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Sample records for address specifically module

  1. Optically addressed asymmetric Fabry-Perot modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, A.; Maserjian, J.

    1991-01-01

    A low power, high contrast optically addressed modulator, operating with normal incidence, has been fabricated. Optically controlled reflection modulation is achieved through optically induced absorption modulation in a periodically delta-doped InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well structure inserted in an integrated asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator. A contrast ratio over 60:1 was measured using a spectrally matched low power InGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser to generate the write (control) signal. The insertion loss for the normally off modulator is 4.6 dB at the highest write signal power (30 mW) used. The device lends itself to the fabrication of arrays for optically addressed spatial light modulation.

  2. Public Address Systems. Specifications - Installation - Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Fred M.

    Provisions for public address in new construction of campus buildings (specifications, installations, and operation of public address systems), are discussed in non-technical terms. Consideration is given to microphones, amplifiers, loudspeakers and the placement and operation of various different combinations. (FS)

  3. Addressing the Mathematics-Specific Needs of Beginning Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Beginning mathematics teachers at the secondary level (middle and high school grades) have mathematics-specific needs that induction programs should address more substantially. However, a number of issues in how programs can accomplish this are more complex than often framed in discussions occurring in the induction programs and the field of…

  4. Design specifications for manufacturability of MCM-C multichip modules

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.; Blazek, R.; Desch, J.; Elarton, J.; Kautz, D.; Markley, D.; Morgenstern, H.; Stewart, R.; Warner, L.

    1995-06-01

    The scope of this document is to establish design guidelines for electronic circuitry packaged as multichip modules of the ceramic substrate variety, although many of these guidelines are applicable to other types of multichip modules. The guidelines begin with prerequisite information which must be developed between customer and designer of the multichip module. The core of the guidelines focuses on the many considerations that must be addressed during the multichip module design. The guidelines conclude with the resulting deliverables from the design which satisfy customer requirements and/or support the multichip module fabrication and testing processes. Considerable supporting information, checklists, and design constraints are captured in specific appendices and used as reference information in the main body text. Finally some real examples of multichip module design are presented.

  5. A Pipelined IP Address Lookup Module for 100 Gbps Line Rates and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuchert, Domenic; Hauger, Simon

    New Internet services and technologies call for higher packet switching capacities in the core network. Thus, a performance bottleneck arises at the backbone routers, as forwarding of Internet Protocol (IP) packets requires to search the most specific entry in a forwarding table that contains up to several hundred thousand address prefixes. The Tree Bitmap algorithm provides a well-balanced solution in respect of storage needs as well as of search and update complexity. In this paper, we present a pipelined lookup module based on this algorithm, which allows for an easy adaption to diverse protocol and hardware constraints. We determined the pipelining degree required to achieve the throughput for a 100 Gbps router line card by analyzing a representative sub-unit for various configured sizes. The module supports IPv4 and IPv6 configurations providing this throughput, as we determined the performance of our design to achieve a processing rate of 178 million packets per second.

  6. Optogenetic approaches addressing extracellular modulation of neural excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczi, Emily A.; Vierock, Johannes; Atsuta-Tsunoda, Kyoko; Tsunoda, Satoshi P.; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Gorini, Christopher; Thompson, Kimberly; Lee, Soo Yeun; Berndt, Andre; Perry, Chelsey; Minniberger, Sonja; Vogt, Arend; Mattis, Joanna; Prakash, Rohit; Delp, Scott; Deisseroth, Karl; Hegemann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular ionic environment in neural tissue has the capacity to influence, and be influenced by, natural bouts of neural activity. We employed optogenetic approaches to control and investigate these interactions within and between cells, and across spatial scales. We began by developing a temporally precise means to study microdomain-scale interactions between extracellular protons and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). By coupling single-component proton-transporting optogenetic tools to ASICs to create two-component optogenetic constructs (TCOs), we found that acidification of the local extracellular membrane surface by a light-activated proton pump recruited a slow inward ASIC current, which required molecular proximity of the two components on the membrane. To elicit more global effects of activity modulation on ‘bystander’ neurons not under direct control, we used densely-expressed depolarizing (ChR2) or hyperpolarizing (eArch3.0, eNpHR3.0) tools to create a slow non-synaptic membrane current in bystander neurons, which matched the current direction seen in the directly modulated neurons. Extracellular protons played contributory role but were insufficient to explain the entire bystander effect, suggesting the recruitment of other mechanisms. Together, these findings present a new approach to the engineering of multicomponent optogenetic tools to manipulate ionic microdomains, and probe the complex neuronal-extracellular space interactions that regulate neural excitability. PMID:27045897

  7. An input-data page modulation scheme for content-addressable holographic digital data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Renu; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2005-05-01

    We implement a new modulation scheme for inputting digital data pages for content-addressable holographic data storage. This scheme, which is a modification of the hybrid ternary modulation (HTM) scheme, exploits the advantages of both pure phase modulation and hybrid ternary modulation. The technique of using binary phase data pages with equal number of 0 and π using twisted-nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator reduces strong dc component and produces a more homogeneous spectral distribution at the recording plane. This technique should facilitate better recording of all spatial frequencies, and thus improve the discrimination capability of a content-addressable memory. In HTM, there are three states to represent binary bits, whereas in the proposed code, we use the two bright states with a difference of π for coding the binary data. The third state, which is a dark state, is used to code the undesired regions of the spatial light modulator (SLM) while performing a search operation using a small search argument. We also introduce a new balanced modulation code which is a modified version of the 8:12 modulation code to address the coding subtleties associated with phase-based data pages. The proposed technique enhances the discrimination capability of content search using small search arguments, thereby giving better results in associative recall in a holographic memory system, with very low number of false hits compared to the existing schemes. A comparative study is presented of discrimination ratio and SNR for the different modulation schemes.

  8. Identifying and addressing specific student difficulties in advanced thermal physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Trevor I.

    As part of an ongoing multi-university research study on student understanding of concepts in thermal physics at the upper division, I identified several student difficulties with topics related to heat engines (especially the Carnot cycle), as well as difficulties related to the Boltzmann factor. In an effort to address these difficulties, I developed two guided-inquiry worksheet activities (a.k.a. tutorials) for use in advanced undergraduate thermal physics courses. Both tutorials seek to improve student understanding of the utility and physical background of a particular mathematical expression. One tutorial focuses on a derivation of Carnot's theorem regarding the limit on thermodynamic efficiency, starting from the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The other tutorial helps students gain an appreciation for the origin of the Boltzmann factor and when it is applicable; focusing on the physical justification of its mathematical derivation, with emphasis on the connections between probability, multiplicity, entropy, and energy. Student understanding of the use and physical implications of Carnot's theorem and the Boltzmann factor was assessed using written surveys both before and after tutorial instruction within the advanced thermal physics courses at the University of Maine and at other institutions. Classroom tutorial sessions at the University of Maine were videotaped to allow in-depth scrutiny of student successes and failures following tutorial prompts. I also interviewed students on various topics related to the Boltzmann factor to gain a more complete picture of their understanding and inform tutorial revisions. Results from several implementations of my tutorials at the University of Maine indicate that students did not have a robust understanding of these physical principles after lectures alone, and that they gain a better understanding of relevant topics after tutorial instruction; Fisher's exact tests yield statistically significant improvement at the

  9. Tissue Specificity of Human Disease Module

    PubMed Central

    Kitsak, Maksim; Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Guney, Emre; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    Genes carrying mutations associated with genetic diseases are present in all human cells; yet, clinical manifestations of genetic diseases are usually highly tissue-specific. Although some disease genes are expressed only in selected tissues, the expression patterns of disease genes alone cannot explain the observed tissue specificity of human diseases. Here we hypothesize that for a disease to manifest itself in a particular tissue, a whole functional subnetwork of genes (disease module) needs to be expressed in that tissue. Driven by this hypothesis, we conducted a systematic study of the expression patterns of disease genes within the human interactome. We find that genes expressed in a specific tissue tend to be localized in the same neighborhood of the interactome. By contrast, genes expressed in different tissues are segregated in distinct network neighborhoods. Most important, we show that it is the integrity and the completeness of the expression of the disease module that determines disease manifestation in selected tissues. This approach allows us to construct a disease-tissue network that confirms known and predicts unexpected disease-tissue associations. PMID:27748412

  10. Optically addressed and submillisecond response phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiangjie; Duan, Jiazhu; Zhang, Dayong; Luo, Yongquan

    2014-10-01

    Liquid crystal based phase only spatial light modulator has attracted many research interests since last decades because of its superior advantage. Until now the liquid crystal spatial light modulator has been applied in many fields, but the response speed of nematic LC limited its further application. In this paper, an optically addressed phase only LC spatial light modulator was proposed based on polymer network liquid crystal. Morphology effect on the light scattering of PNLC was studied, which was mainly consisted of fiber and fiber bundles. The morphology nearly determined the light scattering and electro-optical property. Due to the high threshold voltage, to address the PNLC phase modulator was also concerned. Optical addressing method was proposed, in which BSO crystal was selected to replace one of the glass substrate. The response speed of PNLC was so fast that the reorientation of liquid crystal director will follow the change of effective voltage applied on LC layer, which was related with the voltage signal and especially with electron transport of photo-induced carriers due to diffusion and drift. The on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated. Based on this device, beam steering was also achieved by loading 488nm laser strip on the optical addressed phase only spatial light modulator.

  11. SecureCore Software Architecture: Trusted Management Layer (TML) Kernel Extension Module Interface Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Kernel Extension Module Interface Specification by David J. Shifflett Paul C. Clark Cynthia E. Irvine Thuy D. Nguyen Timothy M. Vidas ...Timothy M. Vidas Timothy E. Levin Research Associate Research Associate...Nguyen, Timothy M. Vidas , and Timothy E. Levin 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  12. 46 CFR 107.317 - Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations. 107.317 Section 107.317 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 107.317 Addresses...

  13. 46 CFR 107.317 - Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations. 107.317 Section 107.317 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 107.317 Addresses...

  14. 46 CFR 107.317 - Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations. 107.317 Section 107.317 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 107.317 Addresses...

  15. Technical Study Addresses a Key Challenge to Harmonizing U.S. and International PV Module Standards (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL builds community and industry support by addressing concerns voiced by key standards organizations. Photovoltaic (PV) manufacturers in the United States test the safety of their products using standards developed through consensus processes. Because U.S. PV module safety standards are not aligned with international standards, manufacturers must test their modules twice - and sometimes maintain separate product lines. By meeting with standards organizations such as the Solar ABCs and Underwriters Laboratories (UL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leaders have worked to identify different stakeholders priorities and concerns. UL, specifically, has expressed concern that the international standards do not address all possible risks. For example, new encapsulant materials could soften at high temperatures and frameless modules could slide apart, exposing live electrical parts or allowing glass to fall on a person below. The deformation of a solid material under the influence of mechanical stresses is known as 'creep.' Current module qualification tests are limited to 85 C, whereas modules can, for short times, reach 105 C outdoors. In response to UL's concern, NREL designed and executed an experiment to compare on-sun and accelerated rates of creep for modules fabricated with various encapsulants, including some that have low melting points. Objectives were to (1) evaluate the potential for creep in outdoor exposure, (2) provide guidance on the risks and design needs with thermoplastic materials, and (3) provide a basis for modifying standards to account for materials with potential to creep. The study tested experimental materials with eight representative encapsulants in both outdoor and indoor (chamber) exposure. The study found that modules with materials that were expected to creep did so in the indoor exposure, but not in most outdoor environments and mounting configurations. The results provide a basis for defining an accelerated test needed to

  16. E-beam addressed Spatial Light Modulator employing electron trapping materials. Phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaojing; Yang, Xiangyang; Wrigley, Charles Y.; Bradley, Richard; Meszaros, Janos

    1995-03-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLM's) play a critically important role in optical signal processing and optical computing. A novel electron beam addressed emissive SLM which combines high performance polycrystalline electron trapping (ET) materials with an advanced field-emitter array is being developed. The proposed SLM combines high resolution (greater than 100 lplmm), high SBP (greater than 1000 x 1000), high frame rate (greater than or equal 1 KHz), high contrast ratio (greater than l03:l) and low drive voltage (less than 15 V) in a single device. The additional features of the proposed SLM are its wide variety of operation modes and electrical and optical dual-addressability. Such a SLM, if successfully developed, will surely have substantial impact on optical processing technology. During the Phase-1 efforts, a review of field emitter arrays has been done to show that it has the merits of electrical-addressability, high space-bandwidth product (SBP), low drive voltage compatible with IC driving circuitry, and high update speed. The device architecture has been investigated and the design of two prototype devices has been provided.

  17. Prior probability modulates anticipatory activity in category-specific areas.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Sabrina; Lepsien, Jöran; Kotz, Sonja A; Bar, Moshe

    2016-02-01

    Bayesian models are currently a dominant framework for describing human information processing. However, it is not clear yet how major tenets of this framework can be translated to brain processes. In this study, we addressed the neural underpinning of prior probability and its effect on anticipatory activity in category-specific areas. Before fMRI scanning, participants were trained in two behavioral sessions to learn the prior probability and correct order of visual events within a sequence. The events of each sequence included two different presentations of a geometric shape and one picture of either a house or a face, which appeared with either a high or a low likelihood. Each sequence was preceded by a cue that gave participants probabilistic information about which items to expect next. This allowed examining cue-related anticipatory modulation of activity as a function of prior probability in category-specific areas (fusiform face area and parahippocampal place area). Our findings show that activity in the fusiform face area was higher when faces had a higher prior probability. The finding of a difference between levels of expectations is consistent with graded, probabilistically modulated activity, but the data do not rule out the alternative explanation of a categorical neural response. Importantly, these differences were only visible during anticipation, and vanished at the time of stimulus presentation, calling for a functional distinction when considering the effects of prior probability. Finally, there were no anticipatory effects for houses in the parahippocampal place area, suggesting sensitivity to stimulus material when looking at effects of prediction.

  18. Interface Specifications for the A-7E Shared Services Module.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-08

    To illustrate the principles, the onboard software for the Navy’s A-7E aircraft will be redesigned and rewritten. The Shared Services module provides...purpose of the Shared Services module is to allow the remainder of the software to remain unchanged when the requirements-based rules for these values and...services change. This report describes the modular structure of the Shared Services module, and contains the abstract interface specifications for all

  19. Cancer cell proliferation is inhibited by specific modulation frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J W; Pennison, M J; Brezovich, I; Yi, N; Yang, C T; Ramaker, R; Absher, D; Myers, R M; Kuster, N; Costa, F P; Barbault, A; Pasche, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is clinical evidence that very low and safe levels of amplitude-modulated electromagnetic fields administered via an intrabuccal spoon-shaped probe may elicit therapeutic responses in patients with cancer. However, there is no known mechanism explaining the anti-proliferative effect of very low intensity electromagnetic fields. Methods: To understand the mechanism of this novel approach, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells were exposed to 27.12 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields using in vitro exposure systems designed to replicate in vivo conditions. Cancer cells were exposed to tumour-specific modulation frequencies, previously identified by biofeedback methods in patients with a diagnosis of cancer. Control modulation frequencies consisted of randomly chosen modulation frequencies within the same 100 Hz–21 kHz range as cancer-specific frequencies. Results: The growth of HCC and breast cancer cells was significantly decreased by HCC-specific and breast cancer-specific modulation frequencies, respectively. However, the same frequencies did not affect proliferation of nonmalignant hepatocytes or breast epithelial cells. Inhibition of HCC cell proliferation was associated with downregulation of XCL2 and PLP2. Furthermore, HCC-specific modulation frequencies disrupted the mitotic spindle. Conclusion: These findings uncover a novel mechanism controlling the growth of cancer cells at specific modulation frequencies without affecting normal tissues, which may have broad implications in oncology. PMID:22134506

  20. Function Specifications for the A-7E Function Driver Module.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-27

    Computer interface specifications (HEN181). The services and values provided by the Shared Services module are accurately described in the Shared Services Module...None$) FD.7.l.3.1 FD.7.1.7.1 5517a FD.App3 -5 Appendix 3 Event List (Alphabetical) Events Signalled by other Shared Services submodules @F( ABSCI+ip az...the Shared Services and Device Interface modules. Al; Answer this question for each table that appears in the function driver specification being

  1. Event-Specific Prevention: Addressing College Student Drinking During Known Windows of Risk

    PubMed Central

    Neighbors, Clayton; Walters, Scott T.; Lee, Christine M.; Vader, Amanda M.; Vehige, Tamara; Szigethy, Thomas; DeJong, William

    2007-01-01

    The unique drinking patterns of college students call for Event-Specific Prevention (ESP) strategies that address college student drinking associated with peak times and events. Despite limited research evaluating ESP, many college campuses are currently implementing programming for specific events. The present paper provides a review of existing literature related to ESP and offers practical guidance for research and practice. The prevention typology proposed by DeJong and Langford (2002) provides a framework for strategic planning, suggesting that programs and policies should address problems at the individual, group, institution, community, state, and society level, and that these interventions should focus on knowledge change, environmental change, health protection, and intervention and treatment services. From this typology, specific examples are provided for comprehensive program planning related to orientation/beginning of school year, homecoming, 21st birthday celebrations, spring break, and graduation. In addition, the University of Connecticut’s efforts to address problems resulting from its annual Spring Weekend are described as an illustration of how advance planning by campus and community partners can produce a successful ESP effort. PMID:17616260

  2. Electromechanical characteristic analysis of passive matrix addressing for grating light modulator.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhu; Wen, Zhiyu; Zhang, Zhihai; Huang, Shanglian

    2009-01-01

    A Grating Light Modulator (GLM) based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is applied in projection display. The operating principle of the GLM is introduced in this paper. The electromechanical characteristic of the passive matrix addressing GLM is studied. It was found that if the spring constant is larger, both the response frequency and the driving voltage are larger. Theoretical analysis shows that the operating voltage and the pull-in voltage of the GLM are 8.16 and 8.74 V, respectively. When an all-selected pixel in a m×n array is actuated by a voltage V(0), the voltages of the half-selected pixel in row and column are V(0)(m-1)/(m+n-1) and V(0)(n-1)/(m+n-1), respectively, and the voltage of the non-selected pixel is V(0)/(m+n-1). Finally, the experimental results indicate that the operating voltage and the pull-in voltage are 7.8 and 8.5V respectively, and the response frequency of the GLM is about 7 kHz. The crosstalk in a 16×16 GLM array is validated by the experiment. These studies provide a theoretical basis for improving the GLM driver.

  3. Vocal imitation in parrots allows addressing of specific individuals in a dynamic communication network.

    PubMed

    Balsby, Thorsten J S; Momberg, Jane Vestergaard; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Parrots in captivity are known for their ability to vocally imitate humans and recently it has been shown that wild-living orange-fronted conures are able to immediately imitate other individuals' contact calls. The function of this exceptional ability to imitate remains unclear. However, orange-fronted conures live in fission-fusion flocks where they encounter many different individuals every day, and it is possible that their vocal imitation ability is a flexible means to address a specific individual within a flock. We tested this via playback to short-term captive wild conures. Test birds were placed together in pairs in outdoor aviaries to form simple flocks. To simulate imitation of a specific individual these pairs received playback of contact calls that primarily imitate one of the two birds. Overall, individuals that received simulated vocal imitations of its calls responded more frequently and faster than the other individual. This suggests that orange-fronted conures can use imitations of contact calls to address specific individuals of a flock. In the discussion we argue that the fission-fusion flock dynamics of many parrot species has been an important factor in evolving conures' and other parrots' exceptional ability to imitate.

  4. Patient specific tube current modulation for CT dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yannan; Yin, Zhye; Yao, Yangyang; Wang, Hui; Wu, Mingye; Kalra, Mannudeep; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Radiation exposure during CT imaging has drawn growing concern from academia, industry as well as the general public. Sinusoidal tube current modulation has been available in most commercial products and used routinely in clinical practice. To further exploit the potential of tube current modulation, Sperl et al. proposed a Computer-Assisted Scan Protocol and Reconstruction (CASPAR) scheme [6] that modulates the tube current based on the clinical applications and patient specific information. The purpose of this study is to accelerate the CASPAR scheme to make it more practical for clinical use and investigate its dose benefit for different clinical applications. The Monte Carlo simulation in the original CASPAR scheme was substituted by the dose reconstruction to accelerate the optimization process. To demonstrate the dose benefit, we used the CATSIM package generate the projection data and perform standard FDK reconstruction. The NCAT phantom at thorax position was used in the simulation. We chose three clinical cases (routine chest scan, coronary CT angiography with and without breast avoidance) and compared the dose level with different mA modulation schemes (patient specific, sinusoidal and constant mA) with matched image quality. The simulation study of three clinical cases demonstrated that the patient specific mA modulation could significantly reduce the radiation dose compared to sinusoidal modulation. The dose benefits depend on the clinical application and object shape. With matched image quality, for chest scan the patient specific mA profile reduced the dose by about 15% compared to the sinusoid mA modulation; for the organ avoidance scan the dose reduction to the breast was over 50% compared to the constant mA baseline.

  5. Content-addressable Holographic Digital Data Storage Based on Hybrid Ternary Modulation with a Twisted-Nematic Liquid-Crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Renu; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    We propose and demonstrate the use of hybrid ternary modulated digital pages for content-addressable holographic data storage. Display of binary data pages with equal number of ZEROs and ONEs by modulating both amplitude and phase of beams using twisted-nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator, reduces strong de component and produces a more homogeneous spectral distribution at the recording plane. This technique facilitates better recording of all spatial frequencies, thus improving the discrimination capability of a content-addressable memory. Hence we get better results in associative recall in a holographic memory system, with very low number of false hits. An important advantage of the hybrid ternary modulation over pure phase data pages is that it offers a dark state for coding the undesired portion of the SLM while the search argument is small. The unique orientation of quarter wave plate and the analyzer blocks the light transmitted from OFF pixels leading to near total removal of dark signals. This in turn improves the system performance and reduces the number of false hits when the size of the search argument is small. Our experimental results show good discrimination capability and signal-to-noise ratio for a hybrid ternary modulation based content addressable memory.

  6. Series-connected shaded modules to address partial shading conditions in SPV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Smita; Dahiya, Ratna

    2016-03-01

    With the progress of technology and reduced cost of PV cells, the PV systems are being installed in many countries, including India. Even though this method of power generation has sufficient potential but its effective utilization is still lacking. This is because the output power of PV cells depends on many factors like insolation, temperature, climate conditions prevailing nearby, aging, using modules from different technologies/manufacturers or partial shading conditions. Among these factors, partial shading causes major reduction in output power despite the size of PV systems. As a result, the produced power is lower than the expected value. The connection of modules to each other has great impact on output power if they are prone to partial shading conditions. In this paper, PV arrays are investigated under partial shading conditions. The results show that partial shading losses can be minimized by connecting shaded modules in series rather than in parallel.

  7. Digital phase-shifting interferometer with an electrically addressed liquid-crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Bitou, Youichi

    2003-09-01

    A digital phase-shifting interferometer with a liquid-crystal-display coupled, parallel aligned, nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulator is developed. The optical phase shift in the Michelson-type polarization interferometer is achieved by a digital phase shift of a grating displayed on the spatial light modulator. Accurate experimental results of using the heterodyne system for pi/2 phase steps were demonstrated. A phase-shifting interferometer with no moving parts and no requirement for calibration of the value of the phase shift was achieved.

  8. Characterization of submillisecond response optical addressing phase modulator based on low light scattering polymer network liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangjie, Zhao E-mail: zxjdouble@gmail.com; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2015-01-07

    Optically addressed conventional nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator has attracted wide research interests. But the slow response speed limited its further application. In this paper, polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was proposed to replace the conventional nematic liquid crystal to enhance the response time to the order of submillisecond. The maximum light scattering of the employed PNLC was suppressed to be less than 2% at 1.064 μm by optimizing polymerization conditions and selecting large viscosity liquid crystal as solvent. The occurrence of phase ripple phenomenon due to electron diffusion and drift in photoconductor was found to deteriorate the phase modulation effect of the optical addressed PNLC phase modulator. The wavelength effect and AC voltage frequency effect on the on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated by experimental methods. These effects were interpreted by electron diffusion and drift theory based on the assumption that free electron was inhomogeneously distributed in accordance with the writing beam intensity distribution along the incident direction. The experimental results indicated that the phase ripple could be suppressed by optimizing the wavelength of the writing beam and the driving AC voltage frequency when varying the writing beam intensity to generate phase change in 2π range. The modulation transfer function was also measured.

  9. Preparing teachers to address climate change with project-based instructional modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, S. E.; DeWaters, J.; Small, M.; Dhaniyala, S.

    2012-12-01

    Clarkson University's Project-Based Global Climate Change Education project funded by NASA has created and disseminated several instructional modules for middle and high school teachers. The modules were developed by a team of teachers and university students and faculty. Fundamental to these inquiry-based modules are questions about climate change or mitigation efforts, use of real-world data to explore historical climate changes, and review of IPCC model results to understand predictions of further changes over the next century. As an example, the Climate Connections module requires middle school students to investigate a geographic region, learn about the culture and likely carbon footprint, and then acquire and analyze data sets of historical and predicted temperature changes. The findings are then interpreted in relation to the impact of these changes on the region's culture. NOAA, NASA, IPCC and DOE databases are used extensively. The inquiry approach and core content included in these modules are well aligned with the new Framework for K-12 Science Education. The climate change science in these modules covers aspects of the disciplinary core subjects (dimension 3) and most of the cross cutting concepts (dimension 2). Our approach for inquiry and analysis are also authentic ways to include most of the science and engineering practices (dimension 1) included in the framework. Dissemination of the modules to teachers in New York State has been a joint effort by NYSERDA (New York State Energy Research and Development Authority) and Clarkson. Half-day and full-day workshops and week-long institutes provided opportunities to either introduce the modules and the basics of finding and using temperature data, or delve into the science concepts and integration of the modules into an instructional plan. A significant challenge has been identified by the workshop instructors - many science teachers lack the skills necessary to fully engage in the science and engineering

  10. Interfacing modules for integrating discipline specific structural mechanics codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endres, Ned M.

    1989-01-01

    An outline of the organization and capabilities of the Engine Structures Computational Simulator (Simulator) at NASA Lewis Research Center is given. One of the goals of the research at Lewis is to integrate various discipline specific structural mechanics codes into a software system which can be brought to bear effectively on a wide range of engineering problems. This system must possess the qualities of being effective and efficient while still remaining user friendly. The simulator was initially designed for the finite element simulation of gas jet engine components. Currently, the simulator has been restricted to only the analysis of high pressure turbine blades and the accompanying rotor assembly, although the current installation can be expanded for other applications. The simulator presently assists the user throughout its procedures by performing information management tasks, executing external support tasks, organizing analysis modules and executing these modules in the user defined order while maintaining processing continuity.

  11. Polymeric membranes modulate human keratinocyte differentiation in specific epidermal layers.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Simona; Morelli, Sabrina; Giordano, Francesca; Gordano, Amalia; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2016-10-01

    In vitro models of human bioengineered skin substitutes are an alternative to animal experimentation for testing the effects and toxicity of drugs, cosmetics and pollutants. For the first time specific and distinct human epidermal strata were engineered by using membranes and keratinocytes. To this purpose, biodegradable membranes of chitosan (CHT), polycaprolactone (PCL) and a polymeric blend of CHT-PCL were prepared by phase-inversion technique and characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physico-chemical and mechanical properties. The capability of membranes to modulate keratinocyte differentiation inducing specific interactions in epidermal membrane systems was investigated. The overall results demonstrated that the membrane properties strongly influence the cell morpho-functional behaviour of human keratinocytes, modulating their terminal differentiation, with the creation of specific epidermal strata or a fully proliferative epidermal multilayer system. In particular, human keratinocytes adhered on CHT and CHT-PCL membranes, forming the structure of the epidermal top layers, such as the corneum and granulosum strata, characterized by withdrawal or reduction from the cell cycle and cell proliferation. On the PCL membrane, keratinocytes developed an epidermal basal lamina, with high proliferating cells that stratified and migrated over time to form a complete differentiating epidermal multilayer system.

  12. Engineered xyloglucan specificity in a carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Lavinia Cicortas; Zhou, Qi; Montanier, Cedric; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Brumer, Harry; Ohlin, Mats

    2006-12-01

    The field of plant cell wall biology is constantly growing and consequently so is the need for more sensitive and specific probes for individual wall components. Xyloglucan is a key polysaccharide widely distributed in the plant kingdom in both structural and storage tissues that exist in both fucosylated and non-fucosylated variants. Presently, the only xyloglucan marker available is the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M1 that is specific to terminal alpha-1,2-linked fucosyl residues on xyloglucan oligo- and polysaccharides. As a viable alternative to searches for natural binding proteins or creation of new monoclonal antibodies, an approach to select xyloglucan-specific binding proteins from a combinatorial library of the carbohydrate-binding module, CBM4-2, from xylanase Xyn10A of Rhodothermus marinus is described. Using phage display technology in combination with a chemoenzymatic method to anchor xyloglucan to solid supports, the selection of xyloglucan-binding modules with no detectable residual wild-type xylan and beta-glucan-binding ability was achieved.

  13. Functional specification of the Performance Measurement (PM) module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the Performance Measurement Module is described with emphasis on what the PM Module would do, and what it would look like to the user. The PM Module as described could take several man-years to develop. An evolutionary approach to the implementation of the PM Module is presented which would provide an operational baseline PM Module within a few months.

  14. Specific modulation of protein activity by using a bioorthogonal reaction.

    PubMed

    Warner, John B; Muthusamy, Anand K; Petersson, E James

    2014-11-24

    Unnatural amino acids with bioorthogonal reactive groups have the potential to provide a rapid and specific mechanism for covalently inhibiting a protein of interest. Here, we use mutagenesis to insert an unnatural amino acid containing an azide group (Z) into the target protein at positions such that a "click" reaction with an alkyne modulator (X) will alter the function of the protein. This bioorthogonally reactive pair can engender specificity of X for the Z-containing protein, even if the target is otherwise identical to another protein, allowing for rapid target validation in living cells. We demonstrate our method using inhibition of the Escherichia coli enzyme aminoacyl transferase by both active-site occlusion and allosteric mechanisms. We have termed this a "clickable magic bullet" strategy, and it should be generally applicable to studying the effects of protein inhibition, within the limits of unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy engineered III-V semiconductor structures for low-power optically addressed spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, Anders G.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Device approaches are investigated for optically addressed SLMs based on molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) engineered III-V materials and structures. Strong photooptic effects can be achieved in periodically delta-doped multiple-quantum-well structures, but are still insufficient for high-contrast modulation with only single- or double-pass absorption through active layers of practical thickness. The asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity approach is employed to permit extinction of light due to interference of light reflected from the front and back surfaces of the cavity. This approach is realized with an all-MBE-grown structure consisting of GaAs/AlAs quarter-wave stack reflector grown over the GaAs substrate as the high reflectance mirror and the GaAs surface as the low reflectance mirror. High-contrast modulation is achieved using a low-power InGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser for the control signal.

  16. To What Extent Is Criminal Justice Content Specifically Addressed in MSW Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epperson, Matthew W.; Roberts, Leslie E.; Ivanoff, Andre; Tripodi, Stephen J.; Gilmer, Christy N.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which criminal justice content is addressed in all CSWE-accredited MSW programs in the United States ("N"?=?192). Criminal justice content was measured in three areas: (1) dual or joint degree programs, (2) concentrations or specializations, and (3) coursework. Excluding social work and law classes, 22%…

  17. Optical correlator using very-large-scale integrated circuit/ferroelectric-liquid-crystal electrically addressed spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Richard M.; Jared, David A.; Sharp, Gary D.; Johnson, Kristina M.

    1993-01-01

    The use of 2-kHz 64 x 64 very-large-scale integrated circuit/ferroelectric-liquid-crystal electrically addressed spatial light modulators as the input and filter planes of a VanderLugt-type optical correlator is discussed. Liquid-crystal layer thickness variations that are present in the devices are analyzed, and the effects on correlator performance are investigated through computer simulations. Experimental results from the very-large-scale-integrated / ferroelectric-liquid-crystal optical-correlator system are presented and are consistent with the level of performance predicted by the simulations.

  18. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben; Gao, Bruce Z

    2012-09-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability.

  19. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben

    2013-01-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability. PMID:24307756

  20. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  1. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  2. Issue-Specific Barriers to Addressing Environmental Issues in the Classroom: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Chankook; Fortner, Rosanne W.

    2006-01-01

    To explore issue-specific barriers to teaching environmental issues, the authors investigated secondary science teachers' perceived current and preferred teaching levels for 23 environmental issues and perceived barriers to teaching the selected issues. Subjects in this graduate project were 41 secondary science teachers self-selected to answer a…

  3. Screening for AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit specific modulators

    PubMed Central

    Azumaya, Caleigh M.; Days, Emily L.; Vinson, Paige N.; Stauffer, Shaun; Sulikowski, Gary; Weaver, C. David; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2017-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPAR) are ligand gated ion channels critical for synaptic transmission and plasticity. Their dysfunction is implicated in a variety of psychiatric and neurological diseases ranging from major depressive disorder to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Attempting to potentiate or depress AMPAR activity is an inherently difficult balancing act between effective treatments and debilitating side effects. A newly explored strategy to target subsets of AMPARs in the central nervous system is to identify compounds that affect specific AMPAR-auxiliary subunit complexes. This exploits diverse spatio-temporal expression patterns of known AMPAR auxiliary subunits, providing means for designing brain region-selective compounds. Here we report a high-throughput screening-based pipeline that can identify compounds that are selective for GluA2-CNIH3 and GluA2-stargazin complexes. These compounds will help us build upon the growing library of AMPAR-auxiliary subunit specific inhibitors, which have thus far all been targeted to TARP γ-8. We used a cell-based assay combined with a voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) to identify changes in glutamate-gated cation flow across the membranes of HEK cells co-expressing GluA2 and an auxiliary subunit. We then used a calcium flux assay to further validate hits picked from the VSD assay. VU0612951 and VU0627849 are candidate compounds from the initial screen that were identified as negative and positive allosteric modulators (NAM and PAM), respectively. They both have lower IC50/EC50s on complexes containing stargazin and CNIH3 than GSG1L or the AMPAR alone. We have also identified a candidate compound, VU0539491, that has NAM activity in GluA2(R)-CNIH3 and GluA2(Q) complexes and PAM activity in GluA2(Q)-GSG1L complexes. PMID:28358902

  4. Calcium modulates membrane association, positional specificity, and product distribution in dual positional specific maize lipoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoungwon; Han, Jihoon; Rakwal, Randeep; Han, Oksoo

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates how calcium modulates the properties of dual positional specific maize lipoxygenase-1, including its interaction with substrate, association with subcellular membrane and alteration of product distribution. Bioinformatic analyses identified Asp(38), Glu(127) and Glu(201) as putative calcium binding residues and Leu(37) as a flanking hydrophobic residue also potentially involved in calcium-mediated binding of the enzyme to subcellular membranes. Asp(38) and Leu(37) were shown to be important but not essential for calcium-mediated association of maize lipoxygenase-1 to subcellular membranes in vitro. Kinetic studies demonstrate that catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) shows a bell-shaped dependence on log of the molar ratio of substrate to unbound calcium. Calcium also modulates product distribution of the maize lipoxygenase-1 reaction, favoring 13-positional specificity and increasing the relative amount of (E,Z)-isomeric products. The results suggest that calcium regulates the maize lipoxygenase-1 reaction by binding to substrate, and by promoting binding of substrate to enzyme and association of maize lipoxygenase-1 to subcellular membranes.

  5. Addressing solar modulation and long-term uncertainties in scaling secondary cosmic rays for in situ cosmogenic nuclide applications [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Bieber, John W.; Clem, John M.; Duldig, Marc L.; Evenson, Paul; Humble, John E.; Pyle, Roger

    2005-10-01

    Solar modulation affects the secondary cosmic rays responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide (CN) production the most at the high geomagnetic latitudes to which CN production rates are traditionally referenced. While this has long been recognized (e.g., D. Lal, B. Peters, Cosmic ray produced radioactivity on the Earth, in: K. Sitte (Ed.), Handbuch Der Physik XLVI/2, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1967, pp. 551-612 and D. Lal, Theoretically expected variations in the terrestrial cosmic ray production rates of isotopes, in: G.C. Castagnoli (Ed.), Proceedings of the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics 95, Italian Physical Society, Varenna 1988, pp. 216-233), these variations can lead to potentially significant scaling model uncertainties that have not been addressed in detail. These uncertainties include the long-term (millennial-scale) average solar modulation level to which secondary cosmic rays should be referenced, and short-term fluctuations in cosmic ray intensity measurements used to derive published secondary cosmic ray scaling models. We have developed new scaling models for spallogenic nucleons, slow-muon capture and fast-muon interactions that specifically address these uncertainties. Our spallogenic nucleon scaling model, which includes data from portions of 5 solar cycles, explicitly incorporates a measure of solar modulation ( S), and our fast- and slow-muon scaling models (based on more limited data) account for solar modulation effects through increased uncertainties. These models improve on previously published models by better sampling the observed variability in measured cosmic ray intensities as a function of geomagnetic latitude, altitude, and solar activity. Furthermore, placing the spallogenic nucleon data in a consistent time-space framework allows for a more realistic assessment of uncertainties in our model than in earlier ones. We demonstrate here that our models reasonably account for the effects of solar modulation on measured

  6. Discovery and Subtyping of Neo-Epitope Specific T-Cell Responses for Cancer Immunotherapy: Addressing the Mutanome.

    PubMed

    Diken, Mustafa; Vormehr, Mathias; Grunwitz, Christian; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2017-01-01

    Cancer accumulates 10s to 1000s of genomic mutations of which a fraction is immunogenic and may serve as an Achilles' heel of tumor cells. Mutation-specific T cells can recognize these antigens and destroy malignant cells. Strategies to immunotherapeutically address individual tumor mutations employing peptide or mRNA based vaccines are now actively investigated in mice and humans. An important step of determining the therapeutic potential of a mutanome vaccine is the detection of mutation reactive T-cell responses. In this chapter we provide protocols to identify and subtype mutation specific T cells in mice based on IFN-γ ELISpot and flow cytometry.

  7. The SSC cycle: a PDCA approach to address site-specific characteristics in a continuous shallow water quality monitoring project.

    PubMed

    Miles, Eduardo J

    2008-05-01

    In any water quality-monitoring project there are several critical success factors that must be adequately addressed in order to ensure the implementation and realization of the monitoring objectives. Site selection is one of these critical success factors. The monitoring sites must be selected to comply with the monitoring and data quality objectives. In the real world, ideal monitoring setting conditions are difficult to achieve, and compromises must be made in order to locate the monitoring stations that best represent the environment to be monitored. Site-specific characteristics are all the environmental, logistical and management factors particular to the monitoring site, that could influence the fulfilment of the monitoring and data quality objectives. Therefore, during the site selection process, it is essential to properly consider and evaluate these site-specific characteristics. The SSC cycle was developed with this goal in mind, to assist the monitoring team to systematically address site-specific characteristics. The cycle is a methodology to organize the site-specific characteristics in different categories, and to ensure a comprehensive overview of these characteristics throughout the project life cycle.

  8. Modules, theories, or islands of expertise? Domain specificity in socialization.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Susan A

    2010-01-01

    The domain-specific approach to socialization processes presented by J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) provides a compelling framework for integrating and interpreting a large and disparate body of research findings, and it generates a wealth of testable new hypotheses. At the same time, it introduces core theoretical questions regarding the nature of social interactions, from the perspective of both children and their caregivers. This commentary draws on the literature regarding domain specificity in cognitive development, applauds what is innovative and exciting about applying a domain-specific approach to socialization processes, and points to questions for future research. Foremost among these is what is meant by "domain specificity."

  9. Focused ultrasound modulates region-specific brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung-Schik; Bystritsky, Alexander; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Fischer, Krisztina; Min, Byoung-Kyong; McDannold, Nathan J.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated the in vivo feasibility of using focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently modulate (through either stimulation or suppression) the function of regional brain tissue in rabbits. FUS was delivered in a train of pulses at low acoustic energy, far below the cavitation threshold, to the animal's somatomotor and visual areas, as guided by anatomical and functional information from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The temporary alterations in the brain function affected by the sonication were characterized by both electrophysiological recordings and functional brain mapping achieved through the use of functional MRI (fMRI). The modulatory effects were bimodal, whereby the brain activity could either be stimulated or selectively suppressed. Histological analysis of the excised brain tissue after the sonication demonstrated that the FUS did not elicit any tissue damages. Unlike transcranial magnetic stimulation, FUS can be applied to deep structures in the brain with greater spatial precision. Transient modulation of brain function using image-guided and anatomically-targeted FUS would enable the investigation of functional connectivity between brain regions and will eventually lead to a better understanding of localized brain functions. It is anticipated that the use of this technology will have an impact on brain research and may offer novel therapeutic interventions in various neurological conditions and psychiatric disorders. PMID:21354315

  10. Symbiont modulates expression of specific gene categories in Angomonas deanei

    PubMed Central

    Penha, Luciana Loureiro; Hoffmann, Luísa; de Souza, Silvanna Sant’Anna; Martins, Allan Cézar de Azevedo; Bottaro, Thayane; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Faffe, Débora Souza; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Ürményi, Turán Péter; Silva, Rosane

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasites that cause disease in humans, animals, and plants. Most are non-pathogenic and some harbor a symbiotic bacterium. Endosymbiosis is part of the evolutionary process of vital cell functions such as respiration and photosynthesis. Angomonas deanei is an example of a symbiont-containing trypanosomatid. In this paper, we sought to investigate how symbionts influence host cells by characterising and comparing the transcriptomes of the symbiont-containing A. deanei (wild type) and the symbiont-free aposymbiotic strains. The comparison revealed that the presence of the symbiont modulates several differentially expressed genes. Empirical analysis of differential gene expression showed that 216 of the 7625 modulated genes were significantly changed. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the largest categories of genes that downregulated in the absence of the symbiont were those involved in oxidation-reduction process, ATP hydrolysis coupled proton transport and glycolysis. In contrast, among the upregulated gene categories were those involved in proteolysis, microtubule-based movement, and cellular metabolic process. Our results provide valuable information for dissecting the mechanism of endosymbiosis in A. deanei. PMID:27706380

  11. Healthy me: A gender-specific program to address body image concerns and risk factors among preadolescents.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Marita P; Connaughton, Catherine; Tatangelo, Gemma; Mellor, David; Busija, Lucy

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated a gender-specific, school-based program to promote positive body image and address risk factors for body dissatisfaction. In total, 652 children aged 8-10 years participated (335 intervention, 317 wait-list control). Children participated in four 60min sessions and a recap session at three months post-intervention. The broad content areas were body image, peer relationships, media awareness, healthy diet, and exercise. The activities and examples for each session were gender specific. The recap session was an overview of the four sessions. Assessment measures were completed at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and after the recap. Boys and girls in the intervention demonstrated higher muscle esteem and vegetable intake at post-intervention, compared to children in the control condition. Boys and girls demonstrated higher body esteem, muscle esteem and fruit and vegetable intake at the recap. Boys in the intervention demonstrated less investment in masculine gender norms at post-intervention and at recap.

  12. Modules, Theories, or Islands of Expertise? Domain Specificity in Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelman, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    The domain-specific approach to socialization processes presented by J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) provides a compelling framework for integrating and interpreting a large and disparate body of research findings, and it generates a wealth of testable new hypotheses. At the same time, it introduces core theoretical questions regarding…

  13. Segment Specification for the Payload Segment of the Reusable Reentry Satellite: Rodent Module Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) System is composed of the payload segment (PS), vehicle segment (VS), and mission support (MS) segments. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the RRS Rodent Module (RM).

  14. Application Specific Electronic Module Program (ASEM), Final Technical Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-14

    Highlights and Accomplishments Associated with the Establishment of a Merchant MCM Foundry and Infrastructure. 14. S5U• ECT TERMS 15. NUM’•BER Of PAGESI...at IBM Microelectronics who built, assembled, and tested the demonstration vehicles 5 These people were invaluable in steering the activity and making ...2.1.1.1.3) Requirements Trade off tools are used to help make early decisions about specific alternatives and their impact to product objectives, even

  15. Practical guidelines addressing ethical issues pertaining to the curation of human locus-specific variation databases (LSDBs)

    PubMed Central

    Povey, Sue; Al Aqeel, Aida I; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dalgleish, Raymond; den Dunnen, Johan T; Firth, Helen V; Greenblatt, Marc S; Barash, Carol Isaacson; Parker, Michael; Patrinos, George P; Savige, Judith; Sobrido, Maria-Jesus; Winship, Ingrid; Cotton, Richard GH

    2010-01-01

    More than 1,000 Web-based locus-specific variation databases (LSDBs) are listed on the Website of the Human Genetic Variation Society (HGVS). These individual efforts, which often relate phenotype to genotype, are a valuable source of information for clinicians, patients, and their families, as well as for basic research. The initiators of the Human Variome Project recently recognized that having access to some of the immense resources of unpublished information already present in diagnostic laboratories would provide critical data to help manage genetic disorders. However, there are significant ethical issues involved in sharing these data worldwide. An international working group presents second-generation guidelines addressing ethical issues relating to the curation of human LSDBs that provide information via a Web-based interface. It is intended that these should help current and future curators and may also inform the future decisions of ethics committees and legislators. These guidelines have been reviewed by the Ethics Committee of the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). Hum Mutat 31:–6, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20683926

  16. Modulation of monocarboxylate transporter 8 oligomerization by specific pathogenic mutations.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jana; Kleinau, Gunnar; Müller, Anne; Kühnen, Peter; Zwanziger, Denise; Kinne, Anita; Rehders, Maren; Moeller, Lars C; Führer, Dagmar; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Brix, Klaudia; Biebermann, Heike

    2015-02-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). These membrane-spanning proteins facilitate translocation of a variety of substrates, MCT8 specifically transports iodothyronines. Mutations in MCT8 are the underlying cause of severe X-linked psychomotor retardation. At the molecular level, such mutations led to deficiencies in substrate translocation due to reduced cell-surface expression, impaired substrate binding, or decreased substrate translocation capabilities. However, the causal relationships between genotypes, molecular features of mutated MCT8, and patient characteristics have not yet been comprehensively deciphered. We investigated the relationship between pathogenic mutants of MCT8 and their capacity to form dimers (presumably oligomeric structures) as a potential regulatory parameter of the transport function of MCT8. Fourteen pathogenic variants of MCT8 were investigated in vitro with respect to their capacity to form oligomers. Particular mutations close to the substrate translocation channel (S194F, A224T, L434W, and R445C) were found to inhibit dimerization of MCT8. This finding is in contrast to those for other transporters or transmembrane proteins, in which substitutions predominantly at the outer-surface inhibit oligomerization. Moreover, specific mutations of MCT8 located in transmembrane helix 2 (del230F, V235M, and ins236V) increased the capacity of MCT8 variants to dimerize. We analyzed the localization of MCT8 dimers in a cellular context, demonstrating differences in MCT8 dimer formation and distribution. In summary, our results add a new link between the functions (substrate transport) and protein organization (dimerization) of MCT8, and might be of relevance for other members of the MFS. Finally, the findings are discussed in relationship to functional data combined with structural-mechanistical insights into MCT8.

  17. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 4: Mission peculiar spacecraft segment and module specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The specifications for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) peculiar spacecraft segment and associated subsystems and modules are presented. The specifications considered include the following: (1) wideband communications subsystem module, (2) mission peculiar software, (3) hydrazine propulsion subsystem module, (4) solar array assembly, and (5) the scanning spectral radiometer.

  18. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  19. Infrared to visible image up-conversion using optically addressed spatial light modulator utilizing liquid crystal and InGaAs photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Solodar, A. Arun Kumar, T.; Sarusi, G.; Abdulhalim, I.

    2016-01-11

    Combination of InGaAs/InP heterojunction photodetector with nematic liquid crystal (LC) as the electro-optic modulating material for optically addressed spatial light modulator for short wavelength infra-red (SWIR) to visible light image conversion was designed, fabricated, and tested. The photodetector layer is composed of 640 × 512 photodiodes array based on heterojunction InP/InGaAs having 15 μm pitch on InP substrate and with backside illumination architecture. The photodiodes exhibit extremely low, dark current at room temperature, with optimum photo-response in the SWIR region. The photocurrent generated in the heterojunction, due to the SWIR photons absorption, is drifted to the surface of the InP, thus modulating the electric field distribution which modifies the orientation of the LC molecules. This device can be attractive for SWIR to visible image upconversion, such as for uncooled night vision goggles under low ambient light conditions.

  20. Infrared to visible image up-conversion using optically addressed spatial light modulator utilizing liquid crystal and InGaAs photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodar, A.; Arun Kumar, T.; Sarusi, G.; Abdulhalim, I.

    2016-01-01

    Combination of InGaAs/InP heterojunction photodetector with nematic liquid crystal (LC) as the electro-optic modulating material for optically addressed spatial light modulator for short wavelength infra-red (SWIR) to visible light image conversion was designed, fabricated, and tested. The photodetector layer is composed of 640 × 512 photodiodes array based on heterojunction InP/InGaAs having 15 μm pitch on InP substrate and with backside illumination architecture. The photodiodes exhibit extremely low, dark current at room temperature, with optimum photo-response in the SWIR region. The photocurrent generated in the heterojunction, due to the SWIR photons absorption, is drifted to the surface of the InP, thus modulating the electric field distribution which modifies the orientation of the LC molecules. This device can be attractive for SWIR to visible image upconversion, such as for uncooled night vision goggles under low ambient light conditions.

  1. Differential recognition of plant cell walls by microbial xylan-specific carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Lesley; Blake, Anthony W; Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Boraston, Alisdair B; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2006-03-21

    Glycoside hydrolases that degrade plant cell walls have complex molecular architectures in which one or more catalytic modules are appended to noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs promote binding to polysaccharides and potentiate enzymic hydrolysis. Although there are diverse sequence-based families of xylan-binding CBMs, these modules, in general, recognize both decorated and unsubstituted forms of the target polysaccharide, and thus the evolutionary rationale for this diversity is unclear. Using immunohistochemistry to interrogate the specificity of six xylan-binding CBMs for their target polysaccharides in cell walls has revealed considerable differences in the recognition of plant materials between these protein modules. Family 2b and 15 CBMs bind to xylan in secondary cell walls in a range of dicotyledon species, whereas family 4, 6, and 22 CBMs display a more limited capability to bind to secondary cell walls. A family 35 CBM, which displays more restricted ligand specificity against purified xylans than the other five protein modules, reveals a highly distinctive binding pattern to plant material including the recognition of primary cell walls of certain dicotyledons, a feature shared with CBM15. Differences in the specificity of the CBMs toward walls of wheat grain and maize coleoptiles were also evident. The variation in CBM specificity for ligands located in plant cell walls provides a biological rationale for the repertoire of structurally distinct xylan-binding CBMs present in nature, and points to the utility of these modules in probing the molecular architecture of cell walls.

  2. Modulation of Automatic Semantic Priming by Feature-Specific Attention Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spruyt, Adriaan; De Houwer, Jan; Hermans, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the semantic analysis of task-irrelevant stimuli is modulated by feature-specific attention allocation. In line with this hypothesis, we found semantic priming of pronunciation responses to depend upon the extent to which participants focused their attention upon specific semantic stimulus dimensions. In Experiment 1, we examined the…

  3. Block 4 solar cell module design and test specification for residential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Near-term design, qualification and acceptance requirements are provided for terrestrial solar cell modules suitable for incorporation in photovoltaic power sources (2 kW to 10 kW) applied to single family residential installations. Requirement levels and recommended design limits for selected performance criteria are specified for modules intended principally for rooftop installations. Modules satisfying the requirements of this specification fall into one of two categories, residential panel or residential shingle, both meeting general performance requirements plus additional category peculiar constraints.

  4. Two-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry with a superimposed grating displayed on an electrically addressed spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Bitou, Youichi

    2005-03-20

    A two-wavelength moire phase-shifting interferometer that uses a superimposed grating has been developed. The optical phase shifts for the two wavelengths are given by digital phase shifts of a superimposed grating displayed on a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. A phase shift of the moire fringe is achieved by equal phase shifts with opposite signs in the two gratings. A moire phase-shifting interferometer with no moving parts and no requirement for calibration of the value of the phase shifts was obtained. Our experimental result shows measurements of the profile of a step object with a 2.65-microm synthetic wavelength.

  5. Preexisting antigen-specific immune responses are modulated by oral KLH feeding in humans.

    PubMed

    Hostmann, Arwed; Meyer, Tim; Maul, Jochen; Preiss, Jan; Boortz, Bertram; Thiel, Andreas; Duchmann, Rainer; Ullrich, Reiner

    2015-07-01

    Oral tolerance is the antigen-specific inhibition of a systemic immune response after oral antigen uptake and well established in animal models. We recently showed that keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) feeding modulates subsequently induced systemic immune responses in humans as well. In the present study, we investigated whether oral KLH can also modulate preexisting antigen-specific systemic B- and T-cell responses. We induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions as well as systemic KLH-specific B- and T-cell responses by subcutaneous KLH injections. Subsequent oral KLH administration decreased the small proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the cytokine IL-17 at the end of the feeding regimen even further. After reimmunization, there was no difference in DTH reactions and the KLH-specific B-cell responses, but KLH-fed volunteers had an increased proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for IL-10 and a reduced proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the skin-homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and IL-2 and IFN-γ. Taken together, oral KLH can modulate a preexisting systemic KLH-specific immune response. These results suggest that feeding antigen may offer therapeutic strategies for the suppression of unwanted immune reactions in humans.

  6. Functional cis-regulatory modules encoded by mouse-specific endogenous retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vasavi; Choudhary, Mayank N. K.; Pehrsson, Erica; Xing, Xiaoyun; Fiore, Christopher; Pandey, Manishi; Maricque, Brett; Udawatta, Methma; Ngo, Duc; Chen, Yujie; Paguntalan, Asia; Ray, Tammy; Hughes, Ava; Cohen, Barak A.; Wang, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Cis-regulatory modules contain multiple transcription factor (TF)-binding sites and integrate the effects of each TF to control gene expression in specific cellular contexts. Transposable elements (TEs) are uniquely equipped to deposit their regulatory sequences across a genome, which could also contain cis-regulatory modules that coordinate the control of multiple genes with the same regulatory logic. We provide the first evidence of mouse-specific TEs that encode a module of TF-binding sites in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The majority (77%) of the individual TEs tested exhibited enhancer activity in mouse ESCs. By mutating individual TF-binding sites within the TE, we identified a module of TF-binding motifs that cooperatively enhanced gene expression. Interestingly, we also observed the same motif module in the in silico constructed ancestral TE that also acted cooperatively to enhance gene expression. Our results suggest that ancestral TE insertions might have brought in cis-regulatory modules into the mouse genome. PMID:28348391

  7. Functional 5-HT1a receptor polymorphism selectively modulates error-specific subprocesses of performance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Domschke, Katharina; Kolev, Vasil; Yordanova, Juliana; Baffa, Anna; Falkenstein, Michael; Konrad, Carsten

    2010-04-01

    Our study investigates the dependence of response monitoring and error detection on genetic influences modulating the serotonergic system. This was done using the event-related potentials (ERPs) after error (Ne/ERN) and correct trials (Nc/CRN). To induce a sufficient amount of errors, a standard flanker task was used. The subjects (N = 94) were genotyped for the functional 5-HT1A C(-1019)G polymorphism. The results show that the 5-HT1A C(-1019)G polymorphism specifically modulates error detection. Neurophysiological modulations on error detection were paralleled by a similar modulation of response slowing after an error, reflecting the behavioral adaptation. The 5-HT1A -1019 CC genotype group showed a larger Ne and stronger posterror slowing than the CG and GG genotype groups. More general processes of performance monitoring, as reflected in the Nc/CRN, were not affected. The finding that error-specific processes, but not general response monitoring processes, are modulated by the 5-HT1A C(-1019)G polymorphism is underlined by a wavelet analysis. In summary, the results suggest a specific effect of the 5-HT1A C(-1019)G polymorphism on error monitoring, as reflected in the Ne, and suggest a neurobiological dissociation between processes of error monitoring and general response monitoring at the level of the serotonin 1A receptor system.

  8. Photochromic dithienylethene-containing triarylborane derivatives: facile approach to modulate photochromic properties with multi-addressable functions.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chun-Ting; Lam, Wai Han; Wong, Hok-Lai; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2015-01-26

    A series of dithienylethene-containing triarylboranes has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The electrochemistry, photophysics, and photochromic behavior have also been studied. The photophysical and photochromic properties could be facilely tuned in this system by varying the thiophene spacers (thiophene, thienothiophene, and bithiophene) between the dithienylethene and the dimesitylboron (BMes2 ) or the position of the BMes2 substitution in the thiophene spacers. The absorption of closed form has been found to be more sensitive towards the structural modification upon incorporation of the BMes2 unit. Moreover, multi-addressable photochromic reactivity is obtained upon addition of Lewis base (F(-) ), which is due to the formation of boron-Lewis base adduct. The dependence of the photophysical and photochromic properties on the thiophene spacers and the position of the BMes2 substitution has been further supported by computational studies.

  9. The 2011 Leona Tyler Award Address: The Relationship--And Its Relationship to the Common and Specific Factors of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    A debate exists about whether the common factors or specific ingredients are critical to producing the benefits of psychotherapy. A model of the relationship, based on evolved human characteristics related to healing, is presented that integrates common factors and specific ingredients. After the initial bond is formed, the relationship involves…

  10. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 3: General purpose spacecraft segment and module specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The specifications for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) general purpose aircraft segment are presented. The satellite is designed to provide attitude stabilization, electrical power, and a communications data handling subsystem which can support various mission peculiar subsystems. The various specifications considered include the following: (1) structures subsystem, (2) thermal control subsystem, (3) communications and data handling subsystem module, (4) attitude control subsystem module, (5) power subsystem module, and (6) electrical integration subsystem.

  11. Integrated module and gene-specific regulatory inference implicates upstream signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sushmita; Lagree, Stephen; Hou, Zhonggang; Thomson, James A; Stewart, Ron; Gasch, Audrey P

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks that control gene expression are important in diverse biological contexts including stress response and development. Each gene's regulatory program is determined by module-level regulation (e.g. co-regulation via the same signaling system), as well as gene-specific determinants that can fine-tune expression. We present a novel approach, Modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), that infers regulatory programs for individual genes while probabilistically constraining these programs to reveal module-level organization of regulatory networks. Using edge-, regulator- and module-based comparisons of simulated networks of known ground truth, we find MERLIN reconstructs regulatory programs of individual genes as well or better than existing approaches of network reconstruction, while additionally identifying modular organization of the regulatory networks. We use MERLIN to dissect global transcriptional behavior in two biological contexts: yeast stress response and human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Regulatory modules inferred by MERLIN capture co-regulatory relationships between signaling proteins and downstream transcription factors thereby revealing the upstream signaling systems controlling transcriptional responses. The inferred networks are enriched for regulators with genetic or physical interactions, supporting the inference, and identify modules of functionally related genes bound by the same transcriptional regulators. Our method combines the strengths of per-gene and per-module methods to reveal new insights into transcriptional regulation in stress and development.

  12. Integrated Module and Gene-Specific Regulatory Inference Implicates Upstream Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sushmita; Lagree, Stephen; Hou, Zhonggang; Thomson, James A.; Stewart, Ron; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks that control gene expression are important in diverse biological contexts including stress response and development. Each gene's regulatory program is determined by module-level regulation (e.g. co-regulation via the same signaling system), as well as gene-specific determinants that can fine-tune expression. We present a novel approach, Modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), that infers regulatory programs for individual genes while probabilistically constraining these programs to reveal module-level organization of regulatory networks. Using edge-, regulator- and module-based comparisons of simulated networks of known ground truth, we find MERLIN reconstructs regulatory programs of individual genes as well or better than existing approaches of network reconstruction, while additionally identifying modular organization of the regulatory networks. We use MERLIN to dissect global transcriptional behavior in two biological contexts: yeast stress response and human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Regulatory modules inferred by MERLIN capture co-regulatory relationships between signaling proteins and downstream transcription factors thereby revealing the upstream signaling systems controlling transcriptional responses. The inferred networks are enriched for regulators with genetic or physical interactions, supporting the inference, and identify modules of functionally related genes bound by the same transcriptional regulators. Our method combines the strengths of per-gene and per-module methods to reveal new insights into transcriptional regulation in stress and development. PMID:24146602

  13. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-11-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer.

  14. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J.; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P.; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-01-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer. PMID:24206915

  15. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-7, Radiographic Specifications and Code Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Rick; Espy, John

    This seventh in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I describes radiographic specifications and code requirements. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  16. Institution-Specific Victimization Surveys: Addressing Legal and Practical Disincentives to Gender-Based Violence Reporting on College Campuses.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Nancy Chi

    2014-07-01

    This review brings together both the legal literature and original empirical research regarding the advisability of amending the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act or creating new Department of Education regulations to mandate that all higher education institutions survey their students approximately every 5 years about students' experiences with sexual violence. Legal research conducted regarding the three relevant federal legal regimes show inconsistent incentives for schools to encourage victim reporting and proactively address sexual violence on campus. Moreover, the original research carried out for this article shows that the experience of institutions that have voluntarily conducted such surveys suggests many benefits not only for students, prospective students, parents, and the general public but also for schools themselves. These experiences confirm the practical viability of a mandated survey by the Department of Education.

  17. Isozyme-Specific Effects of Protein Kinase C in Pain Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chengshui; Leitges, Michael; Gereau, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases that contains more than 10 isozymes. Evidence suggests that PKC may play important roles in pain modulation, but the isozyme-specific effects of PKC on different aspects of pain modulation are not fully understood. We hypothesize that different PKC isozymes play different roles in different aspects of pain modulation. Methods The nociceptive behaviors of mice with deletion of PKC α, β, γ, or δ in multiple pain models were compared with their respective wild type littermates. Also, the morphine analgesia and the development of morphine tolerance in mice with deletion of PKC γ were compared with their respective wild type littermates. Results Thermal hyperalgesia induced by complete Freund’s adjuvant injection was significantly attenuated by the deletion of PKC β, γ or δ, but not PKC α. Deletion of PKC γ significantly attenuated neuropathic mechanical allodynia induced by spared nerve injury, whereas deletion of PKC α enhanced this allodynia. Baseline thermal and mechanical sensitivity, nociceptive behaviors induced by formalin, mechanical allodynia induced by complete Freund’s adjuvant injection, were not altered by deletion of PKC α, β, γ or δ. Finally, morphine analgesia and the development of morphine tolerance were not altered in PKC γ-deficient mice. Conclusions PKC plays isozyme-specific effects in pain modulation. PMID:22042410

  18. Causal co-expression method with module analysis to screen drugs with specific target.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuhao; Zheng, Lulu; Li, Yixue; Li, Chunyan; Ma, Chenchen; Yu, Yang; Li, Xuan; Hao, Pei

    2013-04-10

    The considerable increase of investment in research and development by the pharmaceutical industry over the past three decades has not added the number of approved new drugs. An important issue ignored by drug discovery practice is the multi-dimensional interaction network between drugs and their targets. Thus, it is essential to view drug actions through the lens of network biology. In the current study, based on the co-expression network of transcription factors and their downstream genes, we proposed a novel approach, called causal co-expression method with module analysis, to screen drugs with specific target and fewer side effects. We presented a causal co-expression method with module analysis and it could be used in analyzing the microarray data of different drug candidates. At first, the differential wiring value (DW) was calculated to find some causal transcription factors (TFs) by combining with differential expression genes in the regulated networks. After the discovery of the causal TFs, co-expression module analysis method was applied to mine molecular pharmacology pathways around these causal TFs at molecular level. We applied our methods to two drug candidates, Argyrin A and Bortezomib, both with anti-cancer activities. We first obtained some differentially expressed transcription factors of cells treated with Argyrin A or Bortezomib. Nearly all these transcription factors are associated with the tumor suppressor protein p27kip1. Furthermore, module analysis showed that Bortezomib inhibited tumor growth not specifically by cell cycle and cell proliferation pathway, but through many basic metabolic processes which result in cell toxicity. In contrast, Argyrin A had influence on cell cycle, and was involved in DNA damage repair at the same time, showing that Argyrin A was a more suitable drug for anti-cancer treatment. Our study revealed that the causal co-expression method with module analysis was effective and can be used as a tool to evaluate drug

  19. Biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis in C olletotrichum graminicola is required for modulation of immune responses of maize

    PubMed Central

    Albarouki, Emad; Schafferer, Lukas; Ye, Fanghua; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Haas, Hubertus; Deising, Holger B

    2014-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen C olletotrichum graminicola synthesizes one intracellular and three secreted siderophores. eGFP fusions with the key siderophore biosynthesis gene, SID1, encoding l-ornithine-N 5-monooxygenase, suggested that siderophore biosynthesis is rigorously downregulated specifically during biotrophic development. In order to investigate the role of siderophores during vegetative development and pathogenesis, SID1, which is required for synthesis of all siderophores, and the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene NPS6, synthesizing secreted siderophores, were deleted. Mutant analyses revealed that siderophores are required for vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, ROS tolerance, and cell wall integrity. Δsid1 and Δnps6 mutants were hampered in formation of melanized appressoria and impaired in virulence. In agreement with biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis, Δsid1 and Δnps6 strains were not affected in biotrophic development, but spread of necrotrophic hyphae was reduced. To address the question why siderophore biosynthesis is specifically downregulated in biotrophic hyphae, maize leaves were infiltrated with siderophores. Siderophore infiltration alone did not induce defence responses, but formation of biotrophic hyphae in siderophore-infiltrated leaves caused dramatically increased ROS formation and transcriptional activation of genes encoding defence-related peroxidases and PR proteins. These data suggest that fungal siderophores modulate the plant immune system. PMID:24674132

  20. Biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis in Colletotrichum graminicola is required for modulation of immune responses of maize.

    PubMed

    Albarouki, Emad; Schafferer, Lukas; Ye, Fanghua; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Haas, Hubertus; Deising, Holger B

    2014-04-01

    The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola synthesizes one intracellular and three secreted siderophores. eGFP fusions with the key siderophore biosynthesis gene, SID1, encoding l-ornithine-N(5) -monooxygenase, suggested that siderophore biosynthesis is rigorously downregulated specifically during biotrophic development. In order to investigate the role of siderophores during vegetative development and pathogenesis, SID1, which is required for synthesis of all siderophores, and the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene NPS6, synthesizing secreted siderophores, were deleted. Mutant analyses revealed that siderophores are required for vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, ROS tolerance, and cell wall integrity. Δsid1 and Δnps6 mutants were hampered in formation of melanized appressoria and impaired in virulence. In agreement with biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis, Δsid1 and Δnps6 strains were not affected in biotrophic development, but spread of necrotrophic hyphae was reduced. To address the question why siderophore biosynthesis is specifically downregulated in biotrophic hyphae, maize leaves were infiltrated with siderophores. Siderophore infiltration alone did not induce defence responses, but formation of biotrophic hyphae in siderophore-infiltrated leaves caused dramatically increased ROS formation and transcriptional activation of genes encoding defence-related peroxidases and PR proteins. These data suggest that fungal siderophores modulate the plant immune system.

  1. Addressing Adherence Using Genotype-Specific PBPK Modeling—Impact of Drug Holidays on Tamoxifen and Endoxifen Plasma Levels

    PubMed Central

    Dickschen, Kristin J. R.; Willmann, Stefan; Hempel, Georg; Block, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Tamoxifen is one of the most common treatment opportunities for hormonal positive breast cancer. Despite its good tolerability, patients demonstrate decreasing adherence over years impacting on therapeutic success. PBPK modeling was applied to demonstrate the impact of drug holidays on plasma levels of tamoxifen and its active metabolite endoxifen for different CYP2D6 genotypes. Materials and Methods: A virtual study with 24,000 patients was conducted in order to investigate the development of tamoxifen steady-state kinetics in patient groups of different CYP2D6 genotypes. The impact of drug holidays on steady-state kinetics was investigated assuming changing drug holiday scenarios. Results: Drug holidays in CYP2D6 extensive and intermediate metabolizers (EMs, IMs) exceeding 1 month lead to a decrease of endoxifen steady-state trough levels below the 5th percentile of the control group. Assuming drug holidays of 1, 2, or 3 months and administering a fixed-dose combination of 20 mg tamoxifen and 3 mg endoxifen EMs demonstrated re-established endoxifen steady-state trough levels after 5, 8, and 9 days. IMs receiving the same fixed-dose combination demonstrated re-established endoxifen steady-state trough levels after 7, 10, and 11 days. Discussion: The PBPK model impressively demonstrates the impact of drug holidays in different CYP2D6 genotypes on PK. Population simulation results indicate that drug holidays of more than 2 weeks cause a tremendous decrease of plasma levels despite the long half-life of tamoxifen. To improve therapeutic success, PBPK modeling allows identifying genotype-specific differences in PK following drug holidays and adequate treatment with loading doses. PMID:28382001

  2. Specific Ions Modulate Diffusion Dynamics of Hydration Water on Lipid Membrane Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Effects of specific ions on the local translational diffusion of water near large hydrophilic lipid vesicle surfaces were measured by Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP). ODNP relies on an unpaired electron spin-containing probe located at molecular or surface sites to report on the dynamics of water protons within ∼10 Å from the spin probe, which give rise to spectral densities for electron–proton cross-relaxation processes in the 10 GHz regime. This pushes nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry to more than an order of magnitude higher frequencies than conventionally feasible, permitting the measurement of water moving with picosecond to subnanosecond correlation times. Diffusion of water within ∼10 Å of, i.e., up to ∼3 water layers around the spin probes located on hydrophilic lipid vesicle surfaces is ∼5 times retarded compared to the bulk water translational diffusion. This directly reflects on the activation barrier for surface water diffusion, i.e., how tightly water is bound to the hydrophilic surface and surrounding waters. We find this value to be modulated by the presence of specific ions in solution, with its order following the known Hofmeister series. While a molecular description of how ions affect the hydration structure at the hydrophilic surface remains to be answered, the finding that Hofmeister ions directly modulate the surface water diffusivity implies that the strength of the hydrogen bond network of surface hydration water is directly modulated on hydrophilic surfaces. PMID:24456096

  3. Histone deacetylases control module-specific phenotypic plasticity in beetle weapons

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Takane; Mizuhara, Tomoko; Arata, Masataka; Shimada, Masakazu; Niimi, Teruyuki; Okada, Kensuke; Okada, Yasukazu; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional conditions during early development influence the plastic expression of adult phenotypes. Among several body modules of animals, the development of sexually selected exaggerated traits exhibits striking nutrition sensitivity, resulting in positive allometry and hypervariability distinct from other traits. Using de novo RNA sequencing and comprehensive RNA interference (RNAi) for epigenetic modifying factors, we found that histone deacetylases (HDACs) and polycomb group (PcG) proteins preferentially influence the size of mandibles (exaggerated male weapon) and demonstrate nutrition-dependent hypervariability in the broad-horned flour beetle, Gnatocerus cornutus. RNAi-mediated HDAC1 knockdown (KD) in G. cornutus larvae caused specific curtailment of mandibles in adults, whereas HDAC3 KD led to hypertrophy. Notably, these KDs conferred opposite effects on wing size, but little effect on the size of the core body and genital modules. PcG RNAi also reduced adult mandible size. These results suggest that the plastic development of exaggerated traits is controlled in a module-specific manner by HDACs. PMID:27956627

  4. Role of architecture in the function and specificity of two Notch-regulated transcriptional enhancer modules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Posakony, James W

    2012-07-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, cis-regulatory modules that are activated by the Notch cell-cell signaling pathway all contain two types of transcription factor binding sites: those for the pathway's transducing factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] and those for one or more tissue- or cell type-specific factors called "local activators." The use of different "Su(H) plus local activator" motif combinations, or codes, is critical to ensure that only the correct subset of the broadly utilized Notch pathway's target genes are activated in each developmental context. However, much less is known about the role of enhancer "architecture"--the number, order, spacing, and orientation of its component transcription factor binding motifs--in determining the module's specificity. Here we investigate the relationship between architecture and function for two Notch-regulated enhancers with spatially distinct activities, each of which includes five high-affinity Su(H) sites. We find that the first, which is active specifically in the socket cells of external sensory organs, is largely resistant to perturbations of its architecture. By contrast, the second enhancer, active in the "non-SOP" cells of the proneural clusters from which neural precursors arise, is sensitive to even simple rearrangements of its transcription factor binding sites, responding with both loss of normal specificity and striking ectopic activity. Thus, diverse cryptic specificities can be inherent in an enhancer's particular combination of transcription factor binding motifs. We propose that for certain types of enhancer, architecture plays an essential role in determining specificity, not only by permitting factor-factor synergies necessary to generate the desired activity, but also by preventing other activator synergies that would otherwise lead to unwanted specificities.

  5. Specific directions of ultrasound propagation in double potassium tungstates for light modulation.

    PubMed

    Mazur, M M; Mazur, L I; Pozhar, V E

    2017-01-01

    Acousto-optical characteristics of double potassium tungstates are analyzed and specific directions for light modulation are found. First, an important subgroup of elasto-optic coefficients of KYb(WO4)2 and KLu(WO4)2 crystals are calculated with use of experimental data. It is revealed that with proper choice of ultrasound direction the acousto-optical figure-of-merit approximately 2 times exceeds the maximum value detected in previous experiments. Another unique direction is determined, which permits modulation of randomly polarized light. The elasto-optic characteristics of KYb(WO4)2 and KLu(WO4)2 crystals are compared to those of previously investigated materials of the same crystal group: KY(WO4)2, KGd(WO4)2.

  6. Seeing the body produces limb-specific modulation of skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Sadibolova, Renata; Longo, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Vision of the body, even when non-informative about stimulation, affects somatosensory processing. We investigated whether seeing the body also modulates autonomic control in the periphery by measuring skin temperature while manipulating vision. Using a mirror box, the skin temperature was measured from left hand dorsum while participants: (i) had the illusion of seeing their left hand, (ii) had the illusion of seeing an object at the same location or (iii) looked directly at their contralateral right hand. Skin temperature of the left hand increased when participants had the illusion of directly seeing that hand but not in the other two view conditions. In experiment 2, participants viewed directly their left or right hand, or the box while we recorded both hand dorsum temperatures. Temperature increased in the viewed hand but not the contralateral hand. These results show that seeing the body produces limb-specific modulation of thermal regulation.

  7. Research into Specific Modulators of Vascular Sex Hormone Receptors in the Management of Postmenopausal Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Graciliano R. A.; Barros, Yaskara V. R.; Wells, Amanda K.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women than premenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of female sex hormones. Studies on the vasculature have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30, that mediate genomic and/or non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by inducing the production/activity of nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor, and inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C, Rho kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the cytoskeleton, matrix metalloproteinases and inflammatory factors contribute to vascular remodeling. However, the experimental evidence did not translate into vascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), and the HERS, HERS-II and WHI clinical trials demonstrated adverse cardiovascular events. The discrepancy has been partly related to delayed MHT and potential changes in the vascular ER amount, integrity, affinity, and downstream signaling pathways due to the subjects' age and preexisting CVD. The adverse vascular effects of MHT also highlighted the need of specific modulators of vascular sex hormone receptors. The effectiveness of MHT can be improved by delineating the differences in phramcokinetics and pharmacodynamics of natural, synthetic, and conjugated equine estrogens. Estriol, “hormone bioidenticals” and phytoestrogens are potential estradiol substitutes. The benefits of low dose MHT, and transdermal or vaginal estrogens over oral preparations are being evaluated. Specific ER modulators (SERMs) and ER agonists are being developed to maximize the effects on vascular ERs. Also, the effects of estrogen are being examined in the context of the whole body hormonal environment and the levels of progesterone and androgens. Thus, the experimental vascular benefits of estrogen can be translated to

  8. Three dimensional patient-specific collagen architecture modulates cartilage responses in the knee joint during gait.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Mononen, Mika E; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific variation of collagen fibril orientations can affect cartilage stresses in knee joints. However, this has not been confirmed by 3-D analyses. Therefore, we present a novel method for evaluation of the effect of patient-specific collagen architecture on time-dependent mechanical responses of knee joint cartilage during gait. 3-D finite element (FE) models of a human knee joint were created with the collagen architectures obtained from T2 mapped MRI (patient-specific model) and from literature (literature model). The effect of accuracy of the implementation of collagen fibril architecture into the model was examined by using a submodel with denser FE mesh. Compared to the literature model, fibril strains and maximum principal stresses were reduced especially in the superficial/middle regions of medial tibial cartilage in the patient-specific model after the loading response of gait (up to -413 and -26%, respectively). Compared to the more coarsely meshed joint model, the patient-specific submodel demonstrated similar strain and stress distributions but increased values particularly in the superficial cartilage regions (especially stresses increased >60%). The results demonstrate that implementation of subject-specific collagen architecture of cartilage in 3-D modulates location- and time-dependent mechanical responses of human knee joint cartilage. Submodeling with more accurate implementation of collagen fibril architecture alters cartilage stresses particularly in the superficial/middle tissue.

  9. Modulation of auditory brainstem responses by serotonin and specific serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Melissa A; Hurley, Laura M

    2016-02-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is found throughout the auditory system from the cochlea to the cortex. Although effects of serotonin have been reported at the level of single neurons in many brainstem nuclei, how these effects correspond to more integrated measures of auditory processing has not been well-explored. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effects of serotonin on far-field auditory brainstem responses (ABR) across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and intensities. Using a mouse model, we investigated the consequences of systemic serotonin depletion, as well as the selective stimulation and suppression of the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, on ABR latency and amplitude. Stimuli included tone pips spanning four octaves presented over a forty dB range. Depletion of serotonin reduced the ABR latencies in Wave II and later waves, suggesting that serotonergic effects occur as early as the cochlear nucleus. Further, agonists and antagonists of specific serotonergic receptors had different profiles of effects on ABR latencies and amplitudes across waves and frequencies, suggestive of distinct effects of these agents on auditory processing. Finally, most serotonergic effects were more pronounced at lower ABR frequencies, suggesting larger or more directional modulation of low-frequency processing. This is the first study to describe the effects of serotonin on ABR responses across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes, and it presents an important step in understanding how serotonergic modulation of auditory brainstem processing may contribute to modulation of auditory perception.

  10. Cell-Specific Fine-Tuning of Neuronal Excitability by Differential Expression of Modulator Protein Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, James; Sheldon, Amanda; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Fei, Hong; Koh, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    SLOB (SLOWPOKE-binding protein) modulates the Drosophila SLOWPOKE calcium-activated potassium channel. We have shown previously that SLOB deletion or RNAi knockdown decreases excitability of neurosecretory pars intercerebralis (PI) neurons in the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, we found that SLOB deletion/knockdown enhances neurotransmitter release from motor neurons at the fly larval neuromuscular junction, suggesting an increase in excitability. Because two prominent SLOB isoforms, SLOB57 and SLOB71, modulate SLOWPOKE channels in opposite directions in vitro, we investigated whether divergent expression patterns of these two isoforms might underlie the differential modulation of excitability in PI and motor neurons. By performing detailed in vitro and in vivo analysis, we found strikingly different modes of regulatory control by the slob57 and slob71 promoters. The slob71, but not slob57, promoter contains binding sites for the Hunchback and Mirror transcriptional repressors. Furthermore, several core promoter elements that are absent in the slob57 promoter coordinately drive robust expression of a luciferase vector by the slob71 promoter in vitro. In addition, we visualized the expression patterns of the slob57 and slob71 promoters in vivo and found clear spatiotemporal differences in promoter activity. SLOB57 is expressed prominently in adult PI neurons, whereas larval motor neurons exclusively express SLOB71. In contrast, at the larval neuromuscular junction, SLOB57 expression appears to be restricted mainly to a subset of glial cells. Our results illustrate how the use of alternative transcriptional start sites within an ion channel modulator locus coupled with functionally relevant alternative splicing can be used to fine-tune neuronal excitability in a cell-specific manner. PMID:24133277

  11. CB(1) receptor allosteric modulators display both agonist and signaling pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Gemma L; Horswill, James G; Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Reggio, Patricia H; Bolognini, Daniele; Abood, Mary E; McAllister, Sean; Strange, Phillip G; Stephens, Gary J; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2013-02-01

    We have previously identified allosteric modulators of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor (Org 27569, PSNCBAM-1) that display a contradictory pharmacological profile: increasing the specific binding of the CB(1) receptor agonist [(3)H]CP55940 but producing a decrease in CB(1) receptor agonist efficacy. Here we investigated the effect one or both compounds in a broad range of signaling endpoints linked to CB(1) receptor activation. We assessed the effect of these compounds on CB(1) receptor agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding, inhibition, and stimulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and β-arrestin recruitment. We also investigated the effect of these allosteric modulators on CB(1) agonist binding kinetics. Both compounds display ligand dependence, being significantly more potent as modulators of CP55940 signaling as compared with WIN55212 and having little effect on [(3)H]WIN55212 binding. Org 27569 displays biased antagonism whereby it inhibits: agonist-induced guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding, simulation (Gα(s)-mediated), and inhibition (Gα(i)-mediated) of cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment. In contrast, it acts as an enhancer of agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation. Alone, the compound can act also as an allosteric agonist, increasing cAMP production and ERK phosphorylation. We find that in both saturation and kinetic-binding experiments, the Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1 appeared to influence only orthosteric ligand maximum occupancy rather than affinity. The data indicate that the allosteric modulators share a common mechanism whereby they increase available high-affinity CB(1) agonist binding sites. The receptor conformation stabilized by the allosterics appears to induce signaling and also selectively traffics orthosteric agonist signaling via the ERK phosphorylation pathway.

  12. Oxytocin modulates female sociosexual behavior through a specific class of prefrontal cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Miho; Görlich, Andreas; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human imaging studies have revealed that intranasal administration of the “prosocial” hormone oxytocin (OT) activates the frontal cortex, and that this action of OT correlates with enhanced brain function in autism. Here we report the discovery of a population of somatostatin (Sst) positive, regular spiking interneurons that express the oxytocin receptor (OxtrINs). Silencing of OxtrINs in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of female mice resulted in loss of social interest in male mice specifically during the sexually receptive phase of the estrous cycle. This sociosexual deficit was also present in mice in which the Oxtr gene was conditionally deleted from the mPFC, and in control mice infused with an Oxtr antagonist. Our data demonstrate a gender, cell type and state specific role for OT/Oxtr signaling in the mPFC, and identify a latent cortical circuit element that may modulate other complex social behaviors in response to OT. PMID:25303526

  13. Behavior-specific changes in transcriptional modules lead to distinct and predictable neurogenomic states

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Ament, Seth A.; Eddy, James A.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Schatz, Bruce R.; Price, Nathan D.; Robinson, Gene E.

    2011-01-01

    Using brain transcriptomic profiles from 853 individual honey bees exhibiting 48 distinct behavioral phenotypes in naturalistic contexts, we report that behavior-specific neurogenomic states can be inferred from the coordinated action of transcription factors (TFs) and their predicted target genes. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of these transcriptomic profiles showed three clusters that correspond to three ecologically important behavioral categories: aggression, maturation, and foraging. To explore the genetic influences potentially regulating these behavior-specific neurogenomic states, we reconstructed a brain transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) model. This brain TRN quantitatively predicts with high accuracy gene expression changes of more than 2,000 genes involved in behavior, even for behavioral phenotypes on which it was not trained, suggesting that there is a core set of TFs that regulates behavior-specific gene expression in the bee brain, and other TFs more specific to particular categories. TFs playing key roles in the TRN include well-known regulators of neural and behavioral plasticity, e.g., Creb, as well as TFs better known in other biological contexts, e.g., NF-κB (immunity). Our results reveal three insights concerning the relationship between genes and behavior. First, distinct behaviors are subserved by distinct neurogenomic states in the brain. Second, the neurogenomic states underlying different behaviors rely upon both shared and distinct transcriptional modules. Third, despite the complexity of the brain, simple linear relationships between TFs and their putative target genes are a surprisingly prominent feature of the networks underlying behavior. PMID:21960440

  14. Phase noise reveals early category-specific modulation of the event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Németh, Kornél; Kovács, Petra; Vakli, Pál; Kovács, Gyula; Zimmer, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the amplitude of the early event-related potential (ERP) components evoked by faces, such as N170 and P2, changes systematically as a function of noise added to the stimuli. This change has been linked to an increased perceptual processing demand and to enhanced difficulty in perceptual decision making about faces. However, to date it has not yet been tested whether noise manipulation affects the neural correlates of decisions about face and non-face stimuli similarly. To this end, we measured the ERPs for faces and cars at three different phase noise levels. Subjects performed the same two-alternative age-discrimination task on stimuli chosen from young-old morphing continua that were created from faces as well as cars and were calibrated to lead to similar performances at each noise-level. Adding phase noise to the stimuli reduced performance and enhanced response latency for the two categories to the same extent. Parallel to that, phase noise reduced the amplitude and prolonged the latency of the face-specific N170 component. The amplitude of the P1 showed category-specific noise dependence: it was enhanced over the right hemisphere for cars and over the left hemisphere for faces as a result of adding phase noise to the stimuli, but remained stable across noise levels for cars over the left and for faces over the right hemisphere. Moreover, noise modulation altered the category-selectivity of the N170, while the P2 ERP component, typically associated with task decision difficulty, was larger for the more noisy stimuli regardless of stimulus category. Our results suggest that the category-specificity of noise-induced modulations of ERP responses starts at around 100 ms post-stimulus.

  15. Identity-Specific Reward Representations in Orbitofrontal Cortex Are Modulated by Selective Devaluation.

    PubMed

    Howard, James D; Kahnt, Thorsten

    2017-03-08

    Goal-directed behavior is sensitive to the current value of expected outcomes. This requires independent representations of specific rewards, which have been linked to orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) function. However, the mechanisms by which the human brain updates specific goals on the fly, and translates those updates into choices, have remained unknown. Here we implemented selective devaluation of appetizing food odors in combination with pattern-based neuroimaging and a decision-making task. We found that in a hungry state, participants chose to smell high-intensity versions of two value-matched food odor rewards. After eating a meal corresponding to one of the two odors, participants switched choices toward the low intensity of the sated odor but continued to choose the high intensity of the nonsated odor. This sensory-specific behavioral effect was mirrored by pattern-based changes in fMRI signal in lateral posterior OFC, where specific reward identity representations were altered after the meal for the sated food odor but retained for the nonsated counterpart. In addition, changes in functional connectivity between the OFC and general value coding in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) predicted individual differences in satiety-related choice behavior. These findings demonstrate how flexible representations of specific rewards in the OFC are updated by devaluation, and how functional connections to vmPFC reflect the current value of outcomes and guide goal-directed behavior.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is critical for goal-directed behavior. A recent proposal is that OFC fulfills this function by representing a variety of state and task variables ("cognitive maps"), including a conjunction of expected reward identity and value. Here we tested how identity-specific representations of food odor reward are updated by satiety. We found that fMRI pattern-based signatures of reward identity in lateral posterior OFC were modulated after

  16. Cell line specific modulation of connexin43 expression after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Banaz-Yaşar, Ferya; Tischka, Rabea; Iliakis, George; Winterhager, Elke; Gellhaus, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication plays a significant role in mediating radiation-induced bystander effects. However, the level of Cx43 itself is influenced by ionizing radiation, which could modify the bystander effect. Here we have investigated several cell lines for the modulation of Cx43 expression 24 h after irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays. The mouse endothelial cell line bEnd3 revealed a significantly elevated level of Cx43 already 15 min after exposure to X-rays, whereas human hybrid endothelial cells (EA.hy926) exhibited a transient downregulation of Cx43 mRNA. No obvious changes in the communication properties of the different cell lines could be observed after irradiation. The communication-deficient malignant human trophoblast cell line Jeg3 stably transfected with Cx43 did not reveal any induction of endogenous nor alteration in the exogenous Cx43 transcript level upon exposure to 5 Gy. Taken together, our data show a cell line specific modulation of Cx43 expression after exposure to X-rays.

  17. The leukotriene LTD4 receptor antagonist MK571 specifically modulates MRP associated multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gekeler, V; Ise, W; Sanders, K H; Ulrich, W R; Beck, J

    1995-03-08

    The multidrug resistant cell lines HL60/AR and GLC4/ADR show high overexpression of the gene encoding the multidrug resistance associated protein MRP compared to their drug sensitive parental counterparts. This and the virtual absence of mdr1/P-glycoprotein gene expression was proven by a complementary DNA polymerase chain reaction (cDNA-PCR) approach. Applying a 72-hour tetrazolium based colorimetric MTT-assay we demonstrate on both MDR sublines a dose-dependent modulation of drug resistances by the leukotriene LTD4 receptor antagonist MK571. A complete reversal of vincristine resistances was achieved at final MK571 concentrations of 30 microM (HL60/AR) or 50 microM (GLC4/ADR) which by itself did not disturb cellular proliferation. The drug resistance of a mdr1/P-gp overexpressing multidrug-resistant HL60 subline, in contrast, was not significantly affected by MK571. Similar effects were seen using the glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Our results point to a relationship between MRP and a conjugate transporter and identify MK571 as a new tool structure for developing modulators specific for a MRP associated multidrug resistance.

  18. Expression of specific inflammasome gene modules stratifies older individuals into two extreme clinical and immunological states

    PubMed Central

    Furman, David; Chang, Junlei; Lartigue, Lydia; Bolen, Christopher R; Haddad, François; Gaudilliere, Brice; Ganio, Edward A; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K; Spitzer, Matthew H; Douchet, Isabelle; Daburon, Sophie; Moreau, Jean-François; Nolan, Garry P; Blanco, Patrick; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Dekker, Cornelia L; Jojic, Vladimir; Kuo, Calvin J; Davis, Mark M; Faustin, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Low-grade, chronic inflammation has been associated with many diseases of aging, but the mechanisms responsible for producing this inflammation remain unclear. Inflammasomes can drive chronic inflammation in the context of an infectious disease or cellular stress, and they trigger the maturation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Here we find that the expression of specific inflammasome gene modules stratifies older individuals into two extremes: those with constitutive expression of IL-1β, nucleotide metabolism dysfunction, elevated oxidative stress, high rates of hypertension and arterial stiffness; and those without constitutive expression of IL-1β, who lack these characteristics. Adenine and N4-acetylcytidine, nucleotide-derived metabolites that are detectable in the blood of the former group, prime and activate the NLRC4 inflammasome, induce the production of IL-1β, activate platelets and neutrophils and elevate blood pressure in mice. In individuals over 85 years of age, the elevated expression of inflammasome gene modules was associated with all-cause mortality. Thus, targeting inflammasome components may ameliorate chronic inflammation and various other age-associated conditions. PMID:28092664

  19. Expression of specific inflammasome gene modules stratifies older individuals into two extreme clinical and immunological states.

    PubMed

    Furman, David; Chang, Junlei; Lartigue, Lydia; Bolen, Christopher R; Haddad, François; Gaudilliere, Brice; Ganio, Edward A; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K; Spitzer, Matthew H; Douchet, Isabelle; Daburon, Sophie; Moreau, Jean-François; Nolan, Garry P; Blanco, Patrick; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Dekker, Cornelia L; Jojic, Vladimir; Kuo, Calvin J; Davis, Mark M; Faustin, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Low-grade, chronic inflammation has been associated with many diseases of aging, but the mechanisms responsible for producing this inflammation remain unclear. Inflammasomes can drive chronic inflammation in the context of an infectious disease or cellular stress, and they trigger the maturation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Here we find that the expression of specific inflammasome gene modules stratifies older individuals into two extremes: those with constitutive expression of IL-1β, nucleotide metabolism dysfunction, elevated oxidative stress, high rates of hypertension and arterial stiffness; and those without constitutive expression of IL-1β, who lack these characteristics. Adenine and N(4)-acetylcytidine, nucleotide-derived metabolites that are detectable in the blood of the former group, prime and activate the NLRC4 inflammasome, induce the production of IL-1β, activate platelets and neutrophils and elevate blood pressure in mice. In individuals over 85 years of age, the elevated expression of inflammasome gene modules was associated with all-cause mortality. Thus, targeting inflammasome components may ameliorate chronic inflammation and various other age-associated conditions.

  20. Specification of haematopoietic stem cell fate via modulation of mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Nicola; Girotra, Mukul; Naveiras, Olaia; Nikitin, Gennady; Campos, Vasco; Giger, Sonja; Roch, Aline; Auwerx, Johan; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) differ from their committed progeny by relying primarily on anaerobic glycolysis rather than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. However, whether this change in the metabolic program is the cause or the consequence of the unique function of HSCs remains unknown. Here we show that enforced modulation of energy metabolism impacts HSC self-renewal. Lowering the mitochondrial activity of HSCs by chemically uncoupling the electron transport chain drives self-renewal under culture conditions that normally induce rapid differentiation. We demonstrate that this metabolic specification of HSC fate occurs through the reversible decrease of mitochondrial mass by autophagy. Our data thus reveal a causal relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and fate choice of HSCs and also provide a valuable tool to expand HSCs outside of their native bone marrow niches. PMID:27731316

  1. The binding specificity and affinity determinants of family 1 and family 3 cellulose binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Lehtiö, Janne; Sugiyama, Junji; Gustavsson, Malin; Fransson, Linda; Linder, Markus; Teeri, Tuula T.

    2003-01-01

    Cellulose binding modules (CBMs) potentiate the action of cellulolytic enzymes on insoluble substrates. Numerous studies have established that three aromatic residues on a CBM surface are needed for binding onto cellulose crystals and that tryptophans contribute to higher binding affinity than tyrosines. However, studies addressing the nature of CBM–cellulose interactions have so far failed to establish the binding site on cellulose crystals targeted by CBMs. In this study, the binding sites of CBMs on Valonia cellulose crystals have been visualized by transmission electron microscopy. Fusion of the CBMs with a modified staphylococcal protein A (ZZ-domain) allowed direct immuno-gold labeling at close proximity of the actual CBM binding site. The transmission electron microscopy images provide unequivocal evidence that the fungal family 1 CBMs as well as the family 3 CBM from Clostridium thermocellum CipA have defined binding sites on two opposite corners of Valonia cellulose crystals. In most samples these corners are worn to display significant area of the hydrophobic (110) plane, which thus constitutes the binding site for these CBMs. PMID:12522267

  2. Promoter-Specific Effects of DREADD Modulation on Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    López, Alberto J.; Kramár, Enikö; Matheos, Dina P.; White, André O.; Kwapis, Janine; Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Sakata, Keith; Espinoza, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADDs) are a novel tool with the potential to bidirectionally drive cellular, circuit, and ultimately, behavioral changes. We used DREADDs to evaluate memory formation in a hippocampus-dependent task in mice and effects on synaptic physiology in the dorsal hippocampus. We expressed neuron-specific (hSyn promoter) DREADDs that were either excitatory (HM3D) or inhibitory (HM4D) in the dorsal hippocampus. As predicted, hSyn–HM3D was able to transform a subthreshold learning event into long-term memory (LTM), and hSyn–HM4D completely impaired LTM formation. Surprisingly, the opposite was observed during experiments examining the effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). hSyn–HM3D impaired LTP and hSyn–HM4D facilitated LTP. Follow-up experiments indicated that the hSyn–HM3D-mediated depression of fEPSP appears to be driven by presynaptic activation of inhibitory currents, whereas the hSyn–HM4D-mediated increase of fEPSP is induced by a reduction in GABAA receptor function. To determine whether these observations were promoter specific, we next examined the effects of using the CaMKIIα promoter that limits expression to forebrain excitatory neurons. CaMKIIα–HM3D in the dorsal hippocampus led to the transformation of a subthreshold learning event into LTM, whereas CaMKIIα–HM4D blocked LTM formation. Consistent with these findings, baseline synaptic transmission and LTP was increased in CaMKIIα–HM3D hippocampal slices, whereas slices from CaMKIIα–HM4D mice produced expected decreases in baseline synaptic transmission and LTP. Together, these experiments further demonstrate DREADDs as being a robust and reliable means of modulating neuronal function to manipulate long-term changes in behavior, while providing evidence for specific dissociations between LTM and LTP. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study evaluates the efficacy of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer

  3. Transcriptome analysis reveals specific modulation of abscisic acid signaling by ROP10 small GTPase in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zeyu; Zhao, Yihong; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2005-11-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a hormone that modulates a variety of agronomically important growth and developmental processes and various stresses responses, but its signal transduction pathways remain poorly understood. ROP10, a member of ROP small GTPases in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is a plasma membrane-associated protein specifically involved in negative regulation of ABA responses. To dissect the ROP10-mediated ABA signaling, we carried out transcriptome analysis using the Arabidopsis full-genome chip. Our analysis revealed a total of 262 and 125 genes that were, respectively, up- and down-regulated (> or =2-fold cutoff) by 1 mum ABA in wild type (Wassilewskija [Ws]); 42 up-regulated and 38 down-regulated genes have not been identified in other studies. Consistent with the nonpleiotropic phenotypes of rop10-1, only three genes were altered in rop10-1 in the absence of ABA treatment. In response to 1 microm ABA, 341 and 127 genes were, respectively, activated and repressed in rop10-1. Interestingly, a particular subset of 21 genes that were not altered by 1 microm ABA in Ws but only activated in rop10-1 was identified. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the existence of three distinct categories of ABA dose-response patterns. One novel category is characterized by their ABA unresponsiveness in Ws and activation in rop10-1 at 1 microm but not 10 and 100 microm of ABA. This indicates that ROP10 gates the expression of genes that are specific to low concentrations of ABA. Furthermore, almost all of these 21 genes are known to be highly induced by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Consequently, we found that rop10-1 enhanced the sensitivity of seed germination inhibition to mannitol and sodium chloride. Our results suggest that ROP10 negatively regulates ABA responses by specifically and differentially modulating the ABA sensitivity of a subset of genes including protein kinases and zinc-finger family proteins.

  4. The basolateral amygdala modulates specific sensory memory representations in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Candice M; McGaugh, James L; Weinberger, Norman M

    2009-05-01

    Stress hormones released by an experience can modulate memory strength via the basolateral amygdala, which in turn acts on sites of memory storage such as the cerebral cortex [McGaugh, J. L. (2004). The amygdala modulates the consolidation of memories of emotionally arousing experiences. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 27, 1-28]. Stimuli that acquire behavioral importance gain increased representation in the cortex. For example, learning shifts the tuning of neurons in the primary auditory cortex (A1) to the frequency of a conditioned stimulus (CS), and the greater the level of CS importance, the larger the area of representational gain [Weinberger, N. M. (2007). Associative representational plasticity in the auditory cortex: A synthesis of two disciplines. Learning & Memory, 14(1-2), 1-16]. The two lines of research suggest that BLA strengthening of memory might be accomplished in part by increasing the representation of an environmental stimulus. The present study investigated whether stimulation of the BLA can affect cortical memory representations. In male Sprague-Dawley rats studied under urethane general anesthesia, frequency receptive fields were obtained from A1 before and up to 75min after the pairing of a tone with BLA stimulation (BLAstm: 100 trials, 400ms, 100Hz, 400microA [+/-16.54]). Tone started before and continued after BLAstm. Group BLA/1.0 (n=16) had a 1s CS-BLAstm interval while Group BLA/1.6 (n=5) has a 1.6s interval. The BLA/1.0 group did develop specific tuning shifts toward and to the CS, which could change frequency tuning by as much as two octaves. Moreover, its shifts increased over time and were enduring, lasting 75min. However, group BLA/1.6 did not develop tuning shifts, indicating that precise CS-BLAstm timing is important in the anesthetized animal. Further, training in the BLA/1.0 paradigm but stimulating outside of the BLA did not produce tuning shifts. These findings demonstrate that the BLA is capable of exerting highly specific

  5. Startle reflex hyporeactivity in Parkinson's disease: an emotion-specific or arousal-modulated deficit?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K.M.; Okun, M.S.; Marsiske, M.; Fennell, E.B.; Bowers, D.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) demonstrate reduced psychophysiologic reactivity to unpleasant pictures as indexed by diminished startle eyeblink magnitude (Bowers et al., 2006). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that this hyporeactivity was primarily driven by diminished reactivity to fear-eliciting stimuli as opposed to other types of aversive pictures. This hypothesis was based on previous evidence suggesting amygdalar abnormalities in PD patients coupled with the known role of the amygdala in fear processing. To test this hypothesis, 24 patients with Parkinson's disease and 24 controls viewed standardized sets of emotional pictures that depicted fear, disgust (mutilations, contaminations), pleasant, and neutral contents. Startle eyeblinks were elicited while subjects viewed these emotional pictures. Results did not support the hypothesis of a specific deficit to fear pictures. Instead, the PD patients had reduced reactivity to mutilation pictures relative to other types of negative pictures in the context of normal subjective ratings. Further analyses revealed that controls displayed a pattern of increased startle eyeblink magnitude for “high arousal” versus “low arousal” negative pictures, regardless of picture category, whereas startle eyeblink magnitude in the PD group did not vary by arousal level. These results suggest that previous findings of decreased aversion-modulated startle is driven by reduced reactivity to highly arousing negative stimuli rather than to a specific category (i.e., fear or disgust) of emotion stimuli. PMID:19428424

  6. Block 4 solar cell module design and test specification for intermediate load center applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for performance of terrestrial solar cell modules intended for use in various test applications are established. During the 1979-80 time period, such applications are expected to be in the 20 to 500 kilowatt size range. A series of characterization and qualification tests necessary to certify the module design for production, and the necessary performance test for acceptance of modules are specified.

  7. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system.

  8. Identification of condition-specific regulatory modules through multi-level motif and mRNA expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wang, Yue; Hoffman, Eric P.; Riggins, Rebecca B.; Clarke, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Many computational methods for identification of transcription regulatory modules often result in many false positives in practice due to noise sources of binding information and gene expression profiling data. In this paper, we propose a multi-level strategy for condition-specific gene regulatory module identification by integrating motif binding information and gene expression data through support vector regression and significant analysis. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method on a yeast cell cycle data set. The study on a breast cancer microarray data set shows that it can successfully identify the significant and reliable regulatory modules associated with breast cancer. PMID:20054984

  9. Neuroligin 1 modulates striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission in a pathway and NMDAR subunit-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Felipe; Xuan, Zhong; Liu, Shunan; Powell, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    Together with its presynaptic partner Neurexin 1 (Nxn1), Neuroligin 1 (NL1) participates in synapse specification and synapse maintenance. We and others have shown that NL1 can also modulate glutamatergic synaptic function in the central nervous system of rodent models. These molecular/cellular changes can translate into altered animal behaviors that are thought to be analogous to symptomatology of neuropsychiatric disorders. For example, in dorsal striatum of NL1 deletion mice, we previously reported that the ratio N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) mediated synaptic currents to α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR) mediated synaptic currents (NMDA/AMPA) is reduced in medium spiny neuron (MSNs). Importantly, this reduction in NMDA/AMPA ratio correlated with increased repetitive grooming. The striatum is the input nucleus of the basal ganglia (BG). Classical models of this circuitry imply that there are two principal pathways that render distinct and somewhat opposite striatal outputs critical to the function of these nuclei in modulating motor behavior. Thus, we set out to better characterize the effects of NL1 deletion on direct and indirect pathways of the dorsal striatum by genetically labeling MSNs participating in the direct and indirect pathways. We demonstrate that a decrease in NMDAR-mediated currents is limited to MSNs of the direct pathway. Furthermore, the decrease in NMDAR-mediated currents is largely due to a reduction in function of NMDARs containing the GluN2A subunit. In contrast, indirect pathway MSNs in NL1 knockout (KO) mice showed a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory neurotransmission not observed in the direct pathway. Thus, NL1 deletion differentially affects direct and indirect pathway MSNs in dorsal striatum. These findings have potential implications for striatal function in NL1 KO mice. PMID:26283958

  10. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-12-16

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions.

  11. Understanding How Noncatalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules Can Display Specificity for Xyloglucan*

    PubMed Central

    Luís, Ana S.; Venditto, Immacolata; Temple, Max J.; Rogowski, Artur; Baslé, Arnaud; Xue, Jie; Knox, J. Paul; Prates, José A.M.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Najmudin, Shabir; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant biomass is central to the carbon cycle and to environmentally sustainable industries exemplified by the biofuel sector. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes generally contain noncatalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that fulfil a targeting function, which enhances catalysis. CBMs that bind β-glucan chains often display broad specificity recognizing β1,4-glucans (cellulose), β1,3-β1,4-mixed linked glucans and xyloglucan, a β1,4-glucan decorated with α1,6-xylose residues, by targeting structures common to the three polysaccharides. Thus, CBMs that recognize xyloglucan target the β1,4-glucan backbone and only accommodate the xylose decorations. Here we show that two closely related CBMs, CBM65A and CBM65B, derived from EcCel5A, a Eubacterium cellulosolvens endoglucanase, bind to a range of β-glucans but, uniquely, display significant preference for xyloglucan. The structures of the two CBMs reveal a β-sandwich fold. The ligand binding site comprises the β-sheet that forms the concave surface of the proteins. Binding to the backbone chains of β-glucans is mediated primarily by five aromatic residues that also make hydrophobic interactions with the xylose side chains of xyloglucan, conferring the distinctive specificity of the CBMs for the decorated polysaccharide. Significantly, and in contrast to other CBMs that recognize β-glucans, CBM65A utilizes different polar residues to bind cellulose and mixed linked glucans. Thus, Gln106 is central to cellulose recognition, but is not required for binding to mixed linked glucans. This report reveals the mechanism by which β-glucan-specific CBMs can distinguish between linear and mixed linked glucans, and show how these CBMs can exploit an extensive hydrophobic platform to target the side chains of decorated β-glucans. PMID:23229556

  12. The GHKL ATPase MORC1 Modulates Species-Specific Plant Immunity in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Kang, Hong-Gu; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-08-01

    The microrchidia (MORC) proteins, a subset of the GHKL ATPase superfamily, were recently described as components involved in transcriptional gene silencing and plant immunity in Arabidopsis. To assess the role of MORC1 during resistance to Phytophthora infestans in solanaceous species, we altered the expression of the corresponding MORC1 homologs in potato, tomato, and Nicotiana benthamiana. Basal resistance to P. infestans was compromised in StMORC1-silenced potato and enhanced in overexpressing lines, indicating that StMORC1 positively affects immunity. By contrast, silencing SlMORC1 expression in tomato or NbMORC1 expression in N. benthamiana enhanced basal resistance to this oomycete pathogen. In addition, silencing SlMORC1 further enhanced resistance conferred by two resistance genes in tomato. Transient expression of StMORC1 in N. benthamiana accelerated cell death induced by infestin1 (INF1), whereas SlMORC1 or NbMORC1 suppressed it. Domain-swapping and mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region dictates the species-specific effects of the solanaceous MORC1 proteins on INF1-induced cell death. This C-terminal region also was required for homodimerization and phosphorylation of recombinant StMORC1 and SlMORC1, and its transient expression induced spontaneous cell death in N. benthamiana. Thus, this C-terminal region likely plays important roles in both determining and modulating the biological activity of MORC1 proteins.

  13. Evolution of lineage-specific functions in ancient cis-regulatory modules.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Stefan; Goode, Debbie K; Petrone, Libero; Oliveri, Paola; Elgar, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Morphological evolution is driven both by coding sequence variation and by changes in regulatory sequences. However, how cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) evolve to generate entirely novel expression domains is largely unknown. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of a lens enhancer located within a CRM that not only predates the lens, a vertebrate innovation, but bilaterian animals in general. Alignments of orthologous sequences from different deuterostomes sub-divide the CRM into a deeply conserved core and a more divergent flanking region. We demonstrate that all deuterostome flanking regions, including invertebrate sequences, activate gene expression in the zebrafish lens through the same ancient cluster of activator sites. However, levels of gene expression vary between species due to the presence of repressor motifs in flanking region and core. These repressor motifs are responsible for the relatively weak enhancer activity of tetrapod flanking regions. Ray-finned fish, however, have gained two additional lineage-specific activator motifs which in combination with the ancient cluster of activators and the core constitute a potent lens enhancer. The exploitation and modification of existing regulatory potential in flanking regions but not in the highly conserved core might represent a more general model for the emergence of novel regulatory functions in complex CRMs.

  14. Electro-acupuncture at different acupoints modulating the relative specific brain functional network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiliang; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Yin; Liu, Hesheng; Hong, Yang; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Kehua; Wang, Lei; Xue, Chao; Song, Ming; Liu, Baoyan; Zhu, Bing

    2010-11-01

    Objective: The specific brain effects of acupoint are important scientific concern in acupuncture. However, previous acupuncture fMRI studies focused on acupoints in muscle layer on the limb. Therefore, researches on acupoints within connective tissue at trunk are warranted. Material and Methods: Brain effects of acupuncture on abdomen at acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zhongwan (CV12) were tested using fMRI on 21 healthy volunteers. The data acquisition was performed at resting state, during needle retention, electroacupuncture (EA) and post-EA resting state. Needling sensations were rated after every electroacupuncture (EA) procedure. The needling sensations and the brain functional activity and connectivity were compared between CV4 and CV12 using SPSS, SPM2 and the local and remote connectivity maps. Results and conclusion: EA at CV4 and CV12 induced apparent deactivation effects in the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network. The default mode of the brain was modified by needle retention and EA, respectively. The functional brain network was significantly changed post EA. However, the minor differences existed between these two acupoints. The results demonstrated similarity between functional brain network mode of acupuncture modulation and functional circuits of emotional and cognitive regulation. Acupuncture may produce analgesia, anti-anxiety and anti-depression via the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN).

  15. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-09-07

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages.

  16. Is sensory-specific satiety for a bitter-sweet infusion modulated by context?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Burgos, David; Secchiari, Florencia; Calviño, Amalia

    2015-03-01

    The sensory-affective attributes of beverages have an important influence on a given intake and successive consumptions because of sensory-specific satiety (SSS; defined as a decrease in pleasantness ratings of a food eaten relative to uneaten foods). No studies have, however, investigated how multiple sessions of SSS for familiar drinks over a period of several days up to a week may change their pleasantness and how these hedonic-related judgments are affected by the context during SSS testing. With twenty-six participants, the present study explored the medium lasting and contextual effects of repeated SSS sessions for a bitter-sweet infusion on olfactory and flavour pleasantness over the course of three exposures in either a laboratory or a cafeteria setting. The results showed olfactory and flavour SSS for the infusion following each consumption in both the artificial and the natural setting. More interestingly, despite the failure to detect medium-term SSS (i.e., a greater decrease in pleasantness ratings of a food eaten relative to uneaten foods after repeated SSS sessions over several days as compared to the first SSS session), a contextual modulation of olfactory SSS was observed with a lesser overall magnitude in the cafeteria compared to the laboratory setting. To the best of our knowledge, the impact of eating location on the development of satiation and the differential contextual sensitivity of SSS for orthonasal odours and flavours has not been reported previously. The implications of potential environmental control of SSS are considered in this study.

  17. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Escolà-Gil, Joan C.; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [3H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [3H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  18. "Mycoplasmal antigen modulation," a novel surface variation suggested for a lipoprotein specifically localized on Mycoplasma mobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng Ning; Kawaguchi, Chie; Nakane, Daisuke; Miyata, Makoto

    2012-05-01

    Mycoplasma mobile, a pathogen of freshwater fish, glides easily across surfaces, colonizes on the fish gill, and causes necrosis. The cell surface is differentiated into three parts: the head, neck, and body. Mobile variable surface proteins (Mvsps) localizing at each of these parts may be involved in surface variation including phase variation and antigenic variation, although no proof exists. In this study, we examined this possibility by focusing on MvspI, the largest Mvsp. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that MvspI is expressed on the surfaces of all cells. When anti-MvspI antibody was added at concentrations over 0.8 nM, MvspI was observed to decrease over time. After 72 h of cultivation with the antibody, the fluorescence intensity and amount of MvspI decreased up to 13 and 39%, respectively, compared to those of cells grown without antibody. These changes were reversed by the removal of the antibody. Such effects were not observed when another antibody targeting other Mvsps was used, suggesting that the decrease is specific to the relationship between MvspI and the antibody. Cell growth was also inhibited by the antibody, but the decrease in MvspI could not be explained by the selective growth of MvspI-negative variants or by the inhibition of growth with other conditions. The decrease in MvspI caused by the antibody binding may suggest a novel type of surface variation, designated here as "mycoplasmal antigen modulation."

  19. Evolution of lineage-specific functions in ancient cis-regulatory modules

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, Stefan; Goode, Debbie K.; Petrone, Libero; Oliveri, Paola; Elgar, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Morphological evolution is driven both by coding sequence variation and by changes in regulatory sequences. However, how cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) evolve to generate entirely novel expression domains is largely unknown. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of a lens enhancer located within a CRM that not only predates the lens, a vertebrate innovation, but bilaterian animals in general. Alignments of orthologous sequences from different deuterostomes sub-divide the CRM into a deeply conserved core and a more divergent flanking region. We demonstrate that all deuterostome flanking regions, including invertebrate sequences, activate gene expression in the zebrafish lens through the same ancient cluster of activator sites. However, levels of gene expression vary between species due to the presence of repressor motifs in flanking region and core. These repressor motifs are responsible for the relatively weak enhancer activity of tetrapod flanking regions. Ray-finned fish, however, have gained two additional lineage-specific activator motifs which in combination with the ancient cluster of activators and the core constitute a potent lens enhancer. The exploitation and modification of existing regulatory potential in flanking regions but not in the highly conserved core might represent a more general model for the emergence of novel regulatory functions in complex CRMs. PMID:26538567

  20. Clinical optimization of antigen specific modulation of type 1 diabetes with the plasmid DNA platform.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Peter; Utz, Paul J; Robinson, William; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-12-01

    Some clinical trials in humans have aimed at modulation of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via alteration of the immune response to putative islet cell antigens, particularly proinsulin and insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase and the peptide, DiaPep 277, derived from heat shock protein 60. The focus here is on development of a specially engineered DNA plasmid encoding proinsulin to treat T1D. The plasmid is engineered to turn off adaptive immunity to proinsulin. This approach yielded exciting results in a randomized placebo controlled trial in 80 adult patients with T1D. The implications of this trial are explored in regards to the potential for sparing inflammation in islets and thus allowing the functioning beta cells to recover and produce more insulin. Strategies to further strengthen the effects seen thus far with the tolerizing DNA plasmid to proinsulin will be elucidated. The DNA platform affords an opportunity for easy modifications. In addition standard exploration of dose levels, route of administration and frequency of dose are practical. Optimization of the effects seen to date on C-peptide and on depletion of proinsulin specific CD8 T cells are feasible, with expected concomitant improvement in other parameters like hemoglobin A1c and reduction in insulin usage. T1D is one of the few autoimmune conditions where antigen specific therapy can be achieved, provided the approach is tested intelligently. Tolerizing DNA vaccines to proinsulin and other islet cell autoantigens is a worthy pursuit to potentially treat, prevent and to perhaps even 'cure' or 'prevent' type 1 diabetes.

  1. Task-specific modulation of multi-digit forces to object texture.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, Tara L; Santello, Marco; Johnston, Jamie A; Zhang, Wei; Gordon, Andrew M

    2009-03-01

    During multi-digit grasping both local and non-local digit force responses occur in response to changes in texture at selected digits depending on the grasp configuration. However, the extent to which the specific patterns of force distribution depend on the requirement to hold the object against gravity remains to be determined. In the present study, we examined whether grasp force sharing patterns are invariant when the constraint of maintaining the object orientation vertical against gravity is removed. We used changes in object texture to elicit force changes at single digits during two grasping tasks with different behavioral contexts. One task entailed holding an object against gravity (object hold [OH]). A second (force production [FP]) task consisted of generating lifting forces on an object clamped to the tabletop that were matched to those used during OH. Unlike OH, the FP task lacks the behavioral consequences associated with erroneous sharing of normal and tangential digit forces, e.g., object tilt. Ten subjects lifted and simulated lifting an instrumented object measuring grasping normal and vertical tangential forces at all five digits when the textures were uniformly high-friction sandpaper or low-friction rayon and when one digit contacted a different frictional texture than the other four digits. We found that in both tasks texture changes at individual digits elicited force changes at that digit as well as other digits. However, the specific pattern of force distribution changes differed during OH compared to FP. While subjects modulate the normal and tangential digit forces to different degrees depending on object texture and the grasping task, they ignore the requirement of moment equilibrium when this has no consequences on object orientation (FP task). These findings indicate that multi-digit force responses to texture revealed by previous studies are not obligatory and suggest that the behavioral context of a task should be considered when

  2. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... this paragraph. (4) Modulation. Quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) shall be used. 64-QAM is feasible under many propagation conditions; others such as 32-, 16- and 8-QAM are specified for use when needed. (5) RF protection ratio values....

  3. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this paragraph. (4) Modulation. Quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) shall be used. 64-QAM is feasible under many propagation conditions; others such as 32-, 16- and 8-QAM are specified for use when needed. (5) RF protection ratio values....

  4. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this paragraph. (4) Modulation. Quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) shall be used. 64-QAM is feasible under many propagation conditions; others such as 32-, 16- and 8-QAM are specified for use when needed. (5) RF protection ratio values....

  5. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... this paragraph. (4) Modulation. Quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) shall be used. 64-QAM is feasible under many propagation conditions; others such as 32-, 16- and 8-QAM are specified for use when needed. (5) RF protection ratio values....

  6. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... this paragraph. (4) Modulation. Quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) shall be used. 64-QAM is feasible under many propagation conditions; others such as 32-, 16- and 8-QAM are specified for use when needed. (5) RF protection ratio values....

  7. From mixed sigma-2 receptor/P-glycoprotein targeting agents to selective P-glycoprotein modulators: small structural changes address the mechanism of interaction at the efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Abate, Carmen; Pati, Maria Laura; Contino, Marialessandra; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Perrone, Roberto; Niso, Mauro; Berardi, Francesco

    2015-01-07

    Generations of modulators of the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) have been produced as tools to counteract the Multidrug Resistance (MDR) phenomenon in tumor therapy, but clinical trials were not successful so far. With the aim of contributing to the development of novel P-gp modulators, we started from recently studied high-affinity sigma-2 (σ2) receptor ligands that showed also potent interaction with P-gp. For σ2 receptors high-affinity binding, a basic N-atom is a strict requirement. Therefore, we reduced the basic character of the N-atom present in these ligands, and we obtained potent P-gp modulators with poor or null σ2 receptor affinity. We also evaluated whether modulation of P-gp by these novel compounds involved consumption of ATP (as P-gp substrates do), as a source of energy to support the efflux. Surprisingly, even small structural changes resulted in opposite behavior, with amide 13 depleting ATP, in contrast to its isomer 18. Two compounds, 15 and 25, emerged for their potent activity at P-gp, and deserve further investigations as tools for P-gp modulation.

  8. 47 CFR 73.756 - System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.756 Section 73.756 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) Channel spacing. The nominal spacing for DSB shall be 10 kHz. However,...

  9. Improved sequence learning with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: evidence for treatment-specific network modulation.

    PubMed

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2012-02-22

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA-STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation.

  10. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guangjun; Wu, Kui; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS.

  11. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjun; Wu, Kui; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS.

  12. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  13. Convocation address.

    PubMed

    Kakodkar, A

    1999-07-01

    This convocation addressed by Dr. Anil Kakodkar focuses on the challenges faced by graduating students. In his speech, he emphasized the high level of excellence achieved by the industrial sector; however, he noted that there has been a loss of initiative in maximizing value addition, which was worsened by an increasing population pressure. In facing a stiff competition in the external and domestic markets, it is imperative to maximize value addition within the country in a competitive manner and capture the highest possible market share. To achieve this, high-quality human resources are central. Likewise, family planning programs should become more effective and direct available resources toward national advantage. To boost the domestic market, he suggests the need to search for strengths to achieve leadership position in those areas. First, an insight into the relationship between the lifestyles and the needs of our people and the natural resource endowment must be gained. Second, remodeling of the education system must be undertaken to prepare the people for adding the necessary innovative content in our value addition activities. Lastly, Dr. Kakodkar emphasizes the significance of developing a strong bond between parents and children to provide a sound foundation and allow the education system to grow upon it.

  14. Attentional modulation and domain-specificity underlying the neural organization of auditory categorical perception.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Walker, Breya S

    2017-03-01

    Categorical perception (CP) is highly evident in audition when listeners' perception of speech sounds abruptly shifts identity despite equidistant changes in stimulus acoustics. While CP is an inherent property of speech perception, how (if) it is expressed in other auditory modalities (e.g., music) is less clear. Moreover, prior neuroimaging studies have been equivocal on whether attentional engagement is necessary for the brain to categorically organize sound. To address these questions, we recorded neuroelectric brain responses [event-related potentials (ERPs)] from listeners as they rapidly categorized sounds along a speech and music continuum (active task) or during passive listening. Behaviorally, listeners' achieved sharper psychometric functions and faster identification for speech than musical stimuli, which was perceived in a continuous mode. Behavioral results coincided with stronger ERP differentiation between prototypical and ambiguous tokens (i.e., categorical processing) for speech but not for music. Neural correlates of CP were only observed when listeners actively attended to the auditory signal. These findings were corroborated by brain-behavior associations; changes in neural activity predicted more successful CP (psychometric slopes) for active but not passively evoked ERPs. Our results demonstrate auditory categorization is influenced by attention (active > passive) and is stronger for more familiar/overlearned stimulus domains (speech > music). In contrast to previous studies examining highly trained listeners (i.e., musicians), we infer that (i) CP skills are largely domain-specific and do not generalize to stimuli for which a listener has no immediate experience and (ii) categorical neural processing requires active engagement with the auditory stimulus.

  15. Low frequency steady-state brain responses modulate large scale functional networks in a frequency-specific means.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Heng; Guo, Xiao-Nan; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations are essential for brain functions. Research has suggested that the frequency of neural oscillations is lower for more integrative and remote communications. In this vein, some resting-state studies have suggested that large scale networks function in the very low frequency range (<1 Hz). However, it is difficult to determine the frequency characteristics of brain networks because both resting-state studies and conventional frequency tagging approaches cannot simultaneously capture multiple large scale networks in controllable cognitive activities. In this preliminary study, we aimed to examine whether large scale networks can be modulated by task-induced low frequency steady-state brain responses (lfSSBRs) in a frequency-specific pattern. In a revised attention network test, the lfSSBRs were evoked in the triple network system and sensory-motor system, indicating that large scale networks can be modulated in a frequency tagging way. Furthermore, the inter- and intranetwork synchronizations as well as coherence were increased at the fundamental frequency and the first harmonic rather than at other frequency bands, indicating a frequency-specific modulation of information communication. However, there was no difference among attention conditions, indicating that lfSSBRs modulate the general attention state much stronger than distinguishing attention conditions. This study provides insights into the advantage and mechanism of lfSSBRs. More importantly, it paves a new way to investigate frequency-specific large scale brain activities.

  16. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  17. Presidential address.

    PubMed

    Vohra, U

    1993-07-01

    The Secretary of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare serves as Chair of the Executive Council of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay. She addressed its 35th convocation in 1993. Global population stands at 5.43 billion and increases by about 90 million people each year. 84 million of these new people are born in developing countries. India contributes 17 million new people annually. The annual population growth rate in India is about 2%. Its population size will probably surpass 1 billion by the 2000. High population growth rates are a leading obstacle to socioeconomic development in developing countries. Governments of many developing countries recognize this problem and have expanded their family planning programs to stabilize population growth. Asian countries that have done so and have completed the fertility transition include China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Burma, Malaysia, North Korea, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam have not yet completed the transition. Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Nepal, and Pakistan are half-way through the transition. High population growth rates put pressure on land by fragmenting finite land resources, increasing the number of landless laborers and unemployment, and by causing considerable rural-urban migration. All these factors bring about social stress and burden civic services. India has reduced its total fertility rate from 5.2 to 3.9 between 1971 and 1991. Some Indian states have already achieved replacement fertility. Considerable disparity in socioeconomic development exists among states and districts. For example, the states of Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh have female literacy rates lower than 27%, while that for Kerala is 87%. Overall, infant mortality has fallen from 110 to 80 between 1981 and 1990. In Uttar Pradesh, it has fallen from 150 to 98, while it is at 17 in Kerala. India needs innovative approaches to increase contraceptive prevalence rates

  18. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  19. Phytoestrogens modulate prostaglandin production in bovine endometrium: cell type specificity and intracellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Woclawek-Potocka, Izabela; Acosta, Tomas J; Korzekwa, Anna; Bah, Mamadou M; Shibaya, Masami; Okuda, Kiyoshi; Skarzynski, Dariusz J

    2005-05-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are known to modulate the proper cyclicity of bovine reproductive organs. The main luteolytic agent in ruminants is PGF2alpha, whereas PGE2 has luteotropic actions. Estradiol 17beta (E2) regulates uterus function by influencing PG synthesis. Phytoestrogens structurally resemble E2 and possess estrogenic activity; therefore, they may mimic the effects of E2 on PG synthesis and influence the reproductive system. Using a cell-culture system of bovine epithelial and stromal cells, we determined cell-specific effects of phytoestrogens (i.e., daidzein, genistein), their metabolites (i.e., equol and para-ethyl-phenol, respectively), and E2 on PGF2alpha and PGE2 synthesis and examined the intracellular mechanisms of their actions. Both PGs produced by stromal and epithelial cells were significantly stimulated by phytoestrogens and their metabolites. However, PGF2alpha synthesis by both kinds of cells was greater stimulated than PGE2 synthesis. Moreover, epithelial cells treated with phytoestrogens synthesized more PGF2alpha than stromal cells, increasing the PGF2alpha to PGE2 ratio. The epithelial and stromal cells were preincubated with an estrogen-receptor (ER) antagonist (i.e., ICI), a translation inhibitor (i.e., actinomycin D), a protein kinase A inhibitor (i.e., staurosporin), and a phospholipase C inhibitor (i.e., U73122) for 0.5 hrs and then stimulated with equol, para-ethyl-phenol, or E2. Although the action of E2 on PGF2alpha synthesis was blocked by all reagents, the stimulatory effect of phytoestrogens was blocked only by ICI and actinomycin D in both cell types. Moreover, in contrast to E2 action, phytoestrogens did not cause intracellular calcium mobilization in either epithelial or stromal cells. Phytoestrogens stimulate both PGF2alpha and PGE2 in both cell types of bovine endometrium via an ER-dependent genomic pathway. However, because phytoestrogens preferentially stimulated PGF2alpha synthesis in epithelial cells of bovine

  20. Specific energy yield comparison between crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon based PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferenczi, Toby; Stern, Omar; Hartung, Marianne; Mueggenburg, Eike; Lynass, Mark; Bernal, Eva; Mayer, Oliver; Zettl, Marcus

    2009-08-01

    As emerging thin-film PV technologies continue to penetrate the market and the number of utility scale installations substantially increase, detailed understanding of the performance of the various PV technologies becomes more important. An accurate database for each technology is essential for precise project planning, energy yield prediction and project financing. However recent publications showed that it is very difficult to get accurate and reliable performance data of theses technologies. This paper evaluates previously reported claims the amorphous silicon based PV modules have a higher annual energy yield compared to crystalline silicon modules relative to their rated performance. In order to acquire a detailed understanding of this effect, outdoor module tests were performed at GE Global Research Center in Munich. In this study we examine closely two of the five reported factors that contribute to enhanced energy yield of amorphous silicon modules. We find evidence to support each of these factors and evaluate their relative significance. We discuss aspects for improvement in how PV modules are sold and identify areas for further study further study.

  1. Modulation of cluster incorporation specificity in a de novo iron-sulfur cluster binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Roy, Anindya; Astashkin, Andrei; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins perform an astounding variety of functions, and represent one of the most abundant classes of metalloproteins. Most often, they constitute pairs or chains and act as electron transfer modules either within complex redox enzymes or within small diffusible proteins. We have previously described the design of a three-helix bundle that can bind two clusters within its hydrophobic core. Here, we use single-point mutations to exchange one of the Cys ligands coordinating the cluster to either Leu or Ser. We show that the mutants modulate the redox potential of the clusters and stabilize the [3Fe-4S] form over the [4Fe-4S] form, supporting the use of model iron-sulfur cluster proteins as modules in the design of complex redox enzymes.

  2. Intronic Cis-Regulatory Modules Mediate Tissue-Specific and Microbial Control of angptl4/fiaf Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Jazwa, Amelia L.; Trent, Chad M.; Rawls, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota enhances dietary energy harvest leading to increased fat storage in adipose tissues. This effect is caused in part by the microbial suppression of intestinal epithelial expression of a circulating inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase called Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4/Fiaf). To define the cis-regulatory mechanisms underlying intestine-specific and microbial control of Angptl4 transcription, we utilized the zebrafish system in which host regulatory DNA can be rapidly analyzed in a live, transparent, and gnotobiotic vertebrate. We found that zebrafish angptl4 is transcribed in multiple tissues including the liver, pancreatic islet, and intestinal epithelium, which is similar to its mammalian homologs. Zebrafish angptl4 is also specifically suppressed in the intestinal epithelium upon colonization with a microbiota. In vivo transgenic reporter assays identified discrete tissue-specific regulatory modules within angptl4 intron 3 sufficient to drive expression in the liver, pancreatic islet β-cells, or intestinal enterocytes. Comparative sequence analyses and heterologous functional assays of angptl4 intron 3 sequences from 12 teleost fish species revealed differential evolution of the islet and intestinal regulatory modules. High-resolution functional mapping and site-directed mutagenesis defined the minimal set of regulatory sequences required for intestinal activity. Strikingly, the microbiota suppressed the transcriptional activity of the intestine-specific regulatory module similar to the endogenous angptl4 gene. These results suggest that the microbiota might regulate host intestinal Angptl4 protein expression and peripheral fat storage by suppressing the activity of an intestine-specific transcriptional enhancer. This study provides a useful paradigm for understanding how microbial signals interact with tissue-specific regulatory networks to control the activity and evolution of host gene transcription. PMID:22479192

  3. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, E.C. II

    1994-09-09

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  4. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Rosnick, C.K.

    1996-04-19

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-0126). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  5. Efficient specification of interneurons from human pluripotent stem cells by dorsoventral and rostrocaudal modulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Gon; Yao, Ruiqin; Monnell, Travis; Cho, Jun-Hyeong; Vasudevan, Anju; Koh, Alice; Peeyush, Kumar T; Moon, Minho; Datta, Debkanya; Bolshakov, Vadim Y; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Chung, Sangmi

    2014-07-01

    GABAergic interneurons regulate cortical neural networks by providing inhibitory inputs, and their malfunction, resulting in failure to intricately regulate neural circuit balance, is implicated in brain diseases such as Schizophrenia, Autism, and Epilepsy. During early development, GABAergic interneuron progenitors arise from the ventral telencephalic area such as medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) by the actions of secreted signaling molecules from nearby organizers, and migrate to their target sites where they form local synaptic connections. In this study, using combinatorial and temporal modulation of developmentally relevant dorsoventral and rostrocaudal signaling pathways (SHH, Wnt, and FGF8), we efficiently generated MGE cells from multiple human pluripotent stem cells. Most importantly, modulation of FGF8/FGF19 signaling efficiently directed MGE versus CGE differentiation. Human MGE cells spontaneously differentiated into Lhx6-expressing GABAergic interneurons and showed migratory properties. These human MGE-derived neurons generated GABA, fired action potentials, and displayed robust GABAergic postsynaptic activity. Transplantation into rodent brains results in well-contained neural grafts enriched with GABAergic interneurons that migrate in the host and mature to express somatostatin or parvalbumin. Thus, we propose that signaling modulation recapitulating normal developmental patterns efficiently generate human GABAergic interneurons. This strategy represents a novel tool in regenerative medicine, developmental studies, disease modeling, bioassay, and drug screening.

  6. PKA phosphorylation reshapes the pharmacological kinetics of BmK AS, a unique site-4 sodium channel-specific modulator

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z. R.; Zhang, H.; Wu, J. Q.; Zhou, J. J.; Ji, Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    Although modulation of the activity of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation has been investigated in multiple preparations, the pharmacological sensitivity of VGSCs to scorpion toxins after PKA phosphorylation has rarely been approached. In this study, the effects of BmK AS, a sodium channel-specific modulator from Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, on the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of Nav1.2 were examined before and after PKA activation. After PKA phosphorylation, the pattern of dose-dependent modulation of BmK AS, on both Nav1.2α and Nav1.2 (α + β1) was reshaped. Meanwhile, the shifts in voltage-dependency of activation and inactivation induced by BmK AS were attenuated. The results suggested that PKA might play a role in different patterns how β-like toxins such as BmK AS modulate gating properties and peak currents of VGSCs. PMID:24430351

  7. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  8. Focused transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates specific domains of self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Pripfl, Jürgen; Lamm, Claus

    2015-02-01

    Recent neuroscience theories suggest that different kinds of self-regulation may share a common psychobiological mechanism. However, empirical evidence for a domain general self-regulation mechanism is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate whether focused anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), facilitating the activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), acts on a domain general self-regulation mechanism and thus modulates both affective and appetitive self-regulation. Twenty smokers participated in this within-subject sham controlled study. Effects of anodal left, anodal right and sham tDCS over the dlPFC on affective picture appraisal and nicotine craving-cue appraisal were assessed. Anodal right tDCS over the dlPFC reduced negative affect in emotion appraisal, but neither modulated regulation of positive emotion appraisal nor of craving appraisal. Anodal left stimulation did not induce any significant effects. The results of our study show that domain specific self-regulation networks are at work in the prefrontal cortex. Focused tDCS modulation of this specific self-regulation network could probably be used during the first phase of nicotine abstinence, during which negative affect might easily result in relapse. These findings have implications for neuroscience models of self-regulation and are of relevance for the development of brain stimulation based treatment methods for neuropsychiatric disorders associated with self-regulation deficits.

  9. Modulation of antigen presentation by autoreactive B cell clones specific for GAD65 from a type I diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    BANGA, J P; MOORE, J K; DUHINDAN, N; MADEC, A M; VAN ENDERT, P M; ORGIAZZI, J; ENDL, J

    2004-01-01

    We used a GAD65-specific human B–T cell line cognate system in vitro to investigate the modulation of GAD65 presentation by autoantibody, assessed in a proliferation assay. Generally, if the T cell determinant overlaps or resides within the antibody epitope, effects of presentation are blunted while if they are distant can lead to potent presentation. For three different autoreactive B–T cell line cognate pairs, the modulation of GAD65 presentation followed the mode of overlapping or distant epitopes with resultant potent or undetectable presentation. However, other cognate pairs elicited variability in this pattern of presentation. Notably, one B cell line, DPC, whose antibody epitope did not overlap with the T cell determinants, was consistently poor in presenting GAD65. Using the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 conjugated to GAD65 to study receptor-mediated antigen endocytosis showed that all the antigen-specific B cell clones were efficient in intracellular accumulation of the antigen. Additionally, multicolour immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the internalized GAD65/surface IgG complexes were rapidly targeted to a perinuclear compartment in all GAD-specific B cell clones. This analysis also demonstrated that HLA-DM expression was reduced strongly in DPC compared to the stimulatory B cell clones. Thus the capability of antigen-specific B cells to capture and present antigen to human T cell lines is dependent on the spatial relationship of B and T cell epitopes as well other factors which contribute to the efficiency of presentation. PMID:14678267

  10. Two separate modules of the conserved regulatory RNA AbcR1 address multiple target mRNAs in and outside of the translation initiation region

    PubMed Central

    Overlöper, Aaron; Kraus, Alexander; Gurski, Rosemarie; Wright, Patrick R; Georg, Jens; Hess, Wolfgang R; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    The small RNA AbcR1 regulates the expression of ABC transporters in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, and the human pathogen Brucella abortus. A combination of proteomic and bioinformatic approaches suggested dozens of AbcR1 targets in A. tumefaciens. Several of these newly discovered targets are involved in the uptake of amino acids, their derivatives, and sugars. Among the latter is the periplasmic sugar-binding protein ChvE, a component of the virulence signal transduction system. We examined 16 targets and their interaction with AbcR1 in close detail. In addition to the previously described mRNA interaction site of AbcR1 (M1), the CopraRNA program predicted a second functional module (M2) as target-binding site. Both M1 and M2 contain single-stranded anti-SD motifs. Using mutated AbcR1 variants, we systematically tested by band shift experiments, which sRNA region is responsible for mRNA binding and gene regulation. On the target site, we find that AbcR1 interacts with some mRNAs in the translation initiation region and with others far into their coding sequence. Our data show that AbcR1 is a versatile master regulator of nutrient uptake systems in A. tumefaciens and related bacteria. PMID:24921646

  11. The identification and characterization of specific ARF-Aux/IAA regulatory modules in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Naden T; Berleth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The current model of auxin-inducible transcription describes numerous regulatory interactions between AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORs (ARFs) and Aux/IAAs. However, specific relationships between individual members of these families in planta remain largely uncharacterized. Using a systems biology approach, the entire suite of Aux/IAA genes directly regulated by the developmentally pivotal ARF MONOPTEROS (MP) was recently determined for multiple Arabidopsis tissue types. This study showed that MP directly targets distinct subclades of Aux/IAAs, revealing potential regulatory modules of redundantly acting Aux/IAAs involved in MP-dependent processes. Further, functional analyses indicated that the protein products of these targeted Aux/IAAs negatively feedback on MP. Thus, comprehensive identification of Aux/IAAs targeted by individual ARFs will generate biologically meaningful networks of ARF-Aux/IAA regulatory modules controlling distinct plant pathways.

  12. Auditory imagery modulates frequency-specific areas in the human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jihoon; Kwon, Jae Hyung; Yang, Po Song; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2013-02-01

    Neural responses in early sensory areas are influenced by top-down processing. In the visual system, early visual areas have been shown to actively participate in top-down processing based on their topographical properties. Although it has been suggested that the auditory cortex is involved in top-down control, functional evidence of topographic modulation is still lacking. Here, we show that mental auditory imagery for familiar melodies induces significant activation in the frequency-responsive areas of the primary auditory cortex (PAC). This activation is related to the characteristics of the imagery: when subjects were asked to imagine high-frequency melodies, we observed increased activation in the high- versus low-frequency response area; when the subjects were asked to imagine low-frequency melodies, the opposite was observed. Furthermore, we found that A1 is more closely related to the observed frequency-related modulation than R in tonotopic subfields of the PAC. Our findings suggest that top-down processing in the auditory cortex relies on a mechanism similar to that used in the perception of external auditory stimuli, which is comparable to early visual systems.

  13. The HPV E6 oncoprotein targets histone methyltransferases for modulating specific gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, C-H; Peng, K-L; Jhang, H-C; Lin, C-H; Wu, S-Y; Chiang, C-M; Lee, S-C; Yu, W C Y; Juan, L-J

    2012-01-01

    Expression of viral proteins causes important epigenetic changes leading to abnormal cell growth. Whether viral proteins directly target histone methyltransferases (HMTs), a key family enzyme for epigenetic regulation, and modulate their enzymatic activities remains elusive. Here we show that the E6 proteins of both low-risk and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) interact with three coactivator HMTs, CARM1, PRMT1 and SET7, and downregulate their enzymatic activities in vitro and in HPV-transformed HeLa cells. Furthermore, these three HMTs are required for E6 to attenuate p53 transactivation function. Mechanistically, E6 hampers CARM1- and PRMT1-catalyzed histone methylation at p53-responsive promoters, and suppresses the binding of p53 to chromatinized DNA independently of E6-mediated p53 degradation. p53 pre-methylated at lysine-372 (p53K372 mono-methylation) by SET7 protects p53 from E6-induced degradation. Consistently, E6 downregulates p53K372 mono-methylation and thus reduces p53 protein stability. As a result of the E6-mediated inhibition of HMT activity, expression of p53 downstream genes is suppressed. Together, our results not only reveal a clever approach for the virus to interfere with p53 function, but also demonstrate the modulation of HMT activity as a novel mechanism of epigenetic regulation by a viral oncoprotein. PMID:21963854

  14. The HPV E6 oncoprotein targets histone methyltransferases for modulating specific gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C-H; Peng, K-L; Jhang, H-C; Lin, C-H; Wu, S-Y; Chiang, C-M; Lee, S-C; Yu, W C Y; Juan, L-J

    2012-05-03

    Expression of viral proteins causes important epigenetic changes leading to abnormal cell growth. Whether viral proteins directly target histone methyltransferases (HMTs), a key family enzyme for epigenetic regulation, and modulate their enzymatic activities remains elusive. Here we show that the E6 proteins of both low-risk and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) interact with three coactivator HMTs, CARM1, PRMT1 and SET7, and downregulate their enzymatic activities in vitro and in HPV-transformed HeLa cells. Furthermore, these three HMTs are required for E6 to attenuate p53 transactivation function. Mechanistically, E6 hampers CARM1- and PRMT1-catalyzed histone methylation at p53-responsive promoters, and suppresses the binding of p53 to chromatinized DNA independently of E6-mediated p53 degradation. p53 pre-methylated at lysine-372 (p53K372 mono-methylation) by SET7 protects p53 from E6-induced degradation. Consistently, E6 downregulates p53K372 mono-methylation and thus reduces p53 protein stability. As a result of the E6-mediated inhibition of HMT activity, expression of p53 downstream genes is suppressed. Together, our results not only reveal a clever approach for the virus to interfere with p53 function, but also demonstrate the modulation of HMT activity as a novel mechanism of epigenetic regulation by a viral oncoprotein.

  15. Cell-Specific Modulation of Papovavirus Replication by Tumor Suppressor Protein p53

    PubMed Central

    Lepik, Dina; Ustav, Mart

    2000-01-01

    Small DNA tumor viruses like human papillomaviruses, simian virus 40, and adenoviruses modulate the activity of cellular tumor suppressor proteins p53 and/or pRB. These viruses replicate as nuclear multicopy extrachromosomal elements during the S phase of the cell cycle, and it has been suggested that inactivation of p53 and pRb is necessary for directing the cells to the S phase. Mouse polyomavirus (Py), however, modulates only the pRB protein activity without any obvious interference with the action of p53. We show here that Py replication was not suppressed by the p53 protein indeed in all tested different mouse cell lines. In addition, E1- and E2-dependent papillomavirus origin replication was insensitive to the action of p53 in mouse cells. We show that in hamster (Chinese hamster ovary) or human (osteosarcoma 143) cell lines the replication of both Py and papillomavirus origins was efficiently blocked by p53. The block of Py replication in human and hamster cells is not caused by the downregulation of large T-antigen expression. The deletion analysis of the p53 protein shows that the RPA binding, proline-rich regulatory, DNA-binding, and oligomerization domains are necessary for p53 action in both replication systems. These results indicate that in mouse cells the p53 protein could be inactive for the suppression of papovavirus replication. PMID:10775606

  16. Specific Strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Modulate the Profile of Adipokines In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Fabersani, Emanuel; Abeijon-Mukdsi, María Claudia; Ross, Romina; Medina, Roxana; González, Silvia; Gauffin-Cano, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Obesity induces local/systemic inflammation accompanied by increases in macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and production of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and hormones. Previous studies have shown that probiotics could improve the intestinal dysbiosis induced by metabolic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Microorganisms could (directly or indirectly) affect adipokine levels due to their capacity to induce translocation of several intestinal microbial antigens into systemic circulation, which could lead to metabolic endotoxemia or produce immunomodulation in different organs. The aim of the present study was to select non-inflammatory lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains with the capacity to modulate adipokine secretion by the adipose tissue. We wish to elucidate the role of potential probiotic strains in the regulation of the cross talking between immune cells such as macrophages and adipose cells. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 was used for evaluating the ability of 14 LAB strains to induce cytokine production. The LAB strains were chosen based on their previously studied beneficial properties in health. Then, in murine adipocyte culture and macrophage-adipocyte coculture, we determined the ability of these strains to induce cytokines and leptin secretion. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and leptin levels were measured in cell supernatants. We also performed the detection and quantification of leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) expression in macrophage cell lines stimulated by these LAB strains. Differential secretion profile of cytokines in macrophage cells induced by LAB strains was observed. Also, the levels of Ob-Rb expression diverged among different LAB strains. In LAB-stimulated coculture cells (adipocytes and macrophages), we observed differential production of leptin and cytokines. Furthermore, we detected lower production levels in single culture than

  17. Specific Strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Modulate the Profile of Adipokines In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fabersani, Emanuel; Abeijon-Mukdsi, María Claudia; Ross, Romina; Medina, Roxana; González, Silvia; Gauffin-Cano, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Obesity induces local/systemic inflammation accompanied by increases in macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and production of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and hormones. Previous studies have shown that probiotics could improve the intestinal dysbiosis induced by metabolic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Microorganisms could (directly or indirectly) affect adipokine levels due to their capacity to induce translocation of several intestinal microbial antigens into systemic circulation, which could lead to metabolic endotoxemia or produce immunomodulation in different organs. The aim of the present study was to select non-inflammatory lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains with the capacity to modulate adipokine secretion by the adipose tissue. We wish to elucidate the role of potential probiotic strains in the regulation of the cross talking between immune cells such as macrophages and adipose cells. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 was used for evaluating the ability of 14 LAB strains to induce cytokine production. The LAB strains were chosen based on their previously studied beneficial properties in health. Then, in murine adipocyte culture and macrophage–adipocyte coculture, we determined the ability of these strains to induce cytokines and leptin secretion. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and leptin levels were measured in cell supernatants. We also performed the detection and quantification of leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) expression in macrophage cell lines stimulated by these LAB strains. Differential secretion profile of cytokines in macrophage cells induced by LAB strains was observed. Also, the levels of Ob-Rb expression diverged among different LAB strains. In LAB-stimulated coculture cells (adipocytes and macrophages), we observed differential production of leptin and cytokines. Furthermore, we detected lower production levels in single culture than

  18. Modulation of polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8 T cells in patients responding differently to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Casetti, R; De Simone, G; Sacchi, A; Bordoni, V; Viola, D; Rinaldi, A; Agrati, C; Gioia, C; Martini, F

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy allows a restoration of immune cell homeostasis associated with a normal immune competence. Our goal was to analyze the modulation of polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses during antiretroviral therapy. HIV-infected individuals were divided into four groups according to CD4+ cell count and viral load at the moment of recruitment. Whole blood was stimulated with a pool of CD8-specific HIV-antigens to assess cytokine/chemokine production and cytotoxicity activity by using flow cytometry. The groups show different modulation in HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. In particular, immunological failure showed different distributions of polyfunctional HIVspecific CD8+ responses, mainly due to an increase of cells producing CD107alpha/IFNgamma/IL-2/MIP-1beta. Our results indicate that this particular 4+ functional subset is a possible correlate of immunological failure. Considering the complexity of interactions among HAART, immune system and HIV, work is in progress to find correlates of therapy efficacy.

  19. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  20. The Neurosteroid Allopregnanolone Modulates Specific Functions in Central and Peripheral Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Faroni, Alessandro; Magnaghi, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Since the first observations on the existence of “neurosteroids” in the 1980s, our understanding of the importance of these endogenous steroids in the control of the central and peripheral nervous system (PNS) has increased progressively. Although most of the observations were made in neuronal cells, equally important are the effects that neurosteroids exert on glial cells. Among the different classes of neurosteroids acting on glial cells, the progesterone 5α-3α metabolite, allopregnanolone, displays a particular mechanism of action involving primarily the modulation of classic GABA receptors. In this review, we focus our attention on allopregnanolone because its effects on the physiology of glial cells of the central and PNS are intriguing and could potentially lead to the development of new strategies for neuroprotection and/or regeneration of injured nervous tissues. PMID:22654838

  1. Tissue-specific activities of an immune signaling module regulate physiological responses to pathogenic and nutritional bacteria in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Shivers, Robert P; Kooistra, Tristan; Chu, Stephanie W; Pagano, Daniel J; Kim, Dennis H

    2009-10-22

    Microbes represent both an essential source of nutrition and a potential source of lethal infection to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Immunity in C. elegans requires a signaling module comprised of orthologs of the mammalian Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain protein SARM, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) ASK1, and MAPKK MKK3, which activates p38 MAPK. We determined that the SARM-ASK1-MKK3 module has dual tissue-specific roles in the C. elegans response to pathogens--in the cell-autonomous regulation of innate immunity and the neuroendocrine regulation of serotonin-dependent aversive behavior. SARM-ASK1-MKK3 signaling in the sensory nervous system also regulates egg-laying behavior that is dependent on bacteria provided as a nutrient source. Our data demonstrate that these physiological responses to bacteria share a common mechanism of signaling through the SARM-ASK1-MKK3 module and suggest the co-option of ancestral immune signaling pathways in the evolution of physiological responses to microbial pathogens and nutrients.

  2. Cell-type-specific modulation of targets and distractors by dopamine D1 receptors in primate prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Simon N.; Stalter, Maximilian; Nieder, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is crucial for maintaining relevant information in working memory and resisting interference. PFC neurons are strongly regulated by dopamine, but it is unknown whether dopamine receptors are involved in protecting target memories from distracting stimuli. We investigated the prefrontal circuit dynamics and dopaminergic modulation of targets and distractors in monkeys trained to ignore interfering stimuli in a delayed-match-to-numerosity task. We found that dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) modulate the recovery of task-relevant information following a distracting stimulus. The direction of modulation is cell-type-specific: in putative pyramidal neurons, D1R inhibition enhances and D1R stimulation attenuates coding of the target stimulus after the interference, while the opposite pattern is observed in putative interneurons. Our results suggest that dopaminergic neuromodulation of PFC circuits regulates mental representations of behaviourally relevant stimuli that compete with task-irrelevant input and could play a central role for cognitive functioning in health and disease. PMID:27807366

  3. Dietary fat and fiber interactively modulate apoptosis and mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles in mouse colon in a site-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Vaz, Frederic M; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-05-10

    We have demonstrated that the combination of bioactive components generated by fish oil (containing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) and fermentable fiber (leading to butyrate production) act coordinately to protect against colon cancer. This is, in part, the result of an enhancement of apoptosis at the base of the crypt across all stages (initiation, promotion, and progression) of colon tumorigenesis. As mitochondria are key organelles capable of regulating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and mediating programmed cell death, we investigated the effects of diet on mitochondrial function by measuring mucosal cardiolipin composition, mitochondrial respiratory parameters, and apoptosis in isolated crypts from the proximal and distal colon. C57BL/6 mice (n=15/treatment) were fed one of two dietary fats (corn oil and fish oil) and two fibers (pectin and cellulose) for 4 weeks in a 2×2 factorial design. In general, diet modulated apoptosis and the mucosal bioenergetic profiles in a site-specific manner. The fish/pectin diet promoted a more proapoptotic phenotype - for example, increased proton leak (Pinteraction=0.002) - compared with corn/cellulose (control) only in the proximal colon. With respect to the composition of cardiolipin, a unique phospholipid localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane where it mediates energy metabolism, fish oil feeding indirectly influenced its molecular species with a combined carbon number of C68 or greater, suggesting compensatory regulation. These data indicate that dietary fat and fiber can interactively modulate the mitochondrial metabolic profile and thereby potentially modulate apoptosis and subsequent colon cancer risk.

  4. Attention modulates specificity effects in spoken word recognition: Challenges to the time-course hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Theodore, Rachel M.; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Luthra, Sahil

    2015-01-01

    Findings in the domain of spoken word recognition indicate that lexical representations contain both abstract and episodic information. It has been proposed that processing time determines when each source of information is recruited, with increased processing time required to access lower-frequency episodic instantiations. The time-course hypothesis of specificity effects thus identifies a strong role for retrieval mechanisms mediating the use of abstract versus episodic information. Here we conducted three recognition memory experiments to examine whether findings previously attributed to retrieval mechanisms might reflect attention during encoding. Results from Experiment 1 showed that talker-specificity effects emerged when subjects attended to individual speakers during encoding, but not when they attended to lexical characteristics during encoding, even though processing time at retrieval was equivalent. Results from Experiment 2 showed that talker-specificity effects emerged when listeners attended to talker gender but not when they attended to syntactic characteristics, even though processing time at retrieval was significantly longer in the latter condition. Results from Experiment 3 showed no talker-specificity effects when attending to lexical characteristics even when processing at retrieval was slowed by the addition of background noise. Collectively, these results suggest that when processing time during retrieval is decoupled from encoding factors, it fails to predict the emergence of talker-specificity effects. Rather, attention during encoding appears to be the putative variable. PMID:25824889

  5. Small molecules that dramatically alter multidrug resistance phenotype by modulating the substrate specificity of P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Komarov, Pavel G.; Becker, Yigal; Ewenson, Ariel; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2001-01-01

    By screening a chemical library for the compounds protecting cells from adriamycin (Adr), a series of small molecules was isolated that interfered with the accumulation of Adr in mouse fibroblasts by enhancing efflux of the drug. Isolated compounds also stimulated efflux of Rhodamine 123 (Rho-123), another substrate of multidrug transporters. Stimulation of drug efflux was detectable in the cells expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp), but not in their P-gp-negative variants, and was completely reversible by the P-gp inhibitors. A dramatic stimulation of P-gp activity against Adr and Rho-123 by the identified compounds was accompanied by suppression of P-gp-mediated efflux of other substrates, such as Taxol (paclitaxel) or Hoechst 33342, indicating that they act as modulators of substrate specificity of P-gp. Consistently, P-gp modulators dramatically altered the pattern of cross-resistance of P-gp-expressing cells to different P-gp substrates: an increase in resistance to Adr, daunorubicin, and etoposide was accompanied by cell sensitization to Vinca alkaloids, gramicidin D, and Taxol with no effect on cell sensitivity to colchicine, actinomycin D, puromycin, and colcemid, as well as to several non-P-gp substrates. The relative effect of P-gp modulators against different substrates varied among the isolated compounds that can be used as fine tools for analyzing mechanisms of drug selectivity of P-gp. These results raise the possibility of a rational control over cell sensitivity to drugs and toxins through modulation of P-gp activity by small molecules. PMID:11707575

  6. Specific modulation of corticospinal and spinal excitabilities during maximal voluntary isometric, shortening and lengthening contractions in synergist muscles.

    PubMed

    Duclay, Julien; Pasquet, Benjamin; Martin, Alain; Duchateau, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the cortical and spinal mechanisms involved in the modulations of neural activation during lengthening compared with isometric and shortening maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). Two muscles susceptible to different neural adjustments at the spinal level, the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG), were compared. Twelve healthy males participated in at least two experimental sessions designed to assess corticospinal and spinal excitabilities. We compared the modulation of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation and Hoffmann reflexes (H-reflexes) during isometric and anisometric MVCs. The H-reflex and MEP responses, recorded during lengthening and shortening MVCs, were compared with those obtained during isometric MVCs. The results indicate that the maximal amplitude of both MEP and H-reflex in the SOL were smaller (P < 0.01) during lengthening MVCs compared with isometric and shortening MVCs but similar (P > 0.05) in MG for all three muscle contraction types. The silent period that follows maximal MEPs was reduced (P < 0.01) during lengthening MVCs in the SOL but not the MG. Similar observations were obtained regardless of the initial length of the MG muscle. Collectively, the current results indicate that the relative contribution of both cortical and spinal mechanisms to the modulation of neural activation differs during lengthening MVCs and between two synergist muscles. The comparison of SOL and MG responses further suggests that the specific modulation of the corticospinal excitability during lengthening MVCs depends mainly on pre- and postsynaptic inhibitory mechanisms acting at the spinal level.

  7. Hypocretin neuron-specific transcriptome profiling identifies the sleep modulator Kcnh4a

    PubMed Central

    Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Elbaz, Idan; Diber, Alex; Dahary, Dvir; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Alon, Shahar; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-01-01

    Sleep has been conserved throughout evolution; however, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of sleep are largely unknown. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate sleep\\wake states, feeding, stress, and reward. To elucidate the mechanism that enables these various functions and to identify sleep regulators, we combined fluorescence cell sorting and RNA-seq in hcrt:EGFP zebrafish. Dozens of Hcrt-neuron–specific transcripts were identified and comprehensive high-resolution imaging revealed gene-specific localization in all or subsets of Hcrt neurons. Clusters of Hcrt-neuron–specific genes are predicted to be regulated by shared transcription factors. These findings show that Hcrt neurons are heterogeneous and that integrative molecular mechanisms orchestrate their diverse functions. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kcnh4a, which is expressed in all Hcrt neurons, was silenced by the CRISPR-mediated gene inactivation system. The mutant kcnh4a (kcnh4a-/-) larvae showed reduced sleep time and consolidation, specifically during the night, suggesting that Kcnh4a regulates sleep. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08638.001 PMID:26426478

  8. Modulation of γ-secretase specificity using small molecule allosteric inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Christopher C.; Zhu, Lei; Chau, Deming; Yang, Li; Wang, Rong; Djaballah, Hakim; Zheng, Hui; Li, Yue-Ming

    2009-01-01

    γ-Secretase cleaves multiple substrates within the transmembrane domain that include the amyloid precursor protein as well as the Notch family of receptors. These substrates are associated with Alzheimer disease and cancer. Despite extensive investigation of this protease, little is known regarding the regulation of γ-secretase specificity. To discover selective inhibitors for drug development and for probing the mechanisms of γ-secretase specificity, we screened chemical libraries and consequently developed a di-coumarin family of inhibitors that preferentially inhibit γ-secretase-mediated production of Aβ42 over other cleavage activities. These coumarin dimer-based compounds interact with γ-secretase by binding to an allosteric site. By developing a multiple photo-affinity probe approach, we demonstrate that this allosteric binding causes a conformational change within the active site of γ-secretase at the S2 and S1 sub-sites that leads to selective inhibition of Aβ42. In conclusion, by using these di-coumarin compounds, we reveal a mechanism by which γ-secretase specificity is regulated and provide insights into the molecular basis by which familial presenilin mutations may affect the active site and specificity of γ-secretase. Furthermore, this class of selective inhibitors provides the basis for development of Alzheimer disease therapeutic agents. PMID:19906985

  9. Hypocretin neuron-specific transcriptome profiling identifies the sleep modulator Kcnh4a.

    PubMed

    Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Elbaz, Idan; Diber, Alex; Dahary, Dvir; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Alon, Shahar; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-10-01

    Sleep has been conserved throughout evolution; however, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of sleep are largely unknown. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate sleep\\wake states, feeding, stress, and reward. To elucidate the mechanism that enables these various functions and to identify sleep regulators, we combined fluorescence cell sorting and RNA-seq in hcrt:EGFP zebrafish. Dozens of Hcrt-neuron-specific transcripts were identified and comprehensive high-resolution imaging revealed gene-specific localization in all or subsets of Hcrt neurons. Clusters of Hcrt-neuron-specific genes are predicted to be regulated by shared transcription factors. These findings show that Hcrt neurons are heterogeneous and that integrative molecular mechanisms orchestrate their diverse functions. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kcnh4a, which is expressed in all Hcrt neurons, was silenced by the CRISPR-mediated gene inactivation system. The mutant kcnh4a (kcnh4a(-/-)) larvae showed reduced sleep time and consolidation, specifically during the night, suggesting that Kcnh4a regulates sleep.

  10. CTCF modulates Estrogen Receptor function through specific chromatin and nuclear matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fiorito, Elisa; Sharma, Yogita; Gilfillan, Siv; Wang, Shixiong; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Satheesh, Somisetty V.; Katika, Madhumohan R.; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Thiede, Bernd; Mills, Ian G.; Hurtado, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer regions and transcription start sites of estrogen-target regulated genes are connected by means of Estrogen Receptor long-range chromatin interactions. Yet, the complete molecular mechanisms controlling the transcriptional output of engaged enhancers and subsequent activation of coding genes remain elusive. Here, we report that CTCF binding to enhancer RNAs is enriched when breast cancer cells are stimulated with estrogen. CTCF binding to enhancer regions results in modulation of estrogen-induced gene transcription by preventing Estrogen Receptor chromatin binding and by hindering the formation of additional enhancer-promoter ER looping. Furthermore, the depletion of CTCF facilitates the expression of target genes associated with cell division and increases the rate of breast cancer cell proliferation. We have also uncovered a genomic network connecting loci enriched in cell cycle regulator genes to nuclear lamina that mediates the CTCF function. The nuclear lamina and chromatin interactions are regulated by estrogen-ER. We have observed that the chromatin loops formed when cells are treated with estrogen establish contacts with the nuclear lamina. Once there, the portion of CTCF associated with the nuclear lamina interacts with enhancer regions, limiting the formation of ER loops and the induction of genes present in the loop. Collectively, our results reveal an important, unanticipated interplay between CTCF and nuclear lamina to control the transcription of ER target genes, which has great implications in the rate of growth of breast cancer cells. PMID:27638884

  11. Specific features of sensorimotor cerebral cortex activity modulation by dopamine releaser amantadine.

    PubMed

    Storozhuk, Viktor M; Zinyuk, Larissa E

    2007-09-01

    The modulatory effects of amantadine (1-adamantanamine) on the activity of sensorimotor cerebral cortex neurones during microiontophoretic application of agonists of glutamatergic and GABA-ergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transmission were studied. In non-anaesthetised cats, dopamine (DA) released by amantadine application in a small area of the neocortex increased baseline and evoked neuronal activity, providing stabilization and optimum course of both the neuronal and the conditioned responses of the animal. Amantadine eliminates a decrease in the level of neuronal baseline and evoked activity and marked increase in the latency of neuronal activation and conditioned movement mediated by D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride ((S)-5-aminosulfonyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-2-methoamantadineybenzamide) or GABA. This is reflected by a proportionate decrease in the onset of neuronal impulse reaction and latency of conditioned movement. Combined NMDA (N-methyl-D: -aspartate) and amantadine application also caused a considerable increase in baseline and evoked activity, but produced a slightly weaker effect than that evoked by NMDA application alone. A decrease in the baseline and evoked neuronal activity after NMDA withdrawn lasted during next control session (up to 40 min). The ability of DA releaser amantadine to alleviate significant increase in the latency of neuronal responses and conditioned movement induced by sulpiride or GABA suggests that dopamine modulates the activity of GABA-ergic inhibitory fast spike interneurons in the cat sensorimotor cortex during conditioning.

  12. Establishing an optimized patient-specific verification program for volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Serna, Alfredo; Mata, Fernando; Puchades, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) increases the workload significantly. We compared the results from 4 verification methods to establish an efficient VMAT QA. Planning for VMAT treatments was carried out for 40 consecutive patients. Pretreatment verifications were carried out with ion chamber array Physikalish-Technische Werkstätten (PTW729), electronic portal dosimetry (EPID), ion chamber measurements, and independent dose calculation with Diamond program. 2D analyses were made using the gamma analysis (3mm distance to agreement and 3% dose difference relative to maximum, 10% dose threshold). Average point dose difference calculated by Eclipse relative to ion chamber measurements and Diamond were 0.1%±0.9% and 0.6%±2.2%, respectively. Average pass rate for PTW729 was 99.2%±1.9% and 98.3%±1.3% for EPID. The total required time (linac occupancy time given in parentheses) for each QA method was: PTW729 43.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), EPID 14.5 minutes (2.5 minutes), ion chamber 34.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), and Diamond 12.0 minutes (0 minute). The results were consistent and allowed us to establish an optimized protocol, considering safety and accuracy as well as workload, consisting of 2 verification methods: EPID 2D analysis and independent dose calculation.

  13. Establishing an optimized patient-specific verification program for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serna, Alfredo; Mata, Fernando; Puchades, Vicente

    2013-10-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) increases the workload significantly. We compared the results from 4 verification methods to establish an efficient VMAT QA. Planning for VMAT treatments was carried out for 40 consecutive patients. Pretreatment verifications were carried out with ion chamber array Physikalish-Technische Werkstätten (PTW729), electronic portal dosimetry (EPID), ion chamber measurements, and independent dose calculation with Diamond program. 2D analyses were made using the gamma analysis (3 mm distance to agreement and 3% dose difference relative to maximum, 10% dose threshold). Average point dose difference calculated by Eclipse relative to ion chamber measurements and Diamond were 0.1%±0.9% and 0.6%±2.2%, respectively. Average pass rate for PTW729 was 99.2%±1.9% and 98.3%±1.3% for EPID. The total required time (linac occupancy time given in parentheses) for each QA method was: PTW729 43.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), EPID 14.5 minutes (2.5 minutes), ion chamber 34.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), and Diamond 12.0 minutes (0 minute). The results were consistent and allowed us to establish an optimized protocol, considering safety and accuracy as well as workload, consisting of 2 verification methods: EPID 2D analysis and independent dose calculation.

  14. Heat shock protein coinducers with no effect on protein denaturation specifically modulate the membrane lipid phase

    PubMed Central

    Török, Zsolt; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Balogh, Gábor; Horváth, Ibolya; Nagy, Enikő; Pénzes, Zoltán; Hargitai, Judit; Bensaude, Olivier; Csermely, Péter; Crowe, John H.; Maresca, Bruno; Vígh, László

    2003-01-01

    The hydroxylamine derivative bimoclomol (BM) has been shown to activate natural cytoprotective homeostatic responses by enhancing the capability of cells to cope with various pathophysiological conditions. It exerts its effect in synergy with low levels of stress to induce the synthesis of members of major stress protein families. We show here that the presence of BM does not influence protein denaturation in the cells. BM and its derivatives selectively interact with acidic lipids and modulate their thermal and dynamic properties. BM acts as a membrane fluidizer at normal temperature, but it is a highly efficient membrane stabilizer, inhibiting the bilayer–nonbilayer phase transitions during severe heat shock. We suggest that BM and the related compounds modify those domains of membrane lipids where the thermally or chemically induced perturbation of lipid phase is sensed and transduced into a cellular signal, leading to enhanced activation of heat shock genes. BM may be a prototype for clinically safe membrane-interacting drug candidates that rebalance the level and composition of heat shock proteins. PMID:12615993

  15. Untying the gordian knot: what we do and don't know about gender-specific medicine-keynote address for the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Legato, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    Over the past two decades, a burgeoning interest in women's health, the direct consequence of the feminist movement, has inspired a worldwide interest in the differences between the normal function of men and women and their unique experiences of the same illnesses. The scope and significance of what we have discovered and continue to find has fundamentally changed the way we prevent, diagnose, and treat diseases. Important questions remain, however, and deserve specific investigation and analysis.

  16. Subject-specific modulation of local field potential spectral power during brain-machine interface control in primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Kelvin; Dangi, Siddharth; Orsborn, Amy L.; Gastpar, Michael C.; Carmena, Jose M.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have predominantly utilized spike activity as the control signal. However, an increasing number of studies have shown the utility of local field potentials (LFPs) for decoding motor related signals. Currently, it is unclear how well different LFP frequencies can serve as features for continuous, closed-loop BMI control. Approach. We demonstrate 2D continuous LFP-based BMI control using closed-loop decoder adaptation, which adapts decoder parameters to subject-specific LFP feature modulations during BMI control. We trained two macaque monkeys to control a 2D cursor in a center-out task by modulating LFP power in the 0-150 Hz range. Main results. While both monkeys attained control, they used different strategies involving different frequency bands. One monkey primarily utilized the low-frequency spectrum (0-80 Hz), which was highly correlated between channels, and obtained proficient performance even with a single channel. In contrast, the other monkey relied more on higher frequencies (80-150 Hz), which were less correlated between channels, and had greater difficulty with control as the number of channels decreased. We then restricted the monkeys to use only various sub-ranges (0-40, 40-80, and 80-150 Hz) of the 0-150 Hz band. Interestingly, although both monkeys performed better with some sub-ranges than others, they were able to achieve BMI control with all sub-ranges after decoder adaptation, demonstrating broad flexibility in the frequencies that could potentially be used for LFP-based BMI control. Significance. Overall, our results demonstrate proficient, continuous BMI control using LFPs and provide insight into the subject-specific spectral patterns of LFP activity modulated during control.

  17. Caldendrin, a neuron-specific modulator of Cav/1.2 (L-type) Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Tippens, Alyssa L; Lee, Amy

    2007-03-16

    EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins such as calmodulin and CaBP1 have emerged as important regulatory subunits of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Here, we show that caldendrin, a variant of CaBP1 enriched in the brain, interacts with and distinctly modulates Cav1.2 (L-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels relative to other Ca2+-binding proteins. Caldendrin binds to the C-terminal IQ-domain of the pore-forming alpha1-subunit of Cav1.2 (alpha(1)1.2) and competitively displaces calmodulin and CaBP1 from this site. Compared with CaBP1, caldendrin causes a more modest suppression of Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Cav1.2 through a different subset of molecular determinants. Caldendrin does not bind to the N-terminal domain of alpha11.2, a site that is critical for functional interactions of the channel with CaBP1. Deletion of the N-terminal domain inhibits CaBP1, but spares caldendrin modulation of Cav1.2 inactivation. In contrast, mutations of the IQ-domain abolish physical and functional interactions of caldendrin and Cav1.2, but do not prevent channel modulation by CaBP1. Using antibodies specific for caldendrin and Cav1.2, we show that caldendrin coimmunoprecipitates with Cav1.2 from the brain and colocalizes with Cav1.2 in somatodendritic puncta of cortical neurons in culture. Our findings reveal functional diversity within related Ca2+-binding proteins, which may enhance the specificity of Ca2+ signaling by Cav1.2 channels in different cellular contexts.

  18. Silver Nanoclusters with Specific Ion Recognition Modulated by Ligand Passivation toward Fluorimetric and Colorimetric Copper Analysis and Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongzhao; Li, Shuying; Jiang, Yao; Qiao, Yuchun; Zhang, Liyan; Xu, Lulu; Liu, Jinghui; Qi, Wei; Wang, Hua

    2016-02-05

    Silver nanoclusters were synthesized and passivated by glutathione (GSH) ligand, with high aqueous stability and powerful red fluorescence and UV-vis yellow colour. Importantly, the specific recognition of the AgNCs was modulated from Hg(2+) ions to Cu(2+) ions upon the GSH passivation, of which the unique GSH-Cu(2+) chelating reaction could conduct the fluorescence quenching of AgNCs. Strong UV-vis absorbance of GSH-passivated AgNCs could also be realized depending on the Cu(2+) levels. Moreover, the Cu(2+)-induced loss of fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance of GSH-passivated AgNCs could be well restored by using stronger Cu(2+) chelating agent. A simultaneous and reversible fluorimetric and colorimetric sensing method was thereby developed for probing Cu(2+) ions in blood with high sensitivity and selectivity. Subsequently, the fluorescence-trackable imaging for live tissues and cells was demonstrated towards the analysis Cu(2+) ions using GSH-passivated AgNCs as the fluorescent probes. This study indicates that the use of functional ligands like GSH could not only modulate the specific ion recognition of AgNCs, but also endow them the high aqueous stability and powerful red fluorescence towards the wide applications for ion sensing and biological imaging in the complicated media like blood.

  19. Analysis of measurement deviations for the patient-specific quality assurance using intensity-modulated spot-scanning particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; Hsi, Wen C.

    2017-04-01

    To analyze measurement deviations of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) using intensity-modulated spot-scanning particle beams, a commercial radiation dosimeter using 24 pinpoint ionization chambers was utilized. Before the clinical trial, validations of the radiation dosimeter and treatment planning system were conducted. During the clinical trial 165 measurements were performed on 36 enrolled patients. Two or three fields of particle beam were used for each patient. Measurements were typically performed with the dosimeter placed at special regions of dose distribution along depth and lateral profiles. In order to investigate the dosimeter accuracy, repeated measurements with uniform dose irradiations were also carried out. A two-step approach was proposed to analyze 24 sampling points over a 3D treatment volume. The mean value and the standard deviation of each measurement did not exceed 5% for all measurements performed on patients with various diseases. According to the defined intervention thresholds of mean deviation and the distance-to-agreement concept with a Gamma index analysis using criteria of 3.0% and 2 mm, a decision could be made regarding whether the dose distribution was acceptable for the patient. Based measurement results, deviation analysis was carried out. In this study, the dosimeter was used for dose verification and provided a safety guard to assure precise dose delivery of highly modulated particle therapy. Patient-specific QA will be investigated in future clinical operations.

  20. Covalently attached oligodeoxyribonucleotides induce RNase activity of a short peptide and modulate its base specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Nadezhda L.; Pyshnyi, Dmytryi V.; Ivanova, Eugenya M.; Zenkova, Marina A.; Gross, Hans J.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    2004-01-01

    New artificial ribonucleases, conjugates of short oligodeoxyribonucleotides with peptides containing alternating arginine and leucine, were synthesized and characterized in terms of their catalytic activity and specificity of RNA cleavage. The conjugates efficiently cleave different RNAs within single-stranded regions. Depending on the sequence and length of the oligonucleotide, the conjugates display either G–X>>Pyr–A or Pyr–A>>G–X cleavage specificity. Preferential RNA cleavage at G–X phosphodiester bonds was observed for conjugate NH2-Gly-[ArgLeu]4-CCAAACA. The conjugates function as true catalysts, exhibiting reaction turnover up to 175 for 24 h. Our data show that in the conjugate the oligonucleotide plays the role of a factor which provides an ‘active‘ conformation of the peptide via intramolecular interactions, and that it is the peptide residue itself which is responsible for substrate affinity and catalysis. PMID:15047859

  1. Abstract Interface Specifications for the A-7E Device Interface Module.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-20

    Differential equations are an example of a mathematical abstraction representing systems as diverse as electrical circuits and collections of springs...Oxford, pp. 861-867. /4/ Liskov, B. and Zilles , S.; "Specification Techniques for Data Abstractions," IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, Vol. SE...Crews, L., and Hall, C.; A-7D/E Aircraft Navigation Equations ; NWC Technical Note 404-176; March 1975. 3 George, R.; A-7E Weapon Delivery Equations ; NWC

  2. From specificity to sensitivity: affective states modulate visual working memory for emotional expressive faces

    PubMed Central

    Maran, Thomas; Sachse, Pierre; Furtner, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that visual working memory (VWM) preferentially remembers angry looking faces. However, the meaning of facial actions is construed in relation to context. To date, there are no studies investigating the role of perceiver-based context when processing emotional cues in VWM. To explore the influence of affective context on VWM for faces, we conducted two experiments using both a VWM task for emotionally expressive faces and a mood induction procedure. Affective context was manipulated by unpleasant (Experiment 1) and pleasant (Experiment 2) IAPS pictures in order to induce an affect high in motivational intensity (defensive or appetitive, respectively) compared to a low arousal control condition. Results indicated specifically increased sensitivity of VWM for angry looking faces in the neutral condition. Enhanced VWM for angry faces was prevented by inducing affects of high motivational intensity. In both experiments, affective states led to a switch from specific enhancement of angry expressions in VWM to an equally sensitive representation of all emotional expressions. Our findings demonstrate that emotional expressions are of different behavioral relevance for the receiver depending on the affective context, supporting a functional organization of VWM along with flexible resource allocation. In VWM, stimulus processing adjusts to situational requirements and transitions from a specifically prioritizing default mode in predictable environments to a sensitive, hypervigilant mode in exposure to emotional events. PMID:26379609

  3. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates human color discrimination in a pathway-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Costa, Thiago L; Nagy, Balázs V; Barboni, Mirella T S; Boggio, Paulo S; Ventura, Dora F

    2012-01-01

    Previous research showed that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modulate visual cortex excitability. However, there is no experiment on the effects of tDCS on color perception to date. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of tDCS on color discrimination tasks. Fifteen healthy subjects (mean age of 25.6 ± 4.4 years) were tested with Cambridge Color Test 2.0 (Trivector and ellipses protocols) and a Forced-choice Spatial Color Contrast Sensitivity task (vertical red-green sinusoidal grating) while receiving tDCS. Anodal, cathodal, and sham tDCS were delivered at Oz for 22 min using two square electrodes (25 cm(2) with a current of 1.5 mA) in sessions separated by 7 days. Anodal tDCS significantly increased tritan sensitivity (p < 0.01) and had no significant effect on protan, deutan, or red-green grating discrimination. The effects on the tritan discrimination returned to baseline after 15 min (p < 0.01). Cathodal tDCS reduced the sensitivity in the deutan axis and increased sensitivity in the tritan axis (p < 0.05). The lack of anodal tDCS effects in the protan, deutan, and red-green grating sensitivities could be explained by a "ceiling effect" since adults in this age range tend to have optimal color discrimination performance for these hues. The differential effects of cathodal tDCS on tritan and deutan sensitivities and the absence of the proposed ceiling effects for the tritan axes might be explained by Parvocellular (P) and Koniocellular (K) systems with regard to their functional, physiological, and anatomical differences. The results also support the existence of a systematic segregation of P and K color-coding cells in V1. Future research and possible clinical implications are discussed.

  4. Development and use of culture systems to modulate specific cell responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Yves

    Culture surfaces that induce specific localized cell responses are required to achieve tissue-like cell growth in three-dimensional (3D) environments, as well as to develop more efficient cell-based diagnostic techniques, noticeably when working with fragile cells such as stem cells or platelets. As such, Chapter 1 of this thesis work is devoted to the review of 3D cell-material interactions in vitro and the corresponding existing culture systems available to achieve in vivo-like cell responses. More adequate 3D culture systems will need to be developed to mimic several characteristics of in vivo environments, including lowered non-specific cell-material interactions and localized biochemical signaling. The experimental work in this thesis is based on the hypothesis that well-studied and optimized surface treatments will be able to lower non-specific cell-material interactions and allow local chemical modification in order to achieve specific localized cell-material interactions for different applications. As such, in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 of this thesis, surface treatments were developed using plasma polymerization and covalent immobilization of a low-fouling polymer (i.e., poly(ethylene glycol)) and characterized and optimized using a large number of techniques including atomic force microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, surface plasmon resonance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence-based techniques. The main plasma polymerization parameter important for surface chemical content, specifically nitrogen to carbon content, was identified as being glow discharge power, while reaction time and power determined plasma film thickness. Moreover, plasma films were shown to be stable in aqueous environments. Covalently-bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) layers physicochemical and mechanical properties are dependent on fabrication methods. Polymer concentration in solution is an important indicator of final layer properties, and use of a theta solvent

  5. Addressing the question of disorder-specific risk factors of internet addiction: a comparison of personality traits in patients with addictive behaviors and comorbid internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Müller, K W; Koch, A; Dickenhorst, U; Beutel, M E; Duven, E; Wölfling, K

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled use of the internet has been reported to affect the lives of some users in a negative way. According to epidemiological studies, about 1% of the general population is showing signs of internet addiction. Since internet addiction is becoming a growing health concern, research on potential risk factors is becoming more important in order to develop strategies for prevention and to adopt therapeutic treatment. Although there are some studies investigating personality traits in internet addiction, most of these studies are based on samples of healthy subjects. In this research project, we compared personality profiles of a sample of patients in different rehabilitation centers. 70 patients with an addiction disorder that additionally met the criteria for internet addiction were compared to 48 patients suffering from alcohol dependence. Besides Big Five personality traits, we also assessed depressive symptoms. It was shown that patients with comorbid internet addiction can be discriminated from other patients by higher neuroticism and lower extraversion as well as lower conscientiousness. After controlling for depressive symptoms, lower conscientiousness especially turned out to be a disorder-specific risk factor. As internet addiction is related to unique patterns of personality traits and can be discriminated from alcohol dependence, treatment approaches are needed that meet the specific requirements of patients with internet addiction.

  6. Cell-Type-Specific Modulation of Sensory Responses in Olfactory Bulb Circuits by Serotonergic Projections from the Raphe Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Brunert, Daniela; Tsuno, Yusuke; Rothermel, Markus; Shipley, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic neurons in the brainstem raphe nuclei densely innervate the olfactory bulb (OB), where they can modulate the initial representation and processing of olfactory information. Serotonergic modulation of sensory responses among defined OB cell types is poorly characterized in vivo. Here, we used cell-type-specific expression of optical reporters to visualize how raphe stimulation alters sensory responses in two classes of GABAergic neurons of the mouse OB glomerular layer, periglomerular (PG) and short axon (SA) cells, as well as mitral/tufted (MT) cells carrying OB output to piriform cortex. In PG and SA cells, brief (1–4 s) raphe stimulation elicited a large increase in the magnitude of responses linked to inhalation of ambient air, as well as modest increases in the magnitude of odorant-evoked responses. Near-identical effects were observed when the optical reporter of glutamatergic transmission iGluSnFR was expressed in PG and SA cells, suggesting enhanced excitatory input to these neurons. In contrast, in MT cells imaged from the dorsal OB, raphe stimulation elicited a strong increase in resting GCaMP fluorescence with only a slight enhancement of inhalation-linked responses to odorant. Finally, optogenetically stimulating raphe serotonergic afferents in the OB had heterogeneous effects on presumptive MT cells recorded extracellularly, with an overall modest increase in resting and odorant-evoked responses during serotonergic afferent stimulation. These results suggest that serotonergic afferents from raphe dynamically modulate olfactory processing through distinct effects on multiple OB targets, and may alter the degree to which OB output is shaped by inhibition during behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Modulation of the circuits that process sensory information can profoundly impact how information about the external world is represented and perceived. This study investigates how the serotonergic system modulates the initial processing of olfactory

  7. Sex-specific modulation of the gut microbiome and behavior in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Sylvia, Kristyn E; Jewell, Cathleen P; Rendon, Nikki M; St John, Emma A; Demas, Gregory E

    2017-02-01

    The gut microbiome is a diverse, host-specific, and symbiotic bacterial environment that is critical for mammalian survival and exerts a surprising yet powerful influence on brain and behavior. Gut dysbiosis has been linked to a wide range of physical and psychological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders and anxiety, as well as autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. A wealth of information on the effects of dysbiosis on anxiety and depression has been reported in laboratory model systems (e.g., germ-free mice); however, the effects of microbiome disruption on social behaviors (e.g., aggression) of non-model species that may be particularly important in understanding many aspects of physiology and behavior have yet to be fully explored. Here we assessed the sex-specific effects of a broad-spectrum antibiotic on the gut microbiome and its effects on social behaviors in male and female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). In Experiment 1, we administered a broad-spectrum antibiotic on a short-term basis and found that antibiotic treatment altered the microbial communities in the gut in male and female hamsters. In Experiment 2, we tested the effects of single versus repeated antibiotic treatment (including a recovery phase) on behavior, and found that two, but not one, treatments caused marked decreases in aggressive behavior, but not other social behaviors, in males; aggression returned to normal levels following recovery. Antibiotic-treated females, in contrast, showed decreased aggression after a single treatment, with all other social behaviors unaffected. Unlike males, female aggression did not return to normal during either recovery period. The present findings demonstrate that modest antibiotic treatment results in marked disruption of the gut microbiome in hamsters, akin to research done in other rodent species and humans. Further, we show that treatment with a broad-spectrum antibiotic, which has dysbiotic effects, also has robust, sex-specific

  8. Cell type-specific glycosylation of Orai1 modulates store-operated Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Kathrin; Kilch, Tatiana; Kappel, Sven; Alansary, Dalia; Schwär, Gertrud; Niemeyer, Barbara A; Peinelt, Christine

    2016-03-08

    N-glycosylation of cell surface proteins affects protein function, stability, and interaction with other proteins. Orai channels, which mediate store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), are composed of N-glycosylated subunits. Upon activation by Ca(2+) sensor proteins (stromal interaction molecules STIM1 or STIM2) in the endoplasmic reticulum, Orai Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane mediate Ca(2+) influx. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins, and Siglecs are a family of sialic acid-binding lectins with immunoglobulin-like repeats. Using Western blot analysis and lectin-binding assays from various primary human cells and cancer cell lines, we found that glycosylation of Orai1 is cell type-specific. Ca(2+) imaging experiments and patch-clamp experiments revealed that mutation of the only glycosylation site of Orai1 (Orai1N223A) enhanced SOCE in Jurkat T cells. Knockdown of the sialyltransferase ST6GAL1 reduced α-2,6-linked sialic acids in the glycan structure of Orai1 and was associated with increased Ca(2+) entry in Jurkat T cells. In human mast cells, inhibition of sialyl sulfation altered the N-glycan of Orai1 (and other proteins) and increased SOCE. These data suggest that cell type-specific glycosylation influences the interaction of Orai1 with specific lectins, such as Siglecs, which then attenuates SOCE. In summary, the glycosylation state of Orai1 influences SOCE-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and, thus, may contribute to pathophysiological Ca(2+) signaling observed in immune disease and cancer.

  9. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Cobalamin Uptake by Bovine Serum

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Ruberu, Kalani; Li, Hongyun; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Tracking cellular 57Co-labelled cobalamin (57Co-Cbl) uptake is a well-established method for studying Cbl homeostasis. Previous studies established that bovine serum is not generally permissive for cellular Cbl uptake when used as a supplement in cell culture medium, whereas supplementation with human serum promotes cellular Cbl uptake. The underlying reasons for these differences are not fully defined. In the current study we address this question. We extend earlier observations by showing that fetal calf serum inhibits cellular 57Co-Cbl uptake by HT1080 cells (a fibrosarcoma-derived fibroblast cell line). Furthermore, we discovered that a simple heat-treatment protocol (95°C for 10 min) ameliorates this inhibitory activity for HT1080 cell 57Co-Cbl uptake. We provide evidence that the very high level of haptocorrin in bovine serum (as compared to human serum) is responsible for this inhibitory activity. We suggest that bovine haptocorrin competes with cell-derived transcobalamin for Cbl binding, and that cellular Cbl uptake may be minimised in the presence of large amounts of bovine haptocorrin that are present under routine in vitro cell culture conditions. In experiments conducted with AG01518 cells (a neonatal foreskin-derived fibroblast cell line), overall cellular 57Co-Cbl uptake was 86% lower than for HT1080 cells, cellular TC production was below levels detectable by western blotting, and heat treatment of fetal calf serum resulted in only a modest increase in cellular 57Co-Cbl uptake. We recommend a careful assessment of cell culture protocols should be conducted in order to determine the potential benefits that heat-treated bovine serum may provide for in vitro studies of mammalian cell lines. PMID:27893837

  10. Modulation of mouse Leydig cell steroidogenesis through a specific arginine-vasopressin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Tahri-Joutei, A.; Pointis, G.

    1988-01-01

    Characterization of specific vasopressin binding sites was investigated in purified mouse Leydig cells using tritiated arginine-vasopressin. Binding of radioligand was saturable, time- and temperature-dependent and reversible. (/sup 3/H)-AVP was found to bind to a single class of sites with high affinity and low capacity. Binding displacements with specific selection analogs of AVP indicated the presence of V/sub 1/ subtype receptors on Leydig cells. The ability of AVP to displace (/sup 3/H)-AVP binding was greater than LVP and oxytocin. The unrelated peptides, somatostatin and substance P, were less potent, while neurotensin and LHRH did not displace (/sup 3/H)-AVP binding. The time-course effects of AVP-pretreatment on basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone and cAMP accumulations were studied in primary culture of Leydig cells. Basal testosterone accumulation was significantly increased by a 24 h AVP-pretreatment of Leydig cells. This effect was potentiated by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor (MIX) and was concomitantly accompanied by a slight but significant increase in cAMP accumulation. AVP-pretreatment of the cells for 72 h had no effect on basal testosterone accumulation, but exerted a marked inhibitory effect on the hCG-stimulated testosterone accumulation. This reduction of testosterone accumulation occurred even in the presence of MIX and was not accompanied by any significant change of cAMP levels.

  11. Lipid-Modulated Sequence-Specific Association of Glycophorin A in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Janosi, Lorant; Prakash, Anupam; Doxastakis, Manolis

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Protein association in lipid membranes is a complex process with thermodynamics directed by a multitude of different factors. Amino-acid sequence is a molecular parameter that affects dimerization as shown by limited directed mutations along the transmembrane domains. Membrane-mediated interactions are also important although details of such contributions remain largely unclear. In this study, we probe directly the free energy of association of Glycophorin A by means of extensive parallel Monte Carlo simulations with recently developed methods and a model that accounts for sequence-specificity while representing lipid membranes faithfully. We find that lipid-induced interactions are significant both at short and intermediate separations. The ability of molecules to tilt in a specific hydrophobic environment extends their accessible interfaces, leading to intermittent contacts during protein recognition. The dimer with the lowest free energy is largely determined by the favorable lipid-induced attractive interactions at the closest distance. Finally, the coarse-grained model employed herein, together with the extensive sampling performed, provides estimates of the free energy of association that are in excellent agreement with existing data. PMID:20655857

  12. Dimension-specific signal modulation in visual search: evidence from inter-stimulus surround suppression.

    PubMed

    Chan, Louis K H; Hayward, William G

    2012-04-18

    A fundamental task for the visual system is to determine where to attend next. In general, attention is guided by visual saliency. Computational models suggest that saliency values are estimated through an iterative process in which each visual item suppresses each other item's saliency, especially for those with close proximity. To investigate this proposal, we tested the effect of two salient distractors on visual search for a size target. While fixing the target-to-distractor distance, we manipulated the distance between two distractors. If two salient distractors suppressed each other when they were close together, they should interfere with search less; this was exactly what we found. However, we observed such a distance effect only for distractors of the same dimension (e.g., both defined in color) but not for those of different dimensions (e.g., one defined in color and the other in shape), displaying specificity to a perceptual dimension. Therefore, we conclude that saliency in visual search is calculated through a surround suppression process that occurs at a dimension-specific level.

  13. FOXA1 potentiates lineage-specific enhancer activation through modulating TET1 expression and function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeqing A.; Zhao, Jonathan C.; Fong, Ka-wing; Kim, Jung; Li, Shangze; Song, Chunxiao; Song, Bing; Zheng, Bin; He, Chuan; Yu, Jindan

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box A1 (FOXA1) is an FKHD family protein that plays pioneering roles in lineage-specific enhancer activation and gene transcription. Through genome-wide location analyses, here we show that FOXA1 expression and occupancy are, in turn, required for the maintenance of these epigenetic signatures, namely DNA hypomethylation and histone 3 lysine 4 methylation. Mechanistically, this involves TET1, a 5-methylcytosine dioxygenase. We found that FOXA1 induces TET1 expression via direct binding to its cis-regulatory elements. Further, FOXA1 physically interacts with the TET1 protein through its CXXC domain. TET1 thus co-occupies FOXA1-dependent enhancers and mediates local DNA demethylation and concomitant histone 3 lysine 4 methylation, further potentiating FOXA1 recruitment. Consequently, FOXA1 binding events are markedly reduced following TET1 depletion. Together, our results suggest that FOXA1 is not only able to recognize but also remodel the epigenetic signatures at lineage-specific enhancers, which is mediated, at least in part, by a feed-forward regulatory loop between FOXA1 and TET1. PMID:27257062

  14. Naloxonazine, an Amastigote-Specific Compound, Affects Leishmania Parasites through Modulation of Host-Encoded Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Caljon, Guy; Wolfe, Alan R.; McKerrow, James; Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Host-directed therapies (HDTs) constitute promising alternatives to traditional therapy that directly targets the pathogen but is often hampered by pathogen resistance. HDT could represent a new treatment strategy for leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease caused by the obligate intracellular parasite Leishmania. This protozoan develops exclusively within phagocytic cells, where infection relies on a complex molecular interplay potentially exploitable for drug targets. We previously identified naloxonazine, a compound specifically active against intracellular but not axenic Leishmania donovani. We evaluated here whether this compound could present a host cell-dependent mechanism of action. Microarray profiling of THP-1 macrophages treated with naloxonazine showed upregulation of vATPases, which was further linked to an increased volume of intracellular acidic vacuoles. Treatment of Leishmania-infected macrophages with the vATPase inhibitor concanamycin A abolished naloxonazine effects, functionally demonstrating that naloxonazine affects Leishmania amastigotes indirectly, through host cell vacuolar remodeling. These results validate amastigote-specific screening approaches as a powerful way to identify alternative host-encoded targets. Although the therapeutic value of naloxonazine itself is unproven, our results further demonstrate the importance of intracellular acidic compartments for host defense against Leishmania, highlighting the possibility of targeting this host cell compartment for anti-leishmanial therapy. PMID:28036391

  15. Lid domain plasticity and lipid flexibility modulate enzyme specificity in human monoacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Laura; Arencibia, Jose M; Bono, Luca; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; De Vivo, Marco

    2017-01-12

    Human monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is a membrane-interacting enzyme that generates pro-inflammatory signaling molecules. For this reason, MAGL inhibition is a promising strategy to treat pain, cancer, and neuroinflammatory diseases. MAGL can hydrolyze monoacylglycerols bearing an acyl chain of different lengths and degrees of unsaturation, cleaving primarily the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Importantly, the enzymatic binding site of MAGL is confined by a 75-amino-acid-long, flexible cap domain, named 'lid domain', which is structurally similar to that found in several other lipases. However, it is unclear how lid domain plasticity affects catalysis in MAGL. By integrating extensive molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments, we here define a lid-domain-mediated mechanism for substrate selection and binding in MAGL catalysis. In particular, we clarify the key role of Phe159 and Ile179, two conserved residues within the lid domain, in regulating substrate specificity in MAGL. We conclude by proposing that other structurally related lipases may share this lid-domain-mediated mechanism for substrate specificity.

  16. The apelinergic system: sexual dimorphism and tissue-specific modulations by obesity and insulin resistance in female mice.

    PubMed

    Butruille, Laura; Drougard, Anne; Knauf, Claude; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Valet, Philippe; Storme, Laurent; Deruelle, Philippe; Lesage, Jean

    2013-08-01

    It has been proposed that the apelinergic system (apelin and its receptor APJ) may be a promising therapeutic target in obesity-associated insulin resistance syndrome. However, due to the extended tissue-distribution of this system, the therapeutic use of specific ligands for APJ may target numerous tissues resulting putatively to collateral deleterious effects. To unravel specific tissular dysfunctions of this system under obesity and insulin-resistance conditions, we measured the apelinemia and gene-expression level of both apelin (APL) and APJ in 12-selected tissues of insulin-resistant obese female mice fed with a high fat (HF) diet. In a preliminary study, we compared between adult male and female mice, the circadian plasma apelin variation and the effect of fasting on apelinemia. No significant differences were found for these parameters suggesting that the apelinemia is not affected by the sex. Moreover, plasma apelin level was not modulated during the four days of the estrous cycle in females. In obese and insulin-resistant HF female mice, plasma apelin concentration after fasting was not modified but, the gene-expression level of the APL/APJ system was augmented in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and reduced in the brown adipose tissue (BAT), the liver and in kidneys. BAT apelin content was reduced in HF female mice. Our data suggest that the apelinergic system may be implicated into specific dysfunctions of these tissues under obesity and diabetes and that, pharmacologic modulations of this system may be of interest particularly in the treatment of adipose, liver and renal dysfunctions that occur during these pathologies.

  17. GABAA-Mediated Inhibition Modulates Stimulus-Specific Adaptation in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, David; Hernández, Olga; Covey, Ellen; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect novel sounds in a complex acoustic context is crucial for survival. Neurons from midbrain through cortical levels adapt to repetitive stimuli, while maintaining responsiveness to rare stimuli, a phenomenon called stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). The site of origin and mechanism of SSA are currently unknown. We used microiontophoretic application of gabazine to examine the role of GABAA-mediated inhibition in SSA in the inferior colliculus, the midbrain center for auditory processing. We found that gabazine slowed down the process of adaptation to high probability stimuli but did not abolish it, with response magnitude and latency still depending on the probability of the stimulus. Blocking GABAA receptors increased the firing rate to high and low probability stimuli, but did not completely equalize the responses. Together, these findings suggest that GABAA-mediated inhibition acts as a gain control mechanism that enhances SSA by modifying the responsiveness of the neuron. PMID:22479591

  18. A space oddity: geographic and specific modulation of migration in Eudyptes penguins.

    PubMed

    Thiebot, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yves; Crawford, Robert J M; Makhado, Azwianewi B; Trathan, Philip N; Pinaud, David; Bost, Charles-André

    2013-01-01

    Post-breeding migration in land-based marine animals is thought to offset seasonal deterioration in foraging or other important environmental conditions at the breeding site. However the inter-breeding distribution of such animals may reflect not only their optimal habitat, but more subtle influences on an individual's migration path, including such factors as the intrinsic influence of each locality's paleoenvironment, thereby influencing animals' wintering distribution. In this study we investigated the influence of the regional marine environment on the migration patterns of a poorly known, but important seabird group. We studied the inter-breeding migration patterns in three species of Eudyptes penguins (E. chrysolophus, E. filholi and E. moseleyi), the main marine prey consumers amongst the World's seabirds. Using ultra-miniaturized logging devices (light-based geolocators) and satellite tags, we tracked 87 migrating individuals originating from 4 sites in the southern Indian Ocean (Marion, Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam Islands) and modelled their wintering habitat using the MADIFA niche modelling technique. For each site, sympatric species followed a similar compass bearing during migration with consistent species-specific latitudinal shifts. Within each species, individuals breeding on different islands showed contrasting migration patterns but similar winter habitat preferences driven by sea-surface temperatures. Our results show that inter-breeding migration patterns in sibling penguin species depend primarily on the site of origin and secondly on the species. Such site-specific migration bearings, together with similar wintering habitat used by parapatrics, support the hypothesis that migration behaviour is affected by the intrinsic characteristics of each site. The paleo-oceanographic conditions (primarily, sea-surface temperatures) when the populations first colonized each of these sites may have been an important determinant of subsequent migration

  19. A Space Oddity: Geographic and Specific Modulation of Migration in Eudyptes Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Thiebot, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yves; Crawford, Robert J. M.; Makhado, Azwianewi B.; Trathan, Philip N.; Pinaud, David; Bost, Charles-André

    2013-01-01

    Post-breeding migration in land-based marine animals is thought to offset seasonal deterioration in foraging or other important environmental conditions at the breeding site. However the inter-breeding distribution of such animals may reflect not only their optimal habitat, but more subtle influences on an individual’s migration path, including such factors as the intrinsic influence of each locality’s paleoenvironment, thereby influencing animals’ wintering distribution. In this study we investigated the influence of the regional marine environment on the migration patterns of a poorly known, but important seabird group. We studied the inter-breeding migration patterns in three species of Eudyptes penguins (E. chrysolophus, E. filholi and E. moseleyi), the main marine prey consumers amongst the World’s seabirds. Using ultra-miniaturized logging devices (light-based geolocators) and satellite tags, we tracked 87 migrating individuals originating from 4 sites in the southern Indian Ocean (Marion, Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam Islands) and modelled their wintering habitat using the MADIFA niche modelling technique. For each site, sympatric species followed a similar compass bearing during migration with consistent species-specific latitudinal shifts. Within each species, individuals breeding on different islands showed contrasting migration patterns but similar winter habitat preferences driven by sea-surface temperatures. Our results show that inter-breeding migration patterns in sibling penguin species depend primarily on the site of origin and secondly on the species. Such site-specific migration bearings, together with similar wintering habitat used by parapatrics, support the hypothesis that migration behaviour is affected by the intrinsic characteristics of each site. The paleo-oceanographic conditions (primarily, sea-surface temperatures) when the populations first colonized each of these sites may have been an important determinant of subsequent

  20. Reduced Sialylation Impacts Ventricular Repolarization by Modulating Specific K+ Channel Isoforms Distinctly*

    PubMed Central

    Ednie, Andrew R.; Bennett, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv) are responsible for repolarizing excitable cells and can be heavily glycosylated. Cardiac Kv activity is indispensable where even minimal reductions in function can extend action potential duration, prolong QT intervals, and ultimately contribute to life-threatening arrhythmias. Diseases such as congenital disorders of glycosylation often cause significant cardiac phenotypes that can include arrhythmias. Here we investigated the impact of reduced sialylation on ventricular repolarization through gene deletion of the sialyltransferase ST3Gal4. ST3Gal4-deficient mice (ST3Gal4−/−) had prolonged QT intervals with a concomitant increase in ventricular action potential duration. Ventricular apex myocytes isolated from ST3Gal4−/− mice demonstrated depolarizing shifts in activation gating of the transient outward (Ito) and delayed rectifier (IKslow) components of K+ current with no change in maximum current densities. Consistently, similar protein expression levels of the three Kv isoforms responsible for Ito and IKslow were measured for ST3Gal4−/− versus controls. However, novel non-enzymatic sialic acid labeling indicated a reduction in sialylation of ST3Gal4−/− ventricular Kv4.2 and Kv1.5, which contribute to Ito and IKslow, respectively. Thus, we describe here a novel form of regulating cardiac function through the activities of a specific glycogene product. Namely, reduced ST3Gal4 activity leads to a loss of isoform-specific Kv sialylation and function, thereby limiting Kv activity during the action potential and decreasing repolarization rate, which likely contributes to prolonged ventricular repolarization. These studies elucidate a novel role for individual glycogene products in contributing to a complex network of cardiac regulation under normal and pathologic conditions. PMID:25525262

  1. Sex-specific pharmacological modulation of autophagic process in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Capobianco, Giampiero; Fois, Marco; Montella, Andrea; Dessole, Salvatore; Franconi, Flavia

    2016-11-01

    Sex has largely been neglected in cell studies. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of sexual dimorphism in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). In particular, we investigated the existence of sex differences in basal and in drug-induced autophagy, a process involved in cardiovascular diseases. HUASMCs were isolated from healthy and normal weight male and female newborns (MHUASMCs and FHUASMCs, respectively). Expression of the primary molecules involved in the autophagic process [beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)], and PmTOR were detected using western blotting in basal conditions, after serum starvation, rapamycin and verapamil treatments. The level of constitutive autophagy, measured as the LC3II/I ratio, was similar in male and female HUASMCs in the basal condition. Serum starvation promoted autophagy in both cell types, but the increase was more pronounced in FHUASMCs, while 250nM rapamycin induced autophagy only in female cells. Moreover, the level of verapamil-induced autophagy was not different between the two sexes. Notably, in the basal condition, Beclin-1 was more elevated in MHUASMCs than in FHUASMCs, and the difference disappeared after serum starvation and exposure to rapamycin. After exposure to verapamil, the differences in Beclin-1 increased, with more elevated expression levels in female cells. PmTor did not differ in basal conditions, but it was significantly down-regulated by starvation only in FHUASMCs and by rapamycin both in male and female cells. Finally, a strong negative correlation was observed between the newborn's weight and basal autophagy in female cells and between the newborn's weight and the LC3II/I ratio in male verapamil-treated cells. These results indicate that sex-differences begin in utero, are parameter-specific and drug specific suggesting that HUASMCs are a suitable model for the screening of drugs and to study the influence of sex. The sex differences in the autophagy

  2. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Grants, Jennifer M.; Ying, Lisa T. L.; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C.; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator’s dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals. PMID:26715664

  3. Modulation-Specific and Laminar-Dependent Effects of Acetylcholine on Visual Responses in the Rat Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Shogo; Shimegi, Satoshi; Suematsu, Naofumi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiromichi

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is secreted from cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain to regions throughout the cerebral cortex, including the primary visual cortex (V1), and influences neuronal activities across all six layers via a form of diffuse extrasynaptic modulation termed volume transmission. To understand this effect in V1, we performed extracellular multi-point recordings of neuronal responses to drifting sinusoidal grating stimuli from the cortical layers of V1 in anesthetized rats and examined the modulatory effects of topically administered ACh. ACh facilitated or suppressed the visual responses of individual cells with a laminar bias: response suppression prevailed in layers 2/3, whereas response facilitation prevailed in layer 5. ACh effects on the stimulus contrast-response function showed that ACh changes the response gain upward or downward in facilitated or suppressed cells, respectively. Next, ACh effects on the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and the grating-phase information were tested. The grating-phase information was calculated as the F1/F0 ratio, which represents the amount of temporal response modulation at the fundamental frequency (F1) of a drifting grating relative to the mean evoked response (F0). In facilitated cells, ACh improved the S/N ratio, while in suppressed cells it enhanced the F1/F0 ratio without any concurrent reduction in the S/N ratio. These effects were predominantly observed in regular-spiking cells, but not in fast-spiking cells. Electrophysiological and histological findings suggest that ACh promotes the signaling of grating-phase information to higher-order areas by a suppressive effect on supragranular layers and enhances feedback signals with a high S/N ratio to subcortical areas by a facilitatory effect on infragranular layers. Thus, ACh distinctly and finely controls visual information processing in a manner that is specific for the modulation and cell type and is also laminar dependent. PMID:23844199

  4. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grants, Jennifer M; Ying, Lisa T L; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator's dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals.

  5. Specific modulation of spinal and cortical excitabilities during lengthening and shortening submaximal and maximal contractions in plantar flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Duclay, Julien; Pasquet, Benjamin; Martin, Alain; Duchateau, Jacques

    2014-12-15

    This study investigated the influence of the torque produced by plantar flexor muscles on cortical and spinal excitability during lengthening and shortening voluntary contractions. To that purpose, modulations of motor-evoked potential (MEP) and Hoffmann (H) reflex were compared in the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) during anisometric submaximal and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the plantar flexor muscles. For the submaximal shortening and lengthening contractions, the target torque was set at 50% of their respective MVC force. The results indicate that the amplitudes of both MEP and H-reflex responses, normalized to the maximal M wave, were significantly (P < 0.05) lower during lengthening compared with shortening submaximal contraction. For these two parameters, the reduction reached, respectively, 22.1 and 31.9% for the SOL and 34.5 and 29.3% for the MG. During MVC, normalized MEP and H reflex of the SOL were both reduced significantly by 19.9% (P < 0.05) and 29.9% (P < 0.001) during lengthening and shortening contraction, respectively, whereas no significant change (P > 0.05) was observed for MG. In addition, the silent period in the ongoing electromyogram (EMG) activity following the MEP was significantly (P < 0.01) briefer during lengthening than shortening contractions but did not differ (P > 0.05) between contraction intensities and muscles. Together, these results indicate that cortical and spinal mechanisms involved in the modulation of muscle activation during shortening and lengthening contractions differ between synergistic muscles according to the torque produced. Data further document previous studies reporting that the specific modulation of muscle activation during lengthening contraction is not torque dependent.

  6. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of the Lyn Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domain Modulates Its Binding Affinity and Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lily L.; Wybenga-Groot, Leanne E.; Tong, Jiefei; Taylor, Paul; Minden, Mark D.; Trudel, Suzanne; McGlade, C. Jane; Moran, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are modular protein structures that bind phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing polypeptides and regulate cellular functions through protein-protein interactions. Proteomics analysis showed that the SH2 domains of Src family kinases are themselves tyrosine phosphorylated in blood system cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma. Using the Src family kinase Lyn SH2 domain as a model, we found that phosphorylation at the conserved SH2 domain residue Y194 impacts the affinity and specificity of SH2 domain binding to pY-containing peptides and proteins. Analysis of the Lyn SH2 domain crystal structure supports a model wherein phosphorylation of Y194 on the EF loop modulates the binding pocket that engages amino acid side chains at the pY+2/+3 position. These data indicate another level of regulation wherein SH2-mediated protein-protein interactions are modulated by SH2 kinases and phosphatases. PMID:25587033

  7. Sensorimotor enhancement in mouse mutants lacking the Purkinje cell-specific Gi/o modulator, Pcp2(L7).

    PubMed

    Iscru, Emilia; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Schilling, Karl; Tian, Jinbin; Bowers-Kidder, Stephanie L; Zhang, Rui; Morgan, James I; DeVries, A Courtney; Nelson, Randy J; Zhu, Michael X; Oberdick, John

    2009-01-01

    Pcp2(L7) is a GoLoco domain protein specifically and abundantly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. It has been hypothesized to "tune" G(i/o)-coupled receptor modulation of physiological effectors, including the P-type Ca(2+) channel. We have analyzed a mouse mutant in which the Pcp2(L7) gene was inactivated and find significant anatomical, behavioral and electrophysiological changes. Anatomically, we observed mild cerebellar hypoplasia. Behaviorally, the mutants were altered in modalities atypical for a traditional cerebellar mutant, and oddly, all of these changes could be considered functional enhancements. This includes increased asymptotic performance in gross motor learning, increased rate of acquisition in tone-conditioned fear, and enhanced pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response. Electrophysiological analysis of Purkinje cells in the mutants reveals depression of the complex spike waveform that may underlie the behavioral changes. Based on these observations we suggest that the Pcp2(L7) protein acts as a sensorimotor damper that modulates time- and sense-dependent changes in motor responses.

  8. Specific binding of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin fragment to Claudin-b and modulation of zebrafish epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Ni, Chen; Yang, Zhenguo; Piontek, Anna; Chen, Huapu; Wang, Sijie; Fan, Yiming; Qin, Zhihai; Piontek, Joerg

    2015-08-01

    Claudins (Cldn) are the major components of tight junctions (TJs) sealing the paracellular cleft in tissue barriers of various organs. Zebrafish Cldnb, the homolog of mammalian Cldn4, is expressed at epithelial cell-cell contacts and is important for regulating epidermal permeability. The bacterial toxin Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been shown to bind to a subset of mammalian Cldns. In this study, we used the Cldn-binding C-terminal domain of CPE (194-319 amino acids, cCPE 194-319 ) to investigate its functional role in modulating zebrafish larval epidermal barriers. In vitro analyses show that cCPE 194-319 removed Cldn4 from epithelial cells and disrupted the monolayer tightness, which could be rescued by the removal of cCPE 194-319. Incubation of zebrafish larvae with cCPE 194-319 removed Cldnb specifically from the epidermal cell membrane. Dye diffusion analysis with 4-kDa fluorescent dextran indicated that the permeability of the epidermal barrier increased due to cCPE 194-319 incubation. Electron microscopic investigation revealed reversible loss of TJ integrity by Cldnb removal. Collectively, these results suggest that cCPE 194-319 could be used as a Cldnb modulator to transiently open the epidermal barrier in zebrafish. In addition, zebrafish might be used as an in vivo system to investigate the capability of cCPE to enhance drug delivery across tissue barriers.

  9. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    PubMed

    Sobczynski, Daniel J; Charoenphol, Phapanin; Heslinga, Michael J; Onyskiw, Peter J; Namdee, Katawut; Thompson, Alex J; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid) (PLGA) spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer) is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  10. Specific expression of heme oxygenase-1 by myeloid cells modulates renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Maxime; Thierry, Antoine; Delbauve, Sandrine; Preyat, Nicolas; Soares, Miguel P; Roumeguère, Thierry; Leo, Oberdan; Flamand, Véronique; Le Moine, Alain; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2017-03-15

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major risk factor for delayed graft function in renal transplantation. Compelling evidence exists that the stress-responsive enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mediates protection against IRI. However, the role of myeloid HO-1 during IRI remains poorly characterized. Mice with myeloid-restricted deletion of HO-1 (HO-1(M-KO)), littermate (LT), and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to renal IRI or sham procedures and sacrificed after 24 hours or 7 days. In comparison to LT, HO-1(M-KO) exhibited significant renal histological damage, pro-inflammatory responses and oxidative stress 24 hours after reperfusion. HO-1(M-KO) mice also displayed impaired tubular repair and increased renal fibrosis 7 days after IRI. In WT mice, HO-1 induction with hemin specifically upregulated HO-1 within the CD11b(+) F4/80(lo) subset of the renal myeloid cells. Prior administration of hemin to renal IRI was associated with significant increase of the renal HO-1(+) CD11b(+) F4/80(lo) myeloid cells in comparison to control mice. In contrast, this hemin-mediated protection was abolished in HO-1(M-KO) mice. In conclusion, myeloid HO-1 appears as a critical protective pathway against renal IRI and could be an interesting therapeutic target in renal transplantation.

  11. Gender-specific modulation of neural mechanisms underlying social reward processing by Autism Quotient.

    PubMed

    Barman, Adriana; Richter, Sylvia; Soch, Joram; Deibele, Anna; Richter, Anni; Assmann, Anne; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Walter, Henrik; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Schott, Björn H

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder refers to a neurodevelopmental condition primarily characterized by deficits in social cognition and behavior. Subclinically, autistic features are supposed to be present in healthy humans and can be quantified using the Autism Quotient (AQ). Here, we investigated a potential relationship between AQ and neural correlates of social and monetary reward processing, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in young, healthy participants. In an incentive delay task with either monetary or social reward, reward anticipation elicited increased ventral striatal activation, which was more pronounced during monetary reward anticipation. Anticipation of social reward elicited activation in the default mode network (DMN), a network previously implicated in social processing. Social reward feedback was associated with bilateral amygdala and fusiform face area activation. The relationship between AQ and neural correlates of social reward processing varied in a gender-dependent manner. In women and, to a lesser extent in men, higher AQ was associated with increased posterior DMN activation during social reward anticipation. During feedback, we observed a negative correlation of AQ and right amygdala activation in men only. Our results suggest that social reward processing might constitute an endophenotype for autism-related traits in healthy humans that manifests in a gender-specific way.

  12. Schistosoma mansoni Hemozoin Modulates Alternative Activation of Macrophages via Specific Suppression of Retnla Expression and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Martha; Evans, D. Andrew; Gunn, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The trematode Schistosoma mansoni is one of the etiological agents of schistosomiasis, a key neglected tropical disease responsible for an estimated annual loss of 70 million disability-adjusted life years. Hematophagy represents the primary nutrient acquisition pathway of this parasite, but digestion of hemoglobin also liberates toxic heme. Schistosomes detoxify heme via crystallization into hemozoin, which is subsequently regurgitated into the host's circulation. Here we demonstrate that during experimental schistosomiasis, hemozoin accumulating in the mouse liver is taken up by phagocytes at a time coincident with the development of the egg-induced T-helper 2 (Th2) granulomatous immune response. Furthermore, the uptake of hemozoin also coincides with the hepatic expression of markers of alternative macrophage activation. Alternatively activated macrophages are a key effector cell population associated with protection against schistosomiasis, making hemozoin well placed to play an important immunomodulatory role in this disease. To systematically explore this hypothesis, S. mansoni hemozoin was purified and added to in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures concurrently exposed to cytokines chosen to reflect the shifting state of macrophage activation in vivo. Macrophages undergoing interleukin-4 (IL-4)-induced alternative activation in the presence of hemozoin developed a phenotype specifically lacking in Retnla, a characteristic alternatively activated macrophage product associated with regulation of Th2 inflammatory responses. As such, in addition to its important detoxification role during hematophagy, we propose that schistosome hemozoin also provides a potent immunomodulatory function in the coevolved network of host-parasite relationships during schistosomiasis. PMID:23090958

  13. CaMKII phosphorylation of the GABAA receptor: receptor subtype- and synapse-specific modulation

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Catriona M; He, Qionger; Smart, Trevor G

    2009-01-01

    As a major inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA plays a vital role in the brain by controlling the extent of neuronal excitation. This widespread role is reflected by the ubiquitous distribution of GABAA receptors throughout the central nervous system. To regulate the level of neuronal inhibition requires some endogenous control over the release of GABA and/or its postsynaptic response. In this context, Ca2+ ions are often used as primary or secondary messengers frequently resulting in the activation of protein kinases and phosphatases. One such kinase, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), can target the GABAA receptor to cause its phosphorylation. Evidence is now emerging, which is reviewed here, that GABAA receptors are indeed substrates for CaMKII and that this covalent modification alters the expression of cell surface receptors and their function. This type of regulation can also feature at inhibitory synapses leading to long-term inhibitory synaptic plasticity. Most recently, CaMKII has now been proposed to differentially phosphorylate particular isoforms of GABAA receptors in a synapse-specific context. PMID:19332484

  14. Proteome-wide Light/Dark Modulation of Thiol Oxidation in Cyanobacteria Revealed by Quantitative Site-specific Redox Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Dai, Ziyu; Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein thiol oxidation is an essential regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, metabolism, and gene expression in photosynthetic organisms. Herein, we present proteome-wide quantitative and site-specific profiling of in vivo thiol oxidation modulated by light/dark in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryote, using a resin-assisted thiol enrichment approach. Our proteomic approach integrates resin-assisted enrichment with isobaric tandem mass tag labeling to enable site-specific and quantitative measurements of reversibly oxidized thiols. The redox dynamics of ∼2,100 Cys-sites from 1,060 proteins under light, dark, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosystem II inhibitor) conditions were quantified. In addition to relative quantification, the stoichiometry or percentage of oxidation (reversibly oxidized/total thiols) for ∼1,350 Cys-sites was also quantified. The overall results revealed broad changes in thiol oxidation in many key biological processes, including photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and glycolysis. Moreover, the redox sensitivity along with the stoichiometric data enabled prediction of potential functional Cys-sites for proteins of interest. The functional significance of redox-sensitive Cys-sites in NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin (AhpC/TSA family protein Sll1621), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was further confirmed with site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical studies. Together, our findings provide significant insights into the broad redox regulation of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25118246

  15. UBIQUITIN-SPECIFIC PROTEASE16 interacts with a HEAVY METAL ASSOCIATED ISOPRENYLATED PLANT PROTEIN27 and modulates cadmium tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhou, Huapeng; Li, Yueyong

    2013-10-01

    Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are two reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes, respectively. In Arabidopsis, lots of substrates of ubiquitin ligases were found, whereas only a few targets of deubiquitinating enzymes were identified. Recently, we reported that a functional UBIQUITIN-SPECIFIC PROTEASE16 (UBP16) was involved in salt tolerance through positively regulating plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiport activity and at least partially modulating SERINE HYDROXYMETHYLTRANSFERASE1 (SHM 1) stability and activity. Here, we report that UBP16 interacts with HEAVY META L ASSOCIATED ISOPRENYLATED PLANT PROTEIN 27 (HI PP27), a metallochaperone containing a predicted heavy-metal-associated domain, which has been reported to play an important role in cadmium detoxification. Meanwhile, the ubp16 mutant showed more sensitive to cadmium than wild-type. Taken together, HI PP27 may be another target of UBP16 in cadmium response.

  16. Growth Phase-Dependent Modulation of Rgg Binding Specificity in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Anbalagan, Srivishnupriya; Dmitriev, Alexander; McShan, W. Michael; Dunman, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes Rgg is a transcriptional regulator that interacts with the cofactor LacD.1 to control growth phase-dependent expression of genes, including speB, which encodes a secreted cysteine protease. LacD.1 is thought to interact with Rgg when glycolytic intermediates are abundant in a manner that prevents Rgg-mediated activation of speB expression via binding to the promoter region. When the intermediates diminish, LacD.1 dissociates from Rgg and binds to the speB promoter to activate expression. The purpose of this study was to determine if Rgg bound to chromatin during the exponential phase of growth and, if so, to identify the binding sites. Rgg bound to 62 chromosomal sites, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarrays. Thirty-eight were within noncoding DNA, including sites upstream of the genes encoding the M protein (M49), serum opacity factor (SOF), fibronectin-binding protein (SfbX49), and a prophage-encoded superantigen, SpeH. Each of these sites contained a promoter that was regulated by Rgg, as determined with transcriptional fusion assays. Purified Rgg also bound to the promoter regions of emm49, sof, and sfbX49 in vitro. Results obtained with a lacD.1 mutant showed that both LacD.1 and Rgg were necessary for the repression of emm49, sof, sfbX49, and speH expression. Overall, the results indicated that the DNA binding specificity of Rgg is responsive to environmental changes in a LacD.1-dependent manner and that Rgg and LacD.1 directly control virulence gene expression in the exponential phase of growth. PMID:22636768

  17. Self-regulation of circumscribed brain activity modulates spatially selective and frequency specific connectivity of distributed resting state networks.

    PubMed

    Vukelić, Mathias; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of learning involved in brain self-regulation have still to be unveiled to exploit the full potential of this methodology for therapeutic interventions. This skill of volitionally changing brain activity presumably resembles motor skill learning which in turn is accompanied by plastic changes modulating resting state networks. Along these lines, we hypothesized that brain regulation and neurofeedback would similarly modify intrinsic networks at rest while presenting a distinct spatio-temporal pattern. High-resolution electroencephalography preceded and followed a single neurofeedback training intervention of modulating circumscribed sensorimotor low β-activity by kinesthetic motor imagery in eleven healthy participants. The participants were kept in the deliberative phase of skill acquisition with high demands for learning self-regulation through stepwise increases of task difficulty. By applying the corrected imaginary part of the coherency function, we observed increased functional connectivity of both the primary motor and the primary somatosensory cortex with their respective contralateral homologous cortices in the low β-frequency band which was self-regulated during feedback. At the same time, the primary motor cortex-but none of the surrounding cortical areas-showed connectivity to contralateral supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas in the high β-band. Simultaneously, the neurofeedback target displayed a specific increase of functional connectivity with an ipsilateral fronto-parietal network in the α-band while presenting a de-coupling with contralateral primary and secondary sensorimotor areas in the very same frequency band. Brain self-regulation modifies resting state connections spatially selective to the neurofeedback target of the dominant hemisphere. These are anatomically distinct with regard to the cortico-cortical connectivity pattern and are functionally specific with regard to the time domain of coherent activity

  18. Dopamine Modulates Motor Control in a Specific Plane Related to Support

    PubMed Central

    Herbin, Marc; Simonis, Caroline; Revéret, Lionel; Hackert, Rémi; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Eugène, Daniel; Diaz, Jorge; de Waele, Catherine; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-01-01

    At the acute stage following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL), rats, mice or guinea pigs exhibit a complex motor syndrome combining circling (HSCC lesion) and rolling (utricular lesion). At the chronic stage, they only display circling, because proprioceptive information related to the plane of support substitutes the missing utricular information to control posture in the frontal plane. Circling is also observed following unilateral lesion of the mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by 6- hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA rats) and systemic injection of apomorphine (APO rats). The resemblance of behavior induced by unilateral vestibular and dopaminergic lesions at the chronic stage can be interpreted in two ways. One hypothesis is that the dopaminergic system exerts three-dimensional control over motricity, as the vestibular system does. If this hypothesis is correct, then a unilateral lesion of the nigro-striatal pathway should induce three-dimensional motor deficits, i.e., circling and at least some sort of barrel rolling at the acute stage of the lesion. Then, compensation could also take place very rapidly based on proprioception, which would explain the prevalence of circling. In addition, barrel rolling should reappear when the rodent is placed in water, as it occurs in UL vertebrates. Alternatively, the dopaminergic network, together with neurons processing the horizontal canal information, could control the homeostasis of posture and locomotion specifically in one and only one plane of space, i.e. the plane related to the basis of support. In that case, barrel rolling should never occur, whether at the acute or chronic stage on firm ground or in water. Moreover, circling should have the same characteristics following both types of lesions. Clearly, 6-OHDA and APO-rats never exhibited barrel rolling at the acute stage. They circled at the acute stage of the lesion and continued to do so three weeks later, including in water. In contrast, UL-rats, exhibited

  19. Modulation of intracellular calcium mobilization and GABAergic currents through subtype-specific metabotropic glutamate receptors in neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Taketo, M; Matsuda, H

    2010-01-15

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and are thought to modulate neuronal excitability, by mobilizing intracellular Ca(2+). Difference in Ca(2+) mobilization among subclasses of the receptors has been reported, and regarded as a possible cause of variant neuronal modifications. In hippocampal interneurons, several subclasses of mGluRs including mGluR1 and mGluR5 have been immunohistochemically identified. The subclass-specific physiological effects of mGluRs on neuronal transmission in hippocampus, however, have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, effects of group I mGluR agonist, (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) on intracellular calcium concentration were examined in hippocampal interneurons. Application of DHPG increased fluorescence ratio in neonatal CA3 stratum oriens/alveus interneurons. The DHPG-induced calcium mobilization was markedly inhibited by mGluR1-specific antagonist, cyclopropan[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate (CPCCOEt). Inhibition of the calcium elevation by mGluR5-specific antagonist, 6-methyl-2-(phenylazo)-3-pyrindol (MPEP), was weaker than that of CPCCOEt. The fluorescence ratio was not significantly changed by application of mGluR5-specific agonist, (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG). DHPG induced calcium responses in CA1 interneurons as in CA3, and the responses were partially inhibited by MPEP treatment. Effects of group I mGluR agonist and antagonist were also investigated, on GABA(A) receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in CA3 pyramidal neurons. The GABAergic sIPSCs were facilitated by DHPG perfusion, and the potentiation was reduced by CPCCOEt, and less distinctly by MPEP. The sIPSCs were not significantly potentiated by CHPG application. These results indicate that mGluR1 is functional in hippocampal interneurons, and DHPG exerts its effect mainly through this receptor at early developmental period.

  20. Developmental Febrile Seizures Modulate Hippocampal Gene Expression of Hyperpolarization-Activated Channels in an Isoform- and Cell-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Amy; Bender, Roland A.; Chen, Yuncai; Dube, Celine; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2012-01-01

    Febrile seizures, in addition to being the most common seizure type of the developing human, may contribute to the generation of subsequent limbic epilepsy. Our previous work has demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures in the immature rat model increased hippocampal excitability long term, enhancing susceptibility to future seizures. The mechanisms for these profound proepileptogenic changes did not require cell death and were associated with long-term slowed kinetics of the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (IH). Here we show that these seizures modulate the expression of genes encoding this current, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs): In CA1 neurons expressing multiple HCN isoforms, the seizures induced a coordinated reduction of HCN1 mRNA and enhancement of HCN2 expression, thus altering the neuronal HCN phenotype. The seizure-induced augmentation of HCN2 expression involved CA3 in addition to CA1, whereas for HCN4, mRNA expression was not changed by the seizures in either hippocampal region. This isoform- and region-specific transcriptional regulation of the HCNs required neuronal activity rather than hyperthermia alone, correlated with seizure duration, and favored the formation of slow-kinetics HCN2-encoded channels. In summary, these data demonstrate a novel, activity-dependent transcriptional regulation of HCN molecules by developmental seizures. These changes result in long-lasting alteration of the HCN phenotype of specific hippocampal neuronal populations, with profound consequences on the excitability of the hippocampal network. PMID:12040066

  1. Developmental febrile seizures modulate hippocampal gene expression of hyperpolarization-activated channels in an isoform- and cell-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Amy; Bender, Roland A; Chen, Yuncai; Dube, Celine; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Baram, Tallie Z

    2002-06-01

    Febrile seizures, in addition to being the most common seizure type of the developing human, may contribute to the generation of subsequent limbic epilepsy. Our previous work has demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures in the immature rat model increased hippocampal excitability long term, enhancing susceptibility to future seizures. The mechanisms for these profound proepileptogenic changes did not require cell death and were associated with long-term slowed kinetics of the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (I(H)). Here we show that these seizures modulate the expression of genes encoding this current, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs): In CA1 neurons expressing multiple HCN isoforms, the seizures induced a coordinated reduction of HCN1 mRNA and enhancement of HCN2 expression, thus altering the neuronal HCN phenotype. The seizure-induced augmentation of HCN2 expression involved CA3 in addition to CA1, whereas for HCN4, mRNA expression was not changed by the seizures in either hippocampal region. This isoform- and region-specific transcriptional regulation of the HCNs required neuronal activity rather than hyperthermia alone, correlated with seizure duration, and favored the formation of slow-kinetics HCN2-encoded channels. In summary, these data demonstrate a novel, activity-dependent transcriptional regulation of HCN molecules by developmental seizures. These changes result in long-lasting alteration of the HCN phenotype of specific hippocampal neuronal populations, with profound consequences on the excitability of the hippocampal network.

  2. O6-alkylguanine-DNA transferase (SNAP) as capture module for site-specific covalent bioconjugation of targeting protein on nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Serena; Colombo, Miriam; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Corsi, Fabio; Montenegro, Josè M.; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Prosperi, Davide

    2013-02-01

    A bimodular genetic fusion comprising a delivery module (scFv) and a capture module (SNAP) is proposed as a novel strategy for the biologically mediated site-specific covalent conjugation of targeting proteins to nanoparticles. ScFv800E6, an scFv mutant selective for HER2 antigen overexpressed in breast cancer cells was chosen as targeting ligand. The fusion protein SNAP-scFv was irreversibly immobilized on magnetofluorescent nanoparticles through the recognition between SNAP module and pegylated O6-alkylguanine derivative. The targeting efficiency of the resulting nanoparticle against HER2-positive breast cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence.

  3. A Novel, Noncatalytic Carbohydrate-binding Module Displays Specificity for Galactose-containing Polysaccharides through Calcium-mediated Oligomerization*

    PubMed Central

    Montanier, Cedric Y.; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Flint, James E.; Zhu, Yanping; Baslé, Arnaud; McKee, Lauren S.; Prates, José A. M.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Lewis, Richard J.; Henrissat, Bernard; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    The enzymic degradation of plant cell walls plays a central role in the carbon cycle and is of increasing environmental and industrial significance. The catalytic modules of enzymes that catalyze this process are generally appended to noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs potentiate the rate of catalysis by bringing their cognate enzymes into intimate contact with the target substrate. A powerful plant cell wall-degrading system is the Clostridium thermocellum multienzyme complex, termed the “cellulosome.” Here, we identify a novel CBM (CtCBM62) within the large C. thermocellum cellulosomal protein Cthe_2193 (defined as CtXyl5A), which establishes a new CBM family. Phylogenetic analysis of CBM62 members indicates that a circular permutation occurred within the family. CtCBM62 binds to d-galactose and l-arabinopyranose in either anomeric configuration. The crystal structures of CtCBM62, in complex with oligosaccharides containing α- and β-galactose residues, show that the ligand-binding site in the β-sandwich protein is located in the loops that connect the two β-sheets. Specificity is conferred through numerous interactions with the axial O4 of the target sugars, a feature that distinguishes galactose and arabinose from the other major sugars located in plant cell walls. CtCBM62 displays tighter affinity for multivalent ligands compared with molecules containing single galactose residues, which is associated with precipitation of these complex carbohydrates. These avidity effects, which confer the targeting of polysaccharides, are mediated by calcium-dependent oligomerization of the CBM. PMID:21454512

  4. Cell-specific modulation of drug resistance in acute myeloid leukemic blasts by diphtheria fusion toxin, DT388-GMCSF.

    PubMed

    Frankel, A E; Hall, P D; McLain, C; Safa, A R; Tagge, E P; Kreitman, R J

    1998-01-01

    Radiochemotherapy-resistant blasts commonly cause treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and their resistance is due, in part, to overexpression of multidrug resistance (mdr) proteins. We reasoned that targeted delivery of protein synthesis inactivating toxins to leukemic blasts would reduce the cellular concentrations of relatively short half-life resistance proteins and sensitize the cells to cytotoxic drugs. To test this hypothesis, we employed human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor fused to truncated diphtheria toxin (DT388-GMCSF). The human AML cell line HL60 and its vincristine-resistant sublines, HL60Vinc and HL60VCR, were incubated in vitro for 24 h with varying concentrations of toxin. Doxorubicin was added for an additional 24 h, and cell cytotoxicity was assayed by thymidine incorporation and colony formation in semisolid medium. DT388-GMCSF sensitized HL60Vinc and HL60VCR but not HL60 to doxorubicin. Combination indices for three log cell kill varied from 0.2 to 0.3. In contrast, pretreatment with doxorubicin followed by toxins failed to show synergy. At least in the case of the vincristine-resistant cell lines, modulation of drug resistance correlated with reduction in membrane P-glycoprotein concentrations based on immunoblots with C219 antibody, flow cytometry with MRK16 antibody, and cell uptake of doxorubicin. These observations suggest clinical trials of combination therapy may be warranted in patients with refractory AML. Further, targeted toxins may represent a novel class of cell-specific modulators of drug resistance for a number of malignancies.

  5. Multiple 5'-flanking regions of the human alpha-skeletal actin gene synergistically modulate muscle-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Muscat, G E; Kedes, L

    1987-11-01

    Transfection into myogenic and nonmyogenic cell lines was used to investigate the transcriptional regulation of the human alpha-skeletal actin gene. We demonstrated that 1,300 base pairs of the 5'-flanking region directed high-level transient expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in differentiated mouse C2C12 and rat L8 myotubes but not in mouse nonmuscle L.TK- and HuT-12 cells. Unidirectional 5' deletion analysis and heterologous promoter stimulation experiments demonstrated that at least three transcription-regulating subdomains lie in this 1,300-base-pair region. A proximal cis-acting transcriptional element located between positions -153 and -87 relative to the start of transcription at +1 was both sufficient and necessary for muscle-specific expression and developmental regulation during myogenesis in the two myogenic cell systems. The region 3' of position -87 interacted with factors present in both myogenic and fibroblastic cells and appeared to define, or to be a major component of, the basal promoter. In C2C12 myotubes, but not in L8 myotubes, a distal sequence domain between positions -1300 and -626 and the proximal sequence domain between positions -153 and -87 each induced transcription about 10-fold and synergistically increased CAT expression 100-fold over levels achieved by the sequences 3' of position -87. Furthermore, these cis-acting elements independently and synergistically modulated an enhancerless, heterologous simian virus 40 promoter in a tissue-specific manner. DNA fragments which included the proximal domain displayed classical enhancerlike properties. The central region between positions -626 and -153, although required in neither cell line, had a positive, two- to threefold, additive role in augmenting expression in L8 cells but not in C2C12 cells. This suggests that certain elements between positions -1300 and -153 appear to be differentially utilized for maximal expression in different myogenic cells and

  6. Grapevine Plasticity in Response to an Altered Microclimate: Sauvignon Blanc Modulates Specific Metabolites in Response to Increased Berry Exposure1

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Kari; Jacobson, Dan A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the metabolic and physiological impacts of an altered microclimate on quality-associated primary and secondary metabolites in grape (Vitis vinifera) ‘Sauvignon Blanc’ berries was determined in a high-altitude vineyard. The leaf and lateral shoot removal in the bunch zones altered the microclimate by increasing the exposure of the berries. The physical parameters (berry diameter and weight), primary metabolites (sugars and organic acids), as well as bunch temperature and leaf water potential were predominantly not affected by the treatment. The increased exposure led to higher levels of specific carotenoids and volatile terpenoids in the exposed berries, with earlier berry stages reacting distinctly from the later developmental stages. Plastic/nonplastic metabolite responses could be further classified to identify metabolites that were developmentally controlled and/or responded to the treatment in a predictable fashion (assessed over two consecutive vintages). The study demonstrates that grapevine berries exhibit a degree of plasticity within their secondary metabolites and respond physiologically to the increased exposure by increasing metabolites with potential antioxidant activity. Taken together, the data provide evidence that the underlying physiological responses relate to the maintenance of stress pathways by modulating antioxidant molecules in the berries. PMID:26628747

  7. Intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment modulates the glioma microenvironment and facilitates systemic tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jian; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Ling, Alex; M Nettlebeck, Dirk; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor and is associated with poor survival. Virotherapy is a promising candidate for the development of effective, novel treatments for GBM. Recent studies have underscored the potential of virotherapy in enhancing antitumor immunity despite the fact that its mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, using a syngeneic GBM mouse model, we report that intratumoral virotherapy significantly modulates the tumor microenvironment. We found that intratumoral administration of an oncolytic adenovirus, AdCMVdelta24, decreased tumor-infiltrating CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and increased IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in treated tumors, even in late stage disease in which a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is considered to be a significant barrier to immunotherapy. Importantly, intratumoral AdCMVdelta24 treatment augmented systemically transferred tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy. Furthermore, mechanistic studies showed (1) downregulation of Foxp3 in Tregs that were incubated with media conditioned by virus-infected tumor cells, (2) downregulation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO) in glioma cells upon infection by AdCMVdelta24, and (3) reprograming of Tregs from an immunosuppressive to a stimulatory state. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potency of intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment in enhancing antitumor immunity through the regulation of multiple aspects of immune suppression in the context of glioma, supporting further clinical development of oncolytic adenovirus-based immune therapies for malignant brain cancer. PMID:26405578

  8. Xanthohumol modulates the expression of osteoclast-specific genes during osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kwang Sik; Rhee, Sang Youl; Kim, Young Seol; Lee, Young Soon; Choi, Eun Mi

    2013-12-01

    RANKL has been shown to play a critical role in osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Thus, agents that suppress RANKL signaling have a potential to suppress bone loss. In this study, we examined the ability of xanthohumol, a structurally simple prenylated chalcone, to suppress RANKL signaling during osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. Xanthohumol markedly inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP activity, multinucleated osteoclasts formation, and resorption-pit formation. In experiments to elucidate its mechanism of action, xanthohumol was found to suppress RANKL-induced expression of TRAF6, GAB2, ERK, c-Src, PI3K, and Akt genes. Moreover, RANKL-induced expressions of c-Fos and NFATc1, which are crucial transcription factors for osteoclastogenesis, were reduced by treatment with xanthohumol. Xanthohumol also inhibited RANKL-induced expression of bone-resorption related osteoclast-specific genes (carbonic anhydrase II, TCIRG, CLCN7, OSTM1, cathepsin K, and MMP-9). These data demonstrate that xanthohumol inhibits osteoclastogenesis by modulating RANKL signaling and may be useful for the prevention of bone-destructive diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis and periodontitis.

  9. PKA modulates GSK-3β- and cdk5-catalyzed phosphorylation of tau in site- and kinase-specific manners

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Liang, Zhihou; Shi, Jianhua; Yin, Dongmei; El-Akkad, Ezzat; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorylation of tau protein is regulated by several kinases, especially glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (cdk5) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Phosphorylation of tau by PKA primes it for phosphorylation by GSK-3β, but the site-specific modulation of GSK-3β–catalyzed tau phosphorylation by the prephosphorylation has not been well investigated. Here, we found that prephosphorylation by PKA promotes GSK-3β–catalyzed tau phosphorylation at Thr181, Ser199, Ser202, Thr205, Thr217, Thr231, Ser396 and Ser422, but inhibits its phosphorylation at Thr212 and Ser404. In contrast, the prephosphorylation had no significant effect on its subsequent phosphorylation by cdk5 at Thr181, Ser199, Thr205, Thr231 and Ser422; inhibited it at Ser202, Thr212, Thr217 and Ser404; and slightly promoted it at Ser396. These studies reveal the nature of the inter-regulation of tau phosphorylation by the three major tau kinases. PMID:17078951

  10. In vivo tissue specific modulation of rat insulin receptor gene expression in an experimental model of mineralocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Campión, J; Lahera, V; Cachofeiro, V; Maestro, B; Dávila, N; Carranza, M C; Calle, C

    1998-08-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) gene expression at the mRNA level was investigated in hindlimb skeletal muscle, epididymal adipose tissue and in the liver of rats exposed to prolonged in vivo administration of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA). Following treatment, plasma insulin levels were reduced while glucose levels increased compared to values in control rats. DOCA-treated animals showed an increase in blood pressure and a reduction in body weight. This treatment also induced hypokalemia and decreased plasma protein levels. Sodium levels were unaffected. Moreover, no differences in DNA and protein content or in the indicator of cell size (protein/DNA) were observed in the skeletal muscle or adipose tissue of animals. In contrast, there was a clear increase in the protein and DNA contents of the liver with no change in the indicator of cell size. Northern blot assays revealed 2 major IR mRNA species of approximately 9.5 and 7.5 Kb in the 3 tissues from control animals. DOCA treatment induced no change in the levels of either RNA species in skeletal muscle. However, a decrease of approximately 22% was detected in the levels of both species in adipose tissue whereas the liver showed an increase of 64%. These results provide the first evidence for an in vivo tissue-specific modulation of IR mRNA levels under experimental conditions of mineralocorticoid excess.

  11. Milk secretion of nitrofurantoin, as a specific BCRP/ABCG2 substrate, in assaf sheep: modulation by isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Real, R; Mendoza, G; Merino, G; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I

    2009-10-01

    Studies on residues in milk used for human consumption have increased due to health concerns and priority interest in the control of potentially risky drugs. The protein BCRP/ABCG2, present in the mammary epithelia, actively extrudes drugs into milk and can be modulated by isoflavones. Nitrofurantoin is a specific BCRP substrate which is actively excreted into milk by this transporter. In this research, we studied nitrofurantoin transport into milk in four experimental groups: G1-calves fed forage with isoflavones; G2-calves fed forage with isoflavones and administered exogenous genistein and daidzein; G3-calves fed forage without isoflavones; G4-calves fed forage without isoflavones and administered exogenous genistein and daidzein. Results show increased levels of nitrofurantoin in milk from calves without isoflavones (G3) and decreased nitrofurantoin residues in milk when isoflavones were present, either by forage (G1 and G2) or by exogenous administration (G4). The values of C(max) in milk were significantly lower in those groups with isoflavones in forage (G1, G2). Plasma levels were low and unmodified among the groups. Inter-individual variation was high. All these results seem to point to a feasible control of drug secretion into milk through isoflavones in the diet when the drug is a good BCRP/ABCG2 substrate.

  12. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs.

  13. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  14. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J.; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T.; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules.

  15. Hydrophobic End-Modulated Amino-Acid-Based Neutral Hydrogelators: Structure-Specific Inclusion of Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Pritam; Mandal, Deep; Brahmachari, Sayanti; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-04-04

    Hydrophobic end-modulated l-phenylalanine-containing triethylene glycol monomethyl ether tagged neutral hydrogelators (1-4) are developed. Investigations determine the gelators' structure-dependent inclusion of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) in the self-assembled fibrillar network (SAFIN). The gelators (1, 3, and 4) can immobilize water and aqueous buffer (pH 3-7) with a minimum gelator concentration of 10-15 mg mL(-1). The hydrophobic parts of the gelators are varied from a long chain (C-16) to an extended aromatic pyrenyl moiety, and their abilities to integrate 1 D and 2 D allotropes of carbon (i.e., single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene oxide (GO), respectively) within the gel are investigated. Gelator 1, containing a long alkyl chain (C-16), can include SWNTs, whereas the pyrene-containing 4 can include both SWNTs and GO. Gelator 3 fails to incorporate SWNTs or GO owing to its slow rate of gelation and possibly a mismatch between the aggregated structure and CNMs. The involvement of various forces in self-aggregated gelation and physicochemical changes occurring through CNM inclusion are examined by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The distinctive pattern of self-assembly of gelators 1 and 4 through J- and H-type aggregation might facilitate the structure-specific CNM inclusion. Inclusion of SWNTs/GO within the hydrogel matrix results in a reinforcement in mechanical stiffness of the composites compared with that of the native hydrogels.

  16. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J.; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T.; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules. PMID:27385551

  17. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-07-07

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules.

  18. Aire employs a histone-binding module to mediate immunological tolerance, linking chromatin regulation with organ-specific autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Koh, Andrew S; Kuo, Alex J; Park, Sang Youn; Cheung, Peggie; Abramson, Jakub; Bua, Dennis; Carney, Dylan; Shoelson, Steven E; Gozani, Or; Kingston, Robert E; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2008-10-14

    Aire induces ectopic expression of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells, which promotes immunological tolerance. Beginning with a broad screen of histone peptides, we demonstrate that the mechanism by which this single factor controls the transcription of thousands of genes involves recognition of the amino-terminal tail of histone H3, but not of other histones, by one of Aire's plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers. Certain posttranslational modifications of H3 tails, notably dimethylation or trimethylation at H3K4, abrogated binding by Aire, whereas others were tolerated. Similar PHD finger-H3 tail-binding properties were recently reported for BRAF-histone deacetylase complex 80 and DNA methyltransferase 3L; sequence alignment, molecular modeling, and biochemical analyses showed these factors and Aire to have structure-function relationships in common. In addition, certain PHD1 mutations underlying the polyendocrine disorder autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiases-ectodermaldystrophy compromised Aire recognition of H3. In vitro binding assays demonstrated direct physical interaction between Aire and nucleosomes, which was in part buttressed by its affinity to DNA. In vivo Aire interactions with chromosomal regions depleted of H3K4me3 were dependent on its H3 tail-binding activity, and this binding was necessary but not sufficient for the up-regulation of genes encoding PTAs. Thus, Aire's activity as a histone-binding module mediates the thymic display of PTAs that promotes self-tolerance and prevents organ-specific autoimmunity.

  19. Sex-specific autophagy modulation in osteoblastic lineage: a critical function to counteract bone loss in female

    PubMed Central

    Camuzard, Olivier; Santucci-Darmanin, Sabine; Breuil, Véronique; Cros, Chantal; Gritsaenko, Tatiana; Pagnotta, Sophie; Cailleteau, Laurence; Battaglia, Séverine; Panaïa-Ferrari, Patricia; Heymann, Dominique; Carle, Georges F.; Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Age-related bone loss is associated with an increased oxidative stress which is worsened by estrogen fall during menauposis. This observation has drawn attention to autophagy, a major cellular catabolic process, able to alleviate oxidative stress in osteoblasts (OB) and osteocytes (OST), two key bone cell types. Moreover, an autophagy decline can be associated with aging, suggesting that an age-related autophagy deficiency in OB and/or OST could contribute to skeletal aging and osteoporosis onset. In the present work, autophagy activity was analyzed in OST and OB in male and female mice according to their age and hormonal status. In OST, autophagy decreases with aging in both sexes. In OB, although a 95% decrease in autophagy is observed in OB derived from old females, this activity remains unchanged in males. In addition, while ovariectomy has no effect on OB autophagy levels, orchidectomy appears to stimulate this process. An inverse correlation between autophagy and the oxidative stress level was observed in OB derived from males or females. Finally, using OB-specific autophagy-deficient mice, we showed that autophagy deficiency aggravates the bone loss associated with aging and estrogen deprivation. Taken together, our data indicate that autophagic modulation in bone cells differs according to sex and cell type. The lowering of autophagy in female OB, which is associated with an increased oxidative stress, could play a role in osteoporosis pathophysiology and suggests that autophagy could be a new therapeutic target for osteoporosis in women. PMID:27634908

  20. Rhythm-specific modulation of the sensorimotor network in drug-naive patients with Parkinson's disease by levodopa.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Tessitore, Alessandro; Giordano, Alfonso; De Micco, Rosita; Paccone, Antonella; Conforti, Renta; Pignataro, Giuseppe; Annunziato, Lucio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2013-03-01

    Brain activity during rest is characterized by slow (0.01-0.1 Hz) fluctuations of blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. These fluctuations are organized as functional connectivity networks called resting-state networks, anatomically corresponding to specific neuronal circuits. As Parkinson's disease is mainly characterized by a dysfunction of the sensorimotor pathways, which can be influenced by levodopa administration, the present study investigated the functional connectivity changes within the sensorimotor resting-state network in drug-naïve patients with Parkinson's disease after acute levodopa administration. Using a double-blind placebo-controlled design, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was carried out in 20 drug-naïve patients with Parkinson's disease, immediately before and 60 min after, oral administration of either levodopa or placebo. Control resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were recorded in 18 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Independent component analysis was performed to extract resting-state network maps and associated time-course spectral features. At the anatomical level, levodopa enhanced the sensorimotor network functional connectivity in the supplementary motor area, a region where drug-naïve patients with Parkinson's disease exhibited reduced signal fluctuations compared with untreated patients. At the spectral frequency level, levodopa stimulated these fluctuations in a selective frequency band of the sensorimotor network. The reported effects induced by levodopa on sensorimotor network topological and spectral features confirm that the sensorimotor system is a target of acute levodopa administration in drug-naïve patients with Parkinson's disease. Moreover, while the regional changes in supplementary motor area reflect the functional improvement in motor function, the rhythm-specific modulation induced by the dopamine precursor discloses a novel

  1. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA.

  2. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  3. An oyster species-specific miRNA scaffold42648_5080 modulates haemocyte migration by targeting integrin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs are important gene regulators at post-transcriptional level and can modulate diverse biological processes, including immune response. Dozens of species-specific miRNAs have been identified in oyster Crassostrea gigas while their functions remain largely unknown. In the present study, an oyster species-specific miRNA scaffold42648_5080 was found responsive to LPS stimulation and might target a total of 31 oyster genes possibly involved in cell communication, cellular localization and cellular response to stimulus. Besides, in gain-of-function assay of scaffold42648_5080 in vivo, the phagocytosis (30.90% in miRNA group verse 23.20% in miRNA control group), apoptosis (3.10% in miRNA group verse 5.30% in miRNA control group) and migration rate (13.88% in miRNA group verse 21.03% in miRNA control group) of oyster haemocytes were found significantly altered after the injection of scaffold42648_5080 mimics. Among the target genes, integrin-linked kinase (CgILK) was considered crucial in cell migration and its interaction with scaffold42648_5080 was then verified both in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, a significant decrease of relative luciferase ratio was observed in CgILK 3'-UTR luciferase reporter assay after transfection of scaffold42648_5080 mimics (0.70-fold of that in blank group, p < 0.01). Meanwhile, when scaffold42648_5080 was overexpressed in vivo (5.41-fold of miRNA control group, p < 0.01), the expression of CgILK declined significantly to 0.25-fold of miRNA control group (p < 0.01). Comparatively, a significant decrease of the haemocyte migration rate (19.76% verse 34.82% in siEGFP control group, p < 0.01) was observed after knock-down of CgILK in vivo. The present study, as far as we know, for the first time revealed the immunomodulation role of an oyster species-specific miRNA, which might provide new insights into miRNA-mediated adaptation mechanism of oysters.

  4. Address tracing for parallel machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stunkel, Craig B.; Janssens, Bob; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1991-01-01

    Recently implemented parallel system address-tracing methods based on several metrics are surveyed. The issues specific to collection of traces for both shared and distributed memory parallel computers are highlighted. Five general categories of address-trace collection methods are examined: hardware-captured, interrupt-based, simulation-based, altered microcode-based, and instrumented program-based traces. The problems unique to shared memory and distributed memory multiprocessors are examined separately.

  5. Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels: Heterogeneous affinity in rat brain structures and cognitive modulation by specific blockers.

    PubMed

    Mpari, Bedel; Sreng, Leam; Regaya, Imed; Mourre, Christiane

    2008-07-28

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (K(Ca)2) generating the medium afterhyperpolarization seen after an action potential modulate the neuronal integration signal. The effects of two K(Ca)2 channel blockers, apamin, specific to K(Ca)2.2 and K(Ca)2.3 channels, and lei-Dab7, which binds to K(Ca)2.2 channels only, were compared to evaluate the involvement of K(Ca)2 channel subunits in behavior, spatial learning and memory in rats. Intracerebroventricular (9-5 ng) injections of lei-dab7 decreased locomotor activity, food intake and body weight in rats deprived of food. A dose of 3 ng lei-Dab7 had no effect on these types of behavior. We therefore used this dose for attention and memory tasks. No modification to attention or memory was observed in a spatial radial-arm maze task with rats given 3 ng lei-Dab7, whereas apamin (0.3 ng) improved reference memory and accelerated changes of strategy from egocentric to allocentric. These findings suggest that K(Ca)2.3 blockade improves memory in rats. Lei-Dab7 entirely outcompeted the binding of iodinated apamin to 64 brain structures (mean IC(50): 34.5 nM), although IC(50) values were highly variable. By contrast, overall IC(50) values for apamin were close to mean values (11.3 pM). The very low affinity of the hippocampus and neocortex for lei-Dab7 may account for the absence of a behavioral effect of this compound. The variability of IC(50) values suggests that K(Ca)2 channel composition varies considerably as a function of the brain structure considered.

  6. Emotional learning enhances stimulus-specific top-down modulation of sensorimotor gating in socially reared rats but not isolation-reared rats.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2010-01-20

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI), the suppression of the startle reflex by a preceding sensory stimulus (prepulse), can be top-down modulated in both humans and rats. This study investigated whether emotional-learning-induced enhancement of PPI in rats is prepulse specific. The results show that in socially reared rats, PPI elicited by a narrowband-noise prepulse on the broadband-noise background (masker) was enhanced after the prepulse became fear conditioned. This fear-conditioning-modulated PPI was further enhanced by introducing a perceived spatial separation between the conditioned prepulse and the broadband-noise masker. However, these PPI enhancements disappeared if the conditioned prepulse was replaced by a different narrowband-noise prepulse that was not fear conditioned. In isolation-reared rats, who had both enhanced baseline startle and reduced PPI before conditioning, neither fear conditioning of the prepulse nor perceived spatial separation between the conditioned prepulse and noise masker could enhance PPI. Thus, the emotional-learning-induced enhancement of PPI in socially reared rats is prepulse specific, indicating that auditory processing interacts with mnemonic signaling in the formation of top-down modulation of PPI. Since the deficiency of attentional modulation of PPI in schizophrenic patients is correlated with the symptom severity, the deficiency of top-down modulations of PPI in isolation-reared rats is useful for modeling schizophrenia.

  7. The use of growth factors to modulate the activities of antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Alenzi, FQ; Alenazi, FA; Al-Kaabi, Y; Salem, ML

    2011-01-01

    survival of antigen–specific T cells can be differently modulated by immunomodulatory factors, where, interleukin–12 and IGF–1 induced the favorable effect. These results have a significant implication for T cell adoptive immunotherapy in different settings. PMID:22514573

  8. Matrix factorization reveals aging-specific co-expression gene modules in the fat and muscle tissues in nonhuman primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongcui; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-10-01

    Accurate identification of coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks) in adipose and muscle tissues is important for revealing the related mechanisms and co-regulated pathways involved in the development of aging-related diseases. Here, we proposed a systematically computational approach, called ICEGM, to Identify the Co-Expression Gene Modules through a novel mathematical framework of Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (HO-GSVD). ICEGM was applied on the adipose, and heart and skeletal muscle tissues in old and young female African green vervet monkeys. The genes associated with the development of inflammation, cardiovascular and skeletal disorder diseases, and cancer were revealed by the ICEGM. Meanwhile, genes in the ICEGM modules were also enriched in the adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, cardiac myocytes, and immune cells. Comprehensive disease annotation and canonical pathway analysis indicated that immune cells, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and smooth muscle cells played a synergistic role in cardiac and physical functions in the aged monkeys by regulation of the biological processes associated with metabolism, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. In conclusion, the ICEGM provides an efficiently systematic framework for decoding the co-expression gene modules in multiple tissues. Analysis of genes in the ICEGM module yielded important insights on the cooperative role of multiple tissues in the development of diseases.

  9. Matrix factorization reveals aging-specific co-expression gene modules in the fat and muscle tissues in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongcui; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks) in adipose and muscle tissues is important for revealing the related mechanisms and co-regulated pathways involved in the development of aging-related diseases. Here, we proposed a systematically computational approach, called ICEGM, to Identify the Co-Expression Gene Modules through a novel mathematical framework of Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (HO-GSVD). ICEGM was applied on the adipose, and heart and skeletal muscle tissues in old and young female African green vervet monkeys. The genes associated with the development of inflammation, cardiovascular and skeletal disorder diseases, and cancer were revealed by the ICEGM. Meanwhile, genes in the ICEGM modules were also enriched in the adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, cardiac myocytes, and immune cells. Comprehensive disease annotation and canonical pathway analysis indicated that immune cells, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and smooth muscle cells played a synergistic role in cardiac and physical functions in the aged monkeys by regulation of the biological processes associated with metabolism, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. In conclusion, the ICEGM provides an efficiently systematic framework for decoding the co-expression gene modules in multiple tissues. Analysis of genes in the ICEGM module yielded important insights on the cooperative role of multiple tissues in the development of diseases. PMID:27703186

  10. Assess Student Performance: Skills. Second Edition. Module D-4 of Category D--Instructional Evaluation. Professional Teacher Education Module Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This module, one of a series of 127 performance-based teacher education learning packages focusing upon specific professional competencies of vocational education teachers, deals with assessing student performance of psychomotor skills. Included in the module are learning experiences that address the following topics: important considerations…

  11. The splicing modulator sudemycin induces a specific antitumor response and cooperates with ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rosich, Laia; Montraveta, Arnau; Roldán, Jocabed; Rodríguez, Vanina; Villamor, Neus; Aymerich, Marta; Lagisetti, Chandraiah; Webb, Thomas R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elias; Colomer, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    Mutations or deregulated expression of the components of the spliceosome can influence the splicing pattern of several genes and contribute to the development of tumors. In this context, we report that the spliceosome modulator sudemycin induces selective cytotoxicity in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells when compared with healthy lymphocytes and tumor cells from other B-lymphoid malignancies, with a slight bias for CLL cases with mutations in spliceosome-RNA processing machinery. Consistently, sudemycin exhibits considerable antitumor activity in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) mice engrafted with primary cells from CLL patients. The antileukemic effect of sudemycin involves the splicing modulation of several target genes important for tumor survival, both in SF3B1-mutated and -unmutated cases. Thus, the apoptosis induced by this compound is related to the alternative splicing switch of MCL1 toward its proapoptotic isoform. Sudemycin also functionally disturbs NF-κB pathway in parallel with the induction of a spliced RELA variant that loses its DNA binding domain. Importantly, we show an enhanced antitumor effect of sudemycin in combination with ibrutinib that might be related to the modulation of the alternative splicing of the inhibitor of Btk (IBTK). In conclusion, we provide first evidence that the spliceosome is a relevant therapeutic target in CLL, supporting the use of splicing modulators alone or in combination with ibrutinib as a promising approach for the treatment of CLL patients. PMID:26068951

  12. 47 CFR 73.757 - System specifications for single-sideband (SSB) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... dB per octave. (4) Modulation processing. If audio-frequency signal processing is used, the dynamic... emission is one giving the same audio-frequency signal-to-noise ratio at the receiver output as the... when the ratio of wanted-to-interfering signal is well below the required protection ratio. This...

  13. 47 CFR 73.757 - System specifications for single-sideband (SSB) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... dB per octave. (4) Modulation processing. If audio-frequency signal processing is used, the dynamic... emission is one giving the same audio-frequency signal-to-noise ratio at the receiver output as the... when the ratio of wanted-to-interfering signal is well below the required protection ratio. This...

  14. 47 CFR 73.757 - System specifications for single-sideband (SSB) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... dB per octave. (4) Modulation processing. If audio-frequency signal processing is used, the dynamic... emission is one giving the same audio-frequency signal-to-noise ratio at the receiver output as the... when the ratio of wanted-to-interfering signal is well below the required protection ratio. This...

  15. 47 CFR 73.757 - System specifications for single-sideband (SSB) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... dB per octave. (4) Modulation processing. If audio-frequency signal processing is used, the dynamic... emission is one giving the same audio-frequency signal-to-noise ratio at the receiver output as the... when the ratio of wanted-to-interfering signal is well below the required protection ratio. This...

  16. 47 CFR 73.757 - System specifications for single-sideband (SSB) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... dB per octave. (4) Modulation processing. If audio-frequency signal processing is used, the dynamic... emission is one giving the same audio-frequency signal-to-noise ratio at the receiver output as the... when the ratio of wanted-to-interfering signal is well below the required protection ratio. This...

  17. PI3K/AKT signaling modulates transcriptional expression of EWS/FLI1 through specificity protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Chiara; Boro, Aleksandar; Rechfeld, Florian; Lopez-Garcia, Laura A.; Gierisch, Maria E.; Schäfer, Beat W.; Niggli, Felix K.

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most frequent bone cancer in childhood and is characterized by the presence of the balanced translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12) in more than 85% of cases, generating a dysregulated transcription factor EWS/FLI1. This fusion protein is an essential oncogenic component of ES development which is necessary for tumor cell maintenance and represents an attractive therapeutic target. To search for modulators of EWS/FLI1 activity we screened a library of 153 targeted compounds and identified inhibitors of the PI3K pathway to directly modulate EWS/FLI1 transcription. Surprisingly, treatment of four different ES cell lines with BEZ235 resulted in down regulation of EWS/FLI1 mRNA and protein by ∼50% with subsequent modulation of target gene expression. Analysis of the EWS/FLI1 promoter region (−2239/+67) using various deletion constructs identified two 14bp minimal elements as being important for EWS/FLI1 transcription. We identified SP1 as modulator of EWS/FLI1 gene expression and demonstrated direct binding to one of these regions in the EWS/FLI1 promoter by EMSA and ChIP experiments. These results provide the first insights on the transcriptional regulation of EWS/FLI1, an area that has not been investigated so far, and offer an additional molecular explanation for the known sensitivity of ES cell lines to PI3K inhibition. PMID:26336820

  18. 45 CFR 170.304 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certification Criteria for Health Information Technology § 170.304 Specific certification...

  19. 45 CFR 170.306 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an inpatient setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certification Criteria for Health Information Technology § 170.306 Specific certification...

  20. 45 CFR 170.306 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an inpatient setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certification Criteria for Health Information Technology § 170.306 Specific certification...

  1. 45 CFR 170.304 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certification Criteria for Health Information Technology § 170.304 Specific certification...

  2. 45 CFR 170.304 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of Health and Human Services HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certification Criteria for Health Information Technology § 170.304 Specific certification...

  3. 45 CFR 170.306 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an inpatient setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certification Criteria for Health Information Technology § 170.306 Specific certification...

  4. 45 CFR 170.304 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certification Criteria for Health Information Technology § 170.304 Specific certification...

  5. 45 CFR 170.306 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an inpatient setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of Health and Human Services HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Certification Criteria for Health Information Technology § 170.306 Specific certification...

  6. Cell specific dopamine modulation of the transient potassium current in the pyloric network by the canonical D1 receptor signal transduction cascade.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Rodgers, Edmund W; Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C; Clark, Merry C; Baro, Deborah J

    2010-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) modifies the motor pattern generated by the pyloric network in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, by directly acting on each of the circuit neurons. The 14 pyloric neurons fall into six cell types, and DA actions are cell type specific. The transient potassium current mediated by shal channels (I(A)) is a common target of DA modulation in most cell types. DA shifts the voltage dependence of I(A) in opposing directions in pyloric dilator (PD) versus lateral pyloric (LP) neurons. The mechanism(s) underpinning cell-type specific DA modulation of I(A) is unknown. DA receptors (DARs) can be classified as type 1 (D1R) or type 2 (D2R). D1Rs and D2Rs are known to increase and decrease intracellular cAMP concentrations, respectively. We hypothesized that the opposing DA effects on PD and LP I(A) were due to differences in DAR expression patterns. In the present study, we found that LP expressed somatodendritic D1Rs that were concentrated near synapses but did not express D2Rs. Consistently, DA modulation of LP I(A) was mediated by a Gs-adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway. Additionally, we defined antagonists for lobster D1Rs (flupenthixol) and D2Rs (metoclopramide) in a heterologous expression system and showed that DA modulation of LP I(A) was blocked by flupenthixol but not by metoclopramide. We previously showed that PD neurons express D2Rs, but not D1Rs, thus supporting the idea that cell specific effects of DA on I(A) are due to differences in receptor expression.

  7. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells Derived from Donors with Natural Rubber Latex Allergy Modulate Allergen-Specific T-Cell Responses and IgE Production

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Alejandro; Aguirre, Adam; Guzmán, María Antonieta; González, Rodrigo; Catalán, Diego; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Larrondo, Milton; López, Mercedes; Pesce, Barbara; Rolland, Jennifer; O’Hehir, Robyn; Aguillón, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL; Hevea brasiliensis) allergy is an IgE-mediated reaction to latex proteins. When latex glove exposure is the main sensitizing agent, Hev b 5 is one of the major allergens. Dendritic cells (DC), the main antigen presenting cells, modulated with pharmacological agents can restore tolerance in several experimental models, including allergy. In the current study, we aimed to generate DC with tolerogenic properties from NRL-allergic patients and evaluate their ability to modulate allergen-specific T and B cell responses. Here we show that dexamethasone-treated DC (dxDC) differentiated into a subset of DC, characterized by low expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and CD83 molecules. Compared with LPS-matured DC, dxDC secreted lower IL-12 and higher IL-10 after CD40L activation, and induced lower alloantigenic T cell proliferation. We also show that dxDC pulsed with the dominant Hev b 5 T-cell epitope peptide, Hev b 546–65, inhibited both proliferation of Hev b 5-specific T-cell lines and the production of Hev b 5-specific IgE. Additionally, dxDC induced a subpopulation of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells that suppressed proliferation of Hev b 5-primed T cells. In conclusion, dxDC generated from NRL-allergic patients can modulate allergen-specific T-cell responses and IgE production, supporting their potential use in allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:24465795

  8. Target-specific modulation of the descending prefrontal cortex inputs to the dorsal raphe nucleus by cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Sean D.; Assadzada, Saleha; Lemelin, David; Sokolovski, Alexandra; Bergeron, Richard; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Béïque, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) neurons located in the raphe nuclei modulate a wide range of behaviors by means of an expansive innervation pattern. In turn, the raphe receives a vast array of synaptic inputs, and a remaining challenge lies in understanding how these individual inputs are organized, processed, and modulated in this nucleus to contribute ultimately to the core coding features of 5-HT neurons. The details of the long-range, top-down control exerted by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are of particular interest, in part, because of its purported role in stress processing and mood regulation. Here, we found that the mPFC provides a direct monosynaptic, glutamatergic drive to both DRN 5-HT and GABA neurons and that this architecture was conducive to a robust feed-forward inhibition. Remarkably, activation of cannabinoid (CB) receptors differentially modulated the mPFC inputs onto these cell types in the DRN, in effect regulating the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance governing the excitability of 5-HT neurons. Thus, the CB system dynamically reconfigures the processing features of the DRN, a mood-related circuit believed to provide a concerted and distributed regulation of the excitability of large ensembles of brain networks. PMID:27114535

  9. The RSC chromatin remodeling complex bears an essential fungal-specific protein module with broad functional roles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Boris; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Cairns, Bradley R

    2006-02-01

    RSC is an essential and abundant ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we show that the RSC components Rsc7/Npl6 and Rsc14/Ldb7 interact physically and/or functionally with Rsc3, Rsc30, and Htl1 to form a module important for a broad range of RSC functions. A strain lacking Rsc7 fails to properly assemble RSC, which confers sensitivity to temperature and to agents that cause DNA damage, microtubule depolymerization, or cell wall stress (likely via transcriptional misregulation). Cells lacking Rsc14 display sensitivity to cell wall stress and are deficient in the assembly of Rsc3 and Rsc30. Interestingly, certain rsc7delta and rsc14delta phenotypes are suppressed by an increased dosage of Rsc3, an essential RSC member with roles in cell wall integrity and spindle checkpoint pathways. Thus, Rsc7 and Rsc14 have different roles in the module as well as sharing physical and functional connections to Rsc3. Using a genetic array of nonessential null mutations (SGA) we identified mutations that are sick/lethal in combination with the rsc7delta mutation, which revealed connections to a surprisingly large number of chromatin remodeling complexes and cellular processes. Taken together, we define a protein module on the RSC complex with links to a broad spectrum of cellular functions.

  10. Ubiquitin specific protease 2 acts as a key modulator for the regulation of cell cycle by adiponectin and leptin in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Saroj; Shrestha, Anup; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2015-09-05

    Adiponectin and leptin, both produced from adipose tissue, cause cell cycle arrest and progression, respectively in cancer cells. Ubiquitin specific protease-2 (USP-2), a deubiquitinating enzyme, is known to impair proteasome-induced degradation of cyclin D1, a critical cell cycle regulator. Herein, we investigated the effects of these adipokines on USP-2 expression and its potential role in the modulation of cell cycle. Treatment with globular adiponectin (gAcrp) decreased, whereas leptin increased USP-2 expression both in human hepatoma and breast cancer cells. In addition, overexpression or gene silencing of USP-2 affected cyclin D1 expression and cell cycle progression/arrest by adipokines. Adiponectin and leptin also modulated in vitro proteasomal activity, which was partially dependent on USP-2 expression. Taken together, our results reveal that modulation of USP-2 expression plays a crucial role in cell cycle regulation by adipokines. Thus, USP-2 would be a promising therapeutic target for the modulation of cancer cell growth by adipokines.

  11. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  12. Nitric oxide inhibits neointimal hyperplasia following vascular injury via differential, cell-specific modulation of SOD-1 in the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Bahnson, Edward S M; Koo, Nathaniel; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Tsui, Aaron Y; Havelka, George E; Vercammen, Janet M; Jiang, Qun; Kelley, Eric E; Kibbe, Melina R

    2015-01-30

    Superoxide (O2(•-)) promotes neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Conversely, nitric oxide ((•)NO) inhibits neointimal hyperplasia through various cell-specific mechanisms, including redox regulation. What remains unclear is whether (•)NO exerts cell-specific regulation of the vascular redox environment following arterial injury to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether (•)NO exerts cell-specific, differential modulation of O2(•-) levels throughout the arterial wall, establish the mechanism of such modulation, and determine if it regulates (•)NO-dependent inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. In vivo, (•)NO increased superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) levels following carotid artery balloon injury in a rat model. In vitro, (•)NO increased SOD-1 levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), but had no effect on SOD-1 in endothelial cells or adventitial fibroblasts. This SOD-1 increase was associated with an increase in sod1 gene expression, increase in SOD-1 activity, and decrease in O2(•-) levels. Lastly, to determine the role of SOD-1 in (•)NO-mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia, we performed the femoral artery wire injury model in wild type and SOD-1 knockout (KO) mice, with and without (•)NO. Interestingly, (•)NO inhibited neointimal hyperplasia only in wild type mice, with no effect in SOD-1 KO mice. In conclusion, these data show the cell-specific modulation of O2(•-) by (•)NO through regulation of SOD-1 in the vasculature, highlighting its importance on the inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. These results also shed light into the mechanism of (•)NO-dependent redox balance, and suggest a novel VSMC redox target to prevent neointimal hyperplasia.

  13. Deficits in task-specific modulation of anticipatory postural adjustments in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hidehito; Fukaya, Yoshiki; Ueda, Tomomi; Honma, Shota; Yamashita, Eriya; Yamamoto, Yoshiji; Mori, Etsuko; Shionoya, Katsuyoshi

    2011-05-01

    We examined whether individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (SDCP) have the ability to utilize lower leg muscles in anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) associated with voluntary arm movement while standing, as well as the ability to modulate APAs with changes in the degree of postural perturbation caused by arm movement. Seven individuals with spastic diplegia (SDCP group, 12-22 yr of age) and seven age- and sex-matched individuals without disability (control group) participated in this study. Participants flexed both shoulders and lifted a load under two different load conditions, during which electromyographic activities of focal and postural muscles were recorded. Although the timing of anticipatory activation of the erector spinae and medial hamstring (MH) muscles was similar in the two participant groups, that of the gastrocnemius (GcM) muscle was significantly later in the SDCP group than in the control group. An increase in anticipatory postural muscle activity with an increase in load was observed in MH and GcM in the control group but not in GcM in the SDCP group. The degree of modulation in MH was significantly smaller in the SDCP group than in the control group. An additional experiment confirmed that these differences in APAs between the two participant groups were unlikely to be attributable to their differences in initial standing posture before load lift. The present findings suggest that lower leg muscles play a minor role in APAs in individuals with spastic diplegia. In addition, it is likely that these individuals have difficulty modulating anticipatory postural muscle activity with changes in the degree of postural perturbation.

  14. The perception of speech modulation cues in lexical tones is guided by early language-specific experience.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Laurianne; Tsao, Feng-Ming; Liu, Huei-Mei; Li, Lu-Yang; Hu, You-Hsin; Lorenzi, Christian; Bertoncini, Josiane

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies showed that infants reorganize their perception of speech sounds according to their native language categories during their first year of life. Still, information is lacking about the contribution of basic auditory mechanisms to this process. This study aimed to evaluate when native language experience starts to noticeably affect the perceptual processing of basic acoustic cues [i.e., frequency-modulation (FM) and amplitude-modulation information] known to be crucial for speech perception in adults. The discrimination of a lexical-tone contrast (rising versus low) was assessed in 6- and 10-month-old infants learning either French or Mandarin using a visual habituation paradigm. The lexical tones were presented in two conditions designed to either keep intact or to severely degrade the FM and fine spectral cues needed to accurately perceive voice-pitch trajectory. A third condition was designed to assess the discrimination of the same voice-pitch trajectories using click trains containing only the FM cues related to the fundamental-frequency (F0) in French- and Mandarin-learning 10-month-old infants. Results showed that the younger infants of both language groups and the Mandarin-learning 10-month-olds discriminated the intact lexical-tone contrast while French-learning 10-month-olds failed. However, only the French 10-month-olds discriminated degraded lexical tones when FM, and thus voice-pitch cues were reduced. Moreover, Mandarin-learning 10-month-olds were found to discriminate the pitch trajectories as presented in click trains better than French infants. Altogether, these results reveal that the perceptual reorganization occurring during the first year of life for lexical tones is coupled with changes in the auditory ability to use speech modulation cues.

  15. Behavioral-state modulation of inhibition is context-dependent and cell type specific in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pakan, Janelle MP; Lowe, Scott C; Dylda, Evelyn; Keemink, Sander W; Currie, Stephen P; Coutts, Christopher A; Rochefort, Nathalie L

    2016-01-01

    Cortical responses to sensory stimuli are modulated by behavioral state. In the primary visual cortex (V1), visual responses of pyramidal neurons increase during locomotion. This response gain was suggested to be mediated through inhibitory neurons, resulting in the disinhibition of pyramidal neurons. Using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in layers 2/3 and 4 in mouse V1, we reveal that locomotion increases the activity of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), somatostatin (SST) and parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons during visual stimulation, challenging the disinhibition model. In darkness, while most VIP and PV neurons remained locomotion responsive, SST and excitatory neurons were largely non-responsive. Context-dependent locomotion responses were found in each cell type, with the highest proportion among SST neurons. These findings establish that modulation of neuronal activity by locomotion is context-dependent and contest the generality of a disinhibitory circuit for gain control of sensory responses by behavioral state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14985.001 PMID:27552056

  16. Noradrenergic and cholinergic modulation of olfactory bulb sensory processing

    PubMed Central

    Devore, Sasha; Linster, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Neuromodulation in sensory perception serves important functions such as regulation of signal to noise ratio, attention, and modulation of learning and memory. Neuromodulators in specific sensory areas often have highly similar cellular, but distinct behavioral effects. To address this issue, we here review the function and role of two neuromodulators, acetylcholine (Ach) and noradrenaline (NE) for olfactory sensory processing in the adult main olfactory bulb. We first describe specific bulbar sensory computations, review cellular effects of each modulator and then address their specific roles in bulbar sensory processing. We finally put these data in a behavioral and computational perspective. PMID:22905025

  17. Brain region- and sex-specific modulation of mitochondrial glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation in fluoxetine treated stressed rats: effects on energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Adzic, Miroslav; Lukic, Iva; Mitic, Milos; Djordjevic, Jelena; Elaković, Ivana; Djordjevic, Ana; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Matić, Gordana; Radojcic, Marija

    2013-12-01

    Antidepressants affect glucocorticoid receptor (GR) functioning partly through modulation of its phosphorylation but their effects on mitochondrial GR have remained undefined. We investigated the ability of chronic fluoxetine treatment to affect chronic stress-induced changes of mitochondrial GR and its phosphoisoforms (pGRs) in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of female and male rats. Since mitochondrial GR regulates oxidative phosphorylation, expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunits of cytochrome (cyt) c oxidase and its activity were also investigated. Chronic stress caused accumulation of the GR in mitochondria of female prefrontal cortex, while the changes in the hippocampus were sex-specific at the levels of pGRs. Expression of mitochondrial COXs genes corresponded to chronic stress-modulated mitochondrial GR in both tissues of both genders and to cyt c oxidase activity in females. Moreover, the metabolic parameters in stressed animals were affected by fluoxetine therapy only in the hippocampus. Namely, fluoxetine effects on mitochondrial COXs and cyt c oxidase activity in the hippocampus seem to be conveyed through pGR232 in females, while in males this likely occurs through other mechanisms. In summary, sex-specific regulation of cyt c oxidase by the stress and antidepressant treatment and its differential convergence with mitochondrial GR signaling in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus could contribute to clarification of sex-dependent vulnerability to stress-related disorders and sex-specific clinical impact of antidepressants.

  18. Almond brush module cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Zohns, M.A.; Jenkins, B.M.; Mehlschau, J.J.; Morrison, D.

    1983-06-01

    This paper addresses the design, construction, and evaluation of an almond brush module cutter. The module cutter is one link in a system which processes tree prunings for fuel and fiber. This system includes a modified cotton module builder, a module mover, the cutter, and a tub grinder. An economic analysis of the cutter is presented along with the problems involved in cutting brush modules.

  19. Arousal modulation of memory and amygdala-parahippocampal connectivity: a PET-psychophysiology study in specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Ahs, Fredrik; Palmquist, Asa Michelgård; Pissiota, Anna; Appel, Lieuwe; Frans, Orjan; Liberzon, Israel; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats

    2011-11-01

    Phobic fear is accompanied by intense bodily responses modulated by the amygdala. An amygdala moderated psychophysiological measure related to arousal is electrodermal activity. We evaluated the contributions of electrodermal activity to amygdala-parahippocampal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during phobic memory encoding in subjects with spider or snake phobia. Recognition memory was increased for phobia-related slides and covaried with rCBF in the amygdala and the parahippocampal gyrus. The covariation between parahippocampal rCBF and recognition was related to electrodermal activity suggesting that parahippocampal memory processes were associated with sympathetic activity. Electrodermal activity further mediated the amygdala effect on parahippocampal activity. Memory encoding during phobic fear therefore seems contingent on amygdala's influence on arousal and parahippocampal activity.

  20. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-12

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses.

  1. Cross-species Proteomics Reveals Specific Modulation of Signaling in Cancer and Stromal Cells by Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Rajeeve, Vinothini; Vendrell, Iolanda; Wilkes, Edmund; Torbett, Neil; Cutillas, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays key roles in cancer biology, but its impact on the regulation of signaling pathway activity in cancer cells has not been systemically investigated. We designed an analytical strategy that allows differential analysis of signaling between cancer and stromal cells present in tumor xenografts. We used this approach to investigate how in vivo growth conditions and PI3K inhibitors regulate pathway activities in both cancer and stromal cell populations. We found that, despite inducing more modest changes in protein expression, in vivo growing conditions extensively rewired protein kinase networks in cancer cells. As a result, different sets of phosphorylation sites were modulated by PI3K inhibitors in cancer cells growing in tumors relative to when these cells were in culture. The p110δ PI3K-selective compound CAL-101 (Idelalisib) did not inhibit markers of PI3K activity in cancer or stromal cells; however, unexpectedly, it induced phosphorylation on SQ motifs in both subpopulations of tumor cells in vivo but not in vitro. Thus, the interaction between cancer cells and the stroma modulated the ability of PI3K inhibitors to induce the activation of apoptosis in solid tumors. Our study provides proof-of-principle of a proteomics workflow for measuring signaling specifically in cancer and stromal cells and for investigating how cancer biochemistry is modulated in vivo. PMID:24648465

  2. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A.; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses. PMID:26715744

  3. Diacylglycerol kinase delta and protein kinase C(alpha) modulate epidermal growth factor receptor abundance and degradation through ubiquitin-specific protease 8.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinjin; Crotty, Tracy M; Reichert, Ethan; Carraway, Kermit L; Stafforini, Diana M; Topham, Matthew K

    2010-03-05

    Many human epithelial cancers are characterized by abnormal activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is often caused by its excessive expression in tumor cells. The abundance of EGFR is modulated, in part, by its ubiquitination, which targets it for degradation. The components responsible for adding ubiquitin to EGFR are well characterized, but this is a reversible process, and the mechanisms that modulate the removal of ubiquitin from the EGFR are not well known. We found that de-ubiquitination of EGFR was regulated by diacylglycerol kinase delta (DGKdelta), a lipid kinase that terminates diacylglycerol signaling. In DGKdelta-deficient cells, ubiquitination of EGFR was enhanced, which attenuated the steady-state levels of EGFR and promoted its ligand-induced degradation. These effects were not caused by changes in the ubiquitinating apparatus, but instead were due to reduced expression of the de-ubiquitinase, ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8). Depletion of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha), a target of diacylglycerol, rescued the levels of USP8 and normalized EGFR degradation in DGKdelta-deficient cells. Moreover, the effects of PKCalpha were caused by its inhibition of Akt, which stabilizes USP8. Our data indicate a novel mechanism where DGKdelta and PKCalpha modulate the levels of ubiquitinated EGFR through Akt and USP8.

  4. Computation of Fresnel holograms and diffraction-specific coherent panoramagrams for full-color holographic displays based on anisotropic leaky-mode modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Sundeep; Dreshaj, Ermal; Bove, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    We have previously introduced a computational architecture suitable for driving full-color holographic display systems based around anisotropic leaky-mode modulators; this architecture appropriately handles single-sideband modulation and frequency-division multiplexing of spectral bands that correspond to the independent red, green, and blue color channels in the display output. In this paper, we describe an implementation for driving the MIT Mark IV holographic display system with such a computational approach, in cases of both pre-computed Fresnel CGHs and real-time, GPU-based diffraction specific coherent panoramagrams. Real-time holographic images of nearly VGA-resolution (468 lines) are generated via three dual-head NVIDIA GPUs via a CUDA-based implementation that encompasses the requisite orthographic view generation from 3-D data sources, parallel vector-based fringe computation per hogel and per color, single-sideband modulation, and frequency-division multiplexing. We present the first results of this scheme in driving the Mark IV display system and review the resulting holographic video output and performance metrics.

  5. Neuron type-specific miRNA represses two broadly expressed genes to modulate an avoidance behavior in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drexel, Tanja; Mahofsky, Katharina; Latham, Richard; Zimmer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Two broad gene classes are distinguished within multicellular organisms: cell type-specific genes, which confer particular cellular properties, and ubiquitous genes that support general cellular functions. However, certain so-called ubiquitous genes show functionally relevant cell type-specific repression. How such repression is achieved is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are repressors, many of which are expressed with high cell type specificity. Here we show that mir-791, expressed exclusively in the CO2-sensing neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, represses two otherwise broadly expressed genes. This repression is necessary for normal neuronal function and behavior of the animals toward CO2. miRNA-mediated repression of broadly transcribed genes is a previously unappreciated strategy for cellular specialization. PMID:27688400

  6. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  7. Invitational Addresses, 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Arthur I.; And Others

    The full texts of invitational addresses given at the 1965 International Reading Association (IRA) Convention in Detroit, Michigan, by six recipients of IRA citation awards are presented. Gates suggests steps IRA should take to revive and redirect reading research. McCallister discusses the implications of the changing and expanding vocabulary of…

  8. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  9. Type I interferon suppresses virus-specific B cell responses by modulating CD8+ T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Moseman, E. Ashley; Wu, Tuoqi; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have established a role for T cells in resolving persistent viral infections, yet emerging evidence indicates that both T and B cells are required to control some viruses. During persistent infection, a marked lag or failure to generate neutralizing antibodies is commonly observed and likely contributes to an inability to control certain pathogens. Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) as a model, we have examined how a persistent viral infection can suppress neutralizing humoral immunity. By tracking the fate of virus-specific B cells in vivo, we report that LCMV-specific B cells were rapidly deleted within a few days of persistent infection, and this deletion was completely reversed by blockade of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling. Early interference with IFN-I signaling promoted survival and differentiation of LCMV-specific B cells, which accelerated the generation of neutralizing antibodies. This marked improvement in antiviral humoral immunity did not rely on the cessation of IFN-I signaling in B cells but on alterations in the virus-specific CD8+ T cell response. Using two-photon microscopy and in vivo calcium imaging, we observed that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) productively engaged and killed LCMV-specific B cells in a perforin-dependent manner within the first few days of infection. Blockade of IFN-I signaling protected LCMV-specific B cells by promoting CTL dysfunction. Therapeutic manipulation of this pathway may facilitate efforts to promote humoral immunity during persistent viral infection in humans. Our findings illustrate how events that occur early after infection can disturb the resultant adaptive response and contribute to viral persistence. PMID:27812556

  10. Identification of Stage-Specific Gene Modulation during Early Thymocyte Development by Whole-Genome Profiling Analysis after Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jeffrey H.; Lai, Zhi-Wei; Singh, Kameshwar P.; Middleton, Frank A.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.; Silverstone, Allen E.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, implicated as an important modulator of the immune system and of early thymocyte development. We have shown previously that AHR activation by the environmental contaminant and potent AHR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) leads to a significant decline in the percentage of S-phase cells in the CD3−CD4−CD8− triple-negative stage (TN) 3 and TN4 T-cell committed thymocytes 9 to 12 h after exposure. In the more immature TN1- or TN2-stage cells, no effect on cell cycle was observed. To identify early molecular targets, which could provide insight into how the AHR acts as a modulator of thymocyte development and cell cycle regulation, we performed gene-profiling experiments using RNA isolated from four intrathymic progenitor populations in which the AHR was activated for 6 or 12 h. This microarray analysis of AHR activation identified 108 distinct gene probes that were significantly modulated in the TN1–4 thymocyte progenitor stages. Although most of the genes identified have specific AHR recognition sequences, only seven genes were altered exclusively in the two T-cell committed stages of early thymocyte development (TN3 and TN4) in which the decline of S-phase cells is seen. Moreover, all seven of these genes were reduced in expression, and five of the seven are associated with cell cycle regulatory processes. These seven genes are novel targets for modulation by the TCDD-activated AHR and may be involved in the observed cell-cycle arrest and suppression of early thymocyte development. PMID:20159946

  11. Identification of stage-specific gene modulation during early thymocyte development by whole-genome profiling analysis after aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Laiosa, Michael D; Mills, Jeffrey H; Lai, Zhi-Wei; Singh, Kameshwar P; Middleton, Frank A; Gasiewicz, Thomas A; Silverstone, Allen E

    2010-05-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, implicated as an important modulator of the immune system and of early thymocyte development. We have shown previously that AHR activation by the environmental contaminant and potent AHR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) leads to a significant decline in the percentage of S-phase cells in the CD3(-)CD4(-)CD8(-) triple-negative stage (TN) 3 and TN4 T-cell committed thymocytes 9 to 12 h after exposure. In the more immature TN1- or TN2-stage cells, no effect on cell cycle was observed. To identify early molecular targets, which could provide insight into how the AHR acts as a modulator of thymocyte development and cell cycle regulation, we performed gene-profiling experiments using RNA isolated from four intrathymic progenitor populations in which the AHR was activated for 6 or 12 h. This microarray analysis of AHR activation identified 108 distinct gene probes that were significantly modulated in the TN1-4 thymocyte progenitor stages. Although most of the genes identified have specific AHR recognition sequences, only seven genes were altered exclusively in the two T-cell committed stages of early thymocyte development (TN3 and TN4) in which the decline of S-phase cells is seen. Moreover, all seven of these genes were reduced in expression, and five of the seven are associated with cell cycle regulatory processes. These seven genes are novel targets for modulation by the TCDD-activated AHR and may be involved in the observed cell-cycle arrest and suppression of early thymocyte development.

  12. Sex-specific modulation of spinal nociception by alpha2-adrenoceptors: differential regulation by estrogen and testosterone.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A D; Angelotti, T; Nag, S; Mokha, S S

    2008-06-02

    Sex-related differences in antinociception produced by the activation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors (alpha(2)-ARs) have been reported, however, the precise role of gonadal steroids is still unknown. Hence, we hypothesized that estrogen and testosterone modulate antinociceptive effects of clonidine (an alpha(2)-AR agonist) on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) and heat-induced spinal nociception. We also investigated whether estrogen or testosterone alters the expression of alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors in the spinal cord. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were implanted with PE10 cannulae in the intrathecal space of the lumbosacral spinal cord and divided into male, proestrous and diestrous female, ovariectomized (OVX), estradiol-treated OVX (OVX+E), castrated male (GDX), testosterone (GDX+T) and estradiol-treated castrated male (GDX+E) groups. Clonidine dose-dependently inhibited NMDA-induced scratching behavior in the male and OVX groups but to a significantly lesser extent in the OVX+E group. It also increased the tail withdrawal latency in the male, OVX, diestrous and GDX+T groups but not in the OVX+E, proestrous, GDX and GDX+E groups. Levels of alpha(2A)-AR mRNA were significantly higher in the OVX, estradiol-treated OVX, GDX and GDX+E animals. In contrast, alpha(2A)-AR protein levels were higher in estradiol-treated OVX, GDX, GDX+T and GDX+E animals as compared with the male. Indeed, no correlations were observed between changes in the mRNA or protein levels of alpha(2A)-AR and behavioral observations. These results support our hypothesis that sex-related differences in alpha(2)-AR-mediated modulation of spinal nociception are gonadal hormone-dependent: estrogen attenuates antinociceptive effects in females whereas testosterone is required for the expression of antinociception in males. In addition, results also revealed that the mechanism of action of gonadal hormones may not involve a global alternation in expression of alpha(2A)-AR in the spinal cord. Estrogen-induced attenuation

  13. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 4: PEP functional specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The functional, performance, design, and test requirements for the Orbiter power extension package and its associated ground support equipment are defined. Both government and nongovernment standards and specifications are cited for the following subsystems: electrical power, structural/mechanical, avionics, and thermal control. Quality control assurance provisions and preparation for delivery are also discussed.

  14. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 5: PEP environmental specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This specification establishes the natural and induced environments to which the power extension package may be exposed during ground operations and space operations with the shuttle system. Space induced environments are applicable at the Orbiter attach point interface location. All probable environments are systematically listed according to each ground and mission phase.

  15. Fat-specific protein 27 modulates nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 and the cellular response to stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27), a member of the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor a-like effector (Cide) family, is highly expressed in adipose tissues and is a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein that induces the accumulation of LDs. Using a yeast two-hybrid system to examine potentia...

  16. Religion and Action Control: Faith-Specific Modulation of the Simon Effect but Not Stop-Signal Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Scorolli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that religion has a specific impact on attentional processes. Here we show that religion also affects action control. Experiment 1 compared Dutch Calvinists and Dutch atheists, matched for age, sex, intelligence, education, and cultural and socio-economic background, and Experiment 2 compared Italian Catholics with…

  17. Cultivar-specific gene modulation in Vitis vinifera: analysis of the promoters regulating the expression of WOX transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Boccacci, Paolo; Mela, Anita; Pavez Mina, Catalina; Chitarra, Walter; Perrone, Irene; Gribaudo, Ivana; Gambino, Giorgio

    2017-03-30

    The family of Wuschel-related Homeobox (WOX) genes is a class of transcription factors involved in the early stages of embryogenesis and organ development in plants. Some of these genes have shown different transcription levels in embryogenic tissues and mature organs in two different cultivars of Vitis vinifera: 'Chardonnay' (CH) and 'Cabernet Sauvignon' (CS). Therefore, we investigated the genetic basis responsible for these differences by cloning and sequencing in both the cultivars the promoter regions (~2000 bp) proximal to the transcription start site of five VvWOX genes. We then introduced these promoters into Arabidopsis thaliana for expression pattern characterisation using the GUS reporter gene. In the transgenic Arabidopsis, two promoters isolated from CS (pVvWOX13C_CS and pVvWOX6_CS) induced increased expression compared to the sequence isolated in CH, confirming the data obtained in grapevine tissues. These results were corroborated by transient expression assays using the agroinfiltration approach in grapevine somatic embryos. Truncated versions of pVvWOX13C demonstrated that few nucleotide differences between the sequences isolated from CH and CS are pivotal for the transcriptional regulation of VvWOX13C. Analysis of promoters using heterologous and homologous systems appear to be effective for exploring gene modulation linked with intervarietal sequence variation in grapevine.

  18. Acetylcholine Receptor and Ion Conductance Modulator Sites at the Murine Neuromuscular Junction: Evidence from Specific Toxin Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Edson X.; Barnard, Eric A.; Chiu, Tieh H.; Lapa, Antonio J.; Dolly, J. Oliver; Jansson, Sten-Erik; Daly, John; Witkop, Bernhard

    1973-01-01

    The perhydro derivative of histrionicotoxin reversibly blocks the excitatory ionic transduction system in the synaptic and sarcolemmal membranes of mammalian skeletal muscle cells. The efficacy of perhydrohistrionicotoxin as an antagonist at the post-synaptic membrane is increased by the transient presence of acetylcholine in the endplate of innervated muscles and at extrajunctional receptors in denervated muscles. α-Bungarotoxin and [3H]monoacetyl-α-bungarotoxin block the endplate acetylcholine receptors, each binding to the same extent. The effect of bungarotoxin is partially reversible. These electrophysiological results, together with the effects of perhydrohistrionicotoxin and/or d-tubocurarine on the binding of [3H]monoacetyl-α-bungarotoxin at endplates of murine diaphragm muscle and on the bungarotoxin-elicited irreversible blockade of neuromuscular transmission, suggest that at least two types of sites participate in the synaptic excitation by acetylcholine. One site, competitively blocked by bungarotoxin and by curare, is presumably the acetylcholine receptor. Binding of bungarotoxin at this site is responsible for an irreversible blockade of neuromuscular transmission. The second site, competitively blocked by bungarotoxin and perhydrohistrionicotoxin, is proposed to be part of the cholinergic ion conductance modulator. Binding of bungarotoxin to this site does not result in an irreversible blockade. Images PMID:4351811

  19. Cultivar-specific gene modulation in Vitis vinifera: analysis of the promoters regulating the expression of WOX transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Boccacci, Paolo; Mela, Anita; Pavez Mina, Catalina; Chitarra, Walter; Perrone, Irene; Gribaudo, Ivana; Gambino, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    The family of Wuschel-related Homeobox (WOX) genes is a class of transcription factors involved in the early stages of embryogenesis and organ development in plants. Some of these genes have shown different transcription levels in embryogenic tissues and mature organs in two different cultivars of Vitis vinifera: ‘Chardonnay’ (CH) and ‘Cabernet Sauvignon’ (CS). Therefore, we investigated the genetic basis responsible for these differences by cloning and sequencing in both the cultivars the promoter regions (~2000 bp) proximal to the transcription start site of five VvWOX genes. We then introduced these promoters into Arabidopsis thaliana for expression pattern characterisation using the GUS reporter gene. In the transgenic Arabidopsis, two promoters isolated from CS (pVvWOX13C_CS and pVvWOX6_CS) induced increased expression compared to the sequence isolated in CH, confirming the data obtained in grapevine tissues. These results were corroborated by transient expression assays using the agroinfiltration approach in grapevine somatic embryos. Truncated versions of pVvWOX13C demonstrated that few nucleotide differences between the sequences isolated from CH and CS are pivotal for the transcriptional regulation of VvWOX13C. Analysis of promoters using heterologous and homologous systems appear to be effective for exploring gene modulation linked with intervarietal sequence variation in grapevine. PMID:28358354

  20. Current direction specificity of continuous θ-burst stimulation in modulating human motor cortex excitability when applied to somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Mark F; Zapallow, Christopher M; Tsang, Philemon; Lee, Kevin G H; Asmussen, Michael J; Nelson, Aimee J

    2012-11-14

    The present study examines the influence of primary somatosensory cortex (SI) on corticospinal excitability within primary motor cortex (M1) using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Two groups of subjects participated and both received continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over SI. One group received cTBS oriented to induce anterior-to-posterior (AP) followed by posterior-to-anterior (PA) current flow in the cortex and the other group received cTBS in the opposite direction (PA-AP). Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured from the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the left and right hand before and at three time points (5, 25, 45 min) following cTBS over left-hemisphere SI. CTBS over SI in the AP-PA direction increased contralateral MEPs at 5 and 45 min with a near significant increase at 25 min. In contrast, PA-AP cTBS decreased contralateral MEPs at 25 min. We conclude that cTBS over SI modulates neural output directed to the hand with effects that depend on the direction of induced current.

  1. Abrogation of donor T-cell IL-21 signaling leads to tissue-specific modulation of immunity and separation of GVHD from GVL

    PubMed Central

    Hanash, Alan M.; Kappel, Lucy W.; Yim, Nury L.; Nejat, Rebecca A.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Smith, Odette M.; Rao, Uttam K.; Dykstra, Lindsay; Na, Il-Kang; Holland, Amanda M.; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Liu, Chen; Murphy, George F.; Leonard, Warren J.; Heller, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    IL-21 is a proinflammatory cytokine produced by Th17 cells. Abrogation of IL-21 signaling has recently been shown to reduce GVHD while retaining graft-versus-leukemia/lymphoma (GVL) responses. However, the mechanisms by which IL-21 may lead to a separation of GVHD and GVL remain incompletely understood. In a murine MHC-mismatched BM transplantation model, we observed that IL-21 receptor knockout (IL-21R KO) donor T cells mediate decreased systemic and gastrointestinal GVHD in recipients of a transplant. This reduction in GVHD was associated with expansion of transplanted donor regulatory T cells and with tissue-specific modulation of Th-cell function. IL-21R KO and wild-type donor T cells showed equivalent alloactivation, but IL-21R KO T cells showed decreased infiltration and inflammatory cytokine production within the mesenteric lymph nodes. However, Th-cell cytokine production was maintained peripherally, and IL-21R KO T cells mediated equivalent immunity against A20 and P815 hematopoietic tumors. In summary, abrogation of IL-21 signaling in donor T cells leads to tissue-specific modulation of immunity, such that gastrointestinal GVHD is reduced, but peripheral T-cell function and GVL capacity are retained. IL-21 is thus an exciting target for therapeutic intervention and improvement of clinical transplantation outcomes. PMID:21596854

  2. Ion-Specific Modulation of Interfacial Interaction Potentials between Solid Substrates and Cell-Sized Particles Mediated via Zwitterionic, Super-Hydrophilic Poly(sulfobetaine) Brushes.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Yuji; Fröhlich, Benjamin; Yamamoto, Akihisa; Murakami, Ryo; Kaneko, Makoto; Takahara, Atsushi; Tanaka, Motomu

    2017-02-16

    Zwitterionic polymer brushes draw increasing attention not only because of their superhydrophilic, self-cleaning capability but also due to their excellent antifouling capacity. We investigated the ion-specific modulation of the interfacial interaction potential via densely packed, uniform poly(sulfobetaine) brushes. The vertical Brownian motion of a cell-sized latex particle was monitored by microinterferometry, yielding the effective interfacial interaction potentials V(Δh) and the autocorrelation function of height fluctuation. The potential curvature V″(Δh) exhibited a monotonic increase according to the increase in monovalent salt concentrations, implying the sharpening of the potential confinement. An opposite tendency was observed in CaCl2 solutions, suggesting that the ion specific modulation cannot be explained by the classical Hofmeister series. When the particle fluctuation was monitored in the presence of free sulfobetaine molecules, the increase in [sulfobetaine] resulted in a distinct increase in hydrodynamic friction. This was never observed in all the other salt solutions, suggesting the interference of zwitterionic pairing of sulfobetaine side chains by the intercalation of sulfobetaine molecules into the brush layer. Furthermore, poly(sulfobetaine) brushes exhibited a very low V″(Δh) and hydrodynamic friction to human erythrocytes, which seems to explain the excellent blood repellency of zwitterionic polymer materials.

  3. Cell-Specific Cholinergic Modulation of Excitability of Layer 5B Principal Neurons in Mouse Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ankur; Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Anderson, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    The neuromodulator acetylcholine (ACh) is crucial for several cognitive functions, such as perception, attention, and learning and memory. Whereas, in most cases, the cellular circuits or the specific neurons via which ACh exerts its cognitive effects remain unknown, it is known that auditory cortex (AC) neurons projecting from layer 5B (L5B) to the inferior colliculus, corticocollicular neurons, are required for cholinergic-mediated relearning of sound localization after occlusion of one ear. Therefore, elucidation of the effects of ACh on the excitability of corticocollicular neurons will bridge the cell-specific and cognitive properties of ACh. Because AC L5B contains another class of neurons that project to the contralateral cortex, corticocallosal neurons, to identify the cell-specific mechanisms that enable corticocollicular neurons to participate in sound localization relearning, we investigated the effects of ACh release on both L5B corticocallosal and corticocollicular neurons. Using in vitro electrophysiology and optogenetics in mouse brain slices, we found that ACh generated nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR)-mediated depolarizing potentials and muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR)-mediated hyperpolarizing potentials in AC L5B corticocallosal neurons. In corticocollicular neurons, ACh release also generated nAChR-mediated depolarizing potentials. However, in contrast to the mAChR-mediated hyperpolarizing potentials in corticocallosal neurons, ACh generated prolonged mAChR-mediated depolarizing potentials in corticocollicular neurons. These prolonged depolarizing potentials generated persistent firing in corticocollicular neurons, whereas corticocallosal neurons lacking mAChR-mediated depolarizing potentials did not show persistent firing. We propose that ACh-mediated persistent firing in corticocollicular neurons may represent a critical mechanism required for learning-induced plasticity in AC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Acetylcholine (ACh) is crucial for cognitive

  4. Religion and action control: Faith-specific modulation of the Simon effect but not Stop-Signal performance.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S; Scorolli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M

    2011-08-01

    Previous findings suggest that religion has a specific impact on attentional processes. Here we show that religion also affects action control. Experiment 1 compared Dutch Calvinists and Dutch atheists, matched for age, sex, intelligence, education, and cultural and socio-economic background, and Experiment 2 compared Italian Catholics with matched Italian seculars. As expected, Calvinists showed a smaller and Catholics a larger Simon effect than nonbelievers, while performance of the groups was comparable in the Stop-Signal task. This pattern suggests that religions emphasizing individualism or collectivism affects action control in specific ways, presumably by inducing chronic biases towards a more "exclusive" or "inclusive" style of decision-making. Interestingly, there was no evidence that religious practice affects inhibitory skills.

  5. Content Addressable Memory Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    The Content Addressable M1-emory Project consists of the development of several experimental software systems on an AMT Distributed Array Processor...searching (database) compiler algorithms memory management other systems software) Linear C is an unlovely hybrid language which imports the CAM...memory from AMT’s operating system for the DAP; how- ever, other than this limitation, the memory management routines work exactly as their C counterparts

  6. 16 CFR 0.2 - Official address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official address. 0.2 Section 0.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.2... 20580, unless otherwise specifically directed. The Commission's Web site address is www.ftc.gov....

  7. Modulation of Bacillus thuringiensis Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Phospholipase C Activity by Mutations in the Putative Dimerization Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X.; Shao, C; Zhang, X; Zambonelli, C; Redfield, A; Head, J; Seaton, B; Roberts, M

    2009-01-01

    Cleavage of phosphatidylinositol (PI) to inositol 1,2-(cyclic)-phosphate (cIP) and cIP hydrolysis to inositol 1-phosphate by Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C are activated by the enzyme binding to phosphatidylcholine (PC) surfaces. Part of this reflects improved binding of the protein to interfaces. However, crystallographic analysis of an interfacially impaired phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase (W47A/W242A) suggested protein dimerization might occur on the membrane. In the W47A/W242A dimer, four tyrosine residues from one monomer interact with the same tyrosine cluster of the other, forming a tight dimer interface close to the membrane binding regions. We have constructed mutant proteins in which two or more of these tyrosine residues have been replaced with serine. Phospholipid binding and enzymatic activity of these mutants have been examined to assess the importance of these residues to enzyme function. Replacing two tyrosines had small effects on enzyme activity. However, removal of three or four tyrosine residues weakened PC binding and reduced PI cleavage by the enzyme as well as PC activation of cIP hydrolysis. Crystal structures of Y247S/Y251S in the absence and presence of myo-inositol as well as Y246S/Y247S/Y248S/Y251S indicate that both mutant proteins crystallized as monomers, were very similar to one another, and had no change in the active site region. Kinetic assays, lipid binding, and structural results indicate that either (i) a specific PC binding site, critical for vesicle activities and cIP activation, has been impaired, or (ii) the reduced dimerization potential for Y246S/Y247S/Y248S and Y246S/Y247S/Y248S/Y251S is responsible for their reduced catalytic activity in all assay systems.

  8. Effects of miR-335-5p in modulating osteogenic differentiation by specifically downregulating Wnt antagonist DKK1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Tu, Qisheng; Bonewald, Lynda F; He, Xi; Stein, Gary; Lian, Jane; Chen, Jake

    2011-08-01

    Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1) is essential to maintain skeletal homeostasis as an inhibitor of Wnt signaling and osteogenic differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the developmental stage-specific regulation of the DKK1 protein level. We performed a series of studies including luciferase reporter assays, micro-RNA microarray, site-specific mutations, and gain- and loss-of-function analyses. We found that the DKK1 protein level was regulated via DKK1 3' UTR by miRNA control, which was restricted to osteoblast-lineage cells. As a result of decreased DKK1 protein level by miR-335-5p, Wnt signaling was enhanced, as indicated by elevated GSK-3β phosphorylation and increased β-catenin transcriptional activity. The effects of miR-335-5p were reversed by anti-miR-335-5p treatment, which downregulated endogenous miR-335-5p. In vivo studies showed high expression levels of miR-335-5p in osteoblasts and hypertrophic chondrocytes of mouse embryos, indicating a pivotal role of miR-335-5p in regulating bone development. In conclusion, miR-335-5p activates Wnt signaling and promotes osteogenic differentiation by downregulating DKK1. This cell- and development-specific regulation is essential and mandatory for the initiation and progression of osteogenic differentiation. miR-335-5p proves to be a potential and useful targeting molecule for promoting bone formation and regeneration.

  9. Axonal motility and its modulation by activity are branch-type specific in the intact adult cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Fukaya, Masahiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Linden, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We performed two-photon in vivo imaging of cerebellar climbing fibers (CFs; the terminal arbor of olivocerebellar axons) in adult mice. CF ascending branches innervate Purkinje cells while CF transverse branches show a near complete failure to form conventional synapses. Time-lapse imaging over hours or days revealed that ascending branches were very stable. However, transverse branches were highly dynamic, exhibiting rapid elongation and retraction and varicosity turnover. Thus, different branches of the same axon, with different innervation patterns, display branch type-specific motility in the adult cerebellum. Furthermore, dynamic changes in transverse branch length were almost completely suppressed by pharmacological stimulation of olivary firing. PMID:17988631

  10. Evidence for stage-specific modulation of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and miRNA processing components in zygotic embryo and female gametophyte of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    PubMed

    Oh, Thomas J; Wartell, Roger M; Cairney, John; Pullman, Gerald S

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to regulate plant development, but have not been studied in gymnosperm seed tissues. The presence and characteristics of several miRNAs were examined in zygotic embryos (ZEs) and female gametophytes (FGs) of Pinus taeda (loblolly pine). Evidence for miRNAs was obtained using northern analyses and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) mediated with poly(A) polymerase. Partial sequences of two miRNAs were verified. Three regions of putative mRNA targets were analyzed by qRT-PCR to monitor the occurrence of stage-dependent miRNA-mediated cleavage. Five miRNAs were identified in ZEs and FGs along with partial sequences of Pta-miR166 and Pta-miR167. Both miRNAs showed differing degrees of tissue-specific and stage-specific modulation. Analysis of HB15L mRNA (a potential Pta-miR166 target) suggested miRNA-guided cleavage in ZEs and FGs. Analysis of ARF8L mRNA (a potential Pta-miR167 target) implied cleavage in ZEs but not in FGs. Argonaute9-like mRNA (ptAGO9L) showed stage-specific modulation of expression in ZEs that appeared to be inverted in the corresponding FGs. MicroRNAs and argonaute genes varied spatiotemporally during seed development. The peak levels of Pta-miR166 in FGs and ptAGO9L in embryos occurred at stage 9.1, a critical transition point during embryo development and a point where somatic embryo maturation often stops. MicroRNAs identified in FG tissue may play a role in embryogenesis.

  11. [Specific modulation of neuronal responses to light of different intensities by sound in the rabbit's primary visual cortex].

    PubMed

    Polianskiĭ, V B; Alymkulov, D É; Evtikhin, D V; Chernyshev, B V

    2012-01-01

    Changes in activity of 92 neurons in the primary visual cortex of four rabbits (Orictolagus cuniculus) were analyzed. In the first series of experiments, we recorded discharges of 63 neurons in response to replacement of visual stimuli in pairs (pairs of 0.28 - 1, 1 - 3, 3 - 6, 6 - 8.5, 8.5 - 14, 14 - 17, 17 - 20 cd/m2). Then the same stimuli were presented simultaneously with sound (70 dB, 2000 Hz, 40 ms). Neurons did not respond directly to the sound. Two groups of neurons were found. In the first group of neurons (31%), responses to the complex "light and sound" (40-100 ms from the moment of substitution of stimuli) increased on average by 41% (p < 0.0001) under conditions of the lowest stimuli intensities. With increasing light intensities, discharges to the complex were reduced to the background level of responses to light and even lower. The second group of neurons (19%) showed the opposite properties: at low intensities, responses to the complex were comparable to responses to light (or even lower). At high intensities (14-20 cd/m2), discharges to the complex were significantly (p < 0.05) different from the responses to light (20% and higher, up to 39%). In the second series of experiments, we reconstructed vector sensory spaces on the basis of responses of 29 neurons to light of different intensities and eight complexes of "light and sound." It was found that the sound had also a dual effect on the sensory space of complexes. Some neurons showed an enhancement of the angular distance between the two lowest light intensities (0.28 and 1 cd/m2). Other neurons showed an increase in the angular distance between the highest intensities. Such changes in the space structure are consistent with the groups of neurons revealed in the first two series of the experiments. Comparison of the dynamics of neuronal responses and the amplitudes of evoked potentials under the same conditions of stimulation revealed their considerable similarity. Thus, modulation of neuronal

  12. Modulation of mycobacterial-specific Th1 and Th17 cells in latent tuberculosis by coincident hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumaran, Paramasivam Paul; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2013-05-15

    Hookworm infections and tuberculosis (TB) are coendemic in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that infection with helminth parasites could suppress the predominant Th1 (IFN-γ-mediated) response needed to control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and enhance susceptibility to infection and/or disease. To determine the role of coincident hookworm infection on responses at steady-state and on M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses in latent TB (LTB), we examined the cellular responses in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant hookworm infection. By analyzing the expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 subsets of CD4(+) T cells, we were able to demonstrate that the presence of coincident hookworm infection significantly diminished both spontaneously expressed and M. tuberculosis-specific mono- and dual-functional Th1 and Th17 cells. Hookworm infection, in contrast, was associated with expanded frequencies of mono- and dual-functional Th2 cells at both steady-state and upon Ag stimulation. This differential induction of CD4(+) T cell subsets was abrogated upon mitogen stimulation. Additionally, coincident hookworm infection was associated with increased adaptive T regulatory cells but not natural regulatory T cells in LTB. Finally, the CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression pattern was also associated with alterations in the systemic levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Thus, coincident hookworm infection exerts a profound inhibitory effect on protective Th1 and Th17 responses in LTB and may predispose toward the development of active tuberculosis in humans.

  13. Some cross-linguistic evidence for modulation of implicational universals by language-specific frequency effects in phonological development

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jan; Beckman, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    While broad-focus comparisons of consonant inventories across children acquiring different language can suggest that phonological development follows a universal sequence, finer-grained statistical comparisons can reveal systematic differences. This cross-linguistic study of word-initial lingual obstruents examined some effects of language-specific frequencies on consonant mastery. Repetitions of real words were elicited from 2- and 3-year-old children who were monolingual speakers of English, Cantonese, Greek, or Japanese. The repetitions were recorded and transcribed by an adult native speaker for each language. Results found support for both language-universal effects in phonological acquisition and for language-specific influences related to phoneme and phoneme sequence frequency. These results suggest that acquisition patterns that are common across languages arise in two ways. One influence is direct, via the universal constraints imposed by the physiology and physics of speech production and perception, and how these predict which contrasts will be easy and which will be difficult for the child to learn to control. The other influence is indirect, via the way universal principles of ease of perception and production tend to influence the lexicons of many languages through commonly attested sound changes. PMID:19890438

  14. Progress and prospects of engineered sequence-specific DNA modulating technologies for the management of liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Samantha A; Moyo, Buhle; Arbuthnot, Patrick B

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. The hepatic illnesses, which include inherited metabolic disorders, hemophilias and viral hepatitides, are complex and currently difficult to treat. The maturation of gene therapy has heralded new avenues for developing effective intervention for these diseases. DNA modification using gene therapy is now possible and available technology may be exploited to achieve long term therapeutic benefit. The ability to edit DNA sequences specifically is of paramount importance to advance gene therapy for application to liver diseases. Recent development of technologies that allow for this has resulted in rapid advancement of gene therapy to treat several chronic illnesses. Improvements in application of derivatives of zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), homing endonucleases (HEs) and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated (Cas) systems have been particularly important. These sequence-specific technologies may be used to modify genes permanently and also to alter gene transcription for therapeutic purposes. This review describes progress in development of ZFPs, TALEs, HEs and CRISPR/Cas for application to treating liver diseases. PMID:25937863

  15. An amphipathic sequence in the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 Env alters cell tropism and modulates viral receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Vzorov, A N; Yang, C; Compans, R W

    2015-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 92UG046 Env protein, obtained from a CD4-independent HIV-1 primary isolate (Zerhouni et al., 2004), has the ability to initiate an infection in HeLa cells expressing CD4 when carrying the full-length (FL) Env, but uses CD8 molecules for receptor-mediated entry when carrying a truncated Env (CT84). To determine whether a specific length or structure in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) is responsible for this alteration of tropism, we compared a series of Env constructs with different CT truncations and the presence or absence of an amphipathic alpha- helical sequence. We found that truncated constructs containing the alpha-helical LLP-2 structure in their CT domains conferred a switch from CD4 to CD8 tropism. The results support the conclusion that the structure of the CT domain can play an important role in determining receptor specificity.

  16. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity. PMID:27698654

  17. FGF13 modulates the gating properties of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 in an isoform-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Zhihua; Sinden, Daniel S; Wang, Xiangchong; Shan, Bin; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Hailin; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Wang, Chuan

    2016-09-02

    FGF13 (FHF2), the major fibroblast growth factor homologous factor (FHF) in rodent heart, directly binds to the C-terminus of the main cardiac sodium channel, NaV1.5. Knockdown of FGF13 in cardiomyocytes induces slowed ventricular conduction by altering NaV1.5 function. FGF13 has five splice variants, each of which possess the same core region and C terminus but differing in their respective N termini. Whether and how these alternatively spliced N termini impart isoform-specific regulation of NaV1.5, however, has not been reported. Here, we exploited a heterologous expression to explore the specific modulatory effects of FGF13 splice variants FGF13S, FGF13U and FGF13YV on NaV1.5 function. We found these three splice variants differentially modulated NaV1.5 current density. Although steady-state activation was unaltered by any of the FGF13 isoforms (compared to control cells expressing Nav1.5 but not expressing FGF13), open-state fast inactivation and closed-state fast inactivation were markedly slowed, steady-state availability was significantly shifted toward the depolarizing direction, and the window current was increased by each of FGF13 isoforms. Most strikingly, FGF13S hastened the rate of NaV1.5 entry into the slow inactivation state and induced a dramatic slowing of recovery from inactivation, which caused a large decrease in current after either low or high frequency stimulation. Overall, these data showed the diversity of the roles of the FGF13 N-termini in NaV1.5 channel modulation and suggested the importance of isoform-specific regulation.

  18. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  19. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  20. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  1. Controlling the specificity of modularly assembled small molecules for RNA via ligand module spacing: targeting the RNAs that cause myotonic muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Melissa M; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Pushechnikov, Alexei; French, Jonathan M; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2009-12-02

    tetramer also bind approximately 13- and approximately 63-fold more tightly to DM1 RNAs than does MBNL1. The modularly assembled compounds are cell permeable and nontoxic as determined by flow cytometry. The results establish that for these two systems: (i) a programmable modular assembly approach can provide synthetic ligands for RNA with affinities and specificities that exceed those of natural proteins; and, (ii) the spacing of ligand modules can be used to tune specificity for one RNA target over another.

  2. Early-life nutrition modulates the epigenetic state of specific rDNA genetic variants in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, Michelle L; Lowe, Robert; Caton, Paul W; Gemma, Carolina; Carbajosa, Guillermo; Danson, Amy F; Carpenter, Asha A M; Loche, Elena; Ozanne, Susan E; Rakyan, Vardhman K

    2016-07-29

    A suboptimal early-life environment, due to poor nutrition or stress during pregnancy, can influence lifelong phenotypes in the progeny. Epigenetic factors are thought to be key mediators of these effects. We show that protein restriction in mice from conception until weaning induces a linear correlation between growth restriction and DNA methylation at ribosomal DNA (rDNA). This epigenetic response remains into adulthood and is restricted to rDNA copies associated with a specific genetic variant within the promoter. Related effects are also found in models of maternal high-fat or obesogenic diets. Our work identifies environmentally induced epigenetic dynamics that are dependent on underlying genetic variation and establishes rDNA as a genomic target of nutritional insults.

  3. Specific maltose derivatives modulate the swarming motility of nonswarming mutant and inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Shetye, Gauri S; Singh, Nischal; Jia, Changqing; Nguyen, Chan D K; Wang, Guirong; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2014-07-07

    We have demonstrated that specific synthetic maltose derivatives activate the swarming motility of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nonswarming mutant (rhlA) at low concentration, but inhibit it at high concentration. Although these molecules are not microbicidal, active maltose derivatives with bulky hydrocarbon groups inhibited bacterial adhesion, and exhibited biofilm inhibition and dispersion (IC50 ~20 μM and DC50 ~30 μM, respectively). Because the swarming motility of the rhlA mutant is abolished by the lack natural rhamnolipids, the swarming activation suggests that maltose derivatives are analogues of rhamnolipids. Together, these results suggest a new approach of controlling multiple bacterial activities (bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, and swarming motility) by a set of disaccharide-based molecules.

  4. Modulation of cellular S1P levels with a novel, potent and specific inhibitor of sphingosine kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Schnute, Mark E; McReynolds, Matthew D; Kasten, Tom; Yates, Matthew; Jerome, Gina; Rains, John W; Hall, Troii; Chrencik, Jill; Kraus, Michelle; Cronin, Ciaran N; Saabye, Matthew; Highkin, Maureen K; Broadus, Richard; Ogawa, Shinji; Cukyne, Kristin; Zawadzke, Laura E; Peterkin, Vincent; Iyanar, Kaliapan; Scholten, Jeffrey A; Wendling, Jay; Fujiwara, Hideji; Nemirovskiy, Olga; Wittwer, Arthur J; Nagiec, Marek M

    2012-05-15

    SphK (sphingosine kinase) is the major source of the bioactive lipid and GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor) agonist S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate). S1P promotes cell growth, survival and migration, and is a key regulator of lymphocyte trafficking. Inhibition of S1P signalling has been proposed as a strategy for treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer. In the present paper we describe the discovery and characterization of PF-543, a novel cell-permeant inhibitor of SphK1. PF-543 inhibits SphK1 with a K(i) of 3.6 nM, is sphingosine-competitive and is more than 100-fold selective for SphK1 over the SphK2 isoform. In 1483 head and neck carcinoma cells, which are characterized by high levels of SphK1 expression and an unusually high rate of S1P production, PF-543 decreased the level of endogenous S1P 10-fold with a proportional increase in the level of sphingosine. In contrast with past reports that show that the growth of many cancer cell lines is SphK1-dependent, specific inhibition of SphK1 had no effect on the proliferation and survival of 1483 cells, despite a dramatic change in the cellular S1P/sphingosine ratio. PF-543 was effective as a potent inhibitor of S1P formation in whole blood, indicating that the SphK1 isoform of sphingosine kinase is the major source of S1P in human blood. PF-543 is the most potent inhibitor of SphK1 described to date and it will be useful for dissecting specific roles of SphK1-driven S1P signalling.

  5. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), “Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities—Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015”, we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  6. The cortical modulation of stimulus-specific adaptation in the auditory midbrain and thalamus: a potential neuronal correlate for predictive coding

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, Manuel S.; Anderson, Lucy A.; Antunes, Flora M.

    2015-01-01

    To follow an ever-changing auditory scene, the auditory brain is continuously creating a representation of the past to form expectations about the future. Unexpected events will produce an error in the predictions that should “trigger” the network’s response. Indeed, neurons in the auditory midbrain, thalamus and cortex, respond to rarely occurring sounds while adapting to frequently repeated ones, i.e., they exhibit stimulus specific adaptation (SSA). SSA cannot be explained solely by intrinsic membrane properties, but likely involves the participation of the network. Thus, SSA is envisaged as a high order form of adaptation that requires the influence of cortical areas. However, present research supports the hypothesis that SSA, at least in its simplest form (i.e., to frequency deviants), can be transmitted in a bottom-up manner through the auditory pathway. Here, we briefly review the underlying neuroanatomy of the corticofugal projections before discussing state of the art studies which demonstrate that SSA present in the medial geniculate body (MGB) and inferior colliculus (IC) is not inherited from the cortex but can be modulated by the cortex via the corticofugal pathways. By modulating the gain of neurons in the thalamus and midbrain, the auditory cortex (AC) would refine SSA subcortically, preventing irrelevant information from reaching the cortex. PMID:25805974

  7. Antigen-Specific Immune Modulation Targets mTORC1 Function To Drive Chemokine Receptor-Mediated T Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weirong; Wan, Xiaoxiao; Ukah, Tobechukwu K; Miller, Mindy M; Barik, Subhasis; Cattin-Roy, Alexis N; Zaghouani, Habib

    2016-11-01

    To contain autoimmunity, pathogenic T cells must be eliminated or diverted from reaching the target organ. Recently, we defined a novel form of T cell tolerance whereby treatment with Ag downregulates expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and prevents diabetogenic Th1 cells from reaching the pancreas, leading to suppression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). This report defines the signaling events underlying Ag-induced chemokine receptor-mediated tolerance. Specifically, we show that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major target for induction of CXCR3 downregulation and crippling of Th1 cells. Indeed, Ag administration induces upregulation of programmed death-ligand 1 on dendritic cells in a T cell-dependent manner. In return, programmed death-ligand 1 interacts with the constitutively expressed programmed death-1 on the target T cells and stimulates docking of Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 phosphatase to the cytoplasmic tail of programmed death-1. Active Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 impairs the signaling function of the PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway, leading to functional defect of mTORC1, downregulation of CXCR3 expression, and suppression of T1D. Thus, mTORC1 component of the metabolic pathway serves as a target for chemokine receptor-mediated T cell tolerance and suppression of T1D.

  8. Modulation of p47PHOX activity by site-specific phosphorylation: Akt-dependent activation of the NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Hoyal, Carolyn R.; Gutierrez, Abel; Young, Brandon M.; Catz, Sergio D.; Lin, Jun-Hsiang; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Babior, Bernard M.

    2003-01-01

    The leukocyte NADPH oxidase catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to O\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{2}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} at the expense of NADPH. Extensive phosphorylation of the oxidase subunit p47PHOX occurs during the activation of the enzyme in intact cells. p47PHOX carrying certain serine-to-alanine mutations fails to support NADPH oxidase activity in intact cells, suggesting that the phosphorylation of specific serines on p47PHOX is required for the activation of the oxidase. Earlier studies with both intact cells and a kinase-dependent, cell-free system have suggested that protein kinase C can phosphorylate those serines of p47PHOX whose phosphorylation is necessary for its activity. Work with inhibitors suggested that a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathway also can activate the oxidase. Phosphorylation of p47PHOX by Akt (protein kinase B), whose activation depends on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, could be the final step in such a pathway. We now find that Akt activates the oxidase in vitro by phosphorylating serines S304 and S328 of p47PHOX. These results suggest that Akt could participate in the activation of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase. PMID:12704229

  9. GALNT14 promotes lung-specific breast cancer metastasis by modulating self-renewal and interaction with the lung microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ki-Hoon; Park, Mi So; Nandu, Tulip S.; Gadad, Shrikanth; Kim, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    Some polypeptide N-acetyl-galactosaminyltransferases (GALNTs) are associated with cancer, but their function in organ-specific metastasis remains unclear. Here, we report that GALNT14 promotes breast cancer metastasis to the lung by enhancing the initiation of metastatic colonies as well as their subsequent growth into overt metastases. Our results suggest that GALNT14 augments the self-renewal properties of breast cancer cells (BCCs). Furthermore, GALNT14 overcomes the inhibitory effect of lung-derived bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) on self-renewal and therefore facilitates metastasis initiation within the lung microenvironment. In addition, GALNT14 supports continuous growth of BCCs in the lung by not only inducing macrophage infiltration but also exploiting macrophage-derived fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). Finally, we identify KRAS-PI3K-c-JUN signalling as an upstream pathway that accounts for the elevated expression of GALNT14 in lung-metastatic BCCs. Collectively, our findings uncover an unprecedented role for GALNT14 in the pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:27982029

  10. Depth-specific fluctuations of gene expression and protein abundance modulate the photophysiology in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procaccini, Gabriele; Ruocco, Miriam; Marín-Guirao, Lázaro; Dattolo, Emanuela; Brunet, Christophe; D’Esposito, Daniela; Lauritano, Chiara; Mazzuca, Silvia; Serra, Ilia Anna; Bernardo, Letizia; Piro, Amalia; Beer, Sven; Björk, Mats; Gullström, Martin; Buapet, Pimchanok; Rasmusson, Lina M.; Felisberto, Paulo; Gobert, Sylvie; Runcie, John W.; Silva, João; Olivé, Irene; Costa, Monya M.; Barrote, Isabel; Santos, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Here we present the results of a multiple organizational level analysis conceived to identify acclimative/adaptive strategies exhibited by the seagrass Posidonia oceanica to the daily fluctuations in the light environment, at contrasting depths. We assessed changes in photophysiological parameters, leaf respiration, pigments, and protein and mRNA expression levels. The results show that the diel oscillations of P. oceanica photophysiological and respiratory responses were related to transcripts and proteins expression of the genes involved in those processes and that there was a response asynchrony between shallow and deep plants probably caused by the strong differences in the light environment. The photochemical pathway of energy use was more effective in shallow plants due to higher light availability, but these plants needed more investment in photoprotection and photorepair, requiring higher translation and protein synthesis than deep plants. The genetic differentiation between deep and shallow stands suggests the existence of locally adapted genotypes to contrasting light environments. The depth-specific diel rhythms of photosynthetic and respiratory processes, from molecular to physiological levels, must be considered in the management and conservation of these key coastal ecosystems.

  11. Depth-specific fluctuations of gene expression and protein abundance modulate the photophysiology in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica

    PubMed Central

    Procaccini, Gabriele; Ruocco, Miriam; Marín-Guirao, Lázaro; Dattolo, Emanuela; Brunet, Christophe; D’Esposito, Daniela; Lauritano, Chiara; Mazzuca, Silvia; Serra, Ilia Anna; Bernardo, Letizia; Piro, Amalia; Beer, Sven; Björk, Mats; Gullström, Martin; Buapet, Pimchanok; Rasmusson, Lina M.; Felisberto, Paulo; Gobert, Sylvie; Runcie, John W.; Silva, João; Olivé, Irene; Costa, Monya M.; Barrote, Isabel; Santos, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Here we present the results of a multiple organizational level analysis conceived to identify acclimative/adaptive strategies exhibited by the seagrass Posidonia oceanica to the daily fluctuations in the light environment, at contrasting depths. We assessed changes in photophysiological parameters, leaf respiration, pigments, and protein and mRNA expression levels. The results show that the diel oscillations of P. oceanica photophysiological and respiratory responses were related to transcripts and proteins expression of the genes involved in those processes and that there was a response asynchrony between shallow and deep plants probably caused by the strong differences in the light environment. The photochemical pathway of energy use was more effective in shallow plants due to higher light availability, but these plants needed more investment in photoprotection and photorepair, requiring higher translation and protein synthesis than deep plants. The genetic differentiation between deep and shallow stands suggests the existence of locally adapted genotypes to contrasting light environments. The depth-specific diel rhythms of photosynthetic and respiratory processes, from molecular to physiological levels, must be considered in the management and conservation of these key coastal ecosystems. PMID:28211527

  12. Reverse engineering a mouse embryonic stem cell-specific transcriptional network reveals a new modulator of neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    De Cegli, Rossella; Iacobacci, Simona; Flore, Gemma; Gambardella, Gennaro; Mao, Lei; Cutillo, Luisa; Lauria, Mario; Klose, Joachim; Illingworth, Elizabeth; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles can be used to infer previously unknown transcriptional regulatory interaction among thousands of genes, via systems biology 'reverse engineering' approaches. We 'reverse engineered' an embryonic stem (ES)-specific transcriptional network from 171 gene expression profiles, measured in ES cells, to identify master regulators of gene expression ('hubs'). We discovered that E130012A19Rik (E13), highly expressed in mouse ES cells as compared with differentiated cells, was a central 'hub' of the network. We demonstrated that E13 is a protein-coding gene implicated in regulating the commitment towards the different neuronal subtypes and glia cells. The overexpression and knock-down of E13 in ES cell lines, undergoing differentiation into neurons and glia cells, caused a strong up-regulation of the glutamatergic neurons marker Vglut2 and a strong down-regulation of the GABAergic neurons marker GAD65 and of the radial glia marker Blbp. We confirmed E13 expression in the cerebral cortex of adult mice and during development. By immuno-based affinity purification, we characterized protein partners of E13, involved in the Polycomb complex. Our results suggest a role of E13 in regulating the division between glutamatergic projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons and glia cells possibly by epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  13. Antigen-specific modulation of experimental myasthenia gravis: nasal tolerization with recombinant fragments of the human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit.

    PubMed

    Barchan, D; Souroujon, M C; Im, S H; Antozzi, C; Fuchs, S

    1999-07-06

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is the major autoantigen. The immune response in these diseases is heterogeneous and is directed to a wide variety of T and B cell epitopes of AcChoR. Candidate molecules for specific immunotherapy of MG should, therefore, have a broad specificity. We used recombinant fragments of the human AcChoR, encompassing the extracellular domain of the alpha-subunit, or shorter fragments derived from it, in experiments to modulate EAMG. We have demonstrated that intranasal administration of these recombinant fragments, which represent a major portion of epitopes involved in MG, prevents the induction of EAMG in rats and immunosuppresses an ongoing disease, as assessed by clinical symptoms, weight loss, and muscle AcChoR content. These effects on EAMG were accompanied by a marked reduction in the proliferative T-cell response and IL-2 production in response to AcChoR, in reduced anti-self AcChoR antibody titers and in an isotype switch of AcChoR-specific antibodies, from IgG2 to IgG1. We conclude that nasal tolerance induced by appropriate recombinant fragments of human AcChoR is effective in suppressing EAMG and might possibly be considered as a therapeutic modality for MG.

  14. Antigen-specific modulation of experimental myasthenia gravis: Nasal tolerization with recombinant fragments of the human acetylcholine receptor α-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Barchan, Dora; Souroujon, Miriam C.; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Antozzi, Carlo; Fuchs, Sara

    1999-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is the major autoantigen. The immune response in these diseases is heterogeneous and is directed to a wide variety of T and B cell epitopes of AcChoR. Candidate molecules for specific immunotherapy of MG should, therefore, have a broad specificity. We used recombinant fragments of the human AcChoR, encompassing the extracellular domain of the α-subunit, or shorter fragments derived from it, in experiments to modulate EAMG. We have demonstrated that intranasal administration of these recombinant fragments, which represent a major portion of epitopes involved in MG, prevents the induction of EAMG in rats and immunosuppresses an ongoing disease, as assessed by clinical symptoms, weight loss, and muscle AcChoR content. These effects on EAMG were accompanied by a marked reduction in the proliferative T-cell response and IL-2 production in response to AcChoR, in reduced anti-self AcChoR antibody titers and in an isotype switch of AcChoR-specific antibodies, from IgG2 to IgG1. We conclude that nasal tolerance induced by appropriate recombinant fragments of human AcChoR is effective in suppressing EAMG and might possibly be considered as a therapeutic modality for MG. PMID:10393952

  15. Supramodal Theta, Gamma, and Sustained Fields Predict Modality-specific Modulations of Alpha and Beta Oscillations during Visual and Tactile Working Memory.

    PubMed

    van Ede, Freek; Jensen, Ole; Maris, Eric

    2017-03-30

    Flexible control over currently relevant sensory representations is an essential feature of primate cognition. We investigated the neurophysiological bases of such flexible control in humans during an intermodal working memory task in which participants retained visual or tactile sequences. Using magnetoencephalography, we first show that working memory retention engages early visual and somatosensory areas, as reflected in the sustained load-dependent suppression of alpha and beta oscillations. Next, we identify three components that are also load dependent but modality independent: medial prefrontal theta synchronization, frontoparietal gamma synchronization, and sustained parietal event-related fields. Critically, these domain-general components predict (across trials and within load conditions) the modality-specific suppression of alpha and beta oscillations, with largely unique contributions per component. Thus, working memory engages multiple complementary frontoparietal components that have discernible neuronal dynamics and that flexibly modulate retention-related activity in sensory areas in a manner that tracks the current contents of working memory.

  16. Antiobesity efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide is associated with peripheral tissue-specific modulation of lipid metabolic regulators.

    PubMed

    Decara, Juan; Arrabal, Sergio; Beiroa, Daniel; Rivera, Patricia; Vargas, Antonio; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Ballesteros, Joan; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-11-12

    To investigate the role of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in peripheral lipid metabolism. Both lean and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity (DIO) rats were used to compare the peripheral effects of the subcutaneous and repeated administration of the GLP-1R agonist liraglutide on the expression of key regulators involved in lipid metabolism, β-oxidation and thermogenesis in liver, abdominal muscle, and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). We observed that liraglutide reduced caloric intake, body weight, and plasma levels of triglycerides and VLDL in a diet-independent manner. However, changes in liver fat content and the expression of lipid metabolism regulators were produced in a diet and tissue-dependent manner. In lean rats, liraglutide increased the gene/protein expression of elements involved in lipogenesis (ChREBP, Acaca/ACC, Fasn/FAS, Scd1/SCD1, PPARα/γ), β-oxidation (CPT1b), and thermogenesis (Cox4i1, Ucp1/UCP1) in eWAT and muscle, which suggest an increase in fatty-acid flux and utilization to activate energy expenditure. Regarding DIO rats, the specific reduction of liver lipid content by liraglutide was associated with a decreased expression of main elements involved in lipogenesis (phospho-ACC), peroxisomal β-oxidation (ACOX1), and lipid flux/storage (Pparγ/PPARγ) in liver, which suggest a recovery of lipid homeostasis. Interestingly, the muscle of DIO rats treated with liraglutide showed a decreased expression of PPARγ and the thermogenic factor UCP1. These results help us to better understand the peripheral mechanisms regulating lipid metabolism that underlay the effectiveness of GLP-1 analogues for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):600-611, 2016.

  17. Early Expression of Pregnancy-Specific Glycoprotein 22 (PSG22) by Trophoblast Cells Modulates Angiogenesis in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Sandra M.; Tirado-González, Irene; Wu, Julie; Barrientos, Gabriela; Johnson, Briana; Warren, James; Freitag, Nancy; Klapp, Burghard F.; Irmak, Ster; Ergun, Suleyman; Dveskler, Gabriela S.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mouse and human pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSG) are known to exert immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy by inducing maternal leukocytes to secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines that promote a tolerogenic decidual microenvironment. Many such anti-inflammatory mediators also function as proangiogenic factors, which, along with the reported association of murine PSG with the uterine vasculature, suggest that PSG may contribute to the vascular adaptations necessary for successful implantation and placental development. We observed that PSG22 is strongly expressed around the embryonic crypt on Gestation Day 5.5, indicating that trophoblast giant cells are the main source of PSG22 during the early stages of pregnancy. PSG22 treatment up-regulated the secretion of transforming growth factor beta 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in murine macrophages, uterine dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. A possible role of PSGs in uteroplacental angiogenesis is further supported by the finding that incubation of endothelial cells with PSG22 resulted in the formation of tubes in the presence and absence of VEGFA. We determined that PSG22, like human PSG1 and murine PSG17 and PSG23, binds to the heparan sulfate chains in syndecans. Therefore, our findings indicate that despite the independent evolution and expansion of human and rodent PSG, members in both families have conserved functions that include their ability to induce anti-inflammatory cytokines and proangiogenic factors as well as to induce the formation of capillary structures by endothelial cells. In summary, our results indicate that PSG22, the most abundant PSG expressed during mouse early pregnancy, is likely a major contributor to the establishment of a successful pregnancy. PMID:22423048

  18. D1 and D2 specific dopamine antagonist modulate the caudate nucleus neuronal responses to chronic methylphenidate exposure.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sidish; Claussen, Catherine; Dafny, Nachum

    2017-02-01

    The psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD), is the first line treatment as a pharmacotherapy to treat behavioral disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). MPD is commonly misused in non-ADHD (normal) youth and young adults both as a recreational drug and for cognitive enhancing effects to improve their grades. MPD is known to act on the reward circuit; including the caudate nucleus (CN). The CN is comprised of medium spiny neurons containing largely dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors. It has been widely shown that the DA system plays an important role in the response to MPD exposure. We investigated the role of both D1 and D2 DA receptors in the CN response to chronic MPD administration using specific D1 and D2 DA antagonist. Four groups of young adult, male SD rats were used: a saline (control) and three MPD dose groups (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0 mg/kg). The experiment lasted 11 consecutive days. Each MPD dose group was randomly divided into two subgroups to receive either a 0.4 mg/kg SCH-23390 selective D1 DA antagonist or a 0.3 mg/kg raclopride selective D2 DA antagonist prior to their final (repetitive) MPD rechallenge administration. It was observed that selective D1 DA antagonist (SCH-23390) given 30 min prior to the last MPD exposure at ED11 partially reduced or prevented the effect induced by MPD exposure in CN neuronal firing rates across all MPD doses. Selective D2 DA antagonist (raclopride) resulted in less obvious trends; some CN neuronal firing rates exhibited a slight increase in all MPD doses.

  19. Muscle-Pair Specific Distribution and Grip-Type Modulation of Neural Common Input to Extrinsic Digit Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Winges, Sara A.; Johnston, Jamie A.; Santello, Marco

    2007-01-01

    To gain insight into the synergistic control of hand muscles, we have recently quantified the strength of correlated neural activity across motor units from extrinsic digit flexors during a five-digit object-hold task. We found stronger synchrony and coherence across motor units from thumb and index finger flexor muscle compartment than between the thumb flexor and other finger flexor muscle compartments. The present study of two-digit object hold was designed to determine the extent to which such distribution of common input among thumb-finger flexor muscle compartments, revealed by holding an object with five digits, is preserved when varying the functional role of a given digit pair. We recorded normal force exerted by the digits and electrical activity of single motor units from muscle flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and two compartments of the m. flexor digitorum profundus (FDP2 and FDP3; index and middle finger, respectively). Consistent with our previous results from five-digit grasping, synchrony and coherence across motor units from FPL-FDP2 was significantly stronger than in FPL-FDP3 during object hold with two digits [common input strength: 0.49 ± 0.02 and 0.35 ± 0.02 (means ± SE), respectively; peak coherence: 0.0054 and 0.0038, respectively]. This suggests that the distribution of common neural input is muscle-pair specific regardless of grip type. However, the strength of coherence, but not synchrony, was significantly stronger in two- versus five-digit object hold for both muscle combinations, suggesting the periodicity of common input is sensitive to grip type. PMID:16723414

  20. Methylation-independent DNA Binding Modulates Specificity of Repressor of Silencing 1 (ROS1) and Facilitates Demethylation in Long Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ponferrada-Marín, María Isabel; Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Morales-Ruiz, Teresa; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R.

    2010-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation is an epigenetic mark that promotes gene silencing and performs critical roles during reproduction and development in both plants and animals. The genomic distribution of DNA methylation is the dynamic outcome of opposing methylation and demethylation processes. In plants, active demethylation occurs through a base excision repair pathway initiated by 5-methycytosine (5-meC) DNA glycosylases of the REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1)/DEMETER (DME) family. To gain insight into the mechanism by which Arabidopsis ROS1 recognizes and excises 5-meC, we have identified those protein regions that are required for efficient DNA binding and catalysis. We have found that a short N-terminal lysine-rich domain conserved in members of the ROS1/DME family mediates strong methylation-independent binding of ROS1 to DNA and is required for efficient activity on 5-meC·G, but not for T·G processing. Removal of this domain does not significantly affect 5-meC excision from short molecules, but strongly decreases ROS1 activity on long DNA substrates. This region is not required for product binding and is not involved in the distributive behavior of the enzyme on substrates containing multiple 5-meC residues. Altogether, our results suggest that methylation-independent DNA binding allows ROS1 to perform a highly redundant search for efficient excision of a nondamaged, correctly paired base such as 5-meC in long stretches of DNA. These findings may have implications for understanding the evolution of structure and target specificity in DNA glycosylases. PMID:20489198

  1. The irregular firing properties of thalamic head direction cells mediate turn-specific modulation of the directional tuning curve

    PubMed Central

    Tsanov, Marian; Chah, Ehsan; Noor, Muhammad S.; Egan, Catriona; Reilly, Richard B.; Aggleton, John P.; Erichsen, Jonathan T.; Vann, Seralynne D.

    2014-01-01

    Head direction cells encode an animal's heading in the horizontal plane. However, it is not clear why the directionality of a cell's mean firing rate differs for clockwise, compared with counterclockwise, head turns (this difference is known as the “separation angle”) in anterior thalamus. Here we investigated in freely behaving rats whether intrinsic neuronal firing properties are linked to this phenomenon. We found a positive correlation between the separation angle and the spiking variability of thalamic head direction cells. To test whether this link is driven by hyperpolarization-inducing currents, we investigated the effect of thalamic reticular inhibition during high-voltage spindles on directional spiking. While the selective directional firing of thalamic neurons was preserved, we found no evidence for entrainment of thalamic head direction cells by high-voltage spindle oscillations. We then examined the role of depolarization-inducing currents in the formation of separation angle. Using a single-compartment Hodgkin-Huxley model, we show that modeled neurons fire with higher frequencies during the ascending phase of sinusoidal current injection (mimicking the head direction tuning curve) when simulated with higher high-threshold calcium channel conductance. These findings demonstrate that the turn-specific encoding of directional signal strongly depends on the ability of thalamic neurons to fire irregularly in response to sinusoidal excitatory activation. Another crucial factor for inducing phase lead to sinusoidal current injection was the presence of spike-frequency adaptation current in the modeled neurons. Our data support a model in which intrinsic biophysical properties of thalamic neurons mediate the physiological encoding of directional information. PMID:25122712

  2. DNA Unwinding Functions of Minute Virus of Mice NS1 Protein Are Modulated Specifically by the Lambda Isoform of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Dettwiler, Sabine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P. F.

    1999-01-01

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice NS1 protein is a multifunctional protein involved in a variety of processes during virus propagation, ranging from viral DNA replication to promoter regulation and cytotoxic action to the host cell. Since NS1 becomes phosphorylated during infection, it was proposed that the different tasks of this protein might be regulated in a coordinated manner by phosphorylation. Indeed, comparing biochemical functions of native NS1 with its dephosphorylated counterpart showed that site-specific nicking of the origin and the helicase and ATPase activities are remarkably reduced upon NS1 dephosphorylation while site-specific affinity of the protein to the origin became enhanced. As a consequence, the dephosphorylated polypeptide is deficient for initiation of DNA replication. By adding fractionated cell extracts to a kinase-free in vitro replication system, the combination of two protein components containing members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family was found to rescue the replication activity of the dephosphorylated NS1 protein upon addition of PKC cofactors. One of these components, termed HA-1, also stimulated NS1 helicase function in response to acidic lipids but not phorbol esters, indicating the involvement of atypical PKC isoforms in the modulation of this NS1 function (J. P. F. Nüesch, S. Dettwiler, R. Corbau, and J. Rommelaere, J. Virol. 72:9966–9977, 1998). The present study led to the identification of atypical PKCλ/ι as the active component of HA-1 responsible for the regulation of NS1 DNA unwinding and replicative functions. Moreover, a target PKCλ phosphorylation site was localized at S473 of NS1. By site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that this residue is essential for NS1 helicase activity but not promoter regulation, suggesting a possible modulation of NS1 functions by PKCλ phosphorylation at residue S473. PMID:10438831

  3. SU-E-T-424: Dosimetric Verification of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Delivered Using An Electron Specific Multileaf Collimator for Treatment of Scalp Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Eldib, A; Jin, L; Martin, J; Li, J; Chibani, O; Galloway, T; Ma, C; Mora, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has the potential to achieve better treatment outcome for shallow tumors such as those of breast and scalp. In a separate study with scalp lesions, MERT was compared to volumetric modulated arc therapy. Our results showed a reduction in the dose reaching the brain with MERT. However dose calculation accuracy and delivery efficiency challenges remain. Thus in the current study we proceed to add more cases to demonstrate MERT beneficial outcome and its delivery accuracy using an electron specific multileaf collimator (eMLC). Methods: We have used the MCBEAM code for treatment head simulation and for generating phase space files to be used as radiation source input for our Monte Carlo based treatment planning system (MC TPS). MCPLAN code is used for calculation of patient specific dose deposition coefficient and for final MERT plan dose calculation. An in-house developed optimization code is used for the optimization process. MERT plans were generated for real patients and head and neck phantom. Film was used for dosimetric verification. The film was cut following the contour of the curved phantom surface and then sealed with black masking tape. In the measurement, the sealed film packet was sandwiched between two adjacent slabs of the head and neck phantom. The measured 2D dose distribution was then compared with calculations. Results: The eMLC allows effective treatment of scalps with multi-lesions spreading around the patient head, which was usually difficult to plan or very time consuming with conventional applicators. MERT continues to show better reduction in the brain dose. The dosimetric measurements showed slight discrepancy, which was attributed to the film setup. Conclusion: MERT can improve treatment plan quality for patients with scalp cancers. Our in-house MC TPS is capable of performing treatment planning and accurate dose calculation for MERT using the eMLC.

  4. A cardiac-specific health-related quality of life module for young adults with congenital heart disease: development and validation.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, M; Zwinderman, K H; Vogels, T; Vliegen, H W; Kamphuis, R P; Ottenkamp, J; Verloove-Vanhorick, S P; Bruil, J

    2004-05-01

    This study represents the development and validation of a cardiac-specific module of the generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, the TAAQOL (TNO/AZL Adult Quality Of Life), for young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Items were selected based on literature, an explorative previous study in CHD patients, interviews with patients, and the advice of experts. The newly developed Congenital Heart Disease-TNO/AZL Adult Quality of Life (CHD-TAAQOL) was tested in 156 patients with mild or complex CHD and consisted of three hypothesised subject scales: 'Symptoms' (9 items), 'Impact Cardiac Surveillance' (7 items), and 'Worries' (10 items). Cronbach's alpha for the three scales were 0.77, 0.78, and 0.82, respectively. Scale structure was confirmed by Principal Component Analysis, corrected item-scale and interscale correlations. Overall, 55% of reported health status problems were associated with negative emotions, which is an argument for assessing HRQoL as a concept distinct from health status. Convergent validity with validated generic instruments (TAAQOL and Short Form-36, SF-36) showed satisfactory coefficients. Discriminant validity was proven by significantly higher scores for mild CHD patients compared with those with complex CHD. In conclusion, the CHD-TAAQOL module together with the generic TAAQOL can be used to assess group differences for cardiac-specific HRQoL in young adults with CHD. Testing psychometric properties of the CHD-TAAQOL shows satisfactory results. However, to detect changes in HRQoL over time, further research is needed.

  5. Address block localization based on graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaceb, Djamel; Eglin, Véronique; Lebourgeois, Frank; Emptoz, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    An efficient mail sorting system is mainly based on an accurate optical recognition of the addresses on the envelopes. However, the localizing of the address block (ABL) should be done before the OCR recognition process. The location step is very crucial as it has a great impact on the global performance of the system. Currently, a good localizing step leads to a better recognition rate. The limit of current methods is mainly caused by modular linear architectures used for ABL: their performances greatly depend on each independent module performance. We are presenting in this paper a new approach for ABL based on a pyramidal data organization and on a hierarchical graph coloring for classification process. This new approach presents the advantage to guarantee a good coherence between different modules and reduces both the computation time and the rejection rate. The proposed method gives a very satisfying rate of 98% of good locations on a set of 750 envelope images.

  6. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    pools of neurons that may modulate specific cortical areas. PMID:27147975

  7. Sublethal exposure to alpha radiation (223Ra dichloride) enhances various carcinomas’ sensitivity to lysis by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes through calreticulin-mediated immunogenic modulation

    PubMed Central

    Malamas, Anthony S.; Gameiro, Sofia R.; Knudson, Karin M.; Hodge, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®; 223Ra) is an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical FDA-approved for the treatment of bone metastases in patients with advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. It is also being examined clinically in patients with breast and lung carcinoma and patients with multiple myeloma. As with other forms of radiation, the aim of 223Ra is to reduce tumor burden by directly killing tumor cells. External beam (photon) and proton radiation have been shown to augment tumor sensitivity to antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, little is known about whether treatment with 223Ra can also induce such immunogenic modulation in tumor cells that survive irradiation. We examined these effects in vitro by exposing human prostate, breast, and lung carcinoma cells to sublethal doses of 223Ra. 223Ra significantly enhanced T cell-mediated lysis of each tumor type by CD8+ CTLs specific for MUC-1, brachyury, and CEA tumor antigens. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the increase in CTL killing was accompanied by augmented protein expression of MHC-I and calreticulin in each tumor type, molecules that are essential for efficient antigen presentation. Enhanced tumor-cell lysis was facilitated by calreticulin surface translocation following 223Ra exposure. The phenotypic changes observed after treatment appear to be mediated by induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response pathway. By rendering tumor cells more susceptible to T cell-mediated lysis, 223Ra may potentially be effective in combination with various immunotherapies, particularly cancer vaccines that are designed to generate and expand patients’ endogenous antigen-specific T-cell populations against specific tumor antigens. PMID:27893426

  8. Sublethal exposure to alpha radiation (223Ra dichloride) enhances various carcinomas' sensitivity to lysis by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes through calreticulin-mediated immunogenic modulation.

    PubMed

    Malamas, Anthony S; Gameiro, Sofia R; Knudson, Karin M; Hodge, James W

    2016-12-27

    Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®; 223Ra) is an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical FDA-approved for the treatment of bone metastases in patients with advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. It is also being examined clinically in patients with breast and lung carcinoma and patients with multiple myeloma. As with other forms of radiation, the aim of 223Ra is to reduce tumor burden by directly killing tumor cells. External beam (photon) and proton radiation have been shown to augment tumor sensitivity to antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, little is known about whether treatment with 223Ra can also induce such immunogenic modulation in tumor cells that survive irradiation. We examined these effects in vitro by exposing human prostate, breast, and lung carcinoma cells to sublethal doses of 223Ra. 223Ra significantly enhanced T cell-mediated lysis of each tumor type by CD8+ CTLs specific for MUC-1, brachyury, and CEA tumor antigens. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the increase in CTL killing was accompanied by augmented protein expression of MHC-I and calreticulin in each tumor type, molecules that are essential for efficient antigen presentation. Enhanced tumor-cell lysis was facilitated by calreticulin surface translocation following 223Ra exposure. The phenotypic changes observed after treatment appear to be mediated by induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response pathway. By rendering tumor cells more susceptible to T cell-mediated lysis, 223Ra may potentially be effective in combination with various immunotherapies, particularly cancer vaccines that are designed to generate and expand patients' endogenous antigen-specific T-cell populations against specific tumor antigens.

  9. [Keynote address: Climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Forrister, D.

    1994-12-31

    Broadly speaking, the climate issue is moving from talk to action both in the United States and internationally. While few nations have adopted strict controls or stiff new taxes, a number of them are developing action plans that are making clear their intention to ramp up activity between now and the year 2000... and beyond. There are sensible, economically efficient strategies to be undertaken in the near term that offer the possibility, in many countries, to avoid more draconian measures. These strategies are by-and-large the same measures that the National Academy of Sciences recommended in a 1991 report called, Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. The author thinks the Academy`s most important policy contribution was how it recommended the nations act in the face of uncertain science and high risks--that cost effective measures are adopted as cheap insurance... just as nations insure against other high risk, low certainty possibilities, like catastrophic health insurance, auto insurance, and fire insurance. This insurance theme is still right. First, the author addresses how the international climate change negotiations are beginning to produce insurance measures. Next, the author will discuss some of the key issues to watch in those negotiations that relate to longer-term insurance. And finally, the author will report on progress in the United States on the climate insurance plan--The President`s Climate Action Plan.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC) from umbilical cords of gestational diabetic mothers reveals candidate sites for an epigenetic modulation of specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ambra, R; Manca, S; Palumbo, M C; Leoni, G; Natarelli, L; De Marco, A; Consoli, A; Pandolfi, A; Virgili, F

    2014-01-01

    Within the complex pathological picture associated to diabetes, high glucose (HG) has "per se" effects on cells and tissues that involve epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression. In fetal tissues, epigenetic changes occur genome-wide and are believed to induce specific long term effects. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) obtained at delivery from gestational diabetic women were used to study the transcriptomic effects of chronic hyperglycemia in fetal vascular cells using Affymetrix microarrays. In spite of the small number of samples analyzed (n=6), genes related to insulin sensing and extracellular matrix reorganization were found significantly affected by HG. Quantitative PCR analysis of gene promoters identified a significant differential DNA methylation in TGFB2. Use of Ea.hy926 endothelial cells confirms data on HUVEC. Our study corroborates recent evidences suggesting that epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression occurs with persistent HG and provides a background for future investigations addressing genomic consequences of chronic HG.

  11. Modulation of HCV-specific CD8 effector T-cell function with antiviral effect in infectious hepatitis C virus co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Ojiro, Keisuke; Qu, Xiaowang; Cho, Hyosun; Park, Jang-June; Vuidepot, Annelise; Lissin, Nikolai; Molloy, Peter E; Bennett, Alan; Jakobsen, Bent K; Kaplan, David E; Riley, James L; Chang, Kyong-Mi

    2017-03-08

    Antiviral effects of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8 T-cells have been shown in HCV replicon, but not in authentic infectious cell culture system (HCVcc). Here, we developed tools to examine the antigenicity of HCV-infected HLA A2+ Huh7.5 hepatoma cells (Huh7.5A2) in activating HCV-specific CD8 T-cells with downstream antiviral effects. Infectious HCV epitope mutants encoding well-defined genotype 1a-derived HLA A2-restricted HCV NS3 1073 or NS5 2594 epitope were generated from genotype 2a-derived HCV clone (Jc1Gluc2A) by site-directed mutagenesis. CD8 T-cell lines specific for NS3 1073 and NS5 2594 were expanded from HCV-seropositive persons by peptide stimulation in-vitro or engineered from HCV-seronegative donor T-cells by lentiviral transduction of HCV-specific T-cell receptors. HCV-specific CD8 T-cells were co-cultured with Huh7.5 cells that were pulsed with titrating doses of HCV epitope peptides or infected with HCV epitope mutants. HCV-specific CD8 T-cell activation (CD107, IFNγ, MIP-1β, TNFα) was dose-dependent on peptide concentrations and relative percentages of HCV-infected Huh7.5A2 cells. HCV-infected Huh7.5A2 cells activated HCV-specific CD8 T-cells at levels comparable to 0.1-2μM pulsed peptides, providing a novel estimate at which endogenously processed HCV epitopes are presented in HCV-infected cells. While HCV-specific CD8 T-cell activation with cytolytic and antiviral effects was blunted by PD-L1 expression on HCV-infected Huh7.5A2 cells with improved viability of Huh7.5A2 cells, PD-1 blockade reversed this effect with enhanced cytolytic elimination of HCV-infected Huh7.5A2 cells. Our findings using infectious HCVcc system show that HCV-specific CD8 T-cell function is modulated by antigen expression levels, percentage of HCV-infected cells and PD-1/PD-L1 pathways, with antiviral and cytotoxic effects.IMPORTANCE We developed several novel molecular and immunological tools to study interactions between HCV, HCV-infected hepatocytes and HCV-specific

  12. Increased Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Accelerated Response to Antidepressants in Mice with Specific Deletion of CREB in the Hippocampus: Role of cAMP Response-Element Modulator τ

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Brigitta B.; Briand, Lisa A.; Onksen, Jennifer L.; LeLay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression as well as in the efficacy of antidepressant treatment. However, altering CREB levels appears to have differing effects on anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, depending on which brain region is examined. Furthermore, many manipulations of CREB lead to corresponding changes in other CREB family proteins, and the impact of these changes has been largely ignored. To further investigate the region-specific importance of CREB in depression-related behavior and antidepressant response, we used CrebloxP/loxP mice to localize CREB deletion to the hippocampus. In an assay sensitive to chronic antidepressant response, the novelty-induced hypophagia procedure, hippocampal CREB deletion, did not alter the response to chronic antidepressant treatment. In contrast, mice with hippocampal CREB deletion responded to acute antidepressant treatment in this task, and this accelerated response was accompanied by an increase in hippocampal neurogenesis. Upregulation of the CREB-family protein cAMP response-element modulator (CREM) was observed after CREB deletion. Viral overexpression of the activator isoform of CREM, CREMτ, in the hippocampus also resulted in an accelerated response to antidepressants as well as increased hippocampal neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration of CREMτ within the brain playing a role in behavior and specifically in behavioral outcomes following antidepressant treatment. The current results suggest that activation of CREMτ may provide a means to accelerate the therapeutic efficacy of current antidepressant treatment. PMID:23966689

  13. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  14. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  15. Tfap2a promotes specification and maturation of neurons in the inner ear through modulation of Bmp, Fgf and notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Husniye; Edlund, Renee K; Groves, Andrew K; Riley, Bruce B

    2015-03-01

    Neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) transmit auditory and vestibular information from the inner ear to the hindbrain. SAG neuroblasts originate in the floor of the otic vesicle. New neuroblasts soon delaminate and migrate towards the hindbrain while continuing to proliferate, a phase known as transit amplification. SAG cells eventually come to rest between the ear and hindbrain before terminally differentiating. Regulation of these events is only partially understood. Fgf initiates neuroblast specification within the ear. Subsequently, Fgf secreted by mature SAG neurons exceeds a maximum threshold, serving to terminate specification and delay maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Notch signaling also limits SAG development, but how it is coordinated with Fgf is unknown. Here we show that transcription factor Tfap2a coordinates multiple signaling pathways to promote neurogenesis in the zebrafish inner ear. In both zebrafish and chick, Tfap2a is expressed in a ventrolateral domain of the otic vesicle that includes neurogenic precursors. Functional studies were conducted in zebrafish. Loss of Tfap2a elevated Fgf and Notch signaling, thereby inhibiting SAG specification and slowing maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Conversely, overexpression of Tfap2a inhibited Fgf and Notch signaling, leading to excess and accelerated SAG production. However, most SAG neurons produced by Tfap2a overexpression died soon after maturation. Directly blocking either Fgf or Notch caused less dramatic acceleration of SAG development without neuronal death, whereas blocking both pathways mimicked all observed effects of Tfap2a overexpression, including apoptosis of mature neurons. Analysis of genetic mosaics showed that Tfap2a acts non-autonomously to inhibit Fgf. This led to the discovery that Tfap2a activates expression of Bmp7a, which in turn inhibits both Fgf and Notch signaling. Blocking Bmp signaling reversed the effects of overexpressing Tfap2a. Together, these data

  16. Naturally derived biomaterials for addressing inflammation in tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Brendan AC

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration strategies have traditionally relied on designing biomaterials that closely mimic features of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) as a means to potentially promote site-specific cellular behaviors. However, inflammation, while a necessary component of wound healing, can alter processes associated with successful tissue regeneration following an initial injury. These processes can be further magnified by the implantation of a biomaterial within the wound site. In addition to designing biomaterials to satisfy biocompatibility concerns as well as to replicate elements of the composition, structure, and mechanics of native tissue, we propose that ECM analogs should also include features that modulate the inflammatory response. Indeed, strategies that enhance, reduce, or even change the temporal phenotype of inflammatory processes have unique potential as future pro-regenerative analogs. Here, we review derivatives of three natural materials with intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties and discuss their potential to address the challenges of inflammation in tissue engineering and chronic wounds. PMID:27190254

  17. Spatial Light Amplifier Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Sverre T.; Olsson, N. Anders

    1992-01-01

    Spatial light amplifier modulators (SLAM's) are conceptual devices that effect two-dimensional spatial modulation in optical computing and communication systems. Unlike current spatial light modulators, these provide gain. Optical processors incorporating SLAM's designed to operate in reflection or transmission mode. Each element of planar SLAM array is optical amplifier - surface-emitting diode laser. Array addressed electrically with ac modulating signals superimposed on dc bias currents supplied to lasers. SLAM device provides both desired modulation and enough optical gain to enable splitting of output signal into many optical fibers without excessive loss of power.

  18. Jerantinine A induces tumor-specific cell death through modulation of splicing factor 3b subunit 1 (SF3B1)

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Tan, Perry Faith Tze Ming; Raja, Vijay Joseph; Tan, Boon-Shing; Lim, Kuan-Hon; Kam, Toh-Seok; Hii, Ling-Wei; Tan, Si Hoey; See, Sze-Jia; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Wong, Li-Zhe; Yam, Wai Keat; Mai, Chun Wai; Bradshaw, Tracey D.; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2017-01-01

    Precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is catalyzed by a large ribonucleoprotein complex known as the spliceosome. Numerous studies have indicated that aberrant splicing patterns or mutations in spliceosome components, including the splicing factor 3b subunit 1 (SF3B1), are associated with hallmark cancer phenotypes. This has led to the identification and development of small molecules with spliceosome-modulating activity as potential anticancer agents. Jerantinine A (JA) is a novel indole alkaloid which displays potent anti-proliferative activities against human cancer cell lines by inhibiting tubulin polymerization and inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. Using a combined pooled-genome wide shRNA library screen and global proteomic profiling, we showed that JA targets the spliceosome by up-regulating SF3B1 and SF3B3 protein in breast cancer cells. Notably, JA induced significant tumor-specific cell death and a significant increase in unspliced pre-mRNAs. In contrast, depletion of endogenous SF3B1 abrogated the apoptotic effects, but not the G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by JA. Further analyses showed that JA stabilizes endogenous SF3B1 protein in breast cancer cells and induced dissociation of the protein from the nucleosome complex. Together, these results demonstrate that JA exerts its antitumor activity by targeting SF3B1 and SF3B3 in addition to its reported targeting of tubulin polymerization. PMID:28198434

  19. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  20. Isoform-Specific Modulation of Inflammation Induced by Adenoviral Mediated Delivery of Platelet-Derived Growth Factors in the Adult Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Betsholtz, Christer; Andrae, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are key regulators of mesenchymal cells in vertebrate development. To what extent PDGFs also exert beneficial homeostatic or reparative roles in adult organs, as opposed to adverse fibrogenic responses in pathology, are unclear. PDGF signaling plays critical roles during heart development, during which forced overexpression of PDGFs induces detrimental cardiac fibrosis; other studies have implicated PDGF signaling in post-infarct myocardial repair. Different PDGFs may exert different effects mediated through the two PDGF receptors (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) in different cell types. Here, we assessed responses induced by five known PDGF isoforms in the adult mouse heart in the context of adenovirus vector-mediated inflammation. Our results show that different PDGFs have different, in some cases even opposing, effects. Strikingly, whereas the major PDGFRα agonists (PDGF-A and -C) decreased the amount of scar tissue and increased the numbers of PDGFRα-positive fibroblasts, PDGFRβ agonists either induced large scars with extensive inflammation (PDGF-B) or dampened the adenovirus-induced inflammation and produced a small and dense scar (PDGF-D). These results provide evidence for PDGF isoform-specific inflammation-modulating functions that may have therapeutic implications. They also illustrate a surprising complexity in the PDGF-mediated pathophysiological responses. PMID:27513343

  1. The Ubiquitin Receptor DA1 Regulates Seed and Organ Size by Modulating the Stability of the Ubiquitin-Specific Protease UBP15/SOD2 in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liang; Li, Na; Chen, Liangliang; Xu, Yingxiu; Li, Yu; Zhang, Yueying; Li, Chuanyou; Li, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    Although the control of organ size is a fundamental question in developmental biology, little is known about the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine the final size of seeds in plants. We previously demonstrated that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 acts synergistically with the E3 ubiquitin ligases DA2 and ENHANCER1 OF DA1 (EOD1)/BIG BROTHER to restrict seed growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe UBIQUITIN-SPECIFIC PROTEASE15 (UBP15), encoded by SUPPRESSOR2 OF DA1 (SOD2), which acts maternally to regulate seed size by promoting cell proliferation in the integuments of ovules and developing seeds. The sod2/ubp15 mutants form small seeds, while overexpression of UBP15 increases seed size of wild-type plants. Genetic analyses indicate that UBP15 functions antagonistically in a common pathway with DA1 to influence seed size, but does so independently of DA2 and EOD1. Further results reveal that DA1 physically associates with UBP15 in vitro and in vivo and modulates the stability of UBP15. Therefore, our findings establish a genetic and molecular framework for the regulation of seed size by four ubiquitin-related proteins DA1, DA2, EOD1, and UBP15 and suggest that they are promising targets for increasing seed size in crops. PMID:24585836

  2. The family 42 carbohydrate-binding module of family 54 α-L-arabinofuranosidase specifically binds the arabinofuranose side chain of hemicellulose

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Koseki, Takuya; Miwa, Yozo; Mese, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Sachiko; Kuno, Atsushi; Hirabayashi, Jun; Matsuzawa, Hiroshi; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Shoun, Hirofumi; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2006-01-01

    α-L-Arabinofuranosidase catalyses the hydrolysis of the α-1,2-, α-1,3-, and α-1,5-L-arabinofuranosidic bonds in L-arabinose-containing hemicelluloses such as arabinoxylan. AkAbf54 (the glycoside hydrolase family 54 α-L-arabinofuranosidase from Aspergillus kawachii) consists of two domains, a catalytic and an arabinose-binding domain. The latter has been named AkCBM42 [family 42 CBM (carbohydrate-binding module) of AkAbf54] because homologous domains are classified into CBM family 42. In the complex between AkAbf54 and arabinofuranosyl-α-1,2-xylobiose, the arabinose moiety occupies the binding pocket of AkCBM42, whereas the xylobiose moiety is exposed to the solvent. AkCBM42 was found to facilitate the hydrolysis of insoluble arabinoxylan, because mutants at the arabinose binding site exhibited markedly decreased activity. The results of binding assays and affinity gel electrophoresis showed that AkCBM42 interacts with arabinose-substituted, but not with unsubstituted, hemicelluloses. Isothermal titration calorimetry and frontal affinity chromatography analyses showed that the association constant of AkCBM42 with the arabinose moiety is approximately 103 M−1. These results indicate that AkCBM42 binds the non-reducing-end arabinofuranosidic moiety of hemicellulose. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a CBM that can specifically recognize the side-chain monosaccharides of branched hemicelluloses. PMID:16846393

  3. Novel Pd(II)-salen complexes showing high in vitro anti-proliferative effects against human hepatoma cancer by modulating specific regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammad; Hussain, Zahid; Warad, Ismail; Al-Resayes, Saud I; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Shakir, Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal

    2012-09-21

    We have reported the synthesis of a novel salen ligand and its mononuclear Pd-salen complexes derived from 2-{[2-hydroxy-3-{[(E)-(2-hydroxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}propyl)imino]methyl}phenol. The newly synthesized and isolated Pd(II) complexes have been identified and fully characterized by various physico-chemical studies viz., elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis, (1)H, (13)C NMR spectroscopy, electron spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and TGA/DTA studies. The molecular structure of the salen ligand has been ascertained by single-crystal XRD and it is coordinated to Pd(II) ion through two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms. The UV-Vis data clearly suggest a square-planar environment around both the Pd(II) ions. The DNA binding studies of the synthesized compounds has been investigated by electron spectroscopy and fluorescence measurements. The results suggest that Pd(II) complexes bind to DNA strongly as compared to the free ligand. The free salen ligand and its Pd(II) complexes have also been tested against human hepatoma cancer cell line (Huh7) and results manifested exceptional anti-proliferative effects of the Pd(II) complexes. The anti-proliferative activity of Pd(II) complexes has been modulated by specific regulatory genes.

  4. The SR family proteins B52 and dASF/SF2 modulate development of the Drosophila visual system by regulating specific RNA targets.

    PubMed

    Gabut, Mathieu; Dejardin, Jérôme; Tazi, Jamal; Soret, Johann

    2007-04-01

    Deciphering the role of alternative splicing in developmental processes relies on the identification of key genes whose expression is controlled by splicing regulators throughout the growth of a whole organism. Modulating the expression levels of five SR proteins in the developing eye of Drosophila melanogaster revealed that these splicing factors induce various phenotypic alterations in eye organogenesis and also affect viability. Although the SR proteins dASF/SF2 and B52 caused defects in ommatidia structure, only B52 impaired normal axonal projections of photoreceptors and neurogenesis in visual ganglia. Microarray analyses revealed that many transcripts involved in brain organogenesis have altered splicing profiles upon both loss and gain of B52 function. Conversely, a large proportion of transcripts regulated by dASF/SF2 are involved in eye development. These differential and specific effects of SR proteins indicate that they function to confer accuracy to developmental gene expression programs by facilitating the cell lineage decisions that underline the generation of tissue identities.

  5. Isoform-specific modulation of the chemical sensitivity of conserved TRPA1 channel in the major honeybee ectoparasitic mite, Tropilaelaps mercedesae

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaofeng; Kashio, Makiko; Peng, Guangda; Wang, Xinyue; Tominaga, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We identified and characterized the TRPA1 channel of Tropilaelaps mercedesae (TmTRPA1), one of two major species of honeybee ectoparasitic mite. Three TmTRPA1 isoforms with unique N-terminal sequences were activated by heat, and the isoform highly expressed in the mite's front legs, TmTRPA1b, was also activated by 27 plant-derived compounds including electrophiles. This suggests that the heat- and electrophile-dependent gating mechanisms as nocisensitive TRPA1 channel are well conserved between arthropod species. Intriguingly, one TmTRPA1 isoform, TmTRPA1a, was activated by only six compounds compared with two other isoforms, demonstrating that the N-terminal sequences are critical determinants for the chemical sensitivity. This is the first example of isoform-specific modulation of chemical sensitivity of TRPA1 channel in one species. α-terpineol showed repellent activity towards T. mercedesae in a laboratory assay and repressed T. mercedesae entry for reproduction into the brood cells with fifth instar larvae in hives. Thus, α-terpineol could be used as the potential compound to control two major honeybee ectoparasitic mites, T. mercedesae and Varroa destructor, in the apiculture industry. PMID:27307515

  6. Discrimination of bladder cancer cells from normal urothelial cells with high specificity and sensitivity: combined application of atomic force microscopy and modulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Riches, Andrew; Borger, Eva; Herrington, Simon; Dholakia, Kishan; Adya, Ashok K

    2014-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modulated Raman spectroscopy (MRS) were used to discriminate between living normal human urothelial cells (SV-HUC-1) and bladder tumour cells (MGH-U1) with high specificity and sensitivity. MGH-U1 cells were 1.5-fold smaller, 1.7-fold thicker and 1.4-fold rougher than normal SV-HUC-1 cells. The adhesion energy was 2.6-fold higher in the MGH-U1 cells compared to normal SV-HUC-1 cells, which possibly indicates that bladder tumour cells are more deformable than normal cells. The elastic modulus of MGH-U1 cells was 12-fold lower than SV-HUC-1 cells, suggesting a higher elasticity of the bladder cancer cell membranes. The biochemical fingerprints of cancer cells displayed a higher DNA and lipid content, probably due to an increase in the nuclear to cytoplasm ratio. Normal cells were characterized by higher protein contents. AFM studies revealed a decrease in the lateral dimensions and an increase in thickness of cancer cells compared to normal cells; these studies authenticate the observations from MRS. Nanostructural, nanomechanical and biochemical profiles of bladder cells provide qualitative and quantitative markers to differentiate between normal and cancerous cells at the single cellular level. AFM and MRS allow discrimination between adhesion energy, elasticity and Raman spectra of SV-HUC-1 and MGH-U1 cells with high specificity (83, 98 and 95%) and sensitivity (97, 93 and 98%). Such single-cell-level studies could have a pivotal impact on the development of AFM-Raman combined methodologies for cancer profiling and screening with translational significance.

  7. Pantomiming tool use with an imaginary tool in hand as compared to demonstration with tool in hand specifically modulates the left middle and superior temporal gyri.

    PubMed

    Lausberg, Hedda; Kazzer, Philipp; Heekeren, Hauke R; Wartenburger, Isabell

    2015-10-01

    Neuropsychological lesion studies evidence the necessity to differentiate between various forms of tool-related actions such as real tool use, tool use demonstration with tool in hand and without physical target object, and pantomime without tool in hand. However, thus far, neuroimaging studies have primarily focused only on investigating tool use pantomimes. The present fMRI study investigates pantomime without tool in hand as compared to tool use demonstration with tool in hand in order to explore patterns of cerebral signal modulation associated with acting with imaginary tools in hand. Fifteen participants performed with either hand (i) tool use pantomime with an imaginary tool in hand in response to visual tool presentation and (ii) tool use demonstration with tool in hand in response to visual-tactile tool presentation. In both conditions, no physical target object was present. The conjunction analysis of the right and left hands executions of tool use pantomime relative to tool use demonstration yielded significant activity in the left middle and superior temporal lobe. In contrast, demonstration relative to pantomime revealed large bihemispherically distributed homologous areas of activity. Thus far, fMRI studies have demonstrated the relevance of the left middle and superior temporal gyri in viewing, naming, and matching tools and related actions and contexts. Since in our study all these factors were equally (ir)relevant both in the tool use pantomime and the tool use demonstration conditions, the present findings enhance the knowledge about the function of these brain regions in tool-related cognitive processes. The two contrasted conditions only differ regarding the fact that the pantomime condition requires the individual to act with an imaginary tool in hand. Therefore, we suggest that the left middle and superior temporal gyri are specifically involved in integrating the projected mental image of a tool in the execution of a tool-specific movement

  8. The Reach Address Database (RAD)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Reach Address Database (RAD) stores reach address information for each Water Program feature that has been linked to the underlying surface water features (streams, lakes, etc) in the National Hydrology Database (NHD) Plus dataset.

  9. Automated measurement of printer effective addressability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Brian E.; Eid, Ahmed H.; Rippetoe, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    When evaluating printer resolution, addressability is a key consideration. Addressability defines the maximum number of spots or samples within a given distance, independent of the size of the spots when printed. Effective addressability is the addressability demonstrated by the final, printed output. It is the minimum displacement possible between the centers of printed objects. In this paper, we present a measurement procedure for effective addressability that offers an automated way to experimentally determine the addressability of the printed output. It requires printing, scanning, and measuring a test target. The effective addressability test target contains two types of elements, repeated to fill the page: fiducial lines and line segments. The fiducial lines serve as a relative reference for the incremental displacements of the individual line segments, providing a way to tolerate larger-scale physical distortions in the printer. An ordinary reflection scanner captures the printed test target. By rotating the page on the scanner, it is possible to measure effective addressability well beyond the scanner's sampling resolution. The measurement algorithm computes the distribution of incremental displacements, forming either a unimodal or bimodal histogram. In the latter case, the mean of the second (non-zero) peak indicates the effective addressability. In the former case, the printer successfully rendered the target's resolution, requiring another iteration of the procedure after increasing the resolution of the test target. The algorithm automatically estimates whether the histogram is unimodal or bimodal and computes parameters describing the quality of the measured histogram. Several experiments have refined the test target and measurement procedure, including two round-robin evaluations by the ISO WG4 committee. Results include an analysis of approximately 150 printed samples. The effective addressability attribute and measurement procedure are included in

  10. Bubble Memory Module.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    104 7-13 Four switch drive hybrid ........................................................................ 104 7-14...operation. Address Ready. - This signal is an output signal to the user which acknowledges that the module is busy. Input address is latched in the...expandable in 6.55 M bit increments. Detector noise is minimized by locating sense circuits, cell select switches , and memory cells on the same board

  11. Solution Structure of the Ubp-M BUZ Domain, a Highly Specific Protein Module That Recognizes the C-terminal Tail of Free Ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Ming-Tao; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru; Kovacs, Jeffrey J.; Keaton, Mignon A.; Li, Shawn S.-C.; Yao, Tso-Pang; Zhou, Pei

    2010-01-01

    Summary The BUZ/Znf-UBP domain is a distinct ubiquitin-binding module found in the cytoplasmic deacetylase HDAC6, the E3 ubiquitin ligase BRAP2/IMP, and a subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes. Here we report the solution structure of the BUZ domain of Ubp-M, a ubiquitin-specific protease, and its interaction with ubiquitin. Unlike the BUZ domain from isopeptidase T (isoT) that contains a single zinc finger, the Ubp-M BUZ domain features three zinc-binding sites consisted of twelve residues. These zinc ligands form a pair of cross-braced ring fingers encapsulated within a third zinc finger in the primary structure. In contrast to isoT, which can form an N-terminal loop swapped dimer in the crystal state, the formation of additional zinc fingers in the Ubp-M BUZ domain restricts its N-terminal loop to intra-domain interactions. The ubiquitin-binding site of the Ubp-M BUZ domain is mapped to the highly conserved, concave surface formed by the α3 helix and the central β-sheet. We further show that this site binds to the C-terminal tail of free ubiquitin, and corresponding peptides display essentially the same binding affinities as full-length ubiquitin does for the Ubp-M BUZ domain. However, modification of the G76Ub carboxylate group either by a peptide- or isopeptide-bond abolishes BUZ-domain interaction. The unique ubiquitin-recognition mode of the BUZ domain family suggests that they may function as “sensors” of free ubiquitin in cells to achieve regulatory roles in many aspects of ubiquitin-dependent processes. PMID:17512543

  12. AmpA protein functions by different mechanisms to influence early cell type specification and to modulate cell adhesion and actin polymerization in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Cost, Hoa N; Noratel, Elizabeth F; Blumberg, Daphne D

    2013-01-01

    The Dictyostelium discoideum ampA gene encodes a multifunctional regulator protein that modulates cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions and actin polymerization during growth and is necessary for correct cell type specification and patterning during development. Insertional inactivation of the ampA gene results in defects that define two distinct roles for the ampA gene during development. AmpA is necessary in a non-cell autonomous manner to prevent premature expression of a prespore gene marker. It is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for the anterior like cells, which express the ampA gene, to migrate to the upper cup during culmination. It is also necessary to prevent excessive cell-cell agglutination when cells are developed in a submerged suspension culture. Here, we demonstrate that a supernatant source of AmpA protein, added extracellularly, can prevent the premature mis-expression of the prespore marker. Synthetic oligopeptides are used to identify the domain of the AmpA protein that is important for preventing cells from mis-expressing the prespore gene. We further demonstrate that a factor capable of inducing additional cells to express the prespore gene marker accumulates extracellularly in the absence of AmpA protein. While the secreted AmpA acts extracellularly to suppress prespore gene expression, the effects of AmpA on cell agglutination and on actin polymerization in growing cells are not due to an extracellular role of secreted AmpA protein. Rather, these effects appear to reflect a distinct cell autonomous role of the ampA gene. Finally, we show that secretion of AmpA protein is brought about by elevating the levels of expression of ampA so that the protein accumulates to an excessive level.

  13. HpaP modulates type III effector secretion in Ralstonia solanacearum and harbours a substrate specificity switch domain essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Turner, Marie; Lonjon, Fabien; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria have evolved a type III secretion system (T3SS) to successfully invade their host. This extracellular apparatus allows the translocation of proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), directly into the host cells. T3Es are virulence factors that have been shown to interfere with the host's immunity or to provide nutrients from the host to the bacteria. The Gram-negative bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is a worldwide major crop pest whose virulence strongly relies on the T3SS. In R. solanacearum, transcriptional regulation has been extensively studied. However, very few data are available concerning the role played by type III-associated regulators, such as type III chaperones and T3SS control proteins. Here, we characterized HpaP, a putative type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) protein of R. solanacearum which is not secreted by the bacterium or translocated in the plant cells. HpaP self-interacts and interacts with the PopP1 T3E. HpaP modulates the secretion of early (HrpY pilin) and late (AvrA and PopP1 T3Es) type III substrates. HpaP is dispensable for the translocation of T3Es into the host cells. Finally, we identified two regions of five amino acids in the T3S4 domain that are essential for efficient PopP1 secretion and for HpaP's role in virulence on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana, but not required for HpaP-HpaP and HpaP-PopP1 interactions. Taken together, our results indicate that HpaP is a putative R. solanacearum T3S4 protein important for full pathogenicity on several hosts, acting as a helper for PopP1 secretion, and repressing AvrA and HrpY secretion.

  14. Solution structure of the Ubp-M BUZ domain, a highly specific protein module that recognizes the C-terminal tail of free ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Pai, Ming-Tao; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru; Kovacs, Jeffrey J; Keaton, Mignon A; Li, Shawn S-C; Yao, Tso-Pang; Zhou, Pei

    2007-07-06

    The BUZ/Znf-UBP domain is a distinct ubiquitin-binding module found in the cytoplasmic deacetylase HDAC6, the E3 ubiquitin ligase BRAP2/IMP, and a subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes. Here, we report the solution structure of the BUZ domain of Ubp-M, a ubiquitin-specific protease, and its interaction with ubiquitin. Unlike the BUZ domain from isopeptidase T (isoT) that contains a single zinc finger, the Ubp-M BUZ domain features three zinc-binding sites consisting of 12 residues. These zinc ligands form a pair of cross-braced ring fingers encapsulated within a third zinc finger in the primary structure. In contrast to isoT, which can form an N-terminal loop swapped dimer in the crystal state, the formation of additional zinc fingers in the Ubp-M BUZ domain restricts its N-terminal loop to intra-domain interactions. The ubiquitin-binding site of the Ubp-M BUZ domain is mapped to the highly conserved, concave surface formed by the alpha 3 helix and the central beta-sheet. We further show that this site binds to the C-terminal tail of free ubiquitin, and corresponding peptides display essentially the same binding affinities as full-length ubiquitin does for the Ubp-M BUZ domain. However, modification of the G76(Ub) carboxylate group either by a peptide or isopeptide bond abolishes BUZ-domain interaction. The unique ubiquitin-recognition mode of the BUZ domain family suggests that they may function as "sensors" of free ubiquitin in cells to achieve regulatory roles in many aspects of ubiquitin-dependent processes.

  15. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with 111In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of 111In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  16. Addressing Psychosocial Factors with Library Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Bridget; Alabi, Jaena; Whaley, Pambanisha; Jenda, Claudine

    2017-01-01

    The majority of articles on mentoring in the library and information science field address career development by emphasizing the orientation process for new librarians and building the requisite skills for a specific job. Few articles deal with the psychological and social challenges that many early-career and minority librarians face, which can…

  17. Rational Rhymes for Addressing Common Childhood Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Music-based interventions are valuable tools counselors can use when working with children. Specific types of music-based interventions, such as songs or rhymes, can be especially pertinent in addressing the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of children. Rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) provides a therapeutic framework that encourages…

  18. Platelet serotonin modulates immune functions.

    PubMed

    Mauler, M; Bode, C; Duerschmied, D

    2016-01-01

    This short review addresses immune functions of platelet serotonin. Platelets transport serotonin at a high concentration in dense granules and release it upon activation. Besides haemostatic, vasotonic and developmental modulation, serotonin also influences a variety of immune functions (mediated by different serotonin receptors). First, platelet serotonergic effects are directed against invading pathogens via activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, modulation of cytokine release, and recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation by induction of selectin expression on endothelial cells. Second, serotonin levels are elevated in autoimmune diseases, such as asthma or rheumatoid arthritis, and during tissue regeneration after ischemia of myocardium or brain. Specific antagonism of serotonin receptors appears to improve survival after myocardial infarction or sepsis and to attenuate asthmatic attacks in animal models. It will be of great clinical relevance if these findings can be translated into human applications. In conclusion, targeting immune modulatory effects of platelet serotonin may provide novel therapeutic options for common health problems.

  19. CONTENT-ADDRESSABLE MEMORY SYSTEMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The utility of content -addressable memories (CAM’s) within a general purpose computing system is investigated. Word cells within CAM may be...addressed by the character of all or a part of cell contents . Multimembered sets of word cells may be addressed simultaneously. The distributed logical...package is developed which allows simulation of CAM commands within job programs run on the IBM 7090 and derives tallies of execution times corresponding to a particular realization of a CAM system . (Author)

  20. Amplitude Modulations of Acoustic Communication Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turesson, Hjalmar K.

    2011-12-01

    In human speech, amplitude modulations at 3 -- 8 Hz are important for discrimination and detection. Two different neurophysiological theories have been proposed to explain this effect. The first theory proposes that, as a consequence of neocortical synaptic dynamics, signals that are amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz are propagated better than un-modulated signals, or signals modulated above 8 Hz. This suggests that neural activity elicited by vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz is optimally transmitted, and the vocalizations better discriminated and detected. The second theory proposes that 3 -- 8 Hz amplitude modulations interact with spontaneous neocortical oscillations. Specifically, vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz entrain local populations of neurons, which in turn, modulate the amplitude of high frequency gamma oscillations. This suggests that vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz should induce stronger cross-frequency coupling. Similar to human speech, we found that macaque monkey vocalizations also are amplitude modulated between 3 and 8 Hz. Humans and macaque monkeys share similarities in vocal production, implying that the auditory systems subserving perception of acoustic communication signals also share similarities. Based on the similarities between human speech and macaque monkey vocalizations, we addressed how amplitude modulated vocalizations are processed in the auditory cortex of macaque monkeys, and what behavioral relevance modulations may have. Recording single neuron activity, as well as, the activity of local populations of neurons allowed us to test both of the neurophysiological theories presented above. We found that single neuron responses to vocalizations amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz resulted in better stimulus discrimination than vocalizations lacking 3 -- 8 Hz modulations, and that the effect most likely was mediated by synaptic dynamics. In contrast, we failed to find support for the oscillation-based model proposing a

  1. Comparison of Gafchromic EBT2 and EBT3 for patient-specific quality assurance: Cranial stereotactic radiosurgery using volumetric modulated arc therapy with multiple noncoplanar arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto; Ragona, Riccardo; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Mantovani, Cristina

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific quality assurance in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) brain stereotactic radiosurgery raises specific issues on dosimetric procedures, mainly represented by the small radiation fields associated with the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, the need of small detectors and the high dose delivered (up to 30 Gy). Gafchromic{sup TM} EBT2 and EBT3 films may be considered the dosimeter of choice, and the authors here provide some additional data about uniformity correction for this new generation of radiochromic films.Methods: A new analysis method using blue channel for marker dye correction was proposed for uniformity correction both for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Symmetry, flatness, and field-width of a reference field were analyzed to provide an evaluation in a high-spatial resolution of the film uniformity for EBT3. Absolute doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) as baseline. VMAT plans with multiple noncoplanar arcs were generated with a treatment planning system on a selected pool of eleven patients with cranial lesions and then recalculated on a water-equivalent plastic phantom by Monte Carlo algorithm for patient-specific QA. 2D quantitative dose comparison parameters were calculated, for the computed and measured dose distributions, and tested for statistically significant differences.Results: Sensitometric curves showed a different behavior above dose of 5 Gy for EBT2 and EBT3 films; with the use of inhouse marker-dye correction method, the authors obtained values of 2.5% for flatness, 1.5% of symmetry, and a field width of 4.8 cm for a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} reference field. Compared with TLD and selecting a 5% dose tolerance, the percentage of points with ICRU index below 1 was 100% for EBT2 and 83% for EBT3. Patients analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between EBT2 and EBT3 in the percentage of points with gamma values <1 (p= 0.009 and p= 0.016); the percent difference as well as

  2. What Specific Areas Must a Hazardous Waste Permit Address?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazardous waste permits provide treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) with the legal authority to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste and detail how the facility must comply with the regulations

  3. Addressing the Moral Agency of Culturally Specific Care Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Chrystal S.

    2011-01-01

    Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), as a culturally sensitive framework, realises the totality of caring in context. Few, if any, investigations into caring have articulated CHAT as a feasible mode of inquiry for inserting the cultural perspectives of both the researcher and the researched. This article elucidates CHAT as an intelligible…

  4. English as a Second Language (ESL) Tutor Training Guide. A Set of Five Modules for Use in Training Volunteer ESL Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermanson, Marie, Ed.; And Others

    This guide offers specific instructions and classroom materials for conducting workshops to train volunteer tutors of English as a Second Language (ESL). The guide contains five modules addressing different aspects and techniques of ESL instruction. Each module contains a preparation checklist for the trainer, objectives and precise procedures for…

  5. Energy Capture Module (ECM) for Use in Unmanned Mobile Vehicles (UMVs) With a Specific Study of the Draganflyer X6 UAV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    beam could be aligned to the module ( Tipler , 1987). Recommendations Preliminary research has indicated that in the long run the laser band ECM...Communications and Networks, Second Edition. Prentice Hall, September 2010. Tipler , P. A. College Physics. New York: Worth, 1987. 42 THIS PAGE

  6. From English into Z, a Reverse Specification Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    1991 Abstract On an exercise to translate the communication protocol specification RFC 826, ’The address resolution protocol’, already written in...Division of the DRA at Malvern is to create approaches to the specification of communication protocols which use formal languages that are powerful...forgot to incorporate them in the other module due to the development time-span ( It can often take several years to develop a communications protocol

  7. A specific tryptophan in the I-II linker is a key determinant of beta-subunit binding and modulation in Ca(V)2.3 calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Berrou, L; Klein, H; Bernatchez, G; Parent, L

    2002-01-01

    The ancillary beta subunits modulate the activation and inactivation properties of high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) channels in an isoform-specific manner. The beta subunits bind to a high-affinity interaction site, alpha-interaction domain (AID), located in the I-II linker of HVA alpha1 subunits. Nine residues in the AID motif are absolutely conserved in all HVA channels (QQxExxLxGYxxWIxxxE), but their contribution to beta-subunit binding and modulation remains to be established in Ca(V)2.3. Mutations of W386 to either A, G, Q, R, E, F, or Y in Ca(V)2.3 disrupted [(35)S]beta3-subunit overlay binding to glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing the mutated I-II linker, whereas mutations (single or multiple) of nonconserved residues did not affect the protein-protein interaction with beta3. The tryptophan residue at position 386 appears to be an essential determinant as substitutions with hydrophobic (A and G), hydrophilic (Q, R, and E), or aromatic (F and Y) residues yielded the same results. beta-Subunit modulation of W386 (A, G, Q, R, E, F, and Y) and Y383 (A and S) mutants was investigated after heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. All mutant channels expressed large inward Ba(2+) currents with typical current-voltage properties. Nonetheless, the typical hallmarks of beta-subunit modulation, namely the increase in peak currents, the hyperpolarization of peak voltages, and the modulation of the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation, were eliminated in all W386 mutants, although they were preserved in part in Y383 (A and S) mutants. Altogether these results suggest that W386 is critical for beta-subunit binding and modulation of HVA Ca(2+) channels. PMID:12202369

  8. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Leni; Anghelina, Mirela; Kantor, Taylor; Jones, Desiree; Ramadan, Enass; Xiang, Yang; Huang, Kun; Kolipaka, Arunark; Malarkey, William; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Mohler, Peter J; Quyyumi, Arshed; Moldovan, Nicanor I

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs), have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene), defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all p<0.03) with age (R2 = -0.23), vascular stiffness (R2 = -0.24), and central aortic pressure (R2 = -0.19) and positively correlated with body mass index (R2 = 0.72, in women). The co-expression of three neovascular markers was validated at the single-cell level using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The overall gene expression in this cardiovascular module was reduced by 72±22% in the patients compared with controls. However, the compactness of both modules was increased in the patients' samples, which was reflected in reduced dispersion of their nodes' degrees of connectivity, suggesting a more primitive character of the patients' CSPCs. In conclusion, our results show that the relationship between CSPCs and vascular function is encoded in modules of the PBMCs transcriptional network

  9. Evaluate Your Vocational Program. Second Edition. Module A-11 of Category A--Program Planning, Development, and Evaluation. Professional Teacher Education Module Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This module, which is one in a series of 127 performance-based teacher education learning packages focusing upon specific professional competencies of vocational teachers, deals with developing a plan for evaluating a vocational program, performing a program evaluation, and developing a final evaluation report. Addressed in the individual learning…

  10. Functional Module Analysis for Gene Coexpression Networks with Network Integration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuqin; Zhao, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    Network has been a general tool for studying the complex interactions between different genes, proteins and other small molecules. Module as a fundamental property of many biological networks has been widely studied and many computational methods have been proposed to identify the modules in an individual network. However, in many cases a single network is insufficient for module analysis due to the noise in the data or the tuning of parameters when building the biological network. The availability of a large amount of biological networks makes network integration study possible. By integrating such networks, more informative modules for some specific disease can be derived from the networks constructed from different tissues, and consistent factors for different diseases can be inferred. In this paper, we have developed an effective method for module identification from multiple networks under different conditions. The problem is formulated as an optimization model, which combines the module identification in each individual network and alignment of the modules from different networks together. An approximation algorithm based on eigenvector computation is proposed. Our method outperforms the existing methods, especially when the underlying modules in multiple networks are different in simulation studies. We also applied our method to two groups of gene coexpression networks for humans, which include one for three different cancers, and one for three tissues from the morbidly obese patients. We identified 13 modules with 3 complete subgraphs, and 11 modules with 2 complete subgraphs, respectively. The modules were validated through Gene Ontology enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. We also showed that the main functions of most modules for the corresponding disease have been addressed by other researchers, which may provide the theoretical basis for further studying the modules experimentally. PMID:26451826

  11. Every Other Day. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiller, Tom

    Schools need to be reoriented and restructured so that what is taught and learned, and the way in which it is taught and learned, are better integrated with young people's real-world experiences. Many indicators suggest that the meaningful aspects of school have been lost in the encounter with modern times. The title of this address--"Every…

  12. Agenda to address climate change

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This document looks at addressing climate change in the 21st century. Topics covered are: Responding to climate change; exploring new avenues in energy efficiency; energy efficiency and alternative energy; residential sector; commercial sector; industrial sector; transportation sector; communities; renewable energy; understanding forests to mitigate and adapt to climate change; the Forest Carbon budget; mitigation and adaptation.

  13. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  14. Keynote Address: Rev. Mark Massa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massa, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Rev. Mark S. Massa, S.J., is the dean and professor of Church history at the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College. He was invited to give a keynote to begin the third Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference (CHEC), cosponsored by Boston College and Fordham University. Fr. Massa's address posed critical questions about…

  15. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2016-07-12

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  16. Research strategies for addressing uncertainties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busch, David E.; Brekke, Levi D.; Averyt, Kristen; Jardine, Angela; Welling, Leigh; Garfin, Gregg; Jardine, Angela; Merideth, Robert; Black, Mary; LeRoy, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Research Strategies for Addressing Uncertainties builds on descriptions of research needs presented elsewhere in the book; describes current research efforts and the challenges and opportunities to reduce the uncertainties of climate change; explores ways to improve the understanding of changes in climate and hydrology; and emphasizes the use of research to inform decision making.

  17. Linear modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A study of frequency division multiplexing (FDM) systems was made for the purpose of determining the system performance that can be obtained with available state of the art components. System performance was evaluated on the basis of past experience, system analysis, and component evaluation. The system study was specifically directed to the area of FDM systems using subcarrier channel frequencies from 4 kHz to 200 kHz and channel information bandwidths of dc to 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 kHz. The evaluation also assumes that the demodulation will be from a tape recorder which produces frequency modulation of + or - 1% on the signal due to the tape recorder wow and flutter. For the modulation system it is assumed that the pilot and carrier channel frequencies are stable to within + or - .005% and that the FM on the channel carriers is negligible. The modulator system was evaluated for the temperature range of -20 degree to +85 degree while the demodulator system was evaluated for operation at room temperature.

  18. Matching Alternative Addresses: a Semantic Web Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariannamazi, S.; Karimipour, F.; Hakimpour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of crowd-sourcing or volunteered geographic information (VGI) provides opportunities for authoritatives that deal with geospatial information. Heterogeneity of multiple data sources and inconsistency of data types is a key characteristics of VGI datasets. The expansion of cities resulted in the growing number of POIs in the OpenStreetMap, a well-known VGI source, which causes the datasets to outdate in short periods of time. These changes made to spatial and aspatial attributes of features such as names and addresses might cause confusion or ambiguity in the processes that require feature's literal information like addressing and geocoding. VGI sources neither will conform specific vocabularies nor will remain in a specific schema for a long period of time. As a result, the integration of VGI sources is crucial and inevitable in order to avoid duplication and the waste of resources. Information integration can be used to match features and qualify different annotation alternatives for disambiguation. This study enhances the search capabilities of geospatial tools with applications able to understand user terminology to pursuit an efficient way for finding desired results. Semantic web is a capable tool for developing technologies that deal with lexical and numerical calculations and estimations. There are a vast amount of literal-spatial data representing the capability of linguistic information in knowledge modeling, but these resources need to be harmonized based on Semantic Web standards. The process of making addresses homogenous generates a helpful tool based on spatial data integration and lexical annotation matching and disambiguating.

  19. Multi-port, optically addressed RAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Alan R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Bergman, Larry A. (Inventor); Esener, Sadik (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A random access memory addressing system utilizing optical links between memory and the read/write logic circuits comprises addressing circuits including a plurality of light signal sources, a plurality of optical gates including optical detectors associated with the memory cells, and a holographic optical element adapted to reflect and direct the light signals to the desired memory cell locations. More particularly, it is a multi-port, binary computer memory for interfacing with a plurality of computers. There are a plurality of storage cells for containing bits of binary information, the storage cells being disposed at the intersections of a plurality of row conductors and a plurality of column conductors. There is interfacing logic for receiving information from the computers directing access to ones of the storage cells. There are first light sources associated with the interfacing logic for transmitting a first light beam with the access information modulated thereon. First light detectors are associated with the storage cells for receiving the first light beam, for generating an electrical signal containing the access information, and for conducting the electrical signal to the one of the storage cells to which it is directed. There are holographic optical elements for reflecting the first light beam from the first light sources to the first light detectors.

  20. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family.

  1. Atomic clusters with addressable complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    2017-02-01

    A general formulation for constructing addressable atomic clusters is introduced, based on one or more reference structures. By modifying the well depths in a given interatomic potential in favour of nearest-neighbour interactions that are defined in the reference(s), the potential energy landscape can be biased to make a particular permutational isomer the global minimum. The magnitude of the bias changes the resulting potential energy landscape systematically, providing a framework to produce clusters that should self-organise efficiently into the target structure. These features are illustrated for small systems, where all the relevant local minima and transition states can be identified, and for the low-energy regions of the landscape for larger clusters. For a 55-particle cluster, it is possible to design a target structure from a transition state of the original potential and to retain this structure in a doubly addressable landscape. Disconnectivity graphs based on local minima that have no direct connections to a lower minimum provide a helpful way to visualise the larger databases. These minima correspond to the termini of monotonic sequences, which always proceed downhill in terms of potential energy, and we identify them as a class of biminimum. Multiple copies of the target cluster are treated by adding a repulsive term between particles with the same address to maintain distinguishable targets upon aggregation. By tuning the magnitude of this term, it is possible to create assemblies of the target cluster corresponding to a variety of structures, including rings and chains.

  2. The Implications of Encoder/Modulator/ Phased Array Designs for Future Broadband LEO Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderaar, Mark; Jensen, Chris A.; Terry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the effects of modulation and channel coding on the design of wide angle scan, broadband, phased army antennas. In the paper we perform several trade studies. First, we investigate the amplifier back-off requirement as a function of variability of modulation envelope. Specifically, we contrast constant and non-constant envelope modulations, as well as single and multiple carrier schemes. Additionally, we address the issues an(f concerns of using pulse shaping filters with the above modulation types. Second, we quantify the effects of beam steering on the quality of data, recovery using selected modulation techniques. In particular, we show that the frequency response of the array introduces intersymbol interference for broadband signals and that the mode of operation for the beam steering controller may introduce additional burst or random errors. Finally, we show that the encoder/modulator design must be performed in conjunction with the phased array antenna design.

  3. Stress Modulates the Use of Spatial versus Stimulus-Response Learning Strategies in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippsen, Christine; Richter, Steffen; Bohringer, Andreas; Wippich, Werner; Schachinger, Hartmut; Schwabe, Lars; Oitzl, Melly S.

    2007-01-01

    Animal studies provided evidence that stress modulates multiple memory systems, favoring caudate nucleus-based "habit" memory over hippocampus-based "cognitive" memory. However, effects of stress on learning strategy and memory consolidation were not differentiated. We specifically address the effects of psychosocial stress on the applied learning…

  4. The (Im)possibility of the Project: Radford Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bill

    2010-01-01

    In this address, the author engages both with the possibility "and" the impossibility of the educational project--and suggests something of what it means to say this. His presentation is specifically addressed to the theme of the (im)possibility of the educational project. He draws from philosophy, literature, psychoanalysis and history,…

  5. Development of training modules for magnetic particle inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Daigo; Eisenmann, David J.; Enyart, Darrel; Nakagawa, Norio; Lo, Chester; Orman, David

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) is a nondestructive evaluation technique used with ferromagnetic materials. Although the application of this method may appear straightforward, MPI combines the complicated nature of electromagnetics, metallurgical material effects, fluid-particle motion dynamics, and physiological human factors into a single inspection. To fully appreciate industry specifications such as ASTM E-1444, users should develop a basic understanding of the many factors that are involved in MPI. We have developed a series of MPI training modules that are aimed at addressing this requirement. The modules not only offer qualitative explanations, but also show quantitative explanations in terms of measurement and numerical simulation data in many instances. There are five modules in all. Module ♯1 shows characteristics of waveforms and magnetizing methods. This allows MPI practitioners to make optimum choice of waveform and magnetizing method. Module ♯2 explains how material properties relate to the magnetic characteristics. Module ♯3 shows the strength of the excitation field or the flux leakage from a crack and how it compares to the detectability of a crack by MPI. Module ♯4 shows how specimen status may influence defect detection. Module ♯5 shows the effects of particle properties on defect detection.

  6. Modulation of Gut-Specific Mechanisms by Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration in Male Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus: A Systems Biology Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Angela M.; LeCapitaine, Nicole J.; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter J.; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; McGoey, Robin R.; Auten, Matthew W.; LaMotte, Lynn; Chandra, Lawrance C.; Birke, Leslie L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our studies have demonstrated that chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration results in a generalized attenuation of viral load and tissue inflammation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected male rhesus macaques. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue is an important site for HIV replication and inflammation that can impact disease progression. We used a systems approach to examine the duodenal immune environment in 4- to 6-year-old male rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVMAC251 after 17 months of chronic THC administration (0.18–0.32 mg/kg, intramuscularly, twice daily). Duodenal tissue samples excised from chronic THC- (N=4) and vehicle (VEH)-treated (N=4) subjects at ∼5 months postinoculation showed lower viral load, increased duodenal integrin beta 7+(β7) CD4+ and CD8+ central memory T cells, and a significant preferential increase in Th2 cytokine expression. Gene array analysis identified six genes that were differentially expressed in intestinal samples of the THC/SIV animals when compared to those differentially expressed between VEH/SIV and uninfected controls. These genes were identified as having significant participation in (1) apoptosis, (2) cell survival, proliferation, and morphogenesis, and (3) energy and substrate metabolic processes. Additional analysis comparing the duodenal gene expression in THC/SIV vs. VEH/SIV animals identified 93 differentially expressed genes that participate in processes involved in muscle contraction, protein folding, cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and cell signaling. Immunohistochemical staining showed attenuated apoptosis in epithelial crypt cells of THC/SIV subjects. Our results indicate that chronic THC administration modulated duodenal T cell populations, favored a pro-Th2 cytokine balance, and decreased intestinal apoptosis. These findings reveal novel mechanisms that may potentially contribute to cannabinoid-mediated disease modulation. PMID:24400995

  7. Modulation of gut-specific mechanisms by chronic δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol administration in male rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus: a systems biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Molina, Patricia E; Amedee, Angela M; LeCapitaine, Nicole J; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter J; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; McGoey, Robin R; Auten, Matthew W; LaMotte, Lynn; Chandra, Lawrance C; Birke, Leslie L

    2014-06-01

    Our studies have demonstrated that chronic Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration results in a generalized attenuation of viral load and tissue inflammation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected male rhesus macaques. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue is an important site for HIV replication and inflammation that can impact disease progression. We used a systems approach to examine the duodenal immune environment in 4- to 6-year-old male rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVMAC251 after 17 months of chronic THC administration (0.18-0.32 mg/kg, intramuscularly, twice daily). Duodenal tissue samples excised from chronic THC- (N=4) and vehicle (VEH)-treated (N=4) subjects at ∼5 months postinoculation showed lower viral load, increased duodenal integrin beta 7(+)(β7) CD4(+) and CD8(+) central memory T cells, and a significant preferential increase in Th2 cytokine expression. Gene array analysis identified six genes that were differentially expressed in intestinal samples of the THC/SIV animals when compared to those differentially expressed between VEH/SIV and uninfected controls. These genes were identified as having significant participation in (1) apoptosis, (2) cell survival, proliferation, and morphogenesis, and (3) energy and substrate metabolic processes. Additional analysis comparing the duodenal gene expression in THC/SIV vs. VEH/SIV animals identified 93 differentially expressed genes that participate in processes involved in muscle contraction, protein folding, cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and cell signaling. Immunohistochemical staining showed attenuated apoptosis in epithelial crypt cells of THC/SIV subjects. Our results indicate that chronic THC administration modulated duodenal T cell populations, favored a pro-Th2 cytokine balance, and decreased intestinal apoptosis. These findings reveal novel mechanisms that may potentially contribute to cannabinoid-mediated disease modulation.

  8. Modulation of CD4+ T Cell-Dependent Specific Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cells Differentiation and Proliferation by the Timing of Increase in the Pathogen Load

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Persechini, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Following infection with viruses, bacteria or protozoan parasites, naïve antigen-specific CD8+ T cells undergo a process of differentiation and proliferation to generate effector cells. Recent evidences suggest that the timing of generation of specific effector CD8+ T cells varies widely according to different pathogens. We hypothesized that the timing of increase in the pathogen load could be a critical parameter governing this process. Methodology/Principal Findings Using increasing doses of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi to infect C57BL/6 mice, we observed a significant acceleration in the timing of parasitemia without an increase in mouse susceptibility. In contrast, in CD8 deficient mice, we observed an inverse relationship between the parasite inoculum and the timing of death. These results suggest that in normal mice CD8+ T cells became protective earlier, following the accelerated development of parasitemia. The evaluation of specific cytotoxic responses in vivo to three distinct epitopes revealed that increasing the parasite inoculum hastened the expansion of specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells following infection. The differentiation and expansion of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells is in fact dependent on parasite multiplication, as radiation-attenuated parasites were unable to activate these cells. We also observed that, in contrast to most pathogens, the activation process of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was dependent on MHC class II restricted CD4+ T cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results are compatible with our initial hypothesis that the timing of increase in the pathogen load can be a critical parameter governing the kinetics of CD4+ T cell-dependent expansion of pathogen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. PMID:17460760

  9. Identifying and Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Kestenbaum, Lori A.; Feemster, Kristen A.

    2015-01-01

    In the 20th century, the introduction of multiple vaccines significantly reduced childhood morbidity, mortality, and disease outbreaks. Despite, and perhaps because of, their public health impact, an increasing number of parents and patients are choosing to delay or refuse vaccines. These individuals are described as vaccine hesitant. This phenomenon has developed due to the confluence of multiple social, cultural, political and personal factors. As immunization programs continue to expand, understanding and addressing vaccine hesitancy will be crucial to their successful implementation. This review explores the history of vaccine hesitancy, its causes, and suggested approaches for reducing hesitancy and strengthening vaccine acceptance. PMID:25875982

  10. Identifying and addressing vaccine hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Kestenbaum, Lori A; Feemster, Kristen A

    2015-04-01

    In the 20th century, the introduction of multiple vaccines significantly reduced childhood morbidity, mortality, and disease outbreaks. Despite, and perhaps because of, their public health impact, an increasing number of parents and patients are choosing to delay or refuse vaccines. These individuals are described as "vaccine hesitant." This phenomenon has developed due to the confluence of multiple social, cultural, political, and personal factors. As immunization programs continue to expand, understanding and addressing vaccine hesitancy will be crucial to their successful implementation. This review explores the history of vaccine hesitancy, its causes, and suggested approaches for reducing hesitancy and strengthening vaccine acceptance.

  11. Nanoscale content-addressable memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bryan (Inventor); Principe, Jose C. (Inventor); Fortes, Jose (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A combined content addressable memory device and memory interface is provided. The combined device and interface includes one or more one molecular wire crossbar memories having spaced-apart key nanowires, spaced-apart value nanowires adjacent to the key nanowires, and configurable switches between the key nanowires and the value nanowires. The combination further includes a key microwire-nanowire grid (key MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart key nanowires, and a value microwire-nanowire grid (value MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart value nanowires. A key or value MNGs selects multiple nanowires for a given key or value.

  12. Addressing inequities in healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Friel, Sharon; Hattersley, Libby; Ford, Laura; O'Rourke, Kerryn

    2015-09-01

    What, when, where and how much people eat is influenced by a complex mix of factors at societal, community and individual levels. These influences operate both directly through the food system and indirectly through political, economic, social and cultural pathways that cause social stratification and influence the quality of conditions in which people live their lives. These factors are the social determinants of inequities in healthy eating. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence base for addressing these determinants and for the promotion of equity in healthy eating.

  13. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  14. Intermediate load modules for test and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic modules were tested for qualification. Tests involved the following: (1) delivery of 20 solar cells for use as reference cells; (2) module documentation and inspection plans specifying the 10 Group I modules; (3) design review of module documentation from Group I modules; (4) revise module documentation to overcome any problems of deficiencies associated with the Group I modules; (5) delivery of 10 Group II modules built to revised specifications; (6) testing of Group II modules to the criteria as outlined in qualification specification. It is found that the solarvolt MSP43E40B satisfies the design criteria of qualification specification for intermediate load modules. Design changes were made in the Group I modules to overcome the deficiencies which allowed Group II modules to pass the qualification tests.

  15. Innovative Legal Approaches to Address Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pomeranz, Jennifer L; Teret, Stephen P; Sugarman, Stephen D; Rutkow, Lainie; Brownell, Kelly D

    2009-01-01

    Context: The law is a powerful public health tool with considerable potential to address the obesity issue. Scientific advances, gaps in the current regulatory environment, and new ways of conceptualizing rights and responsibilities offer a foundation for legal innovation. Methods: This article connects developments in public health and nutrition with legal advances to define promising avenues for preventing obesity through the application of the law. Findings: Two sets of approaches are defined: (1) direct application of the law to factors known to contribute to obesity and (2) original and innovative legal solutions that address the weak regulatory stance of government and the ineffectiveness of existing policies used to control obesity. Specific legal strategies are discussed for limiting children's food marketing, confronting the potential addictive properties of food, compelling industry speech, increasing government speech, regulating conduct, using tort litigation, applying nuisance law as a litigation strategy, and considering performance-based regulation as an alternative to typical regulatory actions. Finally, preemption is an overriding issue and can play both a facilitative and a hindering role in obesity policy. Conclusions: Legal solutions are immediately available to the government to address obesity and should be considered at the federal, state, and local levels. New and innovative legal solutions represent opportunities to take the law in creative directions and to link legal, nutrition, and public health communities in constructive ways. PMID:19298420

  16. Global-Address Space Networking (GASNet) Library

    SciTech Connect

    Welcome, Michael L.; Bell, Christian S.

    2011-04-06

    GASNet (Global-Address Space Networking) is a language-independent, low-level networking layer that provides network-independent, high-performance communication primitives tailored for implementing parallel global address space SPMD languages such as UPC and Titanium. The interface is primarily intended as a compilation target and for use by runtime library writers (as opposed to end users), and the primary goals are high performance, interface portability, and expressiveness. GASNet is designed specifically to support high-performance, portable implementations of global address space languages on modern high-end communication networks. The interface provides the flexibility and extensibility required to express a wide variety of communication patterns without sacrificing performance by imposing large computational overheads in the interface. The design of the GASNet interface is partitioned into two layers to maximize porting ease without sacrificing performance: the lower level is a narrow but very general interface called the GASNet core API - the design is basedheavily on Active Messages, and is implemented directly on top of each individual network architecture. The upper level is a wider and more expressive interface called GASNet extended API, which provides high-level operations such as remote memory access and various collective operations. This release implements GASNet over MPI, the Quadrics "elan" API, the Myrinet "GM" API and the "LAPI" interface to the IBM SP switch. A template is provided for adding support for additional network interfaces.

  17. Astronaut Edgar Mitchell addresses MSC personnel and news media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, right, the Apollo 14 lunar module pilot, addresses JSC/MSC personnel and news media representatives and other visitors soon after he and his fellow crewmen were released from a 15-day confinement period in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. Pictured with Mitchell in front of the LRL, MSC bldg 37, are Astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., left, commander; and Stuart A Roosa, command module pilot, Mrs Mitchell is at right and Mrs. Roosa, near left. Roosa is flanked by his four children, left to right, Christopher A., Stuart A. Roosa Jr., John D. and Rosemary D.

  18. HCV-specific interleukin-21+CD4+ T cells responses associated with viral control through the modulation of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells function in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guohua; Zhang, Ji-Yuan; Zeng, Qing-Lei; Jin, Lei; Fu, Junliang; Yang, Bin; Sun, Ying; Jiang, Tianjun; Xu, Xiangsheng; Zhang, Zheng; Yuan, Jinhong; Wu, Liyuan; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21)+CD4+ T cells are involved in the immune response against hepatitis B virus (HBV) by secreting IL-21. However, the role of IL-21+CD4+ T cells in the immune response against chronic hepatitis C (CHC) virus infection is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the role of IL-21+CD4+ T cells in CHC patients and the potential mechanisms. The study subjects included nineteen CHC patients who were grouped by viral load (low, < 10(6) RNA copies/ml, n = 8; high, > 10(6) RNA copies/ml, n = 11). The peripheral frequency of HCV-specific IL-21+CD4+ T cells was higher in the low viral load group and was negatively correlated with the serum HCV RNA viral load in all CHC patients. Meanwhile, IL-21+ cells accumulated in the liver in the low viral load group. In vitro, IL-21 treatment increased the expression of proliferation markers and cytolytic molecules on HCV-specific CD8+ T cells. In summary, these findings suggest that HCV-specific IL-21+CD4+ T cells might contribute to HCV control by rescuing HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in CHC patients.

  19. Engineering nanomaterials to address cell-mediated inflammation in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sean; Liu, Yu-Gang; Scott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder with a pathophysiology driven by both innate and adaptive immunity and a primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) worldwide. Vascular inflammation and accumulation of foam cells and their products induce maturation of atheromas, or plaques, which can rupture by metalloprotease action, leading to ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. Diverse immune cell populations participate in all stages of plaque maturation, many of which directly influence plaque stability and rupture via inflammatory mechanisms. Current clinical treatments for atherosclerosis focus on lowering serum levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) using therapeutics such as statins, administration of antithrombotic drugs, and surgical intervention. Strategies that address cell-mediated inflammation are lacking, and consequently have recently become an area of considerable research focus. Nanomaterials have emerged as highly advantageous tools for these studies, as they can be engineered to target specific inflammatory cell populations, deliver therapeutics of wide-ranging solubilities and enhance analytical methods that include imaging and proteomics. Furthermore, the highly phagocytic nature of antigen presenting cells (APCs), a diverse cell population central to the initiation of immune responses and inflammation, make them particularly amenable to targeting and modulation by nanoscale particulates. Nanomaterials have therefore become essential components of vaccine formulations and treatments for inflammation-driven pathologies like autoimmunity, and present novel opportunities for immunotherapeutic treatments of CVD. Here, we review recent progress in the design and use of nanomaterials for therapeutic assessment and treatment of atherosclerosis. We will focus on promising new approaches that utilize nanomaterials for cell-specific imaging, gene therapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27135051

  20. Modulation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Bandwidth efficient digital modulation techniques, proposed for use on and/or applied to satellite channels, are reviewed. In a survey of recent works on digital modulation techniques, the performance of several schemes operating in various environments are compared. Topics covered include: (1) quadrature phase shift keying; (2) offset - QPSK and MSK; (3) combined modulation and coding; and (4) spectrally efficient modulation techniques.

  1. International Energy Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

  2. Passing the Baton: A Collaborative Approach to Development and Implementation of Context-Specific Modules for Graduate Teaching Assistants in Cognate Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Geraldine; McNamara, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A systematic approach to the training of graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) is required to meet the challenges posed by growing numbers of undergraduate and graduate students. At University College Dublin, educational developers and academic staff across six schools collaborated on the design and phased implementation of context-specific GTA…

  3. Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate lipid delivery and oocyte development in C. elegans revealed by molecular-selective label-free imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lo, Szecheng J.; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibit critical functions in biological systems and their importance during animal oocyte maturation has been increasingly recognized. However, the detailed mechanism of lipid transportation for oocyte development remains largely unknown. In this study, the transportation of yolk lipoprotein (lipid carrier) and the rate of lipid delivery into oocytes in live C. elegans were examined for the first time by using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The accumulation of secreted yolk lipoprotein in the pseudocoelom of live C. elegans can be detected by CARS microscopy at both protein (~1665 cm−1) and lipid (~2845 cm−1) Raman bands. In addition, an image analysis protocol was established to quantitatively measure the levels of secreted yolk lipoprotein aberrantly accumulated in PUFA-deficient fat mutants (fat-1, fat-2, fat-3, fat-4) and PUFA-supplemented fat-2 worms (the PUFA add-back experiments). Our results revealed that the omega-6 PUFAs, not omega-3 PUFAs, play a critical role in modulating lipid/yolk level in the oocytes and regulating reproductive efficiency of C. elegans. This work demonstrates the value of using CARS microscopy as a molecular-selective label-free imaging technique for the study of PUFA regulation and oocyte development in C. elegans. PMID:27535493

  4. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-09-15

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR -129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that -129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with -129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than -129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo.

  5. Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate lipid delivery and oocyte development in C. elegans revealed by molecular-selective label-free imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lo, Szecheng J.; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibit critical functions in biological systems and their importance during animal oocyte maturation has been increasingly recognized. However, the detailed mechanism of lipid transportation for oocyte development remains largely unknown. In this study, the transportation of yolk lipoprotein (lipid carrier) and the rate of lipid delivery into oocytes in live C. elegans were examined for the first time by using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The accumulation of secreted yolk lipoprotein in the pseudocoelom of live C. elegans can be detected by CARS microscopy at both protein (~1665 cm‑1) and lipid (~2845 cm‑1) Raman bands. In addition, an image analysis protocol was established to quantitatively measure the levels of secreted yolk lipoprotein aberrantly accumulated in PUFA-deficient fat mutants (fat-1, fat-2, fat-3, fat-4) and PUFA-supplemented fat-2 worms (the PUFA add-back experiments). Our results revealed that the omega-6 PUFAs, not omega-3 PUFAs, play a critical role in modulating lipid/yolk level in the oocytes and regulating reproductive efficiency of C. elegans. This work demonstrates the value of using CARS microscopy as a molecular-selective label-free imaging technique for the study of PUFA regulation and oocyte development in C. elegans.

  6. A genomic island in Vibrio cholerae with VPI-1 site-specific recombination characteristics contains CRISPR-Cas and type VI secretion modules

    PubMed Central

    Labbate, Maurizio; Orata, Fabini D.; Petty, Nicola K.; Jayatilleke, Nathasha D.; King, William L.; Kirchberger, Paul C.; Allen, Chris; Mann, Gulay; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Boucher, Yan; Charles, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    Cholera is a devastating diarrhoeal disease caused by certain strains of serogroup O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae. Mobile genetic elements such as genomic islands (GIs) have been pivotal in the evolution of O1/O139 V. cholerae. Perhaps the most important GI involved in cholera disease is the V. cholerae pathogenicity island 1 (VPI-1). This GI contains the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) gene cluster that is necessary for colonization of the human intestine as well as being the receptor for infection by the cholera-toxin bearing CTX phage. In this study, we report a GI (designated GIVchS12) from a non-O1/O139 strain of V. cholerae that is present in the same chromosomal location as VPI-1, contains an integrase gene with 94% nucleotide and 100% protein identity to the VPI-1 integrase, and attachment (att) sites 100% identical to those found in VPI-1. However, instead of TCP and the other accessory genes present in VPI-1, GIVchS12 contains a CRISPR-Cas element and a type VI secretion system (T6SS). GIs similar to GIVchS12 were identified in other V. cholerae genomes, also containing CRISPR-Cas elements and/or T6SS’s. This study highlights the diversity of GIs circulating in natural V. cholerae populations and identifies GIs with VPI-1 recombination characteristics as a propagator of CRISPR-Cas and T6SS modules. PMID:27845364

  7. Xylan-specific carbohydrate-binding module belonging to family 6 enhances the catalytic performance of a GH11 endo-xylanase.

    PubMed

    Hoffmam, Zaira B; Zanphorlin, Letícia M; Cota, Junio; Diogo, José A; Almeida, Gabriela B; Damásio, André R L; Squina, Fabio; Murakami, Mario T; Ruller, Roberto

    2016-06-25

    Xylanases catalyze the hydrolysis of β-1,4-linked xylosyl moieties from xylan chains, one of the most abundant hemicellulosic polysaccharides found in plant cell walls. These enzymes can exist either as single catalytic domains or as modular proteins composed of one or more carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) appended to the catalytic core. However, the molecular mechanisms governing the synergistic effects between catalytic domains and their CBMs are not fully understood. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the functional effects of the fusion of a CBM belonging to family 6, which exhibits high affinity to xylan, with the GH11 xylanase from Bacillus subtilis, which does not have a CBM in its wild-type form. The wild-type enzyme (BsXyl11) and the chimeric protein (BsXyl11-CBM6) were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity for biochemical characterization. The molecular fusion did not alter the pH and temperature dependence, but kinetic data revealed an increase of 65% in the catalytic efficiency of the chimeric enzyme. Furthermore, the BsXyl11-CBM6 chimera was used to supplement the commercial cocktail Accellerase® 1500 and improved the reducing sugar release by 17% from pretreated sugarcane bagasse. These results indicate that CBM6 can be used as a molecular tool to enhance the catalytic performance of endo-xylanases (GH11) and provide a new strategy for the development of optimized biocatalysts for biotechnological applications.

  8. Task-specific modulations of locomotor action parameters based on on-line visual information during collision avoidance with moving objects.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Michael Eric; Patla, Aftab E

    2008-06-01

    The objectives of this study were: (a) to determine if the control mechanism for interacting with a dynamic real environment is the same as in the virtual reality (VR) studies, and (b) to identify the action control parameters that are modulated to successfully pass through oscillating doors. The participants walked along a 14-m path towards oscillating doors (rate of change in aperture size = 44 cm/s and maximum aperture varied 70, 80, or 100 cm). The participants had to use vision to extrapolate what the aperture of the doors would be at the time of crossing and determine if a change in action parameters was necessary. If their current state did not match the required state then the participants made modifications to their actions. The results showed that individuals in a real environment used similar action modifications (i.e., velocity adjustments) as those seen in VR studies to increase success. Aside from the gradual velocity adjustments observed, there was an immergence of a different locomotor action parameter on some trials that was not seen in VR studies (i.e., shoulder rotations). These shoulder rotations occurred when the participants perceived that a velocity adjustment alone would not lead to a successful trial. These results show that participants use perception to control movement in a feedback rather than feedforward manner.

  9. Development of a thermal storage module using modified anhydrous sodium hydroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. E.; Rowny, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    The laboratory scale testing of a modified anhydrous NaOH latent heat storage concept for small solar thermal power systems such as total energy systems utilizing organic Rankine systems is discussed. A diagnostic test on the thermal energy storage module and an investigation of alternative heat transfer fluids and heat exchange concepts are specifically addressed. A previously developed computer simulation model is modified to predict the performance of the module in a solar total energy system environment. In addition, the computer model is expanded to investigate parametrically the incorporation of a second heat exchange inside the module which will vaporize and superheat the Rankine cycle power fluid.

  10. The kinesin KIF17b and RNA-binding protein TB-RBP transport specific cAMP-responsive element modulator-regulated mRNAs in male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese; Morales, Carlos R; El-Alfy, Mohamed; Hecht, Norman B

    2003-12-23

    Testis brain RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP), the mouse orthologue of the human protein Translin, is a widely expressed and highly conserved protein with proposed functions in chromosomal translocations, mitotic cell division, and mRNA transport, stabilization, and storage. Targeted inactivation of TB-RBP leads to abnormalities in fertility and behavior. A testis-enriched kinesin KIF17b coimmunoprecipitates with TB-RBP in a RNA-protein complex containing specific cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM)-regulated mRNAs. The specificity of this interaction is confirmed by in vivo RNA-protein crosslinking and transfections of hippocampal neurons. Combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry at the electron microscope level, a temporally sequential dissociation of KIF17b and TB-RBP from specific mRNAs is detected with TB-RBP release coincident with the time of mRNA translation, indicating a separation of the processes of transport and translation. We conclude that KIF17b serves as a molecular motor component of a TB-RBP-mouse ribonucleoprotein complex transporting a group of specific CREM-regulated mRNAs in mammalian male postmeiotic germ cells. Because KIF17b has been reported to control CREM-dependent transcription in male germ cells by regulating the intracellular location of the transcriptional coactivator activator of CREM in testis, this indicates that one kinesin links the processes of transcription and transport of specific mRNAs in mammalian male germ cells.

  11. Content-addressable holographic databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grawert, Felix; Kobras, Sebastian; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Coufal, Hans J.; Hanssen, Holger; Riedel, Marc; Jefferson, C. Michael; Jurich, Mark C.

    2000-11-01

    Holographic data storage allows the simultaneous search of an entire database by performing multiple optical correlations between stored data pages and a search argument. We have recently developed fuzzy encoding techniques for this fast parallel search and demonstrated a holographic data storage system that searches digital data records with high fidelity. This content-addressable retrieval is based on the ability to take the two-dimensional inner product between the search page and each stored data page. We show that this ability is lost when the correlator is defocussed to avoid material oversaturation, but can be regained by the combination of a random phase mask and beam confinement through total internal reflection. Finally, we propose an architecture in which spatially multiplexed holograms are distributed along the path of the search beam, allowing parallel search of large databases.

  12. Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert; Abraham, Jacob; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, J.; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, Bill; Chien, Andrew; Coteus, Paul; DeBardeleben, Nathan; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Fazzari, Saverio; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Rob; Stearley, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on Addressing failures in exascale computing' held in Park City, Utah, 4-11 August 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system, discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system, and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia, and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  13. Addressing failures in exascale computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Abraham, Jacob A.; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, Jim; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, William; Chien, Andrew A.; Coteus, Paul; Debardeleben, Nathan A.; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Saverio, Fazzari; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Robert; Stearly, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on “Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing” held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system; and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia; and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  14. Light addressable photoelectrochemical cyanide sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Myung, N.; Sun, Y.

    1996-03-15

    A sensor is demonstrated that is capable of spatial discrimination of cyanide with use of only a single stationary sensing element. Different spatial regions of the sensing element are light activated to reveal the solution cyanide concentration only at the point of illumination. In this light addressable photoelectrochemical (LAP) sensor the sensing element consists of an n-CdSe electrode immersed in solution, with the open-circuit potential determined under illumination. In alkaline ferro-ferri-cyanide solution, the open-circuit photopotential is highly responsive to cyanide, with a linear response of (120 mV) log [KCN]. LAP detection with a spatial resolution of {+-}1 mm for cyanide detection is demonstrated. The response is almost linear for 0.001-0.100 m cyanide with a resolution of 5 mV. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. An Ultra High-Throughput, Whole-Animal Screen for Small Molecule Modulators of a Specific Genetic Pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Chi K.; Wang, Ying; Malany, Siobhan; Deonarine, Andrew; Nguyen, Kevin; Vasile, Stefan; Choe, Keith P.

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is a powerful approach to drug discovery, but many lead compounds are found to be unsuitable for use in vivo after initial screening. Screening in small animals like C. elegans can help avoid these problems, but this system has been limited to screens with low-throughput or no specific molecular target. We report the first in vivo 1536-well plate assay for a specific genetic pathway in C. elegans. Our assay measures induction of a gene regulated by SKN-1, a master regulator of detoxification genes. SKN-1 inhibitors will be used to study and potentially reverse multidrug resistance in parasitic nematodes. Screens of two small commercial libraries and the full Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) of ∼364,000 compounds validate our platform for ultra HTS. Our platform overcomes current limitations of many whole-animal screens and can be widely adopted for other inducible genetic pathways in nematodes and humans. PMID:23637990

  16. ZSCAN5B and primate-specific paralogs bind RNA polymerase III genes and extra-TFIIIC (ETC) sites to modulate mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Younguk; Zhang, Huimin; Kazemian, Majid; Troy, Joseph M.; Seward, Christopher; Lu, Xiaochen; Stubbs, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes contain hundreds of genes transcribed by RNA Polymerase III (Pol III), encoding noncoding RNAs and especially the tRNAs specialized to carry specific amino acids to the ribosome for protein synthesis. In addition to this well-known function, tRNAs and their genes (tDNAs) serve a variety of other critical cellular functions. For example, tRNAs and other Pol III transcripts can be cleaved to yield small RNAs with potent regulatory activities. Furthermore, from yeast to mammals, active tDNAs and related “extra-TFIIIC” (ETC) loci provide the DNA scaffolds for the most ancient known mechanism of three-dimensional chromatin architecture. Here we identify the ZSCAN5 TF family - including mammalian ZSCAN5B and its primate-specific paralogs - as proteins that occupy mammalian Pol III promoters and ETC sites. We show that ZSCAN5B binds with high specificity to a conserved subset of Pol III genes in human and mouse. Furthermore, primate-specific ZSCAN5A and ZSCAN5D also bind Pol III genes, although ZSCAN5D preferentially localizes to MIR SINE- and LINE2-associated ETC sites. ZSCAN5 genes are expressed in proliferating cell populations and are cell-cycle regulated, and siRNA knockdown experiments suggested a cooperative role in regulation of mitotic progression. Consistent with this prediction, ZSCAN5A knockdown led to increasing numbers of cells in mitosis and the appearance of cells. Together, these data implicate the role of ZSCAN5 genes in regulation of Pol III genes and nearby Pol II loci, ultimately influencing cell cycle progression and differentiation in a variety of tissues. PMID:27732952

  17. Tissue-specific and ubiquitous factors binding next to the glucocorticoid receptor modulate transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cavin, C; Buetti, E

    1995-01-01

    Steroid hormones complexed with their receptors play an essential role in the regulation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) transcription. However, the need for additional tissue-specific regulatory factors is suggested by the lack of virus expression in liver, in which glucocorticoid receptors are highly abundant, and by the tissue-specific transcription of reporter genes linked to an MMTV long terminal repeat in transgenic mice. In this study, we characterized two distal-region regulatory elements, DRa and DRc, which, together with the distal glucocorticoid receptor binding site (DRb), increased transcription from the MMTV promoter in permissive cells. This was demonstrated by transfection of these sequences (DRa, DRb, and DRc) in different combinations with the natural MMTV promoter in mouse fibroblasts and mammary epithelial cells, followed by quantitative S1 nuclease mapping of the transcripts. We further showed by DNase I footprinting, methylation interference, and gel retardation assays with various nuclear extracts from permissive or nonpermissive tissues and cell lines that the factors binding to the DRa site are distinct and tissue-specific whereas those binding to DRc are ubiquitous. PMID:7745724

  18. Tissue-specific expression of ghrelinergic and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 systems in goldfish (Carassius auratus) is modulated by macronutrient composition of diets.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ayelén M; Bertucci, Juan I; Delgado, María J; Valenciano, Ana I; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-05-01

    The macronutrient composition of diets is a very important factor in the regulation of body weight and metabolism. Several lines of research in mammals have shown that macronutrients differentially regulate metabolic hormones, including ghrelin and nesfatin-1 that have opposing effects on energy balance. This study aimed to determine whether macronutrients modulate the expression of ghrelin and the nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2) encoded nesfatin-1 in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Fish were fed once daily on control, high-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat and very high-fat diets for 7 (short-term) or 28 (long-term) days. The expression of preproghrelin, ghrelin O-acyl transferase (goat), growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1 (ghs-r1) and nucb2/nesfatin-1 mRNAs was quantified in the hypothalamus, pituitary, gut and liver. Short-term feeding with fat-enriched diets significantly increased nucb2 mRNA levels in hypothalamus and liver, preproghrelin, goat and ghs-r1 expression in pituitary, and ghs-r1 expression in gut. Fish fed on a high-protein diet exhibited a significant reduction in preproghrelin and ghs-r1 mRNAs in the liver. After long-term feeding, fish fed on high-carbohydrate and very high-fat diets had significantly increased preproghrelin, goat and ghs-r1 expression in pituitary. Feeding on a high-carbohydrate diet also upregulated goat and ghs-r1 transcripts in gut, while feeding on a high-fat diet elicited the same effect only for ghs-r1 in liver. Nucb2 expression increased in pituitary, while it decreased in gut after long-term feeding of a high-protein diet. Collectively, these results show for the first time in fish that macronutrients differentially regulate the expression of ghrelinergic and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 systems in central and peripheral tissues of goldfish.

  19. Brain region specific modulation of ethanol-induced depression of GABAergic neurons in the brain reward system by the nicotine receptor antagonist mecamylamine.

    PubMed

    Adermark, Louise; Söderpalm, Bo; Burkhardt, John M

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced activation of the mesolimbic dopamine system are not fully understood, but increased extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) has been shown to involve nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Basal activity of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is under the influence of GABAergic neurotransmission, and the aim of this study was to characterize the involvement of nAChRs in mediating acute ethanol effects on GABAergic activity in subregions of the brain reward system. Multi-electrode in vivo recordings were made in the VTA and nAc of awake and behaving C57BL6/J mice receiving intraperitoneal injections of saline or ethanol (2.0 g/kg), combined with, or without, pre-injection of the non-competitive nAChR antagonist mecamylamine (1.0 mg/kg). Ethanol significantly decreased the activity of quinpirole-insensitive slow-spiking and fast-spiking units in both the VTA and the nAc as compared to saline injection. Pre-treatment with mecamylamine inhibited the rate-inhibiting properties of ethanol in the VTA, but not in the nAc. The data presented here show that ethanol depresses the activity of quinpirole-insensitive, putative GABAergic neurons, in the mesolimbic dopamine system of mice, and that nAChRs contribute to this modulation. This finding, taken together with previous microdialysis studies, supports an involvement of GABAergic neurons and nAChRs in ethanol's interaction with the mesolimbic dopamine system.

  20. Discovering modulators of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Özgün; Demir, Emek; Gönen, Mithat; Sander, Chris; Dogrusoz, Ugur

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that modulate the activity of transcription factors, often called modulators, play a critical role in creating tissue- and context-specific gene expression responses to the signals cells receive. GEM (Gene Expression Modulation) is a probabilistic framework that predicts modulators, their affected targets and mode of action by combining gene expression profiles, protein–protein interactions and transcription factor–target relationships. Using GEM, we correctly predicted a significant number of androgen receptor modulators and observed that most modulators can both act as co-activators and co-repressors for different target genes. PMID:20466809

  1. Module 13: Bulk Packaging Shipments by Highway

    SciTech Connect

    Przybylski, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Hazardous Materials Modular Training Program provides participating United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites with a basic, yet comprehensive, hazardous materials transportation training program for use onsite. This program may be used to assist individual program entities to satisfy the general awareness, safety training, and function specific training requirements addressed in Code of Federal Regulation (CFR), Title 49, Part 172, Subpart H -- ``Training.`` Module 13 -- Bulk Packaging Shipments by Highway is a supplement to the Basic Hazardous Materials Workshop. Module 13 -- Bulk Packaging Shipments by Highway focuses on bulk shipments of hazardous materials by highway mode, which have additional or unique requirements beyond those addressed in the ten module core program. Attendance in this course of instruction should be limited to those individuals with work experience in transporting hazardous materials utilizing bulk packagings and who have completed the Basic Hazardous Materials Workshop or an equivalent. Participants will become familiar with the rules and regulations governing the transportation by highway of hazardous materials in bulk packagings and will demonstrate the application of these requirements through work projects and examination.

  2. Tissue- and stage-specific Wnt target gene expression is controlled subsequent to β-catenin recruitment to cis-regulatory modules

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; de Paiva Alves, Eduardo; Veenstra, Gert Jan C.; Hoppler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Key signalling pathways, such as canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling, operate repeatedly to regulate tissue- and stage-specific transcriptional responses during development. Although recruitment of nuclear β-catenin to target genomic loci serves as the hallmark of canonical Wnt signalling, mechanisms controlling stage- or tissue-specific transcriptional responses remain elusive. Here, a direct comparison of genome-wide occupancy of β-catenin with a stage-matched Wnt-regulated transcriptome reveals that only a subset of β-catenin-bound genomic loci are transcriptionally regulated by Wnt signalling. We demonstrate that Wnt signalling regulates β-catenin binding to Wnt target genes not only when they are transcriptionally regulated, but also in contexts in which their transcription remains unaffected. The transcriptional response to Wnt signalling depends on additional mechanisms, such as BMP or FGF signalling for the particular genes we investigated, which do not influence β-catenin recruitment. Our findings suggest a more general paradigm for Wnt-regulated transcriptional mechanisms, which is relevant for tissue-specific functions of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in embryonic development but also for stem cell-mediated homeostasis and cancer. Chromatin association of β-catenin, even to functional Wnt-response elements, can no longer be considered a proxy for identifying transcriptionally Wnt-regulated genes. Context-dependent mechanisms are crucial for transcriptional activation of Wnt/β-catenin target genes subsequent to β-catenin recruitment. Our conclusions therefore also imply that Wnt-regulated β-catenin binding in one context can mark Wnt-regulated transcriptional target genes for different contexts. PMID:27068107

  3. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Shawna; Croxford, Matthew W.; Abeysinghe, Amali P.; Breeden, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF), which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state. PMID:27272642

  4. Total and Envelope Protein-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cell Response in Pediatric Dengue Is Highly Modulated by Age and Subsequent Infections.

    PubMed

    Toro, Jessica F; Salgado, Doris M; Vega, Rocío; Rodríguez, Jairo A; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A; Greenberg, Harry B; Narváez, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    The response of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) induced by dengue has only recently started to be characterized. We propose that young age and previous infections could be simple factors that affect this response. Here, we evaluated the primary and secondary responses of circulating ASC in infants (6-12 months old) and children (1-14 years old) infected with dengue showing different degrees of clinical severity. The ASC response was delayed and of lower magnitude in infants, compared with older children. In primary infection (PI), the total and envelope (E) protein-specific IgM ASC were dominant in infants but not in children, and a negative correlation was found between age and the number of IgM ASC (rho = -0.59, P = 0.03). However, infants with plasma dengue-specific IgG detectable in the acute phase developed an intense ASC response largely dominated by IgG and comparable to that of children with secondary infection (SI). IgM and IgG produced by ASC circulating in PI or SI were highly cross-reactive among the four serotypes. Dengue infection caused the disturbance of B cell subsets, particularly a decrease in the relative frequency of naïve B cells. Higher frequencies of total and E protein-specific IgM ASC in the infants and IgG in the children were associated with clinically severe forms of infection. Therefore, the ASC response induced by dengue is highly influenced by the age at which infection occurs and previous immune status, and its magnitude is a relevant element in the clinical outcome. These results are important in the search for correlates of protection and for determining the ideal age for vaccinating against dengue.

  5. Total and Envelope Protein-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cell Response in Pediatric Dengue Is Highly Modulated by Age and Subsequent Infections

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Jessica F.; Salgado, Doris M.; Vega, Rocío; Rodríguez, Jairo A.; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Narváez, Carlos F.

    2016-01-01

    The response of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) induced by dengue has only recently started to be characterized. We propose that young age and previous infections could be simple factors that affect this response. Here, we evaluated the primary and secondary responses of circulating ASC in infants (6–12 months old) and children (1–14 years old) infected with dengue showing different degrees of clinical severity. The ASC response was delayed and of lower magnitude in infants, compared with older children. In primary infection (PI), the total and envelope (E) protein-specific IgM ASC were dominant in infants but not in children, and a negative correlation was found between age and the number of IgM ASC (rho = −0.59, P = 0.03). However, infants with plasma dengue-specific IgG detectable in the acute phase developed an intense ASC response largely dominated by IgG and comparable to that of children with secondary infection (SI). IgM and IgG produced by ASC circulating in PI or SI were highly cross-reactive among the four serotypes. Dengue infection caused the disturbance of B cell subsets, particularly a decrease in the relative frequency of naïve B cells. Higher frequencies of total and E protein-specific IgM ASC in the infants and IgG in the children were associated with clinically severe forms of infection. Therefore, the ASC response induced by dengue is highly influenced by the age at which infection occurs and previous immune status, and its magnitude is a relevant element in the clinical outcome. These results are important in the search for correlates of protection and for determining the ideal age for vaccinating against dengue. PMID:27560782

  6. Addressing the water budget with SMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Y. H.; AlBitar, A.; Tomer, S. K.; Merlin, O.; Pellarin, T.

    2012-12-01

    SMOS, a L Band radiometer using aperture synthesis to achieve a good spatial resolution, was successfully launched on November 2, 2009. It was developed and made under the leadership of the European Space Agency (ESA) as an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission. It is a joint program with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France and the Centro para el Desarrollo Teccnologico Industrial (CDTI) in Spain. SMOS carries a single payload, an L band 2D interferometric,radiometer in the 1400-1427 MHz h protected band. This wavelength penetrates well through the vegetation and the atmosphere is almost transparent enabling to infer both soil moisture and vegetation water content. SMOS achieves an unprecedented spatial resolution of 50 km at L-band maximum (43 km on average) with multi angular-dual polarized (or fully polarized) brightness temperatures over the globe and with a revisit time smaller than 3 days. SMOS as been now acquiring data for almost 2 years. The data quality exceeds what was expected, showing very good sensitivity and stability. The data is however very much impaired by man made emission in the protected band, leading to degraded measurements in several areas including parts of Europe and of China. However, many different international teams are now addressing cal val activities in various parts of the world, with notably large field campaigns either on the long time scale or over specific targets to address the specific issues. In parallel different teams are now starting addressing data use in various fields including hydrology. It requires coupling with other models and or disaggregation to address soil moisture distribution over watersheds. Significant new results were obtained for floods and drought events, together with new potential applications in terms of precipitation monitoring This paper thus gives an overview of the science goals of the SMOS mission, a description of its main elements, and a taste of the first results including

  7. Optical Electronics. Electronics Module 9. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franken, Bill

    This module is the ninth of 10 modules in the competency-based electronics series. Introductory materials include a listing of competencies addressed in the module, a parts/equipment list, and a cross reference table of instructional materials. Five instructional units cover: fiber optic cable; optical coupler; lasers and masers; optical displays;…

  8. Is There an Advantage in Designing Adapted, Patient-Specific PTV Margins in Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Therapy for Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Góra, Joanna; Stock, Markus; Lütgendorf-Caucig, Carola

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate robust margin strategies in intensity modulated proton therapy to account for interfractional organ motion in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: For 9 patients, one planning computed tomography (CT) scan and daily and weekly cone beam CTs (CBCTs) were acquired and coregistered. The following planning target volume (PTV) approaches were investigated: a clinical target volume (CTV) delineated on the planning CT (CTV{sub ct}) plus 10-mm margin (PTV{sub 10mm}); a reduced PTV (PTV{sub Red}): CTV{sub ct} plus 5 mm in the left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 8 mm in the inferior-superior (IS) directions; and a PTV{sub Hull} method: the sum of CTV{sub ct} and CTVs from 5 CBCTs from the first week plus 3 mm in the LR and IS directions and 5 mm in the AP direction. For each approach, separate plans were calculated using a spot-scanning technique with 2 lateral fields. Results: Each approach achieved excellent target coverage. Differences were observed in volume receiving 98% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 98%}) where PTV{sub Hull} and PTV{sub Red} results were superior to the PTV{sub 10mm} concept. The PTV{sub Hull} approach was more robust to organ motion. The V{sub 98%} for CTVs was 99.7%, whereas for PTV{sub Red} and PTV{sub 10mm} plans, V{sub 98%} was 98% and 96.1%, respectively. Doses to organs at risk were higher for PTV{sub Hull} and PTV{sub 10mm} plans than for PTV{sub Red}, but only differences between PTV{sub 10mm} and PTV{sub Red} were significant. Conclusions: In terms of organ sparing, the PTV{sub 10mm} method was inferior but not significantly different from the PTV{sub Red} and PTV{sub Hull} approaches. PTV{sub Hull} was most insensitive to target motion.

  9. Role of the Substrate Specificity-Defining Residues of Human SIRT5 in Modulating the Structural Stability and Inhibitory Features of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junru; Haldar, Manas; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D K

    2016-01-01

    manifested via the mutation induced modulation in the protein structure.

  10. Role of the Substrate Specificity-Defining Residues of Human SIRT5 in Modulating the Structural Stability and Inhibitory Features of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junru; Haldar, Manas; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    manifested via the mutation induced modulation in the protein structure. PMID:27023330

  11. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation.

  12. Tracheophytes Contain Conserved Orthologs of a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor That Modulate ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC Genes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Min

    2017-01-01

    ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC (RHS) genes, which contain the root hair-specific cis-element (RHE) in their regulatory regions, function in root hair morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that an Arabidopsis thaliana basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, ROOT HAIR DEFECTVE SIX-LIKE4 (RSL4), directly binds to the RHE in vitro and in vivo, upregulates RHS genes, and stimulates root hair formation in Arabidopsis. Orthologs of RSL4 from a eudicot (poplar [Populus trichocarpa]), a monocot (rice [Oryza sativa]), and a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii) each restored root hair growth in the Arabidopsis rsl4 mutant. In addition, the rice and S. moellendorffii RSL4 orthologs bound to the RHE in in vitro and in vivo assays. The RSL4 orthologous genes contain RHEs in their promoter regions, and RSL4 was able to bind to its own RHEs in vivo and amplify its own expression. This process likely provides a positive feedback loop for sustainable root hair growth. When RSL4 and its orthologs were expressed in cells in non-root-hair positions, they induced ectopic root hair growth, indicating that these genes are sufficient to specify root hair formation. Our results suggest that RSL4 mediates root hair formation by regulating RHS genes and that this mechanism is conserved throughout the tracheophyte (vascular plant) lineage. PMID:28087829

  13. A region addresses patient safety.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Karen Wolk; Grunden, Naida; Harrison, Edward I

    2002-06-01

    The Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative (PRHI) is a coalition of 35 hospitals, 4 major insurers, more than 30 major and small-business health care purchasers, dozens of corporate and civic leaders, organized labor, and partnerships with state and federal government all working together to deliver perfect patient care throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania. PRHI believes that in pursuing perfection, many of the challenges facing today's health care delivery system (eg, waste and error in the delivery of care, rising costs, frustration and shortage among clinicians and workers, financial distress, overcapacity, and lack of access to care) will be addressed. PRHI has identified patient safety (nosocomial infections and medication errors) and 5 clinical areas (obstetrics, orthopedic surgery, cardiac surgery, depression, and diabetes) as ideal starting points. In each of these areas of work, PRHI partners have assembled multifacility/multidisciplinary groups charged with defining perfection, establishing region-wide reporting systems, and devising and implementing recommended improvement strategies and interventions. Many design and conceptual elements of the PRHI strategy are adapted from the Toyota Production System and its Pittsburgh derivative, the Alcoa Business System. PRHI is in the proof-of-concept phase of development.

  14. The PAX3 paired domain and homeodomain function as a single binding module in vivo to regulate subnuclear localization and mobility by a mechanism that requires base-specific recognition.

    PubMed

    Corry, Gareth N; Raghuram, Nikhil; Missiaen, Kristal K; Hu, Ninghe; Hendzel, Michael J; Underhill, D Alan

    2010-09-10

    The transcription factor PAX3 is essential for myogenesis and neural crest development, and is one of several genes mutated in human Waardenburg syndrome. Analysis of disease-causing missense mutations in PAX3 has established the interdependence of its two DNA-binding domains, the paired domain (PD) and the homeodomain (HD), as well as defects in localization and mobility. Paradoxically, mutants that retained DNA binding activity exhibited the greatest defects in localization and mobility, regardless of the domain in which they reside. In the present study, structure-function analyses were used to determine the mechanistic basis of this effect. In the context of the isolated DNA-binding domains, HD mutants adopted an increase in mobility proportional to their loss in DNA binding, while PD mutants continued to display the inverse relationship observed in the full-length protein. At the structural level, this reflected an unexpected dependence on base-specific contacts in the PD, whereas HD mobility was more severely affected by loss of backbone contacts, as has been observed with other DNA-binding proteins. This requires that the HD switch to a base-specific mode in the full-length protein. Moreover, both domains underwent substantial reduction in mobility and altered localization when in a contiguous polypeptide with the endogenous linker segment. Notably, although the HD conferred localization to heterochromatin, this activity was masked when linked to the PD, despite the absence of determinants for subnuclear compartmentalization in the PD or linker. Last, the propensity for PAX3 heterochromatin localization was modulated by sequences at the amino and carboxy termini, supporting a model in which alternate conformations lead to unmasking of the HD. These data indicate that the PD and the HD functionally interact in vivo and behave as a single binding module whose mobility and localization are dependent on sequence-specific contacts.

  15. Integration host factor (IHF) modulates the expression of the pyrimidine-specific promoter of the carAB operons of Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Charlier, D; Roovers, M; Gigot, D; Huysveld, N; Piérard, A; Glansdorff, N

    1993-02-01

    We report the identification of Integration Host Factor (IHF) as a new element involved in modulation of P1, the upstream pyrimidine-specific promoter of the Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella typhimurium carAB operons. Band-shift assays, performed with S-30 extracts of the wild type and a himA, hip double mutant or with purified IHF demonstrate that, in vitro, this factor binds to a region 300 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site of P1 in both organisms. This was confirmed by deletion analysis of the target site. DNase I, hydroxyl radical and dimethylsulphate footprinting experiments allowed us to allocate the IHF binding site to a 38 bp, highly A+T-rich stretch, centred around nucleotide -305 upstream of the transcription initiation site. Protein-DNA contacts are apparently spread over a large number of bases and are mainly located in the minor groove of the helix. Measurements of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) and beta-galactosidase specific activities from car-lacZ fusion constructs of wild type or IHF target site mutants introduced into several genetic backgrounds affected in the himA gene or in the pyrimidine-mediated control of P1 (carP6 or pyrH+/-), or in both, indicate that, in vivo, IHF influences P1 activity as well as its control by pyrimidines. IHF stimulates P1 promoter activity in minimal medium, but increases the repressibility of this promoter by pyrimidines. These antagonistic effects result in a two- to threefold reduction in the repressibility of promoter P1 by pyrimidines in the absence of IHF binding. IHF thus appears to be required for maximal expression as well as for establishment of full repression. IHF could exert this function by modulating the binding of a pyrimidine-specific regulatory molecule.

  16. Addressing the Needs of Students with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ellenburg, Jennifer S.; Acton, Olivia M.; Torrey, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses symptoms of students with Rett Syndrome, a disability in females characterized by the development of multiple specific deficits following a period of normal functioning after birth. Specific interventions for students with Rett syndrome are provided and address communication, stereotypic movements, self-injurious behaviors,…

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat increases the expression of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 73-kilodalton subunit modulating cellular and viral expression.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; Sancho, Rocío; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, which is essential for HIV gene expression and viral replication, is known to mediate pleiotropic effects on various cell functions. For instance, Tat protein is able to regulate the rate of transcription of host cellular genes and to interact with the signaling machinery, leading to cellular dysfunction. To study the effect that HIV-1 Tat exerts on the host cell, we identified several genes that were up- or down-regulated in tat-expressing cell lines by using the differential display method. HIV-1 Tat specifically increases the expression of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) 73-kDa subunit (CPSF3) without affecting the expression of the 160- and 100-kDa subunits of the CPSF complex. This complex comprises four subunits and has a key function in the 3'-end processing of pre-mRNAs by a coordinated interaction with other factors. CPSF3 overexpression experiments and knockdown of the endogenous CPSF3 by mRNA interference have shown that this subunit of the complex is an important regulatory protein for both viral and cellular gene expression. In addition to the known CPSF3 function in RNA polyadenylation, we also present evidence that this protein exerts transcriptional activities by repressing the mdm2 gene promoter. Thus, HIV-1-Tat up-regulation of CPSF3 could represent a novel mechanism by which this virus increases mRNA processing, causing an increase in both cell and viral gene expression.

  18. Neonatal modulation of serum cytokine profiles by a specific mixture of anti-inflammatory neutral and acidic oligosaccharides in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Jolice P; van Zwieteren, Ninke; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A M; Garssen, Johan; van Elburg, Ruurd M

    2013-10-01

    Infections are common in preterm infants and cause differences in cytokine levels. Aim of this study was to measure cytokine levels in preterm infants during the first year of life and to determine the effect of feeding a specific non-digestible carbohydrate mixture (scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS). Furthermore, other perinatal factors in relation to these cytokine levels were analysed. In a randomized controlled trial, preterm infants (GA <32weeks and/or birth weight <1500 g) received a scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS mixture or a placebo (maltodextrin) between days 3 and 30 of life. Cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) were analysed at 5 time points during the study: before start of the study, at day 7, at day 14 and at 5 and 12 months after the start of the intervention. In total, 55 preterm infants in the scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS group and 58 in the placebo group were included. During the neonatal period cytokine levels increased, followed by a decrease at 5 months and 12 months. Enteral supplementation of the non-digestible oligosaccharides decreased cytokine levels at day 7 but not at day 14, indicating a temporarily anti-inflammatory effect. In the neonatal period, serious infection before sampling increased all cytokine levels. In conclusion, enteral supplementation of this specific non-digestible oligosaccharide mixture decreased cytokine levels in preterm infants at day 7 of life, although this effect disappeared thereafter.

  19. Cell-type-specific activity of the human papillomavirus type 18 upstream regulatory region in transgenic mice and its modulation by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, A; Auewarakul, P; Garcia-Carranca, A; Ovseiovich, R; Gaissert, H; Gissmann, L

    1993-01-01

    The upstream regulatory region (URR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) harbors transcriptional promoter and enhancer elements which are thought to determine the cell-type specificity of the virus. In order to study the regulation of HPV-18 expression in vivo, we constructed transgenic mice carrying the bacterial lacZ gene under the control of the HPV-18 URR. Analysis of beta-galactosidase activity by histochemical staining of tissue sections of four independent transgenic mice showed that the viral promoter was specifically active in epithelial cells within a variety of organs (e.g., tongue, ovary, uterus, testis, and small intestine). Very strong staining was observed in newborn transgenic mice in contrast to a weak activity found during fetal life. Determination of beta-galactosidase activity in crude extracts from tissues of three lines of transgenic mice proved to be a useful tool for a quantitative analysis of transgene expression. In mice from two different transgenic lines treated with dexamethasone such measurements revealed a biphasic effect of the hormone on the activity of the enzyme in the stratified epithelium of the tongue (transient increase followed by a decrease). Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed similar changes in beta-galactosidase mRNA in that tissue. Treatment with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) led to a twofold increase in both enzymatic activity and mRNA levels. Finally, combined treatments with dexamethasone and TPA showed that both factors interfered with each other in their respective effects on transgene expression, suggesting that a cross-talk mechanism between transcription factors could be involved in the regulation of the HPV-18 URR. Images PMID:8411377

  20. Development of stably transfected human and rat hepatoma cell lines for the species-specific assessment of xenobiotic response enhancer module (XREM)-dependent induction of drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fery, Yvonne; Mueller, Stefan O; Schrenk, Dieter

    2010-11-09

    Based on our current knowledge, PXR holds a key position in the induction of a selective battery of enzymes and transporters of drug metabolism. In order to prevent serious adverse drug effects or unpredicted drug-drug interactions (DDI), it is compulsory to investigate the possible inducing potency of drugs under development. Furthermore, analysis of the inducing potency of environmental pollutants and new or manufactured chemicals is part of toxicological risk assessment. In non-transfected human HepG2 and rat H4IIE hepatoma cells, we examined the characteristics of expression of 45 genes involved in drug metabolism. A few gene products such as CYP2B6 or CYP3A4 mRNA were prominent in HepG2 cells while their major rat counterparts were, e.g., CYP2B3 or CYP3A1/3A3. Furthermore, a number of xenobiotic receptors including PXR were expressed in both cell lines. A number of genes were regulated in a cell type and species-specific manner after incubation with the prototypical PXR agonists rifampicin or dexamethasone, respectively. Then, we established cell-based reporter gene assays for screening for PXR-dependent induction of drug metabolism. HepG2 and H4IIE cells were stably transfected with a reporter gene containing PXR responsive elements (XREMs) which mediate the induction of PXR target genes such as CYP3A enzymes. With both stable cell lines the CYP inducers clotrimazole, dexamethasone, omeprazole, phenobarbital, rifampicin, as well as the drug candidate EMD 392949 and the brominated flame retardants hexabromocylododecane (HBCD) and a pentabromodiphenyl ether (pentaBDE) mixture were screened. In the human HepG2-XREM3 and rat H4IIE-XREM3 cells, clotrimazole and HBCD were found as common activators of the human and rat PXR whereas pentaBDE was more effective with the human cell system. Omeprazole and phenobarbital did not induce the rat PXR-dependent reporter gene expression in H4IIE-XREM3 cells, while a moderate increase was found in HepG2-XREM3 cells. EMD 392949

  1. An address geocoding solution for Chinese cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehu; Ma, Haoming; Li, Qi

    2006-10-01

    We introduce the challenges of address geocoding for Chinese cities and present a potential solution along with a prototype system that deal with these challenges by combining and extending current geocoding solutions developed for United States and Japan. The proposed solution starts by separating city addresses into "standard" addresses which meet a predefined address model and non-standard ones. The standard addresses are stored in a structured relational database in their normalized forms, while a selected portion of the non-standard addresses are stored as aliases to the standard addresses. An in-memory address index is then constructed from the address database and serves as the basis for real-time address matching. Test results were obtained from two trials conducted in the city Beijing. On average 80% matching rate were achieved. Possible improvements to the current design are also discussed.

  2. Recessive resistance to thyroid hormone in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor beta: evidence for tissue-specific modulation of receptor function.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, D; Hanebuth, E; Smeyne, R J; Everds, N; Stewart, C L; Wehner, J M; Curran, T

    1996-01-01

    The diverse functions of thyroid hormone (T3) are presumed to be mediated by two genes encoding the related receptors, TRalpha and TRbeta. However, the in vivo functions of TRalpha and TRbeta are undefined. Here, we report that targeted inactivation of the mouse TRbeta gene results in goitre and elevated levels of thyroid hormone. Also, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which is released by pituitary thyrotropes and which is normally suppressed by increased levels of thyroid hormone, was present at elevated levels in homozygous mutant (Thrb-/-) mice. These findings suggest a unique role for TRbeta that cannot be substituted by TRalpha in the T3-dependent feedback regulation of TSH transcription. Thrb-/- mice provide a recessive model for the human syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) that exhibits a similar endocrine disorder but which is typically caused by dominant TRbeta mutants that are transcriptional inhibitors. It is unknown whether TRalpha, TRbeta or other receptors are targets for inhibition in dominant RTH; however, the analysis of Thrb-/- mice suggests that antagonism of TRbeta-mediated pathways underlies the disorder of the pituitary-thyroid axis. Interestingly, in the brain, the absence of TRbeta may not mimic the defects often associated with dominant RTH, since no overt behavioural or neuroanatomical abnormalities were detected in Thrb-/- mice. These data define in vivo functions for TRbeta and indicate that specificity in T3 signalling is conferred by distinct receptor genes. Images PMID:8670802

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and domain/splice variants modulate assembly and elastomeric properties of human elastin. Implications for tissue specificity and durability of elastic tissue.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ming; Reichheld, Sean E; Muiznieks, Lisa D; Sitarz, Eva E; Sharpe, Simon; Keeley, Fred W

    2017-05-01

    Polymeric elastin provides the physiologically essential properties of extensibility and elastic recoil to large arteries, heart valves, lungs, skin and other tissues. Although the detailed relationship between sequence, structure and mechanical properties of elastin remains a matter of investigation, data from both the full-length monomer, tropoelastin, and smaller elastin-like polypeptides have demonstrated that variations in protein sequence can affect both polymeric assembly and tensile mechanical properties. Here we model known splice variants of human tropoelastin (hTE), assessing effects on shape, polymeric assembly and mechanical properties. Additionally we investigate effects of known single nucleotide polymorphisms in hTE, some of which have been associated with later-onset loss of structural integrity of elastic tissues and others predicted to affect material properties of elastin matrices on the basis of their location in evolutionarily conserved sites in amniote tropoelastins. Results of these studies show that such sequence variations can significantly alter both the assembly of tropoelastin monomers into a polymeric network and the tensile mechanical properties of that network. Such variations could provide a temporal- or tissue-specific means to customize material properties of elastic tissues to different functional requirements. Conversely, aberrant splicing inappropriate for a tissue or developmental stage or polymorphisms affecting polymeric assembly could compromise the functionality and durability of elastic tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a study that assesses the consequences of known polymorphisms and domain/splice variants in tropoelastin on assembly and detailed elastomeric properties of polymeric elastin.

  4. Conflict adaptation within but not across NoGo decision criteria: Event-related-potential evidence of specificity in the contextual modulation of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Julia L; Clark, Sheri L; Freitas, Antonio L

    2015-07-01

    From the standpoint of conflict-monitoring theory (Botvinick et al., 2001), detecting an incident of information-processing conflict should attenuate the disruptive influence of information-processing conflicts encountered subsequently, by which time cognitive-control operations will have been engaged. To examine the generality of this conflict-adaptation process across task dimensions, the present research analyzed event-related potentials in a Go/NoGo task that randomly varied the NoGo decision criterion applied across trials. Sequential analyses revealed reduced-amplitude fronto-central N2 and NoGo P3 responses on the second of two consecutive NoGo trials. Importantly, both of these conflict-adaptation effects were present only when the same NoGo decision criterion was applied across trials n and n-1. These findings support the theory that encountering information-processing conflict focuses attention on specific stimulus-response contingencies (Verguts & Notebaert, 2009) rather than engages general cognitive-control mechanisms (Freitas & Clark, 2015). Further implications for the generality of cognitive control are discussed.

  5. Modulation of N-cadherin junctions and their role as epicenters of differentiation-specific actin regulation in the developing lens.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michelle; Zhang, Liping; Zhai, Ni; Cader, Ahmad; Chan, Yim; Nowak, Roberta B; Fowler, Velia M; Menko, A Sue

    2011-01-15

    Extensive elongation of lens fiber cells is a central feature of lens morphogenesis. Our study investigates the role of N-cadherin junctions in this process in vivo. We investigate both the molecular players involved in N-cadherin junctional maturation and the subsequent function of these junctions as epicenters for the assembly of an actin cytoskeleton that drives morphogenesis. We present the first evidence of nascent cadherin junctions in vivo, and show that they are a prominent feature along lateral interfaces of undifferentiated lens epithelial cells. Maturation of these N-cadherin junctions, required for lens cell differentiation, preceded organization of a cortical actin cytoskeleton along the cells' lateral borders, but was linked to recruitment of α-catenin and dephosphorylation of N-cadherin-linked β-catenin. Biochemical analysis revealed differentiation-specific recruitment of actin regulators cortactin and Arp3 to maturing N-cadherin junctions of differentiating cells, linking N-cadherin junctional maturation with actin cytoskeletal assembly during fiber cell elongation. Blocking formation of mature N-cadherin junctions led to reduced association of α-catenin with N-cadherin, prevented organization of actin along lateral borders of differentiating lens fiber cells and blocked their elongation. These studies provide a molecular link between N-cadherin junctions and the organization of an actin cytoskeleton that governs lens fiber cell morphogenesis in vivo.

  6. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 inhibitor rescues the osteogenic ability of mesenchymal stem cells under osteoporotic conditions by modulating H3K4 methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Longwei; Ge, Wenshu; Liu, Yunsong; Lai, Guanyou; Liu, Hao; Li, Wenyue; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering may be hindered by underlying osteoporosis because of a decreased osteogenic ability of autologous seed cells and an unfavorably changed microenvironment in these patients. Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the developmental origins of osteoporosis; however, few studies have investigated the potential of epigenetic therapy to improve or rescue the osteogenic ability of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) under osteoporotic conditions. Here, we investigated pargyline, an inhibitor of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), which mainly catalyzes the demethylation of the di- and mono-methylation of H3K4. We demonstrated that 1.5 mmol·L−1 pargyline was the optimal concentration for the osteogenic differentiation of human BMMSCs. Pargyline rescued the osteogenic differentiation ability of mouse BMMSCs under osteoporotic conditions by enhancing the dimethylation level of H3K4 at the promoter regions of osteogenesis-related genes. Moreover, pargyline partially rescued or prevented the osteoporotic conditions in aged or ovariectomized mouse models, respectively. By introducing the concept of epigenetic therapy into the field of osteoporosis, this study demonstrated that LSD1 inhibitors could improve the clinical practice of MSC-based bone tissue engineering and proposes their novel use to treat osteoporosis. PMID:28058134

  7. The Copper Metabolism MURR1 domain protein 1 (COMMD1) modulates the aggregation of misfolded protein species in a client-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Willianne I M; Kakkar, Vaishali; Bartuzi, Paulina; Jaarsma, Dick; Berger, Ruud; Hofker, Marten H; Klomp, Leo W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kampinga, Harm H; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The Copper Metabolism MURR1 domain protein 1 (COMMD1) is a protein involved in multiple cellular pathways, including copper homeostasis, NF-κB and hypoxia signalling. Acting as a scaffold protein, COMMD1 mediates the levels, stability and proteolysis of its substrates (e.g. the copper-transporters ATP7B and ATP7A, RELA and HIF-1α). Recently, we established an interaction between the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and COMMD1, resulting in a decreased maturation and activation of SOD1. Mutations in SOD1, associated with the progressive neurodegenerative disorder Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), cause misfolding and aggregation of the mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) protein. Here, we identify COMMD1 as a novel regulator of misfolded protein aggregation as it enhances the formation of mSOD1 aggregates upon binding. Interestingly, COMMD1 co-localizes to the sites of mSOD1 inclusions and forms high molecular weight complexes in the presence of mSOD1. The effect of COMMD1 on protein aggregation is client-specific as, in contrast to mSOD1, COMMD1 decreases the abundance of mutant Parkin inclusions, associated with Parkinson's disease. Aggregation of a polyglutamine-expanded Huntingtin, causative of Huntington's disease, appears unaltered by COMMD1. Altogether, this study offers new research directions to expand our current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying aggregation disease pathologies.

  8. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin contributes to pain nociception induced in rats by BmK I, a sodium channel-specific modulator.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Hua, Li-Ming; Jiao, Yun-Lu; Ye, Pin; Fu, Jin; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Ding, Gang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for maintenance of the sensitivity of certain adult sensory neurons. Here, we investigated whether the mTOR cascade is involved in scorpion envenomation-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats. The results showed that intraplantar injection of a neurotoxin from Buthus martensii Karsch, BmK I (10 μg), induced the activation of mTOR, as well as its downstream molecules p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70 S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), in lumbar 5-6 dorsal root ganglia neurons on both sides in rats. The activation peaked at 2 h and recovered 1 day after injection. Compared with the control group, the ratios of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4EBP1 in three types of neurons changed significantly. The cell typology of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4E-BP1 immuno-reactive neurons also changed. Intrathecal administration of deforolimus, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, attenuated BmK I-induced pain responses (spontaneous flinching, paroxysmal pain-like behavior, and mechanical hypersensitivity). Together, these results imply that the mTOR signaling pathway is mobilized by and contributes to experimental scorpion sting-induced pain.

  9. Stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes.

    PubMed

    Campeau, Serge; Liberzon, Israel; Morilak, David; Ressler, Kerry

    2011-09-01

    This review summarizes the major discussion points of a symposium on stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes, which was held during the 2010 workshop on the neurobiology of stress (Boulder, CO, USA). The four discussants addressed a number of specific cognitive and affective factors that are modulated by exposure to acute or repeated stress. Dr David Morilak discussed the effects of various repeated stress situations on cognitive flexibility, as assessed with a rodent model of attentional set-shifting task, and how performance on slightly different aspects of this test is modulated by different prefrontal regions through monoaminergic neurotransmission. Dr Serge Campeau summarized the findings of several studies exploring a number of factors and brain regions that regulate habituation of various autonomic and neuroendocrine responses to repeated audiogenic stress exposures. Dr Kerry Ressler discussed a body of work exploring the modulation and extinction of fear memories in rodents and humans, especially focusing on the role of key neurotransmitter systems including excitatory amino acids and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Dr Israel Liberzon presented recent results on human decision-making processes in response to exogenous glucocorticoid hormone administration. Overall, these discussions are casting a wider framework on the cognitive/affective processes that are distinctly regulated by the experience of stress and some of the brain regions and neurotransmitter systems associated with these effects.

  10. Area-specific modulation of neural activation comparing escitalopram and citalopram revealed by pharmaco-fMRI: a randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Windischberger, Christian; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Holik, Alexander; Spindelegger, Christoph; Stein, Patrycja; Moser, Ulrike; Gerstl, Florian; Fink, Martin; Moser, Ewald; Kasper, Siegfried

    2010-01-15

    Area-specific and stimulation-dependent changes of human brain activation by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are an important issue for improved understanding of treatment mechanisms, given the frequent prescription of these drugs in depression and anxiety disorders. The aim of this neuroimaging study was to investigate differences in BOLD-signal caused by administration of the SSRIs escitalopram and citalopram using pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging (pharmaco-fMRI). Eighteen healthy subjects participated in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study in cross-over repeated measures design. Each volunteer performed facial emotional discrimination and a sensorimotor control paradigm during three scanning sessions. Citalopram (20 mg/d), escitalopram (10 mg/d) and placebo were administered for 10 days each with a drug-free period of at least 21 days. Significant pharmacological effects on BOLD-signal were found in the amygdala, medial frontal gyrus, parahippocampal, fusiform and middle temporal gyri. Post-hoc t-tests revealed decreased BOLD-signal in the right amygdala and left parahippocampal gyrus in both pharmacological conditions, compared to placebo. Escitalopram, compared to citalopram, induced a decrease of BOLD-signal in the medial frontal gyrus and an increase in the right fusiform and left parahippocampal gyri. Drug effects were concentrated in brain regions with dense serotonergic projections. Both escitalopram and citalopram attenuated BOLD-signal in the amygdala and parahippocampal cortex to emotionally significant stimuli compared to control stimuli. We believe that reduced reactivity in the medial frontal gyrus found for escitalopram compared to citalopram administration might explain the response differences between study drugs as demonstrated in previous clinical trials.

  11. Polyamine analogs modulate gene expression by inhibiting lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) and altering chromatin structure in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingsong; Huang, Yi; Marton, Laurence J; Woster, Patrick M; Davidson, Nancy E; Casero, Robert A

    2012-02-01

    Aberrant epigenetic repression of gene expression has been implicated in most cancers, including breast cancer. The nuclear amine oxidase, lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) has the ability to broadly repress gene expression by removing the activating mono- and di-methylation marks at the lysine 4 residue of histone 3 (H3K4me1 and me2). Additionally, LSD1 is highly expressed in estrogen receptor α negative (ER-) breast cancer cells. Since epigenetic marks are reversible, they make attractive therapeutic targets. Here we examine the effects of polyamine analog inhibitors of LSD1 on gene expression, with the goal of targeting LSD1 as a therapeutic modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Exposure of the ER-negative human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 to the LSD1 inhibitors, 2d or PG11144, significantly increases global H3K4me1 and H3K4me2, and alters gene expression. Array analysis indicated that 98 (75 up and 23 down) and 477 (237 up and 240 down) genes changed expression by at least 1.5-fold or greater after treatment with 2d and PG11144, respectively. The expression of 12 up-regulated genes by 2d and 14 up-regulated genes by PG11144 was validated by quantitative RT-PCR. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated that up-regulated gene expression by polyamine analogs is associated with increase of the active histone marks H3K4me1, H3K4me2 and H3K9act, and decrease of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2 and H3K27me3, in the promoter regions of the relevant target genes. These data indicate that the pharmacologic inhibition of LSD1 can effectively alter gene expression and that this therapeutic strategy has potential.

  12. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4–14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  13. Specific endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonism does not modulate insulin-induced hemodynamic effects in the human kidney, eye, or forearm.

    PubMed

    Rab, Anna; Dallinger, Susanne; Polak, Kaija; Pleiner, Johannes; Polska, Elzbieta; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2004-05-01

    There is evidence that hyperinsulinemia may stimulate endothelin-1 (ET-1) generation or release, which may affect diabetic vascular complications. BQ-123, a specific ET(A) receptor antagonist, was used to investigate if insulin-induced vascular effects are influenced by an acute ET-1 release. Two randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over studies were performed. In protocol 1, 12 healthy subjects received, on separate study days, infusions of BQ-123 (60 microg/min for 30 min) during placebo clamp conditions, BQ-123 during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (3 mU/kg/min for 390 min), or placebo during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia. Fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) was measured to assess pulsatile choroidal blood flow, and mean flow velocity (MFV) of the ophtalmic artery was measured by color Doppler imaging. In protocol 2, eight healthy subjects received, on separate study days, intra-arterial infusions of BQ-123 (32 microg/min for 120 min) during placebo or insulin clamp. Forearm blood flow was measured with bilateral plethysmography, expressing the ratio of responses in the intervention arm and in the control arm. Insulin alone increased FPA (+10%, p < 0.001) and forearm blood flow (+19%). BQ-123 increased FPA, MFV, and forearm blood flow ratio in the absence and presence of exogenous insulin, but this effect was not different between normo- and hyperinsulinemic conditions. ET-1 plasma concentrations were not affected by insulin. In conclusion, these data do not support the concept that hyperinsulinemia increases ET-1 generation in healthy subjects. Our results, however, cannot necessarily be extrapolated to diabetic and obese subjects.

  14. Maternal folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methylation and gene expression in the rat offspring in a gestation period-dependent and organ-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Ly, Anna; Ishiguro, Lisa; Kim, Denise; Im, David; Kim, Sung-Eun; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2016-07-01

    Maternal folic acid supplementation can alter DNA methylation and gene expression in the developing fetus, which may confer disease susceptibility later in life. We determined which gestation period and organ were most sensitive to the modifying effect of folic acid supplementation during pregnancy on DNA methylation and gene expression in the offspring. Pregnant rats were randomized to a control diet throughout pregnancy; folic acid supplementation at 2.5× the control during the 1st, 2nd or 3rd week of gestation only; or folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy. The brain, liver, kidney and colon from newborn pups were analyzed for folate concentrations, global DNA methylation and gene expression of the Igf2, Er-α, Gr, Ppar-α and Ppar-γ genes. Folic acid supplementation during the 2nd or 3rd week gestation or throughout pregnancy significantly increased brain folate concentrations (P<.001), while only folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy significantly increased liver folate concentrations (P=.005), in newborn pups. Brain global DNA methylation incrementally decreased from early to late gestational folic acid supplementation and was the lowest with folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy (P=.026). Folic acid supplementation in late gestation or throughout pregnancy significantly decreased Er-α, Gr and Ppar-α gene expression in the liver (P<.05). The kidney and colon were resistant to the effect of folic acid supplementation. Maternal folic acid supplementation affects tissue folate concentrations, DNA methylation and gene expression in the offspring in a gestation-period-dependent and organ-specific manner.

  15. Chondrocyte-specific modulation of Cyp27b1 expression supports a role for local synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in growth plate development.

    PubMed

    Naja, Roy Pascal; Dardenne, Olivier; Arabian, Alice; St Arnaud, René

    2009-09-01

    The Cyp27b1 enzyme (25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase) that converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D into the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], is expressed in kidney but also in other cell types such as chondrocytes. This suggests that local production of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) could play an important role in the differentiation of these cells. To test this hypothesis, we engineered mutant mice that do not express the Cyp27b1 gene in chondrocytes. Inactivation of both alleles of the Cyp27b1 gene led to decreased RANKL expression and reduced osteoclastogenesis, increased width of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate at embryonic d 15.5, increased bone volume in neonatal long bones, and increased expression of the chondrocytic differentiation markers Indian Hedgehog and PTH/PTHrP receptor. The expression of the angiogenic marker VEGF was decreased, accompanied by decreased platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 staining in the neonatal growth plate, suggesting a delay in vascularization. In parallel, we engineered strains of mice overexpressing a Cyp27b1 transgene in chondrocytes by coupling the Cyp27b1 cDNA to the collagen alpha(1)(II) promoter. The transgenic mice showed a mirror image phenotype when compared with the tissue-specific inactivation, i.e. a reduction in the width of the hypertrophic zone of the embryonic growth plate, decreased bone volume in neonatal long bones, and inverse expression patterns of chondrocytic differentiation markers. These results support an intracrine role of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) in endochondral ossification and chondrocyte development in vivo.

  16. Addressable-Matrix Integrated-Circuit Test Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayah, Hoshyar R.; Buehler, Martin G.

    1991-01-01

    Method of quality control based on use of row- and column-addressable test structure speeds collection of data on widths of resistor lines and coverage of steps in integrated circuits. By use of straightforward mathematical model, line widths and step coverages deduced from measurements of electrical resistances in each of various combinations of lines, steps, and bridges addressable in test structure. Intended for use in evaluating processes and equipment used in manufacture of application-specific integrated circuits.

  17. Optimized solar module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santala, T.; Sabol, R.; Carbajal, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The minimum cost per unit of power output from flat plate solar modules can most likely be achieved through efficient packaging of higher efficiency solar cells. This paper outlines a module optimization method which is broadly applicable, and illustrates the potential results achievable from a specific high efficiency tandem junction (TJ) cell. A mathematical model is used to assess the impact of various factors influencing the encapsulated cell and packing efficiency. The optimization of the packing efficiency is demonstrated. The effect of encapsulated cell and packing efficiency on the module add-on cost is shown in a nomograph form.

  18. Deciphering Ligand Specificity of a Clostridium thermocellum Family 35 Carbohydrate Binding Module (CtCBM35) for Gluco- and Galacto- Substituted Mannans and Its Calcium Induced Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arabinda; Luís, Ana Sofia; Brás, Joana L. A.; Pathaw, Neeta; Chrungoo, Nikhil K.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Goyal, Arun

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the role of CBM35 from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM35) in polysaccharide recognition. CtCBM35 was cloned into pET28a (+) vector with an engineered His6 tag and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. A homogenous 15 kDa protein was purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography (IMAC). Ligand binding analysis of CtCBM35 was carried out by affinity electrophoresis using various soluble ligands. CtCBM35 showed a manno-configured ligand specific binding displaying significant association with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 14.3×104 M−1), carob galactomannan (Ka = 12.4×104 M−1) and negligible association (Ka = 12 µM−1) with insoluble mannan. Binding of CtCBM35 with polysaccharides which was calcium dependent exhibited two fold higher association in presence of 10 mM Ca2+ ion with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 41×104 M−1) and carob galactomannan (Ka = 30×104 M−1). The polysaccharide binding was further investigated by fluorescence spectrophotometric studies. On binding with carob galactomannan and konjac glucomannan the conformation of CtCBM35 changed significantly with regular 21 nm peak shifts towards lower quantum yield. The degree of association (Ka) with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan, 14.3×104 M−1 and 11.4×104 M−1, respectively, corroborated the findings from affinity electrophoresis. The association of CtCBM35with konjac glucomannan led to higher free energy of binding (ΔG) −25 kJ mole−1 as compared to carob galactomannan (ΔG) −22 kJ mole−1. On binding CtCBM35 with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan the hydrodynamic radius (RH) as analysed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) study, increased to 8 nm and 6 nm, respectively, from 4.25 nm in absence of ligand. The presence of 10 mM Ca2+ ions imparted stiffer orientation of CtCBM35 particles with increased RH of 4.52 nm. Due to such stiffer orientation CtCBM35 became more thermostable and its melting temperature was shifted

  19. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  20. Addressing concerns and achieving expectations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    Approximately 2-1/2 years ago many of us were gathered here in Prague at a similar conference with a similar name, {open_quotes}Energy and Environment: Transitions in Eastern Europe.{close_quotes} Over 300 professionals from 26 nations attended. The objective of the conference was to: Facilitate the Solution of Long and Short Term Energy and Environmental Problems in Eastern Europe by Bringing Together People, ideas and technologies which could be applied to specific problems in a logical step-by-step manner. It was conceded at the time that the long term solution would consist of thoughtfully integrated steps and that the conference was the first step. We are here in the Czech Republic again this week to continue what was started. As before, this conference continues to: (1) Provide a forum to identify and discuss cost-effective environmentally acceptable energy and environmental technology options and their associated socioeconomic issues. (2) Stimulate the Formation of business partnerships (3) Identify key barrier issues hindering technology applications and identify implementation pathways that eliminate or avoid obstacles to progress.

  1. Combined Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulations Unlock Unprecedented Temporal Elasticity and Reveal Phase-Specific Modulation of the Molecular Circadian Clock of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Andrew P.; Chesham, Johanna E.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian oscillator encoding time-of-day information. SCN timekeeping is sustained by a cell-autonomous transcriptional–translational feedback loop, whereby expression of the Period and Cryptochrome genes is negatively regulated by their protein products. This loop in turn drives circadian oscillations in gene expression that direct SCN electrical activity and thence behavior. The robustness of SCN timekeeping is further enhanced by interneuronal, circuit-level coupling. The aim of this study was to combine pharmacological and genetic manipulations to push the SCN clockwork toward its limits and, by doing so, probe cell-autonomous and emergent, circuit-level properties. Circadian oscillation of mouse SCN organotypic slice cultures was monitored as PER2::LUC bioluminescence. SCN of three genetic backgrounds—wild-type, short-period CK1εTau/Tau mutant, and long-period Fbxl3Afh/Afh mutant—all responded reversibly to pharmacological manipulation with period-altering compounds: picrotoxin, PF-670462 (4-[1-Cyclohexyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]-2-pyrimidinamine dihydrochloride), and KNK437 (N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidine-gamma-butyrolactam). This revealed a remarkably wide operating range of sustained periods extending across 25 h, from ≤17 h to >42 h. Moreover, this range was maintained at network and single-cell levels. Development of a new technique for formal analysis of circadian waveform, first derivative analysis (FDA), revealed internal phase patterning to the circadian oscillation at these extreme periods and differential phase sensitivity of the SCN to genetic and pharmacological manipulations. For example, FDA of the CK1εTau/Tau mutant SCN treated with the CK1ε-specific inhibitor PF-4800567 (3-[(3-Chlorophenoxy)methyl]-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine hydrochloride) revealed that period acceleration in the mutant is due to inappropriately phased

  2. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the