocean. Frontline health diplomacy and behavioral health relief efforts were greatly augmented by the virtual network of support from leading experts around the globe. Future disaster response and recovery efforts ought to build on the success of such virtual support networks, by planning for appropriate technology, expertise, and mutual aid partnerships.

  7. Little children with big worries: addressing the needs of young, anxious children and the problem of parent engagement.

    PubMed

    Mian, Nicholas D

    2014-03-01

    Anxiety disorders in preschool-age children represent an important clinical problem due to high prevalence, substantial impairment, persistence, and associated risk for later emotional problems. Early intervention may mitigate these problems by capitalizing on a strategic developmental period. Elevated neuroplasticity, availability of screening tools, and the potential to modify parenting practices position anxiety as a good candidate for early intervention and preventive efforts. While some novel interventions show promise, the broad success of such programs will largely depend on parent engagement. Since parents are less likely to identify and seek help for anxiety problems compared to other childhood behavior problems, especially in a preventive manner, methods for understanding parents' decisions to participate and enhancing levels of engagement are central to the success of early childhood anxiety prevention and intervention. Understanding these processes is particularly important for families characterized by sociodemographic adversity, which have been underrepresented in anxiety treatment research. This review summarizes the developmental phenomenology of early emerging anxiety symptoms, the rationale for early intervention, and the current state of research on interventions for young, anxious children. The roles of parent engagement and help-seeking processes are emphasized, especially among economically disadvantaged and ethnic minority communities who are acutely at risk. Evidence-based strategies to enhance parent engagement to facilitate the development and dissemination of efficacious programs are offered.

  8. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  9. Difficulties encountered removing locked plates

    PubMed Central

    Raja, S; Imbuldeniya, AM; S, Garg; Groom, G

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Locked plates are commonly used to obtain fixation in periarticular and comminuted fractures. Their use has also gained popularity in repairing fractures in osteoporotic bone. These plates provide stable fixation and promote biological healing. Over the last 3 years, we have used over 150 locked plates with varying success to fix periarticular fractures involving mainly the knee and ankle. In this study, we report our clinical experience and the difficulties encountered when removing locked plates in adult patients with a variety of indications including implant failure, infection, non-union and a palpable symptomatic implant. METHODS A retrospective analysis was performed of patients enrolled prospectively into a database. Included in the study were 36 consecutive adult patients who each underwent the procedure of locked plate removal in a single inner city level 1 trauma centre. Data collected included primary indication for fixation, indication for implant removal, time of the implant in situ, grade of operating surgeon and difficulties encountered during the procedure. RESULTS Implant removal was associated with a complication rate of 47%. The major problems encountered were difficulty in removing the locked screws and the implant itself. A total of ten cold welded screws were found in eight cases. Removal was facilitated by high speed metal cutting burrs and screw removal sets in all but one case, where a decision was made to leave the plate in situ. CONCLUSIONS The majority of studies investigating implant removal and problems encountered in doing so report a relatively high complication rate. With the advent of locking plates and their growing popularity, difficulties are now being seen intra-operatively when removing them. There is a paucity of data, however, specifically directed at locking plate removal. We recommend that surgeons should be aware of the potential complications while removing locked plates. Fluoroscopic control and all

  10. Addressing the physical health of people with serious mental illness: A potential solution for an enduring problem.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Stanton, Robert

    2016-03-01

    People with serious mental illness face significant inequalities in physical health care. As a result, the risk of cardiometabolic disorders and premature mortality is far greater than that observed in the general population. Contributiung to this disparity, is the lack of routine physical health screening by mental health clinicians. One possible solution is the implimentation of a physical health nurse consultant, whose role is to monitor and coordinate the physical health care of people with serious mental illness. Current evidence supports the implimentation of such a role, and a failure to address the widening gaps in physical health care will only serve to increase the disparities faced by people with serious mental illness.

  11. Megacities in the coastal zone: Using a driver-pressure-state-impact-response framework to address complex environmental problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekovski, Ivan; Newton, Alice; Dennison, William C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elaborate on the role of coastal megacities in environmental degradation and their contribution to global climate change. Although only less than 4 percent of the total world's population resides in coastal megacities, their impact on environment is significant due to their rapid development, high population densities and high consumption rate of their residents. This study was carried out by implementing a Drivers-Pressures-States-Impacts-Responses (DPSIR) framework. This analytical framework was chosen because of its potential to link the existing data, gathered from various previous studies, in causal relationship. In this text, coastal megacities have been defined as cities exceeding 10 million inhabitants, situated in "near-coastal zone". Their high rates of the consumption of food, water, space and energy were observed and linked to the high performance rates of related economic activities (industry, transportation, power generation, agriculture and water extraction). In many of the studied coastal megacities, deteriorated quality of air and water was perceived, which can, in combination with global warming, lead to health problems and economic and social disturbance among residents. The extent of problems varied between developing and developed countries, showing higher rates of population growth and certain harmful emissions in megacities of developing countries, as well as more problems regarding food and water shortages, sanitation, and health care support. Although certain projections predict slowdown of growth in most coastal megacities, their future impact on environment is still unclear due to the uncertainties regarding future climate change and trajectories of consumption patterns.

  12. Galileo's Encounter with Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Anderson, J. D.

    2003-04-01

    Galileo's last science periapsis encounter with Jupiter before impact was on orbit 34. One of the main scientific goals of this encounter was a close, targeted flyby of the satellite Amalthea. Although two-way Doppler tracking was lost near closest approach, one-way data were obtained throughout the encounter. Together with solid two-way data before and after the encounter period, there is enough information to constrain the mass of the satellite. Together with previously determined shape and volume information these data yield a useful value for the density of this highly non-spherical moon. Preliminary analyses have been presented indicating a bulk density near 1 gm/cc, considerably lower than was expected from the satellite's dark albedo and anticipated rocky composition. Low-density rock or rock/ice mixtures combined with a high porosity, similar to that inferred from recent small asteroid data, are suggested as the most likely explanation. Refined estimates of mass and density as well as uncertainties will be presented and the implications for Amalthea's composition and porosity discussed.

  13. A Lakatosian Encounter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen

    2010-01-01

    There is much to be learned and pondered by reading "Proofs and Refutations," by Imre Lakatos. It highlights the importance of mathematical definitions, and how definitions evolve to capture the essence of the object they are defining. It also provides an exhilarating encounter with the ups and downs of the mathematical reasoning process, where…

  14. Voyager's Last Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This video describes Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune. Computer animation and actual data convey Voyager's discoveries such as turbulent storms and dark spots in Neptune's atmosphere, six new moons, Neptune's three rings, and the presence of frozen methane on Triton, as researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory describe Voyager's achievements.

  15. Galileo asteroid encounter navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, D. W.; Chodas, P. W.; Kallemeyn, P. H.

    1990-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft will be targeted to encounter one or more asteroids during its cruise to Jupiter. Accurate navigation will maximize science return from these asteroid flyby opportunities. Navigation errors for these encounters are dominated by uncertainties in the asteroid ephemeris, which is obtained from fits to ground-based observations. As the spacecraft approaches, on-board optical navigation dramatically improves knowledge of the spacecraft-relative asteroid position normal to the line of sight, while correlations in the asteroid ephemeris provide moderate improvement along the approach direction. The remaining uncertainty in encounter time can be further reduced only by improving the ground-based asteroid ephemeris. Uncertainties perpendicular to the line of sight can be reduced by improving the timing of optical navigation images and their placement with respect to the star background. At the closest approach to the asteroid Gaspra, the one-sigma errors in knowledge of the spacecraft position are less than 10 km in position and 25 seconds in encounter time.

  16. Information and meaning revisiting Shannon's theory of communication and extending it to address todays technical problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Travis LaDell

    2009-12-01

    This paper has three goals. The first is to review Shannon's theory of information and the subsequent advances leading to today's statistics-based text analysis algorithms, showing that the semantics of the text is neglected. The second goal is to propose an extension of Shannon's original model that can take into account semantics, where the 'semantics' of a message is understood in terms of the intended or actual changes on the recipient of a message. The third goal is to propose several lines of research that naturally fall out of the proposed model. Each computational approach to solving some problem rests on an underlying model or set of models that describe how key phenomena in the real world are represented and how they are manipulated. These models are both liberating and constraining. They are liberating in that they suggest a path of development for new tools and algorithms. They are constraining in that they intentionally ignore other potential paths of development. Modern statistical-based text analysis algorithms have a specific intellectual history and set of underlying models rooted in Shannon's theory of communication. For Shannon, language is treated as a stochastic generator of symbol sequences. Shannon himself, subsequently Weaver, and at least one of his predecessors are all explicit in their decision to exclude semantics from their models. This rejection of semantics as 'irrelevant to the engineering problem' is elegant and combined with developments particularly by Salton and subsequently by Latent Semantic Analysis, has led to a whole collection of powerful algorithms and an industry for data mining technologies. However, the kinds of problems currently facing us go beyond what can be accounted for by this stochastic model. Today's problems increasingly focus on the semantics of specific pieces of information. And although progress is being made with the old models, it seems natural to develop or extend information theory to account for

  17. Looking beyond first-world problems: an emerging global workplace is encouraging more biomedical engineers to address the health issues of the developing world.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Each year, the developed world is flooded with complex new medical technologies, from robotic prosthetics to remote-controlled aspirin implants. Meanwhile, only about 10% of health research funds are spent addressing the pressing problems of developing nations, although these countries make up 93% of the worldwide burden of disease. In short, while a small fraction of the world pops brand-name pharmaceuticals, the majority suffers from poor sanitation, contaminated drinking water, preventable disease, and child mortality.

  18. The Brown Superfund Basic Research Program: A Multistakeholder Partnership Addresses Real-World Problems in Contaminated Communities

    PubMed Central

    Senier, Laura; Hudson, Benjamin; Fort, Sarah; Hoover, Elizabeth; Tillson, Rebecca; Brown, Phil

    2008-01-01

    The NIEHS funds several basic and applied research programs, many of which also require research translation or outreach. This paper reports on a project by the Brown University Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in which outreach and research translation teams collaborated with state regulatory agency personnel and community activists on a legislative initiative to mitigate the financial impacts of living in a contaminated community. The Environmentally Compromised Home Ownership (ECHO) program makes home equity loans of up to $25,000 available to qualified applicants. This collaboration provides a case study in community engagement and demonstrates how research translation and outreach activities that are clearly differentiated yet well integrated can improve a suite of basic and applied research. Although engaging diverse constituencies can be difficult, community-engaged translation and outreach have the potential to make research findings more useful to communities, address some of the social impacts of contamination, and empower stakeholders to pursue their individual and collectively-held goals for remediation. The NIEHS has recently renewed its commitment to community-engaged research and advocacy, making this an optimal time to reflect on how basic research programs that engage stakeholders through research translation and outreach can add value to the overall research enterprise. PMID:18677987

  19. Recommendations on frequently encountered relief requests

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, R.S.; Ransom, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This paper is based on the review of a large database of requests for relief from enservice testing (1ST) requirements for pumps and valves. From the review, the paper identifies areas where enhancements to either the relief request process or the applicable test codes can improve IST of pumps and valves. Certain types of requests occur frequently. The paper examines some frequent requests and considers possible changes to the requirements to determine if the frequent requests can be eliminated. Recommended changes and their bases will be discussed. IST of safety-related pumps and valves at commercial nuclear power plants is done according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code), Section XI. Because of the design and function of some safety systems in nuclear plants, performing Code testing of certain pumps and valves is impractical or a hardship without a compensating increase in the level of safety. Deviations from the Code are allowed by law, as reviewed and approved by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the relief request process. Because of similarities in plant design and system function, many problems encountered in testing components are similar from plant to plant. Likewise, there are often common problems associated with test methods or equipment. Therefore, many relief requests received by the NRC from various plants are similar. Identifying and addressing the root causes for these common requests will greatly improve IST.

  20. Recommendations on frequently encountered relief requests

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, R.S.; Ransom, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is based on the review of a large database of requests for relief from enservice testing (1ST) requirements for pumps and valves. From the review, the paper identifies areas where enhancements to either the relief request process or the applicable test codes can improve IST of pumps and valves. Certain types of requests occur frequently. The paper examines some frequent requests and considers possible changes to the requirements to determine if the frequent requests can be eliminated. Recommended changes and their bases will be discussed. IST of safety-related pumps and valves at commercial nuclear power plants is done according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code), Section XI. Because of the design and function of some safety systems in nuclear plants, performing Code testing of certain pumps and valves is impractical or a hardship without a compensating increase in the level of safety. Deviations from the Code are allowed by law, as reviewed and approved by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the relief request process. Because of similarities in plant design and system function, many problems encountered in testing components are similar from plant to plant. Likewise, there are often common problems associated with test methods or equipment. Therefore, many relief requests received by the NRC from various plants are similar. Identifying and addressing the root causes for these common requests will greatly improve IST.

  1. U.S. view of human problems to be addressed for long duration space flights. [physiological and psychological effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Russian and American space programs have consisted of several thousands of hours of exposure of man to the space environment. In spite of numerous biological phenomena of adaptation observed, the space travellers have displayed, after their return, no enduring pathological effect. Although the usable data remain too limited to reflect fully the effects of space flight, it is possible to sketch the biological responses in the absence of gravity and to define the work bases for the future. Beyond its basic physiological effects, weightlessness has operational consequences in the daily life of the astronauts. These consequences will be still more evident during missions of long duration. The conclusions drawn in flight as well as on the ground are reviewed, and future requirements concerning prolonged flights are outlined. The gaps in actual knowledge are discussed and solutions are suggested. The problems of habitability are considered, particularly those which remain at present without satisfactory solutions: psychological responses to a confined life, cleaning, hygiene, and used material.

  2. Voyager: Neptune Encounter Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Voyager encounter data are presented in computer animation (CA) and real (R) animation. The highlights include a view of 2 full rotations of Neptune. It shows spacecraft trajectory 'diving' over Neptune and intercepting Triton's orbit, depicting radiation and occulation zones. Also shown are a renegade orbit of Triton and Voyager's encounter with Neptune's Magnetopause. A model of the spacecraft's complex maneuvers during close encounters of Neptune and Triton is presented. A view from Earth of Neptune's occulation experiment is is shown as well as a recreation of Voyager's final pass. There is detail of Voyager's Image Compensation technique which produces Voyager images. Eighteen images were produced on June 22 - 23, 1989, from 57 million miles away. A 68 day sequence which provides a stroboscopic view - colorization approximates what is seen by the human eye. Real time images recorded live from Voyager on 8/24/89 are presented. Photoclinometry produced the topography of Triton. Three images are used to create a sequence of Neptune's rings. The globe of Neptune and 2 views of the south pole are shown as well as Neptune rotating. The rotation of a scooter is frozen in images showing differential motion. There is a view of rotation of the Great Dark Spot about its own axis. Photoclinometry provides a 3-dimensional perspective using a color mosaic of Triton images. The globe is used to indicate the orientation of Neptune's crescent. The east and west plumes on Triton are shown.

  3. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  4. Raisonnements arithmetiques et algebriques dans un contexte de resolution des problemes: difficultes rencontrees par les futurs enseignants (Arithmetic and Algebra Teaching within a Problem-Solving Context: Difficulties Encountered by Future Instructors).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Sylvine; Bednarz, Nadine

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties observed in the transition from teaching arithmetic to teaching algebra. Future teachers (n=164) were questioned regarding to what extent they were able to shift back and forth between teaching methods within the context of problem solving. Interviews were conducted individually and in a dyad format. (AIM)

  5. History-Enriched Spaces for Shared Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konomi, Shin'ichi; Sezaki, Kaoru; Kitsuregawa, Masaru

    We discuss "history-enriched spaces" that use historical data to support shared encounters. We first examine our experiences with DeaiExplorer, a social network display that uses RFID and a historical database to support social interactions at academic conferences. This leads to our discussions on three complementary approaches to addressing the issues of supporting social encounters: (1) embedding historical data in embodied interactions, (2) designing for weakly involved interactions such as social navigation, and (3) designing for privacy. Finally, we briefly describe a preliminary prototype of a proxemics-based awareness tool that considers these approaches.

  6. Dynamics of a stressful encounter: cognitive appraisal, coping, and encounter outcomes.

    PubMed

    Folkman, S; Lazarus, R S; Dunkel-Schetter, C; DeLongis, A; Gruen, R J

    1986-05-01

    Despite the importance that is attributed to coping as a factor in psychological and somatic health outcomes, little is known about actual coping processes, the variables that influence them, and their relation to the outcomes of the stressful encounters people experience in their day-to-day lives. This study uses an intraindividual analysis of the interrelations among primary appraisal (what was at stake in the encounter), secondary appraisal (coping options), eight forms of problem- and emotion-focused coping, and encounter outcomes in a sample of community-residing adults. Coping was strongly related to cognitive appraisal; the forms of coping that were used varied depending on what was at stake and the options for coping. Coping was also differentially related to satisfactory and unsatisfactory encounter outcomes. The findings clarify the functional relations among appraisal and coping variables and the outcomes of stressful encounters.

  7. Optical navigation during the Voyager Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, J. E.; Owen, W. M., Jr.; Stuve, J. A.; Synnott, S. P.; Vaughan, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Optical navigation techniques were required to successfully complete the planetary exploration phase of the NASA deep-space Voyager mission. The last of Voyager's planetary encounters, with Neptune, posed unique problems from an optical navigation standpoint. In this paper we briefly review general aspects of the optical navigation process as practiced during the Voyager mission, and discuss in detail particular features of the Neptune encounter which affected optical navigation. New approaches to the centerfinding problem were developed for both stars and extended bodies, and these are described. Results of the optical navigation data analysis are presented, as well as a description of the optical orbit determination system and results of its use during encounter. Partially as a result of the optical navigation processing, results of scientific significance were obtained. These results include the discovery and orbit determination of several new satellites of Neptune and the determination of the size of Triton, Neptune's largest moon.

  8. Teacher Educators Using Encounter Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Danné E.; Kellinger, Janna Jackson

    2014-01-01

    Many prospective teachers are unaware of the encounters that Black, heterosexual women or White lesbians face. Here, we present encounter stories--individual narratives of poignant encounters and interactions that we have experienced with people unlike us--to identify with and ultimately draw on their experiences. Subsequently, the narratives…

  9. Israeli Adolescents and Military Service: Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Amihay; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Asserts that inadequate attention has been paid to the problems of the young soldier entering army life in Israel. Delineates some areas of friction and vulnerability between the worlds of the youth and the military. Describes the systematization of these encounters into groups, creating the "Binary Model," which helps in locating and treating…

  10. Sequencing Voyager II for the Uranus encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    The process of developing the programmed sequence of events necessary for the Voyager 2 spacecraft to return desired data from its Uranus encounter is discussed. The major steps in the sequence process are reviewed, and the elements of the Mission Sequence Software are described. The design phase and the implementation phase of the sequence process are discussed, and the Computer Command Subsystem architecture is examined in detail. The software's role in constructing the sequences and converting them into onboard programs is elucidated, and the problems unique to the Uranus encounter sequences are considered.

  11. A Bayesian Maximum Entropy approach to address the change of support problem in the spatial analysis of childhood asthma prevalence across North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    LEE, SEUNG-JAE; YEATTS, KARIN; SERRE, MARC L.

    2009-01-01

    The spatial analysis of data observed at different spatial observation scales leads to the change of support problem (COSP). A solution to the COSP widely used in linear spatial statistics consists in explicitly modeling the spatial autocorrelation of the variable observed at different spatial scales. We present a novel approach that takes advantage of the non-linear Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) extension of linear spatial statistics to address the COSP directly without relying on the classical linear approach. Our procedure consists in modeling data observed over large areas as soft data for the process at the local scale. We demonstrate the application of our approach to obtain spatially detailed maps of childhood asthma prevalence across North Carolina (NC). Because of the high prevalence of childhood asthma in NC, the small number problem is not an issue, so we can focus our attention solely to the COSP of integrating prevalence data observed at the county-level together with data observed at a targeted local scale equivalent to the scale of school-districts. Our spatially detailed maps can be used for different applications ranging from exploratory and hypothesis generating analyses to targeting intervention and exposure mitigation efforts. PMID:20300553

  12. Universalist ethics in extraterrestrial encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Seth D.

    2010-02-01

    If humanity encounters an extraterrestrial civilization, or if two extraterrestrial civilizations encounter each other, then the outcome may depend not only on the civilizations' relative strength to destroy each other but also on what ethics are held by one or both civilizations. This paper explores outcomes of encounter scenarios in which one or both civilizations hold a universalist ethical framework. Several outcomes are possible in such scenarios, ranging from one civilization destroying the other to both civilizations racing to be the first to commit suicide. Thus, attention to the ethics of both humanity and extraterrestrials is warranted in human planning for such an encounter. Additionally, the possibility of such an encounter raises profound questions for contemporary human ethics, even if such an encounter never occurs.

  13. Stream Lifetimes Against Planetary Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valsecchi, G. B.; Lega, E.; Froeschle, Cl.

    2011-01-01

    We study, both analytically and numerically, the perturbation induced by an encounter with a planet on a meteoroid stream. Our analytical tool is the extension of pik s theory of close encounters, that we apply to streams described by geocentric variables. The resulting formulae are used to compute the rate at which a stream is dispersed by planetary encounters into the sporadic background. We have verified the accuracy of the analytical model using a numerical test.

  14. The National Historic Preservation Act is Not Your Problem, But How You are Addressing it for Your CERCLA Project May Be - 12344

    SciTech Connect

    Cusick, Lesley T.

    2012-07-01

    The 1995 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) joint 'Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under CERCLA was developed so that decommissioning could occur in a manner that ensures protection of worker and public health and the environment, that is consistent with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), that provides for stakeholder involvement, and that achieves risk reduction without unnecessary delay'. The source of the 'unnecessary delays' the joint policy intended to avert could be attributed to numerous factors such as obtaining permits, conducting administrative activities, or implementing regulatory processes that could yield, among other things, differing preferred alternatives. Why, you might ask, more than fifteen years later, does DOE continue to struggle through CERCLA projects with unnecessary delays? From problem identification, to determination of nature and extent, to alternative analysis and ultimately remedy selection and implementation, reaching a compliant and effective clean-up end-point can be a process that seems to mimic geologic timescales. The source of these delays is often the failure to use all of the tools the CERCLA process offers. As one example, renewed commitment to follow the CERCLA process to address the regulatory reviews pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) is called for. Project managers implementing CERCLA actions in any agency, not only DOE, do not need to be apprehensive about using the CERCLA process for NHPA review but should welcome it. It is critical that methods are used that address substantive NHPA requirements clearly and consistently, and that they are shared and communicated as frequently as needed to interested and questioning stakeholders. (author)

  15. Pioneer 11 Encounter. [with Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Pioneer 11's encounter with Jupiter is discussed in detail. The scientific experiments carried out on the probe are described along with the instruments used. Tables are included which provide data on the times of experiments, encounters, and the distances from Jupiter. Educational study projects are also given.

  16. Using the World Health Organization's 4S-Framework to Strengthen National Strategies, Policies and Services to Address Mental Health Problems in Adolescents in Resource-Constrained Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most adolescents live in resource-constrained countries and their mental health has been less well recognised than other aspects of their health. The World Health Organization's 4-S Framework provides a structure for national initiatives to improve adolescent health through: gathering and using strategic information; developing evidence-informed policies; scaling up provision and use of health services; and strengthening linkages with other government sectors. The aim of this paper is to discuss how the findings of a recent systematic review of mental health problems in adolescents in resource-constrained settings might be applied using the 4-S Framework. Method Analysis of the implications of the findings of a systematic search of the English-language literature for national strategies, policies, services and cross-sectoral linkages to improve the mental health of adolescents in resource-constrained settings. Results Data are available for only 33/112 [29%] resource-constrained countries, but in all where data are available, non-psychotic mental health problems in adolescents are identifiable, prevalent and associated with reduced quality of life, impaired participation and compromised development. In the absence of evidence about effective interventions in these settings expert opinion is that a broad public policy response which addresses direct strategies for prevention, early intervention and treatment; health service and health workforce requirements; social inclusion of marginalised groups of adolescents; and specific education is required. Specific endorsed strategies include public education, parent education, training for teachers and primary healthcare workers, psycho-educational curricula, identification through periodic screening of the most vulnerable and referral for care, and the availability of counsellors or other identified trained staff members in schools from whom adolescents can seek assistance for personal, peer and family

  17. The Rings of Chariklo under Close Encounters with the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, R. A. N.; Sfair, R.; Winter, O. C.

    2016-06-01

    The Centaur population is composed of minor bodies wandering between the giant planets that frequently perform close gravitational encounters with these planets, leading to a chaotic orbital evolution. Recently, the discovery of two well-defined narrow rings was announced around the Centaur 10199 Chariklo. The rings are assumed to be in the equatorial plane of Chariklo and to have circular orbits. The existence of a well-defined system of rings around a body in such a perturbed orbital region poses an interesting new problem. Are the rings of Chariklo stable when perturbed by close gravitational encounters with the giant planets? Our approach to address this question consisted of forward and backward numerical simulations of 729 clones of Chariklo, with similar initial orbits, for a period of 100 Myr. We found, on average, that each clone experiences during its lifetime more than 150 close encounters with the giant planets within one Hill radius of the planet in question. We identified some extreme close encounters that were able to significantly disrupt or disturb the rings of Chariklo. About 3% of the clones lose their rings and about 4% of the clones have their rings significantly disturbed. Therefore, our results show that in most cases (more than 90%), the close encounters with the giant planets do not affect the stability of the rings in Chariklo-like systems. Thus, if there is an efficient mechanism that creates the rings, then these structures may be common among these kinds of Centaurs.

  18. Addressing Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Greg; Helmig, Mary; Kaplan, Bill; Kosch, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Four camp directors discuss how the September 11 tragedy and current world events will affect their camps. They describe how they are addressing safety concerns, working with parents, cooperating with outside agencies, hiring and screening international staff, and revising emergency plans. Camps must continue to offer community and support to…

  19. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system. PMID:23487896

  20. A nurse-coordinated educational initiative addressing primary care professionals' attitudes to and problem-solving in depression in older people--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Livingston, G; Yard, P; Beard, A; Katona, C

    2000-05-01

    This study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of an intervention focusing on primary care professionals' attitudes to, problem-solving in and practice relating to depression in old age before and after a nurse-implemented educational intervention. One hundred and twenty-one practices were approached, in which 297 doctors worked. Most practices did not want to be involved in this study. Evidence from previous studies and this one suggests that GPs are more amenable to interventions which are implemented by doctors rather than other health personnel. In addition, the lack of interest in this intervention may be a reflection of the therapeutic nihilism of primary care physicians regarding depression in older people. Sixteen surgeries expressed an interest in the study, of whom 14 participated in the study comprising 40 GPs. Thirty-one GPs and 24 nurses completed the baseline questionnaires. Only six GPs and no nurses returned completed questionnaires post-intervention. The only statistically significant before versus after change in the attitude questionnaire was found in 'I need more training to be able to deal effectively with depression in the elderly'. Mean scores were 0.73 and 0.47 respectively (p<0.05; 95%CI 3.2-47.1). Significant improvements post-intervention were, however, found in the answers to three questions (all p<0.05) addressing whether patients with depression complicated by or presenting with physical illness were referred appropriately and/or followed up. The results of our study do not indicate that the evaluation of nurse-led educational interventions in primary care is feasible in the field of depression in old age. The belief that all that is needed is the provision of accessible education of professionals by experts in the field to change attitudes and practice has not been reinforced. The high refusal rate suggests that such interventions are unlikely in any case to be generally acceptable.

  1. Voyager Encounters Saturn: Scientific Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Observations generated by Voyager 1's encounter with Saturn are disclosed. Atmospheric conditions, the rings, new moons and the five inner moons are described. Titan, Hyperion and Iapetus are discussed in detail, as is Saturn's magnetosphere.

  2. Voyager Saturn encounter press briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The briefing reviewed the mission planning of the Voyager project. The near encounter trajectories of both Voyager spacecraft were examined. The Saturn system is discussed with particular emphasis on Saturn's moons.

  3. The Voyager 2 Neptune encounter

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurutani, B.T. )

    1989-10-01

    The findings made by the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter are reviewed. Data on the bowshock, magnetic field, magnetosphere, rings, plasma sheet, aurora, moons, and dust of Neptune are discussed. Findings made concerning Triton are summarized.

  4. Every Other Day. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiller, Tom

    Schools need to be reoriented and restructured so that what is taught and learned, and the way in which it is taught and learned, are better integrated with young people's real-world experiences. Many indicators suggest that the meaningful aspects of school have been lost in the encounter with modern times. The title of this address--"Every Other…

  5. Parental Knowledge of Behavioral Principles Following Training to Address Sleep Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Follow-up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Kylan

    2012-01-01

    Sleep problems are a common occurrence among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In addition to the challenges that sleep problems present for children's neurodevelopment, learning, and daytime behaviors, sleep problems in children present significant challenges for the entire family. Research studies on behavioral interventions to…

  6. Bacterial encountering with oil droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jian; Molaei, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Encountering of microorganisms with rising oil droplets in aqueous environments is the first and one of the critical steps in the biodegradation of crude oil. Several factors such as droplet sizes, rising velocity, surfactant, and motility of bacteria are expected to affect the encounter rate. We establish well controlled microfluidic devices by applying layer-by-layer technique that allows us to produce horizontal micro droplets with different sizes. The encounter rates of passive particles, motile and non-motile bacteria with these droplets are measured by high speed microscopy. The effects of mobility and motility of these particles on encounter rates are assessed quantitatively. Meanwhile, we visualize reorientation of the particle due to flow filed around the oil droplet. Results show that the motile bacteria have higher probabilities to interact with an oil droplet compare to the passive particles. Ongoing analyses focus on the effect of shear rates, angular dispersion, curvatures of streamlines, and the swimming velocity of bacteria. The ratios of the encounter area to the entire droplet surface at various flow regimes will also been measured. GoMRI.

  7. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  8. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  9. Convocation address.

    PubMed

    Ghatowar, P S

    1993-07-01

    The Union Deputy Minister of Health and Family Welfare in India addressed the 35th convocation of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay in 1993. Officials in developing countries have been concerned about population growth for more than 30 years and have instituted policies to reduce population growth. In the 1960s, population growth in developing countries was around 2.5%, but today it is about 2%. Despite this decline, the world will have 1 billion more individuals by the year 2001. 95% of these new people will be born in developing countries. India's population size is so great that India does not have the time to wait for development to reduce population growth. Population needs to be viewed as an integrated part of overall development, since it is linked to poverty, illiteracy, environmental damage, gender issues, and reproductive health. Despite a large population size, India has made some important advancements in health and family planning. For example, India has reduced population growth (to 2.14% annually between 1981-1991), infant mortality, and its birth rate. It has increased the contraceptive use rate and life expectancy. Its southern states have been more successful at achieving demographic goals than have the northern states. India needs to implement efforts to improve living conditions, to change attitudes and perceptions about small families and contraception, and to promote family planning acceptance earlier among young couples. Improvement of living conditions is especially important in India, since almost 33% of the people live in poverty. India needs to invest in nutrition, health, and education. The mass media and nongovernmental organizations need to create population awareness and demand for family planning services. Improvement in women's status accelerates fertility decline, as has happened in Kerala State. The government needs to facilitate generation of jobs. Community participation is needed for India to achieve

  10. Dialogic Encounters as Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Adetty Perez

    2010-01-01

    Although educators believe in the importance of dialogue and dialogic encounters, and often propose to engage their students in "discussion," dialogic communication is rarely used in the classroom. Rather than through relational and substantive conversation, most educational dialogue in public schools is limited to telling, asking one-way…

  11. A Lakatosian Encounter with Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen

    2010-01-01

    There is much to be learned and pondered by reading "Proofs and Refutations" by Imre Lakatos (Lakatos, 1976). It highlights the importance of mathematical definitions, and how definitions evolve to capture the essence of the object they are defining. It also provides an exhilarating encounter with the ups and downs of the mathematical reasoning…

  12. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  13. School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Can It Help Address the Problem of Disproportionate Minority Representation in the Emotional Disturbance Disability Category?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Jodi Abraham

    2012-01-01

    This research project investigated the possibility of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) as a way to address racial/ethnic disproportionality in the Emotional Disturbance (ED) category. The sample consisted of 114 elementary schools from a suburban school district in the Mid-Atlantic region. There were 57 SWPBS schools and 57 non-SWPBS…

  14. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  15. Voyager 1: Encounter with Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagakos, N.

    1980-01-01

    The history of the Voyager Project is reviewed as well as known facts about Saturn and its satellites. Important results of encounters with Jupiter are summarized. Scientific objectives of the flyby of Saturn involve the planet's atmosphere, rings, and magnetic field interactions with the solar wind and satellites. The search for additional satellites, and various aspects of Titan, Rhea, Dione, Mimas, Iapetus, Hyperion, and Enceladas are also of interest. The instruments developed to obtain these goals are described.

  16. A Demonstration of the Universal Problem-Solving Approach to Address Children's Inappropriate Behavior in Head Start Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Martha E.; Voorhees, Mary D.; Walker, Virginia L.; Berlin, Rebecca A.; Jamison, Kristen Roorbach; Stanton-Chapman, Tina L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this demonstration was to evaluate a universal intervention during teacher-identified routines that were characterized by significant classwide problem behavior. Six Head Start classrooms (seven groups of children, with one classroom divided into two groups) received two workshops and two coaching sessions on universal Positive…

  17. Listen-Identify-Brainstorm-Reality-Test-Encourage (LIBRE) Problem-Solving Model: Addressing Special Education Teacher Attrition through a Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to Teacher Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Norma S.; Hernandez, Art; Hector, Alison M.; Crosby, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Special education teacher attrition rates continue to challenge the profession. A cognitive-behavioral problem-solving approach was used to examine three alternative certification program special education teachers' professional development through a series of 41 interviews conducted over a 2-year period. Beginning when they were novice special…

  18. Social problems, primary care and pathways to help and support: addressing health inequalities at the individual level. Part II: lay perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Popay, Jennie; Kowarzik, Ute; Mallinson, Sara; Mackian, Sara; Barker, Jacqui

    2007-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to describe social problems presented to general practitioners (GPs) in UK inner cities and GPs' responses; describe patients help‐seeking pathways; and consider how these pathways can be improved. Methods The study involved a pilot survey and follow‐up qualitative interviews with patients in two inner city areas in London and Salford in 2001–2. The pilot survey involved five practices in each locality. GPs completed questionnaires on 57 people presenting with social problems. A diversity sample of 12 patients was followed up for interview. Results Study results are presented in two parts. Here (Part II) qualitative research results are reported highlighting four themes: the complex and enduring nature of social problems; the persistence people display seeking help; the fragmented and problematic pathways available; and the roles GPs play as: primary medical adviser; formal gateway to another service; advocates or facilitators to another service; and sources of support and advice during a process of recovery. Commonly, GPs occupied more than one role. Conclusions GPs do help people deal with social problems, but their responses are limited. More integrated pathways to help and advice for social problems are needed. Existing pathways could be more visible and accessible, and new pathways developed through commissioning and extending social prescribing. More partnerships across sectors may create more co‐ordinated provision, but these are notoriously difficult, and other trends such as the focus on lifestyle issues and long‐standing conditions may make it more difficult for people with social needs to access support. PMID:17933955

  19. What Are Our Expectations Telling Us?: Encounters with the NMAI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Gwyneira

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to move beyond issues of representation and to address how museum meanings are made on the ground in ongoing encounters between displays and the ideational worlds their audiences bring with them into the museum space. In particular, the author explores how contrasting expectations about exhibits can serve as an…

  20. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    In spite of a growing recognition of the importance of doctor-patient communication, the issue of language barriers to healthcare has received very little attention in India. The Indian population speaks over 22 major languages with English used as the lingua franca for biomedicine. Large-scale internal migration has meant that health workers are encountering increasing instances of language discordance within clinical settings. Research done predominantly in the West has shown language discordance to significantly affect access to care, cause problems of comprehension and adherence, and decrease the satisfaction and quality of care. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India requires a stronger political commitment to providing non-discriminatory health services, especially to vulnerable groups such as illiterate migrant workers. Research will have to address three broad areas: the ways in which language barriers affect health and healthcare, the efficacy of interventions to overcome language barriers, and the costs of language barriers and efforts to overcome them. There is a need to address such barriers in health worker education and clinical practice. Proven strategies such as hiring multilingual healthcare workers, providing language training to health providers, employing in situ translators or using telephone interpretation services will have to be evaluated for their appropriateness to the Indian context. Internet-based initiatives, the proliferation of mobile phones and recent advances in machine translation promise to contribute to the solution.

  1. Satisfaction with the Outpatient Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Zandbelt, Linda C; Smets, Ellen MA; Oort, Frans J; Godfried, Mieke H; de Haes, Hanneke CJM

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare patients' and physicians' visit-specific satisfaction in an internal medicine outpatient setting, and to explain their respective views. DESIGN patients' and physicians' background characteristics were assessed prior to outpatient encounters. Immediately after the encounter, both patients and physicians completed a questionnaire assessing satisfaction with the visit. SETTING The outpatient division of an academic teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS Thirty residents and specialists in general internal medicine, rheumatology, and gastroenterology, and 330 patients having a follow-up appointment with one of these physicians. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS patients' and physicians' visit-specific satisfaction was assessed using 5 Visual Analogue Scales (0 to 100). patients' overall satisfaction was higher than physicians' satisfaction (mean 81 vs. 66), and correlation of patients' and physicians' overall satisfaction with the specific visit was medium sized (r= .28, P < .001). patients' satisfaction ratings were associated with their previsit self-efficacy in communicating with their physician (P < .001) and with visiting a female physician (P < .01). Physicians' satisfaction was associated with patients' higher educational level (P < .05), primary language being Dutch (P < .001), better mental health (P < .05), and preference for receiving less than full information (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS In an outpatient setting, patients' visit-specific satisfaction ratings were substantially higher than, and only moderately associated with, physicians' ratings of the same visit. The dissimilar predictors explaining patients' and physicians' satisfaction suggest that patients and physicians form their opinion about a consultation in different ways. Hence, when evaluating outpatient encounters, physicians' satisfaction has additional value to patients' satisfaction in establishing quality of care. PMID:15566437

  2. Development and initial evaluation of a telephone-delivered, behavioral activation, and problem-solving treatment program to address functional goals of breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Kathleen D; Hull, Jay G; Kaufman, Peter A; Li, Zhongze; Seville, Janette L; Ahles, Tim A; Kornblith, Alice B; Hegel, Mark T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and pilot test an intervention to optimize functional recovery for breast cancer survivors. Over two studies, 31 women enrolled in a goal-setting program via telephone. All eligible women enrolled (37% of those screened) and 66% completed all study activities. Completers were highly satisfied with the intervention, using it to address, on average, four different challenging activities. The longitudinal analysis showed a main effect of time for overall quality of life (F(5, 43.1) = 5.1, p = 0.001) and improvements in active coping (F (3, 31.7) = 4.9, p = 0.007), planning (F (3, 36.0) = 4.1, p = 0.01), reframing (F (3, 29.3) = 8.5, p < 0.001), and decreases in self-blame (F (3,31.6) = 4.3, p = 0.01). The intervention is feasible and warrants further study to determine its efficacy in fostering recovery and maximizing activity engagement after cancer treatment.

  3. Development and Initial Evaluation of a Telephone-Delivered, Behavioral Activation and Problem-solving Treatment Program to Address Functional Goals of Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Kathleen D.; Hull, Jay G.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Li, Zhongze; Seville, Janette L.; Ahles, Tim A.; Kornblith, Alice B.; Hegel, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and pilot test an intervention to optimize functional recovery for breast cancer survivors. Over two studies, 31 women enrolled in a goal-setting program via telephone. All eligible women enrolled (37% of those screened) and 66% completed all study activities. Completers were highly satisfied with the intervention, using it to address, on average, four different challenging activities. The longitudinal analysis showed a main effect of time for overall quality of life (F(5, 43.1) = 5.1, p = 0.001) and improvements in active coping (F (3, 31.7) = 4.9, p = 0.007), planning (F (3, 36.0) = 4.1, p = 0.01), reframing (F (3, 29.3) = 8.5, p < 0.001), and decreases in self-blame (F (3,31.6) = 4.3, p = 0.01). The intervention is feasible and warrants further study to determine its efficacy in fostering recovery and maximizing activity engagement after cancer treatment. PMID:25668509

  4. Triple Collision and Close Triple Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldvogel, Joerg

    In gravitational systems of point masses binary collisions are mathematically simple and well understood. Collisions of three or more particles are much more complicated, i.e. a dramatic increase of complexity occurs when the number N of particles involved in a collision increases from 2 to 3. Collisions of more than three particles seem to be of the same complexity as triple collisions. However, there are still unanswered questions concerning general N-body collisions.The reason for the complexity of triple collision is the inherent sensitivity to initial conditions for solutions passing near triple collision, even after a short time. Specifically, a solution passing near triple collision may change dramatically if the initial conditions prior to the close encounter are modified infinitesimally. In contrast, this is not the case for a binary collision.We use the planar three-body problem as a model in order to discuss the main features of triple collision of point masses and of its realistic counterpart, the close triple encounter. This comparatively simple model allows us to study all important aspects of close encounters of N > 2 gravitationally interacting point masses.In Chapters 1 and 2 we discuss classical results, beginning with the equations of motion, then studying relationships between the total angular momentum and triple collision. C. L. Siegel's famous series for triple collision solutions, one time considered the highlight of the theory of triple collision, conclude the traditional part of these lectures.Chapter 3 is devoted to studying the relationship between solutions engaging in a sharp triple collision and neighbouring solutions. The variational equation gives a rough idea of what is happening. A complete understanding can be achieved by means of R. McGehee's concept of the collision manifold, which arises by introducing special coordinates blowing up all possible states close to triple collision. In this context, possibilities of regularizing

  5. Convectively Induced Turbulence Encountered During NASA's Fall-2000 Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, David W.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2002-01-01

    Aircraft encounters with atmospheric turbulence are a leading cause of in-flight injuries aboard commercial airliners and cost the airlines millions of dollars each year. Most of these injuries are due to encounters with turbulence in and around convection. In a recent study of 44 turbulence accident reports between 1990 and 1996, 82% of the cases were found to be near or within convective activity (Kaplan et al. 1999). According to NTSB accident reports, pilots' descriptions of these turbulence encounters include 'abrupt', 'in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC)', 'saw nothing on the weather radar', and 'the encounter occurred while deviating around' convective activity. Though the FAA has provided guidelines for aircraft operating in convective environments, turbulence detection capability could decrease the number of injuries by alerting pilots of a potential encounter. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, through its Aviation Safety Program, is addressing turbulence hazards through research, flight experiments, and data analysis. Primary focus of this program element is the characterization of turbulence and its environment, as well as the development and testing of hazard estimation algorithms for both radar and in situ detection. The ultimate goal is to operationally test sensors that will provide ample warning prior to hazardous turbulence encounters. In order to collect data for support of these activities, NASA-Langley's B-757 research aircraft was directed into regions favorable for convectively induced turbulence (CIT). On these flights, the airborne predictive wind shear (PWS) radar, augmented with algorithms designed for turbulence detection, was operated in real time to test this capability. In this paper, we present the results of two research flights when turbulence was encountered. Described is an overview of the flights, the general radar performance, and details of four encounters with severe turbulence.

  6. Comet Encounters and Carbon 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, David; Mordecai, David

    2012-12-01

    The 14C production of shock-accelerated particles is calculated in terms of the total energy released in energetic particles. The recently reported 1.2% jump in the 14C content of the atmosphere in the year C.E. 775, it is found, would require >~ 1034 erg in energetic particles, less than first estimates but far more than any known solar flare on record. It is noted that the superflare from a large comet (comparable to C/Hale-Bopp) colliding with the sun could produce shock-accelerated GeV cosmic rays in the solar corona and/or solar wind, and possibly account for the C.E. 775 event. Several additional predictions of cometary encounters with the sun and other stars may be observable in the future.

  7. COMET ENCOUNTERS AND CARBON 14

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David; Mordecai, David

    2012-12-20

    The {sup 14}C production of shock-accelerated particles is calculated in terms of the total energy released in energetic particles. The recently reported 1.2% jump in the {sup 14}C content of the atmosphere in the year C.E. 775, it is found, would require {approx}> 10{sup 34} erg in energetic particles, less than first estimates but far more than any known solar flare on record. It is noted that the superflare from a large comet (comparable to C/Hale-Bopp) colliding with the sun could produce shock-accelerated GeV cosmic rays in the solar corona and/or solar wind, and possibly account for the C.E. 775 event. Several additional predictions of cometary encounters with the sun and other stars may be observable in the future.

  8. Analysis of vortex wake encounter upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. A.; Teper, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of an airplane being upset by encountering the vortex wake of a large transport on takeoff or landing is currently receiving considerable attention. This report describes the technique and results of a study to assess the effectiveness of automatic control systems in alleviating vortex wake upsets. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear digital simulation was used for this purpose. The analysis included establishing the disturbance input due to penetrating a vortex wake from an arbitrary position and angle. Simulations were computed for both a general aviation airplane and a commercial jet transport. Dynamic responses were obtained for the penetrating aircraft with no augmentation, and with various command augmentation systems, as well as with human pilot control. The results of this preliminary study indicate that attitude command augmentation systems can provide significant alleviation of vortex wake upsets; and can do it better than a human pilot.

  9. Engineering Encounters: The Tightrope Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Bill

    2014-01-01

    In order to prepare students to become the next innovators, teachers need to provide real-world challenges that allow children to exercise their innovation muscles. Innovation starts with a problem and innovators work to solve a problem by planning, creating, and testing. The real-world innovation process does not happen on a worksheet, and it…

  10. Participation during First Social Encounters in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Mary; Healey, Patrick G. T.; McCabe, Rosemarie

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia are socially excluded. The aim of this study was to investigate how patients participate in first encounters with unfamiliar healthy participants, who are unaware of their diagnosis. Methods Patterns of participation were investigated during interactions involving three-people. Three conversation roles were analysed: (i) speaker, (ii) primary recipient- focus of the speaker’s attention and (iii) secondary recipient- unaddressed individual. Twenty patient interactions (1 patient, 2 healthy controls) and 20 control interactions (3 healthy participants) were recorded and motion captured in 3D. The participation of patients and their partners, in each conversation role, was compared with controls at the start, middle and end of the interaction. The relationship between patients’ participation, their symptoms and the rapport others experienced with them was also explored. Results At the start of the interaction patients spoke less (ß = −.639, p = .02) and spent more time as secondary recipient (ß = .349, p = .02). Patients’ participation at the middle and end of the interaction did not differ from controls. Patients’ partners experienced poorer rapport with patients who spent more time as a primary recipient at the start of the interaction (Rho(11) = −.755, p<.01). Patients’ participation was not associated with symptoms. Conclusion Despite their increased participation over time, patients’ initial participation appears to be associated with others’ experience of rapport with them. Thus, the opening moments of patients’ first encounters appear to be interpersonally significant. Further investigation of patient and others’ behaviour during these critical moments is warranted in order to understand, and possibly develop interventions to address, the difficulties schizophrenia patients experience here. PMID:24465363

  11. Unethical Behaviours Preservice Teachers Encounter on Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deveci Topal, Arzu; Kolburan Gecer, Aynur

    2015-01-01

    The development of web 2.0 technology has resulted in an increase in internet sharing. The scope of this study is social networking, which is one of the web 2.0 tools most heavily used by internet users. In this paper, the unethical behaviours that preservice teachers encounter on social networks and the ways to deal with these problems are…

  12. Diseases encountered during war and rebuilding: lessons from past conflicts.

    PubMed

    Elston, Dirk M

    2003-07-01

    As we face the task of helping to rebuild Iraq, it is worthwhile to review our experience with past humanitarian aid missions and past conflicts. These efforts serve as models for the types of problems we may encounter today. It also is critical to review available data concerning the unique aspects of cutaneous diseases in that part of the world. PMID:12889713

  13. Tips for Novice Researchers: Operational Difficulties Encountered in Underdeveloped Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher El-Nahhas, Susan M.

    This paper provides a general overview of the type of problems encountered in the field of research so that individuals who are contemplating conducting research in an underdeveloped country for the first time are better prepared, and hence, better able to complete their research. The paper recounts a female researcher's personal experiences in…

  14. Icing Encounter Duration Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to investigate how aerodynamic performance degradation progresses with time throughout an exposure to icing conditions. It is one of the first documented studies of the effects of ice contamination on aerodynamic performance at various points in time throughout an icing encounter. Both a 1.5 and 6 ft chord, two-dimensional, NACA-23012 airfoils were subjected to icing conditions in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel for varying lengths of time. At the end of each run, lift, drag, and pitching moment measurements were made. Measurements with the 1.5 ft chord model showed that maximum lift and pitching moment degraded more rapidly early in the exposure and degraded more slowly as time progressed. Drag for the 1.5 ft chord model degraded more linearly with time, although drag for very short exposure durations was slightly higher than expected. Only drag measurements were made with the 6 ft chord airfoil. Here, drag for the long exposures was higher than expected. Novel comparison of drag measurements versus an icing scaling parameter, accumulation parameter times collection efficiency was used to compare the data from the two different size model. The comparisons provided a means of assessing the level of fidelity needed for accurate icing simulation.

  15. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  16. Lifetime of binary asteroids versus gravitational encounters and collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauvineau, Bertrand; Farinella, Paolo; Mignard, F.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the effect on the dynamics of a binary asteroid in the case of a near encounter with a third body. The dynamics of the binary is modeled as a two-body problem perturbed by an approaching body in the following ways: near encounters and collisions with a component of the system. In each case, the typical value of the two-body energy variation is estimated, and a random walk for the cumulative effect is assumed. Results are applied to some binary asteroid candidates. The main conclusion is that the collisional disruption is the dominant effect, giving lifetimes comparable to or larger than the age of the solar system.

  17. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Aaron M.; Leigh, Nathan W. C. E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org

    2015-07-20

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  18. Patient Encounters and Care Transitions in One Community Supported by Automated Query-Based Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Thomas R.; Vest, Joshua R.; Ancker, Jessica S.; Kaushal, Rainu

    2013-01-01

    Care transitions from one facility to another threaten patient safety due to the potential loss of critical clinical information. Electronic clinical data exchange may address the problem. Approaches to exchange range from manual directed exchange, or sending point-to-point messages, to automated query-based health information exchange (HIE), or aggregating data from multiple sources. In this study, we measured the extent to which automated query-based HIE supported patient encounters and care transitions in one community. During the 23-month study period, 41% (n=33,219) of affirmatively consented patients had at least one encounter supported by automated query-based HIE. Of these patients, 41% (n=13,685) visited two or more facilities and accounted for 68% of total encounters. Of total encounters, 28% (n=40,828) were care transitions from one facility to another. Findings suggest that automated query-based HIE may support care transitions with efficient information sharing and assist United States providers in achieving stage two of meaningful use. PMID:24551330

  19. A Handbook of Environmental Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This handbook has been designed as a teaching resource to be used in the development of student attitudes and competencies, reflecting an awareness of the environment, and a motivation to work toward solutions to its problems. Listed activities are to be adapted to the abilities and interests of students, school locale, and teaching situation.…

  20. Addressing the Problems of Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri

    2012-01-01

    Homeless adolescents, known as "unaccompanied youth," constitute a small but important portion of the overall homeless population, one that needs particular attention at school. In this article, we review existing literature to provide a background for educational leaders, researchers, and policymakers hoping to understand the phenomenon of…

  1. Understanding metropolitan patterns of daily encounters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Axhausen, Kay W; Lee, Der-Horng; Huang, Xianfeng

    2013-08-20

    Understanding of the mechanisms driving our daily face-to-face encounters is still limited; the field lacks large-scale datasets describing both individual behaviors and their collective interactions. However, here, with the help of travel smart card data, we uncover such encounter mechanisms and structures by constructing a time-resolved in-vehicle social encounter network on public buses in a city (about 5 million residents). Using a population scale dataset, we find physical encounters display reproducible temporal patterns, indicating that repeated encounters are regular and identical. On an individual scale, we find that collective regularities dominate distinct encounters' bounded nature. An individual's encounter capability is rooted in his/her daily behavioral regularity, explaining the emergence of "familiar strangers" in daily life. Strikingly, we find individuals with repeated encounters are not grouped into small communities, but become strongly connected over time, resulting in a large, but imperceptible, small-world contact network or "structure of co-presence" across the whole metropolitan area. Revealing the encounter pattern and identifying this large-scale contact network are crucial to understanding the dynamics in patterns of social acquaintances, collective human behaviors, and--particularly--disclosing the impact of human behavior on various diffusion/spreading processes.

  2. Understanding metropolitan patterns of daily encounters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Axhausen, Kay W; Lee, Der-Horng; Huang, Xianfeng

    2013-08-20

    Understanding of the mechanisms driving our daily face-to-face encounters is still limited; the field lacks large-scale datasets describing both individual behaviors and their collective interactions. However, here, with the help of travel smart card data, we uncover such encounter mechanisms and structures by constructing a time-resolved in-vehicle social encounter network on public buses in a city (about 5 million residents). Using a population scale dataset, we find physical encounters display reproducible temporal patterns, indicating that repeated encounters are regular and identical. On an individual scale, we find that collective regularities dominate distinct encounters' bounded nature. An individual's encounter capability is rooted in his/her daily behavioral regularity, explaining the emergence of "familiar strangers" in daily life. Strikingly, we find individuals with repeated encounters are not grouped into small communities, but become strongly connected over time, resulting in a large, but imperceptible, small-world contact network or "structure of co-presence" across the whole metropolitan area. Revealing the encounter pattern and identifying this large-scale contact network are crucial to understanding the dynamics in patterns of social acquaintances, collective human behaviors, and--particularly--disclosing the impact of human behavior on various diffusion/spreading processes. PMID:23918373

  3. Problems encountered in fluctuating flame temperature measurements by thermocouple.

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Lucero, Ralph E.; Gill, Walter; Yilmaz, Nadir

    2008-11-01

    Some thermocouple experiments were carried out in order to obtain sensitivity of thermocouple readings to fluctuations in flames and to determine if the average thermocouple reading was representative of the local volume temperature for fluctuating flames. The thermocouples considered were an exposed junction thermocouple and a fully sheathed thermocouple with comparable time constants. Either the voltage signal or indicated temperature for each test was recorded at sampling rates between 300-4,096 Hz. The trace was then plotted with respect to time or sample number so that time variation in voltage or temperature could be visualized and the average indicated temperature could be determined. For experiments where high sampling rates were used, the signal was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) to determine the frequencies present in the thermocouple signal. This provided a basic observable as to whether or not the probe was able to follow flame oscillations. To enhance oscillations, for some experiments, the flame was forced. An analysis based on thermocouple time constant, coupled with the transfer function for a sinusoidal input was tested against the experimental results.

  4. Problems encountered when defining Arctic amplification as a ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hind, Alistair; Zhang, Qiong; Brattström, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    In climate change science the term ‘Arctic amplification’ has become synonymous with an estimation of the ratio of a change in Arctic temperatures compared with a broader reference change under the same period, usually in global temperatures. Here, it is shown that this definition of Arctic amplification comes with a suite of difficulties related to the statistical properties of the ratio estimator itself. Most problematic is the complexity of categorizing uncertainty in Arctic amplification when the global, or reference, change in temperature is close to 0 over a period of interest, in which case it may be impossible to set bounds on this uncertainty. An important conceptual distinction is made between the ‘Ratio of Means’ and ‘Mean Ratio’ approaches to defining a ratio estimate of Arctic amplification, as they do not only possess different uncertainty properties regarding the amplification factor, but are also demonstrated to ask different scientific questions. Uncertainty in the estimated range of the Arctic amplification factor using the latest global climate models and climate forcing scenarios is expanded upon and shown to be greater than previously demonstrated for future climate projections, particularly using forcing scenarios with lower concentrations of greenhouse gases. PMID:27461918

  5. Technical problems encountered with the LALA-1 flying laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swidzinski, J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of structural design changes necessitated by the conversion of the An-2R agricultural support aircraft into a flying test bed to be used in feasibility studies evaluating jet engines in agricultural support aircraft. The entire rear of the fuselage was radically modified to permit mounting of the Al-25 jet engine directly behind the trailing edge of the upper wing. The standard piston engine was retained to permit comparison between the two types of power plants in typical agricultural support operations.

  6. Flight Research: Problems Encountered and What They Should Teach Us

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Milton O.; Hunley, J. D.; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The document by Milt Thompson that is reproduced here was an untitled rough draft found in Thompson's papers in the Dryden Historical Reference Collection. Internal evidence suggests that it was written around 1974. I have not attempted to second guess what Milt might have done in revising the paper, but I have made some minor stylistic changes to make it more readable without changing the sense of what Milt initially wrote. For the most part, I have not attempted to bring his comments up to date. For readers who may not be familiar with the history of what is today the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and of its predecessor organizations, I have added a background section.

  7. Problems Encountered in Fluctuating Flame Temperature Measurements by Thermocouple

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Nadir; Gill, Walt; Donaldson, A. Burl; Lucero, Ralph E.

    2008-01-01

    Some thermocouple experiments were carried out in order to obtain sensitivity of thermocouple readings to fluctuations in flames and to determine if the average thermocouple reading was representative of the local volume temperature for fluctuating flames. The thermocouples considered were an exposed junction thermocouple and a fully sheathed thermocouple with comparable time constants. Either the voltage signal or indicated temperature for each test was recorded at sampling rates between 300-4,096 Hz. The trace was then plotted with respect to time or sample number so that time variation in voltage or temperature could be visualized and the average indicated temperature could be determined. For experiments where high sampling rates were used, the signal was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) to determine the frequencies present in the thermocouple signal. This provided a basic observable as to whether or not the probe was able to follow flame oscillations. To enhance oscillations, for some experiments, the flame was forced. An analysis based on thermocouple time constant, coupled with the transfer function for a sinusoidal input was tested against the experimental results.

  8. Problems encountered when defining Arctic amplification as a ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hind, Alistair; Zhang, Qiong; Brattström, Gudrun

    2016-07-01

    In climate change science the term ‘Arctic amplification’ has become synonymous with an estimation of the ratio of a change in Arctic temperatures compared with a broader reference change under the same period, usually in global temperatures. Here, it is shown that this definition of Arctic amplification comes with a suite of difficulties related to the statistical properties of the ratio estimator itself. Most problematic is the complexity of categorizing uncertainty in Arctic amplification when the global, or reference, change in temperature is close to 0 over a period of interest, in which case it may be impossible to set bounds on this uncertainty. An important conceptual distinction is made between the ‘Ratio of Means’ and ‘Mean Ratio’ approaches to defining a ratio estimate of Arctic amplification, as they do not only possess different uncertainty properties regarding the amplification factor, but are also demonstrated to ask different scientific questions. Uncertainty in the estimated range of the Arctic amplification factor using the latest global climate models and climate forcing scenarios is expanded upon and shown to be greater than previously demonstrated for future climate projections, particularly using forcing scenarios with lower concentrations of greenhouse gases.

  9. Development of countermeasures for medical problems encountered in space flight.

    PubMed

    Nicogossian, A E; Rummel, J D; Leveton, L; Teeter, R

    1992-01-01

    By the turn of this century, long-duration space missions, either in low Earth orbit or for got early planetary missions, will become commonplace. From the physiological standpoint, exposure to the weightless environment results in changes in body function, some of which are adaptive in nature and some of which can be life threatening. Important issues such as environmental health, radiation protection, physical deconditioning, and bone and muscle loss are of concern to life scientists and mission designers. Physical conditioning techniques such as exercise are not sufficient to protect future space travellers. A review of past experience with piloted missions has shown that gradual breakdown in bone and muscle tissue, together with fluid losses, despite a vigorous exercise regimen can ultimately lead to increased evidence of renal stones, musculoskeletal injuries, and bone fractures. Biological effects of radiation can, over long periods of time increase the risk of cancer development. Today, a vigorous program of study on the means to provide a complex exercise regimen to the antigravity muscles and skeleton is under study. Additional evaluation of artificial gravity as a mechanism to counteract bone and muscle deconditioning and cardiovascular asthenia is under study. New radiation methods are being developed. This paper will deal with the results of these studies.

  10. Problems encountered when defining Arctic amplification as a ratio.

    PubMed

    Hind, Alistair; Zhang, Qiong; Brattström, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    In climate change science the term 'Arctic amplification' has become synonymous with an estimation of the ratio of a change in Arctic temperatures compared with a broader reference change under the same period, usually in global temperatures. Here, it is shown that this definition of Arctic amplification comes with a suite of difficulties related to the statistical properties of the ratio estimator itself. Most problematic is the complexity of categorizing uncertainty in Arctic amplification when the global, or reference, change in temperature is close to 0 over a period of interest, in which case it may be impossible to set bounds on this uncertainty. An important conceptual distinction is made between the 'Ratio of Means' and 'Mean Ratio' approaches to defining a ratio estimate of Arctic amplification, as they do not only possess different uncertainty properties regarding the amplification factor, but are also demonstrated to ask different scientific questions. Uncertainty in the estimated range of the Arctic amplification factor using the latest global climate models and climate forcing scenarios is expanded upon and shown to be greater than previously demonstrated for future climate projections, particularly using forcing scenarios with lower concentrations of greenhouse gases. PMID:27461918

  11. Development of countermeasures for medical problems encountered in space flight.

    PubMed

    Nicogossian, A E; Rummel, J D; Leveton, L; Teeter, R

    1992-01-01

    By the turn of this century, long-duration space missions, either in low Earth orbit or for got early planetary missions, will become commonplace. From the physiological standpoint, exposure to the weightless environment results in changes in body function, some of which are adaptive in nature and some of which can be life threatening. Important issues such as environmental health, radiation protection, physical deconditioning, and bone and muscle loss are of concern to life scientists and mission designers. Physical conditioning techniques such as exercise are not sufficient to protect future space travellers. A review of past experience with piloted missions has shown that gradual breakdown in bone and muscle tissue, together with fluid losses, despite a vigorous exercise regimen can ultimately lead to increased evidence of renal stones, musculoskeletal injuries, and bone fractures. Biological effects of radiation can, over long periods of time increase the risk of cancer development. Today, a vigorous program of study on the means to provide a complex exercise regimen to the antigravity muscles and skeleton is under study. Additional evaluation of artificial gravity as a mechanism to counteract bone and muscle deconditioning and cardiovascular asthenia is under study. New radiation methods are being developed. This paper will deal with the results of these studies. PMID:11536975

  12. Development of countermeasures for medical problems encountered in space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Rummel, John D.; Leveton, Lauren; Teeter, Ron

    1992-08-01

    By the turn of this century, long-duration space missions, either in low Earth orbit or for got early planetary missions, will become commonplace. From the physiological standpoint, exposure to the weightless environment results in changes in body function, some of which are adaptive in nature and some of which can be life threatening. Important issues such as environmental health, radiation protection, physical deconditioning, and bone and muscle loss are of concern to life scientists and mission designers. Physical conditioning techniques such as exercise are not sufficient to protect future space travellers. A review of past experience with piloted missions has shown that gradual breakdown in bone and muscle tissue, together with fluid losses, despite a vigorous exercise regimen can ultimately lead to increased evidence of renal stones, musculoskeletal injuries, and bone fractures. Biological effects of radiation can, over long periods of time increase the risk of cancer development. Today, a vigorous program of study on the means to provide a complex exercise regimen to the antigravity muscles and skeleton is under study. Additional evaluation of artificial gravity as a mechanism to counteract bone and muscle deconditioning and cardiovascular asthenia is under study. New radiation methods are being developed. This paper will deal with the results of these studies.

  13. Screening-Based Translation of Public Research Encounters Painful Problems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Whether identified through high throughput screening or in silico screening, and whether target-based or phenotypic, sets of hits will contain chemical con artists. Such pan-assay interference compounds (PAINS) and other subversive compounds continue to pollute the scientific literature. There are several angles of attack to aid identification of such nonprogressable molecules. One of these rules above all, and this is a demonstration of genuine structure–activity relationships. Recognition of this, which will require a greater effort in medicinal chemistry, will be of general benefit. PMID:25941544

  14. Encountering Death: Structured Activities for Death Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ira David; And Others

    This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on death and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering Death in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of death and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering Death in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…

  15. Encounter with Jupiter. [Pioneer 10 space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Pioneer 10 space probe's encounter with the Jupiter is discussed in detail. Tables are presented which include data on the distances during the encounter, times of crossing satellite orbits, important events in the flight near Jupiter, and time of experiments. Educational study projects are also included.

  16. Clinical encounters with internet pornography.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Thomas P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Pornography, if understood to involve the depiction of sexual activity, organs, and experiences, is perhaps as old as human civilization itself. Historically linked to various technological innovations, pornography viewing in the Internet age has reached epic proportions, with large numbers of individuals taking advantage of ease of access, affordability, and presumed anonymity to explore sexual material online. Within the mental health professions substantial research exists on the effects of viewing general pornography; however, the distinctive effects of the marriage of pornography and cyberspace is only beginning to be examined. In addition to reviewing some historical and statistical material about pornography and the relevant psychiatric and psychoanalytic literature, four detailed clinical vignettes are presented to illustrate the types of problems related to Internet pornography use that are being presented to practicing psychotherapists. PMID:19113956

  17. Two heads are better than one: Australian tobacco control experts' and mental health change champions' consensus on addressing the problem of high smoking rates among people with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Della; Lawn, Sharon; Coveney, John

    2016-04-01

    Objective The aims of the present study were to explore the beliefs of Australian experts in tobacco control and change champions working in mental health and tobacco cessation, and to identify measures for addressing the problem of high smoking rates for people with mental illness. Methods Qualitative interviews were undertaken to explore participants' views, and the Delphi technique was used to achieve consensus on ways in which the problem would be best addressed. Results This consensus centred on the need for leadership within the mental health system. The problem was reconceptualised from being solely the responsibility of the mental health sector into an issue that requires the combined resources of a partnership and shared leadership between government and non-government services, public health leaders, policy makers and people with mental illness and their families. Conclusions Collaboration would raise the priority of the issue, reduce the debilitating effect of stigma and discrimination within the mental health sector and would place smoking reduction firmly on the political and public agenda. A recovery-orientated focus would increase the skill base and be inclusive of workers, families and carers of people with mental illness who face smoking issues on a daily basis. Reconceptualising this as an issue that would benefit from cooperation and partnerships would disrupt the notion that the problem is solely the responsibility of the mental health sector. What is known about the topic? Rates of smoking have remained high for people with mental illness despite population-wide public health strategies successfully reducing smoking rates in the general population. For people with mental illness, the benefits of quitting smoking for both their mental and physical health are overshadowed by concerns about the complexity of their needs. There is a lack of knowledge about how smoking cessation support can be improved to increase success rates in smokers with

  18. Voyager 1 encounter with the jovian system.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Lane, A L

    1979-06-01

    An overview of the Voyager 1 encounter with Jupiter is presented, including a brief discussion of the characteristics of the spacecraft and trajectory and highlights of the results which are described in the subsequent reports.

  19. Voyager 2 encounter with the saturnian system.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Miner, E D

    1982-01-29

    An overview of the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn is presented, including a brief discussion of the trajectory, the planned observations, and highlights of the results described in the subsequent reports.

  20. Voyager 1 encounter with the saturnian system.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Miner, E D

    1981-04-10

    An overview of the Voyager 1 encounter with Saturn is presented, including a brief discussion of the flight, trajectory, science plan formulation, and highlights of the results described in the subsequent reports.

  1. The Writing of "Encounter": The Editor's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingber, Bonnie Verburg

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the reasons for publishing the picture book "Encounters," which tells of the fateful first meeting of Christopher Columbus and the Native Americans from the point of view of a boy raised in the Tanio culture. (RS)

  2. Exploring Digital Encounters in the Public Arena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieck, Ava Fatah Gen.; Kostakos, Vassilis; Penn, Alan

    In this chapter, we explore the types of encounters that technology enables. We consider the differences between digital and nondigital encounters through two pilot studies carried out in the city of Bath, United Kingdom. We investigate how technology can be appropriated for shared interactions that support conscious (or unconscious) social encounters, and highlight the importance of space and the role of place in providing temporal and spatial mechanisms facilitating different types of shared encounters. Here, we apply a method based on intervention through "sensing and projecting" Bluetooth names and digital identity in the public arena, and describe initial observations about people's reaction toward the projection of their Bluetooth names in public. In particular, we note the significance of constructing socially meaningful relations between people mediated by these technologies. We discuss initial results and outline issues raised in detail before finally describing the ongoing work.

  3. First-Year Principal Encounters Homophobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retelle, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    A 1st-year principal encounters homonegativity and an ethical dilemma when she attempts to terminate a teacher because of the teacher's inadequate and ineffective teaching. The teacher responds by threatening to "out" Ms. L. to the parents.

  4. Pioneer to encounter Saturn on September 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The encounter of the Pioneer 11 Spacecraft with Saturn, designed to provide information on the evolution of the Sun and its planets, is described. Photographs and measurements of Saturn, its rings, and several of its 10 satellites, including Titan, to be taken by Pioneer instruments, are emphasized. The encounter sequence and spacecraft trajectory are discussed. A description of Saturn and its atmosphere is included. Onboard instruments and experiments are also described.

  5. Encounters between binaries and neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    We simulated encounters between a neutron star and primordial and tidal-capture binaries. In the case of encounters involving a tidal-capture binary, comprising a white dwarf and a main-sequence star, we find that most exchange encounters will produce a single merged object with the white dwarf and neutron star engulfed in a common envelope of gas donated by the main-sequence primary of the original binary. A small fraction of exchanges induce a merger of the white dwarf and main-sequence star, with this object being unbound to the neutron star, and the two objects having a large relative speed at infinity. For encounters involving a primordial binary, fewer encounters require the inclusion of hydrodynamical effects. Those involving collisions or close encounters tend to produce a binary comprised of the two merged stars (now forming one star) and the third star. The binaries produced typically have large enough separations to prevent the formation of a single merged object until subsequent stellar evolution of one of the components causes it to fill its Roche lobe. Clean exchanges produce binaries with large eccentricities; they are typically sufficiently wide to avoid circularization.

  6. Optimizing the Encounter Rate in Biological Interactions: Lévy versus Brownian Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartumeus, F.; Catalan, J.; Fulco, U. L.; Lyra, M. L.; Viswanathan, G. M.

    2002-03-01

    An important application involving two-species reaction-diffusion systems relates to the problem of finding the best statistical strategy for optimizing the encounter rate between organisms. We investigate the general problem of how the encounter rate depends on whether organisms move in Lévy or Brownian random walks. By simulating a limiting generalized searcher-target model (e.g., predator-prey, mating partner, pollinator-flower), we find that Lévy walks confer a significant advantage for increasing encounter rates when the searcher is larger or moves rapidly relative to the target, and when the target density is low.

  7. NEAs' Satellites Under Close Encounters with Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Rosana; Winter, O. C.

    2012-10-01

    In the present work we took into account the gravitational effects experienced by a NEA (Near-Earth Asteroid), during a close encounter with Earth, in order to estimate the stability regions of NEAs' satellites as a function of the encounter conditions and for different primary-satellite mass ratio values. Initially, the methodology consisted on numerically simulating a system composed by the Sun, the planets of the Solar System, and samples of NEAs belonging to the groups Apollo, Atens and Amor, for a period of 10 Myr. All encounters with Earth closer than 100 Earth's radius were registered. The next step consisted on simulating all those registered close encounters considering the Earth, the asteroid that perform the close encounter, and a cloud of satellites around the asteroid. We considered no-interacting satellites with circular orbits, random values for the inclination, longitude of the ascending node and true anomaly, and with radial distribution going from 0.024 to 0.4 Hill's radius of the asteroid. The largest radial distance for which all the satellites survive (no collision or ejection) is defined as the critical radius. We present a statistical analysis of the registered encounters and the critical radius found, defining the stable regions as a function of the impact parameter - d, and of the relative velocity - V. For the case of massless satellites, we found that all satellites survived for encounters with d>0.3 Earth Hill's radius. For impact parameter d<0.13 Earth Hill's radius, we found that particles with radial distance greater than 0.24 Hill's radius of the asteroid, are unstable, for any relative velocity. The results for the other considered cases will be presented and discussed. We also discuss the implications of the regions found, specially in the NEAs-binary scenarios.

  8. Centaur's ring system formation by close encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santana, Thamiris; Winter, Othon

    2016-10-01

    Rupture of small bodies due to close approach to a massive body is a frequent event in the Solar System. Some of these small bodies can just disintegrate completely or suffer a material loss.In this work we study the gravitational interaction between a giant planet and a small body in close encounters in order to simulate the formation of a planetary ring system around a centaur by the partial rupture of the small body.Considering the current Chariklo's body and a disk of particles around it, we simulated the system under close encounters with one of giant planets.Another motivation for the study is also the centaur Chiron, that is a candidate to have a ring system like Chariklo. The characteristics of the encounters are defined by the impact parameter and the velocity at infinity.The results are presented in terms of conditions that could lead to a rupture that could generate a ring like system.

  9. Homeless women's experiences of service provider encounters.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Donna J; Nichols, Tracy R

    2014-01-01

    Service providers are gatekeepers to health-sustaining services and resources, although little is known about service encounters from the perspective of homeless women. We conducted in-depth semistructured interviews with 15 homeless women to better understand their experiences of service encounters. Using a phenomenological method, 160 significant statements were extracted from participant transcripts; more positive than negative interactions were reported. The 10 themes that emerged fall along a dehumanizing/humanizing continuum primarily separated by the power participants experienced in the interaction and the trust they felt in the service provider. Implications for nursing practice and research are offered. PMID:24528122

  10. Voyager 2 encounter with the jovian system.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Lane, A L

    1979-11-23

    An overview of the Voyager 2 encounter with Jupiter is presented, including a brief discussion of the trajectory, the major sequence modifications performed because of the Jupiter measurements obtained with Voyager 1, and high-lights of the results that are described in the subsequent reports.

  11. The Expression of Differences in Intercultural Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broome, Benjamin J.

    Participants in an intercultural encounter bring with them differences in values, beliefs, attitudes, and world views. The communication of these differences often results in threatening and defensive behavior. The facilitating attitudes of open-mindedness and nonevaluation promote understanding and a respect for differing experience and…

  12. Students Encountering Obstacles Using a CAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Describes a pilot study on the use of computer algebra at the upper secondary level. A symbolic calculator was introduced in a pre-examination class studying for advanced pre-university mathematics. Focuses on the identification of obstacles that students encounter while using computer algebra with the theoretical framework of Realistic…

  13. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  14. Wake Vortex Encounter Model Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan; Brandon, Jay; Greene, George C.; Rivers, Robert; Shah, Gautam; Stewart, Eric; Stuever, Robert; Rossow, Vernon

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this current research is to establish a database that validate/calibrate wake encounter analysis methods for fleet-wide application; and measure/document atmospheric effects on wake decay. Two kinds of experiments, wind tunnel experiments and flight experiments, are performed. This paper discusses the different types of tests and compares their wake velocity measurement.

  15. Moral Relations in Encounters with Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Karin; Öhman, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this article is to develop in-depth knowledge about the connection between outdoor experiences and moral attitudes towards nature. The study focuses on processes in which moral relations are at stake in encounters between students and nature. The purpose is to identify such events, describe their specific circumstances and…

  16. Domestic Violence Encountered among Kurdish Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Sirwan Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective; There is growing recognition that violence against women has a large public health impact, in addition to being a gross violation of women's human rights. The study's aims were: To show the types of domestic abuse encountered by Kurdish women, and study the relationship between them. Methods; The study conducted in the…

  17. Encounter: A Picture Book for Any Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazler, Kitty Y.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the content of the picture book, "Encounter," written by Jane Yolen and illustrated by David Shannon. States that it focuses on the arrival of Christopher Columbus to San Salvador (El Salvador) from a boy's perspective. Includes questions for use when discussing the messages and content of the book. (CMK)

  18. Sensitivity Training and Group Encounter, an Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siroka, Robert W., Ed.; And Others

    "Sensitivity Training and Group Encounter" attempts to explore group interaction on many levels--verbal, sensory, and physical. It can be utilized as a model for dealing with various forms of interpersonal relations, from ongoing social issues to the isolation, alienation, and distrust felt by the members of a group. Presented as a guide to this…

  19. Encountering Pedagogy through Relational Art Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Rita L.; O'Donoghue, Donal

    2012-01-01

    Two artists involved in "socially engaged art" practice were invited to work with art education teacher candidates and instructors in an effort to rethink notions of teaching, learning and art. We initiated this residency, which we called "The Summerhill Residency", to examine how learning encounters might create environments for meaningful…

  20. Close encounters of the stellar kind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2015-03-01

    Stars which pass close to the Sun can perturb the Oort cloud, injecting comets into the inner solar system where they may collide with the Earth. Using van Leeuwen's re-reduction of the Hipparcos data complemented by the original Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues, along with recent radial velocity surveys, I integrate the orbits of over 50 000 stars through the Galaxy to look for close encounters. The search uses a Monte Carlo sampling of the covariance of the data in order to properly characterize the uncertainties in the times, distances, and speeds of the encounters. I show that modelling stellar encounters by assuming instead a linear relative motion produces, for many encounters, inaccurate and biased results. I find 42, 14, and 4 stars which have encounter distances below 2, 1, and 0.5 pc respectively, although some of these stars have questionable data. Of the 14 stars coming within 1 pc, 5 were found by at least one of three previous studies (which found a total of 7 coming within 1 pc). The closest encounter appears to be Hip 85605, a K or M star, which has a 90% probability of coming between 0.04 and 0.20 pc between 240 and 470 kyr from now (90% Bayesian confidence interval). However, its astrometry may be incorrect, in which case the closest encounter found is the K7 dwarf GL 710, which has a 90% probability of coming within 0.10-0.44 pc in about 1.3 Myr. A larger perturbation may have been caused by gamma Microscopii, a G6 giant with a mass of about 2.5 M⊙, which came within 0.35-1.34 pc (90% confidence interval) around 3.8 Myr ago. Full Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A35

  1. Variable addressability imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala, Kenneth Scott

    The use of variable addressability for creating an optimum human-machine interface is investigated. Current wide field optical systems present more information to the human visual system than it has the capacity to perceive. The axial resolution, and/or the field of view can be increased by minimizing the difference between what the eye can perceive and what the system presents. The variable addressability function was developed through the use of a human factors experiment that characterized the position of the eye during the simulated use of a binocular system. Applying the variable addressability function to a conventional optical design required the development of a new metric for evaluating the expected performance of the variable addressability system. The new metric couples psycho-visual data and traditional optical data in order to specify the required performance of the variable addressability system. A non-linear mapping of the pixels is required in order to have the system work most efficiently with the human visual system, while also compensating for eye motion. The non-linear mapping function, which is the backbone of the variable addressability technique, can be created using optical distortion. The lens and system design is demonstrated in two different spectral bands. One of the designs was fabricated, tested, and assembled into a prototype. Through a second human factors study aimed at measuring performance, the variable addressability prototype was directly compared to a uniform addressability prototype, quantifying the difference in performance for the two prototypes. The human factors results showed that the variable addressability prototype provided better resolution 13% of the time throughout the experiment, but was 15% slower in use than the uniform addressability prototype.

  2. Performance of three-way data types during Voyager's encounter with Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. C.; Taylor, T. H.; Jacobson, R. A.; Lewis, G. D.

    1990-01-01

    Voyager's flyby of Neptune in August of 1989 was the most distant planetary encounter ever achieved. Round trip light travel time was more than eight hours, exceeding view periods at two of the three tracking station sites. Consequently, the majority of radiometric tracking was accomplished by transmitting the uplink from one station, and receiving the downlink at a different station. This procedure defines three-way data. Dependence on three-way data for orbit determination is one distinguishing element of Voyager's successful encounter with Neptune. This paper addresses the performance of three-way range and Doppler data supporting pre-encounter orbit determination and post-encounter orbit reconstruction. Also, calibrations which reduce systematic errors inherent to three-way data are described and analyzed.

  3. Winnicott and Lacan: a missed encounter?

    PubMed

    Vanier, Alain

    2012-04-01

    Winnicott was able to say that Lacan's paper on the mirror stage "had certainly influenced" him, while Lacan argued that he found his object a in Winnicott's transitional object. By following the development of their personal relations, as well as of their theoretical discussions, it is possible to argue that this was a missed encounter--yet a happily missed one, since the misunderstandings of their theoretical exchanges allowed each of them to clarify concepts otherwise difficult to discern.

  4. Numerical Study of a Convective Turbulence Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a convective turbulence event is investigated and compared with observational data. The specific case was encountered during one of NASA's flight tests and was characterized by severe turbulence. The event was associated with overshooting convective turrets that contained low to moderate radar reflectivity. Model comparisons with observations are quite favorable. Turbulence hazard metrics are proposed and applied to the numerical data set. Issues such as adequate grid size are examined.

  5. Understanding L2 Speaking Problems: Implications for ESL Curriculum Development in a Teacher Training Institution in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the result of a study that aimed to identify the problems with oral English skills of ESL (English as a second language) students at a tertiary teacher training institution in Hong Kong. The study, by way of semi-structured interview, addresses the gap in our understanding of the difficulties ESL students encountered in their…

  6. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  7. Globalization, migration health, and educational preparation for transnational medical encounters

    PubMed Central

    Koehn, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    Unprecedented migration, a core dimension of contemporary globalization, challenges population health. In a world of increasing human mobility, many health outcomes are shaped by transnational interactions among care providers and care recipients who meet in settings where nationality/ethnic match is not an option. This review article explores the value of transnational competence (TC) education as preparation for ethnically and socially discordant clinical encounters. The relevance of TC's five core skill domains (analytic, emotional, creative, communicative, and functional) for migration health and the medical-school curriculum is elaborated. A pedagogical approach that prepares for the transnational health-care consultation is presented, with a focus on clinical-clerkship learning experiences. Educational preparation for contemporary medical encounters needs to include a comprehensive set of patient-focused interpersonal skills, be adaptable to a wide variety of service users and global practice sites, and possess utility in addressing both the quality of patient care and socio-political constraints on migration health. PMID:16441899

  8. Spaces of Spiritual Citizenship: Children's Relational and Emotional Encounters with the Everyday School Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemming, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of children's spiritual, relational and emotional encounters with the primary school environment, with reference to concepts and theories from both education studies and human geography. Drawing on mixed-method qualitative research in two case study institutions, the article examines pupils' photographed "special…

  9. Issues encountered in recent attempts to develop novel antidepressant agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzberg, Alan F

    2015-05-01

    The development of new antidepressants has had mixed results over the past decade, with several notable failures. This paper reviews a number of major initiatives in the development of new antidepressant agents. Traditional strategies to build on agents that have monoaminergic effects at the synapse (e.g., vilazodone and ketamine) have been complemented with efforts that have emphasized devices and brain circuits (e.g., deep brain stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation) or chemical agents that modulate neuroendocrine systems (e.g., glucocorticoid antagonists, mixed melatonin agonists/serotonin type-2 receptor antagonists). Interestingly, chemical agents, such as onabotulinumtoxin A, may affect brain circuits as well. We present data from recent studies in drug and device development--reviewing progress made, stumbling blocks encountered, and issues that need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25762133

  10. Caring and uncaring encounters within nursing and health care from the cancer patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, S; Hamrin, E

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this phenomenological study was to explore caring and uncaring encounters with nurses and other health professionals from the perspective of the person who has been diagnosed and treated for cancer. Through thematic analysis of in-depth dialogues with five women and four men in the remission or recovery phase of cancer, three major categories regarding caring and uncaring encounters were identified. The essential structure of a caring encounter was found to be threefold: 1. the nurse/health professional perceived as caring: an indispensable companion on the cancer trajectory; 2. the resulting mutual trust and caring connection; and 3. the perceived effect of the caring encounter: a sense of solidarity, empowerment, well-being, and healing. The essential structure of an uncaring encounter is also threefold: 1. the nurse/health professional perceived as uncaring: an unfortunate hindrance to the perception of well-being and healing; 2. the resulting sense of mistrust and disconnection; and 3. the perceived effect of the uncaring encounter: a sense of uneasiness, discouragement, and a sense of being broken down. The findings emphasize the primacy of competence in professional caring, as well as that of genuine concern, openness and a willingness to connect with others. The often devastating effects of uncaring encounters on the recipient of nursing and health care raises the question whether uncaring as an ethical and a professional problem should perhaps be dealt with as malpractice in nursing and health care.

  11. Energy Problems and Environmental Concern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Train, Russell E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses problems encountered in energy extraction and consumption, involving nuclear power plant construction, environmental consequences of energy systems, and energy conservation ethics. Indicates that the increasing concern over environmental quality is not the true cause of present energy problems. (CC)

  12. The intriguing encounters of Pavlov and Cushing.

    PubMed

    Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C; Benson, Daniel R

    2004-03-01

    Ivan Petrovich Pavlov and Harvey William Cushing were two of the most prominent neuroscientists of the early 20th century. Their contributions helped advance the understanding of the brain and its disorders, and propelled neuroscience into a new era of research and treatment. Although separated geographically and culturally, Pavlov and Cushing exchanged letters and followed one another's careers from afar. They met only a few times, during international scientific gatherings in the US and abroad. These encounters were captured in journal entries, letters, and photographs, and provide a glimpse into the lives of these two great men and the history of neuroscience at the turn of the last century.

  13. The intriguing encounters of Pavlov and Cushing.

    PubMed

    Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C; Benson, Daniel R

    2004-03-01

    Ivan Petrovich Pavlov and Harvey William Cushing were two of the most prominent neuroscientists of the early 20th century. Their contributions helped advance the understanding of the brain and its disorders, and propelled neuroscience into a new era of research and treatment. Although separated geographically and culturally, Pavlov and Cushing exchanged letters and followed one another's careers from afar. They met only a few times, during international scientific gatherings in the US and abroad. These encounters were captured in journal entries, letters, and photographs, and provide a glimpse into the lives of these two great men and the history of neuroscience at the turn of the last century. PMID:15035298

  14. First spacecraft encounter with an asteroid approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.

    1991-01-01

    During the course of the Galileo spacecraft's journey to Jupiter it will make two excursions through the steroid belt situated between Mars and Jupiter. The first excursion involves an encounter with the asteroid 951 Gaspra, which will take place on October 29, 1991. Gaspra is a small (about 15 km diameter) asteroid near the outer edge of the main asteroid belt. It's spectral classification is S, suggesting a composition similar to those of stony-iron meteorites. A figure is given showing the brightness of this asteroid as a function of time.

  15. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  16. STELLAR ENCOUNTER RATE IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C.

    2013-04-01

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates ({Gamma}) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed 'King-model' profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat 'King-model' and 'core-collapsed' clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on {Gamma}, producing the first catalog of globular cluster stellar encounter rates with estimated errors. Comparing our results with published observations of likely products of stellar interactions (numbers of X-ray binaries, numbers of radio millisecond pulsars, and {gamma}-ray luminosity) we find both clear correlations and some differences with published results.

  17. The place of community in medical encounters.

    PubMed

    Hester, D M

    1998-06-01

    Disease and injury creates a break between the individual and the community which compromises the individual's status within the community as well as the integrity of the self as a "product" of social interaction. Our "everyday" activities are called into question since our ability to fulfill obligations and to achieve many of our ends is diminished through the weakening of our bodies. In light of this account of disease, healing is about restoring the individual to a state of vital functioning, and vital functioning entails communal participation. As John Dewey points out, health as "living healthily" can be understood only in context of each patient's pursuits which are always social and communal. But, if living in community with others is the end-in-view for medical encounters, it too must be implicated in the means to that end. A patient who is given the opportunity to participate as a member of the health care community has already begun within the medical encounter itself to live healthily. It follows, then, that we must work to promote new attitudes within health care towards aiding in the effective agency and participation of patients in their healing process -- i.e., we must see community as healing.

  18. Changing concepts: the presidential address.

    PubMed

    Weed, J C

    1974-09-01

    A discussion of conceptual change in areas related to fertility and medicine is presented in an address by the president of the American Fertility Society. Advances in technological research and medicine, particularly in steroids and reporductive physiology, have been the most readily acceptable changes. Cesarean section and surgical sterilization have also become increasingly accepted. Newer developments such as sperm banks, artificial insemination, and ovum transfer have created profound ethical, moral, and medical issued in human engineering research and evolutionary theory. The legalization of abortion has brought moral, ethical, and legal problems for many members of the medical profession. It is urged that the Society promote education of the people in reproductive function, sexual activity, and parental obligation while being acutely aware of the problems in influencing or altering human reproduction.

  19. Envisioning invertebrates and other aquatic encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Eva

    2007-12-01

    To "envision" animals is to visualize, to experience, to figure, to image, kinds of species, discourses, representations, institutions, histories, epistemologies; and, to "imagine possible" a set of material and ethical relationships between species. This dissertation explores the "envisioning of animals" that takes place through/across/between the interfaces of seawater/visuality/experience/biology/technology/phyla---as illustrated in the documentary works of Jean Painleve (scientist and filmmaker), Genevieve Hamon (filmmaker and set-designer), Leni Riefenstahl (filmmaker and photographer), and David Powell (scientist and aquarist). In each case, aesthetic conceptions of beauty and/or ambiguity coupled with biological epistemology and phenomenology of the organisms themselves compete over "what gets to count as culture and nature," and in doing so, construct a host of hybridized and enmeshed "encounters." In the process the following questions are raised: What is the role of the ocean---it's ecosystems and semiotics---in the production of "envisioning"? How are animals used---and in turn shape and reshape the users---to construct tropes of encounter? What theories can be used to understand the phenomenological, semiotic, material, and rhetorical use/miss-use of animals in the articulation of history, economy, biology, narrativity, and representation? How does this motley crew of documentarians answer differently "the animal question," and challenge and/or reinforce anthropocentrism? Divided into two parts, the dissertation first develops a set of methodological questions derived from critical appraisal of "envisioning," encountering, and embodying through science studies, as well as an account of the use and misuse of animals as only "stand ins" for human intentionality; secondly, the dissertation analyses the work of the documentarians in question. Jean Painleve and Genevieve Hamon are shown to critique traditions of representation in nature/science films

  20. Address on the Occasion of the Meeting of the Second Committee of Governmental Experts on Problems in the Field of Copyright and of the Protection of Performers, Producers of Phonograms and Broadcasting Organizations Raised by Transmission via Space Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheu, Rene

    These opening remarks by the Director General of Unesco briefly discuss that organization's activities in the area of copyright within the field of satellite communication. They were addressed to members of a committee whose purpose is to determine whether the protection of signals transmitted by communications satellites does or does not require…

  1. Addressing Issues Related to Technology and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Michael Hacker and David Burghardt, codirectors of Hoftra University's Center for Technological Literacy. Hacker and Burghardt address issues related to technology and engineering. They argue that teachers need to be aware of the problems kids are facing, and how to present these problems in an engaging…

  2. Holographic content addressable storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas; Reyes, George

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a Holographic Content Addressable Storage (HCAS) architecture. The HCAS systems consists of a DMD (Digital Micromirror Array) as the input Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), a CMOS (Complementary Metal-oxide Semiconductor) sensor as the output photodetector and a photorefractive crystal as the recording media. The HCAS system is capable of performing optical correlation of an input image/feature against massive reference data set stored in the holographic memory. Detailed system analysis will be reported in this paper.

  3. Spider behaviors include oral sexual encounters.

    PubMed

    Gregorič, Matjaž; Šuen, Klavdija; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Kralj-Fišer, Simona; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Several clades of spiders whose females evolved giant sizes are known for extreme sexual behaviors such as sexual cannibalism, opportunistic mating, mate-binding, genital mutilation, plugging, and emasculation. However, these behaviors have only been tested in a handful of size dimorphic spiders. Here, we bring another lineage into the picture by reporting on sexual behavior of Darwin's bark spider, Caerostris darwini. This sexually size dimorphic Madagascan species is known for extreme web gigantism and for producing the world's toughest biomaterial. Our field and laboratory study uncovers a rich sexual repertoire that predictably involves cannibalism, genital mutilation, male preference for teneral females, and emasculation. Surprisingly, C. darwini males engage in oral sexual encounters, rarely reported outside mammals. Irrespective of female's age or mating status males salivate onto female genitalia pre-, during, and post-copulation. While its adaptive significance is elusive, oral sexual contact in spiders may signal male quality or reduce sperm competition. PMID:27126507

  4. Brief encounters: Assembling cosmetic surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Ruth; Bell, David; Cheung, Olive; Jones, Meredith; Probyn, Elspeth

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a large-scale, multi-disciplinary, mixed methods project which explores empirically and theoretically the rapidly growing but poorly understood (and barely regulated) phenomenon of cosmetic surgery tourism (CST). We explore CST by drawing on theories of flows, networks and assemblages, aiming to produce a fuller and more nuanced account of - and accounting for - CST. This enables us to conceptualise CST as an interplay of places, people, things, ideas and practices. Through specific instances of assembling cosmetic surgery that we encountered in the field, and that we illustrate with material from interviews with patients, facilitators and surgeons, our analysis advances understandings and theorisations of medical mobilities, globalisation and assemblage thinking. PMID:24985788

  5. EVIDENCE OF AN ASTEROID ENCOUNTERING A PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, P. R.; Karastergiou, A.; Buchner, S.; Roberts, S. J.; Keith, M. J.; Johnston, S.; Shannon, R. M.

    2014-01-10

    Debris disks and asteroid belts are expected to form around young pulsars due to fallback material from their original supernova explosions. Disk material may migrate inward and interact with a pulsar's magnetosphere, causing changes in torque and emission. Long-term monitoring of PSR J0738–4042 reveals both effects. The pulse shape changes multiple times between 1988 and 2012. The torque, inferred via the derivative of the rotational period, changes abruptly from 2005 September. This change is accompanied by an emergent radio component that drifts with respect to the rest of the pulse. No known intrinsic pulsar processes can explain these timing and radio emission signatures. The data lead us to postulate that we are witnessing an encounter with an asteroid or in-falling debris from a disk.

  6. Brief encounters: Assembling cosmetic surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Ruth; Bell, David; Cheung, Olive; Jones, Meredith; Probyn, Elspeth

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a large-scale, multi-disciplinary, mixed methods project which explores empirically and theoretically the rapidly growing but poorly understood (and barely regulated) phenomenon of cosmetic surgery tourism (CST). We explore CST by drawing on theories of flows, networks and assemblages, aiming to produce a fuller and more nuanced account of - and accounting for - CST. This enables us to conceptualise CST as an interplay of places, people, things, ideas and practices. Through specific instances of assembling cosmetic surgery that we encountered in the field, and that we illustrate with material from interviews with patients, facilitators and surgeons, our analysis advances understandings and theorisations of medical mobilities, globalisation and assemblage thinking.

  7. Spider behaviors include oral sexual encounters

    PubMed Central

    Gregorič, Matjaž; Šuen, Klavdija; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Kralj-Fišer, Simona; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Several clades of spiders whose females evolved giant sizes are known for extreme sexual behaviors such as sexual cannibalism, opportunistic mating, mate-binding, genital mutilation, plugging, and emasculation. However, these behaviors have only been tested in a handful of size dimorphic spiders. Here, we bring another lineage into the picture by reporting on sexual behavior of Darwin’s bark spider, Caerostris darwini. This sexually size dimorphic Madagascan species is known for extreme web gigantism and for producing the world’s toughest biomaterial. Our field and laboratory study uncovers a rich sexual repertoire that predictably involves cannibalism, genital mutilation, male preference for teneral females, and emasculation. Surprisingly, C. darwini males engage in oral sexual encounters, rarely reported outside mammals. Irrespective of female’s age or mating status males salivate onto female genitalia pre-, during, and post-copulation. While its adaptive significance is elusive, oral sexual contact in spiders may signal male quality or reduce sperm competition. PMID:27126507

  8. Rhinoplasty Education Using a Standardized Patient Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Eric J.; Khosla, Rohit K.; Howell, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background Comprehensive aesthetic surgery training continues to be a challenge for residency programs. Our residency program developed a rhinoplasty-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) based upon validated methods as part of the residency education curriculum. We report our experience with the rhinoplasty-based OSCE and offer guidance to its incorporation within residency programs. Methods The encounter involved resident evaluation and operative planning for a standardized patient desiring a rhinoplasty procedure. Validated OSCE methods currently used at our medical school were implemented. Residents were evaluated on appropriate history taking, physical examination, and explanation to the patient of treatment options. Examination results were evaluated using analysis of variance (statistical significance P<0.05). Results Twelve residents completed the rhinoplasty OSCE. Medical knowledge assessment showed increasing performance with clinical year, 50% versus 84% for postgraduate year 3 and 6, respectively (P<0.005). Systems-based practice scores showed that all residents incorrectly submitted forms for billing and operative scheduling. All residents confirmed that the OSCE realistically represents an actual patient encounter. All faculty confirmed the utility of evaluating resident performance during the OSCE as a useful assessment tool for determining the Next Accreditation System Milestone level. Conclusions Aesthetic surgery training for residents will require innovative methods for education. Our examination showed a program-educational weakness in billing/coding, an area that will be improved upon by topic-specific lectures. A thoroughly developed OSCE can provide a realistic educational opportunity to improve residents' performance on the nonoperative aspects of rhinoplasty and should be considered as an adjunct to resident education. PMID:27689053

  9. Rhinoplasty Education Using a Standardized Patient Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Eric J.; Khosla, Rohit K.; Howell, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background Comprehensive aesthetic surgery training continues to be a challenge for residency programs. Our residency program developed a rhinoplasty-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) based upon validated methods as part of the residency education curriculum. We report our experience with the rhinoplasty-based OSCE and offer guidance to its incorporation within residency programs. Methods The encounter involved resident evaluation and operative planning for a standardized patient desiring a rhinoplasty procedure. Validated OSCE methods currently used at our medical school were implemented. Residents were evaluated on appropriate history taking, physical examination, and explanation to the patient of treatment options. Examination results were evaluated using analysis of variance (statistical significance P<0.05). Results Twelve residents completed the rhinoplasty OSCE. Medical knowledge assessment showed increasing performance with clinical year, 50% versus 84% for postgraduate year 3 and 6, respectively (P<0.005). Systems-based practice scores showed that all residents incorrectly submitted forms for billing and operative scheduling. All residents confirmed that the OSCE realistically represents an actual patient encounter. All faculty confirmed the utility of evaluating resident performance during the OSCE as a useful assessment tool for determining the Next Accreditation System Milestone level. Conclusions Aesthetic surgery training for residents will require innovative methods for education. Our examination showed a program-educational weakness in billing/coding, an area that will be improved upon by topic-specific lectures. A thoroughly developed OSCE can provide a realistic educational opportunity to improve residents' performance on the nonoperative aspects of rhinoplasty and should be considered as an adjunct to resident education.

  10. Automated design of multiple encounter gravity-assist trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longuski, James M.; Williams, Steve N.

    1990-01-01

    Given a range of initial launch dates and a set of target planets, a new approach to planetary mission design is developed, using an automated method for finding all conic solutions. Each point on the diagrams reproduced represents a single ballistic trajectory and is computed by modeling the trajectory as a conic section and solving the corresponding Lambert problem for each set of launch and arrival dates. An example which prescribes a launch period of 1975-2050 and target planets Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, Neptune and Pluto is described whereby, all possible grand tour missions of this class are found, including the Voyager II trajectory. It is determined that this automated design tool may be applied to a variety of multiple encounter gravity-assist trajectories that are being considered for future missions.

  11. Galileo post-Gaspra cruise and Earth-2 encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, P. E.; Andrews, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    This article documents DSN support for the Galileo cruise after the Oct. 1991 encounter with the asteroid Gaspra. This article also details the Earth-2 encounter and the special non-DSN support provided during the Earth-2 closest approach.

  12. Voyager program. Voyager 1 encounter at Jupiter, 5 March 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Highlights of Voyager 1 activity during the observatory and far-encounter phases are summarized. Daily sequence of events for the spacecraft during the period of greatest encounter activity (Feb. 26 through Mar. 7) the near-encounter phase is given. Times shown designate the time of signal reception at Deep Space Network stations. Events listed emphasize activities pertaining to the four remote sensing instruments on the scan platforms. However, the other 7 experiments will continuously collect data throughout the encounter period.

  13. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  14. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  15. Violent encounters in psychiatric care: a phenomenological study of embodied caring knowledge.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Gunilla; Dahlberg, Karin; Lützen, Kim; Nystrom, Maria

    2004-03-01

    This article focuses on encounters that become violent, a problem in health care that has been the issue of many debates but is still not fully understood. Violent encounters refer to events where the patient expresses an aggressive and hostile attitude toward the caregiver. This study is part of a bigger project that aims to elucidate violent encounters from the caregivers' as well as the patients' perspectives. The purpose of this particular study was to describe the essence of violent encounters from the caregivers' perspective. Guided by a phenomenological method, data were analyzed within a reflective lifeworld approach. The essence of a violent encounter between caregivers and patients, as experienced by the caregivers, is a critical moment characterized by a tension between presence and distance, a moment where everything is happening at the same time. There are important meaning differences in relation to the violent encounter being viewed as positive rather than negative, based on the caregivers' ability to be present and their capacity in these trying situations to manage their fear. The findings also make explicit the particular knowledge that is needed for the caregiver to manage the threat of violence in a creative way. PMID:14726270

  16. Selective Information Seeking after a Single Encounter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitneva, Stanka A.; Dunfield, Kristen A.

    2010-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined whether a single act of testimony can inform children's subsequent information seeking. In Experiment 1, participants saw one informant give a correct and another informant give an incorrect answer to a question, assessed who was "right" ("wrong"), and decided to whom to address a 2nd question. Adults and…

  17. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), “Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities—Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015”, we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  18. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), "Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities-Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015", we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  19. Frequency of encounter of aircraft in a random horizontal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, J. D.; Smith, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    Calculations were made of the frequency of encounter as a function of azimuth of encounter of a passing aircraft with the aircraft in a random planar horizontal field. All the field aircraft moved at a constant speed but in random directions. These calculations included the total frequency of encounter with the aircraft of the field and the frequency of encounter with those aircraft of the field which were encountered in the fore quadrant, in the lateral quadrants, and in the rear quadrant; the calculations were made for various speed ratios of the field aircraft and the passing aircraft.

  20. Encounters with Transcendence in Adventure Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Problem solving in adventure programs contains physical, social, philosophical, and transcendent (insightful) elements. Through transcendent experiences students reach a high level of performance, tolerance, and understanding. Instructors often attempt to facilitate transcendent experiences through such activities as the Native American…

  1. Encounters in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses’ experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care. PMID:23847697

  2. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  3. Bax: Addressed to kill.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Manon, Stéphen

    2011-09-01

    The pro-apoptototic protein Bax (Bcl-2 Associated protein X) plays a central role in the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. In healthy mammalian cells, Bax is essentially cytosolic and inactive. Following a death signal, the protein is translocated to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it promotes a permeabilization that favors the release of different apoptogenic factors, such as cytochrome c. The regulation of Bax translocation is associated to conformational changes that are under the control of different factors. The evidences showing the involvement of different Bax domains in its mitochondrial localization are presented. The interactions between Bax and its different partners are described in relation to their ability to promote (or prevent) Bax conformational changes leading to mitochondrial addressing and to the acquisition of the capacity to permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:21641962

  4. Orthopaedic Problems of the Mentally Retarded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McSweeney, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    Problems encountered by orthopedic surgeons treating the mentally retarded are identified, and cooperation among pediatricians, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and orthopedic surgeons is recommended. (GW)

  5. Assortment of encounters and evolution of cooperativeness.

    PubMed

    Eshel, I; Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1982-02-01

    The method of evolutionary stable strategies (ESS), in its current form, is confronted with a difficulty when it tries to explain how some social behaviors initiate their evolution. We show that this difficulty may be removed by changing the assumption made tacitly in game theory (and in ESS) of randomness of meetings or encounters. In reality, such randomness seems to be rare in nature. Family, population and social structure, customs, and habits impose various types of deviation from randomness. Introducing nonrandomness of meeting in a way formally similar to assortative mating, we show that the bar to initial increase of inherited cooperative or altruistic behaviors can be removed, provided there is sufficient assortment of meetings. Family structure may cause contacts predominantly between certain types of relatives, and one can reconstruct some results of classical kin selection in terms of evolutionary stable strategy with assortative meetings. Neighbor effects and group selection might be similarly treated. Assortment need not be a passive consequence of population and social structure, but it can also be actively pursued. Behaviors favoring the choice of cooperative companions will have the effect of favoring the evolution of cooperativeness. It can be shown that discrimination in the choice of companions, especially if combined with assortment, can favor the development of cooperativeness, making initial increase of cooperative behavior possible even at levels of assortment passively imposed which would not be adequate, per se, to guarantee the increase of cooperativeness. It is possible that, in some cases, cooperativeness and behavior favoring some type of assortment are coselected.

  6. Low energy neutron measurements aboard encounter missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Maksimovic, M.; Trottet, G.

    Neutrons in the MeV to GeV range are produced by interaction of flare accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. Because of their lifetime, only high energy neutrons (> 100 MeV) have a high probability to be detected at earth's orbit. So far, around fifteen solar neutron events have been observed either by high energy detectors aboard spacecrafts at 1 AU or by ground based neutron monitors. Neutrons between 10 and 100 MeV have also been detected for a few events through their proton decay. Measurements of solar neutrons closer to the Sun aboard encounter missions will allow to probe for the first time the MeV neutrons which are produced by the nuclear reactions of energetic ions with thresholds around 1 MeV/nuc and will provide information on the accelerated ion spectrum in the energy range between ˜ 1 MeV and 100 MeV/nuc in complementarity with what can be deduced from γ -ray line emission. The close proximity of the Sun would allow to measure neutron events for many more flares opening a new field of solar physics. Combined with near in-situ ion measurements and γ -ray observations, neutrons will bring information on the link between interacting and escaping ions while getting rid of most of the transport effects.

  7. Viking first encounter of phobos: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Tolson, R H; Duxbury, T C; Born, G H; Christensen, E J; Diehl, R E; Farless, D; Hildebrand, C E; Mitchell, R T; Molko, P M; Morabito, L A; Palluconi, F D; Reichert, R J; Taraji, H; Veverka, J; Neugebauer, G; Findlay, J T

    1978-01-01

    During the last 2 weeks of February 1977, an intensive scientific investigation of the martian satellite Phobos was conducted by the Viking Orbiter-1 (VO-1) spacecraft. More than 125 television pictures were obtained during this period and infrared observations were made. About 80 percent of the illuminated hemisphere was imaged at a resolution of about 30 meters. Higher resolution images of limited areas were also obtained. Flyby distances within 80 kilometers of the surface were achieved. An estimate of the mass of Phobos (GM) was obtained by observing the effect of Phobos's gravity on the orbit of VO-1 as sensed by Earth-based radiometric tracking. Preliminary results indicate a value of GM of 0.00066 +/- 0.00012 cubic kilometer per second squared (standard deviation of 3) and a mean density of about 1.9 +/- 0.6 gram per cubic centimeter (standard deviation of 3). This low density, together with the low albedo and the recently determined spectral reflectance, suggest that Phobos is compositionally similar to type I carbonaceous chondrites. Thus, either this object formed in the outer part of the asteroid belt or Lewis's theory that such material cannot condense at 1.5 astronomical units is incorrect. The data on Phobos obtained during this first encounter period are comparable in quantity to all of the data on Mars returned by Mariner flights 4, 6, and 7. PMID:17841954

  8. Solar Probe: Close Encounter with the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Solar Probe Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) recently completed a detailed study of the Solar Probe Mission based on an earliest launch date of October 2014. Solar Probe, when implemented, will be the first close encounter by a spacecraft with a star (i.e., 3 Rs above the Sun s photosphere). The report and its executive summary were published by NASA (NASA/TM-2005-212786) in September 2005 and can be found at the website http://solarprobe.gsfc.nasa.gov/. A description of the science is being prepared for publication in Reviews of Geophysics by McComas et al. [2006]. For this talk, we will be presenting the consensus view of the STDT including a brief description of the scientific goals, a description of the overall mission, including trajectory scenarios, spacecraft description and proposed scientific payload. We will discuss all these topics and the importance of flying the Solar Probe mission both with regard to understanding fundamental issues of solar wind acceleration and coronal heating near the Sun and Solar Probe s unique role in understanding the acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), which is critical to future Human Exploration.

  9. Close Encounters of the Stellar Kind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has confirmed that close encounters between stars form X-ray emitting, double-star systems in dense globular star clusters. These X-ray binaries have a different birth process than their cousins outside globular clusters, and should have a profound influence on the cluster's evolution. A team of scientists led by David Pooley of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge took advantage of Chandra's unique ability to precisely locate and resolve individual sources to determine the number of X-ray sources in 12 globular clusters in our Galaxy. Most of the sources are binary systems containing a collapsed star such as a neutron star or a white dwarf star that is pulling matter off a normal, Sun-like companion star. "We found that the number of X-ray binaries is closely correlated with the rate of encounters between stars in the clusters," said Pooley. "Our conclusion is that the binaries are formed as a consequence of these encounters. It is a case of nurture not nature." A similar study led by Craig Heinke of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. confirmed this conclusion, and showed that roughly 10 percent of these X-ray binary systems contain neutron stars. Most of these neutron stars are usually quiet, spending less than 10% of their time actively feeding from their companion. NGC 7099 NGC 7099 A globular cluster is a spherical collection of hundreds of thousands or even millions of stars buzzing around each other in a gravitationally-bound stellar beehive that is about a hundred light years in diameter. The stars in a globular cluster are often only about a tenth of a light year apart. For comparison, the nearest star to the Sun, Proxima Centauri, is 4.2 light years away. With so many stars moving so close together, interactions between stars occur frequently in globular clusters. The stars, while rarely colliding, do get close enough to form binary star systems or cause binary stars to

  10. Addressing Passive Smoking in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Sasha G.; Kuijlaars, Jennifer S.; Mesters, Ilse; Muris, Jean W. M.; van Schayck, Constant P.; Dompeling, Edward; Feron, Frans J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant number of parents are unaware or unconvinced of the health consequences of passive smoking (PS) in children. Physicians could increase parental awareness by giving personal advice. Aim To evaluate the current practices of three Dutch health professions (paediatricians, youth health care physicians, and family physicians) regarding parental counselling for passive smoking (PS) in children. Methods All physicians (n = 720) representing the three health professions in Limburg, the Netherlands, received an invitation to complete a self-administered electronic questionnaire including questions on their: sex, work experience, personal smoking habits, counselling practices and education regarding PS in children. Results The response rate was 34%. One tenth (11%) of the responding physicians always addressed PS in children, 32% often, 54% occasionally and 4% reported to never attend to it. The three health professions appeared comparable regarding their frequency of parental counselling for PS in children. Addressing PS was more likely when children had respiratory problems. Lack of time was the most frequently mentioned barrier, being very and somewhat applicable for respectively 14% and 43% of the physicians. One fourth of the responders had received postgraduate education about PS. Additionally, 49% of the responders who did not have any education about PS were interested in receiving it. Conclusions Physicians working in the paediatric field in Limburg, the Netherlands, could more frequently address PS in children with parents. Lack of time appeared to be the most mentioned barrier and physicians were more likely to counsel parents for PS in children with respiratory complaints/diseases. Finally, a need for more education on parental counselling for PS was expressed. PMID:24809443

  11. Collisionless encounters and the origin of the lunar inclination.

    PubMed

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-26

    The Moon is generally thought to have formed from the debris ejected by the impact of a planet-sized object with the proto-Earth towards the end of planetary accretion. Models of the impact process predict that the lunar material was disaggregated into a circumplanetary disk and that lunar accretion subsequently placed the Moon in a near-equatorial orbit. Forward integration of the lunar orbit from this initial state predicts a modern inclination at least an order of magnitude smaller than the lunar value--a long-standing discrepancy known as the lunar inclination problem. Here we show that the modern lunar orbit provides a sensitive record of gravitational interactions with Earth-crossing planetesimals that were not yet accreted at the time of the Moon-forming event. The currently observed lunar orbit can naturally be reproduced via interaction with a small quantity of mass (corresponding to 0.0075-0.015 Earth masses eventually accreted to the Earth) carried by a few bodies, consistent with the constraints and models of late accretion. Although the encounter process has a stochastic element, the observed value of the lunar inclination is among the most likely outcomes for a wide range of parameters. The excitation of the lunar orbit is most readily reproduced via collisionless encounters of planetesimals with the Earth-Moon system with strong dissipation of tidal energy on the early Earth. This mechanism obviates the need for previously proposed (but idealized) excitation mechanisms, places the Moon-forming event in the context of the formation of Earth, and constrains the pristineness of the dynamical state of the Earth-Moon system. PMID:26607544

  12. Collisionless encounters and the origin of the lunar inclination.

    PubMed

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-26

    The Moon is generally thought to have formed from the debris ejected by the impact of a planet-sized object with the proto-Earth towards the end of planetary accretion. Models of the impact process predict that the lunar material was disaggregated into a circumplanetary disk and that lunar accretion subsequently placed the Moon in a near-equatorial orbit. Forward integration of the lunar orbit from this initial state predicts a modern inclination at least an order of magnitude smaller than the lunar value--a long-standing discrepancy known as the lunar inclination problem. Here we show that the modern lunar orbit provides a sensitive record of gravitational interactions with Earth-crossing planetesimals that were not yet accreted at the time of the Moon-forming event. The currently observed lunar orbit can naturally be reproduced via interaction with a small quantity of mass (corresponding to 0.0075-0.015 Earth masses eventually accreted to the Earth) carried by a few bodies, consistent with the constraints and models of late accretion. Although the encounter process has a stochastic element, the observed value of the lunar inclination is among the most likely outcomes for a wide range of parameters. The excitation of the lunar orbit is most readily reproduced via collisionless encounters of planetesimals with the Earth-Moon system with strong dissipation of tidal energy on the early Earth. This mechanism obviates the need for previously proposed (but idealized) excitation mechanisms, places the Moon-forming event in the context of the formation of Earth, and constrains the pristineness of the dynamical state of the Earth-Moon system.

  13. Parkes radio science system design and testing for Voyager Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebold, T. A.; Weese, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Radio Science System installed at Parkes, Australia for the Voyager Neptune encounter was specified to meet the same stringent requirements that were imposed upon the Deep Space Network Radio Science System. The system design and test methodology employed to meet these requirements at Parkes are described, and data showing the measured performance of the system are presented. The results indicate that the system operates with a comfortable margin on the requirements. There was a minor problem with frequency-dependent spurious signals which could not be fixed before the encounter. Test results characterizing these spurious signals are included.

  14. Close Encounters of Lymphoid Cells and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Veiga, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    During infections, the first reaction of the host against microbial pathogens is carried out by innate immune cells, which recognize conserved structures on pathogens, called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Afterward, some of these innate cells can phagocytose and destroy the pathogens, secreting cytokines that would modulate the immune response to the challenge. This rapid response is normally followed by the adaptive immunity, more specific and essential for a complete pathogen clearance in many cases. Some innate immune cells, usually named antigen-presenting cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, are able to process internalized invaders and present their antigens to lymphocytes, triggering the adaptive immune response. Nevertheless, the traditional boundary of separated roles between innate and adaptive immunity has been blurred by several studies, showing that very specialized populations of lymphocytes (cells of the adaptive immunity) behave similarly to cells of the innate immunity. These “innate-like” lymphocytes include γδ T cells, invariant NKT cells, B-1 cells, mucosal-associated invariant T cells, marginal zone B cells, and innate response activator cells, and together with the newly described innate lymphoid cells are able to rapidly respond to bacterial infections. Strikingly, our recent data suggest that conventional CD4+ T cells, the paradigm of cells of the adaptive immunity, also present innate-like behavior, capturing bacteria in a process called transinfection. Transinfected CD4+ T cells digest internalized bacteria like professional phagocytes and secrete large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, protecting for further bacterial challenges. In the present review, we will focus on the data showing such innate-like behavior of lymphocytes following bacteria encounter. PMID:27774092

  15. [Keynote address: Climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Forrister, D.

    1994-12-31

    Broadly speaking, the climate issue is moving from talk to action both in the United States and internationally. While few nations have adopted strict controls or stiff new taxes, a number of them are developing action plans that are making clear their intention to ramp up activity between now and the year 2000... and beyond. There are sensible, economically efficient strategies to be undertaken in the near term that offer the possibility, in many countries, to avoid more draconian measures. These strategies are by-and-large the same measures that the National Academy of Sciences recommended in a 1991 report called, Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. The author thinks the Academy`s most important policy contribution was how it recommended the nations act in the face of uncertain science and high risks--that cost effective measures are adopted as cheap insurance... just as nations insure against other high risk, low certainty possibilities, like catastrophic health insurance, auto insurance, and fire insurance. This insurance theme is still right. First, the author addresses how the international climate change negotiations are beginning to produce insurance measures. Next, the author will discuss some of the key issues to watch in those negotiations that relate to longer-term insurance. And finally, the author will report on progress in the United States on the climate insurance plan--The President`s Climate Action Plan.

  16. Addressing polarisation in science.

    PubMed

    Earp, Brian D

    2015-09-01

    Ploug and Holm argue that polarisation in scientific communities can generate conflicts of interest for individual researchers. Their proposed solution to this problem is that authors should self-report whether they are polarised on conflict of interest disclosure forms. I argue that this is unlikely to work. This is because any author with the self-awareness and integrity to identify herself as polarised would be unlikely to conduct polarised research to begin with. Instead, I suggest that it is the role of (associate-level) editors of journals to detect and report on polarisation. One consequence of this view is that they need to be sufficiently familiar with the field of research they are evaluating to know whether polarisation is at stake.

  17. Active Participation in the Literary Encounter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twining, James E.

    A child's sense of involvement in story and desire to meaningfully experience literature must be sustained and promoted if the problem of "literacy" is to be resolved. Four activities, designed as a series of stages, can enhance the literary experience of children. The first activity is reading to children--exposing them to the language…

  18. The Therapeutic Stage Encounters the Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imholz, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Clinical research in expressive therapies, psychodrama in particular, offer education researchers and software designers descriptive analyses and evidence-based impact studies on attitudinal shifts and enhanced problem solving abilities for patients and students who participate in psychodrama role-play. Gaming environments and virtual worlds that…

  19. Engineering Encounters: Catch Me if You Can!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Kimberly; Wallin, Mark; Roghaar, Deborah; Price, Tyson

    2013-01-01

    A science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) activity is any activity that integrates the use of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to solve a problem. Traditionally, STEM activities are highly engaging and may involve competition among student teams. Young children are natural engineers and often times spontaneously build…

  20. Selecting and implementing scientific objectives. [for Voyager 1 and 2 planetary encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. D.; Stembridge, C. H.; Doms, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    The procedures used to select and implement scientific objectives for the Voyager 1 and 2 planetary encounters are described. Attention is given to the scientific tradeoffs and engineering considerations must be addressed at various stages in the mission planning process, including: the limitations of ground and spacecraft communications systems, ageing of instruments in flight, and instrument calibration over long distances. The contribution of planetary science workshops to the definition of scientific objectives for deep space missions is emphasized.

  1. Non-Parametric Collision Probability for Low-Velocity Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    2007-01-01

    An implicit, but not necessarily obvious, assumption in all of the current techniques for assessing satellite collision probability is that the relative position uncertainty is perfectly correlated in time. If there is any mis-modeling of the dynamics in the propagation of the relative position error covariance matrix, time-wise de-correlation of the uncertainty will increase the probability of collision over a given time interval. The paper gives some examples that illustrate this point. This paper argues that, for the present, Monte Carlo analysis is the best available tool for handling low-velocity encounters, and suggests some techniques for addressing the issues just described. One proposal is for the use of a non-parametric technique that is widely used in actuarial and medical studies. The other suggestion is that accurate process noise models be used in the Monte Carlo trials to which the non-parametric estimate is applied. A further contribution of this paper is a description of how the time-wise decorrelation of uncertainty increases the probability of collision.

  2. Addressing the municipal market

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, R.

    1993-05-12

    Most municipalities employ simple, fairly inexpensive water treatment regimes, which is why some large industrial treatment firms stay away from the municipal market, despite rapid growth in the sector. Of the $625 million/year spent for US wastewater treatment, 46% is for municipalities, up 14.5% from 1987. Waste treatment in general grew by 12% in that period, according to Kline Co. (Fairfield, NJ). Some of the challenges facing municipalities in the Clean Water Act reauthorization bills are metals-contaminated sediments and storm water containment and treatment. Bill Tullos, business manager for chlor-alkali at Elf Atochem North America, does not foresee a phaseout of chlorine-based products used as disinfectant in drinking water treatment by municipalities, or as a wastewater treatment in municipal and industrial use. [open quotes]Alternatives are not as effective and are more expensive,[close quotes] says Tullos. [open quotes]There was some promise with ozone, but unfortunately it tends to tear apart your corrosion and scale inhibitors. Chlorine also provides residual protection from contamination all along the water line system.[close quotes] Tullos adds that the formation of tetrahydromethane-one of the problems of using chlorine-based products-can be avoided by screening out the hydrocarbons first and then adding chlorine.

  3. Addressing psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Woody, G E; McLellan, A T; O'Brien, C P; Luborsky, L

    1991-01-01

    Research studies indicate that addressing psychiatric comorbidity can improve treatment for selected groups of substance-abusing patients. However, the chances for implementing the necessary techniques on a large scale are compromised by the absence of professional input and guidance within programs. This is especially true in public programs, which treat some of the most disadvantaged, disturbed, and socially destructive individuals in the entire mental health system. One starting point for upgrading the level of knowledge and training of staff members who work in this large treatment system could be to develop a better and more authoritative information dissemination network. Such a system exists in medicine; physicians are expected to read appropriate journals and to guide their treatment decisions using the data contained in the journals. Standards of practice and methods for modifying current practice are within the tradition of reading new facts, studying old ones, and comparing treatment outcome under different conditions with what is actually being done. No such general system of information-gathering or -sharing exists, particularly in public treatment programs. One of the most flagrant examples of this "educational shortfall" can be found among those methadone programs that adamantly insist on prescribing no more than 30 to 35 mg/day for all patients, in spite of the overwhelming evidence that these dose levels generally are inadequate. In some cases, program directors are unaware of studies that have shown the relationship between dose and outcome. In other cases, they are aware of the studies but do not modify their practices accordingly. This example of inadequate dosing is offered as an example of one situation that could be improved by adherence to a system of authoritative and systematic information dissemination. Many issues in substance abuse treatment do not lend themselves to information dissemination as readily as that of methadone dosing

  4. SHATTERING FLARES DURING CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, David

    2013-11-10

    We demonstrate that resonant shattering flares can occur during close passages of neutron stars in eccentric or hyperbolic encounters. We provide updated estimates for the rate of close encounters of compact objects in dense stellar environments, which we find are substantially lower than given in previous works. While such occurrences are rare, we show that shattering flares can provide a strong electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational wave bursts expected from such encounters, allowing triggered searches for these events to occur.

  5. Radio science ground data system for the Voyager-Neptune encounter, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Asmar, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager radio science experiments at Neptune required the creation of a ground data system array that includes a Deep Space Network complex, the Parkes Radio Observatory, and the Usuda deep space tracking station. The performance requirements were based on experience with the previous Voyager encounters, as well as the scientific goals at Neptune. The requirements were stricter than those of the Uranus encounter because of the need to avoid the phase-stability problems experienced during that encounter and because the spacecraft flyby was faster and closer to the planet than previous encounters. The primary requirement on the instrument was to recover the phase and amplitude of the S- and X-band (2.3 and 8.4 GHz) signals under the dynamic conditions encountered during the occultations. The primary receiver type for the measurements was open loop with high phase-noise and frequency stability performance. The receiver filter bandwidth was predetermined based on the spacecraft's trajectory and frequency uncertainties.

  6. Latitude and Longitude. AIR Presidential Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle

    This speech addresses the problem of higher education's response to the forces of change and argues for a reinventing of higher education rather than repeatedly amending core teaching and research activities to fit new social and economic situations. Three higher education organizational dynamics (recruitment, budgeting, and handling outside…

  7. Challenges encountered while implementing a multivendor teleradiology network using DICOM 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Betty A.; Cleary, Kevin R.; Norton, Gary S.; Cramer, Timothy J.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    The ISIS Center at Georgetown University was the systems integrator for a project to design, develop, and implement a commercial off-the-shelf teleradiology system to support the US troops in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Computed radiography (CR), computed tomography (CT), film digitization (FD), and ultrasound (US) were the modalities to connect to the network. Dry laser printing and multiple display workstations were also part of the network. All systems were integrated into this network using the Digital Imaging Communications (DICOM) 3.0 standard. The modalities communicate to the workstations using the DICOM 3.0 standard and the workstations send images to the printers and other vendors' workstations using DICOM 3.0. Among the seven DICOM implementations encountered for this project, none were connected without modification to configuration files, changes or patches by vendors, or operational changes by the user. Some problems encountered include missing or ignored required data elements, padding data values, unique study identifiers to differentiate studies and images, and the use of application entity titles. This paper will discuss multi- vendor connectivity and describe the DICOM 3.0 inconsistencies which were encountered. It will also detail the problems encountered and how they were resolved, including the operational changes which were required and software fixes.

  8. Methodological Encounters with the Phenomenal Kind

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Block’s well-known distinction between phenomenal consciousness and access consciousness has generated a large philosophical literature about putative conceptual connections between the two. The scientific literature about whether they come apart in any actual cases is rather smaller. Empirical evidence gathered to date has not settled the issue. Some put this down to a fundamental methodological obstacle to the empirical study of the relation between phenomenal consciousness and access consciousness. Block (2007) has drawn attention to the methodological puzzle and attempted to answer it. While the evidence Block points to is relevant and important, this paper puts forward a more systematic framework for addressing the puzzle. To give it a label, the approach is to study phenomenal consciousness as a natural kind. The approach allows consciousness studies to move beyond initial means of identifying instances of the kind like verbal report, and to find its underlying nature. It is well-recognised that facts about an underlying kind may allow identification of instances of the kind that do not match the initial means of identification (cp. non-liquid samples of water). This paper shows that the same method can be deployed to investigate phenomenal consciousness independently of access consciousness. PMID:22654148

  9. Satellite orbital conjunction reports assessing threatening encounters in space (SOCRATES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, T. S.; Alfano, S.

    2006-05-01

    While many satellite operators are aware of the possibility of a collision between their satellite and another object in earth orbit, most seem unaware of the frequency of near misses occurring each day. Until recently, no service existed to advise satellite operators of an impending conjunction of a satellite payload with another satellite, putting the responsibility for determining these occurrences squarely on the satellite operator's shoulders. This problem has been further confounded by the lack of a timely, comprehensive data set of satellite orbital element sets and computationally efficient tools to provide predictions using industry-standard software. As a result, hundreds of conjunctions within 1 km occur each week, with little or no intervention, putting billions of dollars of space hardware at risk, along with their associated missions. As a service to the satellite operator community, the Center for Space Standards & Innovation (CSSI) offers SOCRATES-Satellite Orbital Conjunction Reports Assessing Threatening Encounters in Space. Twice each day, CSSI runs a list of all satellite payloads on orbit against a list of all objects on orbit using the catalog of all unclassified NORAD two-line element sets to look for conjunctions over the next seven days. The runs are made using STK/CAT-Satellite Tool Kit's Conjunction Analysis Tools-together with the NORAD SGP4 propagator in STK. This paper will discuss how SOCRATES works and how it can help satellite operators avoid undesired close approaches through advanced mission planning.

  10. The northern lakes of Egypt: Encounters with a wetland environment

    SciTech Connect

    Parmenter, B.M.

    1991-01-01

    Five lakes fringe the northern coast of Egypt. Together they represent 25% of the remaining wetland habitat in the Mediterranean basin. Residents of these lakes traditionally exploited a wide variety of resources. Today these lakes face a number of threats to their existence, including large-scale reclamation and water pollution. Agricultural authorities, engineers, fishery managers, and conservationists in Egypt and abroad debate about how best to manage and develop the lake region's resources, but few of these groups understand or communicate with one another, or with residents of lake communities. This study explores how these various groups encounter the coastal lakes of Egypt, focusing particularly on Lakes Manzala and Burullus. Its purpose is to explore the ways in which the lakes, their resources and their inhabitants have been evaluated, and to analyze how underlying preconceptions, goals and structures of professional discourse influence such evaluations. The thesis is that environmental management is in reality not a rational plan but a process. Egypt is currently attempting to develop a coherent strategy to remedy its environmental problems without adversely affecting economic growth.

  11. Do Values Change in an Encounter Group? An Empirical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annis, Lawrence V.

    Encounter groups represent an attempt to apply group methods for the enhancement of personal awareness and the acceleration of personal growth among "normal" people. The extent to which an individual's moral values are modified by disclosure and discussion of these values in an encounter group setting was investigated with a group of nine…

  12. Improving Collaborative Learning by Supporting Casual Encounters in Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Juan; Llamas, Rafael; Vizcaino, Aurora; Vavela, Jesus

    Casual encounters in a learning environment are very useful in reinforcing previous knowledge and acquiring new knowledge. Such encounters are very common in traditional learning environments and can be used successfully in social environments in which students can discover and construct knowledge through a process of dialogue, negotiation, or…

  13. Voyager 2 to make closest encounter with Saturn in August

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The planned Voyager 2 Saturn mission is described. Information about Saturn obtained from the Voyager 1 encounter is summarized. Data on the satellites and rings of Saturn are tabulated. The video programming schedule for the Voyager 2 Saturn encounter is given. The Voyager science team is listed.

  14. Jewish Arab Activism through Dialogical Encounters: Changing an Israeli Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Tamar; Saba, Tuffaha; Shay, Nava

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a Jewish Arab dialogue model of national encounters which has been developed at Tel Hai College in Upper Galilee in Israel. These planned encounters, which have taken place for eight consecutive years within the framework of a course entitled "A Jewish-Arab dialogue--action research" are recognized as part of the bachelor…

  15. Encounters between SPS power beams and satellites in lower orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. K.

    1980-01-01

    Interference between the solar power satellite (SPS) power beam and other satellites in lower orbits is described. Measures which might be taken to reduce the frequency of beam/satellite encounters or to minimize the effects of the encounters are discussed.

  16. BINARY ASTEROID ENCOUNTERS WITH TERRESTRIAL PLANETS: TIMESCALES AND EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-15

    Many asteroids that make close encounters with terrestrial planets are in a binary configuration. Here, we calculate the relevant encounter timescales and investigate the effects of encounters on a binary's mutual orbit. We use a combination of analytical and numerical approaches with a wide range of initial conditions. Our test cases include generic binaries with close, moderate, and wide separations, as well as seven well-characterized near-Earth binaries. We find that close approaches (<10 Earth radii) occur for almost all binaries on 1-10 million year timescales. At such distances, our results suggest substantial modifications to a binary's semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination, which we quantify. Encounters within 30 Earth radii typically occur on sub-million year timescales and significantly affect the wider binaries. Important processes in the lives of near-Earth binaries, such as tidal and radiative evolution, can be altered or stopped by planetary encounters.

  17. GASP cloud encounter statistics - Implications for laminar flow control flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Nastrom, G. D.; Davis, R. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The cloud observation archive from the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is analyzed in order to derive the probability of cloud encounter at altitudes normally flown by commercial airliners, for application to a determination of the feasability of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) on long-range routes. The probability of cloud encounter is found to vary significantly with season. Several meteorological circulation features are apparent in the latitudinal distribution of cloud cover. The cloud encounter data are shown to be consistent with the classical midlatitude cyclone model with more clouds encountered in highs than in lows. Aircraft measurements of route-averaged time-in-clouds fit a gamma probability distribution model which is applied to estimate the probability of extended cloud encounter, and the associated loss of LFC effectiveness along seven high-density routes. The probability is demonstrated to be low.

  18. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications. PMID:21193369

  19. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications.

  20. Problem Solving Skills for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngs, Bettie B.

    This guide was written for children, to help them handle problems they might encounter, learn about other children and how they have handled similar problems, and learn what to do when things go wrong or when they feel misunderstood. In the introduction, children are assured that, even when they have problems, they can be happy again. The body of…

  1. Modification to EPA Method 1623 to address a unique seasonal matrix effect encountered in some U.S. source waters.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Nancy J; Villegas, Leah Fohl; Eldred, Bradley J; Gaynor, Deborah H; Warden, Paul S; Pepich, Barry V

    2008-12-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1623 is designed to detect and determine concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in water through concentration, immuno-magnetic separation (IMS), and immuno-fluorescence assay with microscopic examination. A seasonal interference with the method was observed in some municipal source waters collected from reservoirs and as reported to Shaw Environmental, Inc. in the summers of 2005, 2006, and 2007. This interference, which was not confined to a single region of the nation, caused clumping of the IMS beads during the acid dissociation of the IMS procedure in Method 1623. This effect lowered method recoveries for both Cryptosporidium and Giardia; however, the effect was more pronounced for Giardia. A heat dissociation technique (Ware et al., (2003) J. Microbiol. Methods 55, 575-583) was shown to be a viable option for samples which demonstrate the clumping matrix effect and improved Giardia recoveries in partially clumped samples. The heat dissociation application holds promise for fully clumped samples and warrants further investigation.

  2. NEAs' Binaries and Planetary Close Encounters -Stability and Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Rosana; Winter, O.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In the present work we considered the effects of close encounters, suffered by hypothetical NEAs binaries, with Earth, Mercury and Venus, in order to determine the stability of their satellites as a function of the encounter conditions. In addition, knowing the conditions that leads to the loss (by ejection or collisions) of the most internal satellites, we are able to estimate the frequency of such encounters, and thus, determine the expected lifetime of the NEAs binaries. The methodology consisted on numerically simulate a system composed by the Sun, the planets of the Solar System, and a sample of 2100 NEAs, for a period of 10 Myr (predict NEAs' lifetime). All close encounters with the planets closer than 100 planet's radius were registered. The next step consisted on simulate a representative sample of those registered close encounters, through numerical integration, considering the planet, the asteroid that perform the close encounter, and a cloud of satellites around the asteroid. The largest radial distance for which all the satellites survive (no collision or ejection) was defined as the critical radius - Rc, given as a function of the encounter parameters (relative velocity and impact parameter). For the Earth, we found that the close encounters with impact parameter and relative velocity capable to remove the most internal satellites of the NEAs (Rc < 5 km), are very frequent. We found that 93% of the asteroids of the group Atens suffer an encounter within this limit in 10 Myrs, and that 50% of these encounters happen in approximately 330.000 years. For the Apollos we found that 60% of the asteroids suffer such encounters, and that 50% of then happen in approximately 700.000 years. Such results indicate that, in fact, the lifetime of the binaries is strongly influencied by the planetary close encounters, proving to be significantly shorter than the predicted lifetime of the NEAs. The contribution of the planets Mercury

  3. Sensory information and encounter rates of interacting species.

    PubMed

    Hein, Andrew M; McKinley, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Most motile organisms use sensory cues when searching for resources, mates, or prey. The searcher measures sensory data and adjusts its search behavior based on those data. Yet, classical models of species encounter rates assume that searchers move independently of their targets. This assumption leads to the familiar mass action-like encounter rate kinetics typically used in modeling species interactions. Here we show that this common approach can mischaracterize encounter rate kinetics if searchers use sensory information to search actively for targets. We use the example of predator-prey interactions to illustrate that predators capable of long-distance directional sensing can encounter prey at a rate proportional to prey density to the [Formula: see text] power (where [Formula: see text] is the dimension of the environment) when prey density is low. Similar anomalous encounter rate functions emerge even when predators pursue prey using only noisy, directionless signals. Thus, in both the high-information extreme of long-distance directional sensing, and the low-information extreme of noisy non-directional sensing, encounter rate kinetics differ qualitatively from those derived by classic theory of species interactions. Using a standard model of predator-prey population dynamics, we show that the new encounter rate kinetics derived here can change the outcome of species interactions. Our results demonstrate how the use of sensory information can alter the rates and outcomes of physical interactions in biological systems.

  4. Brain systems underlying encounter expectancy bias in spider phobia.

    PubMed

    Aue, Tatjana; Hoeppli, Marie-Eve; Piguet, Camille; Hofstetter, Christoph; Rieger, Sebastian W; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-06-01

    Spider-phobic individuals are characterized by exaggerated expectancies to be faced with spiders (so-called encounter expectancy bias). Whereas phobic responses have been linked to brain systems mediating fear, little is known about how the recruitment of these systems relates to exaggerated expectancies of threat. We used fMRI to examine spider-phobic and control participants while they imagined visiting different locations in a forest after having received background information about the likelihood of encountering different animals (spiders, snakes, and birds) at these locations. Critically, imagined encounter expectancies modulated brain responses differently in phobics as compared with controls. Phobics displayed stronger negative modulation of activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and visual cortex by encounter expectancies for spiders, relative to snakes or birds (within-participants analysis); these effects were not seen in controls. Between-participants correlation analyses within the phobic group further corroborated the hypothesis that these phobia-specific modulations may underlie irrationality in encounter expectancies (deviations of encounter expectancies from objective background information) in spider phobia; the greater the negative modulation a phobic participant displayed in the lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and visual cortex, the stronger was her bias in encounter expectancies for spiders. Interestingly, irrationality in expectancies reflected in frontal areas relied on right rather than left hemispheric deactivations. Our data accord with the idea that expectancy biases in spider phobia may reflect deficiencies in cognitive control and contextual integration that are mediated by right frontal and parietal areas.

  5. Interagency telemetry arraying for Voyager-Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. W.; Brundage, W. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Kent, S. S.; Bartos, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The reception capability of the Deep Space Network (DSN) has been improved over the years by increasing both the size and number of antennas at each complex to meet spacecraft-support requirements. However, even more aperture was required for the final planetary encounters of the Voyager 2 spacecraft. This need was met by arraying one radio astronomy observatory with the DSN complex in the United States and another with the complex in Australia. Following a review of augmentation for the Uranus encounter, both the preparation at the National Radio Astronomy (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) and the Neptune encounter results for the Parkes-Canberra and VLA-Goldstone arrays are presented.

  6. New ways to develop biosensors towards addressing practical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, N. F.

    2013-11-01

    The main modern approaches which were realized at the development of new generation of biosensors intended for application in field of diagnostics, food quality control and environmental monitoring are presented. The main attention was paid to creation of the multi-parametrical and multi-functional enzymatic and immune biosensors which were realized for the complex diagnostics of diabetes, autoimmune state and for the control of process of sugar production. The label-free bioaffine devices based on the nano-porouse silicon (NPS) with the registration of specific formed signal by chemiluminescence (ChL) and photoresistivity and intended for the determination mycotoxins and diagnostics of retroviral bovine leukemia (RBL) are analyzed too. Improving of ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) through changing silicon nitride on the cerium oxide is discussed as perspective approach in case of micotoxins and Salmonella control. In the conclusion the possibility to replace biological sensitive elements by artificial ones is considered.

  7. Teachers' Engagement with Published Research: Addressing the Knowledge Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increased interest in research impact, there is very little empirical evidence that educational research can inform practice directly, and furthermore, a body of literature which suggests that this is, in principle, impossible. This paper reports on a study in which secondary school teachers were given research findings about teaching…

  8. Introspection in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jäkel, Frank; Schreiber, Cornell

    2013-01-01

    Problem solving research has encountered an impasse. Since the seminal work of Newell und Simon (1972) researchers do not seem to have made much theoretical progress (Batchelder and Alexander, 2012; Ohlsson, 2012). In this paper we argue that one factor that is holding back the field is the widespread rejection of introspection among cognitive…

  9. 2015 ASHG Awards and Addresses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Each year at the annual meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG), addresses are given in honor of The Society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these is given below. On the following pages, we have printed the presidential address and the addresses for the William Allan Award, the Curt Stern Award, and the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award. Webcasts of these addresses, as well as those of many other presentations, can be found at http://www.ashg.org.

  10. The voyager 2 encounter with the uranian system.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Miner, E D

    1986-07-01

    An overview of the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus is presented, inclding a brief discussion of the trajectory and the planned observations as well as the highlights of the results described in the 11 companion papers.

  11. Geological Mapping of the Encounter Hemisphere on Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico, K.; Young, L. A.; Cheng, A. F.; New Horizons GGI Theme Team

    2016-06-01

    We present mapping of Pluto's encounter hemisphere performed to date (focusing on Sputnik Planum and the immediately surrounding area) and offer preliminary descriptions of terrains further afield that will be the subject of future mapping.

  12. Past Time: The Writing of the Picture Book "Encounter."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yolen, Jane

    1992-01-01

    Describes the process of writing the picture book "Encounter," which tells of the fateful first meeting of Christopher Columbus and the Native Americans from the point of view of a boy raised in the Tanio culture. (RS)

  13. First Nations women's encounters with mainstream health care services.

    PubMed

    Browne, A J; Fiske, J A

    2001-03-01

    Health care encounters are important areas for study because they reflect social, political, economic, and ideological relations between patients and the dominant health care system. This study examines mainstream health care encounters from the viewpoint of First Nations women from a reserve community in northwestern Canada. Perspectives from critical medical anthropology and the concept of cultural safety provided the theoretical orientation for the study. Critical and feminist ethnographic approaches were used to guide in-depth interviews conducted with 10 First Nations women. Findings were organized around two broad themes that characterized women's descriptions of "invalidating" and "affirming" encounters. These narratives revealed that women's encounters were shaped by racism, discrimination, and structural inequities that continue to marginalize and disadvantage First Nations women. The women's health care experiences have historical, political, and economic significance and are reflective of wider postcolonial relations that shape their everyday lives.

  14. Crustal failure on icy Moons from a strong tidal encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Giannella, David; Shaw, John G.; Ebinger, Cynthia

    2016-09-01

    Close tidal encounters among large planetesimals and Moons should have been more common than grazing or normal impacts. Using a mass spring model within an N-body simulation, we simulate the deformation of the surface of an elastic spherical body caused by a close parabolic tidal encounter with a body that has similar mass as that of the primary body. Such an encounter can induce sufficient stress on the surface to cause brittle failure of an icy crust and simulated fractures can extend a large fraction of the radius of body. Strong tidal encounters may be responsible for the formation of long graben complexes and chasmata in ancient terrain of icy Moons such as Dione, Tethys, Ariel and Charon.

  15. Simulating tidal evolution and encounters with mass-spring models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Frouard, Julien; Ebinger, Cynthia; Giannella, David; Efroimsky, Michael; Shaw, John

    2016-05-01

    We have recently found that we can directly simulate tidal spin down of viscoelastic objects using damped springs within an N-body code. But there is a 30% discrepancy between the torque analytically predicted and that numerically measured and we still have not identified the cause!Close tidal encounters among large planetesimals and moons were more common than impacts. Using a mass spring model within an N-body simulation, we simulate the deformation of the surface caused by a close tidal encounter and find tidal encounters can induce sufficient stress on the surface to cause brittle failure of an icy crust. Simulated fractures can extend a large fraction of the radius of body. Strong tidal encounters may be responsible for the formation of long graben complexes and chasmata in ancient terrain of icy moons such as Dione, Tethys, Ariel and Charon.

  16. Close encounters of nearly parabolic comets and planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomanov, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    An overview is given of close encounters of nearly parabolic comets (NPCs; with periods of P > 200 years and perihelion distances of q > 0.1 AU; the number of the comets is N = 1041) with planets. The minimum distances Δmin between the cometary and planetary orbits are calculated to select comets whose Δmin are less than the radius of the planet's sphere of influence. Close encounters of these comets with planets are identified by numerical integration of the comets' equations of motion over an interval of ±50 years from the time of passing the perihelion. Close encounters of NPCs with Jupiter in 1663-2011 are reported for seven comets. An encounter with Saturn is reported for comet 2004 F2 (in 2001).

  17. Addressing psychosocial aspects of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kelsay, Kimberly; Klinnert, Mary; Bender, Bruce

    2010-08-01

    Moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) negatively affects patients and their families. Pruritus, scratching, and sleep problems are common complaints linked to disturbed quality of life. Treatment is complex, and nonadherence rates are high. This article reviews the effect of AD on patients and their families and intervention strategies that have some success in improving quality of life. A treatment model for addressing the psychosocial effect of moderate to severe AD within a multidisciplinary setting is suggested herein. PMID:20670820

  18. Two-particle problem in comblike structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, Elena; Cassi, Davide; Cattivelli, Luca; Sartori, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Encounters between walkers performing a random motion on an appropriate structure can describe a wide variety of natural phenomena ranging from pharmacokinetics to foraging. On homogeneous structures the asymptotic encounter probability between two walkers is (qualitatively) independent of whether both walkers are moving or one is kept fixed. On infinite comblike structures this is no longer the case and here we deepen the mechanisms underlying the emergence of a finite probability that two random walkers will never meet, while one single random walker is certain to visit any site. In particular, we introduce an analytical approach to address this problem and even more general problems such as the case of two walkers with different diffusivity, particles walking on a finite comb and on arbitrary bundled structures, possibly in the presence of loops. Our investigations are both analytical and numerical and highlight that, in general, the outcome of a reaction involving two reactants on a comblike architecture can strongly differ according to whether both reactants are moving (no matter their relative diffusivities) or only one is moving and according to the density of shortcuts among the branches.

  19. Two-particle problem in comblike structures.

    PubMed

    Agliari, Elena; Cassi, Davide; Cattivelli, Luca; Sartori, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Encounters between walkers performing a random motion on an appropriate structure can describe a wide variety of natural phenomena ranging from pharmacokinetics to foraging. On homogeneous structures the asymptotic encounter probability between two walkers is (qualitatively) independent of whether both walkers are moving or one is kept fixed. On infinite comblike structures this is no longer the case and here we deepen the mechanisms underlying the emergence of a finite probability that two random walkers will never meet, while one single random walker is certain to visit any site. In particular, we introduce an analytical approach to address this problem and even more general problems such as the case of two walkers with different diffusivity, particles walking on a finite comb and on arbitrary bundled structures, possibly in the presence of loops. Our investigations are both analytical and numerical and highlight that, in general, the outcome of a reaction involving two reactants on a comblike architecture can strongly differ according to whether both reactants are moving (no matter their relative diffusivities) or only one is moving and according to the density of shortcuts among the branches. PMID:27300834

  20. Orbital perturbations of the Galilean satellites during planetary encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Deienno, Rogerio; Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Yokoyama, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    The Nice model of the dynamical instability and migration of the giant planets can explain many properties of the present solar system, and can be used to constrain its early architecture. In the jumping-Jupiter version of the Nice model, required from the terrestrial planet constraint and dynamical structure of the asteroid belt, Jupiter has encounters with an ice giant. Here, we study the survival of the Galilean satellites in the jumping-Jupiter model. This is an important concern because the ice-giant encounters, if deep enough, could dynamically perturb the orbits of the Galilean satellites and lead to implausible results. We performed numerical integrations where we tracked the effect of planetary encounters on the Galilean moons. We considered three instability cases from Nesvorný and Morbidelli that differed in the number and distribution of encounters. We found that in one case, where the number of close encounters was relatively small, the Galilean satellite orbits were not significantly affected. In the other two, the orbital eccentricities of all moons were excited by encounters, Callisto's semimajor axis changed, and, in a large fraction of trials, the Laplace resonance of the inner three moons was disrupted. The subsequent evolution by tides damps eccentricities and can recapture the moons in the Laplace resonance. A more important constraint is represented by the orbital inclinations of the moons, which can be excited during the encounters and not appreciably damped by tides. We find that one instability case taken from Nesvorný and Morbidelli clearly does not meet this constraint. This shows how the regular satellites of Jupiter can be used to set limits on the properties of encounters in the jumping-Jupiter model, and help us to better understand how the early solar system evolved.

  1. The context of ethical problems in medical volunteer work.

    PubMed

    Wall, Anji

    2011-06-01

    Ethical problems are common in clinical medicine, so medical volunteers who practice clinical medicine in developing countries should expect to encounter them just as they would in their practice in the developed world. However, as this article argues, medical volunteers in developing countries should not expect to encounter the same ethical problems as those that dominate Western biomedicine or to address ethical problems in the same way as they do in their practice in developed countries. For example, poor health and advanced disease increase the risks and decrease the potential benefits of some interventions. Consequently, when medical volunteers intervene too readily, without considering the nutritional and general health status of patients, the results can be devastating. Medical volunteers cannot assume that the outcomes of interventions in developing countries will be comparable to the outcomes of the same interventions in developed countries. Rather, they must realistically consider the complex medical conditions of patients when determining whether or not to intervene. Similarly, medical volunteers may face the question of whether to provide a pharmaceutical or perform an intervention that is below the acceptable standard of care versus the alternative of doing nothing. This article critically explores the contextual features of medical volunteer work in developing countries that differentiate it from medical practice in developed countries, arguing that this context contributes to the creation of unique ethical problems and affects the way in which these problems should be analyzed and resolved.

  2. Studying the clinical encounter with the Adaptive Leadership framework

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Donald E; Docherty, Sharron L; Adams, Judith A; Carthron, Dana L; Corazzini, Kirsten; Day, Jennifer R; Neglia, Elizabeth; Thygeson, Marcus; Anderson, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the concept of leadership as a personal capability, not contingent on one's position in a hierarchy. This type of leadership allows us to reframe both the care-giving and organizational roles of nurses and other front-line clinical staff. Little research has been done to explore what leadership means at the point of care, particularly in reference to the relationship between health care practitioners and patients and their family caregivers. The Adaptive Leadership framework, based on complexity science theory, provides a useful lens to explore practitioners' leadership behaviors at the point of care. This framework proposes that there are two broad categories of challenges that patients face: technical and adaptive. Whereas technical challenges are addressed with technical solutions that are delivered by practitioners, adaptive challenges require the patient (or family member) to adjust to a new situation and to do the work of adapting, learning, and behavior change. Adaptive leadership is the work that practitioners do to mobilize and support patients to do the adaptive work. The purpose of this paper is to describe this framework and demonstrate its application to nursing research. We demonstrate the framework's utility with five exemplars of nursing research problems that range from the individual to the system levels. The framework has the potential to guide researchers to ask new questions and to gain new insights into how practitioners interact with patients at the point of care to increase the patient's ability to tackle challenging problems and improve their own health care outcomes. It is a potentially powerful framework for developing and testing a new generation of interventions to address complex issues by harnessing and learning about the adaptive capabilities of patients within their life contexts. PMID:24409083

  3. Studying the clinical encounter with the Adaptive Leadership framework.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Donald E; Docherty, Sharron L; Adams, Judith A; Carthron, Dana L; Corazzini, Kirsten; Day, Jennifer R; Neglia, Elizabeth; Thygeson, Marcus; Anderson, Ruth A

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the concept of leadership as a personal capability, not contingent on one's position in a hierarchy. This type of leadership allows us to reframe both the care-giving and organizational roles of nurses and other front-line clinical staff. Little research has been done to explore what leadership means at the point of care, particularly in reference to the relationship between health care practitioners and patients and their family caregivers. The Adaptive Leadership framework, based on complexity science theory, provides a useful lens to explore practitioners' leadership behaviors at the point of care. This framework proposes that there are two broad categories of challenges that patients face: technical and adaptive. Whereas technical challenges are addressed with technical solutions that are delivered by practitioners, adaptive challenges require the patient (or family member) to adjust to a new situation and to do the work of adapting, learning, and behavior change. Adaptive leadership is the work that practitioners do to mobilize and support patients to do the adaptive work. The purpose of this paper is to describe this framework and demonstrate its application to nursing research. We demonstrate the framework's utility with five exemplars of nursing research problems that range from the individual to the system levels. The framework has the potential to guide researchers to ask new questions and to gain new insights into how practitioners interact with patients at the point of care to increase the patient's ability to tackle challenging problems and improve their own health care outcomes. It is a potentially powerful framework for developing and testing a new generation of interventions to address complex issues by harnessing and learning about the adaptive capabilities of patients within their life contexts. PMID:24409083

  4. Refugees and Migrants: Problems and Program Responses. A Look at the Causes and Consequences of Today's Major International Population Flows, and at the Ford Foundation's New Programs to Address the Problems of Refugees and Migrants in the United States and Elsewhere in the World. A Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford Foundation, New York, NY.

    The paper reflects the Ford Foundation's emphasis since 1980 on long-term problems of refugees and migrants across national borders, and the desire of the Foundation staff to strengthen the long-term capacity of key institutions and communities to cope with population flows. Focus is first on the consequences of migrant flows for sending and…

  5. The meaningful encounter: patient and next-of-kin stories about their experience of meaningful encounters in health-care.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin; Snellma, Ingrid; Gustafsson, Christine

    2013-12-01

    This study focuses on the meaningful encounters of patients and next of kin, as seen from their perspective. Identifying the attributes within meaningful encounters is important for increased understanding of caring and to expand and develop earlier formulated knowledge about caring relationships. Caring theory about the caring relationship provided a point of departure to illuminate the meaningful encounter in healthcare contexts. A qualitative explorative design with a hermeneutic narrative approach was used to analyze and interpret written narratives. The phases of the analysis were naïve interpretation, structure analysis on two different levels (narrative structure, and deep structure through metaphors) and finally a dialectic interpretation. The narratives revealed the meaning of the meaningful encounter as sharing, a nourishing fellowship, common responsibility and coming together, experienced as safety and warmth, that gives, by extension, life-changing moments, a healing force and dissipated insight. The meaningful encounter can be seen as a complex phenomenon with various attributes. Understanding the meaningful encounter will enable nurses to plan and provide professional care, based on caring science, focusing on patient and next-of-kin experiences. PMID:23181930

  6. Close encounters involving free-floating planets in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Zheng, Xiaochen; Church, Ross P.; Davies, Melvyn B.

    2015-06-01

    Instabilities in planetary systems can result in the ejection of planets from their host system, resulting in free-floating planets (FFPs). If this occurs in a star cluster, the FFP may remain bound to the star cluster for some time and interact with the other cluster members until it is ejected. Here, we use N-body simulations to characterize close star-planet and planet-planet encounters and the dynamical fate of the FFP population in star clusters containing 500-2000 single or binary star members. We find that FFPs ejected from their planetary system at low velocities typically leave the star cluster 40 per cent earlier than their host stars, and experience tens of close (<1000 au) encounters with other stars and planets before they escape. The fraction of FFPs that experiences a close encounter depends on both the stellar density and the initial velocity distribution of the FFPs. Approximately half of the close encounters occur within the first 30 Myr, and only 10 per cent occur after 100 Myr. The periastron velocity distribution for all encounters is well described by a modified Maxwell-Bolzmann distribution, and the periastron distance distribution is linear over almost the entire range of distances considered, and flattens off for very close encounters due to strong gravitational focusing. Close encounters with FFPs can perturb existing planetary systems and their debris structures, and they can result in re-capture of FFPs. In addition, these FFP populations may be observed in young star clusters in imaging surveys; a comparison between observations and dynamical predictions may provide clues to the early phases of stellar and planetary dynamics in star clusters.

  7. Kin encounter rate and inbreeding avoidance in canids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geffen, E.; Kam, M.; Hefner, R.; Hersteinsson, P.; Angerbjorn, A.; Dalen, L.; Fuglei, E.; Noren, K.; Adams, J.R.; Vucetich, J.; Meier, T.J.; Mech, L.D.; Vonholdt, B.M.; Stahler, D.R.; Wayne, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Mating with close kin can lead to inbreeding depression through the expression of recessive deleterious alleles and loss of heterozygosity. Mate selection may be affected by kin encounter rate, and inbreeding avoidance may not be uniform but associated with age and social system. Specifically, selection for kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance may be more developed in species that live in family groups or breed cooperatively. To test this hypothesis, we compared kin encounter rate and the proportion of related breeding pairs in noninbred and highly inbred canid populations. The chance of randomly encountering a full sib ranged between 1-8% and 20-22% in noninbred and inbred canid populations, respectively. We show that regardless of encounter rate, outside natal groups mates were selected independent of relatedness. Within natal groups, there was a significant avoidance of mating with a relative. Lack of discrimination against mating with close relatives outside packs suggests that the rate of inbreeding in canids is related to the proximity of close relatives, which could explain the high degree of inbreeding depression observed in some populations. The idea that kin encounter rate and social organization can explain the lack of inbreeding avoidance in some species is intriguing and may have implications for the management of populations at risk. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Evidence for an encounter expectancy bias in fear of spiders.

    PubMed

    Aue, Tatjana; Hoeppli, Marie-Eve

    2012-01-01

    Whereas research has demonstrated that phobic or fearful individuals overestimate the likelihood of incurring aversive consequences from an encounter with feared stimuli, it has not yet been systematically investigated whether these individuals also overestimate the likelihood (i.e., the frequency) of such encounters. In the current study, spider-fearful and control participants were presented with background information that allowed them to estimate the overall likelihood that different kinds of animals (spiders, snakes, or birds) would be encountered. Spider-fearful participants systematically overestimated the likelihood of encountering a spider with respect to the likelihood of encountering a snake or a bird. No such expectancy bias was observed in control participants. The results thus strengthen our idea that there indeed exist two different types of expectancy bias in high fear and phobia that can be related to different components of the fear response. A conscientious distinction and examination of these two types of expectancy bias are of potential interest for therapeutic applications. PMID:21957987

  9. Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, P.D.

    2011-04-01

    One of the main concerns of storage in saline aquifers is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available for these aquifers. This necessitates a method using available fault data to estimate the probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault. The probability of encounter can be calculated from areal fault density statistics from available data, and carbon dioxide plume dimensions from numerical simulation. Given a number of assumptions, the dimension of the plume perpendicular to a fault times the areal density of faults with offsets greater than some threshold of interest provides probability of the plume encountering such a fault. Application of this result to a previously planned large-scale pilot injection in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin yielded a 3% and 7% chance of the plume encountering a fully and half seal offsetting fault, respectively. Subsequently available data indicated a half seal-offsetting fault at a distance from the injection well that implied a 20% probability of encounter for a plume sufficiently large to reach it.

  10. The Moderately Efficient Enzyme: Futile Encounters and Enzyme Floppiness.

    PubMed

    Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron; Noor, Elad; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-18

    The pioneering model of Henri, Michaelis, and Menten was based on the fast equilibrium assumption: the substrate binds its enzyme reversibly, and substrate dissociation is much faster than product formation. Here, we examine this assumption from a somewhat different point of view, asking what fraction of enzyme-substrate complexes are futile, i.e., result in dissociation rather than product formation. In Knowles' notion of a "perfect" enzyme, all encounters of the enzyme with its substrate result in conversion to product. Thus, the perfect enzyme's catalytic efficiency, kcat/KM, is constrained by only the diffusion on-rate, and the fraction of futile encounters (defined as φ) approaches zero. The available data on >1000 different enzymes suggest that for ≥90% of enzymes φ > 0.99 and for the "average enzyme" φ ≥ 0.9999; namely, <1 of 10(4) encounters is productive. Thus, the "fast equilibrium" assumption holds for the vast majority of enzymes. We discuss possible molecular origins for the dominance of futile encounters, including the coexistence of multiple sub-states of an enzyme's active site (enzyme floppiness) and/or its substrate. Floppiness relates to the inherent flexibility of proteins, but also to conflicting demands, or trade-offs, between rate acceleration (the rate-determining chemical step) and catalytic turnover, or between turnover rate and accuracy. The study of futile encounters and active-site floppiness may contribute to a better understanding of enzyme catalysis, enzyme evolution, and improved enzyme design.

  11. Kin encounter rate and inbreeding avoidance in canids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geffen, Eli; Kam, Michael; Hefner, Reuven; Hersteinsson, Pall; Angerbjorn, Anders; Dalen, Love; Fuglei, Eva; Noren, Karin; Adams, Jennifer R.; Vicetich, John; Meier, Thomas J.; Mech, L.D.; VonHoldt, Bridgett M.; Stahler, Daniel R.; Wayne, Robert K.

    2011-01-01

    Mating with close kin can lead to inbreeding depression through the expression of recessive deleterious alleles and loss of heterozygosity. Mate selection may be affected by kin encounter rate, and inbreeding avoidance may not be uniform but associated with age and social system. Specifically, selection for kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance may be more developed in species that live in family groups or breed cooperatively. To test this hypothesis, we compared kin encounter rate and the proportion of related breeding pairs in noninbred and highly inbred canid populations. The chance of randomly encountering a full sib ranged between 1–8% and 20–22% in noninbred and inbred canid populations, respectively. We show that regardless of encounter rate, outside natal groups mates were selected independent of relatedness. Within natal groups, there was a significant avoidance of mating with a relative. Lack of discrimination against mating with close relatives outside packs suggests that the rate of inbreeding in canids is related to the proximity of close relatives, which could explain the high degree of inbreeding depression observed in some populations. The idea that kin encounter rate and social organization can explain the lack of inbreeding avoidance in some species is intriguing and may have implications for the management of populations at risk.

  12. Addressing adolescent pregnancy with legislation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M; Folken, Lori; Seitz, Melody A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a concern among many women's health practitioners. While it is practical and appropriate to work to prevent adolescent pregnancy by educating adolescents in health care clinics, schools and adolescent-friendly community-based organizations, suggesting and supporting legislative efforts to reduce adolescent pregnancy can help address the issue on an even larger scale. This article aims to help nurses better understand current legislation that addresses adolescent pregnancy, and to encourage support of future adolescent pregnancy prevention legislation. PMID:25145716

  13. Addressing adolescent pregnancy with legislation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M; Folken, Lori; Seitz, Melody A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a concern among many women's health practitioners. While it is practical and appropriate to work to prevent adolescent pregnancy by educating adolescents in health care clinics, schools and adolescent-friendly community-based organizations, suggesting and supporting legislative efforts to reduce adolescent pregnancy can help address the issue on an even larger scale. This article aims to help nurses better understand current legislation that addresses adolescent pregnancy, and to encourage support of future adolescent pregnancy prevention legislation.

  14. Learning Impasses in Problem Solving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, J. P. E.

    1992-01-01

    Problem Solving systems customarily use backtracking to deal with obstacles that they encounter in the course of trying to solve a problem. This paper outlines an approach in which the possible obstacles are investigated prior to the search for a solution. This provides a solution strategy that avoids backtracking.

  15. A Typology of Planning Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, John P.; Kuh, George D.

    1984-01-01

    A matrix of planning problems is developed to illustrate pitfalls typically encountered in formal planning. Problems with goals, participation, information and communication, interdependencies, and resources may occur at each of four planning stages: capacity to plan, and initiation, development, and implementation of plans. (Author/MLW)

  16. Acts of Attention: An Exploration of Teacher Candidates' Attention to Educational Encounters, and How It Relates to Task Formulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    This study begins with the belief that the ways in which teachers see and attend to educational encounters matter for their actions in classrooms. Using microethnography as a framework, this dissertation explores the relationship between teacher candidate attention, problem formulation, and action. Through analysis of the M.Ed. inquiry reports of…

  17. Microaggressions and the reproduction of social inequalities in medical encounters in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Smith-Oka, Vania

    2015-10-01

    This article examines the role of microaggressions in the interactions between biomedical personnel and marginalized patients to addresses the constitutive property of medical interactions and their contribution to a class-differentiated and discriminatory local social world. Based on ethnographic fieldwork over the course of three months (2008-2011) the study examined the clinical relationships between obstetric patients and clinicians in a public hospital in the city of Puebla, Mexico. It reveals four factors present in the social hierarchies in Mexico that predispose clinicians to callous interactions toward "problematic others" in society, resulting in microaggressions within clinical encounters: (a) perceptions of suitability for good motherhood; (b) moralized versions of modern motherhood inscribed on patient bodies; (c) a priori assumptions about the hypersexuality of low-income women; and (d) clinician frustration exacerbated by overwork resulting in corporeal violence. This work concludes by questioning the efforts for universal health rights that do not address underlying social and economic inequities.

  18. The Influence of Neighborhood Characteristics on Police Officers’ Encounters with Persons Suspected to Have a Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Krishan, Shaily; Bakeman, Roger; Broussard, Beth; Cristofaro, Sarah L.; Hankerson-Dyson, Dana; Husbands, Letheshia; Watson, Amy C.; Compton, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Police officers’ decisions and behaviors are impacted by the neighborhood context in which police encounters occur. For example, officers may use greater force and be more likely to make arrests in disadvantaged neighborhoods. We examined whether neighborhood characteristics influence police encounters with individuals suspected to have a serious mental illness, addictive disorder, or developmental disability. Method We obtained data on 916 encounters from 166 officers in six jurisdictions in Georgia, USA and abstracted geographical data pertaining to the location of these encounters from United States Decennial Census data. Encounters were nested within 163 census tracts. Officer-reported data covered general encounter characteristics, the officer’s perception of the subject’s condition, subject demographics, use of force, and disposition of the encounter (e.g., arrest v. referral or transport to treatment services). Geographical data included 17 variables representing population and housing characteristics of the census tracts, from which three indices pertaining to neighborhood income, stability, and immigration status were derived using factor-analytic techniques. We then examined associations of these indices with various encounter-related variables using multi-level analysis. Results Encounters taking place in higher-income and higher-stability census tracts were more likely to be dispatch-initiated and take place in a private home compared to those in lower-income and lower-stability neighborhoods. In higher-income neighborhoods, encounters were more likely to involve a subject suspected to have a mental illness (as opposed to an addictive disorder or developmental disability) and less likely to involve a subject suspected to have alcohol problems. The officer’s level of force used was not associated with neighborhood factors. Regarding disposition, although the likelihood of arrest was unrelated to neighborhood characteristics, encounters

  19. Police Encounters, Mental Illness and Injury: An Exploratory Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Amy N.; Morabito, Melissa; Watson, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    Police encounters are believed to be particularly dangerous for people with mental illness and police officers. Despite widespread concern among advocates, researchers and police professionals, little is known about the details of these interactions including the occurrence of injuries. In the current study, we explore injuries to people with mental illness and officers to determine the extent to which situational and individual factors predict injuries. Findings suggest that injuries during police calls involving persons with mental illness are infrequent and rarely require medical attention. Predictors of injuries in these calls are similar to those in police encounters with the general population. PMID:21113331

  20. Preliminary science results of Voyager 1 Saturn encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bane, D.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary science results of the Voyager 1 encounter of the planet Saturn are reported. On August 22, 1980, the spacecraft was 109 million km (68 million mi) from Saturn. Closest approach to Saturn took place on November 12, at 3:46 p.m. (PDT), when the spacecraft passed 126,000 km (78,000 mi) from the cloud tops. Measurements of the atmosphere, wind speed, radiation, six surrounding rings, and the planet's old and newly found satellites were recorded. The encounter ended December 15, 1980. The spacecraft took more than 17,500 photographs of Saturn and its satellites.

  1. Cloud encounter and particle density variabilities from GASP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Holdeman, J. D.; Davis, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Summary statistics and variability studies are presented for cloud encounter and particle number density data as part of the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) aboard commercial Boeing 747 airliners. On the average, cloud encounter is shown on about 15% of the 52,164 data samples available; this value varies with season, latitude, synoptic weather situation, and distance from the tropopause. The number density of particles (diameter greater than 3 microns) also varies with time and location, and depends on the horizontal extent of cloudiness.

  2. Encounter times in overlapping domains and aplication to epidemic spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Paulina; Sanders, David P.

    2014-03-01

    We present results on encounter times for random walkers modeling territorial animals. The walkers are confined to habitats in one or two dimensions with reflecting boundaries, and neighboring habitats overlap. Using Monte Carlo simulations and numerically-exact calculations, we calculate encounter times as a function of the size of the habitats, and the size of the overlap region. These results are applied to model the spread of epidemics in populations of such animals; the speed of propagation of the epidemic is determined in terms of the role of the spatial organization.

  3. Value Encounters - Modeling and Analyzing Co-creation of Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, Hans

    Recent marketing and management literature has introduced the concept of co-creation of value. Current value modeling approaches such as e3-value focus on the exchange of value rather than co-creation. In this paper, an extension to e3-value is proposed in the form of a “value encounter”. Value encounters are defined as interaction spaces where a group of actors meet and derive value by each one bringing in some of its own resources. They can be analyzed from multiple strategic perspectives, including knowledge management, social network management and operational management. Value encounter modeling can be instrumental in the context of service analysis and design.

  4. Effects of workplace, family and cultural influences on low back pain: what opportunities exist to address social factors in general consultations?

    PubMed

    Shaw, William S; Campbell, Paul; Nelson, Candace C; Main, Chris J; Linton, Steven J

    2013-10-01

    Social factors are widely acknowledged in behavioural models of pain and pain management, but incorporating these factors into general medical consultations for low back pain (LBP) can be challenging. While there is no compelling evidence that social factors contribute to LBP onset, these factors have been shown to influence functional limitation and disability, especially the effects of organisational support in the workplace, spousal support, family conflict and social disadvantage. A number of barriers exist to address such social factors in routine medical encounters for LBP, but there is emerging evidence that improving social and organisational support may be an effective strategy to reduce the negative lifestyle consequences of LBP. For clinicians to address these factors in LBP treatment requires a clearer psychosocial framework in assessment and screening, more individualised problem-solving efforts, more patient-centred interventions involving family, peers and workplace supports and a less biomechanical and diagnostic approach.

  5. Grassroots Leadership: Encounters with Power Dynamics and Oppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the nature of power dynamics that faculty and staff grassroots leaders encounter as they attempt to create change. I identified five distinctive types of power dynamics--"oppression," "silencing," "controlling," "inertia," and "micro-aggressions" from the most overt to more subtle and covert forms. Staff experience multiple…

  6. Fertile Zones of Cultural Encounter in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolikant, Yifat Ben-David; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2008-01-01

    We explain certain learning difficulties in computer science education as resulting from a clash between the students' culture as computer users and the professional computing culture. We propose the concept of fertile zones of cultural encounter as a way of overcoming these learning difficulties. This pedagogical approach aims to bridge the gap…

  7. Photographic Images of Refugee Spatial Encounters: Pedagogy of Displacement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subedi, Binaya

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines my effort to document the experiences of a Bhutanese refugee community in a mid-western city of the United States. In particular, the essay looks at housing experiences the community encountered and my efforts to translate the events through photographs. The essay also explores how oppression operates in relation to refugee…

  8. Room with a View: Ethical Encounters in Room 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes ethical encounters in Room 13, a schoolroom where children made what they wanted, posed their own questions, and ran an art room like a small business. In Room 13 children had the responsibility to maintain all aspects of the art studio. Specific decisions fell to an annually elected management team, a small…

  9. Encounters with Forest School and Foucault: A Risky Business?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Trisha

    2007-01-01

    This paper tells the story of an encounter between two early years teachers and two Forest School workers, the growing tensions in their relationships and how these tensions were resolved. When analysed through a Foucauldian (poststructuralist) lens, the story can be read as a battle between dominant discourses--a battle exacerbated by the outdoor…

  10. Identifying Satisfied/Dissatisfied Service Encounters in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chahal, Hardeep; Devi, Pinkey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore satisfactory and dissatisfactory service encounters in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: The data are collected through the well established critical incident technique (CIT) method. All the satisfied and dissatisfied critical incidents are then grouped on the basis of Bitner et al.'s…

  11. In "the Event" That Art and Teaching Encounter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garoian, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    In this writing, I explore the performative correspondences between the complex, disparate, and disjunctive encounters, alliances, and movements that characterize the making of art and the making of teaching that--according to philosophers Deleuze and Guattari--are constituted by the "plane of consistency," "zone of…

  12. Children's Encounters with Things: Schooling the Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Liz

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on work around matter and the material in order to examine how (extra)ordinary "things" are used to (re)produce formulaic and predictable performances within the context of an early years classroom. Using ethnographic data I focus on a series of encounters where oscillations between (in)animate objects and the child…

  13. Young Infants Encode Lexical Stress in Newly Encountered Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the nature of infants' representations of newly encountered word forms. Using a word-object association task, we taught 14-month-olds novel three-syllable words differing in segments and stress patterns. At test, we manipulated the stress pattern of the word or the position of the stressed syllable in the word. Our…

  14. One-to-One Encounters: Facilitators, Participants, and Friendship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Lee

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I explore the claim that one-to-one encounters between community music facilitators and music participants can be described as friendships. By exploring the relational structure through the call and the welcome, I make some general comments on friendship before finally tackling the question lying at the heart of this article: How…

  15. Engineering Encounters: A House for Chase the Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrero, Meghan E.; Gunning, Amanda M.; Buonamano, Christina

    2016-01-01

    From a young age, children encounter different materials and learn color, hardness, texture, and shape. Focusing on observable properties is an engaging way to introduce young children to matter. In this investigation, students use observations and engineering design to decide which material would make the best roof for a doghouse. The authors…

  16. The Validation of an Encounter Group Outcome Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William R.; Zarle, Thomas

    1979-01-01

    This study further investigates the validity of the McMillan Affective Relationship Scale (MARS) by (1) examining its relationship to other commonly used scales; (2) determining whether it was sensitive to change over time for encounter group participants; and (3) attempting to determine whether pretesting on MARS was a possible source of…

  17. Supervision Challenges Encountered during Kenyan University Students' Practicum Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathuri-Ogola, Lucy; VanLeeuwen, Charlene; Kabaria-Muriithi, Joan; Weeks, Lori E.; Kieru, Jane; Ndayala, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    There is little published research that examines the supervision experience of field attachment supervisors in Kenya. In this study, we identify the challenges encountered by field supervisors during student field attachments with community organizations. Fifteen organizations that had hosted third year students from the Department of Community…

  18. Development of a Behavioral Affective Relationship Scale for Encounter Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William R., Jr.; Zarle, Thomas

    The paper outlines several studies over a two-year period to develop a self-report and observer-rating measure of sensitivity/encounter group outcome. The initial form of the scale was taken from McMillan (1971) who developed a measure of 16 categories of group outcome; McMillan's work indicated the scale had high reliability. Subsequent study…

  19. Potential for Inclusion of Information Encountering within Information Literacy Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdelez, Sanda; Basic, Josipa; Levitov, Deborah D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Information encountering (finding information while searching for some other information), is a type of opportunistic discovery of information that complements purposeful approaches to finding information. The motivation for this paper was to determine if the current models of information literacy instruction refer to information…

  20. Storying Practices of Witnessing: Refiguring Quality in Everyday Pedagogical Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nxumalo, Fikile

    2016-01-01

    This article seeks to contribute towards an unsettling of dominant framings of quality pedagogical practices. The author puts to work the figure of the modest witness as a way of storying everyday pedagogical encounters in childhood settings that might refigure quality in practice as materialized more-than-human becomings. Working within the…

  1. Exploring Festival Performance as a State of Encounter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O’Grady, Alice; Kill, Rebekka

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the activities of the research network "Festival Performance as a State of Encounter", which was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council as part of the Beyond Text strategic programme. The network was formulated in 2008, and a range of different events were organized over the course of two years to explore the…

  2. Reconsidering Children's Encounters with Nature and Place Using Posthumanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article explores and reconsiders the view of children's encounters with place as central to a place-based pedagogy that seeks to dismantle rather than support constructions of a nature-culture binary. I unpack the current fervour for reinserting the child in nature and nature-based education as a significant phenomenon in environmental and…

  3. Beyond Dramatic Truth: Theatre within the Therapeutic Encounter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendle, Andy; Rowe, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Recorded footage of counselling sessions with real clients can be a valuable educational resource that gives training counsellors the opportunity to analyse the theories and practices they encounter in their education. However, the use of such material raises complex ethical issues: what are the safeguards against the misuse of the material? Can…

  4. Ulysses at jupiter: an overview of the encounter.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Wenzel, K P; Page, D E

    1992-09-11

    In February 1992, the Ulysses spacecraft flew through the giant magnetosphere of Jupiter. The primary objective of the encounter was to use the gravity field of Jupiter to redirect the spacecraft to the sun's polar regions, which will now be traversed in 1994 and 1995. However, the Ulysses scientific investigations were well suited to observations of the Jovian magnetosphere, and the encounter has resulted in a major contribution to our understanding of this complex and dynamic plasma environment. Among the more exciting results are (i) possible entry into the polar cap, (ii) the identification of magnetospheric ions originating from Jupiter's ionosphere, lo, and the solar wind, (iii) observation of longitudinal asymmetries in density and discrete wave-emitting regions of the lo plasma torus, (iv) the presence of counter-streaming ions and electrons, field-aligned currents, and energetic electron and radio bursts in the dusk sector on high-latitude magnetic field lines, and (v) the identification of the direction of the magnetic field in the dusk sector, which is indicative of tailward convection. This overview serves as an introduction to the accompanying reports that present the preliminary scientific findings. Aspects of the encounter that are common to all of the investigations, such as spacecraft capabilities, the flight path past Jupiter, and unique aspects of the encounter, are presented herein.

  5. Fabricated Childhoods: Uncanny Encounters with the More-than-Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaise, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on uncanny encounters with Julia deVille's exhibit, "Phantasmagoria". Inspired by Deleuzian-informed research practices, the author experiments with provoking practices to defy dominant developmental notions of childhood. This article reworks a humanist ontology by bringing together the discursive, the material, the…

  6. Numerical Modeling of Cometary Meteoroid Streams Encountering Mars and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christou, A. A.; Vaubaillon, J.

    2011-01-01

    We have simulated numerically the existence of meteoroid streams that encounter the orbits of Mars and Venus, potentially producing meteor showers at those planets. We find that 17 known comets can produce such showers, the intensity of which can be determined through observations. Six of these streams contain dense dust trails capable of producing meteor outbursts.

  7. Technology Mediated Information Sharing (Monitor Sharing) in Primary Care Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asan, Onur

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation study was to identify and describe the use of electronic health records (EHRs) for information sharing between patients and clinicians in primary-care encounters and to understand work system factors influencing information sharing. Ultimately, this will promote better design of EHR technologies and effective training…

  8. A Task Force to Address Bullying.

    PubMed

    Keller, Ronald; Budin, Wendy C; Allie, Tammy

    2016-02-01

    Bullying in the workplace can create a dysfunctional environment that is associated with serious physical and psychological harm to the person being bullied. Nurses' experience with bullying has gained considerable attention in recent years, and warrants further discussion. Nurse leaders need to develop and implement effective bullying prevention initiatives that will foster the functioning of a professional and productive staff in a healthy work environment. The aim of this article is to review workplace bullying as experienced by nurses, and describe how nurses at a Magnet-designated academic medical center developed and implemented a bullying task force to address the problem.

  9. A Task Force to Address Bullying.

    PubMed

    Keller, Ronald; Budin, Wendy C; Allie, Tammy

    2016-02-01

    Bullying in the workplace can create a dysfunctional environment that is associated with serious physical and psychological harm to the person being bullied. Nurses' experience with bullying has gained considerable attention in recent years, and warrants further discussion. Nurse leaders need to develop and implement effective bullying prevention initiatives that will foster the functioning of a professional and productive staff in a healthy work environment. The aim of this article is to review workplace bullying as experienced by nurses, and describe how nurses at a Magnet-designated academic medical center developed and implemented a bullying task force to address the problem. PMID:26817556

  10. Encounters with patients from Somalia: experience among vocational trainees in Swedish general practice

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Bengt; Lepp, Margret

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to describe how vocational trainees in general medical practice in Sweden experienced encounters with refugee patients from Somalia. Methods Sixteen vocational trainees in general medical practice in Sweden were interviewed in focus groups. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed according to a phenomenographic approach. Results Three categories with subcategories emerged. In the first category, “meeting the patient”, the family diversity among the patients was noted. Further, the informants noted that few patients presented psychiatric problems. In the second category, “obstacles in the encounter”, the vocational trainees noted difficulties in talking through an interpreter, who often seemed to have an extended dialogue with the patient. Obtaining a medical history was considered a challenge. The third category dealt with how to develop different strategies in the encounter. Conclusions To improve the encounter with patients from Somalia and other minority groups, the importance of curiosity, trust and continuity of care should be discussed in medical education. Health care´s own ways of working and thinking in relation to matters of diversity must be observed in medical training.

  11. Reliably Addressing "What Matters" Through a Quality Improvement Process.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Patricia A

    2016-02-01

    Oncology nurses have a critical role in mitigating the intense vulnerability, loss of control, and fear of the unknown that characterizes the experiences of patients with cancer and their family members. Reliably inquiring about the issues that are at the forefront for patients and their loved ones can encourage a deeper dialogue-where nurses can understand and address the issues that are most important to them. A practical quality improvement approach can help to ensure that processes are in place to assist nurses in devoting time to reliably inquire about "what matters" to each patient at every encounter.

  12. The difficulties encountered in conversion from classic pancreaticoduodenectomy to total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Ozturk, Gokmen; Karatepe, Oguzhan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, total laparoscopic pancreatectomy has been performed at many centres as an alternative to open surgery. In this study, we aimed to present the difficulties that we have encountered in converting from classic open pancreaticoduodenectomy to total laparoscopic pancreatectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between December 2012 and January 2014, we had 100 open pancreaticoduodenectomies. Subsequently, we tried to perform total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (TLPD) in 22 patients. In 17 of these 22 patients, we carried out the total laparoscopic procedure. We analysed the difficulties that we encountered converting to TLPD in three parts: Preoperative, operative and postoperative. Preoperative difficulties involved patient selection, preparation of operative instruments, and planning the operation. Operative difficulties involved the position of the trocars, dissection, and reconstruction problems. The postoperative difficulty involved follow-up of the patient. RESULTS: According to our experiences, the most important problem is the proper selection of patients. Contrary to our previous thoughts, older patients who were in better condition were comparatively more appropriate candidates than younger patients. This is because the younger patients have generally soft pancreatic texture, which complicates the reconstruction. The main operative problems are trocar positions and maintaining the appropriate position of the camera, which requires continuous changes in its angles during the operation. However, postoperative follow-up is not very different from the classic procedure. CONCLUSION: TLPD is a suitable procedure under appropriate conditions. PMID:27251830

  13. The Problem of Three Stars: Stability Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, M.; Mylläri, A.; Orlov, V.; Rubinov, A.

    2008-05-01

    The problem of three stars arises in many connections in stellar dynamics: three-body scattering drives the evolution of star clusters, and bound triple systems form long-lasting intermediate structures in them. Here we address the question of stability of triple stars. For a given system the stability is easy to determine by numerical orbit calculation. However, we often have only statistical knowledge of some of the parameters of the system. Then one needs a more general analytical formula. Here we start with the analytical calculation of the single encounter between a binary and a single star by Heggie (1975). Using some of the later developments we get a useful expression for the energy change per encounter as a function of the pericenter distance, masses, and relative inclination of the orbit. Then we assume that the orbital energy evolves by random walk in energy space until the accumulated energy change leads to instability. In this way we arrive at a stability limit in pericenter distance of the outer orbit for different mass combinations, outer orbit eccentricities and inclinations. The result is compared with numerical orbit calculations.

  14. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  15. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  16. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2016-07-12

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  17. Modelling of microscale patch encounter by chemotactic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, N; Fenchel, T

    1999-10-01

    A model of protozoan chemotaxis, based on the rate of change of chemoreceptor occupancy, was used to analyse the efficiency of chemotaxis in a variety of situations. Simulated swimming behaviour replicated patterns observed experimentally. These were classified into three forms of chemosensory behaviour; run-tumble, steered turning, and helical klinotaxis. All three could be simulated from a basic model of chemotaxis by modifying memory times and rotational velocities. In order to steer during helical klinotaxis, the cell must have a short term memory for responding to a signal within a fraction of the time period of the helix. Steered turning was identified as a form where cells react to negative changes in concentration by steering around the turn to swim back up the gradient. All 3 forms were quite effective for encountering targets within the response radius. A response to negative changes in concentration, experienced when the cell is moving away from a target, was found to be important in the absence of periodic changes in swimming direction. The frequency of patch encounter at a fixed density was calculated to be roughly proportional to swimming speed. On the basis of the model, cells are only able to sense point sources within a radius of a few mm. However, even a response radius of 1 mm is enough to increase encounter probability of otherwise minute targets by 2 orders of magnitude. The mean time for patch encounter was calculated to be an exponential function of the mean distance between patches. This results in a very sharp threshold at approximately 6 cm, above which they are not encountered by protozoa within time periods of several days.

  18. Species abundance, sexual encounter and bioluminescent signalling in the deep sea.

    PubMed Central

    Herring, P J

    2000-01-01

    The problems faced by deep-sea animals in achieving sexual and other encounters require sensory and effector systems the synergy of which can span the often very substantial distances that separate individuals. Bioluminescent systems provide one of the links between individuals, and the sexual dimorphism of some photophores suggests that they are employed to attract a mate. However, nearest-neighbour values for many deep-sea animals put them beyond the effective range of bioluminescent signals and it is therefore likely that these signals are employed at intermediate ranges, once an initial contact (perhaps olfactory) has been made. PMID:11079413

  19. On the clinical encounter with 'zebras' - the science and art of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Haran, Michal; Schattner, Ami

    2011-06-01

    Taught since medical school to concentrate on the more common disease entities, physicians may become insensitive to the possibility of encountering a rare disease ("zebra") or even an unusual presentation of one. The personal experience of one of the authors prompted this article, presenting an alternative view. We stress the need to carefully consider at times even rare diagnostic entities and their potentially unusual presentations. We discuss practical approaches to the special problems of these patients who are under-represented in the literature. In particular, using computerized searches when facing patients with unexplained symptoms, and adopting an honest, supportive attitude when uncertainty persists, seems important.

  20. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in Stirling engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  1. There's Trouble in Paradise: Problems with Educational Metadata Encountered during the MALTED Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monthienvichienchai, Rachada; Sasse, M. Angela; Wheeldon, Richard

    This paper investigates the usability of educational metadata schemas with respect to the case of the MALTED (Multimedia Authoring Language Teachers and Educational Developers) project at University College London (UCL). The project aims to facilitate authoring of multimedia materials for language learning by allowing teachers to share multimedia…

  2. Problems of communicative competence in multi-cultural medical encounters in South African health services.

    PubMed

    Grant, T

    2006-11-01

    Research in health communication shows communicative competence to be an important aspect of successful health-care. Definitions of competence involve more than the participants, however; the position and status of these participants in terms of the medical hierarchy and accepted paradigm, the language of choice, educational levels and a host of other variables affect relationships and perceptions of competence. This article grapples with a number of issues that impact on communicative competence in the health-care professions, given the multi-lingual and -cultural society within South Africa as well as emerging shifts that foreground this debate. In particular, the thorny question around language use, the hegemonies of the past regarding a dominant lingua franca and subsequent issues involving translation and interpretation are discussed.

  3. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in stirling engine modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  4. Some Operating Experience and Problems Encountered During Operation of a Free-jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaulay, John E; Prince, William R

    1957-01-01

    During a free-jet investigation of a 28-inch ram-jet engine at a Mach number of 2.35, flow pulsation at the engine inlet were discovered which proved to have an effect on the engine performance and operational characteristics, particularly the engine rich blowout limits. This report discusses the finding of the flow pulsations, their elimination, and effect. Other facility characteristics, such as the establishment of flow simulation and the degree of subcritical operation of the diffuser, are also explained.

  5. Problems Encountered by Future Teachers in Community Service Practices Course and Solution Offers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yücelsin-Tas, Yaprak Türkan

    2014-01-01

    The course titled ?"Community Service Practices"? has been taught since 2006 to 2007 academic year in all of the faculties of education in Turkey. At Marmara University, future teachers of the French Language Teaching Section of the Department of Foreign Language Teaching at the Atatürk Faculty of Education take this course in the first…

  6. Problems Encountered in Teaching/Learning Integrated Photosynthesis: A Case of Ineffective Pedagogical Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Sriwattanarothai, Namkang

    2008-01-01

    In this article we recount our experiences of teaching photosynthesis in an integrated way to secondary school students and teachers, science undergraduates and postgraduates. Conceptual questions were posed to investigate learners' fundamental understanding of simple light-dependent and light-independent processes taught to most students at…

  7. Problems Encountered During the Recertification of the GLORY Solar Array Dual Axis Gimbal Drive Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Marc; Schepis, Jospeh P.; Bruckner, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The Glory observatory is the current incarnation of the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission spacecraft bus. The VCL spacecraft bus, having been cancelled for programmatic reasons in 2000, was nearly integrated when it was put into storage for possible future use. The Glory mission was a suitable candidate for using this spacecraft and in 2006 an effort to recertify the two axis solar array gimbal drive after its extended storage was begun. What was expected to be a simple performance validation of the two dual axis gimbal stepper motors became a serious test, diagnosis and repair task once questions arose on the flight worthiness of the hardware. A significant test program logic flow was developed which identified decisions that could be made based on the results of individual recertification tests. Without disassembling the bi-axial gimbals, beginning with stepper motor threshold voltage measurements and relating these to powered drive torque measurements, both performed at the spacecraft integrator s facility, a confusing picture of the health of the actuators came to light. Tests at the gimbal assembly level and tests of the disassembled actuators were performed by the manufacturer to validate our results and torque discrepancies were noted. Further disassembly to the component level of the actuator revealed the source of the torque loss.

  8. Refusing in a Foreign Language: An Investigation of Problems Encountered by Chinese Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yuh-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Whereas the speech act of refusal is universal across language, the politeness value and the types of linguistic forms used to perform it vary across language and culture. The majority of the comparative pragmatic research findings were derived from one single source of data (i.e., either production data or perception data). Few attempts have been…

  9. Technology Education Addressing New Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedras, Melvin J.; Braukmann, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The integration of problem solving into the technology education laboratory means there will be changes in the ways in which teachers structure activities for learners and the manner in which teachers behave. (JOW)

  10. Aquarium Problems: How To Solve Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFilippo, Shirley

    1975-01-01

    Presents some solutions to problems commonly encountered in maintaining a classroom aquarium: pH control, overfeeding, overcrowding of tank populations, incorrect temperature settings, faulty introduction of fish into the tank, and the buildup of too many nitrogenous wastes. (PB)

  11. Promoting Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Trainees Addressing Siloed Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitts, Robert Li; Christodoulou, Joanna; Goldman, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Professional siloing within medical institutions has been identified as a problem in medical education, including resident training. The authors discuss how trainees from different disciplines can collaborate to address this problem. Method: A group of trainees from psychiatry, developmental medicine, neurology, and education came…

  12. Lessons Learned During Solutions of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Suna N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Optimization research at NASA Glenn Research Center has addressed the design of structures, aircraft and airbreathing propulsion engines. During solution of the multidisciplinary problems several issues were encountered. This paper lists four issues and discusses the strategies adapted for their resolution: (1) The optimization process can lead to an inefficient local solution. This deficiency was encountered during design of an engine component. The limitation was overcome through an augmentation of animation into optimization. (2) Optimum solutions obtained were infeasible for aircraft and air-breathing propulsion engine problems. Alleviation of this deficiency required a cascading of multiple algorithms. (3) Profile optimization of a beam produced an irregular shape. Engineering intuition restored the regular shape for the beam. (4) The solution obtained for a cylindrical shell by a subproblem strategy converged to a design that can be difficult to manufacture. Resolution of this issue remains a challenge. The issues and resolutions are illustrated through six problems: (1) design of an engine component, (2) synthesis of a subsonic aircraft, (3) operation optimization of a supersonic engine, (4) design of a wave-rotor-topping device, (5) profile optimization of a cantilever beam, and (6) design of a cvlindrical shell. The combined effort of designers and researchers can bring the optimization method from academia to industry.

  13. Soft tissue problems in older adults.

    PubMed

    Holland, N W; Gonzalez, E B

    1998-08-01

    This article describes common soft tissue problems encountered in older adults, including fibromyalgia, selected bursitis/tendinitis syndromes, nerve entrapment syndromes, and miscellaneous topics such as Dupuytren's contractures, trigger fingers, palmar fasciitis, and reflex-sympathetic dystrophy. Clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment are emphasized. These are conditions that are frequently encountered but are generally diagnosed as arthritis or normal age-related problems. This article will hopefully enlighten the reader in distinguishing between these conditions.

  14. Clinical Problems In Coronary Angioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, C. Todd

    1989-06-01

    I have been asked to talk about the clinical problems encountered when performing coronary angioscopy. By definition, this discussion will reflect negatively on the procedure. Nevertheless, after presenting some of the data, I hope you will leave thinking optimistically about the future of coronary angioscopy. The first topic that I would like to address, as shown in Figure 1, concerns the goals for coronary angioscopy. What great discoveries might we ekpect from this tool? Is the potential benefit worthy of a large research and development investment? Then, assuming these goals are meritorious, I will compare the difficulties of percutaneous angioscopy with that of a more fully explored technique- intraoperative angioscopy. I will next describe the differences between percutaneous angioscopy of peripheral vasculature, a procedure enjoying more widespread use, and percutaneous coronary angioscopy (a technique less often utilized). I will then outline the basic requirements for any percutaneous coronary angioscopy system whose attributes can resolve some of the inherent challenges of the technique. Even if this hypothetical instrument were developed and proved to be safe and functional, angioscopy will always have intrinsic limitations. I will next outline these shortcomings. This will be followed by a more optimistic topic- a review of the published studies that have utilized percutaneous coronary angioscopy. Finally, I will speculate on developments in coronary angioscopy for the near future.

  15. The molecular matching problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular chemistry contains many difficult optimization problems that have begun to attract the attention of optimizers in the Operations Research community. Problems including protein folding, molecular conformation, molecular similarity, and molecular matching have been addressed. Minimum energy conformations for simple molecular structures such as water clusters, Lennard-Jones microclusters, and short polypeptides have dominated the literature to date. However, a variety of interesting problems exist and we focus here on a molecular structure matching (MSM) problem.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet observations from voyager 2 encounter with jupiter.

    PubMed

    Sandel, B R; Shemansky, D E; Broadfoot, A L; Bertaux, J L; Blamont, J E; Belton, M J; Ajello, J M; Holberg, J B; Atreya, S K; Donahue, T M; Moos, H W; Strobel, D F; McConnell, J C; Dalgarno, A; Goody, R; McElroy, M B; Takacs, P Z

    1979-11-23

    Extreme ultraviolet spectral observations of the Jovian planetary system made during the Voyager 2 encounter have extended our knowledge of many of the phenomena and physical processes discovered by the Voyager 1 ultraviolet spectrometer. In the 4 months between encounters, the radiation from Io's plasma torus has increased in intensity by a factor of about 2. This change was accompanied by a decrease in plasma temperature of about 30 percent. The high-latitude auroral zones have been positively associated with the magnetic projection of the plasma torus onto the planet. Emission in molecular hydrogen bands has been detected from the equatorial regions of Jupiter, indicating planetwide electron precipitation. Hydrogen Lyman alpha from the dark side of the planet has been measured at an intensity of about 1 kilorayleigh. An observation of the occultation of alpha Leonis by Jupiter was carried out successfully and the data are being analyzed in detail.

  17. Extra-solar Oort cloud encounters and planetary impact rates

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.

    1987-01-01

    Upper limits are estimated to the number density of extra-solar Oort clouds (ESOC) through which the solar system might pass and to the probable number of attendant planetary impacts by comets. All stars are assumed to have Oort clouds. The model is based on the observed stellar spatial density and the ratio of the total number density to the observed number density. It is estimated that 486 close stellar passages and 12,160 ESOC encounters may have occurred. Each encounter would have produced a shower of hyperbolic comets, with the results of 1-3 ESOC impacts with the earth. It is concluded that the great majority of terrestrial cratering events by comets have and will come from solar Oort cloud comets. 19 references.

  18. Phobos and Deimos encounter experiment during the Viking extended mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, R. H.; Blanchard, R. C.; Daniels, E. F.

    1975-01-01

    The Viking '75 Mission to Mars permits a truly unique opportunity to explore the natural satellites, Phobos and Deimos, from distances measured in the tens of kilometers. Because of the particular orbital geometry currently planned for the Viking Mission, the Viking spacecraft can be maneuvered to make repeated passes very close to Phobos and Deimos during the proposed extended mission phase. Multipass images of both satellites will cover approximately 75% of Phobos and 50% of Deimos. Resolution on the order of 50 meters is possible. Close encounters will permit mass determination to an accuracy of tens of percent. A preliminary feasibility study has been made which shows that the propulsive requirements are nominal, the orbit determination accuracy is adequate, and the satellites are within the scan platform pointing capability during portions of each encounter.

  19. Estimating the encounter rate variance in distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fewster, R.M.; Buckland, S.T.; Burnham, K.P.; Borchers, D.L.; Jupp, P.E.; Laake, J.L.; Thomas, L.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant source of variance in line transect sampling is usually the encounter rate variance. Systematic survey designs are often used to reduce the true variability among different realizations of the design, but estimating the variance is difficult and estimators typically approximate the variance by treating the design as a simple random sample of lines. We explore the properties of different encounter rate variance estimators under random and systematic designs. We show that a design-based variance estimator improves upon the model-based estimator of Buckland et al. (2001, Introduction to Distance Sampling. Oxford: Oxford University Press, p. 79) when transects are positioned at random. However, if populations exhibit strong spatial trends, both estimators can have substantial positive bias under systematic designs. We show that poststratification is effective in reducing this bias. ?? 2008, The International Biometric Society.

  20. Resurrecting the buried self: fairy tales and the analytic encounter.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Linda

    2011-12-01

    The author uses the lens of myth and fairy tales to examine the narratives generated by the analytic experience. Fairy tales are understood as representing fundamental developmental conflicts, accounting for their enduring power over time. The analytic encounter is seen as an analogue of the fairy tale in which the hidden self, damaged by loss and abandonment, reemerges only through the redemptive power of [an] other's love. Clinical material is presented in which hidden parts of the patient's self are projected into the analyst for safekeeping; these hidden parts resonate with the analyst's own lost, unrealized potential and form an intersubjective experience which the author believes is transformative. The patient's dormant powers emerge in a newly experienced atmosphere of recognition, and in this way, the analytic encounter resembles the fairy tale in providing an identificatory bond and a protective space for the patient's hidden vitality.

  1. How Ministers Understand and Address Emotional and Sexual Pressures in Ministry Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Genise Aria

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of ministers in regard to how they understand and address emotional and sexual pressures encountered in ministry work. The research was guided by four questions: How do practicing ministers in the Church of Antioch describe and understand pressures in their work settings that they see as emotional or sexual in…

  2. Scientific misconduct encountered by APAME journals: an online survey.

    PubMed

    Looi, Lai-Meng; Wong, Li Xuan; Koh, Cing Chai

    2015-12-01

    In June 2015, invitations were sent by email to 151 APAME journals to participate in an online survey with an objective of gaining insight into the common publication misconduct encountered by APAME editors. The survey, conducted through SurveyMonkey over a 20-day-period, comprised 10 questions with expansions to allow anecdotes limited to 400 characters, estimated to take less than 10 minutes to complete. Only one invitation was issued per journal, targeting (in order of priority) editors, editorial board members and editorial staff, and limited by email availability. 54 (36%) journals responded. 98% of respondents held Editor or Editorial Board positions. All respondent journals have editorial policies on publication ethics and 96% provide instructions related to ethics. 45% use anti-plagiarism software to screen manuscripts, the most popular being iThenticate, CrossCheck and Turnitin. Up to 50% of journals had encountered studies without IRB approval. Author misconduct encountered were (in rank order): plagiarism (75%), duplicate publication (58%), unjustified authorship (39%), authorship disputes (33%), data falsification (29%), data/image manipulation (27%), conflict of interest (25%), copyright violation (17%) and breach of confidentiality (10%). Reviewer misconduct encountered were: conflict of interest (19%), plagiarism (17%), obstructive behavior (17%), abusive language (13%) and breach of confidentiality (13%). Notwithstanding the limitations of the survey and the response rate, a few insights have been gained: (1) the need for strengthening the ethical culture of researchers/authors and reviewers, (2) anti-plagiarism software can improve plagiarism detection by about 15%, and (3) the need for technical support to detect plagiarism, duplicate publication and image manipulation.

  3. Strengthening student communication through pediatric simulated patient encounters.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Ryan; Toussaint, Gregory; Bruce Binder, S; Borges, Nicole J

    2014-01-01

    As medical students enter the role of physician, clinical outcomes not only rely on their mastery of clinical knowledge, but also on the effectiveness in which they can communicate with patients and family members. While students typically have numerous opportunities to practice clinical communication with adult patients, such practice in pediatric settings is limited. This study examines if simulated patient (SP) encounters strengthen third-year medical students' communication skills during the pediatrics clerkship. During 2011-2013, three SP encounters (comprising 3 pediatric scenarios) were incorporated into a pediatrics clerkship at one United States medical school to give students a safe venue to practice advanced communication with observation and direct feedback. Third-year medical students engaged in the scenarios and received both written and oral feedback from an evaluator observing the encounter. With IRB approval, students' self-perceived confidence and abilities at performing the advanced communication skills were measured using an eightitem, Likert scale questionnaire administered pre and post the SP encounter. Pre- and post-questionnaires (n=215; response rate, 96%) analyzed using a Wilcoxon-matched pairs signed-rank test demonstrated statistically significant increases in students' perception of their confidence and abilities regarding their performance (P<0.05; Bonferroni correction, P<0.006). There was an increases in student confidence and self-perceived ability in: first, communicating with children and family members of young patients; second, managing confrontational situations involving parents; third, performing a thorough psychosocial history with an adolescent; and fourth, using Evidence Based Medicine to motivate parents. PMID:25112449

  4. Scientific misconduct encountered by APAME journals: an online survey.

    PubMed

    Looi, Lai-Meng; Wong, Li Xuan; Koh, Cing Chai

    2015-12-01

    In June 2015, invitations were sent by email to 151 APAME journals to participate in an online survey with an objective of gaining insight into the common publication misconduct encountered by APAME editors. The survey, conducted through SurveyMonkey over a 20-day-period, comprised 10 questions with expansions to allow anecdotes limited to 400 characters, estimated to take less than 10 minutes to complete. Only one invitation was issued per journal, targeting (in order of priority) editors, editorial board members and editorial staff, and limited by email availability. 54 (36%) journals responded. 98% of respondents held Editor or Editorial Board positions. All respondent journals have editorial policies on publication ethics and 96% provide instructions related to ethics. 45% use anti-plagiarism software to screen manuscripts, the most popular being iThenticate, CrossCheck and Turnitin. Up to 50% of journals had encountered studies without IRB approval. Author misconduct encountered were (in rank order): plagiarism (75%), duplicate publication (58%), unjustified authorship (39%), authorship disputes (33%), data falsification (29%), data/image manipulation (27%), conflict of interest (25%), copyright violation (17%) and breach of confidentiality (10%). Reviewer misconduct encountered were: conflict of interest (19%), plagiarism (17%), obstructive behavior (17%), abusive language (13%) and breach of confidentiality (13%). Notwithstanding the limitations of the survey and the response rate, a few insights have been gained: (1) the need for strengthening the ethical culture of researchers/authors and reviewers, (2) anti-plagiarism software can improve plagiarism detection by about 15%, and (3) the need for technical support to detect plagiarism, duplicate publication and image manipulation. PMID:26712665

  5. Using data from an encounter sampler to model fish dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obaza, A.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Trexler, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    A method to estimate speed of free-ranging fishes using a passive sampling device is described and illustrated with data from the Everglades, U.S.A. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) from minnow traps embedded in drift fences was treated as an encounter rate and used to estimate speed, when combined with an independent estimate of density obtained by use of throw traps that enclose 1 m2 of marsh habitat. Underwater video was used to evaluate capture efficiency and species-specific bias of minnow traps and two sampling studies were used to estimate trap saturation and diel-movement patterns; these results were used to optimize sampling and derive correction factors to adjust species-specific encounter rates for bias and capture efficiency. Sailfin mollies Poecilia latipinna displayed a high frequency of escape from traps, whereas eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki were most likely to avoid a trap once they encountered it; dollar sunfish Lepomis marginatus were least likely to avoid the trap once they encountered it or to escape once they were captured. Length of sampling and time of day affected CPUE; fishes generally had a very low retention rate over a 24 h sample time and only the Everglades pygmy sunfish Elassoma evergladei were commonly captured at night. Dispersal speed of fishes in the Florida Everglades, U.S.A., was shown to vary seasonally and among species, ranging from 0.05 to 0.15 m s-1 for small poeciliids and fundulids to 0.1 to 1.8 m s-1 for L. marginatus. Speed was generally highest late in the wet season and lowest in the dry season, possibly tied to dispersal behaviours linked to finding and remaining in dry-season refuges. These speed estimates can be used to estimate the diffusive movement rate, which is commonly employed in spatial ecological models.

  6. Multiple encounter simulation for high-acuity multipatient environment training.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Leo; Shapiro, Marc J; Gutman, Deborah C; Jay, Gregory

    2007-12-01

    Patient safety interventions for multitasking, multipatient, error-prone work settings such as the emergency department (ED) must improve assorted clinical abilities, specific cognitive strategies, and teamwork functions of the staff to be effective. Multiple encounter simulation scenarios explore and convey this specialized mental work-set through use of multiple high-fidelity medical simulation (SIM) manikins in realistic surroundings. Multipatient scenarios reflect the work situations being targeted yet have the benefit of scripted control and instructor guidance to advance specific educational objectives. The use of two or more SIM patients promotes the exploration not only of multiple distinct clinical issues but also of interdependent processes pervasive in EDs. Cascading shortages of time, personnel, equipment, and supplies are re-created, thereby replicating process limitations at various levels, in a safe environment in which compensatory actions and adaptive behaviors can be learned. Distinguishing features of multipatient exercises include 1) broadened educational scope and expanded indications for SIM application, 2) enhanced scenario complexity, 3) controlled exposure to high workload environments, 4) expanded communication requirements, and 5) increased potential for reflective learning. Widespread and effective training in well-replicated, carefully coordinated representations of complex multipatient work environments may strengthen educational interventions for personnel working in high acuity and work-overloaded settings such as the ED. The use of concurrent patient encounter SIM exercises to elicit calculated stressors and to foster compensatory staff behaviors is an educational advance toward this objective. The authors present SIM methodology using concurrent patient encounters to replicate these environments.

  7. Mildly negative social encounters reduce physical pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Borsook, Terry K; MacDonald, Geoff

    2010-11-01

    While previous research has demonstrated a reduction in physical pain sensitivity in response to social exclusion, the manipulations employed have arguably been far removed from typical daily experience. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of relatively ordinary social encounters on the perception of pain. Healthy participants rated the intensity and unpleasantness of painful stimuli before and after engaging in a structured interaction with a confederate who was instructed to either be warm and friendly or indifferent. A control group was asked to perform a similar structured activity, but alone. Consistent with predictions, participants who experienced the mildly negative social exchange reported lower pain intensity and unpleasantness after the encounter relative to baseline, whereas those exposed to the positive social exchange did not evidence any change in pain ratings. These results were not mediated by changes in mood or perceived connectedness. If mildly negative social encounters can provoke an analgesic effect, it is possible that social hypoalgesia may be considerably more commonplace than previously realized. Discussion focuses on the role of stress-induced hypoalgesia, and the implications of the results for clinical assessments of pain.

  8. Anomalous diffusion and multifractality enhance mating encounters in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Seuront, Laurent; Stanley, H Eugene

    2014-02-11

    For millimeter-scale aquatic crustaceans such as copepods, ensuring reproductive success is a challenge as potential mates are often separated by hundreds of body lengths in a 3D environment. At the evolutionary scale, this led to the development of remote sensing abilities and behavioral strategies to locate, to track, and to capture a mate. Chemoreception plays a crucial role in increasing mate encounter rates through pheromone clouds and pheromone trails that can be followed over many body lengths. Empirical evidence of trail following behavior is, however, limited to laboratory experiments conducted in still water. An important open question concerns what happens in the turbulent waters of the surface ocean. We propose that copepods experience, and hence react to, a bulk-phase water pheromone concentration. Here we investigate the mating behavior of two key copepod species, Temora longicornis and Eurytemora affinis, to assess the role of background pheromone concentration and the relative roles played by males and females in mating encounters. We find that both males and females react to background pheromone concentration and exhibit both innate and acquired components in their mating strategies. The emerging swimming behaviors have stochastic properties that depend on pheromone concentration, sex, and species, are related to the level of reproductive experience of the individual tested, and significantly diverge from both the Lévy and Brownian models identified in predators searching for low- and high-density prey. Our results are consistent with an adaptation to increase mate encounter rates and hence to optimize reproductive fitness and success.

  9. Effects of Soundscapes on Perceived Crowding and Encounter Norms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Oh; Shelby, Bo

    2011-07-01

    Soundscapes in recreation settings are becoming an important issue, but there are few studies of the effects of sounds on recreation experiences, especially crowding perceptions and encounter norms. This study compared effects of six types of sounds (an airplane, a truck engine, children playing, birds, water, and a control) on perceived crowding (PC) and encounter norms for hikers. Data were collected from 47 college students through lab experiments using simulated images, with moving hikers inserted in the original photo taken in the Jungmeori area of Mudeungsan Provincial Park in Korea. Overall, the motor-made sounds of the airplane and truck engine increased PC and decreased acceptability ratings, and the natural sounds of birds and water decreased PC and increased acceptability ratings. Ratings of the sound of children playing were similar to those in the control (i.e., no sound). In addition, as numbers of hikers increased, the overall effects of sounds decreased, and there were few significant differences in PC or acceptability ratings at the highest encounter levels. Theoretical and methodological implications are discussed.

  10. Pruritus as Reason for Encounter in General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Thomas; Herrmann, Kristin; Sandholzer, Hagen

    2011-01-01

    Background Pruritus is a common reason for consulting the general practitioner. Data from a primary care setting have seldom been published. The goal of the recent investigation was to characterize the consultation prevalence of pruritus, frequency of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, accompanying symptoms and results of encounter or diagnoses of patients with pruritus. Methods Cross-sectional data were collected from randomly selected patients during the SESAM 2 study and compared with unpublished but publicly available data from the Dutch Transition Project and the published Australian BEACH study data. Results Overall 64 of the 8,877 patients from the SESAM 2 study consulted a physician for pruritus. The male to female ratio was 1.0 : 1.3. Pruritus was more frequent in children and people aged over 75 years. Physical examination was performed in all patients. Further diagnostic measures were seldom necessary. Drugs were prescribed in 84% of the cases. Allergic contact eczema and infectious diseases of the skin were the most frequent results of encounter or diagnoses. Medical adverse effects and allergic reactions should be considered as causes of pruritus. We found no significant association to systemic diseases. Conclusions In a primary care setting, pruritus occurs regularly. It is associated to (infectious) skin diseases. Acute dangerous courses are rare. Keywords Pruritus; Itch; General practice; Primary care; Reason for encounter PMID:22383909

  11. Viral video: Live imaging of virus-host encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Cubillos-Ruiz, Andres; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Viruses are non-motile infectious agents that rely on Brownian motion to encounter and subsequently adsorb to their hosts. Paradoxically, the viral adsorption rate is often reported to be larger than the theoretical limit imposed by the virus-host encounter rate, highlighting a major gap in the experimental quantification of virus-host interactions. Here we present the first direct quantification of the viral adsorption rate, obtained using live imaging of individual host cells and viruses for thousands of encounter events. The host-virus pair consisted of Prochlorococcus MED4, a 800 nm small non-motile bacterium that dominates photosynthesis in the oceans, and its virus PHM-2, a myovirus that has a 80 nm icosahedral capsid and a 200 nm long rigid tail. We simultaneously imaged hosts and viruses moving by Brownian motion using two-channel epifluorescent microscopy in a microfluidic device. This detailed quantification of viral transport yielded a 20-fold smaller adsorption efficiency than previously reported, indicating the need for a major revision in infection models for marine and likely other ecosystems.

  12. Stellar encounters involving neutron stars in globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Encounters between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star and a 0.8 solar mass red giant (RG) and between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star (NS) and an 0.8 solar mass main-sequence (MS) star have been successfully simulated. In the case of encounters involving an RG, bound systems are produced when the separation at periastron passage R(MIN) is less than about 2.5 R(RG). At least 70 percent of these bound systems are composed of the RG core and NS forming a binary engulfed in a common envelope of what remains of the former RG envelope. Once the envelope is ejected, a tight white dwarf-NS binary remains. For MS stars, encounters with NSs will produce bound systems when R(MIN) is less than about 3.5 R(MS). Some 50 percent of these systems will be single objects with the NS engulfed in a thick disk of gas almost as massive as the original MS star. The ultimate fate of such systems is unclear.

  13. Human collective dynamics: Two groups in adversarial encounter. [melete code

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.L.; Harlow, F.H.; Genin, K.E.

    1988-04-01

    The behavior of a group of people depends strongly on the interaction of personal (individual) traits with the collective moods of the group as a whole. We have developed a computer program to model circumstances of this nature with recognition of the crucial role played by such psychological properties as fear, excitement, peer pressure, moral outrage, and anger, together with the distribution among participants of intrinsic susceptibilities to these emotions. This report extends previous work to consider two groups of people in adversarial encounter, for example, two platoons in battle, a SWAT team against rioting prisoners, or opposing mobs of different ethnic backgrounds. Closely related applications of the modeling include prowling groups of predatory animals interacting with herds of prey, and even the ''slow-mob'' behavior of social or political units in their response to legislative or judicial activities. Examples in this present study emphasize battlefield encounters, with each group characterizzed by its susceptibilities, skills, and other manifestions of both intentional and accidental circumstances. Specifically, we investigate the relative importance of leadership, camaraderie, training level (i.e. skill in firing weapons), bravery, excitability, and dedication in the battle performance of personnel with random or specified distributions of capabilities and susceptibilities in these various regards. The goal is to exhibit the probable outcome of these encounters in circumstances involving specified battle goals and distributions of terrain impediments. A collateral goal is to provide a real-time hands-on battle simulator into which a leadership trainee can insert his own interactive command.

  14. Tapping trumps typing:how users enter data in an electronic student encounter log.

    PubMed

    Campbell, John; DeFer, Thomas; Sumner, Walton

    2006-01-01

    Handheld encounter logs that accurately record patient diagnoses could facilitate several educational tasks. Unfortunately, data entry on handheld computers is notoriously difficult, requiring either tapping buttons or entering text, for instance by typing. In most medical reference software, long lists of inputs adjust to match typed data, reducing the burden of data entry. Tapping is faster if the user can locate the correct target quickly, but designing and maintaining screens with many fixed targets is tedious, and the program grows large. We developed an Electronic Student Encounter Log, ESEL, allowing students to tap or type to record problems observed in ambulatory patients. The tapping interface comprises collections of related disease checkboxes organized in a shallow, broad tree structure, making 983 diagnoses visible with 2 taps. The typing interface mimics typical reference software, scrolling and searching a list of 1332 common problems in response to user-entered text. ESEL records the paths that students take through the program while trying to record diagnoses. Analysis of 62 students' ESEL records from ambulatory care settings demonstrates that they used the tapping interface much more often than the typing interface, and could record data more quickly by tapping than by typing. If accuracy proves to be acceptable, more robust tapping interfaces deserve wider consideration for data capture on handheld computers.

  15. Managing uncertainty: a grounded theory of stigma in transgender health care encounters.

    PubMed

    Poteat, Tonia; German, Danielle; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2013-05-01

    A growing body of literature supports stigma and discrimination as fundamental causes of health disparities. Stigma and discrimination experienced by transgender people have been associated with increased risk for depression, suicide, and HIV. Transgender stigma and discrimination experienced in health care influence transgender people's health care access and utilization. Thus, understanding how stigma and discrimination manifest and function in health care encounters is critical to addressing health disparities for transgender people. A qualitative, grounded theory approach was taken to this study of stigma in health care interactions. Between January and July 2011, fifty-five transgender people and twelve medical providers participated in one-time in-depth interviews about stigma, discrimination, and health care interactions between providers and transgender patients. Due to the social and institutional stigma against transgender people, their care is excluded from medical training. Therefore, providers approach medical encounters with transgender patients with ambivalence and uncertainty. Transgender people anticipate that providers will not know how to meet their needs. This uncertainty and ambivalence in the medical encounter upsets the normal balance of power in provider-patient relationships. Interpersonal stigma functions to reinforce the power and authority of the medical provider during these interactions. Functional theories of stigma posit that we hold stigmatizing attitudes because they serve specific psychological functions. However, these theories ignore how hierarchies of power in social relationships serve to maintain and reinforce inequalities. The findings of this study suggest that interpersonal stigma also functions to reinforce medical power and authority in the face of provider uncertainty. Within functional theories of stigma, it is important to acknowledge the role of power and to understand how stigmatizing attitudes function to maintain

  16. Addressing Bullying: Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Bradford C.

    2010-01-01

    Bullying can be a serious and damaging experience for students today. The children who bully are more likely to be truant; drop out of school; or engage in alcohol, tobacco, or other drug abuse, and children who are bullied are more likely to experience depression, low self-esteem, health problems, poor grades, and suicidal thoughts. In addition,…

  17. State of the Workforce Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Elizabeth

    The U.S. work force is unready for the new jobs, unready for the new realities, unready for the new challenges of the 1990s. Across the board, jobs are demanding better reading, writing, and reasoning skills and more math and science. Statistics define the scope of the problem: 25 percent of young people drop out of high school; 70 percent of all…

  18. Addressing inequities in healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Friel, Sharon; Hattersley, Libby; Ford, Laura; O'Rourke, Kerryn

    2015-09-01

    What, when, where and how much people eat is influenced by a complex mix of factors at societal, community and individual levels. These influences operate both directly through the food system and indirectly through political, economic, social and cultural pathways that cause social stratification and influence the quality of conditions in which people live their lives. These factors are the social determinants of inequities in healthy eating. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence base for addressing these determinants and for the promotion of equity in healthy eating. PMID:26420812

  19. Identifying and Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Kestenbaum, Lori A.; Feemster, Kristen A.

    2015-01-01

    In the 20th century, the introduction of multiple vaccines significantly reduced childhood morbidity, mortality, and disease outbreaks. Despite, and perhaps because of, their public health impact, an increasing number of parents and patients are choosing to delay or refuse vaccines. These individuals are described as vaccine hesitant. This phenomenon has developed due to the confluence of multiple social, cultural, political and personal factors. As immunization programs continue to expand, understanding and addressing vaccine hesitancy will be crucial to their successful implementation. This review explores the history of vaccine hesitancy, its causes, and suggested approaches for reducing hesitancy and strengthening vaccine acceptance. PMID:25875982

  20. Nanoscale content-addressable memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bryan (Inventor); Principe, Jose C. (Inventor); Fortes, Jose (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A combined content addressable memory device and memory interface is provided. The combined device and interface includes one or more one molecular wire crossbar memories having spaced-apart key nanowires, spaced-apart value nanowires adjacent to the key nanowires, and configurable switches between the key nanowires and the value nanowires. The combination further includes a key microwire-nanowire grid (key MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart key nanowires, and a value microwire-nanowire grid (value MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart value nanowires. A key or value MNGs selects multiple nanowires for a given key or value.

  1. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  2. Mathematical Metaphors: Problem Reformulation and Analysis Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the critical need for the development of intelligent or assisting software tools for the scientist who is working in the initial problem formulation and mathematical model representation stage of research. In particular, examples of that representation in fluid dynamics and instability theory are discussed. The creation of a mathematical model that is ready for application of certain solution strategies requires extensive symbolic manipulation of the original mathematical model. These manipulations can be as simple as term reordering or as complicated as discovery of various symmetry groups embodied in the equations, whereby Backlund-type transformations create new determining equations and integrability conditions or create differential Grobner bases that are then solved in place of the original nonlinear PDEs. Several examples are presented of the kinds of problem formulations and transforms that can be frequently encountered in model representation for fluids problems. The capability of intelligently automating these types of transforms, available prior to actual mathematical solution, is advocated. Physical meaning and assumption-understanding can then be propagated through the mathematical transformations, allowing for explicit strategy development.

  3. Study of the Mutual Interaction Between a Wing Wake and an Encountering Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, A. B.; vanDam, C. P.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to increase airport productivity, several wind-tunnel and flight-test programs are currently underway to determine safe reductions in separation standards between aircraft. These programs are designed to study numerous concepts from the characteristics and detection of wake vortices to the wake-vortex encounter phenomenon. As part of this latter effort, computational tools are being developed and utilized as a means of modeling and verifying wake-vortex hazard encounters. The objective of this study is to assess the ability of PMARC, a low-order potential-flow panel method, to predict the forces and moments imposed on a following business-jet configuration by a vortex interaction. Other issues addressed include the investigation of several wake models and their ability to predict wake shape and trajectory, the validity of the velocity field imposed on the following configuration, modeling techniques and the effect of the high-lift system and the empennage. Comparisons with wind-tunnel data reveal that PMARC predicts the characteristics for the clean wing-body following configuration fairly well. Non-linear effects produced by the addition of the high-lift system and empennage, however, are not so well predicted.

  4. Respect in final-year student nurse–patient encounters – an interpretative phenomenological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clucas, Claudine; Chapman, Hazel M.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known regarding health-care professionals' understanding and experiences of respect towards patients. The study aimed to explore student nurses' understanding and experiences of respect in their encounters with patients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight final-year student nurses with practice placements across different health-care trusts in the UK. Transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Three super-ordinate themes were identified: understanding of what it means to show respect, negotiating role expectations and personal attitudes in practice, and barriers related to the performance of the nursing role. The factors identified should be investigated further and addressed as they are likely to influence patients' experiences of feeling respected in nurse–patient interactions and subsequently their well-being and health-related behaviours. PMID:25750810

  5. Motion/visual cueing requirements for vortex encounters during simulated transport visual approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Bowles, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues of motion/visual cueing fidelity requirements for vortex encounters during simulated transport visual approaches and landings. Four simulator configurations were utilized to provide objective performance measures during simulated vortex penetrations, and subjective comments from pilots were collected. The configurations used were as follows: fixed base with visual degradation (delay), fixed base with no visual degradation, moving base with visual degradation (delay), and moving base with no visual degradation. The statistical comparisons of the objective measures and the subjective pilot opinions indicated that although both minimum visual delay and motion cueing are recommended for the vortex penetration task, the visual-scene delay characteristics were not as significant a fidelity factor as was the presence of motion cues. However, this indication was applicable to a restricted task, and to transport aircraft. Although they were statistically significant, the effects of visual delay and motion cueing on the touchdown-related measures were considered to be of no practical consequence.

  6. Jewish Physicians' Beliefs and Practices Regarding Religion/Spirituality in the Clinical Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Robert M.; Rasinski, Kenneth A.; Curlin, Farr A.

    2013-01-01

    We used data from a 2003 survey of US physicians to examine differences between Jewish and other religiously affiliated physicians on 4-D of physicians' beliefs and practices regarding religion and spirituality (R/S) in the clinical encounter. On each dimension, Jewish physicians ascribed less importance to the effect of R/S on health and a lesser role for physicians in addressing R/S issues. These effects were partially mediated by lower levels of religiosity among Jewish physicians and by differences in demographic and practice-level characteristics. The study provides a salient example of how religious affiliation can be an important independent predictor of physicians' clinically-relevant beliefs and practices. PMID:21706257

  7. Local Group timing in Milgromian dynamics. A past Milky Way-Andromeda encounter at z > 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Famaey, B.; Lüghausen, F.; Kroupa, P.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Local Group (LG) timing is one of the first historical probes of the so-called missing mass problem. Whilst modern cosmological probes indicate that pure baryonic dynamics is not sufficient on the largest scales, nearby galaxies and small galaxy groups persistently obey Milgrom's MOND law, which implies that dynamics at small scales is possibly entirely predicted by the baryons. Aims: Here, we investigate LG timing in this context of Milgromian dynamics. Methods: We used the latest measured proper motions and radial velocities for Andromeda and the Magellanic clouds, and we integrated their orbits backwards by making use of the Milgromian two-body equation of motion. Results: With the currently measured proper motions and radial velocity of M31, we find that MOND would imply that the Milky Way (MW) and M31 first moved apart via Hubble expansion after birth, but then necessarily were attracted again by the Milgromian gravitational attraction, and had a past fly-by encounter before coming to their present positions. This encounter would most probably have happened 7 to 11 Gyr ago (0.8 < z < 3). The absence of a dark matter halo and its associated dynamical friction is necessary for such a close encounter not to have triggered a merger. Observational arguments which could exclude or favour such a past encounter would thus be very important in order to falsify or vindicate Milgromian dynamics on the scale of the LG. Interestingly, the closest approach of the encounter is small enough (<55 kpc) to have had severe consequences on the disc dynamics, including perhaps thick disc formation, and on the satellite systems of both galaxies. The ages of the satellite galaxies and of the young halo globular clusters, all of which form the vast polar structure around the MW, are consistent with these objects having been born during this encounter.

  8. What is a medical decision? A taxonomy based on physician statements in hospital encounters: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ofstad, Eirik H; Frich, Jan C; Schei, Edvin; Frankel, Richard M; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Objective The medical literature lacks a comprehensive taxonomy of decisions made by physicians in medical encounters. Such a taxonomy might be useful in understanding the physician-centred, patient-centred and shared decision-making in clinical settings. We aimed to identify and classify all decisions emerging in conversations between patients and physicians. Design Qualitative study of video recorded patient–physician encounters. Participants and setting 380 patients in consultations with 59 physicians from 17 clinical specialties and three different settings (emergency room, ward round, outpatient clinic) in a Norwegian teaching hospital. A randomised sample of 30 encounters from internal medicine was used to identify and classify decisions, a maximum variation sample of 20 encounters was used for reliability assessments, and the remaining encounters were analysed to test for applicability across specialties. Results On the basis of physician statements in our material, we developed a taxonomy of clinical decisions—the Decision Identification and Classification Taxonomy for Use in Medicine (DICTUM). We categorised decisions into 10 mutually exclusive categories: gathering additional information, evaluating test results, defining problem, drug-related, therapeutic procedure-related, legal and insurance-related, contact-related, advice and precaution, treatment goal, and deferment. Four-coder inter-rater reliability using Krippendorff's α was 0.79. Conclusions DICTUM represents a precise, detailed and comprehensive taxonomy of medical decisions communicated within patient–physician encounters. Compared to previous normative frameworks, the taxonomy is descriptive, substantially broader and offers new categories to the variety of clinical decisions. The taxonomy could prove helpful in studies on the quality of medical work, use of time and resources, and understanding of why, when and how patients are or are not involved in decisions. PMID:26868946

  9. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  10. Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert; Abraham, Jacob; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, J.; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, Bill; Chien, Andrew; Coteus, Paul; DeBardeleben, Nathan; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Fazzari, Saverio; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Rob; Stearley, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on Addressing failures in exascale computing' held in Park City, Utah, 4-11 August 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system, discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system, and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia, and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  11. Addressing failures in exascale computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Abraham, Jacob A.; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, Jim; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, William; Chien, Andrew A.; Coteus, Paul; Debardeleben, Nathan A.; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Saverio, Fazzari; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Robert; Stearly, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on “Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing” held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system; and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia; and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  12. Light addressable photoelectrochemical cyanide sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Myung, N.; Sun, Y.

    1996-03-15

    A sensor is demonstrated that is capable of spatial discrimination of cyanide with use of only a single stationary sensing element. Different spatial regions of the sensing element are light activated to reveal the solution cyanide concentration only at the point of illumination. In this light addressable photoelectrochemical (LAP) sensor the sensing element consists of an n-CdSe electrode immersed in solution, with the open-circuit potential determined under illumination. In alkaline ferro-ferri-cyanide solution, the open-circuit photopotential is highly responsive to cyanide, with a linear response of (120 mV) log [KCN]. LAP detection with a spatial resolution of {+-}1 mm for cyanide detection is demonstrated. The response is almost linear for 0.001-0.100 m cyanide with a resolution of 5 mV. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The multimessenger picture of compact object encounters: binary mergers versus dynamical collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, S.; Piran, T.; Nakar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We explore the multimessenger signatures of encounters between two neutron stars (ns2) and between a neutron star and a stellar mass black hole (nsbh). We focus on the differences between gravitational-wave-driven binary mergers and dynamical collisions that occur, for example, in globular clusters. Our discussion is based on Newtonian hydrodynamics simulations that incorporate a nuclear equation of state and a multiflavour neutrino treatment. For both types of encounters we compare the gravitational wave and neutrino emission properties. We also calculate the rates at which nearly unbound mass is delivered back to the central remnant in a ballistic-fallback-plus-viscous-disc model and we analyse the properties of the dynamically ejected matter. Last but not least we address the electromagnetic transients that accompany each type of encounter. We find that dynamical collisions are at least as promising as binary mergers for producing (short) gamma-ray bursts, but they also share the same possible caveats in terms of baryonic pollution. All encounter remnants produce peak neutrino luminosities of at least ˜1053 erg s-1, some of the collision cases exceed this value by more than an order of magnitude. The canonical ns2 merger case ejects more than 1 per cent of a solar mass of extremely neutron-rich (Ye ˜ 0.03) material, an amount that is consistent with double neutron star mergers being a major source of r-process in the galaxy. nsbh collisions eject very large amounts of matter (˜0.15 M⊙) which seriously constrains their admissible occurrence rates. The compact object collision rate (sum of ns2 and nsbh) must therefore be less, likely much less, than 10 per cent of the ns2 merger rate. The radioactively decaying ejecta produce optical-ultraviolet `macronova' which, for the canonical merger case, peak after ˜0.4 d with a luminosity of ˜5 × 1041 erg s-1. ns2 (nsbh) collisions reach up to two (four) times larger peak luminosities. The dynamic ejecta deposit a

  14. Encounters with Science at ULA, Venezuela: An Incentive for Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, P.

    2006-08-01

    In the School of Science of the Universidad de Los Andes (ULA), in Mérida, Venezuela, a very successful event focused on high school students and primary school students, was founded in 2000. The name of this event is "Encounters with Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Biology" (hereinafter "Encounters with Science"), and it integrates these disciplines as well as Astronomy. Its main purpose is that young minds can become familiar with the methods of science inquiry and reasoning, and can understand the concepts and processes of the sciences through thoroughly prepared experiences. This flourishing program is continuing to grow and to become strong. As a matter of fact, in its sixth edition (2005), the number of high and elementary school students coming from all over the country, has reached the outstanding number of nine thousand. Among all the experiences that the students could be engaged in were many involving Astronomy. These experiences were prepared by professors, together with graduate and undergraduate students, who are pursuing their degrees in all branches of science including astronomy. Although there is this incredible team of faculties and graduate and undergraduate students working together; the target is the students of the high and elementary schools. We certainly focus on the engaging and encouraging of students to experience scientific work first hand. Additionally, our professors have prepared an excellent didactic material that can, together with the hour/class teaching, prepare high school and elementary school students for a better understanding of science; particularly, helping in this way for a better education in Astronomy. The main event of the Encounters lasts five days in the School of Science of ULA, but subsidiary events are spread all over the year and around the country. As a successful program, it can be interesting to see if other countries can adopt this method to recruit or to trigger the interest of students to pursue their

  15. Excitation of the orbital inclination of Iapetus during planetary encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2014-09-01

    Saturn's moon, Iapetus, has an orbit in a transition region where the Laplace surface is bending from the equator to the orbital plane of Saturn. The orbital inclination of Iapetus to the local Laplace plane is ≅ 8°, which is unexpected because the inclination should be ≅ 0 if Iapetus formed from a circumplanetary disk on the Laplace surface. It thus appears that some process has pumped up Iapetus's inclination while leaving its eccentricity near zero (e ≅ 0.03 at present). Here, we examined the possibility that Iapetus's inclination was excited during the early solar system instability when encounters between Saturn and ice giants occurred. We found that the dynamical effects of planetary encounters on Iapetus's orbit sensitively depend on the distance of the few closest encounters. In 4 out of 10 instability cases studied here, the orbital perturbations were too large to be plausible. In one case, Iapetus's orbit was practically unaffected. In the remaining five cases, the perturbations of Iapetus's inclination were adequate to explain its present value. In three of these cases, however, Iapetus's eccentricity was excited to >0.1-0.25, and it is not clear whether it could have been damped to its present value (≅ 0.03) by a subsequent process (e.g., tides and dynamical friction from captured irregular satellites do not seem to be strong enough). Our results therefore imply that only 2 out of 10 instability cases (∼20%) can excite Iapetus's inclination to its current value (∼30% of trials lead to >5°) while leaving its orbital eccentricity low.

  16. Prevalence of abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Hamilton, Ryan; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Tatemichi, Sue R.; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the career prevalence of abusive encounters for family physicians in Canada. DESIGN A 7-page cross-sectional mailed survey in English and French. SETTING Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 3802 randomly selected practising family physicians who were members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Demographic characteristics of survey participants, career prevalence of abusive encounters, and perpetrators of abuse. MAIN FINDINGS Twenty percent (20.4%) of the surveys (n = 774) were returned. Of the respondents, 44% were men and 56% were women. Most were in private practice in urban settings. The average number of years in practice was 15. The career prevalence of abusive encounters was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Of all the respondents, 98% had experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse, 75% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse, and 39% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse. Using χ2 analysis, a number of demographic variables were found to be significantly associated with abuse including the physician’s race and sex. Patients were the most common perpetrators of abuse. Ninety percent of family physicians surveyed reported that they had been abused by patients, while 70% reported that they had been abused by family members of patients. CONCLUSION Approximately 2 in 5 family physicians surveyed were subjected to a considerable amount of severe abuse during practice. Abuse in the office setting might have grave consequences for the health and well-being of the victimized physicians and might hinder service retention where the risk of abuse is greatest. PMID:20228289

  17. How is environmental conflict addressed by SIA?

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, C.J.

    2010-09-15

    The fields of Environmental Conflict Management (ECM), Environmental Conflict Resolution (ECR), and Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) have become well established; however, as yet there has not been much use of Social Impact Assessment (SIA) to manage environmental conflicts. ECM, ECR and PCIA are mainly undertaken when problems are advanced or, more likely, have run their course (post-conflict). This paper examines how conflict is addressed by SIA and whether there is potential to develop it for more proactive assessment of conflicts (pre-conflict or while things develop). SIA has the potential to identify and clarify the cause(s) of environmental and natural resources conflicts, and could possibly enable some avoidance or early mitigation. A promising approach may be for 'conflict-aware' SIA to watch for critical conflict stages or thresholds and to monitor stakeholders. Effective conflict-aware SIA might also significantly contribute to efforts to achieve sustainable development.

  18. Structure and Function of Transient Encounters of Redox Proteins.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander N

    2015-12-15

    Many biomolecular interactions proceed via lowly populated, transient intermediates. Believed to facilitate formation of a productive complex, these short-lived species are inaccessible to conventional biophysical and structural techniques and, until recently, could only be studied by theoretical simulations. Recent development of experimental approaches sensitive to the presence of minor species--in particular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR spectroscopy--has enabled direct visualization and detailed characterization of such lowly populated states. Collectively referred to as an encounter complex, the binding intermediates are particularly important in transient protein interactions, such as those orchestrating signaling cascades or energy-generating electron transfer (ET) chains. Here I discuss encounter complexes of redox proteins mediating biological ET reactions, which are essential for many vital cellular activities including oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis. In particular, this Account focuses on the complex of cytochrome c (Cc) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), which is a paradigm of biomolecular ET and an attractive system for studying protein binding and enzymatic catalysis. The Cc-CcP complex formation proceeds via an encounter state, consisting of multiple protein-protein orientations sampled in the search of the dominant, functionally active bound form and exhibiting a broad spatial distribution, in striking agreement with earlier theoretical simulations. At low ionic strength, CcP binds another Cc molecule to form a weak ternary complex, initially inferred from kinetics experiments and postulated to account for the measured ET activity. Despite strenuous efforts, the ternary complex could not be observed directly and remained eagerly sought for the past two decades. Very recently, we have solved its structure in solution and shown that it consists of two binding forms: the dominant, ET-inactive geometry and an ensemble of

  19. Coincidence studies of diffraction structures in binary encounter electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Richard, P.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have measured binary encounter electron (BEe) production in collisions of 0.3 MeV/u Cu{sup q+} (q=4,12) projectiles on H{sub 2} targets from 0 to 70 degrees with respect to the beam direction. Prominent features are the appearance of the BEe peak splitting and a very strong forward peaked angular distribution which are attributed to the diffractive scattering of the quasifree target electrons in the short range potential of the projectile. Using electron-projectile final charge state coincidence techniques, different collision reaction channels can be separated. Measurements of this type are being pursued.

  20. Predicting close encounters between asteroids with the STB software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly (Schunova), Eva; Jonas, Jeff; Srivatsa, Mudhakar; Ganti, Raghu; Agrawal, Dakshi; Denneau, Larry; Kratky, Martin; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a method that can quickly and efficiently calculate close encounters between all known asteroids both in the past and the future. Only several hundred asteroids out of more than 690,000 have their masses currently known. The most accurate values are from direct measurements by in situ visits (e.g. Dawn at Ceres and Vesta (Russell et al. 2012, Science 336, 6082, pp. 684), Hayabusa at Itokawa (Abe et al. 2006, Science 312, 5778, pp. 1344-1349)) followed by measurements of binary systems and also from mutual orbit perturbations during close encounters between a handful of the largest MBAs.We used software called “Space Time Box” (STB) invented by IBM capable of efficiently determine co-located entities in 3D space and time. Orbits from the MPCORB.DAT database were placed into selected STB granularity with 1 day and 0.05 AU-wide bins. By determining and only tracking asteroids co-located within a selected minimal distance the computational requirements were significantly reduced. Selected instances of co-location were then provided as an input for a numerical integrator SWIFT with 8 planets as perturbers and were integrated until desired epoch with a 0.5 and 1 day timestep. We then used interpolation for the specified time window to check if the positions of asteroids intersect or are within a certain distance parameter.Using the STB optimization we calculated close encounters between years 2014 and 2039. These events offer the opportunity to search in the survey archives for potential collisions and carefully select the events for mass determination based on their minimal approach distance, angle and mass ratio of participating objects. A follow-up astrometric campaign would ensure improvement of the mass determination precision. Predicted future events can also be directly observed in the real time with optical and IR telescopes in search for collisions or mass loss.As an example we present one close encounter event observed with the University

  1. Trailing Vortex-Induced Loads During Close Encounters in Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Lesieutre, Daniel J; Kelly, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The trailing vortex induced aerodynamic loads on a Falcon 20G business jet flying in the wake of a DC-8 are predicted to provide a preflight estimate of safe trail distances during flight test measurements in the wake. Static and dynamic loads on the airframe flying in the near wake are shown at a matrix of locations, and the dynamic motion of the Falcon 20G during traverses of the DC-8 primary trailing vortex is simulated. Safe trailing distances for the test flights are determined, and optimum vortex traverse schemes are identified to moderate the motion of the trailing aircraft during close encounters with the vortex wake.

  2. Challenges Encountered Using Ophthalmic Anesthetics in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuse, T.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Moynihan, S.; LeBlanc, C.; Langford, K.; Magalhaes, L.

    2015-01-01

    On orbit, ophthalmic anesthetics are used for tonometry and off-nominal corneal examinations. Proparacaine has been flown traditionally. However, the manufacturers recently changed its storage requirements from room temperature storage to refrigerated storage to preserve stability and prolong the shelf-life. Since refrigeration on orbit is not readily available and there were stability concerns about flying proparacaine unrefrigerated, tetracaine was selected as an alternative ophthalmic anesthetic in 2013. We will discuss the challenges encountered flying and using these anesthetics on the International Space Station.

  3. Structure and Function of Transient Encounters of Redox Proteins.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander N

    2015-12-15

    Many biomolecular interactions proceed via lowly populated, transient intermediates. Believed to facilitate formation of a productive complex, these short-lived species are inaccessible to conventional biophysical and structural techniques and, until recently, could only be studied by theoretical simulations. Recent development of experimental approaches sensitive to the presence of minor species--in particular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR spectroscopy--has enabled direct visualization and detailed characterization of such lowly populated states. Collectively referred to as an encounter complex, the binding intermediates are particularly important in transient protein interactions, such as those orchestrating signaling cascades or energy-generating electron transfer (ET) chains. Here I discuss encounter complexes of redox proteins mediating biological ET reactions, which are essential for many vital cellular activities including oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis. In particular, this Account focuses on the complex of cytochrome c (Cc) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), which is a paradigm of biomolecular ET and an attractive system for studying protein binding and enzymatic catalysis. The Cc-CcP complex formation proceeds via an encounter state, consisting of multiple protein-protein orientations sampled in the search of the dominant, functionally active bound form and exhibiting a broad spatial distribution, in striking agreement with earlier theoretical simulations. At low ionic strength, CcP binds another Cc molecule to form a weak ternary complex, initially inferred from kinetics experiments and postulated to account for the measured ET activity. Despite strenuous efforts, the ternary complex could not be observed directly and remained eagerly sought for the past two decades. Very recently, we have solved its structure in solution and shown that it consists of two binding forms: the dominant, ET-inactive geometry and an ensemble of

  4. Mercury's helium exosphere after Mariner 10's third encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Hartle, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    From Mariner 10 third encounter UV data, a value of .00045 was calculated as the fraction of the solar wind He++ flux intercepted and captured by Mercury's magnetosphere if the observed He atmosphere is maintained by the solar wind. If an internal source for He prevails, the corresponding upper bound for the global outgassing rate is estimated to be 4.5 x 10 to the 22nd power per sec. A surface temperature distribution was used which satisfies the heat equation over Mercury's entire surface using Mariner 10 determined mean surface thermal characteristics. The means stand off distance of Mercury's magnetopause averaged over Mercury's orbit was also used.

  5. The Problems of Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Describes some problems of classroom dissection including the cruelty that animals destined for the laboratory suffer. Discusses the multilevel approach that the National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) has developed to address the problems of animal dissection such as offering a dissection hotline, exhibiting at science teacher conferences, and…

  6. Problems Facing Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, C. E.; And Others

    Problems facing rural Scottish schools range from short term consideration of daily operation to long term consideration of organizational alternatives. Addressed specifically, such problems include consideration of: (1) liaison between a secondary school and its feeder primary schools; (2) preservice teacher training for work in small, isolated…

  7. Problems in baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, S.

    1994-04-01

    Current issues and problems in the physics of ground- and excited-state baryons are considered, and are classified into those which should be resolved by CEBAF in its present form, and those which may require CEBAF to undergo an energy upgrade to 8 GeV or more. Recent theoretical developments designed to address these problems are outlined.

  8. Addressing Science Use Cases with HELIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, R. D.; Aboudarham, J.; Csillaghy, A.; Jacquey, C.; Hapgood, M. A.; Messerotti, M.; Gallagher, P.; Bocchialini, K.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Roberts, D.; Sanchez Duarte, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Heliophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) is a new VO project funded under the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). It includes thirteen partners scattered over six countries and is led by University College London. HELIO is designed to support the heliophysics community and is based on a Service Oriented Architecture. The services developed by and integrated into HELIO can be used to address a wide range of science problems; they can be used individually or as part of a work-flow driven search engine that can use a propagation (or other) model to help locate obervations that describe interesting phenomena. We will describe and discuss how the components of HELIO could be used to address science use cases, particularly how a user can adapt the work flow to their own science interests. Networking is one of the three Activities of the HELIO Integrated Infrastructure Initiatives (I3) project. Within this activity we plan to involve the community in all aspects of the design and testing of the HELIO system, including determining which data and metadata should be included, how the quality and content of metadata can be included, etc. We are investigating ways of making HELIO "domain-aware" so that researchers who are specialists in one of the communities that constitute heliophysics can easily identify, access and use data they need from the other communities. We will discuss how the community can help us develop this capability.

  9. Time for a change: addressing R&D and commercialization challenges for antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Payne, David J; Miller, Linda Federici; Findlay, David; Anderson, James; Marks, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    The antibacterial therapeutic area has been described as the perfect storm. Resistance is increasing to the point that our hospitals encounter patients infected with untreatable pathogens, the overall industry pipeline is described as dry and most multinational pharmaceutical companies have withdrawn from the area. Major contributing factors to the declining antibacterial industry pipeline include scientific challenges, clinical/regulatory hurdles and low return on investment. This paper examines these challenges and proposes approaches to address them. There is a need for a broader scientific agenda to explore new approaches to discover and develop antibacterial agents. Additionally, ideas of how industry and academia could be better integrated will be presented. While promising progress in the regulatory environment has been made, more streamlined regulatory paths are still required and the solutions will lie in global harmonization and clearly defined guidance. Creating the right incentives for antibacterial research and development is critical and a new commercial model for antibacterial agents will be proposed. One key solution to help resolve both the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and lack of new drug development are rapid, cost-effective, accurate point of care diagnostics that will transform antibacterial prescribing and enable more cost-effective and efficient antibacterial clinical trials. The challenges of AMR are too great for any one group to resolve and success will require leadership and partnerships among academia, industry and governments globally.

  10. Time for a change: addressing R&D and commercialization challenges for antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Payne, David J; Miller, Linda Federici; Findlay, David; Anderson, James; Marks, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    The antibacterial therapeutic area has been described as the perfect storm. Resistance is increasing to the point that our hospitals encounter patients infected with untreatable pathogens, the overall industry pipeline is described as dry and most multinational pharmaceutical companies have withdrawn from the area. Major contributing factors to the declining antibacterial industry pipeline include scientific challenges, clinical/regulatory hurdles and low return on investment. This paper examines these challenges and proposes approaches to address them. There is a need for a broader scientific agenda to explore new approaches to discover and develop antibacterial agents. Additionally, ideas of how industry and academia could be better integrated will be presented. While promising progress in the regulatory environment has been made, more streamlined regulatory paths are still required and the solutions will lie in global harmonization and clearly defined guidance. Creating the right incentives for antibacterial research and development is critical and a new commercial model for antibacterial agents will be proposed. One key solution to help resolve both the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and lack of new drug development are rapid, cost-effective, accurate point of care diagnostics that will transform antibacterial prescribing and enable more cost-effective and efficient antibacterial clinical trials. The challenges of AMR are too great for any one group to resolve and success will require leadership and partnerships among academia, industry and governments globally. PMID:25918443

  11. Time for a change: addressing R&D and commercialization challenges for antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Payne, David J.; Miller, Linda Federici; Findlay, David; Anderson, James; Marks, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial therapeutic area has been described as the perfect storm. Resistance is increasing to the point that our hospitals encounter patients infected with untreatable pathogens, the overall industry pipeline is described as dry and most multinational pharmaceutical companies have withdrawn from the area. Major contributing factors to the declining antibacterial industry pipeline include scientific challenges, clinical/regulatory hurdles and low return on investment. This paper examines these challenges and proposes approaches to address them. There is a need for a broader scientific agenda to explore new approaches to discover and develop antibacterial agents. Additionally, ideas of how industry and academia could be better integrated will be presented. While promising progress in the regulatory environment has been made, more streamlined regulatory paths are still required and the solutions will lie in global harmonization and clearly defined guidance. Creating the right incentives for antibacterial research and development is critical and a new commercial model for antibacterial agents will be proposed. One key solution to help resolve both the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and lack of new drug development are rapid, cost-effective, accurate point of care diagnostics that will transform antibacterial prescribing and enable more cost-effective and efficient antibacterial clinical trials. The challenges of AMR are too great for any one group to resolve and success will require leadership and partnerships among academia, industry and governments globally. PMID:25918443

  12. Addressing concerns and achieving expectations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    Approximately 2-1/2 years ago many of us were gathered here in Prague at a similar conference with a similar name, {open_quotes}Energy and Environment: Transitions in Eastern Europe.{close_quotes} Over 300 professionals from 26 nations attended. The objective of the conference was to: Facilitate the Solution of Long and Short Term Energy and Environmental Problems in Eastern Europe by Bringing Together People, ideas and technologies which could be applied to specific problems in a logical step-by-step manner. It was conceded at the time that the long term solution would consist of thoughtfully integrated steps and that the conference was the first step. We are here in the Czech Republic again this week to continue what was started. As before, this conference continues to: (1) Provide a forum to identify and discuss cost-effective environmentally acceptable energy and environmental technology options and their associated socioeconomic issues. (2) Stimulate the Formation of business partnerships (3) Identify key barrier issues hindering technology applications and identify implementation pathways that eliminate or avoid obstacles to progress.

  13. Residualization is not the answer: Rethinking how to address multicollinearity.

    PubMed

    York, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Here I show that a commonly used procedure to address problems stemming from collinearity and multicollinearity among independent variables in regression analysis, "residualization", leads to biased coefficient and standard error estimates and does not address the fundamental problem of collinearity, which is a lack of information. I demonstrate this using visual representations of collinearity, hypothetical experimental designs, and analyses of both artificial and real world data. I conclude by noting the importance of examining methodological practices to ensure that their validity can be established based on rational criteria.

  14. The Hungaria Asteroids: close encounters and impacts with terrestrial planets .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiazzo, M. A.; Bazso, A.; Dvorak, R.

    The Hungaria asteroid family (Named after (434) Hungaria), which consists of more than 5000 members with semi-major axes between 1.78 and 2.03 AU and have inclinations of the order of 20o, is regarded as one source for Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs). They are mainly perturbed by Jupiter and Mars, and are ejected because of mean motion and secular resonances with these planets and then become Mars-crossers; later they may even cross the orbits of Earth and Venus. We are interested to analyze the close encounters and possible impacts with these planets. For 200 selected objects which are on the edge of the group we integrated their orbits over 100 million years in a simplified model of the planetary system (Mars to Saturn) subject to only gravitational forces. We picked out a sample of 11 objects (each with 50 clones) with large variations in semi-major axis and some of them achieve high inclinations and eccentricities in connection with mean motion and secular resonances which then leads to relatively high velocity impacts on Venus, Earth and Mars. We report all close encounters and impacts with the terrestrial planets and statistically determine the mean life and the orbital distribution of the NEAs of these Hungarias.

  15. Efficient detection of contagious outbreaks in massive metropolitan encounter networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Axhausen, Kay W; Lee, Der-Horng; Cebrian, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Physical contact remains difficult to trace in large metropolitan networks, though it is a key vehicle for the transmission of contagious outbreaks. Co-presence encounters during daily transit use provide us with a city-scale time-resolved physical contact network, consisting of 1 billion contacts among 3 million transit users. Here, we study the advantage that knowledge of such co-presence structures may provide for early detection of contagious outbreaks. We first examine the "friend sensor" scheme--a simple, but universal strategy requiring only local information--and demonstrate that it provides significant early detection of simulated outbreaks. Taking advantage of the full network structure, we then identify advanced "global sensor sets", obtaining substantial early warning times savings over the friends sensor scheme. Individuals with highest number of encounters are the most efficient sensors, with performance comparable to individuals with the highest travel frequency, exploratory behavior and structural centrality. An efficiency balance emerges when testing the dependency on sensor size and evaluating sensor reliability; we find that substantial and reliable lead-time could be attained by monitoring only 0.01% of the population with the highest degree. PMID:24903017

  16. Superkicks in ultrarelativistic encounters of spinning black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas

    2011-01-15

    We study ultrarelativistic encounters of two spinning, equal-mass black holes through simulations in full numerical relativity. Two initial data sequences are studied in detail: one that leads to scattering and one that leads to a grazing collision and merger. In all cases, the initial black hole spins lie in the orbital plane, a configuration that leads to the so-called superkicks. In astrophysical, quasicircular inspirals, such kicks can be as large as {approx}3000 km/s; here, we find configurations that exceed {approx}15 000 km/s. We find that the maximum recoil is to a good approximation proportional to the total amount of energy radiated in gravitational waves, but largely independent of whether a merger occurs or not. This shows that the mechanism predominantly responsible for the superkick is not related to merger dynamics. Rather, a consistent explanation is that the ''bobbing'' motion of the orbit causes an asymmetric beaming of the radiation produced by the in-plane orbital motion of the binary, and the net asymmetry is balanced by a recoil. We use our results to formulate some conjectures on the ultimate kick achievable in any black hole encounter.

  17. Efficient detection of contagious outbreaks in massive metropolitan encounter networks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lijun; Axhausen, Kay W.; Lee, Der-Horng; Cebrian, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Physical contact remains difficult to trace in large metropolitan networks, though it is a key vehicle for the transmission of contagious outbreaks. Co-presence encounters during daily transit use provide us with a city-scale time-resolved physical contact network, consisting of 1 billion contacts among 3 million transit users. Here, we study the advantage that knowledge of such co-presence structures may provide for early detection of contagious outbreaks. We first examine the “friend sensor” scheme - a simple, but universal strategy requiring only local information - and demonstrate that it provides significant early detection of simulated outbreaks. Taking advantage of the full network structure, we then identify advanced “global sensor sets”, obtaining substantial early warning times savings over the friends sensor scheme. Individuals with highest number of encounters are the most efficient sensors, with performance comparable to individuals with the highest travel frequency, exploratory behavior and structural centrality. An efficiency balance emerges when testing the dependency on sensor size and evaluating sensor reliability; we find that substantial and reliable lead-time could be attained by monitoring only 0.01% of the population with the highest degree. PMID:24903017

  18. Efficient detection of contagious outbreaks in massive metropolitan encounter networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Axhausen, Kay W; Lee, Der-Horng; Cebrian, Manuel

    2014-06-06

    Physical contact remains difficult to trace in large metropolitan networks, though it is a key vehicle for the transmission of contagious outbreaks. Co-presence encounters during daily transit use provide us with a city-scale time-resolved physical contact network, consisting of 1 billion contacts among 3 million transit users. Here, we study the advantage that knowledge of such co-presence structures may provide for early detection of contagious outbreaks. We first examine the "friend sensor" scheme--a simple, but universal strategy requiring only local information--and demonstrate that it provides significant early detection of simulated outbreaks. Taking advantage of the full network structure, we then identify advanced "global sensor sets", obtaining substantial early warning times savings over the friends sensor scheme. Individuals with highest number of encounters are the most efficient sensors, with performance comparable to individuals with the highest travel frequency, exploratory behavior and structural centrality. An efficiency balance emerges when testing the dependency on sensor size and evaluating sensor reliability; we find that substantial and reliable lead-time could be attained by monitoring only 0.01% of the population with the highest degree.

  19. Stardust Encounters Comet 81P/Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Anderson, J. D.; Bhaskaran, S.; Cheuvront, A. R.; Clark, B. C.; Duxbury, T.; Economou, T.; Green, S. F.; Hanner, M. S.; Horz, F.; Kissel, J.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Newburn, R. L.; Ryan, R. E.; Sandford, S. A.; Sekanina, Z.; Tuzzolino, A. J.; Vellinga, J. M.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Stardust successfully encountered comet 81P/Wild 2 on 2 January 2004 at a distance of 236.4 +/- 1 km. All encounter investigations acquired valuable new and surprising findings. The time-of-flight spectrometer registered 29 spectra during flyby and measured the first negative ion mass spectra of cometary particles. The dust detectors recorded particles over a broad mass range, 10(exp -11) to 10(exp -4) g. Unexpectedly, the dust distribution along Stardust's flight path was far from uniform, but instead occurred in short 'bursts', suggesting in-flight breakup of fragments ejected from the nucleus. High-resolution, stunning images of the Wild 2 surface show a diverse and complex variety of landforms not seen from comets 1P/Halley and 19P/Borrelly or icy satellites of the outer solar system. Longer-exposure images reveal large numbers of jets projected nearly around the entire perimeter of the nucleus, many of which appear to be highly collimated. A triaxial ellipsoidal fit of the Wild 2 nucleus images yields the principal nucleus radii of 1.65 X 2.00 X2.75 km (+/- 0.05 km). The orientations and source locations on the nucleus surface of 20 highly collimated and partially overlapping jets have been traced. There is every indication that the expected samples were successfully collected from the Wild 2 coma and are poised for a return to Earth on 15 January 2006.

  20. Close Encounters of Asteroids and Comets to Planets

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, J.G.; Goda, M.P.; Solem, J.C.

    1999-07-09

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors find by numerical simulations that the elongated-potato shape that is characteristic of Earth-crossing asteroids (ECAs) is likely the result of previous close tidal encounters with Earth. Some meteoroids graze the atmosphere of Earth before returning to space (at reduced speed). They used a spherical atmospheric model to study such grazers to find the condition under which they are captured into gravitationally bound orbits around Earth. They find that for about every thousand iron asteroids that hit the Earth, one is captured into a gravitational-bound orbit. Some fraction of these captured objects will have their orbits stabilized for many revolutions by tidal encounters with the Moon and the sun. They have also studied how the damage produced by such grazing and near-grazing asteroids differs from that produced by asteroids that hit Earth more directly.

  1. A region addresses patient safety.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Karen Wolk; Grunden, Naida; Harrison, Edward I

    2002-06-01

    The Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative (PRHI) is a coalition of 35 hospitals, 4 major insurers, more than 30 major and small-business health care purchasers, dozens of corporate and civic leaders, organized labor, and partnerships with state and federal government all working together to deliver perfect patient care throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania. PRHI believes that in pursuing perfection, many of the challenges facing today's health care delivery system (eg, waste and error in the delivery of care, rising costs, frustration and shortage among clinicians and workers, financial distress, overcapacity, and lack of access to care) will be addressed. PRHI has identified patient safety (nosocomial infections and medication errors) and 5 clinical areas (obstetrics, orthopedic surgery, cardiac surgery, depression, and diabetes) as ideal starting points. In each of these areas of work, PRHI partners have assembled multifacility/multidisciplinary groups charged with defining perfection, establishing region-wide reporting systems, and devising and implementing recommended improvement strategies and interventions. Many design and conceptual elements of the PRHI strategy are adapted from the Toyota Production System and its Pittsburgh derivative, the Alcoa Business System. PRHI is in the proof-of-concept phase of development. PMID:12032502

  2. Gender: addressing a critical focus.

    PubMed

    Thornton, L; Wegner, M N

    1995-01-01

    The definition of gender was addressed at the Fourth World Conference on Women (Beijing, China). After extensive debate, the definition developed by the UN Population Fund in 1995 was adopted: "a set of qualities and behaviors expected from a female or male by society." The sustainability of family planning (FP) programs depends on acknowledgment of the role gender plays in contraceptive decision-making and use. For example, programs must consider the fact that women in many cultures do not make FP decisions without the consent of their spouse. AVSC is examining providers' gender-based ideas about clients and the effects of these views on the quality of reproductive health services. Questions such as how service providers can encourage joint responsibility for contraception without requiring spousal consent or how they can make men feel comfortable about using a male method in a society where FP is considered a woman's issue are being discussed. Also relevant is how service providers can discuss sexual matters openly with female clients in cultures that do not allow women to enjoy their sexuality. Another concern is the potential for physical violence to a client as a result of the provision of FP services. PMID:12294397

  3. ROV overcomes deepwater problems

    SciTech Connect

    Frisbie, F.R.; Hughes, E.W.

    1984-09-01

    The use of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in supportive drill ships operating in more than 200 meters of water poses severe technical and operational problems. Defining these problems beforehand and addressing them during design, manufacture, testing and installation ensures a functional and effective support capability. Such problems as the availability of desk space, and the subsequent installation, maintenance, and the launch/recovery of the system are described.

  4. Identification and Management of Information Problems by Emergency Department Staff

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Alison R.; Reddy, Madhu C.

    2014-01-01

    Patient-care teams frequently encounter information problems during their daily activities. These information problems include wrong, outdated, conflicting, incomplete, or missing information. Information problems can negatively impact the patient-care workflow, lead to misunderstandings about patient information, and potentially lead to medical errors. Existing research focuses on understanding the cause of these information problems and the impact that they can have on the hospital’s workflow. However, there is limited research on how patient-care teams currently identify and manage information problems that they encounter during their work. Through qualitative observations and interviews in an emergency department (ED), we identified the types of information problems encountered by ED staff, and examined how they identified and managed the information problems. We also discuss the impact that these information problems can have on the patient-care teams, including the cascading effects of information problems on workflow and the ambiguous accountability for fixing information problems within collaborative teams. PMID:25954457

  5. Addressing Global Data Sharing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Alter, George C.

    2015-01-01

    This issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics highlights the ethical issues that arise when researchers conducting projects in low- and middle-income countries seek to share the data they produce. Although sharing data is considered a best practice, the barriers to doing so are considerable and there is a need for guidance and examples. To that end, the authors of this article reviewed the articles in this special issue to identify challenges common to the five countries and to offer some practical advice to assist researchers in navigating this “uncharted territory,” as some termed it. Concerns around informed consent, data management, data dissemination, and validation of research contributions were cited frequently as particularly challenging areas, so the authors focused on these four topics with the goal of providing specific resources to consult as well as examples of successful projects attempting to solve many of the problems raised. PMID:26297753

  6. Addressing Global Data Sharing Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alter, George C; Vardigan, Mary

    2015-07-01

    This issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics highlights the ethical issues that arise when researchers conducting projects in low- and middle-income countries seek to share the data they produce. Although sharing data is considered a best practice, the barriers to doing so are considerable and there is a need for guidance and examples. To that end, the authors of this article reviewed the articles in this special issue to identify challenges common to the five countries and to offer some practical advice to assist researchers in navigating this "uncharted territory," as some termed it. Concerns around informed consent, data management, data dissemination, and validation of research contributions were cited frequently as particularly challenging areas, so the authors focused on these four topics with the goal of providing specific resources to consult as well as examples of successful projects attempting to solve many of the problems raised. PMID:26297753

  7. Addressing Global Data Sharing Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alter, George C; Vardigan, Mary

    2015-07-01

    This issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics highlights the ethical issues that arise when researchers conducting projects in low- and middle-income countries seek to share the data they produce. Although sharing data is considered a best practice, the barriers to doing so are considerable and there is a need for guidance and examples. To that end, the authors of this article reviewed the articles in this special issue to identify challenges common to the five countries and to offer some practical advice to assist researchers in navigating this "uncharted territory," as some termed it. Concerns around informed consent, data management, data dissemination, and validation of research contributions were cited frequently as particularly challenging areas, so the authors focused on these four topics with the goal of providing specific resources to consult as well as examples of successful projects attempting to solve many of the problems raised.

  8. NEO Deflection Strategies In The Presence Of Pre-impact Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodas, Paul; Chesley, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.

    2008-09-01

    The problem of deflecting a Near-Earth Object (NEO) off of an impacting trajectory has received considerable attention in recent years, but it is not well known that there are times at which deflection is completely ineffective in mitigating an impact. It is generally understood that if applied early enough, even a small deflection could change an impacting trajectory to a near-miss trajectory. It is also well known that in order to achieve the maximum deflection for a given velocity change, it is best to apply it in the along-track direction at perihelion. But which perihelion is best? The general rule has been that it is best to deflect as early as possible, since earlier deflections will require smaller velocity changes to achieve a desired position change. We find that this simplistic rule often does not hold for objects with shallow encounters years or decades before impact. Indeed, there are epochs long before impact at which no deflection of any reasonable size will prevent the impact. Any trajectory produced by deflection at these times is essentially refocused by the intervening encounter back onto an impacting trajectory. These zero-leverage times are surrounded by multi-year intervals during which deflection attempts will have very low effectiveness. This effect will be illustrated using several example cases.

  9. Estimates of trapped radiation encountered on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    Estimates were made of the number of trapped protons and electrons encountered by vehicles on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts. The estimates serve as a first step in assessing whether these radiations present a problem to on-board sensitive components and payload. The integrated proton spectra and electron spectra are presented for the case of a trajectory described by a vehicle with a constant-thrust acceleration A sub c equal to 0.001 meter/sq sec. This value of acceleration corresponds to a trip time of about 54 days from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. It is shown that the time spent in the belts and hence the radiation encountered vary nearly inversely with the value of thrust acceleration. Thus, the integrated spectral values presented for the case of A sub c = 0.001 meter/sq sec can be generalized for any other value of thrust acceleration by multiplying them by the factor 0.001/A sub c.

  10. Viewpoint: envisioning the successful integration of EBM and humanism in the clinical encounter: fantasy or fallacy?

    PubMed

    Smith, David Gary

    2008-03-01

    Some authors challenge the dominance of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in current medical practice because of its tendency to disregard the patient in the clinical process and thus distort the clinician's view of the patient as the primary focus. This tendency to "scientize" the clinician-patient encounter threatens to seriously reduce the role of humanistic elements in medicine. Although the pendulum shift toward the epistemology of EBM is worrisome, it is only one aspect of the problems facing modern medicine in the process of discovering-or rediscovering-the human dimension in medical care. The author uses his own and others' interpretation of the philosophy of an underappreciated thinker, Michael Polanyi, as a springboard to envision the research required for the development of models of medical education and clinical practice that appropriately acknowledge both EBM and humanism. Striking the right balance between these two elements will require much additional research, but those who simply demonize EBM as the major barrier to humanistic practice fail to appreciate the essential role for critical thinking in responding to the demands of patient safety and health care quality. All may agree that the current medical landscape needs immediate attention but this author argues that such work needs to use the available tools such as EBM and Polanyi's Theory of Tacit Knowing as well as products of future research efforts. Failure to do less will prevent us from reaching the ideal of a truly humanistic encounter firmly embedded in practices that maximize patient safety and health care quality.

  11. A multi-satellite orbit determination problem in a parallel processing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deakyne, M. S.; Anderle, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    The Engineering Orbit Analysis Unit at GE Valley Forge used an Intel Hypercube Parallel Processor to investigate the performance and gain experience of parallel processors with a multi-satellite orbit determination problem. A general study was selected in which major blocks of computation for the multi-satellite orbit computations were used as units to be assigned to the various processors on the Hypercube. Problems encountered or successes achieved in addressing the orbit determination problem would be more likely to be transferable to other parallel processors. The prime objective was to study the algorithm to allow processing of observations later in time than those employed in the state update. Expertise in ephemeris determination was exploited in addressing these problems and the facility used to bring a realism to the study which would highlight the problems which may not otherwise be anticipated. Secondary objectives were to gain experience of a non-trivial problem in a parallel processor environment, to explore the necessary interplay of serial and parallel sections of the algorithm in terms of timing studies, to explore the granularity (coarse vs. fine grain) to discover the granularity limit above which there would be a risk of starvation where the majority of nodes would be idle or under the limit where the overhead associated with splitting the problem may require more work and communication time than is useful.

  12. Problems Implementing Problem-Based Learning by a Private Malaysian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tik, Chan Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this case study the focus is on lecturers' readiness in the design of PBL problems and to facilitate students' learning. This paper also looks into students' readiness in terms of acquiring metacognitive skills and collaborating in group to solve PBL problems. Problems encountered by both lecturers and students are discussed in the context of…

  13. Modeling of Wake-vortex Aircraft Encounters. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    There are more people passing through the world's airports today than at any other time in history. With this increase in civil transport, airports are becoming capacity limited. In order to increase capacity and thus meet the demands of the flying public, the number of runways and number of flights per runway must be increased. In response to the demand, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), airport operators, and the airline industry are taking steps to increase airport capacity without jeopardizing safety. Increasing the production per runway increases the likelihood that an aircraft will encounter the trailing wake-vortex of another aircraft. The hazard of a wake-vortex encounter is that heavy load aircraft can produce high intensity wake turbulence, through the development of its wing-tip vortices. A smaller aircraft following in the wake of the heavy load aircraft will experience redistribution of its aerodynamic load. This creates a safety hazard for the smaller aircraft. Understanding this load redistribution is of great importance, particularly during landing and take-off. In this research wake-vortex effects on an encountering 10% scale model of the B737-100 aircraft are modeled using both strip theory and vortex-lattice modeling methods. The models are then compared to wind tunnel data that was taken in the 30ft x 60ft wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Comparisons are made to determine if the models will have acceptable accuracy when parts of the geometry are removed, such as the horizontal stabilizer and the vertical tail. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to observe how accurately the models could match the experimental data if there was a 10% error in the circulation strength. It was determined that both models show accurate results when the wing, horizontal stabilizer, and vertical tail were a part of the geometry. When the horizontal

  14. The encounter with God in myth and madness

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Otto; Velásquez, Óscar

    2007-01-01

    Background It is well known how often psychiatric patients report religious experiences. These are especially frequent in schizophrenic and epileptic patients as the subject of their delusions. The question we pose is: are there differences between this kind of religious experiences and those we find in religious texts or in the mythological tradition? Results An overview on famous mythological narratives, such as The Aeneid, allows us to establish that the divinities become recognizable to the human being at the moment of their departure. Thus, Aeneas does not recognise his mother, Venus, when she appears to him in the middle of the forest at the coast of Africa. A dialogue between the two takes place, and only at the end of the encounter, when she is going away and already with her back to Aeneas, she shows her son the signs of her divinity: the rose-flush emanating from her neck, her hair perfume and the majesty of her gait. Something analogous can be observed in the encounter of Moses with Yahweh on Mount Sinai. Moses asks God: "Show me your glory, I beg you". And God replies, among other things: "you shall see the back of me, but my face is not to be seen". In the same sense, the Emmaus disciples do not recognise Jesus till the moment of his disappearance ("but he had vanished from their sight"), and Saul of Tars falls off his horse just in the moment when he feels the divine presence. In short, the direct encounter with the divinity seems not to occur in the realm of myth or in religious tradition. The realm of madness is exactly the opposite. Our research on religious experiences in schizophrenic and epileptic patients leads us to conclude that God appears to them face to face, and the patient describes God the father, Jesus or the Virgin Mary in intimate detail, always in an everyday setting. So, the divinity is seen in the garden, or in the bedroom, or maybe above the wardrobe, without any of its majesty. The nearness to God also tends to be so extreme

  15. The voyager 2 encounter with the neptunian system.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Miner, E D

    1989-12-15

    An overview of the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune is presented, including a brief discussion of the trajectory, the planned observations, and highlights of the results described in the 11 companion papers. Neptune's blue atmosphere has storm systems reminiscent of those in Jupiter's atmosphere. An optically thin methane ice cloud exists near the 1.5-bar pressure level, and an optically thick cloud exists below 3 bars. Neptune's magnetic field is highly tilted and offset from the planet's center; it rotates with a period of 16.11 hours. Two narrow and two broad rings circle the planet; the outermost of these rings has three optically thicker arc segments. Six new moons were discovered in circular prograde orbits, all well inside Triton's retrograde orbit. Triton has a highly reflective and geologically young surface, a thin nitrogen atmosphere, and at least two active geyser-like plumes.

  16. The Voyager 2 encounter with the Neptunian system

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, E.C.; Miner, E.D. )

    1989-12-15

    An overview of the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune is presented, including a brief discussion of the trajectory, the planned observations, and highlights of the results described in the 11 companion papers. Neptune's blue atmosphere has storm systems reminiscent of those in Jupiter's atmosphere. An optically thin methane ice cloud exists near the 1.5-bar pressure level, and an optically thick cloud exists below 3 bars. Neptune's magnetic field is highly tilted and offset from the planet's center; it rotates with a period of 16.11 hours. Two narrow and two broad rings circle the planet; the outermost of these rings has three optically thicker arc segments. Six moons were discovered in circular prograde orbits, all well inside Triton's retrograde orbit. Triton has a highly reflective and geologically young surface, a thin nitrogen atmosphere, and at least two active geyser-like plumes.

  17. Exotic encounters with dental implants: managing complications with unidentified systems.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, N; Janda, M Schittek

    2012-06-01

    As the application of dental implants increases worldwide, so is the number of technical and biological complications that general dental practitioners will be called to manage, while maintaining implant patients. In addition, the greater patient mobility encountered today combined with a growing trend of 'dental implant tourism' will very often result in situations where the dentist is requested to deal with complications in implants placed elsewhere and which sometimes might be of an 'exotic' system one cannot directly recognize. Such a situation can pose significant challenges to even experienced clinicians. The challenges are not only in the scientific field, but often include professional and ethical implications. This case report will discuss strategies for the management of implant complications in cases of unidentified implant systems. Critical factors in such situations would be the clinician's experience and special training, the correct radiographic technique, as well as access to the appropriate tools and devices. PMID:22624768

  18. Extreme ultraviolet observations from voyager 1 encounter with jupiter.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, A L; Belton, M J; Takacs, P Z; Sandel, B R; Shemansky, D E; Holberg, J B; Ajello, J M; Atreya, S K; Donahue, T M; Moos, H W; Bertaux, J L; Blamont, J E; Strobel, D F; McConnell, J C; Dalgarno, A; Goody, R; McElroy, M B

    1979-06-01

    Observations of the optical extreme ultraviolet spectrum of the Jupiter planetary system during the Voyager 1 encounter have revealed previously undetected physical processes of significant proportions. Bright emission lines of S III, S IV, and O III indicating an electron temperature of 10(5) K have been identified in preliminary analyses of the Io plasma torus spectrum. Strong auroral atomic and molecular hydrogen emissions have been observed in the polar regions of Jupiter near magnetic field lines that map the torus into the atmosphere of Jupiter. The observed resonance scattering of solar hydrogen Lyman alpha by the atmosphere of Jupiter and the solar occultation experiment suggest a hot thermosphere (>/= 1000 K) wvith a large atomic hydrogen abundance. A stellar occultation by Ganymede indicates that its atmosphere is at most an exosphere.

  19. GRAVITATIONAL ENCOUNTERS AND THE EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, David

    2015-05-01

    An algorithm is described for evolving the phase-space density of stars or compact objects around a massive black hole at the center of a galaxy. The technique is based on numerical integration of the Fokker–Planck equation in energy-angular momentum space, f(E, L, t), and includes, for the first time, diffusion coefficients that describe the effects of both random and correlated encounters (“resonant relaxation”), as well as energy loss due to emission of gravitational waves. Destruction or loss of stars into the black hole is treated by means of a detailed boundary-layer analysis. Performance of the algorithm is illustrated by calculating two-dimensional, time-dependent, and steady-state distribution functions and their corresponding loss rates.

  20. The spiritual encounter within a complementary therapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Foster, Elizabeth

    2006-05-01

    Interest in both spirituality and complementary therapies is growing, with their inclusion in both daily life and in health care. The concept of spirituality and the delivery of a therapy have a certain synergy as they both espouse a view of the world that recognises the importance of the whole person. Increasingly, clients want their values and beliefs attended to, perhaps choosing a therapy as a pathway to nourish their sense of the spiritual. Consequently working in a holistic way the complementary therapist needs to acknowledge the spiritual dimension of the client. Integral to this is how the therapeutic encounter facilitates this engagement and how important it is that the therapist develops and explores their own spirituality and life values. This article is an exploration of how spirituality and complementary therapies can legitimately work together, creating a sacred space for both therapist and client. PMID:16648095