Science.gov

Sample records for address specifically module

  1. Public Address Systems. Specifications - Installation - Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Fred M.

    Provisions for public address in new construction of campus buildings (specifications, installations, and operation of public address systems), are discussed in non-technical terms. Consideration is given to microphones, amplifiers, loudspeakers and the placement and operation of various different combinations. (FS)

  2. Single layer liquid crystal optically addressed spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collings, N.; Trushkevych, O.; Crossland, W. A.; Wilkinson, T. D.

    2006-08-01

    Traditionally, the light receptor and light modulation aspects of Optically Addressed Spatial Light Modulators (OASLMs) occur in separate layers. Due to the progress that has been made in the study of nonlinearity in liquid crystal cell doped with chromophores in the past 20 years, it is appropriate to consider in what ways they themselves may be useful as OASLMs. The light reception and modulation aspects coexist within the same layer in these cells. We have been studying a variety of chromophore-doped systems (azo and anthraquinone dyes, buckminsterfullerene, and carbon nanotubes) over the past four years. Dynamic holographic grating formation is observed under conditions of low power laser light both with and without external fields. The majority of the samples are planar aligned and normal incidence of light can be used. They possess very good lifetime stability and no degradation even under high write light intensities. We understand how to avoid permanent recordings using appropriate alignment surfaces. This is important in OASLM applications where real-time updating of written information is required (dynamic holography, all-optical switching). The resolution of the devices is superior to the thickness of the liquid crystal layer, and comparable to the best traditional OASLMs. We are currently working on understanding the dynamics in order to address the issue of speed of response. The report will include latest results on diffraction efficiency from our OASLM characterization set-up.

  3. Optically Addressed Spatial Light Modulators for 3d Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collings, N.

    An optically addressed spatial light modulator (OASLM) records the image on a write beam and transfers it to a read beam. Some example application areas are: image transduction; optical correlation; adaptive optics; and optical neural networks. Current interest in OASLMs has been generated by the work of Qinetiq on 3D display. This work is based on Active tiling, where an image can be recorded in one part of the device and is memorised, whilst the remainder of the device is updated with images. This paper will explain this system and survey the technological alternatives for this application.

  4. Addressing the Mathematics-Specific Needs of Beginning Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Beginning mathematics teachers at the secondary level (middle and high school grades) have mathematics-specific needs that induction programs should address more substantially. However, a number of issues in how programs can accomplish this are more complex than often framed in discussions occurring in the induction programs and the field of…

  5. Design specifications for manufacturability of MCM-C multichip modules

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.; Blazek, R.; Desch, J.; Elarton, J.; Kautz, D.; Markley, D.; Morgenstern, H.; Stewart, R.; Warner, L.

    1995-06-01

    The scope of this document is to establish design guidelines for electronic circuitry packaged as multichip modules of the ceramic substrate variety, although many of these guidelines are applicable to other types of multichip modules. The guidelines begin with prerequisite information which must be developed between customer and designer of the multichip module. The core of the guidelines focuses on the many considerations that must be addressed during the multichip module design. The guidelines conclude with the resulting deliverables from the design which satisfy customer requirements and/or support the multichip module fabrication and testing processes. Considerable supporting information, checklists, and design constraints are captured in specific appendices and used as reference information in the main body text. Finally some real examples of multichip module design are presented.

  6. Addressing dual agency: getting specific about the expectations of professionalism.

    PubMed

    Tilburt, Jon C

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism requires that physicians uphold the best interests of patients while simultaneously insuring just use of health care resources. Current articulations of these obligations like the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation's Physician Charter do not reconcile how these obligations fit together when they conflict. This is the problem of dual agency. The most common ways of dealing with dual agency: "bunkering"--physicians act as though societal cost issues are not their problem; "bailing"--physicians assume that they are merely agents of society and deliver care typically based on a strongly consequentialist public health ethic; or "balancing"--a vaguely specified attempt to uphold both patient welfare and societal need for judicious resource use simultaneously--all fail. Here I propose how the problem of dual agency might begin to be addressed with rigor and consistency. Without dealing with the dual agency problem and getting more specific about how to reconcile its norms when they conflict, the expectations of professionalism risk being written off as cute, nonbinding aphorisms from the medical profession. PMID:25127273

  7. Addressing dual agency: getting specific about the expectations of professionalism.

    PubMed

    Tilburt, Jon C

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism requires that physicians uphold the best interests of patients while simultaneously insuring just use of health care resources. Current articulations of these obligations like the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation's Physician Charter do not reconcile how these obligations fit together when they conflict. This is the problem of dual agency. The most common ways of dealing with dual agency: "bunkering"--physicians act as though societal cost issues are not their problem; "bailing"--physicians assume that they are merely agents of society and deliver care typically based on a strongly consequentialist public health ethic; or "balancing"--a vaguely specified attempt to uphold both patient welfare and societal need for judicious resource use simultaneously--all fail. Here I propose how the problem of dual agency might begin to be addressed with rigor and consistency. Without dealing with the dual agency problem and getting more specific about how to reconcile its norms when they conflict, the expectations of professionalism risk being written off as cute, nonbinding aphorisms from the medical profession.

  8. Parallelized genetic optimization of spatial light modulator addressing for diffractive applications.

    PubMed

    Haist, Tobias; Lingel, Christian; Adler, Rodolfo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We describe a new technique for optimizing the addressing of spatial light modulators in dynamic holographic applications. The method utilizes 200 times parallelization using imaging of subholograms in combination with genetic optimization. Compared to a fixed linear addressing curve for all different gratings, the diffraction efficiency can be improved by up to 25% for a Holoeye Pluto LCoS modulator. PMID:24663371

  9. A Pipelined IP Address Lookup Module for 100 Gbps Line Rates and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuchert, Domenic; Hauger, Simon

    New Internet services and technologies call for higher packet switching capacities in the core network. Thus, a performance bottleneck arises at the backbone routers, as forwarding of Internet Protocol (IP) packets requires to search the most specific entry in a forwarding table that contains up to several hundred thousand address prefixes. The Tree Bitmap algorithm provides a well-balanced solution in respect of storage needs as well as of search and update complexity. In this paper, we present a pipelined lookup module based on this algorithm, which allows for an easy adaption to diverse protocol and hardware constraints. We determined the pipelining degree required to achieve the throughput for a 100 Gbps router line card by analyzing a representative sub-unit for various configured sizes. The module supports IPv4 and IPv6 configurations providing this throughput, as we determined the performance of our design to achieve a processing rate of 178 million packets per second.

  10. Optogenetic approaches addressing extracellular modulation of neural excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczi, Emily A.; Vierock, Johannes; Atsuta-Tsunoda, Kyoko; Tsunoda, Satoshi P.; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Gorini, Christopher; Thompson, Kimberly; Lee, Soo Yeun; Berndt, Andre; Perry, Chelsey; Minniberger, Sonja; Vogt, Arend; Mattis, Joanna; Prakash, Rohit; Delp, Scott; Deisseroth, Karl; Hegemann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular ionic environment in neural tissue has the capacity to influence, and be influenced by, natural bouts of neural activity. We employed optogenetic approaches to control and investigate these interactions within and between cells, and across spatial scales. We began by developing a temporally precise means to study microdomain-scale interactions between extracellular protons and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). By coupling single-component proton-transporting optogenetic tools to ASICs to create two-component optogenetic constructs (TCOs), we found that acidification of the local extracellular membrane surface by a light-activated proton pump recruited a slow inward ASIC current, which required molecular proximity of the two components on the membrane. To elicit more global effects of activity modulation on ‘bystander’ neurons not under direct control, we used densely-expressed depolarizing (ChR2) or hyperpolarizing (eArch3.0, eNpHR3.0) tools to create a slow non-synaptic membrane current in bystander neurons, which matched the current direction seen in the directly modulated neurons. Extracellular protons played contributory role but were insufficient to explain the entire bystander effect, suggesting the recruitment of other mechanisms. Together, these findings present a new approach to the engineering of multicomponent optogenetic tools to manipulate ionic microdomains, and probe the complex neuronal-extracellular space interactions that regulate neural excitability. PMID:27045897

  11. Optogenetic approaches addressing extracellular modulation of neural excitability.

    PubMed

    Ferenczi, Emily A; Vierock, Johannes; Atsuta-Tsunoda, Kyoko; Tsunoda, Satoshi P; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Gorini, Christopher; Thompson, Kimberly; Lee, Soo Yeun; Berndt, Andre; Perry, Chelsey; Minniberger, Sonja; Vogt, Arend; Mattis, Joanna; Prakash, Rohit; Delp, Scott; Deisseroth, Karl; Hegemann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular ionic environment in neural tissue has the capacity to influence, and be influenced by, natural bouts of neural activity. We employed optogenetic approaches to control and investigate these interactions within and between cells, and across spatial scales. We began by developing a temporally precise means to study microdomain-scale interactions between extracellular protons and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). By coupling single-component proton-transporting optogenetic tools to ASICs to create two-component optogenetic constructs (TCOs), we found that acidification of the local extracellular membrane surface by a light-activated proton pump recruited a slow inward ASIC current, which required molecular proximity of the two components on the membrane. To elicit more global effects of activity modulation on 'bystander' neurons not under direct control, we used densely-expressed depolarizing (ChR2) or hyperpolarizing (eArch3.0, eNpHR3.0) tools to create a slow non-synaptic membrane current in bystander neurons, which matched the current direction seen in the directly modulated neurons. Extracellular protons played contributory role but were insufficient to explain the entire bystander effect, suggesting the recruitment of other mechanisms. Together, these findings present a new approach to the engineering of multicomponent optogenetic tools to manipulate ionic microdomains, and probe the complex neuronal-extracellular space interactions that regulate neural excitability. PMID:27045897

  12. Identifying and addressing specific student difficulties in advanced thermal physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Trevor I.

    As part of an ongoing multi-university research study on student understanding of concepts in thermal physics at the upper division, I identified several student difficulties with topics related to heat engines (especially the Carnot cycle), as well as difficulties related to the Boltzmann factor. In an effort to address these difficulties, I developed two guided-inquiry worksheet activities (a.k.a. tutorials) for use in advanced undergraduate thermal physics courses. Both tutorials seek to improve student understanding of the utility and physical background of a particular mathematical expression. One tutorial focuses on a derivation of Carnot's theorem regarding the limit on thermodynamic efficiency, starting from the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The other tutorial helps students gain an appreciation for the origin of the Boltzmann factor and when it is applicable; focusing on the physical justification of its mathematical derivation, with emphasis on the connections between probability, multiplicity, entropy, and energy. Student understanding of the use and physical implications of Carnot's theorem and the Boltzmann factor was assessed using written surveys both before and after tutorial instruction within the advanced thermal physics courses at the University of Maine and at other institutions. Classroom tutorial sessions at the University of Maine were videotaped to allow in-depth scrutiny of student successes and failures following tutorial prompts. I also interviewed students on various topics related to the Boltzmann factor to gain a more complete picture of their understanding and inform tutorial revisions. Results from several implementations of my tutorials at the University of Maine indicate that students did not have a robust understanding of these physical principles after lectures alone, and that they gain a better understanding of relevant topics after tutorial instruction; Fisher's exact tests yield statistically significant improvement at the

  13. Tissue Specificity of Human Disease Module

    PubMed Central

    Kitsak, Maksim; Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Guney, Emre; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    Genes carrying mutations associated with genetic diseases are present in all human cells; yet, clinical manifestations of genetic diseases are usually highly tissue-specific. Although some disease genes are expressed only in selected tissues, the expression patterns of disease genes alone cannot explain the observed tissue specificity of human diseases. Here we hypothesize that for a disease to manifest itself in a particular tissue, a whole functional subnetwork of genes (disease module) needs to be expressed in that tissue. Driven by this hypothesis, we conducted a systematic study of the expression patterns of disease genes within the human interactome. We find that genes expressed in a specific tissue tend to be localized in the same neighborhood of the interactome. By contrast, genes expressed in different tissues are segregated in distinct network neighborhoods. Most important, we show that it is the integrity and the completeness of the expression of the disease module that determines disease manifestation in selected tissues. This approach allows us to construct a disease-tissue network that confirms known and predicts unexpected disease-tissue associations. PMID:27748412

  14. Optically addressed and submillisecond response phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiangjie; Duan, Jiazhu; Zhang, Dayong; Luo, Yongquan

    2014-10-01

    Liquid crystal based phase only spatial light modulator has attracted many research interests since last decades because of its superior advantage. Until now the liquid crystal spatial light modulator has been applied in many fields, but the response speed of nematic LC limited its further application. In this paper, an optically addressed phase only LC spatial light modulator was proposed based on polymer network liquid crystal. Morphology effect on the light scattering of PNLC was studied, which was mainly consisted of fiber and fiber bundles. The morphology nearly determined the light scattering and electro-optical property. Due to the high threshold voltage, to address the PNLC phase modulator was also concerned. Optical addressing method was proposed, in which BSO crystal was selected to replace one of the glass substrate. The response speed of PNLC was so fast that the reorientation of liquid crystal director will follow the change of effective voltage applied on LC layer, which was related with the voltage signal and especially with electron transport of photo-induced carriers due to diffusion and drift. The on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated. Based on this device, beam steering was also achieved by loading 488nm laser strip on the optical addressed phase only spatial light modulator.

  15. 46 CFR 107.317 - Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations. 107.317 Section 107.317 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 107.317 Addresses...

  16. 46 CFR 107.317 - Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations. 107.317 Section 107.317 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 107.317 Addresses...

  17. 46 CFR 107.317 - Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations. 107.317 Section 107.317 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 107.317 Addresses...

  18. 46 CFR 107.317 - Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations. 107.317 Section 107.317 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 107.317 Addresses...

  19. 46 CFR 107.317 - Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Addresses for submittal of plans, specifications, and calculations. 107.317 Section 107.317 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 107.317 Addresses...

  20. Technical Study Addresses a Key Challenge to Harmonizing U.S. and International PV Module Standards (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL builds community and industry support by addressing concerns voiced by key standards organizations. Photovoltaic (PV) manufacturers in the United States test the safety of their products using standards developed through consensus processes. Because U.S. PV module safety standards are not aligned with international standards, manufacturers must test their modules twice - and sometimes maintain separate product lines. By meeting with standards organizations such as the Solar ABCs and Underwriters Laboratories (UL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leaders have worked to identify different stakeholders priorities and concerns. UL, specifically, has expressed concern that the international standards do not address all possible risks. For example, new encapsulant materials could soften at high temperatures and frameless modules could slide apart, exposing live electrical parts or allowing glass to fall on a person below. The deformation of a solid material under the influence of mechanical stresses is known as 'creep.' Current module qualification tests are limited to 85 C, whereas modules can, for short times, reach 105 C outdoors. In response to UL's concern, NREL designed and executed an experiment to compare on-sun and accelerated rates of creep for modules fabricated with various encapsulants, including some that have low melting points. Objectives were to (1) evaluate the potential for creep in outdoor exposure, (2) provide guidance on the risks and design needs with thermoplastic materials, and (3) provide a basis for modifying standards to account for materials with potential to creep. The study tested experimental materials with eight representative encapsulants in both outdoor and indoor (chamber) exposure. The study found that modules with materials that were expected to creep did so in the indoor exposure, but not in most outdoor environments and mounting configurations. The results provide a basis for defining an accelerated test needed to

  1. Specific welds for test blanket modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, Michael; Rey, Jörg

    2009-04-01

    Fabrication and assembling test blanket modules needs a variety of different welding techniques. Therefore, an evaluation of plate joining for breeder units by tungsten-inert-gas, laser, and electron beam welding was performed by qualification of relevant mechanical properties like hardness, charpy, and creep strength. The focus was laid on the study of post-weld heat treatments at lowest possible temperatures and for maximum recovery of the joints. The most important result is that thin EUROFER plates may be welded by EB or laser techniques without the necessity of post-welding heat treatments that include an austenitization step.

  2. Event-Specific Prevention: Addressing College Student Drinking During Known Windows of Risk

    PubMed Central

    Neighbors, Clayton; Walters, Scott T.; Lee, Christine M.; Vader, Amanda M.; Vehige, Tamara; Szigethy, Thomas; DeJong, William

    2007-01-01

    The unique drinking patterns of college students call for Event-Specific Prevention (ESP) strategies that address college student drinking associated with peak times and events. Despite limited research evaluating ESP, many college campuses are currently implementing programming for specific events. The present paper provides a review of existing literature related to ESP and offers practical guidance for research and practice. The prevention typology proposed by DeJong and Langford (2002) provides a framework for strategic planning, suggesting that programs and policies should address problems at the individual, group, institution, community, state, and society level, and that these interventions should focus on knowledge change, environmental change, health protection, and intervention and treatment services. From this typology, specific examples are provided for comprehensive program planning related to orientation/beginning of school year, homecoming, 21st birthday celebrations, spring break, and graduation. In addition, the University of Connecticut’s efforts to address problems resulting from its annual Spring Weekend are described as an illustration of how advance planning by campus and community partners can produce a successful ESP effort. PMID:17616260

  3. Vocal imitation in parrots allows addressing of specific individuals in a dynamic communication network.

    PubMed

    Balsby, Thorsten J S; Momberg, Jane Vestergaard; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Parrots in captivity are known for their ability to vocally imitate humans and recently it has been shown that wild-living orange-fronted conures are able to immediately imitate other individuals' contact calls. The function of this exceptional ability to imitate remains unclear. However, orange-fronted conures live in fission-fusion flocks where they encounter many different individuals every day, and it is possible that their vocal imitation ability is a flexible means to address a specific individual within a flock. We tested this via playback to short-term captive wild conures. Test birds were placed together in pairs in outdoor aviaries to form simple flocks. To simulate imitation of a specific individual these pairs received playback of contact calls that primarily imitate one of the two birds. Overall, individuals that received simulated vocal imitations of its calls responded more frequently and faster than the other individual. This suggests that orange-fronted conures can use imitations of contact calls to address specific individuals of a flock. In the discussion we argue that the fission-fusion flock dynamics of many parrot species has been an important factor in evolving conures' and other parrots' exceptional ability to imitate.

  4. Development of a spatial light modulator: a randomly addressed liquid-crystal-over-nMOS array.

    PubMed

    McKnight, D J; Vass, D G; Sillitto, R M

    1989-11-15

    The construction of a 50- x 50-pixel spatial light modulator based on an active silicon backplane and using the hybrid field effect in nematic liquid crystals as the light modulating process is described. The design and electrical evaluation of the pixel array, which is fabricated in 1.5-microm nMOS and has an individual memory cell within each pixel, are discussed. The performances of a 16 x 16 prototype SLM and the new 50- x 50-pixel device are compared to provide an indication of progress toward high performance spatial light modulators with onboard pixel memory.

  5. Interfacing modules for integrating discipline specific structural mechanics codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endres, Ned M.

    1989-01-01

    An outline of the organization and capabilities of the Engine Structures Computational Simulator (Simulator) at NASA Lewis Research Center is given. One of the goals of the research at Lewis is to integrate various discipline specific structural mechanics codes into a software system which can be brought to bear effectively on a wide range of engineering problems. This system must possess the qualities of being effective and efficient while still remaining user friendly. The simulator was initially designed for the finite element simulation of gas jet engine components. Currently, the simulator has been restricted to only the analysis of high pressure turbine blades and the accompanying rotor assembly, although the current installation can be expanded for other applications. The simulator presently assists the user throughout its procedures by performing information management tasks, executing external support tasks, organizing analysis modules and executing these modules in the user defined order while maintaining processing continuity.

  6. Spatiotemporal dynamics of early spatial and category-specific attentional modulations.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Poghosyan, Vahe

    2012-04-15

    Different attention types select and focus brain resources on relevant sensory information. However, key questions remain unresolved: when and where cortical visual processing is first modulated by different types of attention? How do such modulatory effects spread thereafter? Here, we address these issues for spatial and category-specific types of attention using magnetoencephalography (MEG). First we identified the dynamics of visual attention-independent sensory processing to serve as a baseline framework for the attentional modulations of interest. We found that visual information is processed through the entire hierarchy of visual areas in at least two phases, in the 40-130 ms and 130-230 ms periods respectively. Spatial attention modulations were identified from the beginning of the initial stimulus-evoked response in the primary visual cortex ~70 ms post-stimulus. Category-specific attention modulated face processing beginning from the first face-specific response in high-level object-related areas ~100 ms post-stimulus, substantially earlier than previously reported for face-directed attention. Thus both attention types modulated responses during the first processing phase, beginning at the earliest brain area capable of coding the attentional target. Thereafter attentional effects propagated through the visual cortex together with the stimulus-evoked activity. Category-specific attention did not affect the first-phase responses in low-level strongly retinotopic visual areas, while the second-phase responses were enhanced when the stimulus was the response target and reduced when it was a distractor. Responses during both phases in high-level object-related areas were enhanced by category-specific attention independent of their target/distractor status. Spatial attention effects were stronger in low-level areas, whereas category-specific attention effects were stronger in high-level object-related areas. PMID:22342803

  7. Spatially addressable design of gradient index structures through spatial light modulator based holographic lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlinger, Kris; Lutkenhaus, Jeff; Arigong, Bayaner; Zhang, Hualiang; Lin, Yuankun

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we present an achievable gradient refractive index in bi-continuous holographic structures that are formed through five-beam interference. We further present a theoretic approach for the realization of gradient index devices by engineering the phases of the interfering beams with a pixelated spatial light modulator. As an example, the design concept of a gradient index Luneburg lens is verified through full-wave electromagnetic simulations. These five beams with desired phases can be generated through programming gray level super-cells in a diffractive spatial light modulator. As a proof-of-concept, gradient index structures are demonstrated using synthesized and gradient phase patterns displayed in the spatial light modulator.

  8. Series-connected shaded modules to address partial shading conditions in SPV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Smita; Dahiya, Ratna

    2016-03-01

    With the progress of technology and reduced cost of PV cells, the PV systems are being installed in many countries, including India. Even though this method of power generation has sufficient potential but its effective utilization is still lacking. This is because the output power of PV cells depends on many factors like insolation, temperature, climate conditions prevailing nearby, aging, using modules from different technologies/manufacturers or partial shading conditions. Among these factors, partial shading causes major reduction in output power despite the size of PV systems. As a result, the produced power is lower than the expected value. The connection of modules to each other has great impact on output power if they are prone to partial shading conditions. In this paper, PV arrays are investigated under partial shading conditions. The results show that partial shading losses can be minimized by connecting shaded modules in series rather than in parallel.

  9. Grey scale memory in an optically addressed spatial light modulator with a Lu(Pc)2 doped layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéna, M.; Wu, Z. Y.; L'Her, M.; Pondaven, A.; Cadiou, C.

    1998-02-01

    An optically addressed spatial light modulator with electrolyte bisphtalocyanine of lutetium incorporated in the alignment layer is shown to be capable of memorizing a grey scale image. The relationship between the memorized grey scale and the illumination is shown. The temperature, the concentration of Lu(Pc)2 and the spontaneous polarization of liquid crystals are found to have the effect on the memorization rate.

  10. Polymeric membranes modulate human keratinocyte differentiation in specific epidermal layers.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Simona; Morelli, Sabrina; Giordano, Francesca; Gordano, Amalia; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2016-10-01

    In vitro models of human bioengineered skin substitutes are an alternative to animal experimentation for testing the effects and toxicity of drugs, cosmetics and pollutants. For the first time specific and distinct human epidermal strata were engineered by using membranes and keratinocytes. To this purpose, biodegradable membranes of chitosan (CHT), polycaprolactone (PCL) and a polymeric blend of CHT-PCL were prepared by phase-inversion technique and characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physico-chemical and mechanical properties. The capability of membranes to modulate keratinocyte differentiation inducing specific interactions in epidermal membrane systems was investigated. The overall results demonstrated that the membrane properties strongly influence the cell morpho-functional behaviour of human keratinocytes, modulating their terminal differentiation, with the creation of specific epidermal strata or a fully proliferative epidermal multilayer system. In particular, human keratinocytes adhered on CHT and CHT-PCL membranes, forming the structure of the epidermal top layers, such as the corneum and granulosum strata, characterized by withdrawal or reduction from the cell cycle and cell proliferation. On the PCL membrane, keratinocytes developed an epidermal basal lamina, with high proliferating cells that stratified and migrated over time to form a complete differentiating epidermal multilayer system. PMID:27371895

  11. Characterization of submillisecond response optical addressing phase modulator based on low light scattering polymer network liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangjie, Zhao E-mail: zxjdouble@gmail.com; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2015-01-07

    Optically addressed conventional nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator has attracted wide research interests. But the slow response speed limited its further application. In this paper, polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was proposed to replace the conventional nematic liquid crystal to enhance the response time to the order of submillisecond. The maximum light scattering of the employed PNLC was suppressed to be less than 2% at 1.064 μm by optimizing polymerization conditions and selecting large viscosity liquid crystal as solvent. The occurrence of phase ripple phenomenon due to electron diffusion and drift in photoconductor was found to deteriorate the phase modulation effect of the optical addressed PNLC phase modulator. The wavelength effect and AC voltage frequency effect on the on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated by experimental methods. These effects were interpreted by electron diffusion and drift theory based on the assumption that free electron was inhomogeneously distributed in accordance with the writing beam intensity distribution along the incident direction. The experimental results indicated that the phase ripple could be suppressed by optimizing the wavelength of the writing beam and the driving AC voltage frequency when varying the writing beam intensity to generate phase change in 2π range. The modulation transfer function was also measured.

  12. Preparing teachers to address climate change with project-based instructional modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, S. E.; DeWaters, J.; Small, M.; Dhaniyala, S.

    2012-12-01

    Clarkson University's Project-Based Global Climate Change Education project funded by NASA has created and disseminated several instructional modules for middle and high school teachers. The modules were developed by a team of teachers and university students and faculty. Fundamental to these inquiry-based modules are questions about climate change or mitigation efforts, use of real-world data to explore historical climate changes, and review of IPCC model results to understand predictions of further changes over the next century. As an example, the Climate Connections module requires middle school students to investigate a geographic region, learn about the culture and likely carbon footprint, and then acquire and analyze data sets of historical and predicted temperature changes. The findings are then interpreted in relation to the impact of these changes on the region's culture. NOAA, NASA, IPCC and DOE databases are used extensively. The inquiry approach and core content included in these modules are well aligned with the new Framework for K-12 Science Education. The climate change science in these modules covers aspects of the disciplinary core subjects (dimension 3) and most of the cross cutting concepts (dimension 2). Our approach for inquiry and analysis are also authentic ways to include most of the science and engineering practices (dimension 1) included in the framework. Dissemination of the modules to teachers in New York State has been a joint effort by NYSERDA (New York State Energy Research and Development Authority) and Clarkson. Half-day and full-day workshops and week-long institutes provided opportunities to either introduce the modules and the basics of finding and using temperature data, or delve into the science concepts and integration of the modules into an instructional plan. A significant challenge has been identified by the workshop instructors - many science teachers lack the skills necessary to fully engage in the science and engineering

  13. Functional specification of the Performance Measurement (PM) module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the Performance Measurement Module is described with emphasis on what the PM Module would do, and what it would look like to the user. The PM Module as described could take several man-years to develop. An evolutionary approach to the implementation of the PM Module is presented which would provide an operational baseline PM Module within a few months.

  14. Low-power optically addressed spatial light modulators using MBE-grown III-V structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maserjian, Joseph L.; Larsson, Anders G.

    1991-12-01

    Device approaches are investigated for O-SLMs based on MBE engineered III-V materials and structures. Strong photo-optic effects can be achieved in periodically (delta) -doped multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. The doping-defined barriers serve to separate and delay recombination of the photo-generated electron-hole pairs. One can use this photo-effect to change the internal field across the MQWs giving rise to quantum-confined Stark shift. Alternately, the photo-generated electrons can be used to occupy the quantum wells, which in turn causes exciton quenching and a shift of the absorption edge. Recent work has shown that both of these predicted photo-optic effects can indeed be achieved in such MBE engineered structures. However, these enhanced effects are still insufficient for high contrast modulation with only single or double pass absorption through active layers of practical thickness. We use the asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity approach which permits extinction of light due to interference of light reflected from the front and back surfaces of the cavity. Modulation of the absorption in the active cavity layers unbalances the cavity and 'turns on' the reflected output signal, thereby allowing large contrast ratios. This approach is realized with an all-MBE- grown structure consisting of a GaAs/AlAs quarter-wave stack reflector grown over the GaAs substrate as the high reflectance mirror (approximately equals 0.98) and the GaAs surface as the low reflectance mirror (approximately equals 0.3). We use for our active cavities InGaAs/GaAs MQWs separated by npn (delta) -doped GaAs barriers to achieve sensitive photo-optic effect due to exciton quenching. High contrast modulation (> 60:1) is achieved with the Fabry-Perot structures using low power (< 100 mW/cm2) InGaAs/GaAS quantum well lasers for a write signal.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy engineered III-V semiconductor structures for low-power optically addressed spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, Anders G.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Device approaches are investigated for optically addressed SLMs based on molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) engineered III-V materials and structures. Strong photooptic effects can be achieved in periodically delta-doped multiple-quantum-well structures, but are still insufficient for high-contrast modulation with only single- or double-pass absorption through active layers of practical thickness. The asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity approach is employed to permit extinction of light due to interference of light reflected from the front and back surfaces of the cavity. This approach is realized with an all-MBE-grown structure consisting of GaAs/AlAs quarter-wave stack reflector grown over the GaAs substrate as the high reflectance mirror and the GaAs surface as the low reflectance mirror. High-contrast modulation is achieved using a low-power InGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser for the control signal.

  16. Optical correlator using very-large-scale integrated circuit/ferroelectric-liquid-crystal electrically addressed spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Richard M.; Jared, David A.; Sharp, Gary D.; Johnson, Kristina M.

    1993-01-01

    The use of 2-kHz 64 x 64 very-large-scale integrated circuit/ferroelectric-liquid-crystal electrically addressed spatial light modulators as the input and filter planes of a VanderLugt-type optical correlator is discussed. Liquid-crystal layer thickness variations that are present in the devices are analyzed, and the effects on correlator performance are investigated through computer simulations. Experimental results from the very-large-scale-integrated / ferroelectric-liquid-crystal optical-correlator system are presented and are consistent with the level of performance predicted by the simulations.

  17. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben

    2013-01-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability. PMID:24307756

  18. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  19. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  20. To What Extent Is Criminal Justice Content Specifically Addressed in MSW Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epperson, Matthew W.; Roberts, Leslie E.; Ivanoff, Andre; Tripodi, Stephen J.; Gilmer, Christy N.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which criminal justice content is addressed in all CSWE-accredited MSW programs in the United States ("N"?=?192). Criminal justice content was measured in three areas: (1) dual or joint degree programs, (2) concentrations or specializations, and (3) coursework. Excluding social work and law classes, 22%…

  1. Addressing challenges of modulation transfer function measurement with fisheye lens cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deegan, Brian M.; Denny, Patrick E.; Zlokolica, Vladimir; Dever, Barry; Russell, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is a well defined and accepted method of measuring image sharpness. The slanted edge test, as defined in ISO12233 is a standard method of calculating MTF, and is widely used for lens alignment and auto-focus algorithm verification. However, there are a number of challenges which should be considered when measuring MTF in cameras with fisheye lenses. Due to trade-offs related Petzval curvature, planarity of the optical plane is difficult to achieve in fisheye lenses. It is therefore critical to have the ability to accurately measure sharpness throughout the entire image, particularly for lens alignment. One challenge for fisheye lenses is that, because of the radial distortion, the slanted edges will have different angles, depending on the location within the image and on the distortion profile of the lens. Previous work in the literature indicates that MTF measurements are robust for angles between 2 and 10 degrees. Outside of this range, MTF measurements become unreliable. Also, the slanted edge itself will be curved by the lens distortion, causing further measurement problems. This study summarises the difficulties in the use of MTF for sharpness measurement in fisheye lens cameras, and proposes mitigations and alternative methods.

  2. Education and Training to Address Specific Needs During the Career Progression of Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ajit K; Blair, Patrice Gabler; Lupi, Linda K

    2016-02-01

    Surgeons have specific education and training needs as they enter practice, progress through the core period of active practice, and then as they wind down their clinical work before retirement. These transitions and the career progression process, combined with the dynamic health care environment, present specific opportunities for innovative education and training based on practice-based learning and improvement, and continuous professional development methods. Cutting-edge technologies, blended models, simulation, mentoring, preceptoring, and integrated approaches can play critical roles in supporting surgeons as they provide the best surgical care throughout various phases of their careers.

  3. Issue-Specific Barriers to Addressing Environmental Issues in the Classroom: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Chankook; Fortner, Rosanne W.

    2006-01-01

    To explore issue-specific barriers to teaching environmental issues, the authors investigated secondary science teachers' perceived current and preferred teaching levels for 23 environmental issues and perceived barriers to teaching the selected issues. Subjects in this graduate project were 41 secondary science teachers self-selected to answer a…

  4. Targeting treatment technologies to address specific stormwater pollutants and numeric discharge limits.

    PubMed

    Clark, Shirley E; Pitt, Robert

    2012-12-15

    Stormwater treatment is entering a new phase with stormwater management systems being required to meet specific numeric objectives, as opposed to the historic approach of meeting guidance-document-provided percent removal rates. Meeting numeric discharge requirements will require designers to better understand and apply the physical, chemical, and biological processes underpinning these treatment technologies. This critical review paper focuses on the potential unit treatment operations available for stormwater treatment and outlines how to identify the most applicable treatment options based on the needed pollutant removal goals.

  5. Addressing solar modulation and long-term uncertainties in scaling secondary cosmic rays for in situ cosmogenic nuclide applications [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Bieber, John W.; Clem, John M.; Duldig, Marc L.; Evenson, Paul; Humble, John E.; Pyle, Roger

    2005-10-01

    Solar modulation affects the secondary cosmic rays responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide (CN) production the most at the high geomagnetic latitudes to which CN production rates are traditionally referenced. While this has long been recognized (e.g., D. Lal, B. Peters, Cosmic ray produced radioactivity on the Earth, in: K. Sitte (Ed.), Handbuch Der Physik XLVI/2, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1967, pp. 551-612 and D. Lal, Theoretically expected variations in the terrestrial cosmic ray production rates of isotopes, in: G.C. Castagnoli (Ed.), Proceedings of the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics 95, Italian Physical Society, Varenna 1988, pp. 216-233), these variations can lead to potentially significant scaling model uncertainties that have not been addressed in detail. These uncertainties include the long-term (millennial-scale) average solar modulation level to which secondary cosmic rays should be referenced, and short-term fluctuations in cosmic ray intensity measurements used to derive published secondary cosmic ray scaling models. We have developed new scaling models for spallogenic nucleons, slow-muon capture and fast-muon interactions that specifically address these uncertainties. Our spallogenic nucleon scaling model, which includes data from portions of 5 solar cycles, explicitly incorporates a measure of solar modulation ( S), and our fast- and slow-muon scaling models (based on more limited data) account for solar modulation effects through increased uncertainties. These models improve on previously published models by better sampling the observed variability in measured cosmic ray intensities as a function of geomagnetic latitude, altitude, and solar activity. Furthermore, placing the spallogenic nucleon data in a consistent time-space framework allows for a more realistic assessment of uncertainties in our model than in earlier ones. We demonstrate here that our models reasonably account for the effects of solar modulation on measured

  6. The SSC cycle: a PDCA approach to address site-specific characteristics in a continuous shallow water quality monitoring project.

    PubMed

    Miles, Eduardo J

    2008-05-01

    In any water quality-monitoring project there are several critical success factors that must be adequately addressed in order to ensure the implementation and realization of the monitoring objectives. Site selection is one of these critical success factors. The monitoring sites must be selected to comply with the monitoring and data quality objectives. In the real world, ideal monitoring setting conditions are difficult to achieve, and compromises must be made in order to locate the monitoring stations that best represent the environment to be monitored. Site-specific characteristics are all the environmental, logistical and management factors particular to the monitoring site, that could influence the fulfilment of the monitoring and data quality objectives. Therefore, during the site selection process, it is essential to properly consider and evaluate these site-specific characteristics. The SSC cycle was developed with this goal in mind, to assist the monitoring team to systematically address site-specific characteristics. The cycle is a methodology to organize the site-specific characteristics in different categories, and to ensure a comprehensive overview of these characteristics throughout the project life cycle.

  7. Relationship between Conditions Addressed by Hemodialysis Guidelines and Non-ESRD-Specific Conditions Affecting Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Leinau, Lisa; Murphy, Terrence E.; Bradley, Elizabeth; Fried, Terri

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Persons with ESRD identify non-disease-specific conditions as negatively affecting their quality of life. It is unknown how these non-ESRD-specific conditions correlate with each other and with ESRD-specific conditions such as anemia, renal osteodystrophy, dialysis access, and dialysis adequacy. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and inter-relatedness of selected conditions among persons receiving hemodialysis and to analyze the relationship between non-ESRD-specific and ESRD-specific conditions. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This was an observational cohort study of persons with ESRD that included standardized assessments for pain, fatigue, depression, cognitive impairment, and impaired physical performance. The study was conducted at three dialysis clinics in one urban geographic area. Of the 134 persons who met exclusion criteria, 25 declined participation, yielding a sample size of 109. Results: Pain was present in >81% of participants, fatigue and impaired physical performance in >60% participants, and cognitive impairment and depression in >25% of participants. Pain, fatigue, and depression were highly correlated, but had no correlation with use of a catheter for access, hemoglobin (Hgb), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), phosphorous, or Kt/V values outside of the range of guidelines. There was a modest correlation between cognitive function and both Hgb and iPTH. Conclusions: Non-ESRD-specific conditions such as fatigue, pain, and depression are as prevalent as ESRD-specific conditions, and the magnitude of the correlations between the non-ESRD-specific conditions is greater than the correlations between non-ESRD-specific and ESRD-specific conditions. Current guidelines may be failing to address a substantial component of the disease burden for persons with ESRD. PMID:19261828

  8. Modules, theories, or islands of expertise? Domain specificity in socialization.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Susan A

    2010-01-01

    The domain-specific approach to socialization processes presented by J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) provides a compelling framework for integrating and interpreting a large and disparate body of research findings, and it generates a wealth of testable new hypotheses. At the same time, it introduces core theoretical questions regarding the nature of social interactions, from the perspective of both children and their caregivers. This commentary draws on the literature regarding domain specificity in cognitive development, applauds what is innovative and exciting about applying a domain-specific approach to socialization processes, and points to questions for future research. Foremost among these is what is meant by "domain specificity."

  9. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S.

    2006-06-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, astrocytes exert a complex modulatory control on the olfactory network. glutamate | GABA | inhibition | olfactory bulb | synchronization

  10. Design specifications for manufacturability of MCM-C multichip modules

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, R.; Desch, J.; Kautz, D.; Morgenstern, H.

    1996-10-01

    A comprehensive guide for ceramic-based multichip modules (MCMS) has been developed by AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) to provide manufacturability information for its customers about how MCM designs can be affected by existing process and equipment capabilities. This guide extends beyond a listing of design rules by providing information about design layout, low- temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) substrate fabrication, MCM assembly and electrical testing Electrical mechanical packaging, environmental, and producibility issues are reviewed. Examples of three MCM designs are shown in the form of packaging cross-sectional views, LTCC substrate layer allocations, and overall MCM photographs. The guide has proven to be an effective tool for enhancing communications between MCM designers and manufacturers and producing a microcircuit that meets design requirements within the limitations of process capabilities.

  11. Software requirements specification for the program analysis and control system risk management module

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAEFER, J.C.

    1999-06-02

    TWR Program Analysis and Control System Risk Module is used to facilitate specific data processes surrounding the Risk Management program of the Tank Waste Retrieval environment. This document contains the Risk Management system requirements of the database system.

  12. Segment Specification for the Payload Segment of the Reusable Reentry Satellite: Rodent Module Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) System is composed of the payload segment (PS), vehicle segment (VS), and mission support (MS) segments. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the RRS Rodent Module (RM).

  13. Neural Differentiation Modulates the Vertebrate Brain Specific Splicing Program

    PubMed Central

    Madgwick, Alicia; Fort, Philippe; Hanson, Peter S.; Thibault, Philippe; Gaudreau, Marie-Claude; Lutfalla, Georges; Möröy, Tarik; Abou Elela, Sherif; Chaudhry, Bill; Elliott, David J.; Morris, Christopher M.; Venables, Julian P.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing patterns are known to vary between tissues but these patterns have been found to be predominantly peculiar to one species or another, implying only a limited function in fundamental neural biology. Here we used high-throughput RT-PCR to monitor the expression pattern of all the annotated simple alternative splicing events (ASEs) in the Reference Sequence Database, in different mouse tissues and identified 93 brain-specific events that shift from one isoform to another (switch-like) between brain and other tissues. Consistent with an important function, regulation of a core set of 9 conserved switch-like ASEs is highly conserved, as they have the same pattern of tissue-specific splicing in all vertebrates tested: human, mouse and zebrafish. Several of these ASEs are embedded within genes that encode proteins associated with the neuronal microtubule network, and show a dramatic and concerted shift within a short time window of human neural stem cell differentiation. Similarly these exons are dynamically regulated in zebrafish development. These data demonstrate that although alternative splicing patterns often vary between species, there is nonetheless a core set of vertebrate brain-specific ASEs that are conserved between species and associated with neural differentiation. PMID:25993117

  14. Species-specific modulation of pattern-generating circuits.

    PubMed

    Meyrand, P; Faumont, S; Simmers, J; Christie, A E; Nusbaum, M P

    2000-07-01

    Phylogenetic comparison can reveal general principles governing the organization and neuromodulation of neural networks. Suitable models for such an approach are the pyloric and gastric motor networks of the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion (STG). These networks, which have been well studied in several species, are extensively modulated by projection neurons originating in higher-order ganglia. Several of these have been identified in different decapod species, including the paired modulatory proctolin neuron (MPN) in the crab Cancer borealis [Nusbaum & Marder (1989) J. Neurosci., 9,1501-1599; Nusbaum & Marder (1989), J. Neurosci., 9, 1600-1607] and the apparently equivalent neuron pair, called GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurons 1 and 2 (GN1/2), in the lobster Homarus gammarus [Cournil et al. (1990) J. Neurocytol., 19, 478-493]. The morphologies of MPN and GN1/2 are similar, and both exhibit GABA-immunolabelling. However, unlike MPN, GN1/2 does not contain the peptide transmitter proctolin. Instead, GN1/2, but not MPN, is immunoreactive for the neuropeptides related to cholecystokinin (CCK) and FLRFamide. Nonetheless, GN1/2 excitation of the lobster pyloric rhythm is similar to the proctolin-mediated excitation of the crab pyloric rhythm by MPN. In contrast, GN1/2 and MPN both use GABA but produce opposite effects on the gastric mill rhythm. While MPN stimulation produces a GABA-mediated suppression of the gastric rhythm [Blitz & Nusbaum (1999) J. Neurosci., 19, 6774-6783], GN1/2 activates or enhances gastric rhythmicity. These results highlight the care needed when generalizing neuronal organization and function across related species. Here we show that the 'same' neuron in different species does not contain the same neurotransmitter complement, nor does it exert all of the same effects on its postsynaptic targets. Conversely, a different transmitter phenotype is not necessarily associated with a qualitative change in the way that a modulatory neuron

  15. Sex-specific modulation of juvenile social play by vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Veenema, Alexa H; Bredewold, Remco; De Vries, Geert J

    2013-11-01

    Social play activities among juveniles are thought to contribute to the development of social and emotional skills in humans and animals. Conversely, social play deficits are observed in developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. Importantly, many of these disorders show sex differences in incidence, course of the disease, and severity of symptoms. We hypothesized that sex differences in the neural systems controlling social behavior can contribute to these differences. We therefore studied the involvement of the sexually dimorphic vasopressin and oxytocin systems, which have been implicated in these disorders, in juvenile social play behavior. Single-housed 5-week-old juvenile male and female rats were exposed in their home cage to an age-and sex-matched novel conspecific for 10 min, and social play behaviors were recorded. We found no consistent sex differences in duration or elements of social play in vehicle-treated rats. However, intracerebroventricular injection of the specific vasopressin 1a receptor (V1aR) antagonist (CH2)5Tyr(Me(2))AVP significantly reduced social play behaviors in males while increasing them in females. Intracerebroventricular injection of the specific oxytocin receptor antagonist des-Gly-NH2,d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)(2),Thr(4)]OVT did not alter social play in either sex. To locate the effects of V1aR blockade on social play, we targeted the lateral septum, a sexually dimorphic brain region showing denser vasopressin fibers in males than in females and an abundant expression of V1aR in both sexes. Surprisingly, blockade of V1aR in the lateral septum increased social play behaviors in males, but decreased them in females. These findings suggest sex- and brain region-specific roles for vasopressin in the regulation of social play behavior in juvenile rats. PMID:23838102

  16. Stream specificity and asymmetries in feature binding and content-addressable access in visual encoding and memory.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Duong L; Tripathy, Srimant P; Bedell, Harold E; Ögmen, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Human memory is content addressable-i.e., contents of the memory can be accessed using partial information about the bound features of a stored item. In this study, we used a cross-feature cuing technique to examine how the human visual system encodes, binds, and retains information about multiple stimulus features within a set of moving objects. We sought to characterize the roles of three different features (position, color, and direction of motion, the latter two of which are processed preferentially within the ventral and dorsal visual streams, respectively) in the construction and maintenance of object representations. We investigated the extent to which these features are bound together across the following processing stages: during stimulus encoding, sensory (iconic) memory, and visual short-term memory. Whereas all features examined here can serve as cues for addressing content, their effectiveness shows asymmetries and varies according to cue-report pairings and the stage of information processing and storage. Position-based indexing theories predict that position should be more effective as a cue compared to other features. While we found a privileged role for position as a cue at the stimulus-encoding stage, position was not the privileged cue at the sensory and visual short-term memory stages. Instead, the pattern that emerged from our findings is one that mirrors the parallel processing streams in the visual system. This stream-specific binding and cuing effectiveness manifests itself in all three stages of information processing examined here. Finally, we find that the Leaky Flask model proposed in our previous study is applicable to all three features.

  17. Stream specificity and asymmetries in feature binding and content-addressable access in visual encoding and memory.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Duong L; Tripathy, Srimant P; Bedell, Harold E; Ögmen, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Human memory is content addressable-i.e., contents of the memory can be accessed using partial information about the bound features of a stored item. In this study, we used a cross-feature cuing technique to examine how the human visual system encodes, binds, and retains information about multiple stimulus features within a set of moving objects. We sought to characterize the roles of three different features (position, color, and direction of motion, the latter two of which are processed preferentially within the ventral and dorsal visual streams, respectively) in the construction and maintenance of object representations. We investigated the extent to which these features are bound together across the following processing stages: during stimulus encoding, sensory (iconic) memory, and visual short-term memory. Whereas all features examined here can serve as cues for addressing content, their effectiveness shows asymmetries and varies according to cue-report pairings and the stage of information processing and storage. Position-based indexing theories predict that position should be more effective as a cue compared to other features. While we found a privileged role for position as a cue at the stimulus-encoding stage, position was not the privileged cue at the sensory and visual short-term memory stages. Instead, the pattern that emerged from our findings is one that mirrors the parallel processing streams in the visual system. This stream-specific binding and cuing effectiveness manifests itself in all three stages of information processing examined here. Finally, we find that the Leaky Flask model proposed in our previous study is applicable to all three features. PMID:26382005

  18. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 4: Mission peculiar spacecraft segment and module specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The specifications for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) peculiar spacecraft segment and associated subsystems and modules are presented. The specifications considered include the following: (1) wideband communications subsystem module, (2) mission peculiar software, (3) hydrazine propulsion subsystem module, (4) solar array assembly, and (5) the scanning spectral radiometer.

  19. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  20. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed "lowest supercomplex" (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh's disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  1. Differential recognition of plant cell walls by microbial xylan-specific carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Lesley; Blake, Anthony W; Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Boraston, Alisdair B; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2006-03-21

    Glycoside hydrolases that degrade plant cell walls have complex molecular architectures in which one or more catalytic modules are appended to noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs promote binding to polysaccharides and potentiate enzymic hydrolysis. Although there are diverse sequence-based families of xylan-binding CBMs, these modules, in general, recognize both decorated and unsubstituted forms of the target polysaccharide, and thus the evolutionary rationale for this diversity is unclear. Using immunohistochemistry to interrogate the specificity of six xylan-binding CBMs for their target polysaccharides in cell walls has revealed considerable differences in the recognition of plant materials between these protein modules. Family 2b and 15 CBMs bind to xylan in secondary cell walls in a range of dicotyledon species, whereas family 4, 6, and 22 CBMs display a more limited capability to bind to secondary cell walls. A family 35 CBM, which displays more restricted ligand specificity against purified xylans than the other five protein modules, reveals a highly distinctive binding pattern to plant material including the recognition of primary cell walls of certain dicotyledons, a feature shared with CBM15. Differences in the specificity of the CBMs toward walls of wheat grain and maize coleoptiles were also evident. The variation in CBM specificity for ligands located in plant cell walls provides a biological rationale for the repertoire of structurally distinct xylan-binding CBMs present in nature, and points to the utility of these modules in probing the molecular architecture of cell walls.

  2. Practical guidelines addressing ethical issues pertaining to the curation of human locus-specific variation databases (LSDBs).

    PubMed

    Povey, Sue; Al Aqeel, Aida I; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dalgleish, Raymond; den Dunnen, Johan T; Firth, Helen V; Greenblatt, Marc S; Barash, Carol Isaacson; Parker, Michael; Patrinos, George P; Savige, Judith; Sobrido, Maria-Jesus; Winship, Ingrid; Cotton, Richard G H

    2010-11-01

    More than 1,000 Web-based locus-specific variation databases (LSDBs) are listed on the Website of the Human Genetic Variation Society (HGVS). These individual efforts, which often relate phenotype to genotype, are a valuable source of information for clinicians, patients, and their families, as well as for basic research. The initiators of the Human Variome Project recently recognized that having access to some of the immense resources of unpublished information already present in diagnostic laboratories would provide critical data to help manage genetic disorders. However, there are significant ethical issues involved in sharing these data worldwide. An international working group presents second-generation guidelines addressing ethical issues relating to the curation of human LSDBs that provide information via a Web-based interface. It is intended that these should help current and future curators and may also inform the future decisions of ethics committees and legislators. These guidelines have been reviewed by the Ethics Committee of the Human Genome Organization (HUGO).

  3. Modulation of Automatic Semantic Priming by Feature-Specific Attention Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spruyt, Adriaan; De Houwer, Jan; Hermans, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the semantic analysis of task-irrelevant stimuli is modulated by feature-specific attention allocation. In line with this hypothesis, we found semantic priming of pronunciation responses to depend upon the extent to which participants focused their attention upon specific semantic stimulus dimensions. In Experiment 1, we examined the…

  4. Infrared to visible image up-conversion using optically addressed spatial light modulator utilizing liquid crystal and InGaAs photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodar, A.; Arun Kumar, T.; Sarusi, G.; Abdulhalim, I.

    2016-01-01

    Combination of InGaAs/InP heterojunction photodetector with nematic liquid crystal (LC) as the electro-optic modulating material for optically addressed spatial light modulator for short wavelength infra-red (SWIR) to visible light image conversion was designed, fabricated, and tested. The photodetector layer is composed of 640 × 512 photodiodes array based on heterojunction InP/InGaAs having 15 μm pitch on InP substrate and with backside illumination architecture. The photodiodes exhibit extremely low, dark current at room temperature, with optimum photo-response in the SWIR region. The photocurrent generated in the heterojunction, due to the SWIR photons absorption, is drifted to the surface of the InP, thus modulating the electric field distribution which modifies the orientation of the LC molecules. This device can be attractive for SWIR to visible image upconversion, such as for uncooled night vision goggles under low ambient light conditions.

  5. Block 4 solar cell module design and test specification for residential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Near-term design, qualification and acceptance requirements are provided for terrestrial solar cell modules suitable for incorporation in photovoltaic power sources (2 kW to 10 kW) applied to single family residential installations. Requirement levels and recommended design limits for selected performance criteria are specified for modules intended principally for rooftop installations. Modules satisfying the requirements of this specification fall into one of two categories, residential panel or residential shingle, both meeting general performance requirements plus additional category peculiar constraints.

  6. TASK DIFFICULTY MODULATES ACTIVITY OF SPECIFIC NEURONAL POPULATIONS IN PRIMARY VISUAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Macknik, Stephen L.; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A.; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Spatial attention enhances our ability to detect stimuli at restricted regions of the visual field. This enhancement is thought to depend on the difficulty of the task being performed, but the underlying neuronal mechanisms for this dependency remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that task difficulty modulates neuronal firing rate at the earliest stages of cortical visual processing (area V1) in the macaque monkey. These modulations are spatially specific: increasing task difficulty enhances V1 neuronal firing rate at the focus of attention and suppresses it in regions surrounding the focus. Moreover, we show that response enhancement and suppression are mediated by distinct populations of neurons that differ in direction selectivity, spike width, interspike interval distribution and contrast sensitivity. Our results provide strong support for center-surround models of spatial attention and suggest that task difficulty modulates the activity of specific populations of neurons in the primary visual cortex. PMID:18604204

  7. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. (a... digital audio broadcasting and datacasting are authorized. The RF requirements for the DRM system...

  8. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. (a... digital audio broadcasting and datacasting are authorized. The RF requirements for the DRM system...

  9. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.758 Section 73.758 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... § 73.758 System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. (a... digital audio broadcasting and datacasting are authorized. The RF requirements for the DRM system...

  10. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 3: General purpose spacecraft segment and module specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The specifications for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) general purpose aircraft segment are presented. The satellite is designed to provide attitude stabilization, electrical power, and a communications data handling subsystem which can support various mission peculiar subsystems. The various specifications considered include the following: (1) structures subsystem, (2) thermal control subsystem, (3) communications and data handling subsystem module, (4) attitude control subsystem module, (5) power subsystem module, and (6) electrical integration subsystem.

  11. Photochromic dithienylethene-containing triarylborane derivatives: facile approach to modulate photochromic properties with multi-addressable functions.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chun-Ting; Lam, Wai Han; Wong, Hok-Lai; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2015-01-26

    A series of dithienylethene-containing triarylboranes has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The electrochemistry, photophysics, and photochromic behavior have also been studied. The photophysical and photochromic properties could be facilely tuned in this system by varying the thiophene spacers (thiophene, thienothiophene, and bithiophene) between the dithienylethene and the dimesitylboron (BMes2 ) or the position of the BMes2 substitution in the thiophene spacers. The absorption of closed form has been found to be more sensitive towards the structural modification upon incorporation of the BMes2 unit. Moreover, multi-addressable photochromic reactivity is obtained upon addition of Lewis base (F(-) ), which is due to the formation of boron-Lewis base adduct. The dependence of the photophysical and photochromic properties on the thiophene spacers and the position of the BMes2 substitution has been further supported by computational studies. PMID:25469818

  12. Evolution of DNA specificity in a transcription factor family produced a new gene regulatory module.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Alesia N; Bridgham, Jamie T; Anderson, Dave W; Murphy, Michael N; Ortlund, Eric A; Thornton, Joseph W

    2014-09-25

    Complex gene regulatory networks require transcription factors (TFs) to bind distinct DNA sequences. To understand how novel TF specificity evolves, we combined phylogenetic, biochemical, and biophysical approaches to interrogate how DNA recognition diversified in the steroid hormone receptor (SR) family. After duplication of the ancestral SR, three mutations in one copy radically weakened binding to the ancestral estrogen response element (ERE) and improved binding to a new set of DNA sequences (steroid response elements, SREs). They did so by establishing unfavorable interactions with ERE and abolishing unfavorable interactions with SRE; also required were numerous permissive substitutions, which nonspecifically improved cooperativity and affinity of DNA binding. Our findings indicate that negative determinants of binding play key roles in TFs' DNA selectivity and-with our prior work on the evolution of SR ligand specificity during the same interval-show how a specific new gene regulatory module evolved without interfering with the integrity of the ancestral module. PMID:25259920

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-7, Radiographic Specifications and Code Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Rick; Espy, John

    This seventh in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I describes radiographic specifications and code requirements. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  14. The 2011 Leona Tyler Award Address: The Relationship--And Its Relationship to the Common and Specific Factors of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    A debate exists about whether the common factors or specific ingredients are critical to producing the benefits of psychotherapy. A model of the relationship, based on evolved human characteristics related to healing, is presented that integrates common factors and specific ingredients. After the initial bond is formed, the relationship involves…

  15. Redistribution and modulation of Gross murine leukemia virus antigens induced by specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ioachim, H L; Sabbath, M

    1979-01-01

    Gross murine leukemia virus (G-MuLV)-induced rat leukemia cells in tissue culture replicate G-MuLV, express strong virus-associated membrane antigenicity, and are consistently killed by specific antibodies and complement in cytotoxicity tests. To explore the effect of specific antibodies, rat anti-G-MuLV antisera were added to the cultures of leukemia cells for variable periods of time. Redistribution of virus particles as well as of membrane virus antigens in the form of polar patches and caps was observed by electron microscopy, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy. Substantial decreases in cytotoxicity indexes accompanied these changes. The antigen modulation induced by anti-G-MuLV antibodies in vitro paralleled similar changes obtained in vivo by transplanttion of leukemia cells in rats with high anti-G-MuLV antibody titers. The importance of antigen modulation in this system resides in its direct relationship with the malignant potential of the leukemia cells.

  16. Specificity of the Human Frequency Following Response for Carrier and Modulation Frequency Assessed Using Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Hedwig E; Krugliak, Alexandra; Plack, Christopher J; Carlyon, Robert P

    2015-12-01

    The frequency following response (FFR) is a scalp-recorded measure of phase-locked brainstem activity to stimulus-related periodicities. Three experiments investigated the specificity of the FFR for carrier and modulation frequency using adaptation. FFR waveforms evoked by alternating-polarity stimuli were averaged for each polarity and added, to enhance envelope, or subtracted, to enhance temporal fine structure information. The first experiment investigated peristimulus adaptation of the FFR for pure and complex tones as a function of stimulus frequency and fundamental frequency (F0). It showed more adaptation of the FFR in response to sounds with higher frequencies or F0s than to sounds with lower frequency or F0s. The second experiment investigated tuning to modulation rate in the FFR. The FFR to a complex tone with a modulation rate of 213 Hz was not reduced more by an adaptor that had the same modulation rate than by an adaptor with a different modulation rate (90 or 504 Hz), thus providing no evidence that the FFR originates mainly from neurons that respond selectively to the modulation rate of the stimulus. The third experiment investigated tuning to audio frequency in the FFR using pure tones. An adaptor that had the same frequency as the target (213 or 504 Hz) did not generally reduce the FFR to the target more than an adaptor that differed in frequency (by 1.24 octaves). Thus, there was no evidence that the FFR originated mainly from neurons tuned to the frequency of the target. Instead, the results are consistent with the suggestion that the FFR for low-frequency pure tones at medium to high levels mainly originates from neurons tuned to higher frequencies. Implications for the use and interpretation of the FFR are discussed. PMID:26162415

  17. Stimulus Specificity of Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on Code Modulation Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qingguo; Feng, Siwei; Lu, Zongwu

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) based on code modulated visual evoked potentials (c-VEP) is among the fastest BCIs that have ever been reported, but it has not yet been given a thorough study. In this study, a pseudorandom binary M sequence and its time lag sequences are utilized for modulation of different stimuli and template matching is adopted as the method for target recognition. Five experiments were devised to investigate the effect of stimulus specificity on target recognition and we made an effort to find the optimal stimulus parameters for size, color and proximity of the stimuli, length of modulation sequence and its lag between two adjacent stimuli. By changing the values of these parameters and measuring classification accuracy of the c-VEP BCI, an optimal value of each parameter can be attained. Experimental results of ten subjects showed that stimulus size of visual angle 3.8°, white, spatial proximity of visual angle 4.8° center to center apart, modulation sequence of length 63 bits and the lag of 4 bits between adjacent stimuli yield individually superior performance. These findings provide a basis for determining stimulus presentation of a high-performance c-VEP based BCI system. PMID:27243454

  18. Stimulus Specificity of Brain-Computer Interfaces Based on Code Modulation Visual Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingguo; Feng, Siwei; Lu, Zongwu

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) based on code modulated visual evoked potentials (c-VEP) is among the fastest BCIs that have ever been reported, but it has not yet been given a thorough study. In this study, a pseudorandom binary M sequence and its time lag sequences are utilized for modulation of different stimuli and template matching is adopted as the method for target recognition. Five experiments were devised to investigate the effect of stimulus specificity on target recognition and we made an effort to find the optimal stimulus parameters for size, color and proximity of the stimuli, length of modulation sequence and its lag between two adjacent stimuli. By changing the values of these parameters and measuring classification accuracy of the c-VEP BCI, an optimal value of each parameter can be attained. Experimental results of ten subjects showed that stimulus size of visual angle 3.8°, white, spatial proximity of visual angle 4.8° center to center apart, modulation sequence of length 63 bits and the lag of 4 bits between adjacent stimuli yield individually superior performance. These findings provide a basis for determining stimulus presentation of a high-performance c-VEP based BCI system.

  19. Biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis in C olletotrichum graminicola is required for modulation of immune responses of maize

    PubMed Central

    Albarouki, Emad; Schafferer, Lukas; Ye, Fanghua; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Haas, Hubertus; Deising, Holger B

    2014-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen C olletotrichum graminicola synthesizes one intracellular and three secreted siderophores. eGFP fusions with the key siderophore biosynthesis gene, SID1, encoding l-ornithine-N 5-monooxygenase, suggested that siderophore biosynthesis is rigorously downregulated specifically during biotrophic development. In order to investigate the role of siderophores during vegetative development and pathogenesis, SID1, which is required for synthesis of all siderophores, and the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene NPS6, synthesizing secreted siderophores, were deleted. Mutant analyses revealed that siderophores are required for vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, ROS tolerance, and cell wall integrity. Δsid1 and Δnps6 mutants were hampered in formation of melanized appressoria and impaired in virulence. In agreement with biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis, Δsid1 and Δnps6 strains were not affected in biotrophic development, but spread of necrotrophic hyphae was reduced. To address the question why siderophore biosynthesis is specifically downregulated in biotrophic hyphae, maize leaves were infiltrated with siderophores. Siderophore infiltration alone did not induce defence responses, but formation of biotrophic hyphae in siderophore-infiltrated leaves caused dramatically increased ROS formation and transcriptional activation of genes encoding defence-related peroxidases and PR proteins. These data suggest that fungal siderophores modulate the plant immune system. PMID:24674132

  20. Specific Ions Modulate Diffusion Dynamics of Hydration Water on Lipid Membrane Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Effects of specific ions on the local translational diffusion of water near large hydrophilic lipid vesicle surfaces were measured by Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP). ODNP relies on an unpaired electron spin-containing probe located at molecular or surface sites to report on the dynamics of water protons within ∼10 Å from the spin probe, which give rise to spectral densities for electron–proton cross-relaxation processes in the 10 GHz regime. This pushes nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry to more than an order of magnitude higher frequencies than conventionally feasible, permitting the measurement of water moving with picosecond to subnanosecond correlation times. Diffusion of water within ∼10 Å of, i.e., up to ∼3 water layers around the spin probes located on hydrophilic lipid vesicle surfaces is ∼5 times retarded compared to the bulk water translational diffusion. This directly reflects on the activation barrier for surface water diffusion, i.e., how tightly water is bound to the hydrophilic surface and surrounding waters. We find this value to be modulated by the presence of specific ions in solution, with its order following the known Hofmeister series. While a molecular description of how ions affect the hydration structure at the hydrophilic surface remains to be answered, the finding that Hofmeister ions directly modulate the surface water diffusivity implies that the strength of the hydrogen bond network of surface hydration water is directly modulated on hydrophilic surfaces. PMID:24456096

  1. Creating a lesson that addresses gender differences in physics testing a specific instructional technique in college level physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, James J.

    Research-based instructional methods are applied in an effort to close the persistent gender gap in physics. Creating a short text on a limited topic using some of these methods could benefit female students specifically. A literature review showed research on the gender gap in physics and updated instructional methods for females. Two female physics students were interviewed and observations were conducted at a high performing all-girls school. A physics lab dialogue between two female physics students was recorded and analyzed, which informed the style and voice of the interactive dialogue lesson. An original written lesson intended to engage female physics students was created and tested on three classes of college-level physics students. The survey data, based on multiple choice and essay responses, measured the students' opinions of the lesson and their current textbook. Results showed the interactive lesson was preferred over the current text, and some students requested similar lessons.

  2. Seeing the body produces limb-specific modulation of skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Sadibolova, Renata; Longo, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Vision of the body, even when non-informative about stimulation, affects somatosensory processing. We investigated whether seeing the body also modulates autonomic control in the periphery by measuring skin temperature while manipulating vision. Using a mirror box, the skin temperature was measured from left hand dorsum while participants: (i) had the illusion of seeing their left hand, (ii) had the illusion of seeing an object at the same location or (iii) looked directly at their contralateral right hand. Skin temperature of the left hand increased when participants had the illusion of directly seeing that hand but not in the other two view conditions. In experiment 2, participants viewed directly their left or right hand, or the box while we recorded both hand dorsum temperatures. Temperature increased in the viewed hand but not the contralateral hand. These results show that seeing the body produces limb-specific modulation of thermal regulation.

  3. Design of LED-based reflector-array module for specific illuminance distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Enguo; Yu, Feihong

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents an efficient and practical design method for a LED based reflector-array lighting module. Improving on previous designs, this method could offer higher design freedom to achieve specific illuminance distribution for actual lighting application and deal with the LED light intensity distribution while shortening the design time. The detailed design description of the lighting system is thoroughly investigated. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, an ultra-compact reflector-array module, which produces a rectangular illumination area with a large aspect ratio, is specially designed to meet the high-demanding requirements of industrial lighting application. Design results show that most LED emitting energy could be collected into the required lighting region while higher-brightness and better-uniformity are simultaneously available within the focus region. It is expected that this method will have great potential for other lighting applications.

  4. Optically Addressable Spatial Light Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph; Larsson, Anders G.

    1994-01-01

    Integrated multiple-quantum-well/Fabry-Perot structure provides high-contrast variation of reflection of reading beam, under control of writing beam. Periodic potential barriers separate photogenerated electrons from holes, leading to long recombination lifetimes and large concentrations of free charge carriers. Concentrations quench excitons or fill energy bands in quantum wells, altering absorption of reading beam.

  5. Design of phylum-specific hybrid primers for DNA barcoding: addressing the need for efficient COI amplification in the Echinodermata.

    PubMed

    Hoareau, T B; Boissin, E

    2010-11-01

    Recent research has shown the usefulness of the Folmer region of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) as a genetic barcode to assist in species delimitation of echinoderms. However, amplification of COI is often challenging in echinoderms (low success or pseudogenes). We present a method that allows the design of phylum-specific hybrid primers, and use this to develop COI primers for the Echinodermata. We aligned COI sequences from 310 echinoderm species and designed all possible primers along the consensus sequence with two methods (standard degenerate and hybrid). We found much lower degeneracy for hybrid primers (4-fold degeneracy) than for standard degenerate primers (≥48-fold degeneracy). We then designed the most conserved hybrid primers to amplify a >500-bp region within COI. These primers successfully amplified this gene region in all tested taxa (123 species across all echinoderm classes). Sequencing of 30 species among these confirmed both the quality of the sequences (>500 bp, no pseudogenes) and their utility as a DNA barcode. This method should be useful for developing primers for other mitochondrial genes and other phyla. The method will also be of interest for the development of future projects involving both community-based genetic assessments on macroorganisms and biodiversity assessment of environmental samples using high-throughput sequencing.

  6. Research into Specific Modulators of Vascular Sex Hormone Receptors in the Management of Postmenopausal Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Graciliano R. A.; Barros, Yaskara V. R.; Wells, Amanda K.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women than premenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of female sex hormones. Studies on the vasculature have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30, that mediate genomic and/or non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by inducing the production/activity of nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor, and inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C, Rho kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the cytoskeleton, matrix metalloproteinases and inflammatory factors contribute to vascular remodeling. However, the experimental evidence did not translate into vascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), and the HERS, HERS-II and WHI clinical trials demonstrated adverse cardiovascular events. The discrepancy has been partly related to delayed MHT and potential changes in the vascular ER amount, integrity, affinity, and downstream signaling pathways due to the subjects' age and preexisting CVD. The adverse vascular effects of MHT also highlighted the need of specific modulators of vascular sex hormone receptors. The effectiveness of MHT can be improved by delineating the differences in phramcokinetics and pharmacodynamics of natural, synthetic, and conjugated equine estrogens. Estriol, “hormone bioidenticals” and phytoestrogens are potential estradiol substitutes. The benefits of low dose MHT, and transdermal or vaginal estrogens over oral preparations are being evaluated. Specific ER modulators (SERMs) and ER agonists are being developed to maximize the effects on vascular ERs. Also, the effects of estrogen are being examined in the context of the whole body hormonal environment and the levels of progesterone and androgens. Thus, the experimental vascular benefits of estrogen can be translated to

  7. Temporal response of ganglion cells of the macaque retina to cone-specific modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T.; Lee, B. B.; Kremers, J.

    1995-03-01

    The temporal response of cone inputs to macaque retinal ganglion cells were compared with cone-specific sinusoidal modulation used to isolate each cone type. For all cell types of the parvocellular (PC) pathway, temporal responsivity was similar for short (S)-, middle (M)-, and long (L)-wavelength-sensitive cone inputs, apart from small latency differences between inputs to center and surround. The temporal response resembled that expected from receptor physiology. Responses of cells of the magnocellular pathway to M- or L-cone modulation showed more complex properties indicative of postreceptoral processing. Human psychophysical temporal-sensitivity functions were acquired with S-cone modulation under conditions similar to those for the physiological measurements. Ratios of psychophysical to physiological data from S-cone cells (the only cells that respond to this stimulus) yielded an estimate of the central filter acting upon PC-pathway signals. The filter characteristic could be described by a four-stage low-pass filter with corner frequency 3-5 Hz.

  8. Equal modulation of endothelial cell function by four distinct tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate multiple end-stage mesenchymal cell types and constitute a promising population of cells for regenerative therapies. Additionally, there is increasing evidence supporting other trophic activities of MSCs, including the ability to enable formation of vasculature in vivo. Although MSCs were originally isolated from the bone marrow, the presence of these cells in the stromal vascular fraction of multiple adult tissues has been recently recognized. However, it is unknown whether the capacity to modulate vasculogenesis is ubiquitous to all MSCs regardless of their tissue of origin. Here, we demonstrated that tissue-resident MSCs isolated from four distinct tissues have equal capacity to modulate endothelial cell function, including formation of vascular networks in vivo. MSCs were isolated from four murine tissues, including bone marrow, white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. In culture, all four MSC populations secreted a plethora of pro-angiogenic factors that unequivocally induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). In vivo, co-implantation of MSCs with ECFCs into mice generated an extensive network of blood vessels with ECFCs specifically lining the lumens and MSCs occupying perivascular positions. Importantly, there were no differences among all four MSCs evaluated. Our studies suggest that the capacity to modulate the formation of vasculature is a ubiquitous property of all MSCs, irrespective of their original anatomical location. These results validate multiple tissues as potential sources of MSCs for future cell-based vascular therapies.

  9. Cell-Specific Fine-Tuning of Neuronal Excitability by Differential Expression of Modulator Protein Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, James; Sheldon, Amanda; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Fei, Hong; Koh, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    SLOB (SLOWPOKE-binding protein) modulates the Drosophila SLOWPOKE calcium-activated potassium channel. We have shown previously that SLOB deletion or RNAi knockdown decreases excitability of neurosecretory pars intercerebralis (PI) neurons in the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, we found that SLOB deletion/knockdown enhances neurotransmitter release from motor neurons at the fly larval neuromuscular junction, suggesting an increase in excitability. Because two prominent SLOB isoforms, SLOB57 and SLOB71, modulate SLOWPOKE channels in opposite directions in vitro, we investigated whether divergent expression patterns of these two isoforms might underlie the differential modulation of excitability in PI and motor neurons. By performing detailed in vitro and in vivo analysis, we found strikingly different modes of regulatory control by the slob57 and slob71 promoters. The slob71, but not slob57, promoter contains binding sites for the Hunchback and Mirror transcriptional repressors. Furthermore, several core promoter elements that are absent in the slob57 promoter coordinately drive robust expression of a luciferase vector by the slob71 promoter in vitro. In addition, we visualized the expression patterns of the slob57 and slob71 promoters in vivo and found clear spatiotemporal differences in promoter activity. SLOB57 is expressed prominently in adult PI neurons, whereas larval motor neurons exclusively express SLOB71. In contrast, at the larval neuromuscular junction, SLOB57 expression appears to be restricted mainly to a subset of glial cells. Our results illustrate how the use of alternative transcriptional start sites within an ion channel modulator locus coupled with functionally relevant alternative splicing can be used to fine-tune neuronal excitability in a cell-specific manner. PMID:24133277

  10. Ligand-specific and non-specific in vivo modulation of human epidermal cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP).

    PubMed

    Hirschel-Scholz, S; Siegenthaler, G; Saurat, J H

    1989-04-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is bound intracellularly by a specific, low molecular weight protein (CRABP), that is unrelated to its nuclear receptor and whose function and regulation are still unknown. In the present study we were able to obtain an in vivo modulation of CRABP by different stimuli in one of the major target organs of RA: the human skin. We found increased CRABP after daily application during 4 days of natural or synthetic retinoids (RA, acitretin, isotretinoin, Ro137410, retinol), that have either a high affinity to CRABP or can be transformed into RA. Only Ro150778 with no affinity and no reported transformation had no effect. No macro- or microscopical changes could be observed with any of the tested compounds. Induction of inflammatory and hyperproliferative changes in the skin by topical dithranol treatment, UVB irradiation or scotch tape stripping also induced a significant increase of CRABP 3 days after exposure. Topical diflucortolone showed not only a tendancy to decrease intrinsic CRABP levels, but significantly reduced the retinoid stimulated rise of CRABP. Thus we conclude that the increase of CRABP in a fully differentiated adult tissue seems to be a biological phenomenon following processes of inflammation and proliferation with a lag of several days, while retinoids seem to be able to induce such a rise independently of, or before, the appearance of such processes. Corticosteroids seem to be inhibitors of this reaction. We discuss the hypothesis that CRABP might function as an intracellular 'buffer' in the case of RA overload. PMID:2543582

  11. Age-Specific Peculiarities of Modulation of Blood Aldo-Keto Reductase Isoenzyme Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Davydov, V V

    2015-12-01

    The aldo-keto reductase spectrum of the blood was studied at different stages of ontogeny to elucidate the role of reduction pathway in utilization of the carbonyl products of free radical oxidation in modulation of organism sensitivity to the damaging effect of stress during ontogeny. The studies revealed the age-specific changes in aldo-keto reductase spectrum in the blood. An analogy of the aldo-keto reductase spectrum structure in animals of early maturity and in old rats was found. The appearance of age specificity of the aldo-keto reductase spectrum in the blood creates metabolic prerequisites for changes in the efficiency of utilization of carbonyl products of free radical oxidation via their reductive transformation.

  12. Oxytocin modulates female sociosexual behavior through a specific class of prefrontal cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Miho; Görlich, Andreas; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human imaging studies have revealed that intranasal administration of the “prosocial” hormone oxytocin (OT) activates the frontal cortex, and that this action of OT correlates with enhanced brain function in autism. Here we report the discovery of a population of somatostatin (Sst) positive, regular spiking interneurons that express the oxytocin receptor (OxtrINs). Silencing of OxtrINs in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of female mice resulted in loss of social interest in male mice specifically during the sexually receptive phase of the estrous cycle. This sociosexual deficit was also present in mice in which the Oxtr gene was conditionally deleted from the mPFC, and in control mice infused with an Oxtr antagonist. Our data demonstrate a gender, cell type and state specific role for OT/Oxtr signaling in the mPFC, and identify a latent cortical circuit element that may modulate other complex social behaviors in response to OT. PMID:25303526

  13. Modulated Expression of Specific tRNAs Drives Gene Expression and Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Hani; Nguyen, Hoang C B; Zhang, Steven; Dill, Brian D; Molina, Henrik; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2016-06-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are primarily viewed as static contributors to gene expression. By developing a high-throughput tRNA profiling method, we find that specific tRNAs are upregulated in human breast cancer cells as they gain metastatic activity. Through loss-of-function, gain-of-function, and clinical-association studies, we implicate tRNAGluUUC and tRNAArgCCG as promoters of breast cancer metastasis. Upregulation of these tRNAs enhances stability and ribosome occupancy of transcripts enriched for their cognate codons. Specifically, tRNAGluUUC promotes metastatic progression by directly enhancing EXOSC2 expression and enhancing GRIPAP1-constituting an "inducible" pathway driven by a tRNA. The cellular proteomic shift toward a pro-metastatic state mirrors global tRNA shifts, allowing for cell-state and cell-type transgene expression optimization through codon content quantification. TRNA modulation represents a mechanism by which cells achieve altered expression of specific transcripts and proteins. TRNAs are thus dynamic regulators of gene expression and the tRNA codon landscape can causally and specifically impact disease progression. PMID:27259150

  14. Phase noise reveals early category-specific modulation of the event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Kornél; Kovács, Petra; Vakli, Pál; Kovács, Gyula; Zimmer, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the amplitude of the early event-related potential (ERP) components evoked by faces, such as N170 and P2, changes systematically as a function of noise added to the stimuli. This change has been linked to an increased perceptual processing demand and to enhanced difficulty in perceptual decision making about faces. However, to date it has not yet been tested whether noise manipulation affects the neural correlates of decisions about face and non-face stimuli similarly. To this end, we measured the ERPs for faces and cars at three different phase noise levels. Subjects performed the same two-alternative age-discrimination task on stimuli chosen from young–old morphing continua that were created from faces as well as cars and were calibrated to lead to similar performances at each noise-level. Adding phase noise to the stimuli reduced performance and enhanced response latency for the two categories to the same extent. Parallel to that, phase noise reduced the amplitude and prolonged the latency of the face-specific N170 component. The amplitude of the P1 showed category-specific noise dependence: it was enhanced over the right hemisphere for cars and over the left hemisphere for faces as a result of adding phase noise to the stimuli, but remained stable across noise levels for cars over the left and for faces over the right hemisphere. Moreover, noise modulation altered the category-selectivity of the N170, while the P2 ERP component, typically associated with task decision difficulty, was larger for the more noisy stimuli regardless of stimulus category. Our results suggest that the category-specificity of noise-induced modulations of ERP responses starts at around 100 ms post-stimulus. PMID:24795689

  15. Cell line specific modulation of connexin43 expression after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Banaz-Yaşar, Ferya; Tischka, Rabea; Iliakis, George; Winterhager, Elke; Gellhaus, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication plays a significant role in mediating radiation-induced bystander effects. However, the level of Cx43 itself is influenced by ionizing radiation, which could modify the bystander effect. Here we have investigated several cell lines for the modulation of Cx43 expression 24 h after irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays. The mouse endothelial cell line bEnd3 revealed a significantly elevated level of Cx43 already 15 min after exposure to X-rays, whereas human hybrid endothelial cells (EA.hy926) exhibited a transient downregulation of Cx43 mRNA. No obvious changes in the communication properties of the different cell lines could be observed after irradiation. The communication-deficient malignant human trophoblast cell line Jeg3 stably transfected with Cx43 did not reveal any induction of endogenous nor alteration in the exogenous Cx43 transcript level upon exposure to 5 Gy. Taken together, our data show a cell line specific modulation of Cx43 expression after exposure to X-rays.

  16. Cell line specific modulation of connexin43 expression after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Banaz-Yaşar, Ferya; Tischka, Rabea; Iliakis, George; Winterhager, Elke; Gellhaus, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication plays a significant role in mediating radiation-induced bystander effects. However, the level of Cx43 itself is influenced by ionizing radiation, which could modify the bystander effect. Here we have investigated several cell lines for the modulation of Cx43 expression 24 h after irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays. The mouse endothelial cell line bEnd3 revealed a significantly elevated level of Cx43 already 15 min after exposure to X-rays, whereas human hybrid endothelial cells (EA.hy926) exhibited a transient downregulation of Cx43 mRNA. No obvious changes in the communication properties of the different cell lines could be observed after irradiation. The communication-deficient malignant human trophoblast cell line Jeg3 stably transfected with Cx43 did not reveal any induction of endogenous nor alteration in the exogenous Cx43 transcript level upon exposure to 5 Gy. Taken together, our data show a cell line specific modulation of Cx43 expression after exposure to X-rays. PMID:16531320

  17. Identification of a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules with broad ligand specificity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Yu-Liang; Cao, Qi-Long; Huang, Ming-Yue; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Most enzymes that act on carbohydrates include non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that recognize and target carbohydrates. CBMs bring their appended catalytic modules into close proximity with the target substrate and increase the hydrolytic rate of enzymes acting on insoluble substrates. We previously identified a novel CBM (CBMC5614-1) at the C-terminus of endoglucanase C5614-1 from an uncultured microorganism present in buffalo rumen. In the present study, that the functional region of CBMC5614-1 involved in ligand binding was localized to 134 amino acids. Two representative homologs of CBMC5614-1, sharing the same ligand binding profile, targeted a range of β-linked polysaccharides that adopt very different conformations. Targeted substrates included soluble and insoluble cellulose, β-1,3/1,4-mixed linked glucans, xylan, and mannan. Mutagenesis revealed that three conserved aromatic residues (Trp-380, Tyr-411, and Trp-423) play an important role in ligand recognition and targeting. These results suggest that CBMC5614-1 and its homologs form a novel CBM family (CBM72) with a broad ligand-binding specificity. CBM72 members can provide new insight into CBM-ligand interactions and may have potential in protein engineering and biocatalysis. PMID:26765840

  18. Specification of haematopoietic stem cell fate via modulation of mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Nicola; Girotra, Mukul; Naveiras, Olaia; Nikitin, Gennady; Campos, Vasco; Giger, Sonja; Roch, Aline; Auwerx, Johan; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) differ from their committed progeny by relying primarily on anaerobic glycolysis rather than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. However, whether this change in the metabolic program is the cause or the consequence of the unique function of HSCs remains unknown. Here we show that enforced modulation of energy metabolism impacts HSC self-renewal. Lowering the mitochondrial activity of HSCs by chemically uncoupling the electron transport chain drives self-renewal under culture conditions that normally induce rapid differentiation. We demonstrate that this metabolic specification of HSC fate occurs through the reversible decrease of mitochondrial mass by autophagy. Our data thus reveal a causal relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and fate choice of HSCs and also provide a valuable tool to expand HSCs outside of their native bone marrow niches. PMID:27731316

  19. A NEW ROLE FOR HIV NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN IN MODULATING THE SPECIFICITY OF PLUS STRAND PRIMING

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Deena T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    The current study indicates a new role for HIV nucleocapsid protein (NC) in modulating the specificity of plus strand priming. RNase H cleavage by reverse transcriptase (RT) during minus strand synthesis gives rise to RNA fragments that could potentially be used as primers for synthesis of the plus strand, leading to the initiation of priming from multiple points as has been observed for other retroviruses. For HIV, the central and 3′ polypurine tracts (PPTs) are the major sites of plus strand initiation. Using reconstituted in vitro assays, results showed that NC greatly reduced the efficiency of extension of non-PPT RNA primers, but not PPT. Experiments mimicking HIV replication showed that RT generated and used both PPT and non-PPT RNAs to initiate “plus strand” synthesis, but non-PPT usage was strongly inhibited by NC. The results support a role for NC in specifying primer usage during plus strand synthesis. PMID:18632127

  20. PLANT MICROBIOME. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root microbiome by specific bacterial taxa.

    PubMed

    Lebeis, Sarah L; Paredes, Sur Herrera; Lundberg, Derek S; Breakfield, Natalie; Gehring, Jase; McDonald, Meredith; Malfatti, Stephanie; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Jones, Corbin D; Tringe, Susannah G; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2015-08-21

    Immune systems distinguish "self" from "nonself" to maintain homeostasis and must differentially gate access to allow colonization by potentially beneficial, nonpathogenic microbes. Plant roots grow within extremely diverse soil microbial communities but assemble a taxonomically limited root-associated microbiome. We grew isogenic Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered immune systems in a wild soil and also in recolonization experiments with a synthetic bacterial community. We established that biosynthesis of, and signaling dependent on, the foliar defense phytohormone salicylic acid is required to assemble a normal root microbiome. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root by specific bacterial families. Thus, plant immune signaling drives selection from the available microbial communities to sculpt the root microbiome.

  1. Modulation of Notch signaling by antibodies specific for the extracellular negative regulatory region of NOTCH3.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Li, Yucheng; Wu, Wenjuan; Gordon, Wendy R; Chang, David W; Lu, Mason; Scoggin, Shane; Fu, Tihui; Vien, Long; Histen, Gavin; Zheng, Ji; Martin-Hollister, Rachel; Duensing, Thomas; Singh, Sanjaya; Blacklow, Stephen C; Yao, Zhengbin; Aster, Jon C; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2008-03-21

    The Notch pathway regulates the development of many tissues and cell types and is involved in a variety of human diseases, making it an attractive potential therapeutic target. This promise has been limited by the absence of potent inhibitors or agonists that are specific for individual human Notch receptors (NOTCH1-4). Using an unbiased functional screening, we identified monoclonal antibodies that specifically inhibit or induce activating proteolytic cleavages in NOTCH3. Remarkably, the most potent inhibitory and activating antibodies bind to overlapping epitopes within a juxtamembrane negative regulatory region that protects NOTCH3 from proteolysis and activation in its resting autoinhibited state. The inhibitory antibodies revert phenotypes conveyed on 293T cells by NOTCH3 signaling, such as increased cellular proliferation, survival, and motility, whereas the activating antibody mimics some of the effects of ligand-induced Notch activation. These findings provide insights into the mechanisms of Notch autoinhibition and activation and pave the way for the further development of specific antibody-based modulators of the Notch receptors, which are likely to be of utility in a wide range of experimental and therapeutic settings. PMID:18182388

  2. REST and CoREST Modulate Neuronal Subtype Specification, Maturation and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gokhan, Solen; Zheng, Deyou; Bergman, Aviv; Mehler, Mark F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) is a master regulator of neuronal gene expression. REST functions as a modular scaffold for dynamic recruitment of epigenetic regulatory factors including its primary cofactor, the corepressor for element-1-silencing transcription factor (CoREST), to genomic loci that contain the repressor element-1 (RE1) binding motif. While REST was initially believed to silence RE1 containing neuronal genes in neural stem cells (NSCs) and non-neuronal cells, emerging evidence shows an increasingly complex cell type- and developmental stage-specific repertoire of REST target genes and functions that include regulation of neuronal lineage maturation and plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we utilized chromatin immunoprecipitation on chip (ChIP-chip) analysis to examine REST and CoREST functions during NSC-mediated specification of cholinergic neurons (CHOLNs), GABAergic neurons (GABANs), glutamatergic neurons (GLUTNs), and medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs). We identified largely distinct but overlapping profiles of REST and CoREST target genes during neuronal subtype specification including a disproportionately high percentage that are exclusive to each neuronal subtype. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that the differential deployment of REST and CoREST is an important regulatory mechanism that mediates neuronal subtype specification by modulating specific gene networks responsible for inducing and maintaining neuronal subtype identity. Our observations also implicate a broad array of factors in the generation of neuronal diversity including but not limited to those that mediate homeostasis, cell cycle dynamics, cell viability, stress responses and epigenetic regulation. PMID:19997604

  3. Promoter-Specific Effects of DREADD Modulation on Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    López, Alberto J.; Kramár, Enikö; Matheos, Dina P.; White, André O.; Kwapis, Janine; Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Sakata, Keith; Espinoza, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADDs) are a novel tool with the potential to bidirectionally drive cellular, circuit, and ultimately, behavioral changes. We used DREADDs to evaluate memory formation in a hippocampus-dependent task in mice and effects on synaptic physiology in the dorsal hippocampus. We expressed neuron-specific (hSyn promoter) DREADDs that were either excitatory (HM3D) or inhibitory (HM4D) in the dorsal hippocampus. As predicted, hSyn–HM3D was able to transform a subthreshold learning event into long-term memory (LTM), and hSyn–HM4D completely impaired LTM formation. Surprisingly, the opposite was observed during experiments examining the effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). hSyn–HM3D impaired LTP and hSyn–HM4D facilitated LTP. Follow-up experiments indicated that the hSyn–HM3D-mediated depression of fEPSP appears to be driven by presynaptic activation of inhibitory currents, whereas the hSyn–HM4D-mediated increase of fEPSP is induced by a reduction in GABAA receptor function. To determine whether these observations were promoter specific, we next examined the effects of using the CaMKIIα promoter that limits expression to forebrain excitatory neurons. CaMKIIα–HM3D in the dorsal hippocampus led to the transformation of a subthreshold learning event into LTM, whereas CaMKIIα–HM4D blocked LTM formation. Consistent with these findings, baseline synaptic transmission and LTP was increased in CaMKIIα–HM3D hippocampal slices, whereas slices from CaMKIIα–HM4D mice produced expected decreases in baseline synaptic transmission and LTP. Together, these experiments further demonstrate DREADDs as being a robust and reliable means of modulating neuronal function to manipulate long-term changes in behavior, while providing evidence for specific dissociations between LTM and LTP. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study evaluates the efficacy of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer

  4. Block 4 solar cell module design and test specification for intermediate load center applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for performance of terrestrial solar cell modules intended for use in various test applications are established. During the 1979-80 time period, such applications are expected to be in the 20 to 500 kilowatt size range. A series of characterization and qualification tests necessary to certify the module design for production, and the necessary performance test for acceptance of modules are specified.

  5. The basolateral amygdala modulates specific sensory memory representations in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Candice M; McGaugh, James L; Weinberger, Norman M

    2009-05-01

    Stress hormones released by an experience can modulate memory strength via the basolateral amygdala, which in turn acts on sites of memory storage such as the cerebral cortex [McGaugh, J. L. (2004). The amygdala modulates the consolidation of memories of emotionally arousing experiences. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 27, 1-28]. Stimuli that acquire behavioral importance gain increased representation in the cortex. For example, learning shifts the tuning of neurons in the primary auditory cortex (A1) to the frequency of a conditioned stimulus (CS), and the greater the level of CS importance, the larger the area of representational gain [Weinberger, N. M. (2007). Associative representational plasticity in the auditory cortex: A synthesis of two disciplines. Learning & Memory, 14(1-2), 1-16]. The two lines of research suggest that BLA strengthening of memory might be accomplished in part by increasing the representation of an environmental stimulus. The present study investigated whether stimulation of the BLA can affect cortical memory representations. In male Sprague-Dawley rats studied under urethane general anesthesia, frequency receptive fields were obtained from A1 before and up to 75min after the pairing of a tone with BLA stimulation (BLAstm: 100 trials, 400ms, 100Hz, 400microA [+/-16.54]). Tone started before and continued after BLAstm. Group BLA/1.0 (n=16) had a 1s CS-BLAstm interval while Group BLA/1.6 (n=5) has a 1.6s interval. The BLA/1.0 group did develop specific tuning shifts toward and to the CS, which could change frequency tuning by as much as two octaves. Moreover, its shifts increased over time and were enduring, lasting 75min. However, group BLA/1.6 did not develop tuning shifts, indicating that precise CS-BLAstm timing is important in the anesthetized animal. Further, training in the BLA/1.0 paradigm but stimulating outside of the BLA did not produce tuning shifts. These findings demonstrate that the BLA is capable of exerting highly specific

  6. Modulation of stratum corneum lipid composition and organization of human skin equivalents by specific medium supplements.

    PubMed

    Thakoersing, Varsha S; van Smeden, Jeroen; Boiten, Walter A; Gooris, Gert S; Mulder, Aat A; Vreeken, Rob J; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-09-01

    Our in-house human skin equivalents contain all stratum corneum (SC) barrier lipid classes, but have a reduced level of free fatty acids (FAs), of which a part is mono-unsaturated. These differences lead to an altered SC lipid organization and thereby a reduced barrier function compared to human skin. In this study, we aimed to improve the SC FA composition and, consequently, the SC lipid organization of the Leiden epidermal model (LEM) by specific medium supplements. The standard FA mixture (consisting of palmitic, linoleic and arachidonic acids) supplemented to the medium was modified, by replacing protonated palmitic acid with deuterated palmitic acid or by the addition of deuterated arachidic acid to the mixture, to determine whether FAs are taken up from the medium and are incorporated into SC of LEM. Furthermore, supplementation of the total FA mixture or that of palmitic acid alone was increased four times to examine whether this improves the SC FA composition and lipid organization of LEM. The results demonstrate that the deuterated FAs are taken up into LEMs and are subsequently elongated and incorporated in their SC. However, a fourfold increase in palmitic acid supplementation does not change the SC FA composition or lipid organization of LEM. Increasing the concentration of the total FA mixture in the medium resulted in a decreased level of very long chain FAs and an increased level of mono-unsaturated FAs, which lead to deteriorated SC lipid properties. These results indicate that SC lipid properties can be modulated by specific medium supplements.

  7. Serotonin modulates responses to species-specific vocalizations in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-06-01

    Neuromodulators such as serotonin are capable of altering the neural processing of stimuli across many sensory modalities. In the inferior colliculus, a major midbrain auditory gateway, serotonin alters the way that individual neurons respond to simple tone bursts and linear frequency modulated sweeps. The effects of serotonin are complex, and vary among neurons. How serotonin transforms the responses to spectrotemporally complex sounds of the type normally heard in natural settings has been poorly examined. To explore this issue further, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on the responses of individual inferior colliculus neurons to a variety of recorded species-specific vocalizations were examined. These experiments were performed in the Mexican free-tailed bat, a species that uses a rich repertoire of vocalizations for the purposes of communication as well as echolocation. Serotonin frequently changed the number of recorded calls that were capable of evoking a response from individual neurons, sometimes increasing (15% of serotonin-responsive neurons), but usually decreasing (62% of serotonin-responsive neurons), this number. A functional consequence of these serotonin-evoked changes would be to change the population response to species-specific vocalizations. PMID:15830241

  8. Startle reflex hyporeactivity in Parkinson's disease: an emotion-specific or arousal-modulated deficit?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K.M.; Okun, M.S.; Marsiske, M.; Fennell, E.B.; Bowers, D.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) demonstrate reduced psychophysiologic reactivity to unpleasant pictures as indexed by diminished startle eyeblink magnitude (Bowers et al., 2006). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that this hyporeactivity was primarily driven by diminished reactivity to fear-eliciting stimuli as opposed to other types of aversive pictures. This hypothesis was based on previous evidence suggesting amygdalar abnormalities in PD patients coupled with the known role of the amygdala in fear processing. To test this hypothesis, 24 patients with Parkinson's disease and 24 controls viewed standardized sets of emotional pictures that depicted fear, disgust (mutilations, contaminations), pleasant, and neutral contents. Startle eyeblinks were elicited while subjects viewed these emotional pictures. Results did not support the hypothesis of a specific deficit to fear pictures. Instead, the PD patients had reduced reactivity to mutilation pictures relative to other types of negative pictures in the context of normal subjective ratings. Further analyses revealed that controls displayed a pattern of increased startle eyeblink magnitude for “high arousal” versus “low arousal” negative pictures, regardless of picture category, whereas startle eyeblink magnitude in the PD group did not vary by arousal level. These results suggest that previous findings of decreased aversion-modulated startle is driven by reduced reactivity to highly arousing negative stimuli rather than to a specific category (i.e., fear or disgust) of emotion stimuli. PMID:19428424

  9. The essential mycobacterial amidotransferase GatCAB is a modulator of specific translational fidelity.

    PubMed

    Su, Hong-Wei; Zhu, Jun-Hao; Li, Hao; Cai, Rong-Jun; Ealand, Christopher; Wang, Xun; Chen, Yu-Xiang; Kayani, Masood Ur Rehman; Zhu, Ting F; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Huang, Hairong; Kana, Bavesh D; Javid, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Although regulation of translation fidelity is an essential process(1-7), diverse organisms and organelles have differing requirements of translational accuracy(8-15), and errors in gene translation serve an adaptive function under certain conditions(16-20). Therefore, optimal levels of fidelity may vary according to context. Most bacteria utilize a two-step pathway for the specific synthesis of aminoacylated glutamine and/or asparagine tRNAs, involving the glutamine amidotransferase GatCAB(21-25), but it had not been appreciated that GatCAB may play a role in modulating mistranslation rates. Here, by using a forward genetic screen, we show that the mycobacterial GatCAB enzyme complex mediates the translational fidelity of glutamine and asparagine codons. We identify mutations in gatA that cause partial loss of function in the holoenzyme, with a consequent increase in rates of mistranslation. By monitoring single-cell transcription dynamics, we demonstrate that reduced gatCAB expression leads to increased mistranslation rates, which result in enhanced rifampicin-specific phenotypic resistance. Consistent with this, strains with mutations in gatA from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis show increased mistranslation, with associated antibiotic tolerance, suggesting a role for mistranslation as an adaptive strategy in tuberculosis. Together, our findings demonstrate a potential role for the indirect tRNA aminoacylation pathway in regulating translational fidelity and adaptive mistranslation. PMID:27564922

  10. The BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Modulates Sleep Intensity: EEG Frequency- and State-Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Valérie; Klein, Carina; Bodenmann, Sereina; Schäfer, Nikolaus; Berger, Wolfgang; Brugger, Peter; Landolt, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: EEG slow waves are the hallmark of deep NREM sleep and may reflect the restorative functions of sleep. Evidence suggests that increased sleep slow waves after sleep deprivation reflect plastic synaptic processes, and that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is causally involved in their homeostatic regulation. The functional Val66Met polymorphism of the gene encoding pro-BDNF causes impaired activity-dependent secretion of mature BDNF protein. We investigated whether this polymorphism contributes to the pronounced inter-individual variation in sleep slow wave activity (SWA) in humans. Setting: Sleep laboratory in temporal isolation unit. Participants: Eleven heterozygous Met allele carriers and 11 individually sex- and age-matched Val/Val homozygotes. Interventions: Forty hours prolonged wakefulness. Measurements and Results: Cognitive performance, subjective state, and waking and sleep EEG in baseline and after sleep deprivation were studied. Val/Val homozygotes showed better response accuracy than Met allele carriers on a verbal 2-back working memory task. This difference did not reflect genotype-dependent differences in sleepiness, well-being, or sustained attention. In baseline and recovery nights, deep stage 4 sleep and NREM sleep intensity as quantified by EEG SWA (0.75-4.5 Hz) were higher in Val/Val compared to Val/Met genotype. Similar to sleep deprivation, the difference was most pronounced in the first NREM sleep episode. By contrast, increased activity in higher EEG frequencies (> 6 Hz) in wakefulness and REM sleep was distinct from the effects of prolonged wakefulness. Conclusion: BDNF contributes to the regulation of sleep slow wave oscillations, suggesting that genetically determined variation in neuronal plasticity modulates NREM sleep intensity in humans. Citation: Bachmann V; Klein C; Bodenmann S; Schäfer N; Berger W; Brugger P; Landolt HP. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism modulates sleep intensity: EEG frequency- and state-specificity

  11. Mammalian Mss51 is a skeletal muscle-specific gene modulating cellular metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Adam L.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathways modulate skeletal muscle growth, regeneration, and cellular metabolism. Several recent gene expression studies have shown that inhibition of myostatin and TGF-β1 signaling consistently leads to a significant reduction in expression of Mss51, also named Zmynd17. The function of mammalian Mss51 is unknown although a putative homolog in yeast is a mitochondrial translational activator. Objective The objective of this work was to characterize mammalian Mss51. Methods Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot of subcellular fractionation were used to determine expression patterns and localization of Mss51. The CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to reduce expression of Mss51 in C2C12 myoblasts and the function of Mss51 was evaluated in assays of proliferation, differentiation and cellular metabolism. Results Mss51 was predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle and in those muscles dominated by fast-twitch fibers. In vitro, its expression was upregulated upon differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. Expression of Mss51 was modulated in response to altered TGF-β family signaling. In human muscle, Mss51 localized to the mitochondria. Its genetic disruption resulted in increased levels of cellular ATP, β-oxidation, glycolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Conclusions Mss51 is a novel, skeletal muscle-specific gene and a key target of myostatin and TGF-β1 signaling. Unlike myostatin, TGF-β1 and IGF-1, Mss51 does not regulate myoblast proliferation or differentiation. Rather, Mss51 appears to be one of the effectors of these growth factors on metabolic processes including fatty acid oxidation, glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:26634192

  12. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-12-16

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions.

  13. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  14. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M.; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64+ monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients’ inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64+ cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64+ cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64+ cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  15. Understanding How Noncatalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules Can Display Specificity for Xyloglucan*

    PubMed Central

    Luís, Ana S.; Venditto, Immacolata; Temple, Max J.; Rogowski, Artur; Baslé, Arnaud; Xue, Jie; Knox, J. Paul; Prates, José A.M.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Najmudin, Shabir; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant biomass is central to the carbon cycle and to environmentally sustainable industries exemplified by the biofuel sector. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes generally contain noncatalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that fulfil a targeting function, which enhances catalysis. CBMs that bind β-glucan chains often display broad specificity recognizing β1,4-glucans (cellulose), β1,3-β1,4-mixed linked glucans and xyloglucan, a β1,4-glucan decorated with α1,6-xylose residues, by targeting structures common to the three polysaccharides. Thus, CBMs that recognize xyloglucan target the β1,4-glucan backbone and only accommodate the xylose decorations. Here we show that two closely related CBMs, CBM65A and CBM65B, derived from EcCel5A, a Eubacterium cellulosolvens endoglucanase, bind to a range of β-glucans but, uniquely, display significant preference for xyloglucan. The structures of the two CBMs reveal a β-sandwich fold. The ligand binding site comprises the β-sheet that forms the concave surface of the proteins. Binding to the backbone chains of β-glucans is mediated primarily by five aromatic residues that also make hydrophobic interactions with the xylose side chains of xyloglucan, conferring the distinctive specificity of the CBMs for the decorated polysaccharide. Significantly, and in contrast to other CBMs that recognize β-glucans, CBM65A utilizes different polar residues to bind cellulose and mixed linked glucans. Thus, Gln106 is central to cellulose recognition, but is not required for binding to mixed linked glucans. This report reveals the mechanism by which β-glucan-specific CBMs can distinguish between linear and mixed linked glucans, and show how these CBMs can exploit an extensive hydrophobic platform to target the side chains of decorated β-glucans. PMID:23229556

  16. Specific regulation of male rat liver cytosolic estrogen receptor by the modulator of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Celiker, M Y; Haas, A; Saunders, D; Litwack, G

    1993-08-31

    Modulator is a novel low-molecular-weight organic compound that regulates activities of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors as well as protein kinase C. In this study we show that male rat liver cytosolic estrogen receptor activation is inhibited by modulator in a dose-dependent manner. Fifty percent inhibition is obtained with 1 unit/ml modulator purified from bovine liver which is within the physiological concentration for modulator. However, sheep uterine cytosolic estrogen and androgen receptors are insensitive to regulation by modulator. Exogenous sodium molybdate treatment inhibits activation of all of these receptors of liver or uterus origin in an identical manner, further differentiating the effects of modulator and the molybdate anion. PMID:8363596

  17. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Escolà-Gil, Joan C.; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [3H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [3H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  18. Electro-acupuncture at different acupoints modulating the relative specific brain functional network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiliang; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Yin; Liu, Hesheng; Hong, Yang; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Kehua; Wang, Lei; Xue, Chao; Song, Ming; Liu, Baoyan; Zhu, Bing

    2010-11-01

    Objective: The specific brain effects of acupoint are important scientific concern in acupuncture. However, previous acupuncture fMRI studies focused on acupoints in muscle layer on the limb. Therefore, researches on acupoints within connective tissue at trunk are warranted. Material and Methods: Brain effects of acupuncture on abdomen at acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zhongwan (CV12) were tested using fMRI on 21 healthy volunteers. The data acquisition was performed at resting state, during needle retention, electroacupuncture (EA) and post-EA resting state. Needling sensations were rated after every electroacupuncture (EA) procedure. The needling sensations and the brain functional activity and connectivity were compared between CV4 and CV12 using SPSS, SPM2 and the local and remote connectivity maps. Results and conclusion: EA at CV4 and CV12 induced apparent deactivation effects in the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network. The default mode of the brain was modified by needle retention and EA, respectively. The functional brain network was significantly changed post EA. However, the minor differences existed between these two acupoints. The results demonstrated similarity between functional brain network mode of acupuncture modulation and functional circuits of emotional and cognitive regulation. Acupuncture may produce analgesia, anti-anxiety and anti-depression via the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN).

  19. Is sensory-specific satiety for a bitter-sweet infusion modulated by context?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Burgos, David; Secchiari, Florencia; Calviño, Amalia

    2015-03-01

    The sensory-affective attributes of beverages have an important influence on a given intake and successive consumptions because of sensory-specific satiety (SSS; defined as a decrease in pleasantness ratings of a food eaten relative to uneaten foods). No studies have, however, investigated how multiple sessions of SSS for familiar drinks over a period of several days up to a week may change their pleasantness and how these hedonic-related judgments are affected by the context during SSS testing. With twenty-six participants, the present study explored the medium lasting and contextual effects of repeated SSS sessions for a bitter-sweet infusion on olfactory and flavour pleasantness over the course of three exposures in either a laboratory or a cafeteria setting. The results showed olfactory and flavour SSS for the infusion following each consumption in both the artificial and the natural setting. More interestingly, despite the failure to detect medium-term SSS (i.e., a greater decrease in pleasantness ratings of a food eaten relative to uneaten foods after repeated SSS sessions over several days as compared to the first SSS session), a contextual modulation of olfactory SSS was observed with a lesser overall magnitude in the cafeteria compared to the laboratory setting. To the best of our knowledge, the impact of eating location on the development of satiation and the differential contextual sensitivity of SSS for orthonasal odours and flavours has not been reported previously. The implications of potential environmental control of SSS are considered in this study.

  20. The GHKL ATPase MORC1 Modulates Species-Specific Plant Immunity in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Kang, Hong-Gu; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-08-01

    The microrchidia (MORC) proteins, a subset of the GHKL ATPase superfamily, were recently described as components involved in transcriptional gene silencing and plant immunity in Arabidopsis. To assess the role of MORC1 during resistance to Phytophthora infestans in solanaceous species, we altered the expression of the corresponding MORC1 homologs in potato, tomato, and Nicotiana benthamiana. Basal resistance to P. infestans was compromised in StMORC1-silenced potato and enhanced in overexpressing lines, indicating that StMORC1 positively affects immunity. By contrast, silencing SlMORC1 expression in tomato or NbMORC1 expression in N. benthamiana enhanced basal resistance to this oomycete pathogen. In addition, silencing SlMORC1 further enhanced resistance conferred by two resistance genes in tomato. Transient expression of StMORC1 in N. benthamiana accelerated cell death induced by infestin1 (INF1), whereas SlMORC1 or NbMORC1 suppressed it. Domain-swapping and mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region dictates the species-specific effects of the solanaceous MORC1 proteins on INF1-induced cell death. This C-terminal region also was required for homodimerization and phosphorylation of recombinant StMORC1 and SlMORC1, and its transient expression induced spontaneous cell death in N. benthamiana. Thus, this C-terminal region likely plays important roles in both determining and modulating the biological activity of MORC1 proteins.

  1. The ubiquitin-specific protease USP10 modulates androgen receptor function.

    PubMed

    Faus, Hortensia; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander; Huber, Martina; Bahr, Inke; Haendler, Bernard

    2005-12-21

    The role of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in degrading nuclear hormone receptors and regulating their transcriptional function has emerged in the last few years. We identified the ubiquitin-specific protease USP10 as part of DNA-bound androgen receptor (AR) complexes purified from nuclear extracts of PC-3 cells stably expressing the AR. The interaction between USP10 and the AR was confirmed by GST pull-down assays. Fluorescence microscopy documented that USP10 was localised in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Cell-based transactivation assays in PC-3/AR cells revealed that overexpression of wild-type USP10, but not of an enzymatically inactive form, stimulated AR activity mediated by reporter constructs harbouring selective androgen response elements (AREs), non-selective steroid response elements (SREs) or the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter. Conversely, USP10 expression knock-down by siRNAs impaired the MMTV response to androgen. In summary, the data indicate that USP10 is a new cofactor that binds to the AR and stimulates the androgen response of target promoters. This finding underlines the role of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in modulating the AR function.

  2. SOX11 MODULATES BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR EXPRESSION IN AN EXON PROMOTER-SPECIFIC MANNER

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Kathleen M.; Jing, Xiaotang; Diges, Charlotte M.; Cornuet, Pamela K.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Albers, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Sox11 is a high mobility group (HMG) containing transcription factor that is significantly elevated in peripheral neurons in response to nerve injury. In vitro and in vivo studies support a central role for Sox11 in adult neuron growth and survival following injury. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a pleiotropic growth factor that has effects on neuronal survival, differentiation, synaptic plasticity and regeneration. BDNF transcription is elevated in the DRG following nerve injury in parallel with Sox11 allowing for the possible regulation by Sox11. To begin to assess the possible influence of Sox11 we used reverse transcriptase PCR assays to determine the relative expression of the nine (I-IXa) noncoding exons and one coding exon (exon IX) of the BDNF gene after sciatic nerve axotomy in the mouse. Exons with upstream promoter regions containing the Sox binding motif 5′-AACAAAG-3′ (I, IV, VII and VIII) were increased at 1d or 3d following axotomy. Exons 1 and IV showed the greatest increase and only exon 1 remained elevated at 3d. Luciferase assays showed that Sox11 could activate the most highly regulated exons, I and IV, and that this activation was reduced by mutation of putative Sox binding sites. Exon expression in injured DRG neurons had some overlap with Neuro2a cells that overexpress Sox11, showing elevation in exon IV and VII transcripts. These findings indicate cell type and contextual specificity of Sox11 in modulation of BDNF transcription. PMID:22331573

  3. The GHKL ATPase MORC1 Modulates Species-Specific Plant Immunity in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Kang, Hong-Gu; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-08-01

    The microrchidia (MORC) proteins, a subset of the GHKL ATPase superfamily, were recently described as components involved in transcriptional gene silencing and plant immunity in Arabidopsis. To assess the role of MORC1 during resistance to Phytophthora infestans in solanaceous species, we altered the expression of the corresponding MORC1 homologs in potato, tomato, and Nicotiana benthamiana. Basal resistance to P. infestans was compromised in StMORC1-silenced potato and enhanced in overexpressing lines, indicating that StMORC1 positively affects immunity. By contrast, silencing SlMORC1 expression in tomato or NbMORC1 expression in N. benthamiana enhanced basal resistance to this oomycete pathogen. In addition, silencing SlMORC1 further enhanced resistance conferred by two resistance genes in tomato. Transient expression of StMORC1 in N. benthamiana accelerated cell death induced by infestin1 (INF1), whereas SlMORC1 or NbMORC1 suppressed it. Domain-swapping and mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region dictates the species-specific effects of the solanaceous MORC1 proteins on INF1-induced cell death. This C-terminal region also was required for homodimerization and phosphorylation of recombinant StMORC1 and SlMORC1, and its transient expression induced spontaneous cell death in N. benthamiana. Thus, this C-terminal region likely plays important roles in both determining and modulating the biological activity of MORC1 proteins. PMID:25822715

  4. A novel slow-inactivation-specific ion channel modulator attenuates neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael E; Smith, Paula L; Bladen, Chris; Eduljee, Cyrus; Xie, Jennifer Y; Chen, Lina; Fee-Maki, Molly; Doering, Clint J; Mezeyova, Janette; Zhu, Yongbao; Belardetti, Francesco; Pajouhesh, Hassan; Parker, David; Arneric, Stephen P; Parmar, Manjeet; Porreca, Frank; Tringham, Elizabeth; Zamponi, Gerald W; Snutch, Terrance P

    2011-04-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are implicated in pain sensation and transmission signaling mechanisms within both peripheral nociceptors and the spinal cord. Genetic knockdown and knockout experiments have shown that specific channel isoforms, including Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.8 sodium channels and Ca(V)3.2 T-type calcium channels, play distinct pronociceptive roles. We have rationally designed and synthesized a novel small organic compound (Z123212) that modulates both recombinant and native sodium and calcium channel currents by selectively stabilizing channels in their slow-inactivated state. Slow inactivation of voltage-gated channels can function as a brake during periods of neuronal hyperexcitability, and Z123212 was found to reduce the excitability of both peripheral nociceptors and lamina I/II spinal cord neurons in a state-dependent manner. In vivo experiments demonstrate that oral administration of Z123212 is efficacious in reversing thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia in the rat spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain and also produces acute antinociception in the hot-plate test. At therapeutically relevant concentrations, Z123212 did not cause significant motor or cardiovascular adverse effects. Taken together, the state-dependent inhibition of sodium and calcium channels in both the peripheral and central pain signaling pathways may provide a synergistic mechanism toward the development of a novel class of pain therapeutics. PMID:21349638

  5. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-09-07

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages.

  6. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  7. Zeaxanthin protects plant photosynthesis by modulating chlorophyll triplet yield in specific light-harvesting antenna subunits.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Holt, Nancy E; Kaligotla, Shanti; Fuciman, Marcel; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Carbonera, Donatella; Frank, Harry A; Alric, Jean; Bassi, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Plants are particularly prone to photo-oxidative damage caused by excess light. Photoprotection is essential for photosynthesis to proceed in oxygenic environments either by scavenging harmful reactive intermediates or preventing their accumulation to avoid photoinhibition. Carotenoids play a key role in protecting photosynthesis from the toxic effect of over-excitation; under excess light conditions, plants accumulate a specific carotenoid, zeaxanthin, that was shown to increase photoprotection. In this work we genetically dissected different components of zeaxanthin-dependent photoprotection. By using time-resolved differential spectroscopy in vivo, we identified a zeaxanthin-dependent optical signal characterized by a red shift in the carotenoid peak of the triplet-minus-singlet spectrum of leaves and pigment-binding proteins. By fractionating thylakoids into their component pigment binding complexes, the signal was found to originate from the monomeric Lhcb4-6 antenna components of Photosystem II and the Lhca1-4 subunits of Photosystem I. By analyzing mutants based on their sensitivity to excess light, the red-shifted triplet-minus-singlet signal was tightly correlated with photoprotection in the chloroplasts, suggesting the signal implies an increased efficiency of zeaxanthin in controlling chlorophyll triplet formation. Fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance analysis showed a decrease in the amplitude of signals assigned to chlorophyll triplets belonging to the monomeric antenna complexes of Photosystem II upon zeaxanthin binding; however, the amplitude of carotenoid triplet signal does not increase correspondingly. Results show that the high light-induced binding of zeaxanthin to specific proteins plays a major role in enhancing photoprotection by modulating the yield of potentially dangerous chlorophyll-excited states in vivo and preventing the production of singlet oxygen.

  8. Identification of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules based on interactions between transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J; Qian, Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Background Evolutionary conservation has been used successfully to help identify cis-acting DNA regions that are important in regulating tissue-specific gene expression. Motivated by increasing evidence that some DNA regulatory regions are not evolutionary conserved, we have developed an approach for cis-regulatory region identification that does not rely upon evolutionary sequence conservation. Results The conservation-independent approach is based on an empirical potential energy between interacting transcription factors (TFs). In this analysis, the potential energy is defined as a function of the number of TF interactions in a genomic region and the strength of the interactions. By identifying sets of interacting TFs, the analysis locates regions enriched with the binding sites of these interacting TFs. We applied this approach to 30 human tissues and identified 6232 putative cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) regulating 2130 tissue-specific genes. Interestingly, some genes appear to be regulated by different CRMs in different tissues. Known regulatory regions are highly enriched in our predicted CRMs. In addition, DNase I hypersensitive sites, which tend to be associated with active regulatory regions, significantly overlap with the predicted CRMs, but not with more conserved regions. We also find that conserved and non-conserved CRMs regulate distinct gene groups. Conserved CRMs control more essential genes and genes involved in fundamental cellular activities such as transcription. In contrast, non-conserved CRMs, in general, regulate more non-essential genes, such as genes related to neural activity. Conclusion These results demonstrate that identifying relevant sets of binding motifs can help in the mapping of DNA regulatory regions, and suggest that non-conserved CRMs play an important role in gene regulation. PMID:17996093

  9. Addressing Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Greg; Helmig, Mary; Kaplan, Bill; Kosch, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Four camp directors discuss how the September 11 tragedy and current world events will affect their camps. They describe how they are addressing safety concerns, working with parents, cooperating with outside agencies, hiring and screening international staff, and revising emergency plans. Camps must continue to offer community and support to…

  10. 47 CFR 73.756 - System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.756 Section 73.756 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) Channel spacing. The nominal spacing for DSB shall be 10 kHz. However,...

  11. 47 CFR 73.756 - System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.756 Section 73.756 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) Channel spacing. The nominal spacing for DSB shall be 10 kHz. However,...

  12. 47 CFR 73.756 - System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.756 Section 73.756 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) Channel spacing. The nominal spacing for DSB shall be 10 kHz. However,...

  13. 47 CFR 73.756 - System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.756 Section 73.756 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) Channel spacing. The nominal spacing for DSB shall be 10 kHz. However,...

  14. 47 CFR 73.756 - System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false System specifications for double-sideband (DBS) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.756 Section 73.756 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) Channel spacing. The nominal spacing for DSB shall be 10 kHz. However,...

  15. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system. PMID:23487896

  16. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guangjun; Wu, Kui; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS.

  17. Strain-specific colonization patterns and serum modulation of multi-species oral biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Biyikoğlu, Basak; Ricker, Austin; Diaz, Patricia I

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis results from an ecological shift in the composition of subgingival biofilms. Subgingival community maturation is modulated by inter-organismal interactions and the relationship of communities with the host. In an effort to better understand this process, we evaluated biofilm formation, with oral commensal species, by three strains of the subgingivally prevalent microorganism Fusobacterium nucleatum and four strains of the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. We also tested the effect of serum, which resembles gingival exudates, on subgingival biofilms. Biofilms were allowed to develop in flow cells using salivary medium. We found that although not all strains of F. nucleatum were able to grow in mono-species biofilms, forming a community with health-associated partners Actinomyces oris and Veillonella parvula promoted biofilm growth of all F. nucleatum strains. Strains of P. gingivalis also showed variable ability to form mono-species biofilms. P. gingivalis W50 and W83 did not form biofilms, while ATCC 33277 and 381 formed biofilm structures, but only strain ATCC 33277 grew over time. Unlike the enhanced growth of F. nucleatum with the two health-associated species, no strain of P. gingivalis grew in three-species communities with A. oris and V. parvula. However, addition of F. nucleatum facilitated growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 with health-associated partners. Importantly, serum negatively affected the adhesion of F. nucleatum, while it favored biofilm growth by P. gingivalis. This work highlights strain specificity in subgingival biofilm formation. Environmental factors such as serum alter the colonization patterns of oral microorganisms and could impact subgingival biofilms by selectively promoting pathogenic species.

  18. Tissue-specific modulation of mitochondrial DNA segregation by a defect in mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Riikka; Marttinen, Paula; Stewart, James B; Neil Dear, T; Battersby, Brendan J

    2016-02-15

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that divide and fuse by remodeling an outer and inner membrane in response to developmental, physiological and stress stimuli. These events are coordinated by conserved dynamin-related GTPases. The dynamics of mitochondrial morphology require coordination with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to ensure faithful genome transmission, however, this process remains poorly understood. Mitochondrial division is linked to the segregation of mtDNA but how it affects cases of mtDNA heteroplasmy, where two or more mtDNA variants/mutations co-exist in a cell, is unknown. Segregation of heteroplasmic human pathogenic mtDNA mutations is a critical factor in the onset and severity of human mitochondrial diseases. Here, we investigated the coupling of mitochondrial morphology to the transmission and segregation of mtDNA in mammals by taking advantage of two genetically modified mouse models: one with a dominant-negative mutation in the dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 or Dnm1l) that impairs mitochondrial fission and the other, heteroplasmic mice segregating two neutral mtDNA haplotypes (BALB and NZB). We show a tissue-specific response to mtDNA segregation from a defect in mitochondrial fission. Only mtDNA segregation in the hematopoietic compartment is modulated from impaired Dnm1l function. In contrast, no effect was observed in other tissues arising from the three germ layers during development and in mtDNA transmission through the female germline. Our data suggest a robust organization of a heteroplasmic mtDNA segregating unit across mammalian cell types that can overcome impaired mitochondrial division to ensure faithful transmission of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:26681804

  19. Is sensory-specific satiety for a bitter-sweet infusion modulated by context?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Burgos, David; Secchiari, Florencia; Calviño, Amalia

    2015-03-01

    The sensory-affective attributes of beverages have an important influence on a given intake and successive consumptions because of sensory-specific satiety (SSS; defined as a decrease in pleasantness ratings of a food eaten relative to uneaten foods). No studies have, however, investigated how multiple sessions of SSS for familiar drinks over a period of several days up to a week may change their pleasantness and how these hedonic-related judgments are affected by the context during SSS testing. With twenty-six participants, the present study explored the medium lasting and contextual effects of repeated SSS sessions for a bitter-sweet infusion on olfactory and flavour pleasantness over the course of three exposures in either a laboratory or a cafeteria setting. The results showed olfactory and flavour SSS for the infusion following each consumption in both the artificial and the natural setting. More interestingly, despite the failure to detect medium-term SSS (i.e., a greater decrease in pleasantness ratings of a food eaten relative to uneaten foods after repeated SSS sessions over several days as compared to the first SSS session), a contextual modulation of olfactory SSS was observed with a lesser overall magnitude in the cafeteria compared to the laboratory setting. To the best of our knowledge, the impact of eating location on the development of satiation and the differential contextual sensitivity of SSS for orthonasal odours and flavours has not been reported previously. The implications of potential environmental control of SSS are considered in this study. PMID:25542889

  20. Improved Sequence Learning with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: Evidence for Treatment-Specific Network Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C.; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H2 15Opositron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA–STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation. PMID:22357863

  1. Neural control of rhythmic, cyclical human arm movement: task dependency, nerve specificity and phase modulation of cutaneous reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, E Paul; Kido, Aiko

    2001-01-01

    The organization and pattern of cutaneous reflex modulation during rhythmic cyclical movements of the human upper limbs has received much less attention than that afforded the lower limb. Our working hypothesis is that control mechanisms underlying the modulation of cutaneous reflex amplitude during rhythmic arm movement are similar to those that control reflex modulation in the leg. Thus, we hypothesized that cutaneous reflexes would show task dependency and nerve specificity in the upper limb during rhythmic cyclical arm movement as has been demonstrated in the human lower limb. EMG was recorded from 10 muscles crossing the human shoulder, elbow and wrist joints while bilateral whole arm rhythmic cyclical movements were performed on a custom-made, hydraulic apparatus. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked with trains (5× 1.0 ms pulses at 300 Hz) of electrical stimulation delivered at non-noxious intensities (∼2× threshold for radiating parasthesia) to the superficial radial, median and ulnar nerves innervating the hand. Cutaneous reflexes were typically modulated with the movement cycle (i.e. phase dependency was observed). There was evidence for nerve specificity of cutaneous reflexes during rhythmic movement of the upper limbs. Task-dependent modulation was also seen as cutaneous reflexes were of larger amplitude or inhibitory (reflex reversal) during arm cycling as compared to static contraction. While there are some differences in the patterns of cutaneous reflex modulation seen between the arms and legs, it is concluded that cutaneous reflexes are modulated similarly in the upper and lower limbs implicating similar motor control mechanisms. PMID:11744775

  2. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Children is Associated with Impairment of Sleep Stage Specific Shift of Cardiac Autonomic Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Duanping; Li, Xian; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Liu, Jiahao; Rodriguez-Colon, Sol; Calhoun, Susan; Bixler, Edward O.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of sleep stages and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) on autonomic modulation in 700 children. Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) during one 9-hour nighttime polysomnography was used to define SDB. Sleep stage specific autonomic modulation was measured by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of the first available 5-minute RR intervals from each sleep stage. The mean (SD) age was 112 (21) months (49% male and 25% non-Caucasian). The average AHI was 0.79 (SD=1.03)/hour, while 73.0%, 25.8%, and 1.2% of children had AHI < 1 (No-SDB), 1–5 (Mild-SDB), and ≥ 5 (Moderate-SDB), respectively. In no-SDB group, the HF and RMSSD significantly increased from wake to stage 2, and slow-wave sleep (SWS), and then decreased dramatically when shifting into REM sleep. In moderate-SDB group, the pattern of HRV shift is similar to that of no-SDB. However, the decreases in HF and RMSSD from SWS to REM were more pronounced in moderate-SDB children [between group differences in HF (−24% in moderate-SDB vs. −10% in no-SDB) and RMSSD (−27% vs. −12%) were significant (p < 0.05)]. The REM stage HF is significantly lower in moderate-SDB group compared to no-SDB group [mean (SE): 4.49 (0.43) vs. 5.80 (0.05) ms2, respectively, p < 0.05]. Conclusions: autonomic modulation significantly shifts towards higher parasympathetic modulation from wake to non-REM sleep, and reverses to a less parasympathetic modulation during REM sleep. However, the autonomic modulation is impaired among children with moderate-SDB in the directions of more reduction in parasympathetic modulation from SWS to REM sleep and significantly weaker parasympathetic modulation in REM sleep, which may lead to higher arrhythmia vulnerability, especially during REM sleep. PMID:20337904

  3. Low frequency steady-state brain responses modulate large scale functional networks in a frequency-specific means.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Heng; Guo, Xiao-Nan; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations are essential for brain functions. Research has suggested that the frequency of neural oscillations is lower for more integrative and remote communications. In this vein, some resting-state studies have suggested that large scale networks function in the very low frequency range (<1 Hz). However, it is difficult to determine the frequency characteristics of brain networks because both resting-state studies and conventional frequency tagging approaches cannot simultaneously capture multiple large scale networks in controllable cognitive activities. In this preliminary study, we aimed to examine whether large scale networks can be modulated by task-induced low frequency steady-state brain responses (lfSSBRs) in a frequency-specific pattern. In a revised attention network test, the lfSSBRs were evoked in the triple network system and sensory-motor system, indicating that large scale networks can be modulated in a frequency tagging way. Furthermore, the inter- and intranetwork synchronizations as well as coherence were increased at the fundamental frequency and the first harmonic rather than at other frequency bands, indicating a frequency-specific modulation of information communication. However, there was no difference among attention conditions, indicating that lfSSBRs modulate the general attention state much stronger than distinguishing attention conditions. This study provides insights into the advantage and mechanism of lfSSBRs. More importantly, it paves a new way to investigate frequency-specific large scale brain activities. PMID:26512872

  4. Low frequency steady-state brain responses modulate large scale functional networks in a frequency-specific means.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Heng; Guo, Xiao-Nan; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations are essential for brain functions. Research has suggested that the frequency of neural oscillations is lower for more integrative and remote communications. In this vein, some resting-state studies have suggested that large scale networks function in the very low frequency range (<1 Hz). However, it is difficult to determine the frequency characteristics of brain networks because both resting-state studies and conventional frequency tagging approaches cannot simultaneously capture multiple large scale networks in controllable cognitive activities. In this preliminary study, we aimed to examine whether large scale networks can be modulated by task-induced low frequency steady-state brain responses (lfSSBRs) in a frequency-specific pattern. In a revised attention network test, the lfSSBRs were evoked in the triple network system and sensory-motor system, indicating that large scale networks can be modulated in a frequency tagging way. Furthermore, the inter- and intranetwork synchronizations as well as coherence were increased at the fundamental frequency and the first harmonic rather than at other frequency bands, indicating a frequency-specific modulation of information communication. However, there was no difference among attention conditions, indicating that lfSSBRs modulate the general attention state much stronger than distinguishing attention conditions. This study provides insights into the advantage and mechanism of lfSSBRs. More importantly, it paves a new way to investigate frequency-specific large scale brain activities.

  5. Holographic content addressable storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas; Reyes, George

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a Holographic Content Addressable Storage (HCAS) architecture. The HCAS systems consists of a DMD (Digital Micromirror Array) as the input Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), a CMOS (Complementary Metal-oxide Semiconductor) sensor as the output photodetector and a photorefractive crystal as the recording media. The HCAS system is capable of performing optical correlation of an input image/feature against massive reference data set stored in the holographic memory. Detailed system analysis will be reported in this paper.

  6. Modulation of cluster incorporation specificity in a de novo iron-sulfur cluster binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Roy, Anindya; Astashkin, Andrei; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins perform an astounding variety of functions, and represent one of the most abundant classes of metalloproteins. Most often, they constitute pairs or chains and act as electron transfer modules either within complex redox enzymes or within small diffusible proteins. We have previously described the design of a three-helix bundle that can bind two clusters within its hydrophobic core. Here, we use single-point mutations to exchange one of the Cys ligands coordinating the cluster to either Leu or Ser. We show that the mutants modulate the redox potential of the clusters and stabilize the [3Fe-4S] form over the [4Fe-4S] form, supporting the use of model iron-sulfur cluster proteins as modules in the design of complex redox enzymes.

  7. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  8. CR2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors: bench-to-bedside using a novel strategy for site-specific complement modulation.

    PubMed

    Holers, V Michael; Rohrer, Bärbel; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Recent approval of the first human complement pathway-directed therapeutics, along with high-profile genetic association studies, has catalyzed renewed biopharmaceutical interest in developing drugs that modulate the complement system. Substantial challenges remain, however, that must be overcome before widespread application of complement inhibitors in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases becomes possible. Among these challenges are the following: (1) defining the complement pathways and effector mechanisms that cause tissue injury in humans and determining whether the relative importance of each varies by disease, (2) blocking or modulating, using traditional small molecule or biologic approaches, the function of complement proteins whose circulating levels are very high and whose turnover rates are relatively rapid, especially in the setting of acute and chronic autoimmune diseases, and (3) avoiding infectious complications or impairment of other important physiological functions of complement when using systemically active complement-blocking agents. This chapter will review data that address these challenges to therapeutic development, with a focus on the development of a novel strategy of blocking specific complement pathways by targeting inhibitors using a recombinant portion of the human complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) which specifically targets to sites of local complement C3 activation where C3 fragments are covalently fixed. Recently, the first of these CR2-targeted proteins has entered human phase I studies in the human disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The results of murine translational studies using CR2-targeted inhibitors strongly suggest that a guiding principle going forward in complement therapeutic development may well be to focus on developing strategies to modulate the pathway as precisely as possible by physically localizing therapeutic inhibitory effects.

  9. CR2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors: bench-to-bedside using a novel strategy for site-specific complement modulation.

    PubMed

    Holers, V Michael; Rohrer, Bärbel; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Recent approval of the first human complement pathway-directed therapeutics, along with high-profile genetic association studies, has catalyzed renewed biopharmaceutical interest in developing drugs that modulate the complement system. Substantial challenges remain, however, that must be overcome before widespread application of complement inhibitors in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases becomes possible. Among these challenges are the following: (1) defining the complement pathways and effector mechanisms that cause tissue injury in humans and determining whether the relative importance of each varies by disease, (2) blocking or modulating, using traditional small molecule or biologic approaches, the function of complement proteins whose circulating levels are very high and whose turnover rates are relatively rapid, especially in the setting of acute and chronic autoimmune diseases, and (3) avoiding infectious complications or impairment of other important physiological functions of complement when using systemically active complement-blocking agents. This chapter will review data that address these challenges to therapeutic development, with a focus on the development of a novel strategy of blocking specific complement pathways by targeting inhibitors using a recombinant portion of the human complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) which specifically targets to sites of local complement C3 activation where C3 fragments are covalently fixed. Recently, the first of these CR2-targeted proteins has entered human phase I studies in the human disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The results of murine translational studies using CR2-targeted inhibitors strongly suggest that a guiding principle going forward in complement therapeutic development may well be to focus on developing strategies to modulate the pathway as precisely as possible by physically localizing therapeutic inhibitory effects. PMID:23402024

  10. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... modulated emissions may share the same spectrum or be interleaved with analog emissions in the same high frequency broadcasting (HFBC) band, provided the protection afforded to the analog emissions is at least as... the 5 kHz center frequency locations in the channel raster currently in use within the HFBC...

  11. 47 CFR 73.758 - System specifications for digitally modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... modulated emissions may share the same spectrum or be interleaved with analog emissions in the same high frequency broadcasting (HFBC) band, provided the protection afforded to the analog emissions is at least as... the 5 kHz center frequency locations in the channel raster currently in use within the HFBC...

  12. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  13. Convocation address.

    PubMed

    Ghatowar, P S

    1993-07-01

    The Union Deputy Minister of Health and Family Welfare in India addressed the 35th convocation of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay in 1993. Officials in developing countries have been concerned about population growth for more than 30 years and have instituted policies to reduce population growth. In the 1960s, population growth in developing countries was around 2.5%, but today it is about 2%. Despite this decline, the world will have 1 billion more individuals by the year 2001. 95% of these new people will be born in developing countries. India's population size is so great that India does not have the time to wait for development to reduce population growth. Population needs to be viewed as an integrated part of overall development, since it is linked to poverty, illiteracy, environmental damage, gender issues, and reproductive health. Despite a large population size, India has made some important advancements in health and family planning. For example, India has reduced population growth (to 2.14% annually between 1981-1991), infant mortality, and its birth rate. It has increased the contraceptive use rate and life expectancy. Its southern states have been more successful at achieving demographic goals than have the northern states. India needs to implement efforts to improve living conditions, to change attitudes and perceptions about small families and contraception, and to promote family planning acceptance earlier among young couples. Improvement of living conditions is especially important in India, since almost 33% of the people live in poverty. India needs to invest in nutrition, health, and education. The mass media and nongovernmental organizations need to create population awareness and demand for family planning services. Improvement in women's status accelerates fertility decline, as has happened in Kerala State. The government needs to facilitate generation of jobs. Community participation is needed for India to achieve

  14. Intronic cis-regulatory modules mediate tissue-specific and microbial control of angptl4/fiaf transcription.

    PubMed

    Camp, J Gray; Jazwa, Amelia L; Trent, Chad M; Rawls, John F

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota enhances dietary energy harvest leading to increased fat storage in adipose tissues. This effect is caused in part by the microbial suppression of intestinal epithelial expression of a circulating inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase called Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4/Fiaf). To define the cis-regulatory mechanisms underlying intestine-specific and microbial control of Angptl4 transcription, we utilized the zebrafish system in which host regulatory DNA can be rapidly analyzed in a live, transparent, and gnotobiotic vertebrate. We found that zebrafish angptl4 is transcribed in multiple tissues including the liver, pancreatic islet, and intestinal epithelium, which is similar to its mammalian homologs. Zebrafish angptl4 is also specifically suppressed in the intestinal epithelium upon colonization with a microbiota. In vivo transgenic reporter assays identified discrete tissue-specific regulatory modules within angptl4 intron 3 sufficient to drive expression in the liver, pancreatic islet β-cells, or intestinal enterocytes. Comparative sequence analyses and heterologous functional assays of angptl4 intron 3 sequences from 12 teleost fish species revealed differential evolution of the islet and intestinal regulatory modules. High-resolution functional mapping and site-directed mutagenesis defined the minimal set of regulatory sequences required for intestinal activity. Strikingly, the microbiota suppressed the transcriptional activity of the intestine-specific regulatory module similar to the endogenous angptl4 gene. These results suggest that the microbiota might regulate host intestinal Angptl4 protein expression and peripheral fat storage by suppressing the activity of an intestine-specific transcriptional enhancer. This study provides a useful paradigm for understanding how microbial signals interact with tissue-specific regulatory networks to control the activity and evolution of host gene transcription. PMID:22479192

  15. Effect of activated antigen-specific B cells on ES-62-mediated modulation of effector function of heterologous antigen-specific T cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Fraser A; Watson, Katherine A; Garside, Paul; Harnett, Margaret M; Harnett, William

    2008-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the idea of using helminth-derived molecules for therapeutic purposes and indeed we have shown that ES-62, a filarial nematode-derived phosphorylcholine-containing glycoprotein, significantly reduces the severity of arthritis in a murine model. Clearly, knowledge of mechanism of action is important when considering molecules for use in treating disease and although much is known regarding how ES-62 interacts with the immune system, gaps in our understanding remain. A feature of filarial nematode infection is a defective, T helper 2 (Th2)-polarized antigen-specific T-cell response and in relation to this we have recently shown that ES-62 inhibits clonal expansion and modulates effector function towards a Th2 phenotype, of antigen-specific T cells in vivo. ES-62 is also known to directly modulate B-cell behaviour and hence to determine whether it was mediating these effects on T cells by disrupting B–T-cell co-operation, we have investigated antigen-specific responses using an adoptive transfer system in which traceable numbers of tg ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells and hen egg lysozyme (HEL)-specific B cells respond to a chemically coupled form of OVA–HEL that contains linked epitopes that promote cognate T- and B-cell interactions. Surprisingly, these studies indicate that activated B cells restore T-cell expansion and prevent Th2-like polarization. However, ES-62-treated double cell transfer mice demonstrate a more generalized immunosuppression with reduced levels of Th1 and -2 type cytokines and antibody subclasses. Collectively, these results suggest that whilst ES-62 can target B–T-cell co-operation, this does not promote polarizing of T-cell responses towards a Th2-type phenotype. PMID:17961164

  16. Cell-specific activity of the modulator region in the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lubon, H.K.; Hennighausen, L. ); Ghazal, P.; Reynolds-Kohler, C.; Lockshin, C.; Nelson, J. )

    1989-03-01

    In this paper the authors demonstrate that modular sequences upstream of the enhancer of the major immediate-early promoter of human cytomegalovirus exert a differential effort on the level of transcription in a variety of cells and that this region has the capacity to interact with specific nuclear protein. Depending on the cell type, these modulator sequences increased or decreased transcriptional activation from the IE1 gene promoter-enhancer. The cell lines identified in this report should be useful to study the molecular mechanism of cell-specific transcriptional repression and activation exerted by the major immediate-early promoter upstream region.

  17. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  18. Gene-Specific Assessment of Guanine Oxidation as an Epigenetic Modulator for Cardiac Specification of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonghoon; Park, Jong Woo; Oh, Hawmok; Maria, Fernanda S; Kang, Jaeku; Tian, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics have essential roles in development and human diseases. Compared to the complex histone modifications, epigenetic changes on mammalian DNA are as simple as methylation on cytosine. Guanine, however, can be oxidized as an epigenetic change which can undergo base-pair transversion, causing a genetic difference. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules for embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation, possibly through transient changes on genomic DNA such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). Technical limitations on detecting such DNA modifications, however, restrict the investigation of the role of 8-oxoG in ESC differentiation. Here, we developed a Hoogsteen base pairing-mediated PCR-sequencing assay to detect 8-oxoG lesions that can subsequently cause G to T transversions during PCR. We then used this assay to assess the epigenetic and transient 8-oxoG formation in the Tbx5 gene of R1 mouse ESCs subjected to oxidative stress by removing 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) from the culture media. To our surprise, significantly higher numbers of 8-oxoG-mediated G∙C to C∙G transversion, not G∙C to T∙A, were detected at 7th and 9th base position from the transcription start site of exon 1 of Tbx5 in ESCs in the (-)2ME than (+)2ME group (p < 0.05). This was consistent with the decrease in the amount of amplifiable of DNA harboring the 8-oxoG lesions at the Tbx5 promoter region in the oxidative stressed ESCs. The ESCs responded to oxidative stress, possibly through the epigenetic effects of guanine oxidation with decreased proliferation (p < 0.05) and increased formation of beating embryoid bodies (EBs; p < 0.001). Additionally, the epigenetic changes of guanine induced up-regulation of Ogg1 and PolB, two base excision repairing genes for 8-oxoG, in ESCs treated with (-)2ME (p < 0.01). Together, we developed a gene-specific and direct quantification assay for guanine oxidation. Using oxidative stressed

  19. Gene-Specific Assessment of Guanine Oxidation as an Epigenetic Modulator for Cardiac Specification of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonghoon; Park, Jong Woo; Oh, Hawmok; Maria, Fernanda S.; Kang, Jaeku; Tian, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics have essential roles in development and human diseases. Compared to the complex histone modifications, epigenetic changes on mammalian DNA are as simple as methylation on cytosine. Guanine, however, can be oxidized as an epigenetic change which can undergo base-pair transversion, causing a genetic difference. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules for embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation, possibly through transient changes on genomic DNA such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). Technical limitations on detecting such DNA modifications, however, restrict the investigation of the role of 8-oxoG in ESC differentiation. Here, we developed a Hoogsteen base pairing-mediated PCR-sequencing assay to detect 8-oxoG lesions that can subsequently cause G to T transversions during PCR. We then used this assay to assess the epigenetic and transient 8-oxoG formation in the Tbx5 gene of R1 mouse ESCs subjected to oxidative stress by removing 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) from the culture media. To our surprise, significantly higher numbers of 8-oxoG-mediated G∙C to C∙G transversion, not G∙C to T∙A, were detected at 7th and 9th base position from the transcription start site of exon 1 of Tbx5 in ESCs in the (-)2ME than (+)2ME group (p < 0.05). This was consistent with the decrease in the amount of amplifiable of DNA harboring the 8-oxoG lesions at the Tbx5 promoter region in the oxidative stressed ESCs. The ESCs responded to oxidative stress, possibly through the epigenetic effects of guanine oxidation with decreased proliferation (p < 0.05) and increased formation of beating embryoid bodies (EBs; p < 0.001). Additionally, the epigenetic changes of guanine induced up-regulation of Ogg1 and PolB, two base excision repairing genes for 8-oxoG, in ESCs treated with (-)2ME (p < 0.01). Together, we developed a gene-specific and direct quantification assay for guanine oxidation. Using oxidative stressed

  20. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Rosnick, C.K.

    1996-04-19

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-0126). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  1. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, E.C. II

    1994-09-09

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  2. Modulation of antigen presentation by autoreactive B cell clones specific for GAD65 from a type I diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    BANGA, J P; MOORE, J K; DUHINDAN, N; MADEC, A M; VAN ENDERT, P M; ORGIAZZI, J; ENDL, J

    2004-01-01

    We used a GAD65-specific human B–T cell line cognate system in vitro to investigate the modulation of GAD65 presentation by autoantibody, assessed in a proliferation assay. Generally, if the T cell determinant overlaps or resides within the antibody epitope, effects of presentation are blunted while if they are distant can lead to potent presentation. For three different autoreactive B–T cell line cognate pairs, the modulation of GAD65 presentation followed the mode of overlapping or distant epitopes with resultant potent or undetectable presentation. However, other cognate pairs elicited variability in this pattern of presentation. Notably, one B cell line, DPC, whose antibody epitope did not overlap with the T cell determinants, was consistently poor in presenting GAD65. Using the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 conjugated to GAD65 to study receptor-mediated antigen endocytosis showed that all the antigen-specific B cell clones were efficient in intracellular accumulation of the antigen. Additionally, multicolour immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the internalized GAD65/surface IgG complexes were rapidly targeted to a perinuclear compartment in all GAD-specific B cell clones. This analysis also demonstrated that HLA-DM expression was reduced strongly in DPC compared to the stimulatory B cell clones. Thus the capability of antigen-specific B cells to capture and present antigen to human T cell lines is dependent on the spatial relationship of B and T cell epitopes as well other factors which contribute to the efficiency of presentation. PMID:14678267

  3. Nucleus Accumbens-Specific Interventions in RGS9-2 Activity Modulate Responses to Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Gaspari, Sevasti; Papachatzaki, Maria M; Koo, Ja Wook; Carr, Fiona B; Tsimpanouli, Maria-Efstratia; Stergiou, Eugenia; Bagot, Rosemary C; Ferguson, Deveroux; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Chakravarty, Sumana; Deisseroth, Karl; Lobo, Mary Kay; Zachariou, Venetia

    2014-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signalling 9-2 (Rgs9-2) modulates the actions of a wide range of CNS-acting drugs by controlling signal transduction of several GPCRs in the striatum. RGS9-2 acts via a complex mechanism that involves interactions with Gα subunits, the Gβ5 protein, and the adaptor protein R7BP. Our recent work identified Rgs9-2 complexes in the striatum associated with acute or chronic exposures to mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonists. In this study we use several new genetic tools that allow manipulations of Rgs9-2 activity in particular brain regions of adult mice in order to better understand the mechanism via which this protein modulates opiate addiction and analgesia. We used adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to express forms of Rgs9-2 in the dorsal and ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens, NAc) in order to examine the influence of this protein in morphine actions. Consistent with earlier behavioural findings from constitutive Rgs9 knockout mice, we show that Rgs9-2 actions in the NAc modulate morphine reward and dependence. Notably, Rgs9-2 in the NAc affects the analgesic actions of morphine as well as the development of analgesic tolerance. Using optogenetics we demonstrate that activation of Channelrhodopsin2 in Rgs9-2-expressing neurons, or in D1 dopamine receptor (Drd1)-enriched medium spiny neurons, accelerates the development of morphine tolerance, whereas activation of D2 dopamine receptor (Drd2)-enriched neurons does not significantly affect the development of tolerance. Together, these data provide new information on the signal transduction mechanisms underlying opiate actions in the NAc. PMID:24561386

  4. Nucleus accumbens-specific interventions in RGS9-2 activity modulate responses to morphine.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Sevasti; Papachatzaki, Maria M; Koo, Ja Wook; Carr, Fiona B; Tsimpanouli, Maria-Efstratia; Stergiou, Eugenia; Bagot, Rosemary C; Ferguson, Deveroux; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Chakravarty, Sumana; Deisseroth, Karl; Lobo, Mary Kay; Zachariou, Venetia

    2014-07-01

    Regulator of G protein signalling 9-2 (Rgs9-2) modulates the actions of a wide range of CNS-acting drugs by controlling signal transduction of several GPCRs in the striatum. RGS9-2 acts via a complex mechanism that involves interactions with Gα subunits, the Gβ5 protein, and the adaptor protein R7BP. Our recent work identified Rgs9-2 complexes in the striatum associated with acute or chronic exposures to mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonists. In this study we use several new genetic tools that allow manipulations of Rgs9-2 activity in particular brain regions of adult mice in order to better understand the mechanism via which this protein modulates opiate addiction and analgesia. We used adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to express forms of Rgs9-2 in the dorsal and ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens, NAc) in order to examine the influence of this protein in morphine actions. Consistent with earlier behavioural findings from constitutive Rgs9 knockout mice, we show that Rgs9-2 actions in the NAc modulate morphine reward and dependence. Notably, Rgs9-2 in the NAc affects the analgesic actions of morphine as well as the development of analgesic tolerance. Using optogenetics we demonstrate that activation of Channelrhodopsin2 in Rgs9-2-expressing neurons, or in D1 dopamine receptor (Drd1)-enriched medium spiny neurons, accelerates the development of morphine tolerance, whereas activation of D2 dopamine receptor (Drd2)-enriched neurons does not significantly affect the development of tolerance. Together, these data provide new information on the signal transduction mechanisms underlying opiate actions in the NAc.

  5. Waste Receiving and Processing, Module 2A, feed specification: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, O.L.; Sheriff, M.L.

    1994-11-14

    Detailed descriptions of the various mixed low-level waste feed streams that will be processed in the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 2A (WRAP 2A) are provided. Feed stream descriptions are based on available reports, the solid waste information tracking system database, and the 1993 solid waste forecast data. Available chemical and physical attributes, radionuclide data, waste codes, and packaging information are shown for 15 feed streams. The information sources and methodology for obtaining projections for WRAP 2A expected feed stream volumes also are described.

  6. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviors through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

    PubMed Central

    Creed, Meaghan C.; Ntamati, Niels R.; Tan, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to dopamine (DA) neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons. The task of signaling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs), a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioral level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs) to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24478655

  7. Attention modulates specificity effects in spoken word recognition: Challenges to the time-course hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Theodore, Rachel M.; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Luthra, Sahil

    2015-01-01

    Findings in the domain of spoken word recognition indicate that lexical representations contain both abstract and episodic information. It has been proposed that processing time determines when each source of information is recruited, with increased processing time required to access lower-frequency episodic instantiations. The time-course hypothesis of specificity effects thus identifies a strong role for retrieval mechanisms mediating the use of abstract versus episodic information. Here we conducted three recognition memory experiments to examine whether findings previously attributed to retrieval mechanisms might reflect attention during encoding. Results from Experiment 1 showed that talker-specificity effects emerged when subjects attended to individual speakers during encoding, but not when they attended to lexical characteristics during encoding, even though processing time at retrieval was equivalent. Results from Experiment 2 showed that talker-specificity effects emerged when listeners attended to talker gender but not when they attended to syntactic characteristics, even though processing time at retrieval was significantly longer in the latter condition. Results from Experiment 3 showed no talker-specificity effects when attending to lexical characteristics even when processing at retrieval was slowed by the addition of background noise. Collectively, these results suggest that when processing time during retrieval is decoupled from encoding factors, it fails to predict the emergence of talker-specificity effects. Rather, attention during encoding appears to be the putative variable. PMID:25824889

  8. Hypocretin neuron-specific transcriptome profiling identifies the sleep modulator Kcnh4a

    PubMed Central

    Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Elbaz, Idan; Diber, Alex; Dahary, Dvir; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Alon, Shahar; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-01-01

    Sleep has been conserved throughout evolution; however, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of sleep are largely unknown. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate sleep\\wake states, feeding, stress, and reward. To elucidate the mechanism that enables these various functions and to identify sleep regulators, we combined fluorescence cell sorting and RNA-seq in hcrt:EGFP zebrafish. Dozens of Hcrt-neuron–specific transcripts were identified and comprehensive high-resolution imaging revealed gene-specific localization in all or subsets of Hcrt neurons. Clusters of Hcrt-neuron–specific genes are predicted to be regulated by shared transcription factors. These findings show that Hcrt neurons are heterogeneous and that integrative molecular mechanisms orchestrate their diverse functions. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kcnh4a, which is expressed in all Hcrt neurons, was silenced by the CRISPR-mediated gene inactivation system. The mutant kcnh4a (kcnh4a-/-) larvae showed reduced sleep time and consolidation, specifically during the night, suggesting that Kcnh4a regulates sleep. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08638.001 PMID:26426478

  9. Hypocretin neuron-specific transcriptome profiling identifies the sleep modulator Kcnh4a.

    PubMed

    Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Elbaz, Idan; Diber, Alex; Dahary, Dvir; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Alon, Shahar; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-01-01

    Sleep has been conserved throughout evolution; however, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of sleep are largely unknown. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate sleep\\wake states, feeding, stress, and reward. To elucidate the mechanism that enables these various functions and to identify sleep regulators, we combined fluorescence cell sorting and RNA-seq in hcrt:EGFP zebrafish. Dozens of Hcrt-neuron-specific transcripts were identified and comprehensive high-resolution imaging revealed gene-specific localization in all or subsets of Hcrt neurons. Clusters of Hcrt-neuron-specific genes are predicted to be regulated by shared transcription factors. These findings show that Hcrt neurons are heterogeneous and that integrative molecular mechanisms orchestrate their diverse functions. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kcnh4a, which is expressed in all Hcrt neurons, was silenced by the CRISPR-mediated gene inactivation system. The mutant kcnh4a (kcnh4a(-/-)) larvae showed reduced sleep time and consolidation, specifically during the night, suggesting that Kcnh4a regulates sleep.

  10. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Sunita A.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A.; Ryan, Peter R.; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:26219411

  11. Establishing an optimized patient-specific verification program for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serna, Alfredo; Mata, Fernando; Puchades, Vicente

    2013-10-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) increases the workload significantly. We compared the results from 4 verification methods to establish an efficient VMAT QA. Planning for VMAT treatments was carried out for 40 consecutive patients. Pretreatment verifications were carried out with ion chamber array Physikalish-Technische Werkstätten (PTW729), electronic portal dosimetry (EPID), ion chamber measurements, and independent dose calculation with Diamond program. 2D analyses were made using the gamma analysis (3 mm distance to agreement and 3% dose difference relative to maximum, 10% dose threshold). Average point dose difference calculated by Eclipse relative to ion chamber measurements and Diamond were 0.1%±0.9% and 0.6%±2.2%, respectively. Average pass rate for PTW729 was 99.2%±1.9% and 98.3%±1.3% for EPID. The total required time (linac occupancy time given in parentheses) for each QA method was: PTW729 43.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), EPID 14.5 minutes (2.5 minutes), ion chamber 34.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), and Diamond 12.0 minutes (0 minute). The results were consistent and allowed us to establish an optimized protocol, considering safety and accuracy as well as workload, consisting of 2 verification methods: EPID 2D analysis and independent dose calculation.

  12. Establishing an optimized patient-specific verification program for volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Serna, Alfredo; Mata, Fernando; Puchades, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) increases the workload significantly. We compared the results from 4 verification methods to establish an efficient VMAT QA. Planning for VMAT treatments was carried out for 40 consecutive patients. Pretreatment verifications were carried out with ion chamber array Physikalish-Technische Werkstätten (PTW729), electronic portal dosimetry (EPID), ion chamber measurements, and independent dose calculation with Diamond program. 2D analyses were made using the gamma analysis (3mm distance to agreement and 3% dose difference relative to maximum, 10% dose threshold). Average point dose difference calculated by Eclipse relative to ion chamber measurements and Diamond were 0.1%±0.9% and 0.6%±2.2%, respectively. Average pass rate for PTW729 was 99.2%±1.9% and 98.3%±1.3% for EPID. The total required time (linac occupancy time given in parentheses) for each QA method was: PTW729 43.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), EPID 14.5 minutes (2.5 minutes), ion chamber 34.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), and Diamond 12.0 minutes (0 minute). The results were consistent and allowed us to establish an optimized protocol, considering safety and accuracy as well as workload, consisting of 2 verification methods: EPID 2D analysis and independent dose calculation.

  13. RNA helicase module in an acetyltransferase that modifies a specific tRNA anticodon

    PubMed Central

    Chimnaronk, Sarin; Suzuki, Tateki; Manita, Tetsuhiro; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Yao, Min; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Post-transcriptional RNA modifications in the anticodon of transfer RNAs frequently contribute to the high fidelity of protein synthesis. In eubacteria, two genome-encoded transfer RNA (tRNA) species bear the same CAU sequence as the anticodons, which are differentiated by modified cytidines at the wobble positions. The elongator tRNAMet accepts an acetyl moiety at the wobble base to form N4-acetylcytidine (ac4C): an inherent modification ensures precise decoding of the AUG codon by strengthening C−G base-pair interaction and concurrently preventing misreading of the near cognate AUA codon. We have determined the crystal structure of tRNAMet cytidine acetyltransferase (TmcA) from Escherichia coli complexed with two natural ligands, acetyl-CoA and ADP, at 2.35 Å resolution. The structure unexpectedly reveals an idiosyncratic RNA helicase module fused with a GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) fold, which intimately cross-interact. Taken together with the biochemical evidence, we further unravelled the function of acetyl-CoA as an enzyme-activating switch, and propose that an RNA helicase motor driven by ATP hydrolysis is used to deliver the wobble base to the active centre of the GNAT domain. PMID:19322199

  14. Maturity and ripening-stage specific modulation of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Alka; Gupta, Aditya K; Datsenka, Tatsiana; Mattoo, Autar K; Handa, Avtar K

    2010-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit is a model to study molecular basis of fleshy fruit development and ripening. We profiled gene expression during fruit development (immature green and mature green fruit) and ripening (breaker stage onwards) program to obtain a global perspective of genes whose expression is modulated at each stage of fruit development and ripening. A custom made cDNA macroarray containing cDNAs representing various metabolic pathways, defense, signaling, transcription, transport, cell structure and cell wall related functions was developed and used to quantify changes in the abundance of different transcripts. About 34 % of 1066 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) printed on the macroarray were differentially expressed during tomato fruit ripening. Out of these, 25 % genes classify under metabolism and protein biosynthesis/degradation related processes, while a significant proportion represented stress-responsive genes and about 44 % represented genes with unknown functions. RNA gel blot analysis validated changes in a few representative genes. Although the mature green fruit was found transcriptionally quiescent, the K-means cluster analysis highlighted coordinated up or down regulation of genes during progressive ripening; emphasizing that ripening is a transcriptionally active process. Many stress-related genes were found up-regulated, suggesting their role in the fruit ripening program.

  15. A specific E3 ligase/deubiquitinase pair modulates TBP protein levels during muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Martinez, Silvia Sanchez; Hu, Wenxin; Liu, Zhe; Tjian, Robert

    2015-01-01

    TFIID-a complex of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFs)-is a central component of the Pol II promoter recognition apparatus. Recent studies have revealed significant downregulation of TFIID subunits in terminally differentiated myocytes, hepatocytes and adipocytes. Here, we report that TBP protein levels are tightly regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Using an in vitro ubiquitination assay coupled with biochemical fractionation, we identified Huwe1 as an E3 ligase targeting TBP for K48-linked ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Upregulation of Huwe1 expression during myogenesis induces TBP degradation and myotube differentiation. We found that Huwe1 activity on TBP is antagonized by the deubiquitinase USP10, which protects TBP from degradation. Thus, modulating the levels of both Huwe1 and USP10 appears to fine-tune the requisite degradation of TBP during myogenesis. Together, our study unmasks a previously unknown interplay between an E3 ligase and a deubiquitinating enzyme regulating TBP levels during cellular differentiation.

  16. A specific E3 ligase/deubiquitinase pair modulates TBP protein levels during muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Martinez, Silvia Sanchez; Hu, Wenxin; Liu, Zhe; Tjian, Robert

    2015-01-01

    TFIID—a complex of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFs)—is a central component of the Pol II promoter recognition apparatus. Recent studies have revealed significant downregulation of TFIID subunits in terminally differentiated myocytes, hepatocytes and adipocytes. Here, we report that TBP protein levels are tightly regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Using an in vitro ubiquitination assay coupled with biochemical fractionation, we identified Huwe1 as an E3 ligase targeting TBP for K48-linked ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Upregulation of Huwe1 expression during myogenesis induces TBP degradation and myotube differentiation. We found that Huwe1 activity on TBP is antagonized by the deubiquitinase USP10, which protects TBP from degradation. Thus, modulating the levels of both Huwe1 and USP10 appears to fine-tune the requisite degradation of TBP during myogenesis. Together, our study unmasks a previously unknown interplay between an E3 ligase and a deubiquitinating enzyme regulating TBP levels during cellular differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08536.001 PMID:26393420

  17. Natural variation of the Y chromosome suppresses sex ratio distortion and modulates testis-specific gene expression in Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Branco, A T; Tao, Y; Hartl, D L; Lemos, B

    2013-07-01

    X-linked sex-ratio distorters that disrupt spermatogenesis can cause a deficiency in functional Y-bearing sperm and a female-biased sex ratio. Y-linked modifiers that restore a normal sex ratio might be abundant and favored when a X-linked distorter is present. Here we investigated natural variation of Y-linked suppressors of sex-ratio in the Winters systems and the ability of these chromosomes to modulate gene expression in Drosophila simulans. Seventy-eight Y chromosomes of worldwide origin were assayed for their resistance to the X-linked sex-ratio distorter gene Dox. Y chromosome diversity caused males to sire ∼63% to ∼98% female progeny. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed hundreds of genes differentially expressed between isogenic males with sensitive (high sex ratio) and resistant (low sex ratio) Y chromosomes from the same population. Although the expression of about 75% of all testis-specific genes remained unchanged across Y chromosomes, a subset of post-meiotic genes was upregulated by resistant Y chromosomes. Conversely, a set of accessory gland-specific genes and mitochondrial genes were downregulated in males with resistant Y chromosomes. The D. simulans Y chromosome also modulated gene expression in XXY females in which the Y-linked protein-coding genes are not transcribed. The data suggest that the Y chromosome might exert its regulatory functions through epigenetic mechanisms that do not require the expression of protein-coding genes. The gene network that modulates sex ratio distortion by the Y chromosome is poorly understood, other than that it might include interactions with mitochondria and enriched for genes expressed in post-meiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  18. Subject-specific modulation of local field potential spectral power during brain-machine interface control in primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Kelvin; Dangi, Siddharth; Orsborn, Amy L.; Gastpar, Michael C.; Carmena, Jose M.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have predominantly utilized spike activity as the control signal. However, an increasing number of studies have shown the utility of local field potentials (LFPs) for decoding motor related signals. Currently, it is unclear how well different LFP frequencies can serve as features for continuous, closed-loop BMI control. Approach. We demonstrate 2D continuous LFP-based BMI control using closed-loop decoder adaptation, which adapts decoder parameters to subject-specific LFP feature modulations during BMI control. We trained two macaque monkeys to control a 2D cursor in a center-out task by modulating LFP power in the 0-150 Hz range. Main results. While both monkeys attained control, they used different strategies involving different frequency bands. One monkey primarily utilized the low-frequency spectrum (0-80 Hz), which was highly correlated between channels, and obtained proficient performance even with a single channel. In contrast, the other monkey relied more on higher frequencies (80-150 Hz), which were less correlated between channels, and had greater difficulty with control as the number of channels decreased. We then restricted the monkeys to use only various sub-ranges (0-40, 40-80, and 80-150 Hz) of the 0-150 Hz band. Interestingly, although both monkeys performed better with some sub-ranges than others, they were able to achieve BMI control with all sub-ranges after decoder adaptation, demonstrating broad flexibility in the frequencies that could potentially be used for LFP-based BMI control. Significance. Overall, our results demonstrate proficient, continuous BMI control using LFPs and provide insight into the subject-specific spectral patterns of LFP activity modulated during control.

  19. An estrogen-responsive module in the ventromedial hypothalamus selectively drives sex-specific activity in females.

    PubMed

    Correa, Stephanie M; Newstrom, David W; Warne, James P; Flandin, Pierre; Cheung, Clement C; Lin-Moore, Alexander T; Pierce, Andrew A; Xu, Allison W; Rubenstein, John L; Ingraham, Holly A

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-receptor alpha (ERα) neurons in the ventrolateral region of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHVL) control an array of sex-specific responses to maximize reproductive success. In females, these VMHVL neurons are believed to coordinate metabolism and reproduction. However, it remains unknown whether specific neuronal populations control distinct components of this physiological repertoire. Here, we identify a subset of ERα VMHVL neurons that promotes hormone-dependent female locomotion. Activating Nkx2-1-expressing VMHVL neurons via pharmacogenetics elicits a female-specific burst of spontaneous movement, which requires ERα and Tac1 signaling. Disrupting the development of Nkx2-1(+) VMHVL neurons results in female-specific obesity, inactivity, and loss of VMHVL neurons coexpressing ERα and Tac1. Unexpectedly, two responses controlled by ERα(+) neurons, fertility and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis, are unaffected. We conclude that a dedicated subset of VMHVL neurons marked by ERα, NKX2-1, and Tac1 regulates estrogen-dependent fluctuations in physical activity and constitutes one of several neuroendocrine modules that drive sex-specific responses. PMID:25543145

  20. Silver Nanoclusters with Specific Ion Recognition Modulated by Ligand Passivation toward Fluorimetric and Colorimetric Copper Analysis and Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongzhao; Li, Shuying; Jiang, Yao; Qiao, Yuchun; Zhang, Liyan; Xu, Lulu; Liu, Jinghui; Qi, Wei; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoclusters were synthesized and passivated by glutathione (GSH) ligand, with high aqueous stability and powerful red fluorescence and UV-vis yellow colour. Importantly, the specific recognition of the AgNCs was modulated from Hg(2+) ions to Cu(2+) ions upon the GSH passivation, of which the unique GSH-Cu(2+) chelating reaction could conduct the fluorescence quenching of AgNCs. Strong UV-vis absorbance of GSH-passivated AgNCs could also be realized depending on the Cu(2+) levels. Moreover, the Cu(2+)-induced loss of fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance of GSH-passivated AgNCs could be well restored by using stronger Cu(2+) chelating agent. A simultaneous and reversible fluorimetric and colorimetric sensing method was thereby developed for probing Cu(2+) ions in blood with high sensitivity and selectivity. Subsequently, the fluorescence-trackable imaging for live tissues and cells was demonstrated towards the analysis Cu(2+) ions using GSH-passivated AgNCs as the fluorescent probes. This study indicates that the use of functional ligands like GSH could not only modulate the specific ion recognition of AgNCs, but also endow them the high aqueous stability and powerful red fluorescence towards the wide applications for ion sensing and biological imaging in the complicated media like blood. PMID:26847593

  1. Silver Nanoclusters with Specific Ion Recognition Modulated by Ligand Passivation toward Fluorimetric and Colorimetric Copper Analysis and Biological Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zongzhao; Li, Shuying; Jiang, Yao; Qiao, Yuchun; Zhang, Liyan; Xu, Lulu; Liu, Jinghui; Qi, Wei; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoclusters were synthesized and passivated by glutathione (GSH) ligand, with high aqueous stability and powerful red fluorescence and UV-vis yellow colour. Importantly, the specific recognition of the AgNCs was modulated from Hg2+ ions to Cu2+ ions upon the GSH passivation, of which the unique GSH-Cu2+ chelating reaction could conduct the fluorescence quenching of AgNCs. Strong UV-vis absorbance of GSH-passivated AgNCs could also be realized depending on the Cu2+ levels. Moreover, the Cu2+-induced loss of fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance of GSH-passivated AgNCs could be well restored by using stronger Cu2+ chelating agent. A simultaneous and reversible fluorimetric and colorimetric sensing method was thereby developed for probing Cu2+ ions in blood with high sensitivity and selectivity. Subsequently, the fluorescence-trackable imaging for live tissues and cells was demonstrated towards the analysis Cu2+ ions using GSH-passivated AgNCs as the fluorescent probes. This study indicates that the use of functional ligands like GSH could not only modulate the specific ion recognition of AgNCs, but also endow them the high aqueous stability and powerful red fluorescence towards the wide applications for ion sensing and biological imaging in the complicated media like blood. PMID:26847593

  2. Silver Nanoclusters with Specific Ion Recognition Modulated by Ligand Passivation toward Fluorimetric and Colorimetric Copper Analysis and Biological Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zongzhao; Li, Shuying; Jiang, Yao; Qiao, Yuchun; Zhang, Liyan; Xu, Lulu; Liu, Jinghui; Qi, Wei; Wang, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Silver nanoclusters were synthesized and passivated by glutathione (GSH) ligand, with high aqueous stability and powerful red fluorescence and UV-vis yellow colour. Importantly, the specific recognition of the AgNCs was modulated from Hg2+ ions to Cu2+ ions upon the GSH passivation, of which the unique GSH-Cu2+ chelating reaction could conduct the fluorescence quenching of AgNCs. Strong UV-vis absorbance of GSH-passivated AgNCs could also be realized depending on the Cu2+ levels. Moreover, the Cu2+-induced loss of fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance of GSH-passivated AgNCs could be well restored by using stronger Cu2+ chelating agent. A simultaneous and reversible fluorimetric and colorimetric sensing method was thereby developed for probing Cu2+ ions in blood with high sensitivity and selectivity. Subsequently, the fluorescence-trackable imaging for live tissues and cells was demonstrated towards the analysis Cu2+ ions using GSH-passivated AgNCs as the fluorescent probes. This study indicates that the use of functional ligands like GSH could not only modulate the specific ion recognition of AgNCs, but also endow them the high aqueous stability and powerful red fluorescence towards the wide applications for ion sensing and biological imaging in the complicated media like blood.

  3. Brainstem PCO2 modulates phrenic responses to specific carotid body hypoxia in an in situ dual perfused rat preparation

    PubMed Central

    Day, Trevor A; Wilson, Richard J A

    2007-01-01

    Inputs from central (brainstem) and peripheral (carotid body) respiratory chemoreceptors are coordinated to protect blood gases against potentially deleterious fluctuations. However, the mathematics of the steady-state interaction between chemoreceptors has been difficult to ascertain. Further, how this interaction affects time-dependent phenomena (in which chemoresponses depend upon previous experience) is largely unknown. To determine how central PCO2 modulates the response to peripheral chemostimulation in the rat, we utilized an in situ arterially perfused, vagotomized, decerebrate preparation, in which central and peripheral chemoreceptors were perfused separately (i.e. dual perfused preparation (DPP)). We carried out two sets of experiments: in Experiment 1, we alternated steady-state brainstem PCO2 between 25 and 50 Torr in each preparation, and applied specific carotid body hypoxia (60 Torr PO2 and 40 Torr PCO2) under both conditions; in Experiment 2, we applied four 5 min bouts (separated by 5 min) of specific carotid body hypoxia (60 Torr PO2 and 40 Torr PCO2) while holding the brainstem at either 30 Torr or 50 Torr PCO2. We demonstrate that the level of brainstem PCO2 modulates (a) the magnitude of the phrenic responses to a single step of specific carotid body hypoxia and (b) the magnitude of time-dependent phenomena. We report that the interaction between chemoreceptors is negative (i.e. hypo-additive), whereby a lower brainstem PCO2 augments phrenic responses resulting from specific carotid body hypoxia. A negative interaction may underlie the pathophysiology of central sleep apnoea in populations that are chronically hypocapnic. PMID:17082232

  4. From specificity to sensitivity: affective states modulate visual working memory for emotional expressive faces

    PubMed Central

    Maran, Thomas; Sachse, Pierre; Furtner, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that visual working memory (VWM) preferentially remembers angry looking faces. However, the meaning of facial actions is construed in relation to context. To date, there are no studies investigating the role of perceiver-based context when processing emotional cues in VWM. To explore the influence of affective context on VWM for faces, we conducted two experiments using both a VWM task for emotionally expressive faces and a mood induction procedure. Affective context was manipulated by unpleasant (Experiment 1) and pleasant (Experiment 2) IAPS pictures in order to induce an affect high in motivational intensity (defensive or appetitive, respectively) compared to a low arousal control condition. Results indicated specifically increased sensitivity of VWM for angry looking faces in the neutral condition. Enhanced VWM for angry faces was prevented by inducing affects of high motivational intensity. In both experiments, affective states led to a switch from specific enhancement of angry expressions in VWM to an equally sensitive representation of all emotional expressions. Our findings demonstrate that emotional expressions are of different behavioral relevance for the receiver depending on the affective context, supporting a functional organization of VWM along with flexible resource allocation. In VWM, stimulus processing adjusts to situational requirements and transitions from a specifically prioritizing default mode in predictable environments to a sensitive, hypervigilant mode in exposure to emotional events. PMID:26379609

  5. Activation of the amino acid response modulates lineage specification during differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jixiu; Hamazaki, Takashi; Tang, Tiffany A.; Terada, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    In somatic cells, a collection of signaling pathways activated by amino acid limitation have been identified and referred to as the amino acid response (AAR). Despite the importance of possible detrimental effects of nutrient limitation during in vitro culture, the AAR has not been investigated in embryonic stem cells (ESC). AAR activation caused the expected increase in transcription factors that mediate specific AAR pathways, as well as the induction of asparagine synthetase, a terminal AAR target gene. Neither AAR activation nor stable knockdown of activating transcription factor (Atf) 4, a transcriptional mediator of the AAR, adversely affected ESC self-renewal or pluripotency. Low-level induction of the AAR over a 12-day period of embryoid body differentiation did alter lineage specification such that the primitive endodermal, visceral endodermal, and endodermal lineages were favored, whereas mesodermal and certain ectodermal lineages were suppressed. Knockdown of Atf4 further enhanced the AAR-induced increase in endodermal formation, suggesting that this phenomenon is mediated by an Atf4-independent mechanism. Collectively, the results indicate that, during differentiation of mouse embryoid bodies in culture, the availability of nutrients, such as amino acids, can influence the formation of specific cell lineages. PMID:23736538

  6. Mechanism of the tissue-specific action of the selective androgen receptor modulator S-101479.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Ohyabu, Yuki; Morikyu, Teruyuki; Ishige, Hirohide; Albers, Michael; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) comprise a new class of molecules that induce anabolic effects with fewer side effects than those of other anabolic agents. We previously reported that the novel SARM S-101479 had a tissue-selective bone anabolic effect with diminished side effects in female animals. However, the mechanism of its tissue selectivity is not well known. In this report, we show that S-101479 increased alkaline phosphatase activity and androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in osteoblastic cell lines in the same manner as the natural androgen ligand dihydrotestosterone (DHT); conversely, stimulation of AR dimerization was very low compared with that of DHT (34.4%). S-101479 increased bone mineral content in ovariectomized rats without promoting endometrial proliferation. Yeast two-hybrid interaction assays revealed that DHT promoted recruitment of numerous cofactors to AR such as TIF2, SRC1, β-catenin, NCoA3, gelsolin and PROX1 in a dose-dependent manner. SARMs induced recruitment of fewer cofactors than DHT; in particular, S-101479 failed to induce recruitment of canonical p160 coactivators such as SRC1, TIF2 and notably NCoA3 but only stimulated binding of AR to gelsolin and PROX1. The results suggest that a full capability of the AR to dimerize and to effectively and unselectively recruit all canonical cofactors is not a prerequisite for transcriptional activity in osteoblastic cells and resulting anabolic effects in bone tissues. Instead, few relevant cofactors might be sufficient to promote AR activity in these tissues.

  7. Development and use of culture systems to modulate specific cell responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Yves

    Culture surfaces that induce specific localized cell responses are required to achieve tissue-like cell growth in three-dimensional (3D) environments, as well as to develop more efficient cell-based diagnostic techniques, noticeably when working with fragile cells such as stem cells or platelets. As such, Chapter 1 of this thesis work is devoted to the review of 3D cell-material interactions in vitro and the corresponding existing culture systems available to achieve in vivo-like cell responses. More adequate 3D culture systems will need to be developed to mimic several characteristics of in vivo environments, including lowered non-specific cell-material interactions and localized biochemical signaling. The experimental work in this thesis is based on the hypothesis that well-studied and optimized surface treatments will be able to lower non-specific cell-material interactions and allow local chemical modification in order to achieve specific localized cell-material interactions for different applications. As such, in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 of this thesis, surface treatments were developed using plasma polymerization and covalent immobilization of a low-fouling polymer (i.e., poly(ethylene glycol)) and characterized and optimized using a large number of techniques including atomic force microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, surface plasmon resonance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence-based techniques. The main plasma polymerization parameter important for surface chemical content, specifically nitrogen to carbon content, was identified as being glow discharge power, while reaction time and power determined plasma film thickness. Moreover, plasma films were shown to be stable in aqueous environments. Covalently-bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) layers physicochemical and mechanical properties are dependent on fabrication methods. Polymer concentration in solution is an important indicator of final layer properties, and use of a theta solvent

  8. MexAB-OprM specific efflux pump inhibitors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Part 4: Addressing the problem of poor stability due to photoisomerization of an acrylic acid moiety.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kiyoshi; Kuru, Noriko; Ohtsuka, Masami; Yokomizo, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Atsunobu; Kawato, Haruko; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ohta, Toshiharu; Hoshino, Kazuki; Akimoto, Katsuya; Itoh, Junko; Ishida, Hiroko; Cho, Aesop; Palme, Monica H; Zhang, Jason Z; Lee, Ving J; Watkins, William J

    2004-05-17

    Exchange of the ethylene tether in a series of pyridopyrimidine-based MexAB-OprM specific efflux pump inhibitors to an amide bond stabilized the olefin of the acrylic acid moiety, preventing facile photoisomerization to the Z-isomer. Furthermore, the activity was drastically improved in the amide tether variants, providing extremely potent acrylic acid and vinyl tetrazole analogues.

  9. Dopaminergic modulation of the striatal microcircuit: receptor-specific configuration of cell assemblies.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Hernández-López, Salvador; Tapia, Dagoberto; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2011-10-19

    Selection and inhibition of motor behaviors are related to the coordinated activity and compositional capabilities of striatal cell assemblies. Striatal network activity represents a main step in basal ganglia processing. The dopaminergic system differentially regulates distinct populations of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) through the activation of D(1)- or D(2)-type receptors. Although postsynaptic and presynaptic actions of these receptors are clearly different in MSNs during cell-focused studies, their activation during network activity has shown inconsistent responses. Therefore, using electrophysiological techniques, functional multicell calcium imaging, and neuronal population analysis in rat corticostriatal slices, we describe the effect of selective dopaminergic receptor activation in the striatal network by observing cell assembly configurations. At the microcircuit level, during striatal network activity, the selective activation of either D(1)- or D(2)-type receptors is reflected as overall increases in neuronal synchronization. However, graph theory techniques applied to the transitions between network states revealed receptor-specific configurations of striatal cell assemblies: D(1) receptor activation generated closed trajectories with high recurrence and few alternate routes favoring the selection of specific sequences, whereas D(2) receptor activation created trajectories with low recurrence and more alternate pathways while promoting diverse transitions among neuronal pools. At the single-cell level, the activation of dopaminergic receptors enhanced the negative-slope conductance region (NSCR) in D(1)-type-responsive cells, whereas in neurons expressing D(2)-type receptors, the NSCR was decreased. Consequently, receptor-specific network dynamics most probably result from the interplay of postsynaptic and presynaptic dopaminergic actions.

  10. Different tobacco retrotransposons are specifically modulated by the elicitor cryptogein and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Anca, Iulia-Andra; Fromentin, Jérôme; Bui, Quynh Trang; Mhiri, Corinne; Grandbastien, Marie-Angèle; Simon-Plas, Françoise

    2014-10-15

    Interactions of plant retrotransposons with different steps of biotic and abiotic stress-associated signaling cascades are still poorly understood. We perform here a finely tuned comparison of four tobacco retrotransposons (Tnt1, Tnt2, Queenti, and Tto1) responses to the plant elicitor cryptogein. We demonstrate that basal transcript levels in cell suspensions and plant leaves as well as the activation during the steps of defense signaling events are specific to each retrotransposon. Using antisense NtrbohD lines, we show that NtrbohD-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production might act as negative regulator of retrotransposon activation. PMID:25128785

  11. Neuroactive substances specifically modulate rhythmic body contractions in the nerveless metazoon Tethya wilhelma (Demospongiae, Porifera)

    PubMed Central

    Ellwanger, Kornelia; Nickel, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background Sponges (Porifera) are nerve- and muscleless metazoa, but display coordinated motor reactions. Therefore, they represent a valuable phylum to investigate coordination systems, which evolved in a hypothetical Urmetazoon prior to the central nervous system (CNS) of later metazoa. We have chosen the contractile and locomotive species Tethya wilhelma (Demospongiae, Hadromerida) as a model system for our research, using quantitative analysis based on digital time lapse imaging. In order to evaluate candidate coordination pathways, we extracorporeally tested a number of chemical messengers, agonists and antagonists known from chemical signalling pathways in animals with CNS. Results Sponge body contraction of T. wilhelma was induced by caffeine, glycine, serotonine, nitric oxide (NO) and extracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The induction by glycine and cAMP followed patterns varying from other substances. Induction by cAMP was delayed, while glycine lead to a bi-phasic contraction response. The frequency of the endogenous contraction rhythm of T. wilhelma was significantly decreased by adrenaline and NO, with the same tendency for cAMP and acetylcholine. In contrast, caffeine and glycine increased the contraction frequency. The endogenous rhythm appeared irregular during application of caffeine, adrenaline, NO and cAMP. Caffeine, glycine and NO attenuated the contraction amplitude. All effects on the endogenous rhythm were neutralised by the washout of the substances from the experimental reactor system. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that a number of chemical messengers, agonists and antagonists induce contraction and/or modulate the endogenous contraction rhythm and amplitude of our nerveless model metazoon T. wilhelma. We conclude that a relatively complex system of chemical messengers regulates the contraction behaviour through auto- and paracrine signalling, which is presented in a hypothetical model. We assume that adrenergic

  12. FOXA1 potentiates lineage-specific enhancer activation through modulating TET1 expression and function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeqing A.; Zhao, Jonathan C.; Fong, Ka-wing; Kim, Jung; Li, Shangze; Song, Chunxiao; Song, Bing; Zheng, Bin; He, Chuan; Yu, Jindan

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box A1 (FOXA1) is an FKHD family protein that plays pioneering roles in lineage-specific enhancer activation and gene transcription. Through genome-wide location analyses, here we show that FOXA1 expression and occupancy are, in turn, required for the maintenance of these epigenetic signatures, namely DNA hypomethylation and histone 3 lysine 4 methylation. Mechanistically, this involves TET1, a 5-methylcytosine dioxygenase. We found that FOXA1 induces TET1 expression via direct binding to its cis-regulatory elements. Further, FOXA1 physically interacts with the TET1 protein through its CXXC domain. TET1 thus co-occupies FOXA1-dependent enhancers and mediates local DNA demethylation and concomitant histone 3 lysine 4 methylation, further potentiating FOXA1 recruitment. Consequently, FOXA1 binding events are markedly reduced following TET1 depletion. Together, our results suggest that FOXA1 is not only able to recognize but also remodel the epigenetic signatures at lineage-specific enhancers, which is mediated, at least in part, by a feed-forward regulatory loop between FOXA1 and TET1. PMID:27257062

  13. Meigo governs dendrite targeting specificity by modulating Ephrin level and N-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Sayaka U; Haraguchi, Shuka; Chao, Kinhong; Kato, Tomoko; Luo, Liqun; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Neural circuit assembly requires precise dendrite and axon targeting. We identified an evolutionarily conserved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein, Meigo, from a mosaic genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster. Meigo was cell-autonomously required in olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons to target their axons and dendrites to the lateral antennal lobe and to refine projection neuron dendrites into individual glomeruli. Loss of Meigo induced an unfolded protein response and reduced the amount of neuronal cell surface proteins, including Ephrin. Ephrin overexpression specifically suppressed the projection neuron dendrite refinement defect present in meigo mutant flies, and ephrin knockdown caused a similar projection neuron dendrite refinement defect. Meigo positively regulated the level of Ephrin N-glycosylation, which was required for its optimal function in vivo. Thus, Meigo, an ER-resident protein, governs neuronal targeting specificity by regulating ER folding capacity and protein N-glycosylation. Furthermore, Ephrin appears to be an important substrate that mediates Meigo’s function in refinement of glomerular targeting. PMID:23624514

  14. Modulation of mouse Leydig cell steroidogenesis through a specific arginine-vasopressin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Tahri-Joutei, A.; Pointis, G.

    1988-01-01

    Characterization of specific vasopressin binding sites was investigated in purified mouse Leydig cells using tritiated arginine-vasopressin. Binding of radioligand was saturable, time- and temperature-dependent and reversible. (/sup 3/H)-AVP was found to bind to a single class of sites with high affinity and low capacity. Binding displacements with specific selection analogs of AVP indicated the presence of V/sub 1/ subtype receptors on Leydig cells. The ability of AVP to displace (/sup 3/H)-AVP binding was greater than LVP and oxytocin. The unrelated peptides, somatostatin and substance P, were less potent, while neurotensin and LHRH did not displace (/sup 3/H)-AVP binding. The time-course effects of AVP-pretreatment on basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone and cAMP accumulations were studied in primary culture of Leydig cells. Basal testosterone accumulation was significantly increased by a 24 h AVP-pretreatment of Leydig cells. This effect was potentiated by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor (MIX) and was concomitantly accompanied by a slight but significant increase in cAMP accumulation. AVP-pretreatment of the cells for 72 h had no effect on basal testosterone accumulation, but exerted a marked inhibitory effect on the hCG-stimulated testosterone accumulation. This reduction of testosterone accumulation occurred even in the presence of MIX and was not accompanied by any significant change of cAMP levels.

  15. Untying the gordian knot: what we do and don't know about gender-specific medicine-keynote address for the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Legato, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    Over the past two decades, a burgeoning interest in women's health, the direct consequence of the feminist movement, has inspired a worldwide interest in the differences between the normal function of men and women and their unique experiences of the same illnesses. The scope and significance of what we have discovered and continue to find has fundamentally changed the way we prevent, diagnose, and treat diseases. Important questions remain, however, and deserve specific investigation and analysis.

  16. GABAA-Mediated Inhibition Modulates Stimulus-Specific Adaptation in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, David; Hernández, Olga; Covey, Ellen; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect novel sounds in a complex acoustic context is crucial for survival. Neurons from midbrain through cortical levels adapt to repetitive stimuli, while maintaining responsiveness to rare stimuli, a phenomenon called stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). The site of origin and mechanism of SSA are currently unknown. We used microiontophoretic application of gabazine to examine the role of GABAA-mediated inhibition in SSA in the inferior colliculus, the midbrain center for auditory processing. We found that gabazine slowed down the process of adaptation to high probability stimuli but did not abolish it, with response magnitude and latency still depending on the probability of the stimulus. Blocking GABAA receptors increased the firing rate to high and low probability stimuli, but did not completely equalize the responses. Together, these findings suggest that GABAA-mediated inhibition acts as a gain control mechanism that enhances SSA by modifying the responsiveness of the neuron. PMID:22479591

  17. HypE-specific Nanobodies as Tools to Modulate HypE-mediated Target AMPylation

    PubMed Central

    Truttmann, Matthias C.; Wu, Qin; Stiegeler, Sarah; Duarte, Joao N.; Ingram, Jessica; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2015-01-01

    The covalent addition of mono-AMP to target proteins (AMPylation) by Fic domain-containing proteins is a poorly understood, yet highly conserved post-translational modification. Here, we describe the generation, evaluation, and application of four HypE-specific nanobodies: three that inhibit HypE-mediated target AMPylation in vitro and one that acts as an activator. All heavy chain-only antibody variable domains bind HypE when expressed as GFP fusions in intact cells. We observed localization of HypE at the nuclear envelope and further identified histones H2–H4, but not H1, as novel in vitro targets of the human Fic protein. Its role in histone modification provides a possible link between AMPylation and regulation of gene expression. PMID:25678711

  18. A Space Oddity: Geographic and Specific Modulation of Migration in Eudyptes Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Thiebot, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yves; Crawford, Robert J. M.; Makhado, Azwianewi B.; Trathan, Philip N.; Pinaud, David; Bost, Charles-André

    2013-01-01

    Post-breeding migration in land-based marine animals is thought to offset seasonal deterioration in foraging or other important environmental conditions at the breeding site. However the inter-breeding distribution of such animals may reflect not only their optimal habitat, but more subtle influences on an individual’s migration path, including such factors as the intrinsic influence of each locality’s paleoenvironment, thereby influencing animals’ wintering distribution. In this study we investigated the influence of the regional marine environment on the migration patterns of a poorly known, but important seabird group. We studied the inter-breeding migration patterns in three species of Eudyptes penguins (E. chrysolophus, E. filholi and E. moseleyi), the main marine prey consumers amongst the World’s seabirds. Using ultra-miniaturized logging devices (light-based geolocators) and satellite tags, we tracked 87 migrating individuals originating from 4 sites in the southern Indian Ocean (Marion, Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam Islands) and modelled their wintering habitat using the MADIFA niche modelling technique. For each site, sympatric species followed a similar compass bearing during migration with consistent species-specific latitudinal shifts. Within each species, individuals breeding on different islands showed contrasting migration patterns but similar winter habitat preferences driven by sea-surface temperatures. Our results show that inter-breeding migration patterns in sibling penguin species depend primarily on the site of origin and secondly on the species. Such site-specific migration bearings, together with similar wintering habitat used by parapatrics, support the hypothesis that migration behaviour is affected by the intrinsic characteristics of each site. The paleo-oceanographic conditions (primarily, sea-surface temperatures) when the populations first colonized each of these sites may have been an important determinant of subsequent

  19. A space oddity: geographic and specific modulation of migration in Eudyptes penguins.

    PubMed

    Thiebot, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yves; Crawford, Robert J M; Makhado, Azwianewi B; Trathan, Philip N; Pinaud, David; Bost, Charles-André

    2013-01-01

    Post-breeding migration in land-based marine animals is thought to offset seasonal deterioration in foraging or other important environmental conditions at the breeding site. However the inter-breeding distribution of such animals may reflect not only their optimal habitat, but more subtle influences on an individual's migration path, including such factors as the intrinsic influence of each locality's paleoenvironment, thereby influencing animals' wintering distribution. In this study we investigated the influence of the regional marine environment on the migration patterns of a poorly known, but important seabird group. We studied the inter-breeding migration patterns in three species of Eudyptes penguins (E. chrysolophus, E. filholi and E. moseleyi), the main marine prey consumers amongst the World's seabirds. Using ultra-miniaturized logging devices (light-based geolocators) and satellite tags, we tracked 87 migrating individuals originating from 4 sites in the southern Indian Ocean (Marion, Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam Islands) and modelled their wintering habitat using the MADIFA niche modelling technique. For each site, sympatric species followed a similar compass bearing during migration with consistent species-specific latitudinal shifts. Within each species, individuals breeding on different islands showed contrasting migration patterns but similar winter habitat preferences driven by sea-surface temperatures. Our results show that inter-breeding migration patterns in sibling penguin species depend primarily on the site of origin and secondly on the species. Such site-specific migration bearings, together with similar wintering habitat used by parapatrics, support the hypothesis that migration behaviour is affected by the intrinsic characteristics of each site. The paleo-oceanographic conditions (primarily, sea-surface temperatures) when the populations first colonized each of these sites may have been an important determinant of subsequent migration

  20. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grants, Jennifer M; Ying, Lisa T L; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator's dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals. PMID:26715664

  1. Modulation-specific and laminar-dependent effects of acetylcholine on visual responses in the rat primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Soma, Shogo; Shimegi, Satoshi; Suematsu, Naofumi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiromichi

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is secreted from cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain to regions throughout the cerebral cortex, including the primary visual cortex (V1), and influences neuronal activities across all six layers via a form of diffuse extrasynaptic modulation termed volume transmission. To understand this effect in V1, we performed extracellular multi-point recordings of neuronal responses to drifting sinusoidal grating stimuli from the cortical layers of V1 in anesthetized rats and examined the modulatory effects of topically administered ACh. ACh facilitated or suppressed the visual responses of individual cells with a laminar bias: response suppression prevailed in layers 2/3, whereas response facilitation prevailed in layer 5. ACh effects on the stimulus contrast-response function showed that ACh changes the response gain upward or downward in facilitated or suppressed cells, respectively. Next, ACh effects on the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and the grating-phase information were tested. The grating-phase information was calculated as the F1/F0 ratio, which represents the amount of temporal response modulation at the fundamental frequency (F1) of a drifting grating relative to the mean evoked response (F0). In facilitated cells, ACh improved the S/N ratio, while in suppressed cells it enhanced the F1/F0 ratio without any concurrent reduction in the S/N ratio. These effects were predominantly observed in regular-spiking cells, but not in fast-spiking cells. Electrophysiological and histological findings suggest that ACh promotes the signaling of grating-phase information to higher-order areas by a suppressive effect on supragranular layers and enhances feedback signals with a high S/N ratio to subcortical areas by a facilitatory effect on infragranular layers. Thus, ACh distinctly and finely controls visual information processing in a manner that is specific for the modulation and cell type and is also laminar dependent.

  2. Modulation-Specific and Laminar-Dependent Effects of Acetylcholine on Visual Responses in the Rat Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Shogo; Shimegi, Satoshi; Suematsu, Naofumi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiromichi

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is secreted from cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain to regions throughout the cerebral cortex, including the primary visual cortex (V1), and influences neuronal activities across all six layers via a form of diffuse extrasynaptic modulation termed volume transmission. To understand this effect in V1, we performed extracellular multi-point recordings of neuronal responses to drifting sinusoidal grating stimuli from the cortical layers of V1 in anesthetized rats and examined the modulatory effects of topically administered ACh. ACh facilitated or suppressed the visual responses of individual cells with a laminar bias: response suppression prevailed in layers 2/3, whereas response facilitation prevailed in layer 5. ACh effects on the stimulus contrast-response function showed that ACh changes the response gain upward or downward in facilitated or suppressed cells, respectively. Next, ACh effects on the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and the grating-phase information were tested. The grating-phase information was calculated as the F1/F0 ratio, which represents the amount of temporal response modulation at the fundamental frequency (F1) of a drifting grating relative to the mean evoked response (F0). In facilitated cells, ACh improved the S/N ratio, while in suppressed cells it enhanced the F1/F0 ratio without any concurrent reduction in the S/N ratio. These effects were predominantly observed in regular-spiking cells, but not in fast-spiking cells. Electrophysiological and histological findings suggest that ACh promotes the signaling of grating-phase information to higher-order areas by a suppressive effect on supragranular layers and enhances feedback signals with a high S/N ratio to subcortical areas by a facilitatory effect on infragranular layers. Thus, ACh distinctly and finely controls visual information processing in a manner that is specific for the modulation and cell type and is also laminar dependent. PMID:23844199

  3. Domain-specific modification of heparan sulfate by Qsulf1 modulates the binding of the bone morphogenetic protein antagonist Noggin.

    PubMed

    Viviano, Beth L; Paine-Saunders, Stephenie; Gasiunas, Nijole; Gallagher, John; Saunders, Scott

    2004-02-13

    We have reported previously that Noggin is a heparin-binding protein and associates with the cell surface through heparan sulfate proteoglycans, where it remains functional for the binding of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Here we report that the binding of Noggin to the cell surface is highly selective for heparan sulfate and that specific structural features are required for the interaction. Noggin binds most efficiently to heparin sequences composed of 10 or more monosaccharides; N-, 6-O-, and 2-O-sulfates contribute to this interaction. In addition, we have shown that the developmentally regulated endosulfatase Qsulf1 selectively removes sulfate groups from the 6-O position of sugars within the most highly sulfated S domains of heparan sulfate, whereas 6-O-sulfates in the NA/NS domains are not substrates for the enzyme. The activity of Qsulf1 in cells in culture results in the release of Noggin from the cell surface and a restoration of BMP responsiveness to the cells. This shows that Noggin binds to the S domains of heparan sulfate and provides evidence that, in addition to modulating Wnt signaling in vivo by the release of heparan sulfate bound Wnt, Qsulf1 also modulates BMP signaling by the release of surface-bound Noggin. PMID:14645250

  4. Sensorimotor enhancement in mouse mutants lacking the Purkinje cell-specific Gi/o modulator, Pcp2(L7)

    PubMed Central

    Iscru, Emilia; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Schilling, Karl; Tian, Jinbin; Bowers-Kidder, Stephanie L.; Zhang, Rui; Morgan, James I.; DeVries, A. Courtney; Nelson, Randy J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Oberdick, John

    2009-01-01

    Pcp2(L7) is a GoLoco domain protein specifically and abundantly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. It has been hypothesized to “tune” Gi/o-coupled receptor modulation of physiological effectors, including the P-type Ca2+ channel. We have analyzed a mouse mutant in which the Pcp2(L7) gene was inactivated and find significant anatomical, behavioral and electrophysiological changes. Anatomically, we observed mild cerebellar hypoplasia. Behaviorally, the mutants were altered in modalities atypical for a traditional cerebellar mutant, and oddly, all of these changes could be considered functional enhancements. This includes increased asymptotic performance in gross motor learning, increased rate of acquisition in tone-conditioned fear, and enhanced pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response. Electrophysiological analysis of Purkinje cells in the mutants reveals depression of the complex spike waveform that may underlie the behavioral changes. Based on these observations we suggest that the Pcp2(L7) protein acts as a sensorimotor damper that modulates time- and sense-dependent changes in motor responses. PMID:18930827

  5. Conformational Analysis of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Hyaluronate Lyase and Characterization of Its Hyaluronan-specific Carbohydrate-binding Module*

    PubMed Central

    Suits, Michael D. L.; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Law, Adrienne; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S.; Chai, Wengang; Feizi, Ten; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2014-01-01

    For a subset of pathogenic microorganisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the recognition and degradation of host hyaluronan contributes to bacterial spreading through the extracellular matrix and enhancing access to host cell surfaces. The hyaluronate lyase (Hyl) presented on the surface of S. pneumoniae performs this role. Using glycan microarray screening, affinity electrophoresis, and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that the N-terminal module of Hyl is a hyaluronan-specific carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and the founding member of CBM family 70. The 1.2 Å resolution x-ray crystal structure of CBM70 revealed it to have a β-sandwich fold, similar to other CBMs. The electrostatic properties of the binding site, which was identified by site-directed mutagenesis, are distinct from other CBMs and complementary to its acidic ligand, hyaluronan. Dynamic light scattering and solution small angle x-ray scattering revealed the full-length Hyl protein to exist as a monomer/dimer mixture in solution. Through a detailed analysis of the small angle x-ray scattering data, we report the pseudoatomic solution structures of the monomer and dimer forms of the full-length multimodular Hyl. PMID:25100731

  6. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of the Lyn Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domain Modulates Its Binding Affinity and Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lily L.; Wybenga-Groot, Leanne E.; Tong, Jiefei; Taylor, Paul; Minden, Mark D.; Trudel, Suzanne; McGlade, C. Jane; Moran, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are modular protein structures that bind phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing polypeptides and regulate cellular functions through protein-protein interactions. Proteomics analysis showed that the SH2 domains of Src family kinases are themselves tyrosine phosphorylated in blood system cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma. Using the Src family kinase Lyn SH2 domain as a model, we found that phosphorylation at the conserved SH2 domain residue Y194 impacts the affinity and specificity of SH2 domain binding to pY-containing peptides and proteins. Analysis of the Lyn SH2 domain crystal structure supports a model wherein phosphorylation of Y194 on the EF loop modulates the binding pocket that engages amino acid side chains at the pY+2/+3 position. These data indicate another level of regulation wherein SH2-mediated protein-protein interactions are modulated by SH2 kinases and phosphatases. PMID:25587033

  7. Category label effects on Chinese children's inductive inferences: modulation by perceptual detail and category specificity.

    PubMed

    Long, Changquan; Lu, Xiaoying; Zhang, Li; Li, Hong; Deák, Gedeon O

    2012-02-01

    Inductive generalization of novel properties to same-category or similar-looking objects was studied in Chinese preschool children. The effects of category labels on generalizations were investigated by comparing basic-level labels, superordinate-level labels, and a control phrase applied to three kinds of stimulus materials: colored photographs (Experiment 1), realistic line drawings (Experiment 2), and cartoon-like line drawings (Experiment 3). No significant labeling effects were found for photos and realistic drawings, but there were significant effects for cartoon-like drawings. Children made mostly (>70%) category-based inferences about photographs whether or not labels were provided (Experiment 1). Children showed a bias toward category-based inferences about realistic drawings (Experiment 2) but did so only when labels were provided. Finally, children made mostly appearance-based generalizations for cartoon-like drawings (Experiment 3). However, labels (basic or superordinate level) reduced appearance-based responses. Labeling effects did not depend on having identical labels; however, identical superordinate labels were more effective than different basic-level labels for the least informative stimuli (i.e., cartoons). Thus, labels sometimes confirm the identity of ambiguous items. This evidence of labeling effects in Mandarin-speaking Chinese children extends previous findings beyond English-speaking children and shows that the effects are not narrowly culture and language specific.

  8. The human-specific invariant chain isoform Iip35 modulates Iip33 trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Sand, Kine Marita Knudsen; Landsverk, Ole J B; Berg-Larsen, Axel; Bakke, Oddmund; Gregers, Tone F

    2014-10-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) is a multifunctional protein, which has an essential role in the assembly and transport of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. From a single gene, Ii is synthesized as four different isoforms: Iip33, Iip35, Iip41 and Iip43. Iip35 and Iip43 are specific to humans, and are formed due to an upstream alternative translation site, resulting in an N-terminal extension of 16 amino acids. This extension harbors a strong endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif. Consequently, Iip35 or Iip43 expressed alone are retained in the ER, whereas Iip33 and Iip41 rapidly traffic to the endosomal pathway. Endogenously expressed, the four isoforms form mixed heterotrimers in the ER; however, mainly due to the absence of the Iip35/p43 isoforms in mice, little is known about how they influence general Ii function. In this study, we have co-expressed Iip33 and Iip35 in human cells with and without MHC II to gain a better understanding of how Iip35 isoform influences the cellular properties of Iip33. We find that Iip35 significantly affects the properties of Iip33. In the presence of Iip35, the transport of Iip33 out of the ER is delayed, its half-life is dramatically prolonged and its ability to induce enlarged endosomes and delayed endosomal maturation is abrogated.

  9. Gender-specific modulation of neural mechanisms underlying social reward processing by Autism Quotient.

    PubMed

    Barman, Adriana; Richter, Sylvia; Soch, Joram; Deibele, Anna; Richter, Anni; Assmann, Anne; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Walter, Henrik; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Schott, Björn H

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder refers to a neurodevelopmental condition primarily characterized by deficits in social cognition and behavior. Subclinically, autistic features are supposed to be present in healthy humans and can be quantified using the Autism Quotient (AQ). Here, we investigated a potential relationship between AQ and neural correlates of social and monetary reward processing, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in young, healthy participants. In an incentive delay task with either monetary or social reward, reward anticipation elicited increased ventral striatal activation, which was more pronounced during monetary reward anticipation. Anticipation of social reward elicited activation in the default mode network (DMN), a network previously implicated in social processing. Social reward feedback was associated with bilateral amygdala and fusiform face area activation. The relationship between AQ and neural correlates of social reward processing varied in a gender-dependent manner. In women and, to a lesser extent in men, higher AQ was associated with increased posterior DMN activation during social reward anticipation. During feedback, we observed a negative correlation of AQ and right amygdala activation in men only. Our results suggest that social reward processing might constitute an endophenotype for autism-related traits in healthy humans that manifests in a gender-specific way.

  10. Schistosoma mansoni Hemozoin Modulates Alternative Activation of Macrophages via Specific Suppression of Retnla Expression and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Martha; Evans, D. Andrew; Gunn, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The trematode Schistosoma mansoni is one of the etiological agents of schistosomiasis, a key neglected tropical disease responsible for an estimated annual loss of 70 million disability-adjusted life years. Hematophagy represents the primary nutrient acquisition pathway of this parasite, but digestion of hemoglobin also liberates toxic heme. Schistosomes detoxify heme via crystallization into hemozoin, which is subsequently regurgitated into the host's circulation. Here we demonstrate that during experimental schistosomiasis, hemozoin accumulating in the mouse liver is taken up by phagocytes at a time coincident with the development of the egg-induced T-helper 2 (Th2) granulomatous immune response. Furthermore, the uptake of hemozoin also coincides with the hepatic expression of markers of alternative macrophage activation. Alternatively activated macrophages are a key effector cell population associated with protection against schistosomiasis, making hemozoin well placed to play an important immunomodulatory role in this disease. To systematically explore this hypothesis, S. mansoni hemozoin was purified and added to in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures concurrently exposed to cytokines chosen to reflect the shifting state of macrophage activation in vivo. Macrophages undergoing interleukin-4 (IL-4)-induced alternative activation in the presence of hemozoin developed a phenotype specifically lacking in Retnla, a characteristic alternatively activated macrophage product associated with regulation of Th2 inflammatory responses. As such, in addition to its important detoxification role during hematophagy, we propose that schistosome hemozoin also provides a potent immunomodulatory function in the coevolved network of host-parasite relationships during schistosomiasis. PMID:23090958

  11. Addressing the question of disorder-specific risk factors of internet addiction: a comparison of personality traits in patients with addictive behaviors and comorbid internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Müller, K W; Koch, A; Dickenhorst, U; Beutel, M E; Duven, E; Wölfling, K

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled use of the internet has been reported to affect the lives of some users in a negative way. According to epidemiological studies, about 1% of the general population is showing signs of internet addiction. Since internet addiction is becoming a growing health concern, research on potential risk factors is becoming more important in order to develop strategies for prevention and to adopt therapeutic treatment. Although there are some studies investigating personality traits in internet addiction, most of these studies are based on samples of healthy subjects. In this research project, we compared personality profiles of a sample of patients in different rehabilitation centers. 70 patients with an addiction disorder that additionally met the criteria for internet addiction were compared to 48 patients suffering from alcohol dependence. Besides Big Five personality traits, we also assessed depressive symptoms. It was shown that patients with comorbid internet addiction can be discriminated from other patients by higher neuroticism and lower extraversion as well as lower conscientiousness. After controlling for depressive symptoms, lower conscientiousness especially turned out to be a disorder-specific risk factor. As internet addiction is related to unique patterns of personality traits and can be discriminated from alcohol dependence, treatment approaches are needed that meet the specific requirements of patients with internet addiction.

  12. A systematic study of site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation modulating proprotein convertase processing.

    PubMed

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Goth, Christoffer K; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Brunak, Søren; Bennett, Eric P; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik

    2011-11-18

    Site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is emerging as an important co-regulator of proprotein convertase (PC) processing of proteins. PC processing is crucial in regulating many fundamental biological pathways and O-glycans in or immediately adjacent to processing sites may affect recognition and function of PCs. Thus, we previously demonstrated that deficiency in site-specific O-glycosylation in a PC site of the fibroblast growth factor, FGF23, resulted in marked reduction in secretion of active unprocessed FGF23, which cause familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia. GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is found on serine and threonine amino acids and up to 20 distinct polypeptide GalNAc transferases catalyze the first addition of GalNAc to proteins making this step the most complex and differentially regulated steps in protein glycosylation. There is no reliable prediction model for O-glycosylation especially of isolated sites, but serine and to a lesser extent threonine residues are frequently found adjacent to PC processing sites. In the present study we used in vitro enzyme assays and ex vivo cell models to systematically address the boundaries of the region within site-specific O-glycosylation affect PC processing. The results demonstrate that O-glycans within at least ±3 residues of the RXXR furin cleavage site may affect PC processing suggesting that site-specific O-glycosylation is a major co-regulator of PC processing.

  13. A systematic study of site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation modulating proprotein convertase processing.

    PubMed

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Goth, Christoffer K; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Brunak, Søren; Bennett, Eric P; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik

    2011-11-18

    Site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is emerging as an important co-regulator of proprotein convertase (PC) processing of proteins. PC processing is crucial in regulating many fundamental biological pathways and O-glycans in or immediately adjacent to processing sites may affect recognition and function of PCs. Thus, we previously demonstrated that deficiency in site-specific O-glycosylation in a PC site of the fibroblast growth factor, FGF23, resulted in marked reduction in secretion of active unprocessed FGF23, which cause familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia. GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is found on serine and threonine amino acids and up to 20 distinct polypeptide GalNAc transferases catalyze the first addition of GalNAc to proteins making this step the most complex and differentially regulated steps in protein glycosylation. There is no reliable prediction model for O-glycosylation especially of isolated sites, but serine and to a lesser extent threonine residues are frequently found adjacent to PC processing sites. In the present study we used in vitro enzyme assays and ex vivo cell models to systematically address the boundaries of the region within site-specific O-glycosylation affect PC processing. The results demonstrate that O-glycans within at least ±3 residues of the RXXR furin cleavage site may affect PC processing suggesting that site-specific O-glycosylation is a major co-regulator of PC processing. PMID:21937429

  14. The adipocyte specific transcription factor C/EBPalpha modulates human ob gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S G; De Vos, P; Guerre-Millo, M; Wong, K; Hermann, T; Staels, B; Briggs, M R; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    The ob gene product, leptin, apparently exclusively expressed in adipose tissue, is a signaling factor regulating body weight homeostasis and energy balance. ob gene expression is increased in obese rodents and regulated by feeding, insulin, and glucocorticoids, which supports the concept that ob gene expression is under hormonal control, which is expected for a key factor controlling body weight homeostasis and energy balance. In humans, ob mRNA expression is increased in gross obesity; however, the effects of the above factors on human ob expression are unknown. We describe the structure of the human ob gene and initial functional analysis of its promoter. The human ob gene's three exons cover approximately 15 kb of genomic DNA. The entire coding region is contained in exons 2 and 3, which are separated by a 2-kb intron. The first small 30-bp untranslated exon is located >10.5 kb upstream of the initiator ATG codon. Three kilobases of DNA upstream of the transcription start site has been cloned and characterized. Only 217 bp of 5' sequence are required for basal adipose tissue-specific expression of the ob gene as well as enhanced expression by C/EBPalpha. Mutation of the single C/EBPalpha site in this region abolished inducibility of the promoter by C/EBPalpha in cotransfection assays. The gene structure will facilitate our analysis of ob mutations in human obesity, whereas knowledge of sequence elements and factors regulating ob gene expression should be of major importance in the prevention and treatment of obesity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8643605

  15. Crystal structures of human tissue kallikrein 4: activity modulation by a specific zinc binding site.

    PubMed

    Debela, Mekdes; Magdolen, Viktor; Grimminger, Valerie; Sommerhoff, Christian; Messerschmidt, Albrecht; Huber, Robert; Friedrich, Rainer; Bode, Wolfram; Goettig, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Human tissue kallikrein 4 (hK4) belongs to a 15-member family of closely related serine proteinases. hK4 is predominantly expressed in prostate, activates hK3/PSA, and is up-regulated in prostate and ovarian cancer. We have identified active monomers of recombinant hK4 besides inactive oligomers in solution. hK4 crystallised in the presence of zinc, nickel, and cobalt ions in three crystal forms containing cyclic tetramers and octamers. These structures display a novel metal site between His25 and Glu77 that links the 70-80 loop with the N-terminal segment. Micromolar zinc as present in prostatic fluid inhibits the enzymatic activity of hK4 against fluorogenic substrates. In our measurements, wild-type hK4 exhibited a zinc inhibition constant (IC50) of 16 microM including a permanent residual activity, in contrast to the zinc-independent mutants H25A and E77A. Since the Ile16 N terminus of wild-type hK4 becomes more accessible for acetylating agents in the presence of zinc, we propose that zinc affects the hK4 active site via the salt-bridge formed between the N terminus and Asp194 required for a functional active site. hK4 possesses an unusual 99-loop that creates a groove-like acidic S2 subsite. These findings explain the observed specificity of hK4 for the P1 to P4 substrate residues. Moreover, hK4 shows a negatively charged surface patch, which may represent an exosite for prime-side substrate recognition. PMID:16950394

  16. DDX3Y, a Male-Specific Region of Y Chromosome Gene, May Modulate Neuronal Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vakilian, Haghighat; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Pooyan, Paria; Habibi Rezaee, Lida; Parker, Lindsay; Haynes, Paul A; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    Although it is apparent that chromosome complement mediates sexually dimorphic expression patterns of some proteins that lead to functional differences, there has been insufficient evidence following the manipulation of the male-specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY) gene expression during neural development. In this study, we profiled the expression of 23 MSY genes and 15 of their X-linked homologues during neural cell differentiation of NTERA-2 human embryonal carcinoma cell line (NT2) cells in three different developmental stages using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. The expression level of 12 Y-linked genes significantly increased over neural differentiation, including RBMY1, EIF1AY, DDX3Y, HSFY1, BPY2, PCDH11Y, UTY, RPS4Y1, USP9Y, SRY, PRY, and ZFY. We showed that siRNA-mediated knockdown of DDX3Y, a DEAD box RNA helicase enzyme, in neural progenitor cells impaired cell cycle progression and increased apoptosis, consequently interrupting differentiation. Label-free quantitative shotgun proteomics based on a spectral counting approach was then used to characterize the proteomic profile of the cells after DDX3Y knockdown. Among 917 reproducibly identified proteins detected, 71 proteins were differentially expressed following DDX3Y siRNA treatment compared with mock treated cells. Functional grouping indicated that these proteins were involved in cell cycle, RNA splicing, and apoptosis, among other biological functions. Our results suggest that MSY genes may play an important role in neural differentiation and demonstrate that DDX3Y could play a multifunctional role in neural cell development, probably in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  17. Individual Cytokines Modulate the Neurological Symptoms of ATM Deficiency in a Region Specific Manner1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chin Wai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a multisystemic neurodegenerative disease of childhood caused by the absence of functional ATM (A-T mutated) protein. The cerebellar cortex has the most obvious neuropathology, yet cells in other brain regions are also abnormal. A-T mouse models have been produced that replicate much, though not all, of the complex A-T phenotype. Nongenetic factors, including modulations of the immune status of the animal, have also recently been found to play a role in the disease phenotype. Here we report that these modulations show both cytokine and brain region specificity. The CNS changes induced by broad-spectrum immune challenges, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections are a complex mixture of neuroprotective (TNFα) and neurodegenerative (IL1β) cytokine responses that change over time. For example, LPS first induces a protective response in A-T neurons through activation of tissue repair genes through infiltration of monocytes with M2 phenotype, followed over time by a set of more degenerative responses. Additional phenotypic complexity arises because the neuronal response to an immune challenge is regionally variable; cerebellum and cortex differ in important ways in their patterns of cellular and biochemical changes. Tracking these changes reveals an important though not exclusive role for the MAP kinase pathway. Our findings suggest brain responses to cytokine challenges are temporally and regionally specific and that both features are altered by the absence of ATM. This implies that management of the immune status of A-T patients might have significant clinical benefit. PMID:26465009

  18. Dopamine Modulates Motor Control in a Specific Plane Related to Support

    PubMed Central

    Herbin, Marc; Simonis, Caroline; Revéret, Lionel; Hackert, Rémi; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Eugène, Daniel; Diaz, Jorge; de Waele, Catherine; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-01-01

    At the acute stage following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL), rats, mice or guinea pigs exhibit a complex motor syndrome combining circling (HSCC lesion) and rolling (utricular lesion). At the chronic stage, they only display circling, because proprioceptive information related to the plane of support substitutes the missing utricular information to control posture in the frontal plane. Circling is also observed following unilateral lesion of the mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by 6- hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA rats) and systemic injection of apomorphine (APO rats). The resemblance of behavior induced by unilateral vestibular and dopaminergic lesions at the chronic stage can be interpreted in two ways. One hypothesis is that the dopaminergic system exerts three-dimensional control over motricity, as the vestibular system does. If this hypothesis is correct, then a unilateral lesion of the nigro-striatal pathway should induce three-dimensional motor deficits, i.e., circling and at least some sort of barrel rolling at the acute stage of the lesion. Then, compensation could also take place very rapidly based on proprioception, which would explain the prevalence of circling. In addition, barrel rolling should reappear when the rodent is placed in water, as it occurs in UL vertebrates. Alternatively, the dopaminergic network, together with neurons processing the horizontal canal information, could control the homeostasis of posture and locomotion specifically in one and only one plane of space, i.e. the plane related to the basis of support. In that case, barrel rolling should never occur, whether at the acute or chronic stage on firm ground or in water. Moreover, circling should have the same characteristics following both types of lesions. Clearly, 6-OHDA and APO-rats never exhibited barrel rolling at the acute stage. They circled at the acute stage of the lesion and continued to do so three weeks later, including in water. In contrast, UL-rats, exhibited

  19. Specific induction of cranial placode cells from Xenopus ectoderm by modulating the levels of BMP, Wnt, and FGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoko; Kanai, Yuna; Matsukawa, Shinya; Michiue, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    The neural-epidermal boundary tissues include the neural crest and preplacodal ectoderm (PPE) as primordial constituents. The PPE region is essential for the development of various sensory and endocrine organs, such as the anterior lobe of the pituitary, olfactory epithelium, lens, trigeminal ganglion, and otic vesicles. During gastrulation, a neural region is induced in ectodermal cells that interacts with mesendodermal tissue and responds to several secreted factors. Among them, inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in the presumptive neuroectoderm is essential for the induction of neural regions, and formation of a Wnt and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling gradient along the midline determines anterior-posterior patterning. In this study, we attempted to specifically induce PPE cells from undifferentiated Xenopus cells by regulating BMP, Wnt, and FGF signaling. We showed that the proper level of BMP inhibition with an injection of truncated BMP receptor or treatment with a chemical antagonist triggered the expression of PPE genes. In addition, by varying the amount of injected chordin, we optimized specific expression of the PPE genes. PPE gene expression is increased by adding an appropriate dose of an FGF receptor antagonist. Furthermore, co-injection with either wnt8 or the Wnt inhibitor dkk-1 altered the expression levels of several region-specific genes according to the injected dose. We specifically induced PPE cell differentiation in animal cap cells from early-stage Xenopus embryos by modulating BMP, Wnt, and FGF signaling. This is not the first research on placode induction, but our simple method could potentially be applied to mammalian stem cell systems. PMID:26249012

  20. Development and validation of a specific quality of life module in post-menopausal women with osteoporosis: the QUALIOST.

    PubMed

    Marquis, P; Cialdella, P; De la Loge, C

    2001-01-01

    Established post-menopausal osteoporosis (PMO) has serious consequences on health related quality of life (HRQL), as long-term back and joint pain can severely limit normal activities. The quality of life questionnaire in osteoporosis (QUALIOST), a self-administered module consisting of 23 questions which complements the SF-36, was specifically designed to evaluate the repercussions of PMO on patient HRQL. The QUALIOST was developed simultaneously in French and English after discussion with 45 patients. A validation study in France and the UK included 140 women with PMO, with at least one osteoporotic vertebral fracture. Patients completed the SF-36 and QUALIOST twice, 7 days apart. Factorial analysis revealed a physical and emotional component. Three scores were calculated: physical repercussions (10 items), emotional repercussions (13 items) and the global score (23 items). Internal reliability and stability over time were excellent. Concurrent validity with the SF-36 physical and mental fields was satisfactory. A deterioration in clinical state, as measured by pain severity, hospital admission and walking stick use, increased the repercussions on HRQL for all three scores, demonstrating the clinical validity of the questionnaire. The QUALIOST, combined with the SF-36, is a valid rating scale for measuring HRQL in clinical trials for established PMO, providing both general and specific data on the effects of PMO on patient HRQL.

  1. O6-alkylguanine-DNA transferase (SNAP) as capture module for site-specific covalent bioconjugation of targeting protein on nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Serena; Colombo, Miriam; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Corsi, Fabio; Montenegro, Josè M.; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Prosperi, Davide

    2013-02-01

    A bimodular genetic fusion comprising a delivery module (scFv) and a capture module (SNAP) is proposed as a novel strategy for the biologically mediated site-specific covalent conjugation of targeting proteins to nanoparticles. ScFv800E6, an scFv mutant selective for HER2 antigen overexpressed in breast cancer cells was chosen as targeting ligand. The fusion protein SNAP-scFv was irreversibly immobilized on magnetofluorescent nanoparticles through the recognition between SNAP module and pegylated O6-alkylguanine derivative. The targeting efficiency of the resulting nanoparticle against HER2-positive breast cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence.

  2. Identification of Two Residues within the LDL-A Module of Tva That Dictate the Altered Receptor Specificity of Mutant Subgroup A Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Tia; Caffrey, Michael; Rong, Lijun

    2005-01-01

    Avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) entry is mediated by interactions between the viral glycoprotein EnvA and its cognate receptor Tva. Previously, some interesting mutants of ASLV-A have been selected by others which can use chicken Tva, but not quail Tva, for efficient entry. The mutant phenotypes are caused by two point mutations within the surface subunit of EnvA (S. L. Holmen, D. C. Melder, and M. J. Federspiel, J. Virol. 75:726-737, 2001). In this study, we have shown that the altered receptor specificity maps to the LDL-A module of Tva. Further, we have identified two residues in the chicken LDL-A module that allow more efficient viral entry by the mutant viruses. These results demonstrate that the altered receptor specificity of the mutant viruses is determined by specific interactions with residues in the LDL-A module of Tva. PMID:16282495

  3. Hydrophobic End-Modulated Amino-Acid-Based Neutral Hydrogelators: Structure-Specific Inclusion of Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Pritam; Mandal, Deep; Brahmachari, Sayanti; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic end-modulated l-phenylalanine-containing triethylene glycol monomethyl ether tagged neutral hydrogelators (1-4) are developed. Investigations determine the gelators' structure-dependent inclusion of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) in the self-assembled fibrillar network (SAFIN). The gelators (1, 3, and 4) can immobilize water and aqueous buffer (pH 3-7) with a minimum gelator concentration of 10-15 mg mL(-1). The hydrophobic parts of the gelators are varied from a long chain (C-16) to an extended aromatic pyrenyl moiety, and their abilities to integrate 1 D and 2 D allotropes of carbon (i.e., single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene oxide (GO), respectively) within the gel are investigated. Gelator 1, containing a long alkyl chain (C-16), can include SWNTs, whereas the pyrene-containing 4 can include both SWNTs and GO. Gelator 3 fails to incorporate SWNTs or GO owing to its slow rate of gelation and possibly a mismatch between the aggregated structure and CNMs. The involvement of various forces in self-aggregated gelation and physicochemical changes occurring through CNM inclusion are examined by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The distinctive pattern of self-assembly of gelators 1 and 4 through J- and H-type aggregation might facilitate the structure-specific CNM inclusion. Inclusion of SWNTs/GO within the hydrogel matrix results in a reinforcement in mechanical stiffness of the composites compared with that of the native hydrogels.

  4. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  5. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J.; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T.; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules.

  6. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules. PMID:27385551

  7. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  8. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J.; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T.; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules. PMID:27385551

  9. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-07-07

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules.

  10. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs.

  11. Estrogen Receptor-Selective Agonists Modulate Learning in Female Rats in a Dose- and Task-Specific Manner.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Samantha L; Neese, Steven L; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Schantz, Susan L; Korol, Donna L

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are well known for their enhancing effects on hippocampus-sensitive cognition. However, estrogens can also impair learning and memory, particularly the acquisition of striatum-sensitive tasks. These cognitive shifts appear to be mediated through local estrogen receptor (ER) activation in each neural structure, but little information is known regarding which specific ER subtypes drive the opposing effects on learning. Elucidating the mnemonic roles of discrete ER subtypes is essential for predicting how treatments with distinct ER pharmacology such as drugs, hormone therapies, and phytoestrogen supplements affect cognitive abilities in and thus the daily lives of the women who take them. The present study examined the effects of the ERα-selective compound propyl pyrazole triol and the ERβ-selective compounds diarylpropionitrile and Br-ERb-041 on place and response learning in young adult female rats. Long-Evans rats were ovariectomized and maintained on phytoestrogen-free chow for 3 weeks before behavioral training, with treatments administered via subcutaneous injection 48 and 24 hours before testing. A dose-response paradigm was used, with each compound tested at 4 different doses in separate groups of rats. Propyl pyrazole triol, diarylpropionitrile, and Br-ERb-041 all enhanced place learning and impaired response learning, albeit with distinct dose-response patterns for each compound and task. These results are consistent with the detection of ERα and ERβ in the hippocampus and striatum and suggest that learning is modulated via activation of either ER subtype. PMID:26465198

  12. Grapevine Plasticity in Response to an Altered Microclimate: Sauvignon Blanc Modulates Specific Metabolites in Response to Increased Berry Exposure.

    PubMed

    Young, Philip R; Eyeghe-Bickong, Hans A; du Plessis, Kari; Alexandersson, Erik; Jacobson, Dan A; Coetzee, Zelmari; Deloire, Alain; Vivier, Melané A

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the metabolic and physiological impacts of an altered microclimate on quality-associated primary and secondary metabolites in grape (Vitis vinifera) 'Sauvignon Blanc' berries was determined in a high-altitude vineyard. The leaf and lateral shoot removal in the bunch zones altered the microclimate by increasing the exposure of the berries. The physical parameters (berry diameter and weight), primary metabolites (sugars and organic acids), as well as bunch temperature and leaf water potential were predominantly not affected by the treatment. The increased exposure led to higher levels of specific carotenoids and volatile terpenoids in the exposed berries, with earlier berry stages reacting distinctly from the later developmental stages. Plastic/nonplastic metabolite responses could be further classified to identify metabolites that were developmentally controlled and/or responded to the treatment in a predictable fashion (assessed over two consecutive vintages). The study demonstrates that grapevine berries exhibit a degree of plasticity within their secondary metabolites and respond physiologically to the increased exposure by increasing metabolites with potential antioxidant activity. Taken together, the data provide evidence that the underlying physiological responses relate to the maintenance of stress pathways by modulating antioxidant molecules in the berries. PMID:26628747

  13. Mannan as an antigen in cell-mediated immunity (CMI) assays and as a modulator of mannan-specific CMI.

    PubMed

    Domer, J E; Garner, R E; Befidi-Mengue, R N

    1989-03-01

    Mannan (MAN) extracted from Candida albicans 20A was investigated for its potential as an antigen in the detection of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in vivo and in vitro and for its ability to modulate CMI when administered intravenously (i.v.). CBA/J mice were either immunized as adults by the cutaneous inoculation of 10(6) viable blastoconidia or colonized as infants (primed) and then boosted cutaneously as adults. When immunized animals were footpad tested with MAN, highly significant delayed-type hypersensitivity (DH) responses were detected. The DH responses to MAN were of a greater magnitude than those noted with the same quantity of cell wall glycoprotein (GP), an ethylenediamine extract of the cell wall which contains both glucan and MAN. In contrast, GP was a better antigen for the detection of CMI responses in an in vitro lymphoproliferative assay with either spleen or lymph node cell suspensions. Mice treated with MAN i.v. prior to the initiation of immunization or between priming and secondary inoculations developed significantly suppressed DH reactions when tested with either MAN or GP. The lowest effective dose of MAN was 250 micrograms, maximum suppression occurred with 500 micrograms, and either dose given 1 week prior to immunization was suppressive. The suppression by MAN was specific for MAN or the MAN-containing GP. Responses to another unrelated candidal antigen, a membrane extract designated BEX, were relatively unaffected. MAN, therefore, was an effective antigen for the detection of CMI in vivo, and its administration i.v. created what appeared to be a MAN-specific suppression since it could be detected with both MAN and a MAN-containing extract from the cell wall. Caution must be exercised in the interpretation of these data, however, since the protein component of each of these extracts has not been characterized with respect to its potential role in the phenomena observed.

  14. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA. PMID:26707880

  15. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA.

  16. A quantitative study of the cell-type specific modulation of c-Rel by hydrogen peroxide and TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Marques, Virgínia; Silva, Teresa; Cunha, Filipa; Covas, Gonçalo; Marinho, H Susana; Antunes, Fernando; Cyrne, Luísa

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at moderate steady-state concentrations synergizes with TNF-α, leading to increased nuclear levels of NF-κB p65 subunit and to a cell-type specific up-regulation of a limited number of NF-κB-dependent genes. Here, we address how H2O2 achieves this molecular specificity. HeLa and MCF-7 cells were exposed to steady-state H2O2 and/or TNF-α and levels of c-Rel, p65, IκB-α, IκB-β and IκB-ε were determined. For an extracellular concentration of 25 µM H2O2, the intracellular H2O2 concentration is 3.7 µM and 12.5 µM for respectively HeLa and MCF-7 cells. The higher cytosolic H2O2 concentration present in MCF-7 cells may be a contributing factor for the higher activation of NF-κB caused by H2O2 in this cell line, when compared to HeLa cells. In both cells lines, H2O2 precludes the recovery of TNF-α-dependent IκB-α degradation, which may explain the observed synergism between H2O2 and TNF-α concerning p65 nuclear translocation. In MCF-7 cells, H2O2, in the presence of TNF-α, tripled the induction of c-Rel triggered either by TNF-α or H2O2. Conversely, in HeLa cells, H2O2 had a small antagonistic effect on TNF-α-induced c-Rel nuclear levels, concomitantly with a 50 % induction of IκB-ε, the preferential inhibitor protein of c-Rel dimers. The 6-fold higher c-Rel/IκB-ε ratio found in MCF-7 cells when compared with HeLa cells, may be a contributing factor for the cell-type dependent modulation of c-Rel by H2O2. Our results suggest that H2O2 might have an important cell-type specific role in the regulation of c-Rel-dependent processes, e.g. cancer or wound healing. PMID:24024170

  17. An oyster species-specific miRNA scaffold42648_5080 modulates haemocyte migration by targeting integrin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs are important gene regulators at post-transcriptional level and can modulate diverse biological processes, including immune response. Dozens of species-specific miRNAs have been identified in oyster Crassostrea gigas while their functions remain largely unknown. In the present study, an oyster species-specific miRNA scaffold42648_5080 was found responsive to LPS stimulation and might target a total of 31 oyster genes possibly involved in cell communication, cellular localization and cellular response to stimulus. Besides, in gain-of-function assay of scaffold42648_5080 in vivo, the phagocytosis (30.90% in miRNA group verse 23.20% in miRNA control group), apoptosis (3.10% in miRNA group verse 5.30% in miRNA control group) and migration rate (13.88% in miRNA group verse 21.03% in miRNA control group) of oyster haemocytes were found significantly altered after the injection of scaffold42648_5080 mimics. Among the target genes, integrin-linked kinase (CgILK) was considered crucial in cell migration and its interaction with scaffold42648_5080 was then verified both in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, a significant decrease of relative luciferase ratio was observed in CgILK 3'-UTR luciferase reporter assay after transfection of scaffold42648_5080 mimics (0.70-fold of that in blank group, p < 0.01). Meanwhile, when scaffold42648_5080 was overexpressed in vivo (5.41-fold of miRNA control group, p < 0.01), the expression of CgILK declined significantly to 0.25-fold of miRNA control group (p < 0.01). Comparatively, a significant decrease of the haemocyte migration rate (19.76% verse 34.82% in siEGFP control group, p < 0.01) was observed after knock-down of CgILK in vivo. The present study, as far as we know, for the first time revealed the immunomodulation role of an oyster species-specific miRNA, which might provide new insights into miRNA-mediated adaptation mechanism of oysters. PMID:27544269

  18. Less calcemic Vitamin D analogs enhance creatine kinase specific activity and modulate responsiveness to gonadal steroids in the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Somjen, Dalia; Posner, Gary H; Stern, Naftali

    2006-11-01

    Vitamin D receptors are widely expressed in the cardiovascular system, in which Vitamin D and its metabolites exert a variety of biological activities such as regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation, cell calcium transients and cell energy metabolism in vitro. The latter is mediated through the control of the brain type creatine kinase specific activity (CK), which serves to provide a readily available reservoir for ATP generation under increased work-load. In the present study we undertook to assess the role of Vitamin D on energy metabolism in the rat heart and aorta in vivo by using CK, which is a key energy metabolizing enzyme and compare Vitamin D depleted and repleted animals. Vascular tissues from female or male Vitamin D-depleted rats showed 61-80% lower CK activity in the aorta (Ao) and left ventricle of the heart (Lv) than control, Vitamin D-replete rats. Moreover, neither estradiol-17beta (E2) nor dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which increases CK specific activity in Ao and Lv of intact female or male rats, respectively, were able to stimulate CK in Vitamin D-depleted rats. Treatment of intact female rats for 2 weeks or 2 months with the less-calcemic Vitamin D analogs JKF 1624F2-2 (JKF) or QW 1624F2-2 (QW) (Fig. 1), did not significantly affect CK specific activity. However, after pretreatment with these analogs, there was an up regulation of the E2-induced CK response in Ao and Lv. In intact female rats, all Vitamin D analogs also potentiated the in vivo CK response to the SERMs raloxifene (Ral) and tamoxifen (TAM) in Ao and Lv. However the inhibitory effect of Ral or TAM on E2-induced CK activity was lost after pretreatment with Vitamin D analogs. The non-calcemic analog CB 1093 (CB) induced a significant increase in estradiol receptor alpha (ERalpha) protein in both myocardial and aortic tissue from intact and from ovariectomized female rats. Collectively, these results indicate that Vitamin D analogs modulate cell energy homeostasis in

  19. Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels: Heterogeneous affinity in rat brain structures and cognitive modulation by specific blockers.

    PubMed

    Mpari, Bedel; Sreng, Leam; Regaya, Imed; Mourre, Christiane

    2008-07-28

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (K(Ca)2) generating the medium afterhyperpolarization seen after an action potential modulate the neuronal integration signal. The effects of two K(Ca)2 channel blockers, apamin, specific to K(Ca)2.2 and K(Ca)2.3 channels, and lei-Dab7, which binds to K(Ca)2.2 channels only, were compared to evaluate the involvement of K(Ca)2 channel subunits in behavior, spatial learning and memory in rats. Intracerebroventricular (9-5 ng) injections of lei-dab7 decreased locomotor activity, food intake and body weight in rats deprived of food. A dose of 3 ng lei-Dab7 had no effect on these types of behavior. We therefore used this dose for attention and memory tasks. No modification to attention or memory was observed in a spatial radial-arm maze task with rats given 3 ng lei-Dab7, whereas apamin (0.3 ng) improved reference memory and accelerated changes of strategy from egocentric to allocentric. These findings suggest that K(Ca)2.3 blockade improves memory in rats. Lei-Dab7 entirely outcompeted the binding of iodinated apamin to 64 brain structures (mean IC(50): 34.5 nM), although IC(50) values were highly variable. By contrast, overall IC(50) values for apamin were close to mean values (11.3 pM). The very low affinity of the hippocampus and neocortex for lei-Dab7 may account for the absence of a behavioral effect of this compound. The variability of IC(50) values suggests that K(Ca)2 channel composition varies considerably as a function of the brain structure considered. PMID:18561910

  20. Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy: Effective and Efficient End-to-End Patient-Specific Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    O'Daniel, Jennifer; Das, Shiva; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin Fangfang

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To explore an effective and efficient end-to-end patient-specific quality-assurance (QA) protocol for volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) and to evaluate the suitability of a stationary radiotherapy QA device (two-dimensional [2D] ion chamber array) for VMAT QA. Methods and Materials: Three methods were used to analyze 39 VMAT treatment plans for brain, spine, and prostate: ion chamber (one-dimensional absolute, n = 39), film (2D relative, coronal/sagittal, n = 8), and 2D ion chamber array (ICA, 2D absolute, coronal/sagittal, n = 39) measurements. All measurements were compared with the treatment planning system dose calculation either via gamma analysis (3%, 3- to 4-mm distance-to-agreement criteria) or absolute point dose comparison. The film and ion chamber results were similarly compared with the ICA measurements. Results: Absolute point dose measurements agreed well with treatment planning system computed doses (ion chamber: median deviation, 1.2%, range, -0.6% to 3.3%; ICA: median deviation, 0.6%, range, -1.8% to 2.9%). The relative 2D dose measurements also showed good agreement with computed doses (>93% of pixels in all films passing gamma, >90% of pixels in all ICA measurements passing gamma). The ICA relative dose results were highly similar to those of film (>90% of pixels passing gamma). The coronal and sagittal ICA measurements were statistically indistinguishable by the paired t test with a hypothesized mean difference of 0.1%. The ion chamber and ICA absolute dose measurements showed a similar trend but had disparities of 2-3% in 18% of plans. Conclusions: After validating the new VMAT implementation with ion chamber, film, and ICA, we were able to maintain an effective yet efficient patient-specific VMAT QA protocol by reducing from five (ion chamber, film, and ICA) to two measurements (ion chamber and single ICA) per plan. The ICA (Matrixx Registered-Sign , IBA Dosimetry) was validated for VMAT QA, but ion chamber measurements are

  1. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  2. From phenotype to gene: detecting disease-specific gene functional modules via a text-based human disease phenotype network construction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Chao; Li, Xia; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Wei; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yu-Qing

    2010-08-20

    Currently, some efforts have been devoted to the text analysis of disease phenotype data, and their results indicated that similar disease phenotypes arise from functionally related genes. These related genes work together, as a functional module, to perform a desired cellular function. We constructed a text-based human disease phenotype network and detected 82 disease-specific gene functional modules, each corresponding to a different phenotype cluster, by means of graph-based clustering and mapping from disease phenotype to gene. Since genes in such gene functional modules are functionally related and cause clinically similar diseases, they may share common genetic origin of their associated disease phenotypes. We believe the investigation may facilitate the ultimate understanding of the common pathophysiologic basis of associated diseases.

  3. The use of growth factors to modulate the activities of antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Alenzi, FQ; Alenazi, FA; Al-Kaabi, Y; Salem, ML

    2011-01-01

    survival of antigen–specific T cells can be differently modulated by immunomodulatory factors, where, interleukin–12 and IGF–1 induced the favorable effect. These results have a significant implication for T cell adoptive immunotherapy in different settings. PMID:22514573

  4. Matrix factorization reveals aging-specific co-expression gene modules in the fat and muscle tissues in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongcui; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks) in adipose and muscle tissues is important for revealing the related mechanisms and co-regulated pathways involved in the development of aging-related diseases. Here, we proposed a systematically computational approach, called ICEGM, to Identify the Co-Expression Gene Modules through a novel mathematical framework of Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (HO-GSVD). ICEGM was applied on the adipose, and heart and skeletal muscle tissues in old and young female African green vervet monkeys. The genes associated with the development of inflammation, cardiovascular and skeletal disorder diseases, and cancer were revealed by the ICEGM. Meanwhile, genes in the ICEGM modules were also enriched in the adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, cardiac myocytes, and immune cells. Comprehensive disease annotation and canonical pathway analysis indicated that immune cells, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and smooth muscle cells played a synergistic role in cardiac and physical functions in the aged monkeys by regulation of the biological processes associated with metabolism, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. In conclusion, the ICEGM provides an efficiently systematic framework for decoding the co-expression gene modules in multiple tissues. Analysis of genes in the ICEGM module yielded important insights on the cooperative role of multiple tissues in the development of diseases. PMID:27703186

  5. Matrix factorization reveals aging-specific co-expression gene modules in the fat and muscle tissues in nonhuman primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongcui; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-10-01

    Accurate identification of coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks) in adipose and muscle tissues is important for revealing the related mechanisms and co-regulated pathways involved in the development of aging-related diseases. Here, we proposed a systematically computational approach, called ICEGM, to Identify the Co-Expression Gene Modules through a novel mathematical framework of Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (HO-GSVD). ICEGM was applied on the adipose, and heart and skeletal muscle tissues in old and young female African green vervet monkeys. The genes associated with the development of inflammation, cardiovascular and skeletal disorder diseases, and cancer were revealed by the ICEGM. Meanwhile, genes in the ICEGM modules were also enriched in the adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, cardiac myocytes, and immune cells. Comprehensive disease annotation and canonical pathway analysis indicated that immune cells, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and smooth muscle cells played a synergistic role in cardiac and physical functions in the aged monkeys by regulation of the biological processes associated with metabolism, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. In conclusion, the ICEGM provides an efficiently systematic framework for decoding the co-expression gene modules in multiple tissues. Analysis of genes in the ICEGM module yielded important insights on the cooperative role of multiple tissues in the development of diseases.

  6. Seeking structural specificity: direct modulation of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels by alcohols and general anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Howard, Rebecca J; Trudell, James R; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Alcohols and other anesthetic agents dramatically alter neurologic function in a wide range of organisms, yet their molecular sites of action remain poorly characterized. Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, long implicated in important direct effects of alcohol and anesthetic binding, have recently been illuminated in renewed detail thanks to the determination of atomic-resolution structures of several family members from lower organisms. These structures provide valuable models for understanding and developing anesthetic agents and for allosteric modulation in general. This review surveys progress in this field from function to structure and back again, outlining early evidence for relevant modulation of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels and the development of early structural models for ion channel function and modulation. We highlight insights and challenges provided by recent crystal structures and resulting simulations, as well as opportunities for translation of these newly detailed models back to behavior and therapy.

  7. Development and first application of an Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) for quasi online compound specific aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohaus, Thorsten; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Trimborn, Dagmar; Jayne, John; Wahner, Andreas; Worsnop, Doug

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate and human health on regional and global scales (IPCC, 2007). In many environments organics are a major fraction of the aerosol influencing its properties. Due to the huge variety of organic compounds present in atmospheric aerosol current measurement techniques are far from providing a full speciation of organic aerosol (Hallquist et al., 2009). The development of new techniques for compound specific measurements with high time resolution is a timely issue in organic aerosol research. Here we present first laboratory characterisations of an aerosol collection module (ACM) which was developed to allow for the sampling and transfer of atmospheric PM1 aerosol. The system consists of an aerodynamic lens system focussing particles on a beam. This beam is directed to a 3.4 mm in diameter surface which is cooled to -30 °C with liquid nitrogen. After collection the aerosol sample can be evaporated from the surface by heating it to up to 270 °C. The sample is transferred through a 60cm long line with a carrier gas. In order to test the ACM for linearity and sensitivity we combined it with a GC-MS system. The tests were performed with octadecane aerosol. The octadecane mass as measured with the ACM-GC-MS was compared versus the mass as calculated from SMPS derived total volume. The data correlate well (R2 0.99, slope of linear fit 1.1) indicating 100 % collection efficiency. From 150 °C to 270 °C no effect of desorption temperature on transfer efficiency could be observed. The ACM-GC-MS system was proven to be linear over the mass range 2-100 ng and has a detection limit of ~ 2 ng. First experiments applying the ACM-GC-MS system were conducted at the Jülich Aerosol Chamber. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was formed from ozonolysis of 600 ppbv of b-pinene. The major oxidation product nopinone was detected in the aerosol and could be shown to decrease from 2 % of the total aerosol to 0.5 % of the aerosol over the 48 hours of

  8. Positive allosteric modulation reveals a specific role for mGlu2 receptors in sensory processing in the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Copeland, C S; Neale, S A; Salt, T E

    2012-02-15

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu) modulation of sensory processing in the rat ventrobasal thalamic nucleus (VB) has been extensively studied in vivo. However, it is not yet known what the relative contributions are of the Group II mGlu receptor subtypes (mGlu2 and mGlu3) to this modulation, nor to what extent these receptors may be activated under physiological conditions during this process. Using single-neurone recording in the rat VB in vivo with local application of the selective Group II agonist LY354740 and the subtype selective mGlu2 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) LY487379, our findings were twofold. Firstly, we found that there is an mGlu2 component to the effects of LY354740 on sensory responses in the VB. Secondly, we have demonstrated that application of the PAM alone can modulate sensory responses of single neurones in vivo. This indicates that mGlu2 receptors can be activated by endogenous agonist following physiological sensory stimulation. We speculate that the mGlu2 subtype could be activated under physiological stimulus-evoked conditions by 'glutamate spillover' from synapses between excitatory sensory afferents and VB neurones that can lead to a reduction in sensory-evoked inhibition arising from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN). We propose that this potential mGlu2 receptor modulation of inhibition could play an important role in discerning relevant information from background activity upon physiological sensory stimulation. Furthermore, this could be a site of action for mGlu2 PAMs to modulate cognitive processes. PMID:22199165

  9. The splicing modulator sudemycin induces a specific antitumor response and cooperates with ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rosich, Laia; Montraveta, Arnau; Roldán, Jocabed; Rodríguez, Vanina; Villamor, Neus; Aymerich, Marta; Lagisetti, Chandraiah; Webb, Thomas R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elias; Colomer, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    Mutations or deregulated expression of the components of the spliceosome can influence the splicing pattern of several genes and contribute to the development of tumors. In this context, we report that the spliceosome modulator sudemycin induces selective cytotoxicity in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells when compared with healthy lymphocytes and tumor cells from other B-lymphoid malignancies, with a slight bias for CLL cases with mutations in spliceosome-RNA processing machinery. Consistently, sudemycin exhibits considerable antitumor activity in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) mice engrafted with primary cells from CLL patients. The antileukemic effect of sudemycin involves the splicing modulation of several target genes important for tumor survival, both in SF3B1-mutated and -unmutated cases. Thus, the apoptosis induced by this compound is related to the alternative splicing switch of MCL1 toward its proapoptotic isoform. Sudemycin also functionally disturbs NF-κB pathway in parallel with the induction of a spliced RELA variant that loses its DNA binding domain. Importantly, we show an enhanced antitumor effect of sudemycin in combination with ibrutinib that might be related to the modulation of the alternative splicing of the inhibitor of Btk (IBTK). In conclusion, we provide first evidence that the spliceosome is a relevant therapeutic target in CLL, supporting the use of splicing modulators alone or in combination with ibrutinib as a promising approach for the treatment of CLL patients. PMID:26068951

  10. Specific modulation of apoptosis and Bcl-xL phosphorylation in yeast by distinct mammalian protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Lucília; Silva, Rui D; Pereira, Gil; Gonçalves, Jorge; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2006-08-01

    Mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms have been subject of particular attention because of their ability to modulate apoptotic proteins. However, the roles played by each PKC isoform in apoptosis are still unclear. Here, expression of individual mammalian PKC isoforms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a new approach to study the role of each isoform in apoptosis. The four isoforms tested, excepting PKC-delta, stimulate S. cerevisiae acetic-acid-induced apoptosis essentially through a mitochondrial ROS-dependent pathway. However, their co-expression with Bcl-xL reveals a PKC-isoform-dependent modulation of Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic activity. A yeast pathway homologue to the mammalian SAPK/JNK is responsible for acetic-acid-induced Bcl-xL phosphorylation that is differently modulated by PKC isoforms. The data obtained suggest conservation of an ancient mechanism of apoptosis regulation in yeast and mammals and offer new insights into mammalian apoptosis modulation by PKC isoforms.

  11. 47 CFR 73.757 - System specifications for single-sideband (SSB) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.757 Section 73.757 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) System parameters—(1) Channel spacing. In a mixed DSB, SSB and digital environment... broadcasting does not require a frequency tolerance less than 10 Hz. The degradation mentioned in Note 1...

  12. 47 CFR 73.757 - System specifications for single-sideband (SSB) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.757 Section 73.757 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) System parameters—(1) Channel spacing. In a mixed DSB, SSB and digital environment... broadcasting does not require a frequency tolerance less than 10 Hz. The degradation mentioned in Note 1...

  13. 47 CFR 73.757 - System specifications for single-sideband (SSB) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) modulated emissions in the HF broadcasting service. 73.757 Section 73.757 Telecommunication FEDERAL... broadcasting service. (a) System parameters—(1) Channel spacing. In a mixed DSB, SSB and digital environment... broadcasting does not require a frequency tolerance less than 10 Hz. The degradation mentioned in Note 1...

  14. PI3K/AKT signaling modulates transcriptional expression of EWS/FLI1 through specificity protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Chiara; Boro, Aleksandar; Rechfeld, Florian; Lopez-Garcia, Laura A.; Gierisch, Maria E.; Schäfer, Beat W.; Niggli, Felix K.

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most frequent bone cancer in childhood and is characterized by the presence of the balanced translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12) in more than 85% of cases, generating a dysregulated transcription factor EWS/FLI1. This fusion protein is an essential oncogenic component of ES development which is necessary for tumor cell maintenance and represents an attractive therapeutic target. To search for modulators of EWS/FLI1 activity we screened a library of 153 targeted compounds and identified inhibitors of the PI3K pathway to directly modulate EWS/FLI1 transcription. Surprisingly, treatment of four different ES cell lines with BEZ235 resulted in down regulation of EWS/FLI1 mRNA and protein by ∼50% with subsequent modulation of target gene expression. Analysis of the EWS/FLI1 promoter region (−2239/+67) using various deletion constructs identified two 14bp minimal elements as being important for EWS/FLI1 transcription. We identified SP1 as modulator of EWS/FLI1 gene expression and demonstrated direct binding to one of these regions in the EWS/FLI1 promoter by EMSA and ChIP experiments. These results provide the first insights on the transcriptional regulation of EWS/FLI1, an area that has not been investigated so far, and offer an additional molecular explanation for the known sensitivity of ES cell lines to PI3K inhibition. PMID:26336820

  15. Assess Student Performance: Skills. Second Edition. Module D-4 of Category D--Instructional Evaluation. Professional Teacher Education Module Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This module, one of a series of 127 performance-based teacher education learning packages focusing upon specific professional competencies of vocational education teachers, deals with assessing student performance of psychomotor skills. Included in the module are learning experiences that address the following topics: important considerations…

  16. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells Derived from Donors with Natural Rubber Latex Allergy Modulate Allergen-Specific T-Cell Responses and IgE Production

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Alejandro; Aguirre, Adam; Guzmán, María Antonieta; González, Rodrigo; Catalán, Diego; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Larrondo, Milton; López, Mercedes; Pesce, Barbara; Rolland, Jennifer; O’Hehir, Robyn; Aguillón, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL; Hevea brasiliensis) allergy is an IgE-mediated reaction to latex proteins. When latex glove exposure is the main sensitizing agent, Hev b 5 is one of the major allergens. Dendritic cells (DC), the main antigen presenting cells, modulated with pharmacological agents can restore tolerance in several experimental models, including allergy. In the current study, we aimed to generate DC with tolerogenic properties from NRL-allergic patients and evaluate their ability to modulate allergen-specific T and B cell responses. Here we show that dexamethasone-treated DC (dxDC) differentiated into a subset of DC, characterized by low expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and CD83 molecules. Compared with LPS-matured DC, dxDC secreted lower IL-12 and higher IL-10 after CD40L activation, and induced lower alloantigenic T cell proliferation. We also show that dxDC pulsed with the dominant Hev b 5 T-cell epitope peptide, Hev b 546–65, inhibited both proliferation of Hev b 5-specific T-cell lines and the production of Hev b 5-specific IgE. Additionally, dxDC induced a subpopulation of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells that suppressed proliferation of Hev b 5-primed T cells. In conclusion, dxDC generated from NRL-allergic patients can modulate allergen-specific T-cell responses and IgE production, supporting their potential use in allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:24465795

  17. The perception of speech modulation cues in lexical tones is guided by early language-specific experience.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Laurianne; Tsao, Feng-Ming; Liu, Huei-Mei; Li, Lu-Yang; Hu, You-Hsin; Lorenzi, Christian; Bertoncini, Josiane

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies showed that infants reorganize their perception of speech sounds according to their native language categories during their first year of life. Still, information is lacking about the contribution of basic auditory mechanisms to this process. This study aimed to evaluate when native language experience starts to noticeably affect the perceptual processing of basic acoustic cues [i.e., frequency-modulation (FM) and amplitude-modulation information] known to be crucial for speech perception in adults. The discrimination of a lexical-tone contrast (rising versus low) was assessed in 6- and 10-month-old infants learning either French or Mandarin using a visual habituation paradigm. The lexical tones were presented in two conditions designed to either keep intact or to severely degrade the FM and fine spectral cues needed to accurately perceive voice-pitch trajectory. A third condition was designed to assess the discrimination of the same voice-pitch trajectories using click trains containing only the FM cues related to the fundamental-frequency (F0) in French- and Mandarin-learning 10-month-old infants. Results showed that the younger infants of both language groups and the Mandarin-learning 10-month-olds discriminated the intact lexical-tone contrast while French-learning 10-month-olds failed. However, only the French 10-month-olds discriminated degraded lexical tones when FM, and thus voice-pitch cues were reduced. Moreover, Mandarin-learning 10-month-olds were found to discriminate the pitch trajectories as presented in click trains better than French infants. Altogether, these results reveal that the perceptual reorganization occurring during the first year of life for lexical tones is coupled with changes in the auditory ability to use speech modulation cues. PMID:26379605

  18. Context-specific flow through the MEK/ERK module produces cell- and ligand-specific patterns of ERK single and double phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Nao; D'Alessandro, Lorenza A; Depner, Sofia; Hahn, Bettina; Kramer, Bernhard A; Lucarelli, Philippe; Vlasov, Artyom; Stepath, Markus; Böhm, Martin E; Deharde, Daniela; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Lehmann, Wolf D; Klingmüller, Ursula; Schilling, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    The same pathway, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, can produce different cellular responses, depending on stimulus or cell type. We examined the phosphorylation dynamics of the MAPK kinase MEK and its targets extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in primary hepatocytes and the transformed keratinocyte cell line HaCaT A5 exposed to either hepatocyte growth factor or interleukin-6. By combining quantitative mass spectrometry with dynamic modeling, we elucidated network structures for the reversible threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK in both cell types. In addition to differences in the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions, the HaCaT network model required two feedback mechanisms, which, as the experimental data suggested, involved the induction of the dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP6 and the scaffold paxillin. We assayed and modeled the accumulation of the double-phosphorylated and active form of ERK1/2, as well as the dynamics of the changes in the monophosphorylated forms of ERK1/2. Modeling the differences in the dynamics of the changes in the distributions of the phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 suggested that different amounts of MEK activity triggered context-specific responses, with primary hepatocytes favoring the formation of double-phosphorylated ERK1/2 and HaCaT A5 cells that produce both the threonine-phosphorylated and the double-phosphorylated form. These differences in phosphorylation distributions explained the threshold, sensitivity, and saturation of the ERK response. We extended the findings of differential ERK phosphorylation profiles to five additional cultured cell systems and matched liver tumor and normal tissue, which revealed context-specific patterns of the various forms of phosphorylated ERK. PMID:26838549

  19. Behavioral-state modulation of inhibition is context-dependent and cell type specific in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pakan, Janelle MP; Lowe, Scott C; Dylda, Evelyn; Keemink, Sander W; Currie, Stephen P; Coutts, Christopher A; Rochefort, Nathalie L

    2016-01-01

    Cortical responses to sensory stimuli are modulated by behavioral state. In the primary visual cortex (V1), visual responses of pyramidal neurons increase during locomotion. This response gain was suggested to be mediated through inhibitory neurons, resulting in the disinhibition of pyramidal neurons. Using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in layers 2/3 and 4 in mouse V1, we reveal that locomotion increases the activity of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), somatostatin (SST) and parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons during visual stimulation, challenging the disinhibition model. In darkness, while most VIP and PV neurons remained locomotion responsive, SST and excitatory neurons were largely non-responsive. Context-dependent locomotion responses were found in each cell type, with the highest proportion among SST neurons. These findings establish that modulation of neuronal activity by locomotion is context-dependent and contest the generality of a disinhibitory circuit for gain control of sensory responses by behavioral state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14985.001 PMID:27552056

  20. Variable addressability imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala, Kenneth Scott

    The use of variable addressability for creating an optimum human-machine interface is investigated. Current wide field optical systems present more information to the human visual system than it has the capacity to perceive. The axial resolution, and/or the field of view can be increased by minimizing the difference between what the eye can perceive and what the system presents. The variable addressability function was developed through the use of a human factors experiment that characterized the position of the eye during the simulated use of a binocular system. Applying the variable addressability function to a conventional optical design required the development of a new metric for evaluating the expected performance of the variable addressability system. The new metric couples psycho-visual data and traditional optical data in order to specify the required performance of the variable addressability system. A non-linear mapping of the pixels is required in order to have the system work most efficiently with the human visual system, while also compensating for eye motion. The non-linear mapping function, which is the backbone of the variable addressability technique, can be created using optical distortion. The lens and system design is demonstrated in two different spectral bands. One of the designs was fabricated, tested, and assembled into a prototype. Through a second human factors study aimed at measuring performance, the variable addressability prototype was directly compared to a uniform addressability prototype, quantifying the difference in performance for the two prototypes. The human factors results showed that the variable addressability prototype provided better resolution 13% of the time throughout the experiment, but was 15% slower in use than the uniform addressability prototype.

  1. Almond brush module cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Zohns, M.A.; Jenkins, B.M.; Mehlschau, J.J.; Morrison, D.

    1983-06-01

    This paper addresses the design, construction, and evaluation of an almond brush module cutter. The module cutter is one link in a system which processes tree prunings for fuel and fiber. This system includes a modified cotton module builder, a module mover, the cutter, and a tub grinder. An economic analysis of the cutter is presented along with the problems involved in cutting brush modules.

  2. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A.; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses. PMID:26715744

  3. Computation of Fresnel holograms and diffraction-specific coherent panoramagrams for full-color holographic displays based on anisotropic leaky-mode modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Sundeep; Dreshaj, Ermal; Bove, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    We have previously introduced a computational architecture suitable for driving full-color holographic display systems based around anisotropic leaky-mode modulators; this architecture appropriately handles single-sideband modulation and frequency-division multiplexing of spectral bands that correspond to the independent red, green, and blue color channels in the display output. In this paper, we describe an implementation for driving the MIT Mark IV holographic display system with such a computational approach, in cases of both pre-computed Fresnel CGHs and real-time, GPU-based diffraction specific coherent panoramagrams. Real-time holographic images of nearly VGA-resolution (468 lines) are generated via three dual-head NVIDIA GPUs via a CUDA-based implementation that encompasses the requisite orthographic view generation from 3-D data sources, parallel vector-based fringe computation per hogel and per color, single-sideband modulation, and frequency-division multiplexing. We present the first results of this scheme in driving the Mark IV display system and review the resulting holographic video output and performance metrics.

  4. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-12

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses.

  5. Neuron type-specific miRNA represses two broadly expressed genes to modulate an avoidance behavior in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drexel, Tanja; Mahofsky, Katharina; Latham, Richard; Zimmer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Two broad gene classes are distinguished within multicellular organisms: cell type-specific genes, which confer particular cellular properties, and ubiquitous genes that support general cellular functions. However, certain so-called ubiquitous genes show functionally relevant cell type-specific repression. How such repression is achieved is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are repressors, many of which are expressed with high cell type specificity. Here we show that mir-791, expressed exclusively in the CO2-sensing neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, represses two otherwise broadly expressed genes. This repression is necessary for normal neuronal function and behavior of the animals toward CO2. miRNA-mediated repression of broadly transcribed genes is a previously unappreciated strategy for cellular specialization. PMID:27688400

  6. Type I interferon suppresses virus-specific B cell responses by modulating CD8+ T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Moseman, E. Ashley; Wu, Tuoqi; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have established a role for T cells in resolving persistent viral infections, yet emerging evidence indicates that both T and B cells are required to control some viruses. During persistent infection, a marked lag or failure to generate neutralizing antibodies is commonly observed and likely contributes to an inability to control certain pathogens. Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) as a model, we have examined how a persistent viral infection can suppress neutralizing humoral immunity. By tracking the fate of virus-specific B cells in vivo, we report that LCMV-specific B cells were rapidly deleted within a few days of persistent infection, and this deletion was completely reversed by blockade of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling. Early interference with IFN-I signaling promoted survival and differentiation of LCMV-specific B cells, which accelerated the generation of neutralizing antibodies. This marked improvement in antiviral humoral immunity did not rely on the cessation of IFN-I signaling in B cells but on alterations in the virus-specific CD8+ T cell response. Using two-photon microscopy and in vivo calcium imaging, we observed that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) productively engaged and killed LCMV-specific B cells in a perforin-dependent manner within the first few days of infection. Blockade of IFN-I signaling protected LCMV-specific B cells by promoting CTL dysfunction. Therapeutic manipulation of this pathway may facilitate efforts to promote humoral immunity during persistent viral infection in humans. Our findings illustrate how events that occur early after infection can disturb the resultant adaptive response and contribute to viral persistence. PMID:27812556

  7. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  8. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 4: PEP functional specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The functional, performance, design, and test requirements for the Orbiter power extension package and its associated ground support equipment are defined. Both government and nongovernment standards and specifications are cited for the following subsystems: electrical power, structural/mechanical, avionics, and thermal control. Quality control assurance provisions and preparation for delivery are also discussed.

  9. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 5: PEP environmental specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This specification establishes the natural and induced environments to which the power extension package may be exposed during ground operations and space operations with the shuttle system. Space induced environments are applicable at the Orbiter attach point interface location. All probable environments are systematically listed according to each ground and mission phase.

  10. Religion and Action Control: Faith-Specific Modulation of the Simon Effect but Not Stop-Signal Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Scorolli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that religion has a specific impact on attentional processes. Here we show that religion also affects action control. Experiment 1 compared Dutch Calvinists and Dutch atheists, matched for age, sex, intelligence, education, and cultural and socio-economic background, and Experiment 2 compared Italian Catholics with…

  11. Fat-specific protein 27 modulates nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 and the cellular response to stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27), a member of the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor a-like effector (Cide) family, is highly expressed in adipose tissues and is a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein that induces the accumulation of LDs. Using a yeast two-hybrid system to examine potentia...

  12. LRP5 Regulates Human Body Fat Distribution by Modulating Adipose Progenitor Biology in a Dose- and Depot-Specific Fashion

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Nellie Y.; Neville, Matt J.; Marinou, Kyriakoula; Hardcastle, Sarah A.; Fielding, Barbara A.; Duncan, Emma L.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Tobias, Jonathan H.; Gregson, Celia L.; Karpe, Fredrik; Christodoulides, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    Summary Common variants in WNT pathway genes have been associated with bone mass and fat distribution, the latter predicting diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. Rare mutations in the WNT co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 are similarly associated with bone and cardiometabolic disorders. We investigated the role of LRP5 in human adipose tissue. Subjects with gain-of-function LRP5 mutations and high bone mass had enhanced lower-body fat accumulation. Reciprocally, a low bone mineral density-associated common LRP5 allele correlated with increased abdominal adiposity. Ex vivo LRP5 expression was higher in abdominal versus gluteal adipocyte progenitors. Equivalent knockdown of LRP5 in both progenitor types dose-dependently impaired β-catenin signaling and led to distinct biological outcomes: diminished gluteal and enhanced abdominal adipogenesis. These data highlight how depot differences in WNT/β-catenin pathway activity modulate human fat distribution via effects on adipocyte progenitor biology. They also identify LRP5 as a potential pharmacologic target for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:25651180

  13. LRP5 regulates human body fat distribution by modulating adipose progenitor biology in a dose- and depot-specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Loh, Nellie Y; Neville, Matt J; Marinou, Kyriakoula; Hardcastle, Sarah A; Fielding, Barbara A; Duncan, Emma L; McCarthy, Mark I; Tobias, Jonathan H; Gregson, Celia L; Karpe, Fredrik; Christodoulides, Constantinos

    2015-02-01

    Common variants in WNT pathway genes have been associated with bone mass and fat distribution, the latter predicting diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. Rare mutations in the WNT co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 are similarly associated with bone and cardiometabolic disorders. We investigated the role of LRP5 in human adipose tissue. Subjects with gain-of-function LRP5 mutations and high bone mass had enhanced lower-body fat accumulation. Reciprocally, a low bone mineral density-associated common LRP5 allele correlated with increased abdominal adiposity. Ex vivo LRP5 expression was higher in abdominal versus gluteal adipocyte progenitors. Equivalent knockdown of LRP5 in both progenitor types dose-dependently impaired β-catenin signaling and led to distinct biological outcomes: diminished gluteal and enhanced abdominal adipogenesis. These data highlight how depot differences in WNT/β-catenin pathway activity modulate human fat distribution via effects on adipocyte progenitor biology. They also identify LRP5 as a potential pharmacologic target for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders.

  14. Religion and action control: Faith-specific modulation of the Simon effect but not Stop-Signal performance.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S; Scorolli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M

    2011-08-01

    Previous findings suggest that religion has a specific impact on attentional processes. Here we show that religion also affects action control. Experiment 1 compared Dutch Calvinists and Dutch atheists, matched for age, sex, intelligence, education, and cultural and socio-economic background, and Experiment 2 compared Italian Catholics with matched Italian seculars. As expected, Calvinists showed a smaller and Catholics a larger Simon effect than nonbelievers, while performance of the groups was comparable in the Stop-Signal task. This pattern suggests that religions emphasizing individualism or collectivism affects action control in specific ways, presumably by inducing chronic biases towards a more "exclusive" or "inclusive" style of decision-making. Interestingly, there was no evidence that religious practice affects inhibitory skills.

  15. Context-Specific Effects of TGF-β/SMAD3 in Cancer Are Modulated by the Epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Tufegdzic Vidakovic, Ana; Rueda, Oscar M.; Vervoort, Stephin J.; Sati Batra, Ankita; Goldgraben, Mae Akilina; Uribe-Lewis, Santiago; Greenwood, Wendy; Coffer, Paul J.; Bruna, Alejandra; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Summary The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway exerts opposing effects on cancer cells, acting as either a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor. Here, we show that these opposing effects are a result of the synergy between SMAD3, a downstream effector of TGF-β signaling, and the distinct epigenomes of breast-tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). These effects of TGF-β are associated with distinct gene expression programs, but genomic SMAD3 binding patterns are highly similar in the BTIC-promoting and BTIC-suppressing contexts. Our data show cell-type-specific patterns of DNA and histone modifications provide a modulatory layer by determining accessibility of genes to regulation by TGF-β/SMAD3. LBH, one such context-specific target gene, is regulated according to its DNA methylation status and is crucial for TGF-β-dependent promotion of BTICs. Overall, these results reveal that the epigenome plays a central and previously overlooked role in shaping the context-specific effects of TGF-β in cancer. PMID:26686634

  16. Estradiol and testosterone modulate the tissue-specific expression of ghrelin, ghs-r, goat and nucb2 in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Canosa, Luis Fabián; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-01

    Ghrelin, and nesfatin-1 (encoded by nucleobindin2/nucb2) are two metabolic peptides with multiple biological effects in vertebrates. While sex steroids are known to regulate endogenous ghrelin and NUCB2 in mammals, such actions by steroids in fish remain unknown. This study aimed to determine whether estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) affects the expression of preproghrelin, ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) and NUCB2 in goldfish (Carassius auratus). First, a dose-response assay was performed in which fish were intraperitoneally (ip) implanted with pellets containing 25, 50 or 100 μg/g body weight (BW) of E2 or T. It was found that sex steroids (100 μg/g BW) administered for 2.5 days achieved the highest E2 or T in circulation. In a second experiment, fish were ip implanted with pellets containing 100 μg/g BW of E2, T or without hormone (control). RT-qPCR analyses at 2.5 days post-administration show that gut preproghrelin and GOAT expression was upregulated by both E2 and T treatments, while the same effect was observed for GHS-R only in the pituitary. Both treatments also reduced hypothalamic preproghrelin mRNA expression. NUCB2 expression was increased in the forebrain of T treated group and reduced in the gut and pituitary under both treatments. These results show for the first time a modulation of preproghrelin and nucb2/nesfatin-1 by sex steroids in fish. The interaction between sex steroids and genes implicated in both metabolism and reproduction might help meeting the reproduction dependent energy demands in fish. PMID:26773340

  17. Adult male mice emit context-specific ultrasonic vocalizations that are modulated by prior isolation or group rearing environment.

    PubMed

    Chabout, Jonathan; Serreau, Pierre; Ey, Elodie; Bellier, Ludovic; Aubin, Thierry; Bourgeron, Thomas; Granon, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions in mice are frequently analysed in genetically modified strains in order to get insight of disorders affecting social interactions such as autism spectrum disorders. Different types of social interactions have been described, mostly between females and pups, and between adult males and females. However, we recently showed that social interactions between adult males could also encompass cognitive and motivational features. During social interactions, rodents emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), but it remains unknown if call types are differently used depending of the context and if they are correlated with motivational state. Here, we recorded the calls of adult C57BL/6J male mice in various behavioral conditions, such as social interaction, novelty exploration and restraint stress. We introduced a modulator for the motivational state by comparing males maintained in isolation and males maintained in groups before the experiments. Male mice uttered USVs in all social and non-social situations, and even in a stressful restraint context. They nevertheless emitted the most important number of calls with the largest diversity of call types in social interactions, particularly when showing a high motivation for social contact. For mice maintained in social isolation, the number of calls recorded was positively correlated with the duration of social contacts, and most calls were uttered during contacts between the two mice. This correlation was not observed in mice maintained in groups. These results open the way for a deeper understanding and characterization of acoustic signals associated with social interactions. They can also help evaluating the role of motivational states in the emission of acoustic signals.

  18. Modulation of crystal formation by bone phosphoproteins: structural specificity of the osteopontin-mediated inhibition of hydroxyapatite formation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, G K; Kyle, C L; Goldberg, H A

    1994-06-15

    Osteopontin is a phosphorylated sialoprotein containing a conserved sequence of contiguous aspartic acid residues. This protein is expressed at high levels in mineralized tissues and has previously been shown to inhibit the in vitro formation of hydroxyapatite (HA). In the present study, protein modification and model compound studies have been used to identify the structural features of osteopontin that are responsible for its crystal-modulating properties. Using metastable calcium phosphate solutions buffered by autotitration, osteopontin caused half-maximal inhibition of HA formation at a concentration (IC50) of 0.06 microgram/ml. The hen egg yolk phosphoprotein phosvitin was a much weaker inhibitor, while dextran sulphate had no effect. The synthetic polypeptide poly(aspartic acid) was almost as effective an inhibitor of HA formation as osteopontin (IC50 0.11 microgram/ml), whereas poly(glutamic acid) was more than a thousand times less potent (IC50 155 micrograms/ml). In a steady-state agarose gel system, much higher polypeptide concentrations were required for inhibition of HA formation, but a similar relative order of inhibitory effectiveness was observed. Treatment of osteopontin with alkaline phosphatase removed 84% of the covalently bound phosphate and reduced its HA-inhibiting activity by more than 40-fold. Treatment with glycine ethyl ester in the presence of carbodi-imide modified 86% of the carboxylate groups in osteopontin and reduced its inhibitory activity by 6-fold. These findings indicate that osteopontin is a potent inhibitor of HA formation. This activity requires phosphate and carboxylate groups, possibly including the conserved sequence of contiguous aspartic acid residues. Osteopontin may act as an inhibitor of phase separation in physiological fluids of high supersaturation.

  19. RecR-mediated modulation of RecF dimer specificity for single- and double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Makharashvili, Nodar; Mi, Tian; Koroleva, Olga; Korolev, Sergey

    2009-01-16

    RecF pathway proteins play an important role in the restart of stalled replication and DNA repair in prokaryotes. Following DNA damage, RecF, RecR, and RecO initiate homologous recombination (HR) by loading of the RecA recombinase on single-stranded (ss) DNA, protected by ssDNA-binding protein. The specific role of RecF in this process is not well understood. Previous studies have proposed that RecF directs the RecOR complex to boundaries of damaged DNA regions by recognizing single-stranded/double-stranded (ss/ds) DNA junctions. RecF belongs to ABC-type ATPases, which function through an ATP-dependent dimerization. Here, we demonstrate that the RecF of Deinococcus radiodurans interacts with DNA as an ATP-dependent dimer, and that the DNA binding and ATPase activity of RecF depend on both the structure of DNA substrate, and the presence of RecR. We found that RecR interacts as a tetramer with the RecF dimer. RecR increases the RecF affinity to dsDNA without stimulating ATP hydrolysis but destabilizes RecF binding to ssDNA and dimerization, likely due to increasing the ATPase rate. The DNA-dependent binding of RecR to the RecF-DNA complex occurs through specific protein-protein interactions without significant contributions from RecR-DNA interactions. Finally, RecF neither alone nor in complex with RecR preferentially binds to the ss/dsDNA junction. Our data suggest that the specificity of the RecFOR complex toward the boundaries of DNA damaged regions may result from a network of protein-protein and DNA-protein interactions, rather than a simple recognition of the ss/dsDNA junction by RecF. PMID:19017635

  20. Assist Students in Developing Technical Reading Skills. Module M-2 of Category M--Assisting Students in Improving Their Basic Skills. Professional Teacher Education Module Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fardig, Glen E.; West, Gail B.

    This learning module, one of a series of 127 performance-based teacher education learning packages focusing on specific professional competencies of vocational teachers, deals with the task of assisting students in developing technical reading skills. Addressed in the individual learning experiences included in the module are the following topics:…

  1. IL-10 and NOS2 Modulate Antigen-Specific Reactivity and Nerve Infiltration by T Cells in Experimental Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Hagge, Deanna A.; Scollard, David M.; Ray, Nashone A.; Marks, Vilma T.; Deming, Angelina T.; Spencer, John S.; Adams, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although immunopathology dictates clinical outcome in leprosy, the dynamics of early and chronic infection are poorly defined. In the tuberculoid region of the spectrum, Mycobacterium leprae growth is restricted yet a severe granulomatous lesion can occur. The evolution and maintenance of chronic inflammatory processes like those observed in the leprosy granuloma involve an ongoing network of communications via cytokines. IL-10 has immunosuppressive properties and IL-10 genetic variants have been associated with leprosy development and reactions. Methodology/Principal Findings The role of IL-10 in resistance and inflammation in leprosy was investigated using Mycobacterium leprae infection of mice deficient in IL-10 (IL-10−/−), as well as mice deficient in both inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2−/−) and IL-10 (10NOS2−/−). Although a lack of IL-10 did not affect M. leprae multiplication in the footpads (FP), inflammation increased from C57Bl/6 (B6)modulators in the resistant forms of leprosy and presents a new model for investigating the

  2. Modulation of mycobacterial-specific Th1 and Th17 cells in latent tuberculosis by coincident hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumaran, Paramasivam Paul; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2013-05-15

    Hookworm infections and tuberculosis (TB) are coendemic in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that infection with helminth parasites could suppress the predominant Th1 (IFN-γ-mediated) response needed to control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and enhance susceptibility to infection and/or disease. To determine the role of coincident hookworm infection on responses at steady-state and on M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses in latent TB (LTB), we examined the cellular responses in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant hookworm infection. By analyzing the expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 subsets of CD4(+) T cells, we were able to demonstrate that the presence of coincident hookworm infection significantly diminished both spontaneously expressed and M. tuberculosis-specific mono- and dual-functional Th1 and Th17 cells. Hookworm infection, in contrast, was associated with expanded frequencies of mono- and dual-functional Th2 cells at both steady-state and upon Ag stimulation. This differential induction of CD4(+) T cell subsets was abrogated upon mitogen stimulation. Additionally, coincident hookworm infection was associated with increased adaptive T regulatory cells but not natural regulatory T cells in LTB. Finally, the CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression pattern was also associated with alterations in the systemic levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Thus, coincident hookworm infection exerts a profound inhibitory effect on protective Th1 and Th17 responses in LTB and may predispose toward the development of active tuberculosis in humans.

  3. Preservation and modulation of specific left hemisphere regions is vital for treated recovery from anomia in stroke.

    PubMed

    Fridriksson, Julius

    2010-09-01

    The location and extent of brain changes that support recovery in chronic stroke is probably related to the structural integrity of the remaining cortex. However, little is known about the specifics of this relationship and how it influences treatment outcome in chronic stroke. To examine this issue, the current study examined frank brain damage and changes in cortical activation as predictors of language-treatment outcome in patients with chronic aphasia caused by stroke. Twenty-six patients received multiple MRI sessions before and after 30 h of aphasia treatment targeting anomia, an impairment in the ability to name common objects. Improved naming was associated with increased brain activation in the anterior and posterior regions of the left hemisphere, whereas damage to the posterior portion of the left middle temporal lobe and the temporal-occipital junction had a particularly negative effect on treatment outcome. Specifically, patients whose brain damage included regions commonly associated with lexical retrieval and phonological processing (e.g., Brodmann's areas 37 and 39) were less likely to show treatment-related improvement in correct naming compared with cases where the same areas were intact. These findings suggest that brain changes associated with improved naming ability in chronic aphasia rely on preservation and recruitment of eloquent cortex in the left hemisphere. In general, it seems likely that a similar relationship between cortical preservation and recruitment may also pertain to recovery from other functional impairments in chronic stroke.

  4. Progress and prospects of engineered sequence-specific DNA modulating technologies for the management of liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Samantha A; Moyo, Buhle; Arbuthnot, Patrick B

    2015-04-28

    Liver diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. The hepatic illnesses, which include inherited metabolic disorders, hemophilias and viral hepatitides, are complex and currently difficult to treat. The maturation of gene therapy has heralded new avenues for developing effective intervention for these diseases. DNA modification using gene therapy is now possible and available technology may be exploited to achieve long term therapeutic benefit. The ability to edit DNA sequences specifically is of paramount importance to advance gene therapy for application to liver diseases. Recent development of technologies that allow for this has resulted in rapid advancement of gene therapy to treat several chronic illnesses. Improvements in application of derivatives of zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), homing endonucleases (HEs) and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated (Cas) systems have been particularly important. These sequence-specific technologies may be used to modify genes permanently and also to alter gene transcription for therapeutic purposes. This review describes progress in development of ZFPs, TALEs, HEs and CRISPR/Cas for application to treating liver diseases.

  5. A systematic study of modulation of ADAM-mediated ectodomain shedding by site-specific O-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Goth, Christoffer K.; Halim, Adnan; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Clausen, Henrik; Schjoldager, Katrine T.-B. G.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated shedding of the ectodomain of cell membrane proteins by proteases is a common process that releases the extracellular domain from the cell and activates cell signaling. Ectodomain shedding occurs in the immediate extracellular juxtamembrane region, which is also where O-glycosylation is often found and examples of crosstalk between shedding and O-glycosylation have been reported. Here, we systematically investigated the potential of site-specific O-glycosylation mediated by distinct polypeptide GalNAc-transferase (GalNAc-T) isoforms to coregulate ectodomain shedding mediated by the A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM) subfamily of proteases and in particular ADAM17. We analyzed 25 membrane proteins that are known to undergo ADAM17 shedding and where the processing sites included Ser/Thr residues within ± 4 residues that could represent O-glycosites. We used in vitro GalNAc-T enzyme and ADAM cleavage assays to demonstrate that shedding of at least 12 of these proteins are potentially coregulated by O-glycosylation. Using TNF-α as an example, we confirmed that shedding mediated by ADAM17 is coregulated by O-glycosylation controlled by the GalNAc-T2 isoform both ex vivo in isogenic cell models and in vivo in mouse Galnt2 knockouts. The study provides compelling evidence for a wider role of site-specific O-glycosylation in ectodomain shedding. PMID:26554003

  6. A systematic study of modulation of ADAM-mediated ectodomain shedding by site-specific O-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Goth, Christoffer K; Halim, Adnan; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Rader, Daniel J; Clausen, Henrik; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G

    2015-11-24

    Regulated shedding of the ectodomain of cell membrane proteins by proteases is a common process that releases the extracellular domain from the cell and activates cell signaling. Ectodomain shedding occurs in the immediate extracellular juxtamembrane region, which is also where O-glycosylation is often found and examples of crosstalk between shedding and O-glycosylation have been reported. Here, we systematically investigated the potential of site-specific O-glycosylation mediated by distinct polypeptide GalNAc-transferase (GalNAc-T) isoforms to coregulate ectodomain shedding mediated by the A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM) subfamily of proteases and in particular ADAM17. We analyzed 25 membrane proteins that are known to undergo ADAM17 shedding and where the processing sites included Ser/Thr residues within ± 4 residues that could represent O-glycosites. We used in vitro GalNAc-T enzyme and ADAM cleavage assays to demonstrate that shedding of at least 12 of these proteins are potentially coregulated by O-glycosylation. Using TNF-α as an example, we confirmed that shedding mediated by ADAM17 is coregulated by O-glycosylation controlled by the GalNAc-T2 isoform both ex vivo in isogenic cell models and in vivo in mouse Galnt2 knockouts. The study provides compelling evidence for a wider role of site-specific O-glycosylation in ectodomain shedding. PMID:26554003

  7. Some cross-linguistic evidence for modulation of implicational universals by language-specific frequency effects in phonological development

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jan; Beckman, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    While broad-focus comparisons of consonant inventories across children acquiring different language can suggest that phonological development follows a universal sequence, finer-grained statistical comparisons can reveal systematic differences. This cross-linguistic study of word-initial lingual obstruents examined some effects of language-specific frequencies on consonant mastery. Repetitions of real words were elicited from 2- and 3-year-old children who were monolingual speakers of English, Cantonese, Greek, or Japanese. The repetitions were recorded and transcribed by an adult native speaker for each language. Results found support for both language-universal effects in phonological acquisition and for language-specific influences related to phoneme and phoneme sequence frequency. These results suggest that acquisition patterns that are common across languages arise in two ways. One influence is direct, via the universal constraints imposed by the physiology and physics of speech production and perception, and how these predict which contrasts will be easy and which will be difficult for the child to learn to control. The other influence is indirect, via the way universal principles of ease of perception and production tend to influence the lexicons of many languages through commonly attested sound changes. PMID:19890438

  8. A patient-specific computational model of hypoxia-modulated radiation resistance in glioblastoma using 18F-FMISO-PET

    PubMed Central

    Rockne, Russell C.; Trister, Andrew D.; Jacobs, Joshua; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea J.; Neal, Maxwell L.; Hendrickson, Kristi; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Kinahan, Paul; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Swanson, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive primary brain tumour that has poor prognosis despite aggressive treatment. A hallmark of these tumours is diffuse invasion into the surrounding brain, necessitating a multi-modal treatment approach, including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. We have previously demonstrated the ability of our model to predict radiographic response immediately following radiation therapy in individual GBM patients using a simplified geometry of the brain and theoretical radiation dose. Using only two pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging scans, we calculate net rates of proliferation and invasion as well as radiation sensitivity for a patient's disease. Here, we present the application of our clinically targeted modelling approach to a single glioblastoma patient as a demonstration of our method. We apply our model in the full three-dimensional architecture of the brain to quantify the effects of regional resistance to radiation owing to hypoxia in vivo determined by [18F]-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography (FMISO-PET) and the patient-specific three-dimensional radiation treatment plan. Incorporation of hypoxia into our model with FMISO-PET increases the model–data agreement by an order of magnitude. This improvement was robust to our definition of hypoxia or the degree of radiation resistance quantified with the FMISO-PET image and our computational model, respectively. This work demonstrates a useful application of patient-specific modelling in personalized medicine and how mathematical modelling has the potential to unify multi-modality imaging and radiation treatment planning. PMID:25540239

  9. Progress and prospects of engineered sequence-specific DNA modulating technologies for the management of liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Samantha A; Moyo, Buhle; Arbuthnot, Patrick B

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. The hepatic illnesses, which include inherited metabolic disorders, hemophilias and viral hepatitides, are complex and currently difficult to treat. The maturation of gene therapy has heralded new avenues for developing effective intervention for these diseases. DNA modification using gene therapy is now possible and available technology may be exploited to achieve long term therapeutic benefit. The ability to edit DNA sequences specifically is of paramount importance to advance gene therapy for application to liver diseases. Recent development of technologies that allow for this has resulted in rapid advancement of gene therapy to treat several chronic illnesses. Improvements in application of derivatives of zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), homing endonucleases (HEs) and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated (Cas) systems have been particularly important. These sequence-specific technologies may be used to modify genes permanently and also to alter gene transcription for therapeutic purposes. This review describes progress in development of ZFPs, TALEs, HEs and CRISPR/Cas for application to treating liver diseases. PMID:25937863

  10. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity.

  11. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity. PMID:27698654

  12. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  13. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  14. Cysteine is not a substrate but a specific modulator of human ASCT2 (SLC1A5) transporter.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Pochini, Lorena; Pingitore, Piero; Hedfalk, Kristina; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-11-30

    The Alanine Serine Cysteine Transporter 2 (ASCT2) is involved in balancing the intracellular amino acid pool. This function is allowed by the antiport mechanism and the asymmetric specificity towards different neutral amino acids, distinctive of this transporter. In the present work, the interaction of the putative substrate Cys with the human ASCT2 has been studied using the recombinant hASCT2 over-produced in Pichia pastoris and the native ASCT2 extracted from HeLa in both proteoliposomes and intact cells. It was found that Cys is a potent competitive inhibitor of hASCT2 but is not a substrate. Moreover, Cys binding to a second site, different from that of substrate, triggers a protein-mediated unidirectional Gln efflux.

  15. Early-life nutrition modulates the epigenetic state of specific rDNA genetic variants in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, Michelle L; Lowe, Robert; Caton, Paul W; Gemma, Carolina; Carbajosa, Guillermo; Danson, Amy F; Carpenter, Asha A M; Loche, Elena; Ozanne, Susan E; Rakyan, Vardhman K

    2016-07-29

    A suboptimal early-life environment, due to poor nutrition or stress during pregnancy, can influence lifelong phenotypes in the progeny. Epigenetic factors are thought to be key mediators of these effects. We show that protein restriction in mice from conception until weaning induces a linear correlation between growth restriction and DNA methylation at ribosomal DNA (rDNA). This epigenetic response remains into adulthood and is restricted to rDNA copies associated with a specific genetic variant within the promoter. Related effects are also found in models of maternal high-fat or obesogenic diets. Our work identifies environmentally induced epigenetic dynamics that are dependent on underlying genetic variation and establishes rDNA as a genomic target of nutritional insults.

  16. Early-life nutrition modulates the epigenetic state of specific rDNA genetic variants in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, Michelle L; Lowe, Robert; Caton, Paul W; Gemma, Carolina; Carbajosa, Guillermo; Danson, Amy F; Carpenter, Asha A M; Loche, Elena; Ozanne, Susan E; Rakyan, Vardhman K

    2016-07-29

    A suboptimal early-life environment, due to poor nutrition or stress during pregnancy, can influence lifelong phenotypes in the progeny. Epigenetic factors are thought to be key mediators of these effects. We show that protein restriction in mice from conception until weaning induces a linear correlation between growth restriction and DNA methylation at ribosomal DNA (rDNA). This epigenetic response remains into adulthood and is restricted to rDNA copies associated with a specific genetic variant within the promoter. Related effects are also found in models of maternal high-fat or obesogenic diets. Our work identifies environmentally induced epigenetic dynamics that are dependent on underlying genetic variation and establishes rDNA as a genomic target of nutritional insults. PMID:27386920

  17. Modulation of NMDA receptors by intrathecal administration of the sensory neuron-specific receptor agonist BAM8-22.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingjun; Hu, Zhijing; Quirion, Rémi; Hong, Yanguo

    2008-04-01

    The sensory neuron-specific receptor (SNSR) is exclusively distributed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. We have demonstrated that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of SNSR agonists inhibits formalin-evoked responses and the development of morphine tolerance [Chen, T., Cai, Q., Hong, Y., 2006. Intrathecal sensory neuron-specific receptor agonists bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 and (tyr(6))-gamma2-msh-6-12 inhibit formalin-evoked nociception and neuronal fos-like immunoreactivity in the spinal cord of the rat. Neuroscience 141, 965-975]. The present study was undertaken to examine the possible impact of the activation of SNSR on NMDA receptors. I.t. administration of NMDA (6.8 nmol) induced nociceptive behaviors, including scratching, biting and lifting, followed by thermal hypoalgesia and hyperalgesia. These responses were associated with the expression of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) throughout the spinal dorsal horn with highest effect seen in laminae I-II. I.t. NMDA also induced an increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in superficial layers of the dorsal horn, but not around the central canal, as revealed by NADPH diaphorase histochemistry. Pretreatment with the SNSR agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (3, 10 and 30 nmol) dose-dependently diminished NMDA-evoked nocifensive behaviors and hyperalgesia. This agonist also reduced NMDA-evoked expression of FLI and NADPH reactivity in the spinal dorsal horn. Taken together, these data suggest that the activation of SNSR induces spinal analgesia by suppressing NMDA receptor-mediated activation of spinal dorsal horn neurons and an increase in NOS activity.

  18. Chronic Stress Modulates Regional Cerebral Glucose Transporter Expression in an Age-Specific and Sexually-Dimorphic Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sean D.; Harrell, Constance S.; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2014-01-01

    Facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT) mediate glucose uptake across the blood-brain-barrier into neurons and glia. Deficits in specific cerebral GLUT isoforms are linked to developmental and neurological dysfunction, but less is known about the range of variation in cerebral GLUT expression in normal conditions and the effects of environmental influences on cerebral GLUT expression. Knowing that puberty is a time of increased cerebral plasticity, metabolic demand, and shifts in hormonal balance for males and females, we first assessed gene expression of five GLUT subtypes in four brain regions in male and female adolescent and adult Wistar rats. The data indicated that sex differences in GLUT expression were most profound in the hypothalamus, and the transition from adolescence to adulthood had the most profound effect on GLUT expression in the hippocampus. Next, given the substantial energetic demands during adolescence and prior demonstrations of the adverse effects of adolescent stress, we determined the extent to which chronic stress altered GLUT expression in males and females in both adolescence and adulthood. Chronic stress significantly altered cerebral GLUT expression in males and females throughout both developmental stages but in a sexually dimorphic and brain region-specific manner. Collectively, our data demonstrate that cerebral GLUTs are expressed differentially based on brain region, sex, age, and stress exposure. These results suggest that developmental and environmental factors influence GLUT expression in multiple brain regions. Given the importance of appropriate metabolic balance within the brain, further assessment of the functional implications of life stage and environmentally-induced changes in GLUTs are warranted. PMID:24382486

  19. The cortical modulation of stimulus-specific adaptation in the auditory midbrain and thalamus: a potential neuronal correlate for predictive coding

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, Manuel S.; Anderson, Lucy A.; Antunes, Flora M.

    2015-01-01

    To follow an ever-changing auditory scene, the auditory brain is continuously creating a representation of the past to form expectations about the future. Unexpected events will produce an error in the predictions that should “trigger” the network’s response. Indeed, neurons in the auditory midbrain, thalamus and cortex, respond to rarely occurring sounds while adapting to frequently repeated ones, i.e., they exhibit stimulus specific adaptation (SSA). SSA cannot be explained solely by intrinsic membrane properties, but likely involves the participation of the network. Thus, SSA is envisaged as a high order form of adaptation that requires the influence of cortical areas. However, present research supports the hypothesis that SSA, at least in its simplest form (i.e., to frequency deviants), can be transmitted in a bottom-up manner through the auditory pathway. Here, we briefly review the underlying neuroanatomy of the corticofugal projections before discussing state of the art studies which demonstrate that SSA present in the medial geniculate body (MGB) and inferior colliculus (IC) is not inherited from the cortex but can be modulated by the cortex via the corticofugal pathways. By modulating the gain of neurons in the thalamus and midbrain, the auditory cortex (AC) would refine SSA subcortically, preventing irrelevant information from reaching the cortex. PMID:25805974

  20. Matrix elasticity perturbation and Lamin-A/C expression in stem cells modulate their mechanics and lineage specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovska, Irena; Discher, Dennis

    2012-02-01

    Commitment of stem cells to different lineages is regulated by many cues in their local microenvironment. They are particularly sensitive to the mechanical properties of their extracellular matrix. Nuclear lamins are fibrous proteins providing structural function and transcriptional regulation in the cell nucleus. In particular Lamin A/C levels could influence cellular mechanical sensitivity. Here we show that perturbation of the extracellular matrix and nucleus mechanics can direct stem cells lineage specification. We studied the behavior of human mensechymal stem cells (hMSC) cultured on thin highly ordered collagen nanofilms. To tune the mechanical properties of the nanofilms we used the enzyme transglutaminase as a crosslinking agent. AFM imaging and manipulation is used to examine the nano topography and mechanical properties of the films and cells. Film stiffening affects cells morphology, cytoskeleton organization and their elastic response. hMSCs cultured for two weeks on collagen nanofilms initially tune their stiffness with matrix elasticity but later continuously change it with time. We observed upregulation of osteogenic markers on cross-linked films and increased lamin A/C expression. We show that manipulating Lamin-A/C expression in stem cells also directs cell lineage with knockdown favoring adipogenesis and over expression favoring osteogenesis. We found positive correlation between matrix and nucleus mechanics and that they have a synergistic effect on hMSCs differentiation potential.

  1. The splicing factor SRSF1 modulates pattern formation by inhibiting transcription of tissue specific genes during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Chowon; Kim, Yoo-Kyung; Ismail, Tayaba; Jeong, Youngeun; Park, Kyeongyeon; Park, Jeen-Woo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Dong-Seok; Park, Mae-Ja; Park, Do-Sim; Lee, Hyun-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism regulating pattern of gene expression through the production of multiple mRNAs from a single gene transcript. Any misregulation can cause various human diseases and also have severe effects on embryogenesis. SRSF1 is one of the critical factors regulating alternative splicing at many stages of vertebrate development and any disturbance in SRSF1 leads to serious consequences. In current study, we investigated the effects of loss of the SRSF1 gene using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) in Xenopus embryogenesis. It is evident from the results of RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization that SRSF1 is a maternal gene having strong expression in head, eyes and central nervous system. Moreover, SRSF1 morphants exhibited malformed phenotypes, including miscoiled guts, heart and cartilage formation, edema in the head and heart, and small eyes. Especially, in SRSF1 morphants, bone cartilage formation was reduced in the brain and Nkx-2.5 expression was dramatically reduced in the heart of SRSF1 morphants. In addition, a dramatic reduction in functional chordin RNA in SRSF1 morphants was observed suggesting that chordin is one of the targets of SRSF1. Thus, we concluded that SRSF1 is an essential factor for pattern formation including heart, cartilage and germ layers through the regulation of specific genes. PMID:27396620

  2. Ubiquitin-specific protease 11 functions as a tumor suppressor by modulating Mgl-1 protein to regulate cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Suresh, Bharathi; Park, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Soo; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) gene encodes a cortical cytoskeleton protein, Lgl, and is involved in maintaining cell polarity and epithelial integrity. Previously, we observed that Mgl-1, a mammalian homologue of the Drosophila tumor suppressor protein Lgl, is subjected to degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and scaffolding protein RanBPM prevents the turnover of the Mgl-1 protein. Consequently, overexpression of RanBPM enhances Mgl-1-mediated cell proliferation and migration. Here, we analyzed the ability of ubiquitin-specific protease 11 (USP11) as a novel regulator of Mgl-1 and it requires RanBPM to regulate proteasomal degradation of Mgl-1. USP11 showed deubiquitinating activity and stabilized Mgl-1 protein. However, USP11-mediated Mgl-1 stabilization was inhibited in RanBPM-knockdown cells. Furthermore, in the cancer cell migration, the regulation of Mgl-1 by USP11 required RanBPM expression. In addition, an in vivo study revealed that depletion of USP11 leads to tumor formation. Taken together, the results indicated that USP11 functions as a tumor suppressor through the regulation of Mgl-1 protein degradation via RanBPM. PMID:26919101

  3. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boccella, Serena; Vacca, Valentina; Errico, Francesco; Marinelli, Sara; Squillace, Marta; Di Maio, Anna; Vitucci, Daniela; Palazzo, Enza; De Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Pavone, Flaminia; Usiello, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO). D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/−) or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS) neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6) and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions. PMID:25629055

  4. SUMO-specific protease 1 modulates cadmium-augmented transcriptional activity of androgen receptor (AR) by reversing AR SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruiqin; Cui, Yaxiong; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Haitao; Wang, Yimei; He, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Peng, Shuangqing

    2014-09-01

    Cadmium is a potential prostate carcinogen and can mimic the effects of androgen by a mechanism that involves the hormone-binding domain of the androgen receptor (AR), which is a key transcriptional factor in prostate carcinogenesis. We focused on transcriptional activity of AR to investigate the toxicity of cadmium exposure on human prostate cell lines. Cadmium increased the proliferative index of LNCaP and the proliferative effect was obstructed significantly by AR blocking agent. In luciferase assay, cadmium activated the transcriptional activity of AR in 293T cells co-transfected with wild-type AR and an ARE (AR response elements)-luciferase reporter gene. Cadmium also increased expression of PSA, a downstream gene of AR, whereas the metal had no significant effect on AR amount. AR is regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications including SUMOylation. SUMOylated AR shows a lower transcriptional activity. SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) decreases AR SUMOylation by deconjugating AR-SUMO covalent bond. We detected that cadmium increased the amount of SENP1 in a dose and time dependent manner. Knocking down of SENP1 by RNAi led to decrease of PSA expression and transcriptional activity of AR in luciferase assay. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) results showed that SUMOylation level of AR was decreased after cadmium treatment. In conclusion, our results indicated that cadmium-induced SENP1 enhanced AR transcriptional activity by decreasing AR SUMOylation.

  5. Modulation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling and Specific Glucocorticoid Receptor Phosphorylation in the Treatment of Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Jovicic, Milica J.; Lukic, Iva; Radojcic, Marija; Adzic, Miroslav; Maric, Nadja P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid resistance is a common finding in major depressive disorder. Increased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) phosphorylation at serine 226 is associated with increased glucocorticoid resistance. Previously we have demonstrated that depressed patients exhibit higher levels of GR phosphorylated at serine 226 compared to healthy controls. The enzyme that is involved in this specific GR phosphorylation is c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase (JNK). We propose that modulation of glucocorticoid phosphorylation at serine 226, by targeting JNK signaling pathway, could be a potential strategy for antidepressant treatment. We base this assumption on the results of previous research that examined GR phosphorylation and JNK signaling in animal models and human studies. We also discuss the potential challenges in targeting JNK signaling pathway in depression. PMID:26052031

  6. Identification of cytokine-induced modulation of microRNA expression and secretion as measured by a novel microRNA specific qPCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Benes, Vladimir; Collier, Paul; Kordes, Claus; Stolte, Jens; Rausch, Tobias; Muckentaler, Martina U.; Häussinger, Dieter; Castoldi, Mirco

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs are an abundant class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression post-transcriptionally. Importantly, microRNA activity participates in the regulation of cellular processes and is a potentially valuable source of biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Here we introduce miQPCR, an innovative method to quantify microRNAs expression by using Real-Time PCR. miQPCR exploits T4 RNA ligase activities to extend uniformly microRNAs’ 3′-ends by addition of a linker-adapter. The adapter is then used as ‘anchor’ to prime cDNA synthesis and throughout qPCR to amplify specifically target amplicons. miQPCR is an open, adaptable and cost-effective procedure, which offers the following advantages; i) universal elongation and reverse transcription of all microRNAs; ii) Tm-adjustment of microRNA-specific primers; iii) high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating among closely related sequences and; iv) suitable for the analysis of cellular and cell-free circulating microRNAs. Analysis of cellular and cell-free circulating microRNAs secreted by rat primary hepatocytes stimulated with cytokines and growth factors identifies for the first time a widespread modulation of both microRNAs expression and secretion. Altogether, our findings suggest that the pleiotropic activity of humoral factors on microRNAs may extensively affect liver function in response to injury and regeneration. PMID:26108880

  7. Inducible knock-down of GNOM during root formation reveals tissue-specific response to auxin transport and its modulation of local auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingzhe; Wei, Jun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    In plants, active transport of auxin plays an essential role in root development. Localization of the PIN1 auxin transporters to the basal membrane of cells directs auxin flow and depends on the trafficking mediator GNOM. GNOM-dependent auxin transport is vital for root development and thus offers a useful tool for the investigation of a possible tissue-specific response to dynamic auxin transport. To avoid pleiotropic effects, DEX-inducible expression of GNOM antisense RNA was used to disrupt GNOM expression transiently or persistently during embryonic root development. It was found that the elongation zone and the pericycle layer are the most sensitive to GNOM-dependent auxin transport variations, which is shown by the phenotypes in cell elongation and the initiation of lateral root primordia, respectively. This suggests that auxin dynamics is critical to cell differentiation and cell fate transition, but not to cell division. The results also reveal that GNOM-dependent auxin transport could affect local auxin biosynthesis. This suggests that local auxin biosynthesis may also contribute to the establishment of GNOM-dependent auxin gradients in specific tissues, and that auxin transport and local auxin biosynthesis may function together in the regulatory network for initiation and development of lateral root primordia. Thus, the data reveal a tissue-specific response to auxin transport and modulation of local auxin biosynthesis by auxin transport.

  8. Different modulation of the outputs of yeast MAPK-mediated pathways by distinct stimuli and isoforms of the dual-specificity phosphatase Msg5.

    PubMed

    Marín, María José; Flández, Marta; Bermejo, Clara; Arroyo, Javier; Martín, Humberto; Molina, María

    2009-03-01

    The activity of protein phosphatases on mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKS) is essential in the modulation of the final outcome of MAPK-signalling pathways. The yeast dual-specificity phosphatase (DSP) Msg5, expressed as two isoforms of different length, dephosphorylates the MAPKs of mating and cell integrity pathways, Fus3 and Slt2, respectively, but its action on the MAPK Kss1 is unclear. Here we analyse the global impact of Msg5 on the yeast transcriptome. Both Fus3- and Slt2- but not Kss1-mediated gene expression is induced in cells lacking Msg5. However, although these cells show high Slt2 phosphorylation, the Rlm1-dependent Slt2-regulated transcriptional response is weak. Therefore, mechanisms concomitant with Slt2 phosphorylation are required for a strong Rlm1 activation. The limited Slt2 activity on Rlm1 is not a specific effect on this substrate but a consequence of its low kinase activity in msg5Delta cells. Lack of Msg5 does not increase Kss1 phosphorylation although both proteins physically interact. Both Msg5 isoforms interact similarly with Slt2, whereas the long form binds Fus3 with higher affinity and consequently down-regulates it more efficiently than the short one. We propose that specific binding of DSP isoforms to distinct MAPKs provides a novel mechanism for fine tuning different pathways by the same phosphatase. PMID:19123063

  9. Silibinin attenuates antigen-specific IgE production through the modulation of Th1/Th2 balance in ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fu-Hua; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2009-03-01

    The effect of silibinin on antigen-specific antibody production and T-cell cytokine expression was investigated. BALB/c mice were either left untreated or administered daily with vehicle (VH; saline) and/or silibinin (200 or 400 mg/kg) by gavage for 3 consecutive days prior to sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA). The antibody production in the serum and T-cell-derived cytokine expression by splenocytes were determined 7 days post OVA sensitization. Our results demonstrated that the production of OVA-specific serum IgE and total IgE was significantly attenuated by silibinin treatment, whereas OVA-specific IgG(2a) was markedly enhanced. In parallel with the differential modulation of the production of IgG(2a) and IgE, treatment of OVA-sensitized mice with silibinin markedly increased and decreased the production of IFN-gamma and IL-4, respectively, by splenocytes cultured in the presence of OVA. Together, these results suggest that silibinin treatment polarizes the Th1/Th2 immune balance toward the Th1-dominant direction, which may be beneficial against IgE-mediated allergy.

  10. In vitro selection of state-specific peptide modulators of G protein signaling using mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Ja, William W; Roberts, Richard W

    2004-07-20

    The G protein regulatory (GPR) motif is a approximately 20-residue conserved domain that acts as a guanine dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for G(i/o)(alpha) subunits. Here, we describe the isolation of peptides derived from a GPR consensus sequence using mRNA display selection libraries. Biotinylated G(i)(alpha)(1), modified at either the N or C terminus, serves as a high-affinity binding target for mRNA-displayed GPR peptides. In vitro selection using mRNA display libraries based on the C terminus of the GPR motif revealed novel peptide sequences with conserved residues. Surprisingly, selected peptides contain mutations to a highly conserved Arg in the GPR motif, previously shown to be crucial for binding and inhibition activities. The dominant peptide from the selection, R6A, and a minimal 9-mer peptide, R6A-1, do not contain Arg residues yet retain high affinity (K(D) = 60 and 200 nM, respectively) and specificity for the GDP-bound state of G(i)(alpha)(1), as measured by surface plasmon resonance. The selected peptides also maintain GDI activity for G(i)(alpha)(1), inhibiting both the exchange of GDP in GTPgammaS binding assays and the AlF(4)(-)-stimulated enhancement of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The kinetics of GDI activity, however, are different for the selected peptides and demonstrate biphasic kinetics, suggesting a complex mechanism for inhibition. Like the GPR motif, the R6A and R6A-1 peptides compete with G(betagamma) subunits for binding to G(i)(alpha)(1), suggesting their use as activators of G(betagamma) signaling. PMID:15248784

  11. Substrate-specific modulation of CYP3A4 activity by genetic variants of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR)

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vishal; Choi, Ji Ha; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Miller, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives CYP3A4 receives electrons from P450 oxidoreductase (POR) to metabolize about 50% of clinically used drugs. There is substantial inter-individual variation in CYP3A4 catalytic activity that is not explained by CYP3A4 genetic variants. CYP3A4 is flexible and distensible, permitting it to accommodate substrates varying in shape and size. To elucidate mechanisms of variability in CYP3A4 catalysis, we examined the effects of genetic variants of POR, and explored the possibility that substrate-induced conformational changes in CYP3A4 differentially affect the ability of POR variants to support catalysis. Methods We expressed human CYP3A4 and four POR variants (Q153R, A287P, R457H, A503V) in bacteria, reconstituted them in vitro and measured the Michaelis constant and maximum velocity with testosterone, midazolam, quinidine and erythromycin as substrates. Results POR A287P and R457H had low activity with all substrates; Q153R had 76–94% of wild type (WT) activity with midazolam and erythromycin, but 129–150% activity with testosterone and quinidine. The A503V polymorphism reduced CYP3A4 activity to 61–77% of wild type with testosterone and midazolam, but had nearly wild type activity with quinidine and erythromycin. Conclusion POR variants affect CYP3A4 activities. The impact of a POR variant on catalysis by CYP3A4 is substrate-specific, probably due to substrate-induced conformational changes in CYP3A4. PMID:20697309

  12. Human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatases: sugar-moiety-induced enzymic and antigenic modulations and genetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Nosjean, O; Koyama, I; Goseki, M; Roux, B; Komoda, T

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the possible role(s) of glycans in human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity, the iso-enzymes were purified and treated with various exo- and endo-glycosidases. Catalytic activity, oligomerization, conformation and immunoreactivity of the modified TNAPs were evaluated. All TNAPs proved to be N-glycosylated, and only the liver isoform (LAP) is not O-glycosylated. Usually, the kidney (KAP) and bone (BAP) isoenzymes are similar and cannot be clearly discriminated. Differences between the immunoreactivity of KAP/BAP and LAP with a BAP antibody were mainly attributed to the N-glycosylated moieties of the TNAPs. In addition, elimination of O-glycosylations moderately affects the TNAP reactivity. Interestingly, N-glycosylation is absolutely essential for TNAP activity, but not for that of the placental or intestinal enzymes. According to the deduced amino acid sequence of TNAP cDNA, Asn-213 is a possible N-glycosylation site, and our present findings suggest that this sugar chain plays a key role in enzyme regulation. With regard to the oligomeric state of alkaline phosphatase (AP) isoforms, the dimer/tetramer equilibrium is dependent on the deglycosylation of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol(GPI)-free APs, but not GPI-linked APs. This equilibrium does not affect the AP conformation as observed with CD. With regard to TNAPs, no data were available on the gene expression or nature of the 5'-non-translated leader exon of human KAP, as opposed to BAP and LAP genes. cDNA sequencing revealed that cortex/medulla KAP is genetically related to BAP, and medulla KAP to LAP. PMID:9020858

  13. A cardiac-specific health-related quality of life module for young adults with congenital heart disease: development and validation.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, M; Zwinderman, K H; Vogels, T; Vliegen, H W; Kamphuis, R P; Ottenkamp, J; Verloove-Vanhorick, S P; Bruil, J

    2004-05-01

    This study represents the development and validation of a cardiac-specific module of the generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, the TAAQOL (TNO/AZL Adult Quality Of Life), for young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Items were selected based on literature, an explorative previous study in CHD patients, interviews with patients, and the advice of experts. The newly developed Congenital Heart Disease-TNO/AZL Adult Quality of Life (CHD-TAAQOL) was tested in 156 patients with mild or complex CHD and consisted of three hypothesised subject scales: 'Symptoms' (9 items), 'Impact Cardiac Surveillance' (7 items), and 'Worries' (10 items). Cronbach's alpha for the three scales were 0.77, 0.78, and 0.82, respectively. Scale structure was confirmed by Principal Component Analysis, corrected item-scale and interscale correlations. Overall, 55% of reported health status problems were associated with negative emotions, which is an argument for assessing HRQoL as a concept distinct from health status. Convergent validity with validated generic instruments (TAAQOL and Short Form-36, SF-36) showed satisfactory coefficients. Discriminant validity was proven by significantly higher scores for mild CHD patients compared with those with complex CHD. In conclusion, the CHD-TAAQOL module together with the generic TAAQOL can be used to assess group differences for cardiac-specific HRQoL in young adults with CHD. Testing psychometric properties of the CHD-TAAQOL shows satisfactory results. However, to detect changes in HRQoL over time, further research is needed.

  14. SU-E-T-424: Dosimetric Verification of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Delivered Using An Electron Specific Multileaf Collimator for Treatment of Scalp Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Eldib, A; Jin, L; Martin, J; Li, J; Chibani, O; Galloway, T; Ma, C; Mora, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has the potential to achieve better treatment outcome for shallow tumors such as those of breast and scalp. In a separate study with scalp lesions, MERT was compared to volumetric modulated arc therapy. Our results showed a reduction in the dose reaching the brain with MERT. However dose calculation accuracy and delivery efficiency challenges remain. Thus in the current study we proceed to add more cases to demonstrate MERT beneficial outcome and its delivery accuracy using an electron specific multileaf collimator (eMLC). Methods: We have used the MCBEAM code for treatment head simulation and for generating phase space files to be used as radiation source input for our Monte Carlo based treatment planning system (MC TPS). MCPLAN code is used for calculation of patient specific dose deposition coefficient and for final MERT plan dose calculation. An in-house developed optimization code is used for the optimization process. MERT plans were generated for real patients and head and neck phantom. Film was used for dosimetric verification. The film was cut following the contour of the curved phantom surface and then sealed with black masking tape. In the measurement, the sealed film packet was sandwiched between two adjacent slabs of the head and neck phantom. The measured 2D dose distribution was then compared with calculations. Results: The eMLC allows effective treatment of scalps with multi-lesions spreading around the patient head, which was usually difficult to plan or very time consuming with conventional applicators. MERT continues to show better reduction in the brain dose. The dosimetric measurements showed slight discrepancy, which was attributed to the film setup. Conclusion: MERT can improve treatment plan quality for patients with scalp cancers. Our in-house MC TPS is capable of performing treatment planning and accurate dose calculation for MERT using the eMLC.

  15. Region-specific modulation of PER2 expression in the limbic forebrain and hypothalamus by nighttime restricted feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Khoja, Zehra; Stewart, Jane; Amir, Shimon

    2008-07-25

    energy balance and vary as a function of time of day in a brain region-specific manner.

  16. Addressing Standards and Assessments on the IEP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandra J.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Esler, Amy; Whetstone, Patti J.

    2001-01-01

    A study that examined state Individualized Education Program (IEP) forms found that out of the 41 with IEP forms, only 5 specifically addressed educational standards on their forms. Thirty-one states addressed the general curriculum on their IEP forms and 30 states listed three or more options for assessment participation. (Contains nine…

  17. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  18. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  19. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  20. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    pools of neurons that may modulate specific cortical areas.

  1. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    pools of neurons that may modulate specific cortical areas. PMID:27147975

  2. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    pools of neurons that may modulate specific cortical areas. PMID:27147975

  3. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), “Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities—Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015”, we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  4. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), "Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities-Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015", we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  5. Specific combinations of the chromatin-modifying enzyme modulators significantly attenuate glioblastoma cell proliferation and viability while exerting minimal effect on normal adult stem cells growth.

    PubMed

    Alexanian, Arshak R; Huang, Yi-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The discoveries of recent decade showed that all critical changes in cancer cells, such as silencing of tumor-suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes, are caused not only by genetic but also by epigenetic mechanisms. Although epigenetic changes are somatically heritable, in contrast to genetic changes, they are potentially reversible, making them good targets for therapeutic intervention. Covalent modifications of chromatin such as methylation and acetylation of histones and methylation of DNA are the important components of epigenetic machinery. In this study, we investigated the effect of different modulators of DNA and histone covalent-modifying enzymes on the proliferation and viability of normal adult stem cells, such as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), and on malignant tumor cells, such as glioblastoma (GB) D54 cells. Results demonstrated that specific combinations of histone methyltransferases and deacetylases inhibitors significantly attenuated D54 cells viability but having only a small effect on hMSCs growth. Taken together, these studies suggest that specific combinations of histone covalent modifiers could be an effective treatment option for the most aggressive type of primary brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme.

  6. DAN (NBL1) specifically antagonizes BMP2 and BMP4 and modulates the actions of GDF9, BMP2, and BMP4 in the rat ovary.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Ting; Wu, Fang-Ju; Wang, Chun-Jen; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2012-05-01

    Although differential screening-selected gene aberrative in neuroblastoma (DAN, official symbol NBL1) is the founding member of the DAN subfamily of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists, its antagonizing targets, gene regulation, and physiological functions remain unclear. Using diverse cell expression systems, we found that the generation of bioactive DAN is likely to be cell type specific. Unlike other phylogenetically close members, which are covalently linked homodimers, DAN forms a noncovalently linked homodimer during folding. Purified recombinant DAN specifically blocked signaling of BMP2 and BMP4 but not that of other ovarian-expressed transforming growth factor-beta members. Although widely distributed in many organs, DAN transcript level was periodically regulated by gonadotropins. Ovarian microdissection indicated that NBL1 (DAN) mRNA is mainly expressed in granulosa cells, where its transcript level is up-regulated by the gonadotropin-driven cAMP cascade. We further investigated the local regulation and ovarian functions of DAN. NBL1 (DAN) mRNA expression in granulosa cells was up-regulated by oocyte-derived growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), whereas treatment with DAN significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of BMP4 on follicle-stimulating hormone-induced progesterone production in cultured granulosa cells. Our findings suggest the DAN gradient in granulosa cells, established by oocyte-derived GDF9, may serve as an antagonist barrier that modulates the actions of theca-derived BMP4 and granulosa/theca-derived BMP2 during folliculogenesis both spatially and temporally.

  7. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  8. Bax: Addressed to kill.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Manon, Stéphen

    2011-09-01

    The pro-apoptototic protein Bax (Bcl-2 Associated protein X) plays a central role in the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. In healthy mammalian cells, Bax is essentially cytosolic and inactive. Following a death signal, the protein is translocated to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it promotes a permeabilization that favors the release of different apoptogenic factors, such as cytochrome c. The regulation of Bax translocation is associated to conformational changes that are under the control of different factors. The evidences showing the involvement of different Bax domains in its mitochondrial localization are presented. The interactions between Bax and its different partners are described in relation to their ability to promote (or prevent) Bax conformational changes leading to mitochondrial addressing and to the acquisition of the capacity to permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:21641962

  9. Modulational effects in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T.

    1997-12-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed.

  10. [Keynote address: Climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Forrister, D.

    1994-12-31

    Broadly speaking, the climate issue is moving from talk to action both in the United States and internationally. While few nations have adopted strict controls or stiff new taxes, a number of them are developing action plans that are making clear their intention to ramp up activity between now and the year 2000... and beyond. There are sensible, economically efficient strategies to be undertaken in the near term that offer the possibility, in many countries, to avoid more draconian measures. These strategies are by-and-large the same measures that the National Academy of Sciences recommended in a 1991 report called, Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. The author thinks the Academy`s most important policy contribution was how it recommended the nations act in the face of uncertain science and high risks--that cost effective measures are adopted as cheap insurance... just as nations insure against other high risk, low certainty possibilities, like catastrophic health insurance, auto insurance, and fire insurance. This insurance theme is still right. First, the author addresses how the international climate change negotiations are beginning to produce insurance measures. Next, the author will discuss some of the key issues to watch in those negotiations that relate to longer-term insurance. And finally, the author will report on progress in the United States on the climate insurance plan--The President`s Climate Action Plan.

  11. Patent filarial infection modulates malaria-specific type 1 cytokine responses in an IL-10-dependent manner in a filaria/malaria-coinfected population.

    PubMed

    Metenou, Simon; Dembélé, Benoit; Konate, Siaka; Dolo, Housseini; Coulibaly, Siaka Y; Coulibaly, Yaya I; Diallo, Abdallah A; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Michel E; Sanogo, Dramane; Doumbia, Salif S; Wagner, Marissa; Traoré, Sekou F; Klion, Amy; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nutman, Thomas B

    2009-07-15

    The effect of filarial infections on malaria-specific immune responses was investigated in Malian villages coendemic for filariasis (Fil) and malaria. Cytokines were measured from plasma and Ag-stimulated whole blood from individuals with Wuchereria bancrofti and/or Mansonella perstans infections (Fil(+); n = 19) and those without evidence of filarial infection (Fil(-); n = 19). Plasma levels of IL-10 (geometric mean [GM], 22.8 vs 10.4) were higher in Fil(+) compared with Fil(-), whereas levels of IFN-inducible protein (IP)-10 were lower in Fil(+) (GM, 66.3 vs 110.0). Fil(+) had higher levels of spontaneously secreted IL-10 (GM, 59.3 vs 6.8 pg/ml) and lower levels of IL-2 (1.0 vs 1.2 pg/ml) than did Fil(-). Although there were no differences in levels of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B-induced cytokines between the two groups, Fil(+) mounted lower IL-12p70 (GM, 1.11 vs 3.83 pg/ml; p = 0.007), IFN-gamma (GM, 5.44 vs 23.41 pg/ml; p = 0.009), and IP-10 (GM, 29.43 vs 281.7 pg/ml; p = 0.007) responses following malaria Ag (MalAg) stimulation compared with Fil(-). In contrast, Fil(+) individuals had a higher MalAg-specific IL-10 response (GM, 7318 pg/ml vs 3029 pg/ml; p = 0.006) compared with those without filarial infection. Neutralizing Ab to IL-10 (but not to TGFbeta) reversed the down-regulated MalAg-specific IFN-gamma and IP-10 (p < 0.001) responses in Fil(+). Together, these data demonstrate that filarial infections modulate the Plasmodium falciparum-specific IL-12p70/IFN-gamma secretion pathways known to play a key role in resistance to malaria and that they do so in an IL-10-dependent manner. PMID:19561105

  12. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  13. Isoform-specific modulation of the chemical sensitivity of conserved TRPA1 channel in the major honeybee ectoparasitic mite, Tropilaelaps mercedesae

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaofeng; Kashio, Makiko; Peng, Guangda; Wang, Xinyue; Tominaga, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We identified and characterized the TRPA1 channel of Tropilaelaps mercedesae (TmTRPA1), one of two major species of honeybee ectoparasitic mite. Three TmTRPA1 isoforms with unique N-terminal sequences were activated by heat, and the isoform highly expressed in the mite's front legs, TmTRPA1b, was also activated by 27 plant-derived compounds including electrophiles. This suggests that the heat- and electrophile-dependent gating mechanisms as nocisensitive TRPA1 channel are well conserved between arthropod species. Intriguingly, one TmTRPA1 isoform, TmTRPA1a, was activated by only six compounds compared with two other isoforms, demonstrating that the N-terminal sequences are critical determinants for the chemical sensitivity. This is the first example of isoform-specific modulation of chemical sensitivity of TRPA1 channel in one species. α-terpineol showed repellent activity towards T. mercedesae in a laboratory assay and repressed T. mercedesae entry for reproduction into the brood cells with fifth instar larvae in hives. Thus, α-terpineol could be used as the potential compound to control two major honeybee ectoparasitic mites, T. mercedesae and Varroa destructor, in the apiculture industry. PMID:27307515

  14. Isoform-Specific Modulation of Inflammation Induced by Adenoviral Mediated Delivery of Platelet-Derived Growth Factors in the Adult Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Betsholtz, Christer; Andrae, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are key regulators of mesenchymal cells in vertebrate development. To what extent PDGFs also exert beneficial homeostatic or reparative roles in adult organs, as opposed to adverse fibrogenic responses in pathology, are unclear. PDGF signaling plays critical roles during heart development, during which forced overexpression of PDGFs induces detrimental cardiac fibrosis; other studies have implicated PDGF signaling in post-infarct myocardial repair. Different PDGFs may exert different effects mediated through the two PDGF receptors (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) in different cell types. Here, we assessed responses induced by five known PDGF isoforms in the adult mouse heart in the context of adenovirus vector-mediated inflammation. Our results show that different PDGFs have different, in some cases even opposing, effects. Strikingly, whereas the major PDGFRα agonists (PDGF-A and -C) decreased the amount of scar tissue and increased the numbers of PDGFRα-positive fibroblasts, PDGFRβ agonists either induced large scars with extensive inflammation (PDGF-B) or dampened the adenovirus-induced inflammation and produced a small and dense scar (PDGF-D). These results provide evidence for PDGF isoform-specific inflammation-modulating functions that may have therapeutic implications. They also illustrate a surprising complexity in the PDGF-mediated pathophysiological responses. PMID:27513343

  15. Isoform-specific modulation of the chemical sensitivity of conserved TRPA1 channel in the major honeybee ectoparasitic mite, Tropilaelaps mercedesae.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaofeng; Kashio, Makiko; Peng, Guangda; Wang, Xinyue; Tominaga, Makoto; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    We identified and characterized the TRPA1 channel of Tropilaelaps mercedesae (TmTRPA1), one of two major species of honeybee ectoparasitic mite. Three TmTRPA1 isoforms with unique N-terminal sequences were activated by heat, and the isoform highly expressed in the mite's front legs, TmTRPA1b, was also activated by 27 plant-derived compounds including electrophiles. This suggests that the heat- and electrophile-dependent gating mechanisms as nocisensitive TRPA1 channel are well conserved between arthropod species. Intriguingly, one TmTRPA1 isoform, TmTRPA1a, was activated by only six compounds compared with two other isoforms, demonstrating that the N-terminal sequences are critical determinants for the chemical sensitivity. This is the first example of isoform-specific modulation of chemical sensitivity of TRPA1 channel in one species. α-terpineol showed repellent activity towards T. mercedesae in a laboratory assay and repressed T. mercedesae entry for reproduction into the brood cells with fifth instar larvae in hives. Thus, α-terpineol could be used as the potential compound to control two major honeybee ectoparasitic mites, T. mercedesae and Varroa destructor, in the apiculture industry. PMID:27307515

  16. Identification of specific recognition molecules on murine mononuclear phagocytes and B lymphocytes for Vi capsular polysaccharide: modulation of MHC class II expression on stimulation with the polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, A

    1997-01-01

    Vi bacterial polysaccharide is a homopolymer of alpha 1-4 N-acetyl polygalacturonic acid with variable O-acetylation at position C-3 and forms a capsule around many bacteria. It has been referred to as the virulence factor of Salmonella typhi and is also a candidate vaccine against typhoid fever. The present study reports the interaction of this polysaccharide with murine mononuclear phagocytes and lymphocytes, and with human monocytes. Vi showed a dose-dependent binding to the murine monocyte cell lines WEHI-274.1 and J774. This binding was abrogated if the polysaccharide was deacetylated, suggesting involvement of acetyl groups in this interaction. Vi also bound to the murine B-cell lymphoma line A20, to peritoneal exudate cells and to a lesser degree to spleen cells and thymocytes from BALB/c mice. The polysaccharide also interacted with the human histiocytic lymphoma line U937 but not with the human monocyte cell line THP-1. Stimulation with Vi led to up-regulation of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression on A20 cells. Immunoprecipitation of Vi-bound molecules from cell surface biotinylated A20 and WEHI-274.1 revealed two bands with MW of about 32,000 and 36,000. The study demonstrates that Vi capsular polysaccharide can interact with mononuclear phagocytes and lymphocytes through specific cell surface molecules and modulate MHC class II expression. Images Figure 5 PMID:9370937

  17. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  18. Pantomiming tool use with an imaginary tool in hand as compared to demonstration with tool in hand specifically modulates the left middle and superior temporal gyri.

    PubMed

    Lausberg, Hedda; Kazzer, Philipp; Heekeren, Hauke R; Wartenburger, Isabell

    2015-10-01

    Neuropsychological lesion studies evidence the necessity to differentiate between various forms of tool-related actions such as real tool use, tool use demonstration with tool in hand and without physical target object, and pantomime without tool in hand. However, thus far, neuroimaging studies have primarily focused only on investigating tool use pantomimes. The present fMRI study investigates pantomime without tool in hand as compared to tool use demonstration with tool in hand in order to explore patterns of cerebral signal modulation associated with acting with imaginary tools in hand. Fifteen participants performed with either hand (i) tool use pantomime with an imaginary tool in hand in response to visual tool presentation and (ii) tool use demonstration with tool in hand in response to visual-tactile tool presentation. In both conditions, no physical target object was present. The conjunction analysis of the right and left hands executions of tool use pantomime relative to tool use demonstration yielded significant activity in the left middle and superior temporal lobe. In contrast, demonstration relative to pantomime revealed large bihemispherically distributed homologous areas of activity. Thus far, fMRI studies have demonstrated the relevance of the left middle and superior temporal gyri in viewing, naming, and matching tools and related actions and contexts. Since in our study all these factors were equally (ir)relevant both in the tool use pantomime and the tool use demonstration conditions, the present findings enhance the knowledge about the function of these brain regions in tool-related cognitive processes. The two contrasted conditions only differ regarding the fact that the pantomime condition requires the individual to act with an imaginary tool in hand. Therefore, we suggest that the left middle and superior temporal gyri are specifically involved in integrating the projected mental image of a tool in the execution of a tool-specific movement

  19. Oviduct-specific glycoprotein and heparin modulate sperm–zona pellucida interaction during fertilization and contribute to the control of polyspermy

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Pilar; Cánovas, Sebastián; Mondéjar, Irene; Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Romar, Raquel; Grullón, Luis; Matás, Carmen; Avilés, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Polyspermy is an important anomaly of fertilization in placental mammals, causing premature death of the embryo. It is especially frequent under in vitro conditions, complicating the successful generation of viable embryos. A block to polyspermy develops as a result of changes after sperm entry (i.e., cortical granule exocytosis). However, additional factors may play an important role in regulating polyspermy by acting on gametes before sperm–oocyte interaction. Most studies have used rodents as models, but ungulates may differ in mechanisms preventing polyspermy. We hypothesize that zona pellucida (ZP) changes during transit of the oocyte along the oviductal ampulla modulate the interaction with spermatozoa, contributing to the regulation of polyspermy. We report here that periovulatory oviductal fluid (OF) from sows and heifers increases (both, con- and heterospecifically) ZP resistance to digestion with pronase (a parameter commonly used to measure the block to polyspermy), changing from digestion times of ≈1 min (pig) or 2 min (cattle) to 45 min (pig) or several hours (cattle). Exposure of oocytes to OF increases monospermy after in vitro fertilization in both species, and in pigs, sperm–ZP binding decreases. The resistance of OF-exposed oocytes to pronase was abolished by exposure to heparin-depleted medium; in a medium with heparin it was not altered. Proteomic analysis of the content released in the heparin-depleted medium after removal of OF-exposed oocytes allowed the isolation and identification of oviduct-specific glycoprotein. Thus, an oviduct-specific glycoprotein–heparin protein complex seems to be responsible for ZP changes in the oviduct before fertilization, affecting sperm binding and contributing to the regulation of polyspermy. PMID:18838686

  20. Pantomiming tool use with an imaginary tool in hand as compared to demonstration with tool in hand specifically modulates the left middle and superior temporal gyri.

    PubMed

    Lausberg, Hedda; Kazzer, Philipp; Heekeren, Hauke R; Wartenburger, Isabell

    2015-10-01

    Neuropsychological lesion studies evidence the necessity to differentiate between various forms of tool-related actions such as real tool use, tool use demonstration with tool in hand and without physical target object, and pantomime without tool in hand. However, thus far, neuroimaging studies have primarily focused only on investigating tool use pantomimes. The present fMRI study investigates pantomime without tool in hand as compared to tool use demonstration with tool in hand in order to explore patterns of cerebral signal modulation associated with acting with imaginary tools in hand. Fifteen participants performed with either hand (i) tool use pantomime with an imaginary tool in hand in response to visual tool presentation and (ii) tool use demonstration with tool in hand in response to visual-tactile tool presentation. In both conditions, no physical target object was present. The conjunction analysis of the right and left hands executions of tool use pantomime relative to tool use demonstration yielded significant activity in the left middle and superior temporal lobe. In contrast, demonstration relative to pantomime revealed large bihemispherically distributed homologous areas of activity. Thus far, fMRI studies have demonstrated the relevance of the left middle and superior temporal gyri in viewing, naming, and matching tools and related actions and contexts. Since in our study all these factors were equally (ir)relevant both in the tool use pantomime and the tool use demonstration conditions, the present findings enhance the knowledge about the function of these brain regions in tool-related cognitive processes. The two contrasted conditions only differ regarding the fact that the pantomime condition requires the individual to act with an imaginary tool in hand. Therefore, we suggest that the left middle and superior temporal gyri are specifically involved in integrating the projected mental image of a tool in the execution of a tool-specific movement

  1. Spatial Light Amplifier Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Sverre T.; Olsson, N. Anders

    1992-01-01

    Spatial light amplifier modulators (SLAM's) are conceptual devices that effect two-dimensional spatial modulation in optical computing and communication systems. Unlike current spatial light modulators, these provide gain. Optical processors incorporating SLAM's designed to operate in reflection or transmission mode. Each element of planar SLAM array is optical amplifier - surface-emitting diode laser. Array addressed electrically with ac modulating signals superimposed on dc bias currents supplied to lasers. SLAM device provides both desired modulation and enough optical gain to enable splitting of output signal into many optical fibers without excessive loss of power.

  2. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  3. Addressing psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Woody, G E; McLellan, A T; O'Brien, C P; Luborsky, L

    1991-01-01

    Research studies indicate that addressing psychiatric comorbidity can improve treatment for selected groups of substance-abusing patients. However, the chances for implementing the necessary techniques on a large scale are compromised by the absence of professional input and guidance within programs. This is especially true in public programs, which treat some of the most disadvantaged, disturbed, and socially destructive individuals in the entire mental health system. One starting point for upgrading the level of knowledge and training of staff members who work in this large treatment system could be to develop a better and more authoritative information dissemination network. Such a system exists in medicine; physicians are expected to read appropriate journals and to guide their treatment decisions using the data contained in the journals. Standards of practice and methods for modifying current practice are within the tradition of reading new facts, studying old ones, and comparing treatment outcome under different conditions with what is actually being done. No such general system of information-gathering or -sharing exists, particularly in public treatment programs. One of the most flagrant examples of this "educational shortfall" can be found among those methadone programs that adamantly insist on prescribing no more than 30 to 35 mg/day for all patients, in spite of the overwhelming evidence that these dose levels generally are inadequate. In some cases, program directors are unaware of studies that have shown the relationship between dose and outcome. In other cases, they are aware of the studies but do not modify their practices accordingly. This example of inadequate dosing is offered as an example of one situation that could be improved by adherence to a system of authoritative and systematic information dissemination. Many issues in substance abuse treatment do not lend themselves to information dissemination as readily as that of methadone dosing

  4. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with (111)In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of (111)In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  5. HpaP modulates type III effector secretion in Ralstonia solanacearum and harbours a substrate specificity switch domain essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Turner, Marie; Lonjon, Fabien; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria have evolved a type III secretion system (T3SS) to successfully invade their host. This extracellular apparatus allows the translocation of proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), directly into the host cells. T3Es are virulence factors that have been shown to interfere with the host's immunity or to provide nutrients from the host to the bacteria. The Gram-negative bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is a worldwide major crop pest whose virulence strongly relies on the T3SS. In R. solanacearum, transcriptional regulation has been extensively studied. However, very few data are available concerning the role played by type III-associated regulators, such as type III chaperones and T3SS control proteins. Here, we characterized HpaP, a putative type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) protein of R. solanacearum which is not secreted by the bacterium or translocated in the plant cells. HpaP self-interacts and interacts with the PopP1 T3E. HpaP modulates the secretion of early (HrpY pilin) and late (AvrA and PopP1 T3Es) type III substrates. HpaP is dispensable for the translocation of T3Es into the host cells. Finally, we identified two regions of five amino acids in the T3S4 domain that are essential for efficient PopP1 secretion and for HpaP's role in virulence on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana, but not required for HpaP-HpaP and HpaP-PopP1 interactions. Taken together, our results indicate that HpaP is a putative R. solanacearum T3S4 protein important for full pathogenicity on several hosts, acting as a helper for PopP1 secretion, and repressing AvrA and HrpY secretion.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 3C modulates transcription through interaction with the sequence-specific DNA-binding protein J kappa.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E S; Grossman, S; Johannsen, E; Miller, C; Lin, J; Tomkinson, B; Kieff, E

    1995-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear protein 3C (EBNA 3C) is essential for EBV-mediated transformation of primary B lymphocytes, is turned on by EBNA 2, and regulates transcription of some of the viral and cellular genes which are regulated by EBNA 2. EBNA 2 is targeted to response elements by binding to the DNA sequence-specific, transcriptional repressor protein J kappa. We now show that EBNA 3C also binds to J kappa. EBNA 3C causes J kappa to not bind DNA or EBNA 2. J kappa DNA binding activity in EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells is consequently reduced. More than 10% of the EBNA 3C coimmunoprecipitated with J kappa from extracts of non-EBV-infected B lymphoblasts that had been stably converted to EBNA 3C expression. EBNA 3C in nuclear extracts from these cells (or in vitro-translated EBNA 3C) prevented J kappa from interacting with a high-affinity DNA binding site. Under conditions of transient overexpression in B lymphoblasts, EBNA 2 and EBNA 3C associated with J kappa and less EBNA 2 associated with J kappa when EBNA 3C was coexpressed in the same cell. EBNA 3C had no effect on the activity of a -512/+40 LMP1 promoter-CAT reporter construct that has two upstream J kappa sites, but it did inhibit EBNA 2 transactivation of this promoter. These data are compatible with a role for EBNA 3C as a "feedback" down modulator of EBNA 2-mediated transactivation. EBNA 3C could, in theory, also activate transcription by inhibiting the interaction of the J kappa repressor with its cognate DNA. The interaction of two viral transcriptional regulators with the same cell protein may reflect an unusually high level of complexity or stringency in target gene regulation. PMID:7707539

  7. MKP1-dependent PTH modulation of bone matrix mineralization in female mice is osteoblast maturation stage specific and involves P-ERK and P-p38 MAPKs.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Chandrika D; Sampathi, Bharat Reddy; Sharma, Sonali; Datta, Tanuka; Das, Varsha; Abou-Samra, Abdul B; Datta, Nabanita S

    2013-03-01

    Limited information is available on the role of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP1) signaling in osteoblasts. We have recently reported distinct roles for MKP1 during osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and skeletal responsiveness to parathyroid hormone (PTH). As MKP1 regulates the phosphorylation status of MAPKs, we investigated the involvement of P-ERK and P-p38 MAPKs in MKP1 knockout (KO) early and mature osteoblasts with respect to mineralization and PTH response. Calvarial osteoblasts from 9-14-week-old WT and MKP1 KO male and female mice were examined. Western blot analysis revealed downregulation and sustained expressions of P-ERK and P-p38 with PTH treatment in differentiated osteoblasts derived from KO males and females respectively. Exposure of early osteoblasts to p38 inhibitor, SB203580 (S), markedly inhibited mineralization in WT and KO osteoblasts from both genders as determined by von Kossa assay. In osteoblasts from males, ERK inhibitor U0126 (U), not p38 inhibitor (S), prevented the inhibitory effects of PTH on mineralization in early or mature osteoblasts. In osteoblasts from KO females, PTH sustained mineralization in early osteoblasts and decreased mineralization in mature cells. This effect of PTH was attenuated by S in early osteoblasts and by U in mature KO cells. Changes in matrix Gla protein expression with PTH in KO osteoblasts did not correlate with mineralization, indicative of MKP1-dependent additional mechanisms essential for PTH action on osteoblast mineralization. We conclude that PTH regulation of osteoblast mineralization in female mice is maturation stage specific and involves MKP1 modulation of P-ERK and P-p38 MAPKs.

  8. A highly specific q-RT-PCR assay to address the relevance of the JAK2WT and JAK2V617F expression levels and control genes in Ph-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Francesca; Di Capua, Emma Nora; Cenfra, Natalia; Pessina, Gloria; Mecarocci, Sergio; Rago, Angela; Cotroneo, Ettore; Busanello, Anna; Equitani, Francesco; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Nervi, Clara; Cimino, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    In Ph- myeloproliferative neoplasms, the quantification of the JAK2V617F transcripts may provide some advantages over the DNA allele burden determination. We developed a q-RT-PCR to assess the JAK2WT and JAK2V617F mRNA expression in 105 cases (23 donors, 13 secondary polycythemia, 22 polycythemia vera (PV), 38 essential thrombocythemia (ET), and 9 primary myelofibrosis (PMF)). Compared with the standard allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO)-PCR technique, our assay showed a 100 % concordance rate detecting the JAK2V617F mutation in 22/22 PV (100 %), 29/38 (76.3 %) ET, and 5/9 (55.5 %) PMF cases, respectively. The sensitivity of the assay was 0.01 %. Comparing DNA and RNA samples, we found that the JAK2V617F mutational ratios were significantly higher at the RNA level both in PV (p = 0.005) and ET (p = 0.001) samples. In PV patients, JAK2WT expression levels positively correlated with the platelets (PLTs) (p = 0.003) whereas a trend to negative correlation was observed with the Hb levels (p = 0.051). JAK2V617F-positive cases showed the lowest JAK2WT and ABL1 mRNA expression levels. In all the samples, the expression pattern of beta-glucoronidase (GUSB) was more homogeneous than that of ABL1 or β2 microglobulin (B2M). Using GUSB as normalizator gene, a significant increase of the JAK2V617F mRNA levels was seen in two ET patients at time of progression to PV. In conclusion, the proposed q-RT-PCR is a sensitive and accurate method to quantify the JAK2 mutational status that can also show clinical correlations suggesting the impact of the residual amount of the JAK2WT allele on the Ph- MPN disease phenotype. Our observations also preclude the use of ABL1 as a housekeeping gene for these neoplasms.

  9. Amplitude Modulations of Acoustic Communication Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turesson, Hjalmar K.

    2011-12-01

    In human speech, amplitude modulations at 3 -- 8 Hz are important for discrimination and detection. Two different neurophysiological theories have been proposed to explain this effect. The first theory proposes that, as a consequence of neocortical synaptic dynamics, signals that are amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz are propagated better than un-modulated signals, or signals modulated above 8 Hz. This suggests that neural activity elicited by vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz is optimally transmitted, and the vocalizations better discriminated and detected. The second theory proposes that 3 -- 8 Hz amplitude modulations interact with spontaneous neocortical oscillations. Specifically, vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz entrain local populations of neurons, which in turn, modulate the amplitude of high frequency gamma oscillations. This suggests that vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz should induce stronger cross-frequency coupling. Similar to human speech, we found that macaque monkey vocalizations also are amplitude modulated between 3 and 8 Hz. Humans and macaque monkeys share similarities in vocal production, implying that the auditory systems subserving perception of acoustic communication signals also share similarities. Based on the similarities between human speech and macaque monkey vocalizations, we addressed how amplitude modulated vocalizations are processed in the auditory cortex of macaque monkeys, and what behavioral relevance modulations may have. Recording single neuron activity, as well as, the activity of local populations of neurons allowed us to test both of the neurophysiological theories presented above. We found that single neuron responses to vocalizations amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz resulted in better stimulus discrimination than vocalizations lacking 3 -- 8 Hz modulations, and that the effect most likely was mediated by synaptic dynamics. In contrast, we failed to find support for the oscillation-based model proposing a

  10. The TACPyAT repeats in the chalcone synthase promoter of Petunia hybrida act as a dominant negative cis-acting module in the control of organ-specific expression.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, I M; Brouwer, M; Spelt, C E; Mol, J N; Stuitje, A R

    1992-07-01

    Analysis of the expression of the GUS reporter gene driven by various regions of the Petunia hybrida chalcone synthase (chsA) promoter revealed that the developmental and organ-specific expression of the chsA gene is conferred by a TATA proximal module located between -67 and -53, previously designated as the TACPyAT repeats. Histochemical analysis of GUS reporter gene expression revealed that the organ-specific 67 bp promoter fragment directs the same cell-type specificity as a 530 bp promoter, whereas additional enhancer sequences are present within the more TATA distal region. Moreover, the region between -800 and -530 is also involved in extending the cell-type specificity to the trichomes of flower organs and of young seedlings. The mechanism by which the TACPyAT repeats modulate expression during plant development was studied by analysing the expression of the GUS gene driven by chimeric promoters consisting of the CaMV 35S enhancer (domain B, -750 to -90) fused to various chsA 5' upstream sequences. Detailed enzymatic and histochemical analysis revealed that in the presence of the TACPyAT module the CaMV 35S region only enhances GUS activity in those organs in which the chsA promoter is normally active. Furthermore, this analysis shows that enhancement in the presence of the CaMV 35S domain B is accomplished by increasing the number of cell types expressing the GUS gene within the organ, rather than enhancement of the chsA cell-type-specific expression within these organs. Deletion of the TACPyAT sequences in the chimeric promoter construct completely restores the well-documented CaMV 35S domain B cell-type specificity, showing that the TACPyAT module acts as a dominant negative cis-acting element which controls both organ and developmental regulation of the chsA promoter activity.

  11. Comparison of Gafchromic EBT2 and EBT3 for patient-specific quality assurance: Cranial stereotactic radiosurgery using volumetric modulated arc therapy with multiple noncoplanar arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto; Ragona, Riccardo; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Mantovani, Cristina

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific quality assurance in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) brain stereotactic radiosurgery raises specific issues on dosimetric procedures, mainly represented by the small radiation fields associated with the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, the need of small detectors and the high dose delivered (up to 30 Gy). Gafchromic{sup TM} EBT2 and EBT3 films may be considered the dosimeter of choice, and the authors here provide some additional data about uniformity correction for this new generation of radiochromic films.Methods: A new analysis method using blue channel for marker dye correction was proposed for uniformity correction both for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Symmetry, flatness, and field-width of a reference field were analyzed to provide an evaluation in a high-spatial resolution of the film uniformity for EBT3. Absolute doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) as baseline. VMAT plans with multiple noncoplanar arcs were generated with a treatment planning system on a selected pool of eleven patients with cranial lesions and then recalculated on a water-equivalent plastic phantom by Monte Carlo algorithm for patient-specific QA. 2D quantitative dose comparison parameters were calculated, for the computed and measured dose distributions, and tested for statistically significant differences.Results: Sensitometric curves showed a different behavior above dose of 5 Gy for EBT2 and EBT3 films; with the use of inhouse marker-dye correction method, the authors obtained values of 2.5% for flatness, 1.5% of symmetry, and a field width of 4.8 cm for a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} reference field. Compared with TLD and selecting a 5% dose tolerance, the percentage of points with ICRU index below 1 was 100% for EBT2 and 83% for EBT3. Patients analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between EBT2 and EBT3 in the percentage of points with gamma values <1 (p= 0.009 and p= 0.016); the percent difference as well as

  12. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications. PMID:21193369

  13. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications.

  14. Rational Rhymes for Addressing Common Childhood Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Music-based interventions are valuable tools counselors can use when working with children. Specific types of music-based interventions, such as songs or rhymes, can be especially pertinent in addressing the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of children. Rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) provides a therapeutic framework that encourages…

  15. The construction and testing of the EORTC colorectal cancer-specific quality of life questionnaire module (QLQ-CR38). European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Study Group on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, M A; te Velde, A; Aaronson, N K

    1999-02-01

    The objectives of the current study were to construct a colorectal cancer-specific quality of life (QL) questionnaire module to be used in conjunction with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and to test its reliability and validity in The Netherlands. Module construction took place following the EORTC guidelines for module development. The module--the QLQ-CR38--consists of 38 items covering symptoms and side-effects related to different treatment modalities, body image, sexuality and future perspective. This module was tested among 117 colorectal cancer patients on several occasions. The timing was prior to treatment with radiotherapy or chemotherapy, during treatment and 3 months following the second assessment. For purposes of test-retest reliability, a subsample of patients completed the QLQ-CR38 1 week following the third assessment. Multitrait scaling analysis confirmed the hypothesised scale structure of the function scales but not of the symptom scales. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for seven of the nine scales exceeded the 0.70 criterion at one or both assessments. The test-retest reliability for all scales and one single item was 0.78 or higher. The stability of the two remaining single items was lower. On the basis of known-groups comparisons, selective scales distinguished clearly between patients differing in disease stage, initial and on-treatment performance status and the presence of a stoma. Additionally, selective scales detected change over time as a function of change in performance status and treatment-induced change. These results lend support to the clinical validity of the QLQ-CR38 as a supplementary questionnaire for assessing specific QL issues relevant to patients with colorectal cancer. Additional efforts to test the module's cross-cultural validity are needed.

  16. 2015 ASHG Awards and Addresses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Each year at the annual meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG), addresses are given in honor of The Society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these is given below. On the following pages, we have printed the presidential address and the addresses for the William Allan Award, the Curt Stern Award, and the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award. Webcasts of these addresses, as well as those of many other presentations, can be found at http://www.ashg.org.

  17. 21 CFR 20.119 - Lists of names and addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lists of names and addresses. 20.119 Section 20... PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.119 Lists of names and addresses. Names and addresses of individuals in Food and Drug Administration records shall not be sold or...

  18. Addressing the Moral Agency of Culturally Specific Care Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Chrystal S.

    2011-01-01

    Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), as a culturally sensitive framework, realises the totality of caring in context. Few, if any, investigations into caring have articulated CHAT as a feasible mode of inquiry for inserting the cultural perspectives of both the researcher and the researched. This article elucidates CHAT as an intelligible…

  19. Disease specific modules and hub genes for intervention strategies: A co-expression network based approach for Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, Pon Arunachalam; Pandey, Isha; Kaur, Ramandeep; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2015-10-01

    Systems biology approaches that are based on gene expression and bioinformatics analysis have been successful in predicting the functions of many genes in Plasmodium falciparum, a protozoan parasite responsible for most of the deaths due to malaria. However, approaches that can provide information about the biological processes that are active in this parasite in vivo during complicated malaria conditions have been scarcely deployed. Here we report the analysis of a weighted gene co-expression based network for P. falciparum, from non-cerebral clinical complications. Gene expression profiles of 20 P. falciparum clinical isolates were utilized to construct the same. A total of 20 highly interacting modules were identified post network creation. In 12 of these modules, at least 10% of the member genes, were found to be differentially regulated in parasites from patient isolates showing complications, when compared with those from patients with uncomplicated disease. Enrichment analysis helped identify biological processes like oxidation-reduction, electron transport chain, protein synthesis, ubiquitin dependent catabolic processes, RNA binding and purine nucleotide metabolic processes as associated with these modules. Additionally, for each module, highly connected hub genes were identified. Detailed functional analysis of many of these, which have known annotated functions underline their importance in parasite development and survival. This suggests, that other hub genes with unknown functions may also be playing crucial roles in parasite biology, and, are potential candidates for intervention strategies.

  20. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Leni; Anghelina, Mirela; Kantor, Taylor; Jones, Desiree; Ramadan, Enass; Xiang, Yang; Huang, Kun; Kolipaka, Arunark; Malarkey, William; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Mohler, Peter J; Quyyumi, Arshed; Moldovan, Nicanor I

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs), have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene), defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all p<0.03) with age (R2 = -0.23), vascular stiffness (R2 = -0.24), and central aortic pressure (R2 = -0.19) and positively correlated with body mass index (R2 = 0.72, in women). The co-expression of three neovascular markers was validated at the single-cell level using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The overall gene expression in this cardiovascular module was reduced by 72±22% in the patients compared with controls. However, the compactness of both modules was increased in the patients' samples, which was reflected in reduced dispersion of their nodes' degrees of connectivity, suggesting a more primitive character of the patients' CSPCs. In conclusion, our results show that the relationship between CSPCs and vascular function is encoded in modules of the PBMCs transcriptional network

  1. Modulation of specific protein expression levels by PTEN: identification of AKAP121, DHFR, G3BP, Rap1, and RCC1 as potential targets of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanping; Wernyj, Roman P; Norton, Darrell D; Precht, Patricia; Seminario, Maria-Cristina; Wange, Ronald L

    2005-05-26

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is mutated in a high percentage of human cancers, and is implicated in pathways regulating cell growth, proliferation, survival, and migration. Despite significant advances, our understanding of its mechanisms of action remains incomplete. We have used a high-throughput proteomic immunoblotting approach to identify proteins whose expression levels are modulated by PTEN. Out of over 800 proteins screened, 22 proteins showed significant changes in expression. Five proteins that exhibited two-fold or greater changes in expression level were further characterized. AKAP121 and G3BP expression was reduced, while dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), Rap1 and RCC1 expression was elevated in response to PTEN expression in a PTEN-null T-cell leukemia line. The phosphatase activity of PTEN was required for these effects. However, direct inhibition of PI-3 Kinase could mimic PTEN in modulating expression of DHFR, G3BP, Rap1 and RCC1, but not AKAP121. Real-time PCR showed that the effects of PTEN were primarily post-transcriptional, and would not have been revealed by mRNA-based screens. We conclude from these data that PTEN can modulate the expression level of a number of different proteins. The identified proteins have the potential to serve as previously unrecognized effectors of PTEN, and suggest the existence of additional complexity in the modes by which PTEN can regulate cellular biology.

  2. Functional Module Analysis for Gene Coexpression Networks with Network Integration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuqin; Zhao, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    Network has been a general tool for studying the complex interactions between different genes, proteins and other small molecules. Module as a fundamental property of many biological networks has been widely studied and many computational methods have been proposed to identify the modules in an individual network. However, in many cases a single network is insufficient for module analysis due to the noise in the data or the tuning of parameters when building the biological network. The availability of a large amount of biological networks makes network integration study possible. By integrating such networks, more informative modules for some specific disease can be derived from the networks constructed from different tissues, and consistent factors for different diseases can be inferred. In this paper, we have developed an effective method for module identification from multiple networks under different conditions. The problem is formulated as an optimization model, which combines the module identification in each individual network and alignment of the modules from different networks together. An approximation algorithm based on eigenvector computation is proposed. Our method outperforms the existing methods, especially when the underlying modules in multiple networks are different in simulation studies. We also applied our method to two groups of gene coexpression networks for humans, which include one for three different cancers, and one for three tissues from the morbidly obese patients. We identified 13 modules with 3 complete subgraphs, and 11 modules with 2 complete subgraphs, respectively. The modules were validated through Gene Ontology enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. We also showed that the main functions of most modules for the corresponding disease have been addressed by other researchers, which may provide the theoretical basis for further studying the modules experimentally. PMID:26451826

  3. Addressing adolescent pregnancy with legislation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M; Folken, Lori; Seitz, Melody A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a concern among many women's health practitioners. While it is practical and appropriate to work to prevent adolescent pregnancy by educating adolescents in health care clinics, schools and adolescent-friendly community-based organizations, suggesting and supporting legislative efforts to reduce adolescent pregnancy can help address the issue on an even larger scale. This article aims to help nurses better understand current legislation that addresses adolescent pregnancy, and to encourage support of future adolescent pregnancy prevention legislation. PMID:25145716

  4. Addressing adolescent pregnancy with legislation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M; Folken, Lori; Seitz, Melody A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a concern among many women's health practitioners. While it is practical and appropriate to work to prevent adolescent pregnancy by educating adolescents in health care clinics, schools and adolescent-friendly community-based organizations, suggesting and supporting legislative efforts to reduce adolescent pregnancy can help address the issue on an even larger scale. This article aims to help nurses better understand current legislation that addresses adolescent pregnancy, and to encourage support of future adolescent pregnancy prevention legislation.

  5. Linear modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A study of frequency division multiplexing (FDM) systems was made for the purpose of determining the system performance that can be obtained with available state of the art components. System performance was evaluated on the basis of past experience, system analysis, and component evaluation. The system study was specifically directed to the area of FDM systems using subcarrier channel frequencies from 4 kHz to 200 kHz and channel information bandwidths of dc to 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 kHz. The evaluation also assumes that the demodulation will be from a tape recorder which produces frequency modulation of + or - 1% on the signal due to the tape recorder wow and flutter. For the modulation system it is assumed that the pilot and carrier channel frequencies are stable to within + or - .005% and that the FM on the channel carriers is negligible. The modulator system was evaluated for the temperature range of -20 degree to +85 degree while the demodulator system was evaluated for operation at room temperature.

  6. Addressing spiritual leadership: an organizational model.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Lisa; Solari-Twadell, P Ann; Haas, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Commission requires health systems to address spiritual care. Research indicates that spirituality is associated with better physical, psychological, and social health and that culturally diverse populations and individuals at end-of-life often request spiritual care. The authors report the results of a consensus conference of 21 executives representing 10 large faith-based health systems who discussed the input, process, and outcomes of a corporate model for spiritual leadership. Specific initiatives are highlighted.

  7. t-PA-specific modulation of a human blood-brain barrier model involves plasmin-mediated activation of the Rho kinase pathway in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Niego, Be'eri; Freeman, Roxann; Puschmann, Till B; Turnley, Ann M; Medcalf, Robert L

    2012-05-17

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) can modulate permeability of the neurovascular unit and exacerbate injury in ischemic stroke. We examined the effects of t-PA using in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier. t-PA caused a concentration-dependent increase in permeability. This effect was dependent on plasmin formation and potentiated in the presence of plasminogen. An inactive t-PA variant inhibited the t-PA-mediated increase in permeability, whereas blockade of low-density lipoprotein receptors or exposed lysine residues resulted in similar inhibition, implying a role for both a t-PA receptor, most likely a low-density lipoprotein receptor, and a plasminogen receptor. This effect was selective to t-PA and its close derivative tenecteplase. The truncated t-PA variant reteplase had a minor effect on permeability, whereas urokinase and desmoteplase were ineffective. t-PA also induced marked shape changes in both brain endothelial cells and astrocytes. Changes in astrocyte morphology coincided with increased F-actin staining intensity, larger focal adhesion size, and elevated levels of phosphorylated myosin. Inhibition of Rho kinase blocked these changes and reduced t-PA/plasminogen-mediated increase in permeability. Hence plasmin, generated on the cell surface selectively by t-PA, modulates the astrocytic cytoskeleton, leading to an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability. Blockade of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway may have beneficial consequences during thrombolytic therapy.

  8. The Neuronal-Specific SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2) Kinase as a Transcriptional Modulator of BAG4, Brox, and PPP1CB Genes Expression

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Rebeca; Ávila, Julio; Arteaga, María F.; Canessa, Cecilia M.; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Kinase 1, SGK1, exhibits a broad range of cellular functions that include regulation of the number of ion channels in plasma membrane and modulation of signaling pathways of cell survival. This diversity of functions is made possible by various regulatory processes acting upon the SGK1 gene, giving rise to various isoforms: SGK1_v1–5, each with distinct properties and distinct aminotermini that serve to target proteins to different subcellular compartments. Among cellular effects of SGK1 expression is to indirectly modulate gene transcription by phosphorylating transcriptional factors of the FOXO family. Here we examined if SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2; NM_001143676), which associates primarily to the plasma membrane, is also able to regulate gene expression. Using a differential gene expression approach we identified six genes upregulated by SGK1.1 in HeLa cells. Further analysis of transcript and protein levels validated two genes: BCL2-associated athanogene 4 (BAG-4) and Brox. The results indicate that SGK1.1 regulates gene transcription upon a different set of genes some of which participate in cell survival pathways (BAG-4) and others in intracellular vesicular traffic (Brox). PMID:25849655

  9. Addressing problems of employee performance.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee performance problems are essentially of 2 kinds: those that are motivational in origin and those resulting from skill deficiencies. Both kinds of problems are the province of the department manager. Performance problems differ from problems of conduct in that traditional disciplinary processes ordinarily do not apply. Rather, performance problems are addressed through educational and remedial processes. The manager has a basic responsibility in ensuring that everything reasonable is done to help each employee succeed. There are a number of steps the manager can take to address employee performance problems.

  10. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family.

  11. The Implications of Encoder/Modulator/ Phased Array Designs for Future Broadband LEO Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderaar, Mark; Jensen, Chris A.; Terry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the effects of modulation and channel coding on the design of wide angle scan, broadband, phased army antennas. In the paper we perform several trade studies. First, we investigate the amplifier back-off requirement as a function of variability of modulation envelope. Specifically, we contrast constant and non-constant envelope modulations, as well as single and multiple carrier schemes. Additionally, we address the issues an(f concerns of using pulse shaping filters with the above modulation types. Second, we quantify the effects of beam steering on the quality of data, recovery using selected modulation techniques. In particular, we show that the frequency response of the array introduces intersymbol interference for broadband signals and that the mode of operation for the beam steering controller may introduce additional burst or random errors. Finally, we show that the encoder/modulator design must be performed in conjunction with the phased array antenna design.

  12. Determination of specific neuropeptides modulation time course in a rat model of osteoarthritis pain by liquid chromatography ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferland, Catherine E; Pailleux, Floriane; Vachon, Pascal; Beaudry, Francis

    2011-12-01

    Animal models are useful to evaluate pharmacological therapies to alleviate joint pain. The present study characterized central neuropeptides modulation in the monoiodoacetate (MIA) rat model. Animals receiving a single 3mg MIA injection were euthanized at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post injection. Spinal cords were analyzed by liquid chromatography ion trap mass spectrometry. Up-regulations of the calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P were observed starting on days 7 and 28 respectively, whereas big dynorphin(₁₋₃₂) content decreased significantly on day 14 in comparison to control animals (P<0.05). Preclinical drug evaluations using this model should be conducted between 7 and 21 days post injection when the lesions resemble most to human osteoarthritis.

  13. FASTBUS Snoop Diagnostic Module

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.; Downing, R.

    1980-11-01

    Development of the FASTBUS Snoop Module, undertaken as part of the prototype program for the new interlaboratory data bus standard, is described. The Snoop Module resides on a FASTBUS crate segment and provides diagnostic monitoring and testing capability. Communication with a remote host computer is handled independent of FASTBUS through a serial link. The module consists of a high-speed ECL front-end to monitor and single-step FASTBUS cycles, a master-slave interface, and a control microprocessor with serial communication ports. Design details and performance specifications of the prototype module are reported. 9 figures, 1 table.

  14. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  15. Every Other Day. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiller, Tom

    Schools need to be reoriented and restructured so that what is taught and learned, and the way in which it is taught and learned, are better integrated with young people's real-world experiences. Many indicators suggest that the meaningful aspects of school have been lost in the encounter with modern times. The title of this address--"Every Other…

  16. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  17. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2016-07-12

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  18. Soleus Hoffmann reflex amplitudes are specifically modulated by cutaneous inputs from the arms and opposite leg during walking but not standing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Futatsubashi, Genki; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Yukari; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Electrical stimulation of cutaneous nerves innervating heteronymous limbs (the arms or contralateral leg) modifies the excitability of soleus Hoffmann (H-) reflexes. The differences in the sensitivities of the H-reflex pathway to cutaneous afferents from different limbs and their modulation during the performance of motor tasks (i.e., standing and walking) are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated changes in soleus H-reflex amplitudes induced by electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves. Selected targets for conditioning stimulation included the superficial peroneal nerve, which innervates the foot dorsum in the contralateral ankle (cSP), and the superficial radial nerve, which innervates the dorsum of the hand in the ipsilateral (iSR) or contralateral wrist (cSR). Stimulation and subsequent reflex assessment took place during the standing and early-stance phase of treadmill walking in ten healthy subjects. Cutaneous stimulation produced long-latency inhibition (conditioning-test interval of ~100 ms) of the H-reflex during the early-stance phase of walking, and the inhibition was stronger following cSP stimulation compared with iSR or cSR stimulation. In contrast, although similar conditioning stimulation significantly facilitated the H-reflex during standing, this effect remained constant irrespective of the different conditioning sites. These findings suggest that cutaneous inputs from the arms and contralateral leg had reversible effects on the H-reflex amplitudes, including inhibitions with different sensitivities during the early-stance phase of walking and facilitation during standing. Furthermore, the differential sensitivities of the H-reflex modulations were expressed only during walking when the locations of the afferent inputs were functionally relevant. PMID:27030502

  19. Modulation of Gut-Specific Mechanisms by Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration in Male Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus: A Systems Biology Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Angela M.; LeCapitaine, Nicole J.; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter J.; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; McGoey, Robin R.; Auten, Matthew W.; LaMotte, Lynn; Chandra, Lawrance C.; Birke, Leslie L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our studies have demonstrated that chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration results in a generalized attenuation of viral load and tissue inflammation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected male rhesus macaques. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue is an important site for HIV replication and inflammation that can impact disease progression. We used a systems approach to examine the duodenal immune environment in 4- to 6-year-old male rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVMAC251 after 17 months of chronic THC administration (0.18–0.32 mg/kg, intramuscularly, twice daily). Duodenal tissue samples excised from chronic THC- (N=4) and vehicle (VEH)-treated (N=4) subjects at ∼5 months postinoculation showed lower viral load, increased duodenal integrin beta 7+(β7) CD4+ and CD8+ central memory T cells, and a significant preferential increase in Th2 cytokine expression. Gene array analysis identified six genes that were differentially expressed in intestinal samples of the THC/SIV animals when compared to those differentially expressed between VEH/SIV and uninfected controls. These genes were identified as having significant participation in (1) apoptosis, (2) cell survival, proliferation, and morphogenesis, and (3) energy and substrate metabolic processes. Additional analysis comparing the duodenal gene expression in THC/SIV vs. VEH/SIV animals identified 93 differentially expressed genes that participate in processes involved in muscle contraction, protein folding, cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and cell signaling. Immunohistochemical staining showed attenuated apoptosis in epithelial crypt cells of THC/SIV subjects. Our results indicate that chronic THC administration modulated duodenal T cell populations, favored a pro-Th2 cytokine balance, and decreased intestinal apoptosis. These findings reveal novel mechanisms that may potentially contribute to cannabinoid-mediated disease modulation. PMID:24400995

  20. Development of training modules for magnetic particle inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Daigo; Eisenmann, David J.; Enyart, Darrel; Nakagawa, Norio; Lo, Chester; Orman, David

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) is a nondestructive evaluation technique used with ferromagnetic materials. Although the application of this method may appear straightforward, MPI combines the complicated nature of electromagnetics, metallurgical material effects, fluid-particle motion dynamics, and physiological human factors into a single inspection. To fully appreciate industry specifications such as ASTM E-1444, users should develop a basic understanding of the many factors that are involved in MPI. We have developed a series of MPI training modules that are aimed at addressing this requirement. The modules not only offer qualitative explanations, but also show quantitative explanations in terms of measurement and numerical simulation data in many instances. There are five modules in all. Module ♯1 shows characteristics of waveforms and magnetizing methods. This allows MPI practitioners to make optimum choice of waveform and magnetizing method. Module ♯2 explains how material properties relate to the magnetic characteristics. Module ♯3 shows the strength of the excitation field or the flux leakage from a crack and how it compares to the detectability of a crack by MPI. Module ♯4 shows how specimen status may influence defect detection. Module ♯5 shows the effects of particle properties on defect detection.

  1. Modulation of CD4+ T Cell-Dependent Specific Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cells Differentiation and Proliferation by the Timing of Increase in the Pathogen Load

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Persechini, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Following infection with viruses, bacteria or protozoan parasites, naïve antigen-specific CD8+ T cells undergo a process of differentiation and proliferation to generate effector cells. Recent evidences suggest that the timing of generation of specific effector CD8+ T cells varies widely according to different pathogens. We hypothesized that the timing of increase in the pathogen load could be a critical parameter governing this process. Methodology/Principal Findings Using increasing doses of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi to infect C57BL/6 mice, we observed a significant acceleration in the timing of parasitemia without an increase in mouse susceptibility. In contrast, in CD8 deficient mice, we observed an inverse relationship between the parasite inoculum and the timing of death. These results suggest that in normal mice CD8+ T cells became protective earlier, following the accelerated development of parasitemia. The evaluation of specific cytotoxic responses in vivo to three distinct epitopes revealed that increasing the parasite inoculum hastened the expansion of specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells following infection. The differentiation and expansion of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells is in fact dependent on parasite multiplication, as radiation-attenuated parasites were unable to activate these cells. We also observed that, in contrast to most pathogens, the activation process of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was dependent on MHC class II restricted CD4+ T cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results are compatible with our initial hypothesis that the timing of increase in the pathogen load can be a critical parameter governing the kinetics of CD4+ T cell-dependent expansion of pathogen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. PMID:17460760

  2. Matching Alternative Addresses: a Semantic Web Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariannamazi, S.; Karimipour, F.; Hakimpour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of crowd-sourcing or volunteered geographic information (VGI) provides opportunities for authoritatives that deal with geospatial information. Heterogeneity of multiple data sources and inconsistency of data types is a key characteristics of VGI datasets. The expansion of cities resulted in the growing number of POIs in the OpenStreetMap, a well-known VGI source, which causes the datasets to outdate in short periods of time. These changes made to spatial and aspatial attributes of features such as names and addresses might cause confusion or ambiguity in the processes that require feature's literal information like addressing and geocoding. VGI sources neither will conform specific vocabularies nor will remain in a specific schema for a long period of time. As a result, the integration of VGI sources is crucial and inevitable in order to avoid duplication and the waste of resources. Information integration can be used to match features and qualify different annotation alternatives for disambiguation. This study enhances the search capabilities of geospatial tools with applications able to understand user terminology to pursuit an efficient way for finding desired results. Semantic web is a capable tool for developing technologies that deal with lexical and numerical calculations and estimations. There are a vast amount of literal-spatial data representing the capability of linguistic information in knowledge modeling, but these resources need to be harmonized based on Semantic Web standards. The process of making addresses homogenous generates a helpful tool based on spatial data integration and lexical annotation matching and disambiguating.

  3. Stress Modulates the Use of Spatial versus Stimulus-Response Learning Strategies in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippsen, Christine; Richter, Steffen; Bohringer, Andreas; Wippich, Werner; Schachinger, Hartmut; Schwabe, Lars; Oitzl, Melly S.

    2007-01-01

    Animal studies provided evidence that stress modulates multiple memory systems, favoring caudate nucleus-based "habit" memory over hippocampus-based "cognitive" memory. However, effects of stress on learning strategy and memory consolidation were not differentiated. We specifically address the effects of psychosocial stress on the applied learning…

  4. Multi-port, optically addressed RAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Alan R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Bergman, Larry A. (Inventor); Esener, Sadik (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A random access memory addressing system utilizing optical links between memory and the read/write logic circuits comprises addressing circuits including a plurality of light signal sources, a plurality of optical gates including optical detectors associated with the memory cells, and a holographic optical element adapted to reflect and direct the light signals to the desired memory cell locations. More particularly, it is a multi-port, binary computer memory for interfacing with a plurality of computers. There are a plurality of storage cells for containing bits of binary information, the storage cells being disposed at the intersections of a plurality of row conductors and a plurality of column conductors. There is interfacing logic for receiving information from the computers directing access to ones of the storage cells. There are first light sources associated with the interfacing logic for transmitting a first light beam with the access information modulated thereon. First light detectors are associated with the storage cells for receiving the first light beam, for generating an electrical signal containing the access information, and for conducting the electrical signal to the one of the storage cells to which it is directed. There are holographic optical elements for reflecting the first light beam from the first light sources to the first light detectors.

  5. Intermediate load modules for test and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic modules were tested for qualification. Tests involved the following: (1) delivery of 20 solar cells for use as reference cells; (2) module documentation and inspection plans specifying the 10 Group I modules; (3) design review of module documentation from Group I modules; (4) revise module documentation to overcome any problems of deficiencies associated with the Group I modules; (5) delivery of 10 Group II modules built to revised specifications; (6) testing of Group II modules to the criteria as outlined in qualification specification. It is found that the solarvolt MSP43E40B satisfies the design criteria of qualification specification for intermediate load modules. Design changes were made in the Group I modules to overcome the deficiencies which allowed Group II modules to pass the qualification tests.

  6. International Energy Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

  7. Is Poor Frequency Modulation Detection Linked to Literacy Problems? A Comparison of Specific Reading Disability and Mild to Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, L. F.; Bishop, D. V. M.

    2006-01-01

    Specific reading disability (SRD) is now widely recognised as often being caused by phonological processing problems, affecting analysis of spoken as well as written language. According to one theoretical account, these phonological problems are due to low-level problems in auditory perception of dynamic acoustic cues. Evidence for this has come…

  8. Institutional patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance does not predict unacceptable plan delivery as measured by IROC Houston’s head and neck phantom

    PubMed Central

    Kry, Stephen F.; Molineu, Andrea; Kerns, James; Faught, Austin; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley; Tonigan, Jackie; Alvarez, Paola; Stingo, Francesco; Followill, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether in-house patient-specific IMRT QA results predict the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials IROC Houston’s IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution’s clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans was determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom i.e., poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (e.g., 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process. PMID:25442044

  9. Passing the Baton: A Collaborative Approach to Development and Implementation of Context-Specific Modules for Graduate Teaching Assistants in Cognate Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Geraldine; McNamara, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A systematic approach to the training of graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) is required to meet the challenges posed by growing numbers of undergraduate and graduate students. At University College Dublin, educational developers and academic staff across six schools collaborated on the design and phased implementation of context-specific GTA…

  10. Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate lipid delivery and oocyte development in C. elegans revealed by molecular-selective label-free imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lo, Szecheng J.; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibit critical functions in biological systems and their importance during animal oocyte maturation has been increasingly recognized. However, the detailed mechanism of lipid transportation for oocyte development remains largely unknown. In this study, the transportation of yolk lipoprotein (lipid carrier) and the rate of lipid delivery into oocytes in live C. elegans were examined for the first time by using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The accumulation of secreted yolk lipoprotein in the pseudocoelom of live C. elegans can be detected by CARS microscopy at both protein (~1665 cm−1) and lipid (~2845 cm−1) Raman bands. In addition, an image analysis protocol was established to quantitatively measure the levels of secreted yolk lipoprotein aberrantly accumulated in PUFA-deficient fat mutants (fat-1, fat-2, fat-3, fat-4) and PUFA-supplemented fat-2 worms (the PUFA add-back experiments). Our results revealed that the omega-6 PUFAs, not omega-3 PUFAs, play a critical role in modulating lipid/yolk level in the oocytes and regulating reproductive efficiency of C. elegans. This work demonstrates the value of using CARS microscopy as a molecular-selective label-free imaging technique for the study of PUFA regulation and oocyte development in C. elegans. PMID:27535493

  11. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-09-15

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR -129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that -129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with -129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than -129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo.

  12. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR −129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that −129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with −129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than −129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo. PMID:26370050

  13. Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate lipid delivery and oocyte development in C. elegans revealed by molecular-selective label-free imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lo, Szecheng J.; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibit critical functions in biological systems and their importance during animal oocyte maturation has been increasingly recognized. However, the detailed mechanism of lipid transportation for oocyte development remains largely unknown. In this study, the transportation of yolk lipoprotein (lipid carrier) and the rate of lipid delivery into oocytes in live C. elegans were examined for the first time by using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The accumulation of secreted yolk lipoprotein in the pseudocoelom of live C. elegans can be detected by CARS microscopy at both protein (~1665 cm‑1) and lipid (~2845 cm‑1) Raman bands. In addition, an image analysis protocol was established to quantitatively measure the levels of secreted yolk lipoprotein aberrantly accumulated in PUFA-deficient fat mutants (fat-1, fat-2, fat-3, fat-4) and PUFA-supplemented fat-2 worms (the PUFA add-back experiments). Our results revealed that the omega-6 PUFAs, not omega-3 PUFAs, play a critical role in modulating lipid/yolk level in the oocytes and regulating reproductive efficiency of C. elegans. This work demonstrates the value of using CARS microscopy as a molecular-selective label-free imaging technique for the study of PUFA regulation and oocyte development in C. elegans.

  14. Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate lipid delivery and oocyte development in C. elegans revealed by molecular-selective label-free imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lo, Szecheng J; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibit critical functions in biological systems and their importance during animal oocyte maturation has been increasingly recognized. However, the detailed mechanism of lipid transportation for oocyte development remains largely unknown. In this study, the transportation of yolk lipoprotein (lipid carrier) and the rate of lipid delivery into oocytes in live C. elegans were examined for the first time by using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The accumulation of secreted yolk lipoprotein in the pseudocoelom of live C. elegans can be detected by CARS microscopy at both protein (~1665 cm(-1)) and lipid (~2845 cm(-1)) Raman bands. In addition, an image analysis protocol was established to quantitatively measure the levels of secreted yolk lipoprotein aberrantly accumulated in PUFA-deficient fat mutants (fat-1, fat-2, fat-3, fat-4) and PUFA-supplemented fat-2 worms (the PUFA add-back experiments). Our results revealed that the omega-6 PUFAs, not omega-3 PUFAs, play a critical role in modulating lipid/yolk level in the oocytes and regulating reproductive efficiency of C. elegans. This work demonstrates the value of using CARS microscopy as a molecular-selective label-free imaging technique for the study of PUFA regulation and oocyte development in C. elegans. PMID:27535493

  15. The (Im)possibility of the Project: Radford Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bill

    2010-01-01

    In this address, the author engages both with the possibility "and" the impossibility of the educational project--and suggests something of what it means to say this. His presentation is specifically addressed to the theme of the (im)possibility of the educational project. He draws from philosophy, literature, psychoanalysis and history, as well…

  16. Development of a thermal storage module using modified anhydrous sodium hydroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. E.; Rowny, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    The laboratory scale testing of a modified anhydrous NaOH latent heat storage concept for small solar thermal power systems such as total energy systems utilizing organic Rankine systems is discussed. A diagnostic test on the thermal energy storage module and an investigation of alternative heat transfer fluids and heat exchange concepts are specifically addressed. A previously developed computer simulation model is modified to predict the performance of the module in a solar total energy system environment. In addition, the computer model is expanded to investigate parametrically the incorporation of a second heat exchange inside the module which will vaporize and superheat the Rankine cycle power fluid.

  17. Ras-GAP SH3 domain binding protein (G3BP) is a modulator of USP10, a novel human ubiquitin specific protease.

    PubMed

    Soncini, C; Berdo, I; Draetta, G

    2001-06-28

    Degradation of cellular proteins through ubiquitination is a fundamental strategy for regulating biological pathways. De-ubiquitination, i.e. the removal of ubiquitin from proteins and peptides to which ubiquitin is attached, is catalyzed by processing proteases known as de-ubiquitinating enzymes. We are studying the biology of a family of de-ubiquitinating enzymes, the mammalian ubiquitin-specific proteases (USPs), some of which appear to play a role in growth control. Given the fact that the modes of regulation of USPs and of their substrate specificity are poorly understood, we decided to attempt the identification of USP interacting proteins. Using the yeast two-hybrid system (2HS), we have isolated a cDNA clone whose product specifically interacts with USP10 but not with other USP baits tested. The isolated clone encodes a protein known to interact with the Ras-GTPase activating protein (G3BP). This interaction was further confirmed by performing a 2HS with G3BP, which led to the isolation of USP10 encoding cDNAs. We validated the interaction between the two proteins by performing in vitro binding assays and immunoprecipitations in human cells. G3BP does not appear to be a substrate of USP10; it rather inhibits the ability of USP10 to disassemble ubiquitin chains. The USP10/G3BP complex appears to co-immunoprecipitate with ubiquitinated species that could be substrates of USP10.

  18. PARP1 activation/expression modulates regional-specific neuronal and glial responses to seizure in a hemodynamic-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Kim, Y-J; Kim, J Y; Kang, T-C

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) plays a regulatory role in apoptosis, necrosis and other cellular processes after injury. Status epilepticus (SE) induces neuronal and astroglial death that show regional-specific patterns in the rat hippocampus and piriform cortex (PC). Thus, we investigated whether PARP1 regulates the differential neuronal/glial responses to pilocarpine (PILO)-induced SE in the distinct brain regions. In the present study, both CA1 and CA3 neurons showed PARP1 hyperactivation-dependent neuronal death pathway, whereas PC neurons exhibited PARP1 degradation-mediated neurodegeneration following SE. PARP1 degradation was also observed in astrocytes within the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. PARP1 induction was detected in CA1-3-reactive astrocytes, as well as in reactive microglia within the PC. Although PARP1 inhibitors attenuated CA1-3 neuronal death and reactive gliosis in the CA1 region, they deteriorated the astroglial death in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region. Ex vivo study showed the similar regional and cellular patterns of PARP1 activation/degradation. Taken together, our findings suggest that the cellular-specific PARP1 activation/degradation may distinctly involve regional-specific neuronal damage, astroglial death and reactive gliosis in response to SE independently of hemodynamics.

  19. Characterization of the driving force as a modulator of gating in cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channels - evidence for specific elementary properties.

    PubMed

    Benz, I; Haverkampf, K; Kohlhardt, M

    1998-09-01

    Single cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channels and, comparatively, two other members of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel family, cardiac K+(ir) and K+(ACh) channels, were studied in the inside-out recording mode in order to analyze influence and significance of the electrochemical K+ gradient for open-state kinetics of these K+ channels. The conductive state of K+(ATP) channels was defined as a function of the electrochemical K+ gradient in that increased driving force correlates with shortened open-channel lifetime. Flux coupling of gating can be largely excluded as the underlying mechanism for two reasons: (i) tauopen proved identical in 23 pS, 56 pS and 80 pS channels; (ii) K+(ATP) channel protonation by an external pH shift from 9.5 to 5.5 reduced conductance without a concomitant detectable change of tauopen. Since gating continued to operate at EK, i.e., in the absence of K+ permeation through the pore, K+ driving force cannot be causally involved in gating. Rather the driving force acts to modulate the gating process similar to Rb+ whose interference with an externally located binding site stabilizes the open state. In K+(ir) and K+(ACh) channels, the open state is essentially independent on driving force meaning that their gating apparatus does not sense the electrochemical K+ gradient. Thus, K+(ATP) channels differ in an important functional aspect which may be tentatively explained by a structural peculiarity of their gating apparatus.

  20. Brain region specific modulation of ethanol-induced depression of GABAergic neurons in the brain reward system by the nicotine receptor antagonist mecamylamine.

    PubMed

    Adermark, Louise; Söderpalm, Bo; Burkhardt, John M

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced activation of the mesolimbic dopamine system are not fully understood, but increased extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) has been shown to involve nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Basal activity of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is under the influence of GABAergic neurotransmission, and the aim of this study was to characterize the involvement of nAChRs in mediating acute ethanol effects on GABAergic activity in subregions of the brain reward system. Multi-electrode in vivo recordings were made in the VTA and nAc of awake and behaving C57BL6/J mice receiving intraperitoneal injections of saline or ethanol (2.0 g/kg), combined with, or without, pre-injection of the non-competitive nAChR antagonist mecamylamine (1.0 mg/kg). Ethanol significantly decreased the activity of quinpirole-insensitive slow-spiking and fast-spiking units in both the VTA and the nAc as compared to saline injection. Pre-treatment with mecamylamine inhibited the rate-inhibiting properties of ethanol in the VTA, but not in the nAc. The data presented here show that ethanol depresses the activity of quinpirole-insensitive, putative GABAergic neurons, in the mesolimbic dopamine system of mice, and that nAChRs contribute to this modulation. This finding, taken together with previous microdialysis studies, supports an involvement of GABAergic neurons and nAChRs in ethanol's interaction with the mesolimbic dopamine system.

  1. Tissue-specific expression of ghrelinergic and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 systems in goldfish (Carassius auratus) is modulated by macronutrient composition of diets.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ayelén M; Bertucci, Juan I; Delgado, María J; Valenciano, Ana I; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-05-01

    The macronutrient composition of diets is a very important factor in the regulation of body weight and metabolism. Several lines of research in mammals have shown that macronutrients differentially regulate metabolic hormones, including ghrelin and nesfatin-1 that have opposing effects on energy balance. This study aimed to determine whether macronutrients modulate the expression of ghrelin and the nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2) encoded nesfatin-1 in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Fish were fed once daily on control, high-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat and very high-fat diets for 7 (short-term) or 28 (long-term) days. The expression of preproghrelin, ghrelin O-acyl transferase (goat), growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1 (ghs-r1) and nucb2/nesfatin-1 mRNAs was quantified in the hypothalamus, pituitary, gut and liver. Short-term feeding with fat-enriched diets significantly increased nucb2 mRNA levels in hypothalamus and liver, preproghrelin, goat and ghs-r1 expression in pituitary, and ghs-r1 expression in gut. Fish fed on a high-protein diet exhibited a significant reduction in preproghrelin and ghs-r1 mRNAs in the liver. After long-term feeding, fish fed on high-carbohydrate and very high-fat diets had significantly increased preproghrelin, goat and ghs-r1 expression in pituitary. Feeding on a high-carbohydrate diet also upregulated goat and ghs-r1 transcripts in gut, while feeding on a high-fat diet elicited the same effect only for ghs-r1 in liver. Nucb2 expression increased in pituitary, while it decreased in gut after long-term feeding of a high-protein diet. Collectively, these results show for the first time in fish that macronutrients differentially regulate the expression of ghrelinergic and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 systems in central and peripheral tissues of goldfish. PMID:26805937

  2. Basic memory module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietze, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    Construction and electrical characterization of the 4096 x 2-bit Basic Memory Module (BMM) are reported for the Space Ultrareliable Modular Computer (SUMC) program. The module uses four 2K x 1-bit N-channel FET, random access memory chips, called array chips, and two sense amplifier chips, mounted and interconnected on a ceramic substrate. Four 5% tolerance power supplies are required. At the Module, the address, chip select, and array select lines require a 0-8.5 V MOS signal level. The data output, read-strobe, and write-enable lines operate at TTl levels. Although the module is organized as 4096 x 2 bits, it can be used in a 8196 x 1-bit application with appropriate external connections. A 4096 x 1-bit organization can be obtained by depopulating chips.

  3. Addressing Passive Smoking in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Sasha G.; Kuijlaars, Jennifer S.; Mesters, Ilse; Muris, Jean W. M.; van Schayck, Constant P.; Dompeling, Edward; Feron, Frans J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant number of parents are unaware or unconvinced of the health consequences of passive smoking (PS) in children. Physicians could increase parental awareness by giving personal advice. Aim To evaluate the current practices of three Dutch health professions (paediatricians, youth health care physicians, and family physicians) regarding parental counselling for passive smoking (PS) in children. Methods All physicians (n = 720) representing the three health professions in Limburg, the Netherlands, received an invitation to complete a self-administered electronic questionnaire including questions on their: sex, work experience, personal smoking habits, counselling practices and education regarding PS in children. Results The response rate was 34%. One tenth (11%) of the responding physicians always addressed PS in children, 32% often, 54% occasionally and 4% reported to never attend to it. The three health professions appeared comparable regarding their frequency of parental counselling for PS in children. Addressing PS was more likely when children had respiratory problems. Lack of time was the most frequently mentioned barrier, being very and somewhat applicable for respectively 14% and 43% of the physicians. One fourth of the responders had received postgraduate education about PS. Additionally, 49% of the responders who did not have any education about PS were interested in receiving it. Conclusions Physicians working in the paediatric field in Limburg, the Netherlands, could more frequently address PS in children with parents. Lack of time appeared to be the most mentioned barrier and physicians were more likely to counsel parents for PS in children with respiratory complaints/diseases. Finally, a need for more education on parental counselling for PS was expressed. PMID:24809443

  4. Addressing inequities in healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Friel, Sharon; Hattersley, Libby; Ford, Laura; O'Rourke, Kerryn

    2015-09-01

    What, when, where and how much people eat is influenced by a complex mix of factors at societal, community and individual levels. These influences operate both directly through the food system and indirectly through political, economic, social and cultural pathways that cause social stratification and influence the quality of conditions in which people live their lives. These factors are the social determinants of inequities in healthy eating. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence base for addressing these determinants and for the promotion of equity in healthy eating. PMID:26420812

  5. Identifying and Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Kestenbaum, Lori A.; Feemster, Kristen A.

    2015-01-01

    In the 20th century, the introduction of multiple vaccines significantly reduced childhood morbidity, mortality, and disease outbreaks. Despite, and perhaps because of, their public health impact, an increasing number of parents and patients are choosing to delay or refuse vaccines. These individuals are described as vaccine hesitant. This phenomenon has developed due to the confluence of multiple social, cultural, political and personal factors. As immunization programs continue to expand, understanding and addressing vaccine hesitancy will be crucial to their successful implementation. This review explores the history of vaccine hesitancy, its causes, and suggested approaches for reducing hesitancy and strengthening vaccine acceptance. PMID:25875982

  6. Nanoscale content-addressable memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bryan (Inventor); Principe, Jose C. (Inventor); Fortes, Jose (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A combined content addressable memory device and memory interface is provided. The combined device and interface includes one or more one molecular wire crossbar memories having spaced-apart key nanowires, spaced-apart value nanowires adjacent to the key nanowires, and configurable switches between the key nanowires and the value nanowires. The combination further includes a key microwire-nanowire grid (key MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart key nanowires, and a value microwire-nanowire grid (value MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart value nanowires. A key or value MNGs selects multiple nanowires for a given key or value.

  7. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  8. Astronaut Edgar Mitchell addresses MSC personnel and news media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, right, the Apollo 14 lunar module pilot, addresses JSC/MSC personnel and news media representatives and other visitors soon after he and his fellow crewmen were released from a 15-day confinement period in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. Pictured with Mitchell in front of the LRL, MSC bldg 37, are Astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., left, commander; and Stuart A Roosa, command module pilot, Mrs Mitchell is at right and Mrs. Roosa, near left. Roosa is flanked by his four children, left to right, Christopher A., Stuart A. Roosa Jr., John D. and Rosemary D.

  9. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Shawna; Croxford, Matthew W.; Abeysinghe, Amali P.; Breeden, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF), which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state. PMID:27272642

  10. SU-E-T-69: Cloud-Based Monte Carlo Patient-Specific Quality Assurance (QA) Method for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Xing, L; Luxton, G; Bush, K; Azcona, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific QA for VMAT is incapable of providing full 3D dosimetric information and is labor intensive in the case of severe heterogeneities or small-aperture beams. A cloud-based Monte Carlo dose reconstruction method described here can perform the evaluation in entire 3D space and rapidly reveal the source of discrepancies between measured and planned dose. Methods: This QA technique consists of two integral parts: measurement using a phantom containing array of dosimeters, and a cloud-based voxel Monte Carlo algorithm (cVMC). After a VMAT plan was approved by a physician, a dose verification plan was created and delivered to the phantom using our Varian Trilogy or TrueBeam system. Actual delivery parameters (i.e., dose fraction, gantry angle, and MLC at control points) were extracted from Dynalog or trajectory files. Based on the delivery parameters, the 3D dose distribution in the phantom containing detector were recomputed using Eclipse dose calculation algorithms (AAA and AXB) and cVMC. Comparison and Gamma analysis is then conducted to evaluate the agreement between measured, recomputed, and planned dose distributions. To test the robustness of this method, we examined several representative VMAT treatments. Results: (1) The accuracy of cVMC dose calculation was validated via comparative studies. For cases that succeeded the patient specific QAs using commercial dosimetry systems such as Delta- 4, MAPCheck, and PTW Seven29 array, agreement between cVMC-recomputed, Eclipse-planned and measured doses was obtained with >90% of the points satisfying the 3%-and-3mm gamma index criteria. (2) The cVMC method incorporating Dynalog files was effective to reveal the root causes of the dosimetric discrepancies between Eclipse-planned and measured doses and provide a basis for solutions. Conclusion: The proposed method offers a highly robust and streamlined patient specific QA tool and provides a feasible solution for the rapidly increasing use of VMAT

  11. Pattern Dynamics in Adaxial-Abaxial Specific Gene Expression Are Modulated by a Plastid Retrograde Signal during Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Tameshige, Toshiaki; Fujita, Hironori; Watanabe, Keiro; Toyokura, Koichi; Kondo, Maki; Tatematsu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Noritaka; Tsugeki, Ryuji; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Mikio; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance and reformation of gene expression domains are the basis for the morphogenic processes of multicellular systems. In a leaf primordium of Arabidopsis thaliana, the expression of FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL) and the activity of the microRNA miR165/166 are specific to the abaxial side. This miR165/166 activity restricts the target gene expression to the adaxial side. The adaxial and abaxial specific gene expressions are crucial for the wide expansion of leaf lamina. The FIL-expression and the miR165/166-free domains are almost mutually exclusive, and they have been considered to be maintained during leaf development. However, we found here that the position of the boundary between the two domains gradually shifts from the adaxial side to the abaxial side. The cell lineage analysis revealed that this boundary shifting was associated with a sequential gene expression switch from the FIL-expressing (miR165/166 active) to the miR165/166-free (non-FIL-expressing) states. Our genetic analyses using the enlarged fil expression domain2 (enf2) mutant and chemical treatment experiments revealed that impairment in the plastid (chloroplast) gene expression machinery retards this boundary shifting and inhibits the lamina expansion. Furthermore, these developmental effects caused by the abnormal plastids were not observed in the genomes uncoupled1 (gun1) mutant background. This study characterizes the dynamic nature of the adaxial-abaxial specification process in leaf primordia and reveals that the dynamic process is affected by the GUN1-dependent retrograde signal in response to the failure of plastid gene expression. These findings advance our understanding on the molecular mechanism linking the plastid function to the leaf morphogenic processes. PMID:23935517

  12. Total and Envelope Protein-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cell Response in Pediatric Dengue Is Highly Modulated by Age and Subsequent Infections.

    PubMed

    Toro, Jessica F; Salgado, Doris M; Vega, Rocío; Rodríguez, Jairo A; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A; Greenberg, Harry B; Narváez, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    The response of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) induced by dengue has only recently started to be characterized. We propose that young age and previous infections could be simple factors that affect this response. Here, we evaluated the primary and secondary responses of circulating ASC in infants (6-12 months old) and children (1-14 years old) infected with dengue showing different degrees of clinical severity. The ASC response was delayed and of lower magnitude in infants, compared with older children. In primary infection (PI), the total and envelope (E) protein-specific IgM ASC were dominant in infants but not in children, and a negative correlation was found between age and the number of IgM ASC (rho = -0.59, P = 0.03). However, infants with plasma dengue-specific IgG detectable in the acute phase developed an intense ASC response largely dominated by IgG and comparable to that of children with secondary infection (SI). IgM and IgG produced by ASC circulating in PI or SI were highly cross-reactive among the four serotypes. Dengue infection caused the disturbance of B cell subsets, particularly a decrease in the relative frequency of naïve B cells. Higher frequencies of total and E protein-specific IgM ASC in the infants and IgG in the children were associated with clinically severe forms of infection. Therefore, the ASC response induced by dengue is highly influenced by the age at which infection occurs and previous immune status, and its magnitude is a relevant element in the clinical outcome. These results are important in the search for correlates of protection and for determining the ideal age for vaccinating against dengue. PMID:27560782

  13. Total and Envelope Protein-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cell Response in Pediatric Dengue Is Highly Modulated by Age and Subsequent Infections

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Jessica F.; Salgado, Doris M.; Vega, Rocío; Rodríguez, Jairo A.; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Narváez, Carlos F.

    2016-01-01

    The response of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) induced by dengue has only recently started to be characterized. We propose that young age and previous infections could be simple factors that affect this response. Here, we evaluated the primary and secondary responses of circulating ASC in infants (6–12 months old) and children (1–14 years old) infected with dengue showing different degrees of clinical severity. The ASC response was delayed and of lower magnitude in infants, compared with older children. In primary infection (PI), the total and envelope (E) protein-specific IgM ASC were dominant in infants but not in children, and a negative correlation was found between age and the number of IgM ASC (rho = −0.59, P = 0.03). However, infants with plasma dengue-specific IgG detectable in the acute phase developed an intense ASC response largely dominated by IgG and comparable to that of children with secondary infection (SI). IgM and IgG produced by ASC circulating in PI or SI were highly cross-reactive among the four serotypes. Dengue infection caused the disturbance of B cell subsets, particularly a decrease in the relative frequency of naïve B cells. Higher frequencies of total and E protein-specific IgM ASC in the infants and IgG in the children were associated with clinically severe forms of infection. Therefore, the ASC response induced by dengue is highly influenced by the age at which infection occurs and previous immune status, and its magnitude is a relevant element in the clinical outcome. These results are important in the search for correlates of protection and for determining the ideal age for vaccinating against dengue. PMID:27560782

  14. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Miles, Shawna; Croxford, Matthew W; Abeysinghe, Amali P; Breeden, Linda L

    2016-06-01

    Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF), which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state. PMID:27272642

  15. Global-Address Space Networking (GASNet) Library

    2011-04-06

    GASNet (Global-Address Space Networking) is a language-independent, low-level networking layer that provides network-independent, high-performance communication primitives tailored for implementing parallel global address space SPMD languages such as UPC and Titanium. The interface is primarily intended as a compilation target and for use by runtime library writers (as opposed to end users), and the primary goals are high performance, interface portability, and expressiveness. GASNet is designed specifically to support high-performance, portable implementations of global address spacemore » languages on modern high-end communication networks. The interface provides the flexibility and extensibility required to express a wide variety of communication patterns without sacrificing performance by imposing large computational overheads in the interface. The design of the GASNet interface is partitioned into two layers to maximize porting ease without sacrificing performance: the lower level is a narrow but very general interface called the GASNet core API - the design is basedheavily on Active Messages, and is implemented directly on top of each individual network architecture. The upper level is a wider and more expressive interface called GASNet extended API, which provides high-level operations such as remote memory access and various collective operations. This release implements GASNet over MPI, the Quadrics "elan" API, the Myrinet "GM" API and the "LAPI" interface to the IBM SP switch. A template is provided for adding support for additional network interfaces.« less

  16. Innovative Legal Approaches to Address Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pomeranz, Jennifer L; Teret, Stephen P; Sugarman, Stephen D; Rutkow, Lainie; Brownell, Kelly D

    2009-01-01

    Context: The law is a powerful public health tool with considerable potential to address the obesity issue. Scientific advances, gaps in the current regulatory environment, and new ways of conceptualizing rights and responsibilities offer a foundation for legal innovation. Methods: This article connects developments in public health and nutrition with legal advances to define promising avenues for preventing obesity through the application of the law. Findings: Two sets of approaches are defined: (1) direct application of the law to factors known to contribute to obesity and (2) original and innovative legal solutions that address the weak regulatory stance of government and the ineffectiveness of existing policies used to control obesity. Specific legal strategies are discussed for limiting children's food marketing, confronting the potential addictive properties of food, compelling industry speech, increasing government speech, regulating conduct, using tort litigation, applying nuisance law as a litigation strategy, and considering performance-based regulation as an alternative to typical regulatory actions. Finally, preemption is an overriding issue and can play both a facilitative and a hindering role in obesity policy. Conclusions: Legal solutions are immediately available to the government to address obesity and should be considered at the federal, state, and local levels. New and innovative legal solutions represent opportunities to take the law in creative directions and to link legal, nutrition, and public health communities in constructive ways. PMID:19298420

  17. Role of the Substrate Specificity-Defining Residues of Human SIRT5 in Modulating the Structural Stability and Inhibitory Features of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junru; Haldar, Manas; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    manifested via the mutation induced modulation in the protein structure. PMID:27023330

  18. Role of the Substrate Specificity-Defining Residues of Human SIRT5 in Modulating the Structural Stability and Inhibitory Features of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junru; Haldar, Manas; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D K

    2016-01-01

    manifested via the mutation induced modulation in the protein structure.

  19. Role of the Substrate Specificity-Defining Residues of Human SIRT5 in Modulating the Structural Stability and Inhibitory Features of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junru; Haldar, Manas; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D K

    2016-01-01

    manifested via the mutation induced modulation in the protein structure. PMID:27023330

  20. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation.

  1. Optical Electronics. Electronics Module 9. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franken, Bill

    This module is the ninth of 10 modules in the competency-based electronics series. Introductory materials include a listing of competencies addressed in the module, a parts/equipment list, and a cross reference table of instructional materials. Five instructional units cover: fiber optic cable; optical coupler; lasers and masers; optical displays;…

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat increases the expression of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 73-kilodalton subunit modulating cellular and viral expression.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; Sancho, Rocío; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, which is essential for HIV gene expression and viral replication, is known to mediate pleiotropic effects on various cell functions. For instance, Tat protein is able to regulate the rate of transcription of host cellular genes and to interact with the signaling machinery, leading to cellular dysfunction. To study the effect that HIV-1 Tat exerts on the host cell, we identified several genes that were up- or down-regulated in tat-expressing cell lines by using the differential display method. HIV-1 Tat specifically increases the expression of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) 73-kDa subunit (CPSF3) without affecting the expression of the 160- and 100-kDa subunits of the CPSF complex. This complex comprises four subunits and has a key function in the 3'-end processing of pre-mRNAs by a coordinated interaction with other factors. CPSF3 overexpression experiments and knockdown of the endogenous CPSF3 by mRNA interference have shown that this subunit of the complex is an important regulatory protein for both viral and cellular gene expression. In addition to the known CPSF3 function in RNA polyadenylation, we also present evidence that this protein exerts transcriptional activities by repressing the mdm2 gene promoter. Thus, HIV-1-Tat up-regulation of CPSF3 could represent a novel mechanism by which this virus increases mRNA processing, causing an increase in both cell and viral gene expression.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat Increases the Expression of Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor 73-Kilodalton Subunit Modulating Cellular and Viral Expression

    PubMed Central

    Calzado, Marco A.; Sancho, Rocío; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, which is essential for HIV gene expression and viral replication, is known to mediate pleiotropic effects on various cell functions. For instance, Tat protein is able to regulate the rate of transcription of host cellular genes and to interact with the signaling machinery, leading to cellular dysfunction. To study the effect that HIV-1 Tat exerts on the host cell, we identified several genes that were up- or down-regulated in tat-expressing cell lines by using the differential display method. HIV-1 Tat specifically increases the expression of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) 73-kDa subunit (CPSF3) without affecting the expression of the 160- and 100-kDa subunits of the CPSF complex. This complex comprises four subunits and has a key function in the 3′-end processing of pre-mRNAs by a coordinated interaction with other factors. CPSF3 overexpression experiments and knockdown of the endogenous CPSF3 by mRNA interference have shown that this subunit of the complex is an important regulatory protein for both viral and cellular gene expression. In addition to the known CPSF3 function in RNA polyadenylation, we also present evidence that this protein exerts transcriptional activities by repressing the mdm2 gene promoter. Thus, HIV-1-Tat up-regulation of CPSF3 could represent a novel mechanism by which this virus increases mRNA processing, causing an increase in both cell and viral gene expression. PMID:15194760

  4. BMP signalling in human fetal ovary somatic cells is modulated in a gene-specific fashion by GREM1 and GREM2

    PubMed Central

    Bayne, Rosemary A.; Donnachie, Douglas J.; Kinnell, Hazel L.; Childs, Andrew J.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    expression of BMP antagonists GREM1, GREM2 and CHRD  increases in the lead-up to primordial follicle formation in the human fetal ovary, and that the BMP pathway is active in cultured ovarian somatic cells. This leads to differential changes in the expression of a number of genes, some of which are further modulated by GREM1 and/or GREM2. The positive transcriptional regulation of LGR5 (a marker of less differentiated somatic cells) by BMP4 in vitro suggests that increasing levels of GREM1 and reduced levels of BMP4 as the ovary develops in vivo may act to reduce LGR5 levels and allow pre-granulosa cell differentiation. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION While we have demonstrated that markers of different somatic cell types are expressed in the cultured ovarian somatic cells, their proportions may not represent the same cells in the intact ovary which also contains germ cells. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS This study extends previous work identifying germ cells as targets of ovarian BMP signalling, and suggests BMPs may regulate the development of both germ and somatic cells in the developing ovary around the time of follicle formation. LARGE SCALE DATA Not applicable. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS This work was supported by The UK Medical Research Council (Grant No.: G1100357 to RAA), and Medical Research Scotland (Grant No. 345FRG to AJC). The authors have no competing interests to declare. PMID:27385727

  5. Changing concepts: the presidential address.

    PubMed

    Weed, J C

    1974-09-01

    A discussion of conceptual change in areas related to fertility and medicine is presented in an address by the president of the American Fertility Society. Advances in technological research and medicine, particularly in steroids and reporductive physiology, have been the most readily acceptable changes. Cesarean section and surgical sterilization have also become increasingly accepted. Newer developments such as sperm banks, artificial insemination, and ovum transfer have created profound ethical, moral, and medical issued in human engineering research and evolutionary theory. The legalization of abortion has brought moral, ethical, and legal problems for many members of the medical profession. It is urged that the Society promote education of the people in reproductive function, sexual activity, and parental obligation while being acutely aware of the problems in influencing or altering human reproduction.

  6. Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert; Abraham, Jacob; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, J.; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, Bill; Chien, Andrew; Coteus, Paul; DeBardeleben, Nathan; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Fazzari, Saverio; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Rob; Stearley, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on Addressing failures in exascale computing' held in Park City, Utah, 4-11 August 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system, discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system, and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia, and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  7. Addressing failures in exascale computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Abraham, Jacob A.; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, Jim; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, William; Chien, Andrew A.; Coteus, Paul; Debardeleben, Nathan A.; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Saverio, Fazzari; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Robert; Stearly, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on “Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing” held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system; and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia; and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  8. Light addressable photoelectrochemical cyanide sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Myung, N.; Sun, Y.

    1996-03-15

    A sensor is demonstrated that is capable of spatial discrimination of cyanide with use of only a single stationary sensing element. Different spatial regions of the sensing element are light activated to reveal the solution cyanide concentration only at the point of illumination. In this light addressable photoelectrochemical (LAP) sensor the sensing element consists of an n-CdSe electrode immersed in solution, with the open-circuit potential determined under illumination. In alkaline ferro-ferri-cyanide solution, the open-circuit photopotential is highly responsive to cyanide, with a linear response of (120 mV) log [KCN]. LAP detection with a spatial resolution of {+-}1 mm for cyanide detection is demonstrated. The response is almost linear for 0.001-0.100 m cyanide with a resolution of 5 mV. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The first bromodomain of the testis-specific double bromodomain protein Brdt is required for chromocenter organization that is modulated by genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Berkovits, Binyamin D.; Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2011-01-01

    Mice homozygous for a mutation (BrdtΔBD1/ΔBD1) lacking the first bromodomain of Brdt, a testis-specific member of the BET family of double-bromodomain containing proteins, are sterile and exhibit profound defects in chromatin remodeling during spermiogenesis. We have now observed that a prominent feature of the aberrant spermatid nuclei is a fragmented chromocenter, a structure comprised of peri-centromeric heterochromatin. There was a concomitant increase in the levels of heterochromatin protein 1 alpha (Hp1α), suggesting that the presence of multiple chromocenters was correlated with a spread of heterochromatin beyond the normal centromeric region. Brdt protein was normally present throughout the nucleus but was excluded from the chromocenter. A more densely staining region of Brdt protein appeared to separate sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) protein from contact with the chromocenter. Although still nuclear, this unique localization of Brdt protein was lost in BrdtΔBD1/ΔBD1 mutant spermatids and Brdt and Sirt1 overlapped around the chromocenters. There was also ectopic localization of the H1 histone family, member N, testis-specific (H1fnt) protein in BrdtΔBD1/ΔBD1 round spermatids, which may be linked to the previously reported loss of polarized localization of peri-nuclear heterochromatin foci. The extent of chromocenter fragmentation was more severe and penetrant in mutant testes on a pure 129Sv/Ev as compared to a pure C57Bl/6 background. Indeed, all aspects of the mutant phenotype were more severe on the 129Sv/Ev background. Contrary to previous studies in genetic models where fragmented chromocenters were observed in spermatids, the BrdtΔBD1/ΔBD1 mutant spermatids do not undergo apoptosis (on either background). These observations suggest that the first bromodomain of Brdt is critical in the formation and/or maintenance of an intact chromocenter and implicate this structure in proper remodeling of the chromatin architecture of the sperm head. PMID:22020252

  10. Development of stably transfected human and rat hepatoma cell lines for the species-specific assessment of xenobiotic response enhancer module (XREM)-dependent induction of drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fery, Yvonne; Mueller, Stefan O; Schrenk, Dieter

    2010-11-01

    Based on our current knowledge, PXR holds a key position in the induction of a selective battery of enzymes and transporters of drug metabolism. In order to prevent serious adverse drug effects or unpredicted drug-drug interactions (DDI), it is compulsory to investigate the possible inducing potency of drugs under development. Furthermore, analysis of the inducing potency of environmental pollutants and new or manufactured chemicals is part of toxicological risk assessment. In non-transfected human HepG2 and rat H4IIE hepatoma cells, we examined the characteristics of expression of 45 genes involved in drug metabolism. A few gene products such as CYP2B6 or CYP3A4 mRNA were prominent in HepG2 cells while their major rat counterparts were, e.g., CYP2B3 or CYP3A1/3A3. Furthermore, a number of xenobiotic receptors including PXR were expressed in both cell lines. A number of genes were regulated in a cell type and species-specific manner after incubation with the prototypical PXR agonists rifampicin or dexamethasone, respectively. Then, we established cell-based reporter gene assays for screening for PXR-dependent induction of drug metabolism. HepG2 and H4IIE cells were stably transfected with a reporter gene containing PXR responsive elements (XREMs) which mediate the induction of PXR target genes such as CYP3A enzymes. With both stable cell lines the CYP inducers clotrimazole, dexamethasone, omeprazole, phenobarbital, rifampicin, as well as the drug candidate EMD 392949 and the brominated flame retardants hexabromocylododecane (HBCD) and a pentabromodiphenyl ether (pentaBDE) mixture were screened. In the human HepG2-XREM3 and rat H4IIE-XREM3 cells, clotrimazole and HBCD were found as common activators of the human and rat PXR whereas pentaBDE was more effective with the human cell system. Omeprazole and phenobarbital did not induce the rat PXR-dependent reporter gene expression in H4IIE-XREM3 cells, while a moderate increase was found in HepG2-XREM3 cells. EMD 392949

  11. The modulation of extracellular superoxide dismutase in the specifically enhanced cellular immune response against secondary challenge of Vibrio splendidus in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Liu, Conghui; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Weilin; Jia, Zhihao; Jiang, Shuai; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EcSOD) is a copper-containing glycoprotein playing an important role in antioxidant defense of living cells exposed to oxidative stress, and also participating in microorganism internalization and cell adhesion in invertebrates. EcSOD from oyster (designated CgEcSOD) had been previously reported to bind lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and act as a bridge molecule in Vibrio splendidus internalization. Its mRNA expression pattern, PAMP binding spectrum and microorganism binding capability were examined in the present study. The mRNA expression of CgEcSOD in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated at the initial phase and decreased sharply at 48 h post V. splendidus stimulation. The recombinant CgEcSOD protein (rCgEcSOD) could bind LPS, PGN and poly (I:C), as well as various microorganisms including Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Vibrio anguillarum, V. splendidus, Pastoris pastoris and Yarrowia lipolytica at the presence of divalent metal ions Cu(2+). After the secondary V. splendidus stimulation, the mRNA and protein of CgEcSOD were both down-regulated significantly. The results collectively indicated that CgEcSOD could not only function in the immune recognition, but also might contribute to the immune priming of oyster by inhibiting the foreign microbe invasion through a specific down-regulation. PMID:27268574

  12. Recessive resistance to thyroid hormone in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor beta: evidence for tissue-specific modulation of receptor function.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, D; Hanebuth, E; Smeyne, R J; Everds, N; Stewart, C L; Wehner, J M; Curran, T

    1996-01-01

    The diverse functions of thyroid hormone (T3) are presumed to be mediated by two genes encoding the related receptors, TRalpha and TRbeta. However, the in vivo functions of TRalpha and TRbeta are undefined. Here, we report that targeted inactivation of the mouse TRbeta gene results in goitre and elevated levels of thyroid hormone. Also, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which is released by pituitary thyrotropes and which is normally suppressed by increased levels of thyroid hormone, was present at elevated levels in homozygous mutant (Thrb-/-) mice. These findings suggest a unique role for TRbeta that cannot be substituted by TRalpha in the T3-dependent feedback regulation of TSH transcription. Thrb-/- mice provide a recessive model for the human syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) that exhibits a similar endocrine disorder but which is typically caused by dominant TRbeta mutants that are transcriptional inhibitors. It is unknown whether TRalpha, TRbeta or other receptors are targets for inhibition in dominant RTH; however, the analysis of Thrb-/- mice suggests that antagonism of TRbeta-mediated pathways underlies the disorder of the pituitary-thyroid axis. Interestingly, in the brain, the absence of TRbeta may not mimic the defects often associated with dominant RTH, since no overt behavioural or neuroanatomical abnormalities were detected in Thrb-/- mice. These data define in vivo functions for TRbeta and indicate that specificity in T3 signalling is conferred by distinct receptor genes. Images PMID:8670802

  13. Conflict adaptation within but not across NoGo decision criteria: Event-related-potential evidence of specificity in the contextual modulation of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Julia L; Clark, Sheri L; Freitas, Antonio L

    2015-07-01

    From the standpoint of conflict-monitoring theory (Botvinick et al., 2001), detecting an incident of information-processing conflict should attenuate the disruptive influence of information-processing conflicts encountered subsequently, by which time cognitive-control operations will have been engaged. To examine the generality of this conflict-adaptation process across task dimensions, the present research analyzed event-related potentials in a Go/NoGo task that randomly varied the NoGo decision criterion applied across trials. Sequential analyses revealed reduced-amplitude fronto-central N2 and NoGo P3 responses on the second of two consecutive NoGo trials. Importantly, both of these conflict-adaptation effects were present only when the same NoGo decision criterion was applied across trials n and n-1. These findings support the theory that encountering information-processing conflict focuses attention on specific stimulus-response contingencies (Verguts & Notebaert, 2009) rather than engages general cognitive-control mechanisms (Freitas & Clark, 2015). Further implications for the generality of cognitive control are discussed.

  14. The Copper Metabolism MURR1 Domain Protein 1 (COMMD1) Modulates the Aggregation of Misfolded Protein Species in a Client-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vonk, Willianne I. M.; Kakkar, Vaishali; Bartuzi, Paulina; Jaarsma, Dick; Berger, Ruud; Hofker, Marten H.; Klomp, Leo W. J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kampinga, Harm H.; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The Copper Metabolism MURR1 domain protein 1 (COMMD1) is a protein involved in multiple cellular pathways, including copper homeostasis, NF-κB and hypoxia signalling. Acting as a scaffold protein, COMMD1 mediates the levels, stability and proteolysis of its substrates (e.g. the copper-transporters ATP7B and ATP7A, RELA and HIF-1α). Recently, we established an interaction between the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and COMMD1, resulting in a decreased maturation and activation of SOD1. Mutations in SOD1, associated with the progressive neurodegenerative disorder Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), cause misfolding and aggregation of the mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) protein. Here, we identify COMMD1 as a novel regulator of misfolded protein aggregation as it enhances the formation of mSOD1 aggregates upon binding. Interestingly, COMMD1 co-localizes to the sites of mSOD1 inclusions and forms high molecular weight complexes in the presence of mSOD1. The effect of COMMD1 on protein aggregation is client-specific as, in contrast to mSOD1, COMMD1 decreases the abundance of mutant Parkin inclusions, associated with Parkinson’s disease. Aggregation of a polyglutamine-expanded Huntingtin, causative of Huntington’s disease, appears unaltered by COMMD1. Altogether, this study offers new research directions to expand our current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying aggregation disease pathologies. PMID:24691167

  15. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin contributes to pain nociception induced in rats by BmK I, a sodium channel-specific modulator.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Hua, Li-Ming; Jiao, Yun-Lu; Ye, Pin; Fu, Jin; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Ding, Gang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for maintenance of the sensitivity of certain adult sensory neurons. Here, we investigated whether the mTOR cascade is involved in scorpion envenomation-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats. The results showed that intraplantar injection of a neurotoxin from Buthus martensii Karsch, BmK I (10 μg), induced the activation of mTOR, as well as its downstream molecules p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70 S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), in lumbar 5-6 dorsal root ganglia neurons on both sides in rats. The activation peaked at 2 h and recovered 1 day after injection. Compared with the control group, the ratios of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4EBP1 in three types of neurons changed significantly. The cell typology of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4E-BP1 immuno-reactive neurons also changed. Intrathecal administration of deforolimus, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, attenuated BmK I-induced pain responses (spontaneous flinching, paroxysmal pain-like behavior, and mechanical hypersensitivity). Together, these results imply that the mTOR signaling pathway is mobilized by and contributes to experimental scorpion sting-induced pain. PMID:24132796

  16. Pre-B cell receptor binding to galectin-1 modifies galectin-1/carbohydrate affinity to modulate specific galectin-1/glycan lattice interactions.

    PubMed

    Bonzi, Jeremy; Bornet, Olivier; Betzi, Stephane; Kasper, Brian T; Mahal, Lara K; Mancini, Stephane J; Schiff, Claudine; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Guerlesquin, Francoise; Elantak, Latifa

    2015-01-01

    Galectins are glycan-binding proteins involved in various biological processes including cell/cell interactions. During B-cell development, bone marrow stromal cells secreting galectin-1 (GAL1) constitute a specific niche for pre-BII cells. Besides binding glycans, GAL1 is also a pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) ligand that induces receptor clustering, the first checkpoint of B-cell differentiation. The GAL1/pre-BCR interaction is the first example of a GAL1/unglycosylated protein interaction in the extracellular compartment. Here we show that GAL1/pre-BCR interaction modifies GAL1/glycan affinity and particularly inhibits binding to LacNAc containing epitopes. GAL1/pre-BCR interaction induces local conformational changes in the GAL1 carbohydrate-binding site generating a reduction in GAL1/glycan affinity. This fine tuning of GAL1/glycan interactions may be a strategic mechanism for allowing pre-BCR clustering and pre-BII cells departure from their niche. Altogether, our data suggest a novel mechanism for a cell to modify the equilibrium of the GAL1/glycan lattice involving GAL1/unglycosylated protein interactions. PMID:25708191

  17. Organ specific, protocol dependent modulation of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene carcinogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by dietary ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Harttig, U; Hendricks, J D; Stoner, G D; Bailey, G S

    1996-11-01

    This study investigated pre-initiation and post-initiation effects of dietary ellagic acid (EA) on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) multi-organ carcinogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). EA at 100, 250 (study 2), 1000 and 2000 (study 1) p.p.m. suppressed stomach adenopapilloma incidence by 33, 60, 70 and 78% (P < or = 0.001), respectively, as well as tumor multiplicity (P < 0.01) and size (P < 0.001) when fed continuously following DMBA initiation. However, continuous EA feeding also produced modest (250 p.p.m.) to extensive (1000, 2000 p.p.m.) growth rate suppression in these studies. Retrospective logistic regression modeling of the data allowed separation of growth-related from non-growth-related inhibitory effects. By this approach: (i) tumor development showed a similarly strong dependence (same regression slope) on animal growth rate in all treatment groups; (ii) EA-mediated reduction in mean population growth contributed to suppressed stomach tumor response above 250 p.p.m. EA; and (iii) even at high, toxic doses EA displayed inhibitory mechanisms additional to, and distinct from, growth suppression effect. The effects of post-initiation EA were organ specific. Chronic EA treatment significantly suppressed swim-bladder as well as stomach tumor incidence at doses > or = 1000 p.p.m., but increased liver tumor incidence at doses > or = 250 p.p.m. Three protocols examined EA effects on the initiation process. EA fed at 1000 p.p.m. concurrently with 750 p.p.m. dietary DMBA for 7 weeks modestly reduced stomach tumor incidence (from 85 to 78%, P < 0.05) and multiplicity (from 6.3 +/- 4.3 to 4.9 +/- 2.9, P < 0.01), but did not alter swim-bladder or liver response. The effect of EA pretreatment prior to DMBA single-dose initiation by gill uptake was also examined. When fed for 1 week prior to initiation, 2000 p.p.m. EA again imposed a small reduction in stomach adenoma incidence (from 88 to 78%; P < 0.05) and multiplicity (from 5.5 +/- 3.2 to 4

  18. Maternal folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methylation and gene expression in the rat offspring in a gestation period-dependent and organ-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Ly, Anna; Ishiguro, Lisa; Kim, Denise; Im, David; Kim, Sung-Eun; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2016-07-01

    Maternal folic acid supplementation can alter DNA methylation and gene expression in the developing fetus, which may confer disease susceptibility later in life. We determined which gestation period and organ were most sensitive to the modifying effect of folic acid supplementation during pregnancy on DNA methylation and gene expression in the offspring. Pregnant rats were randomized to a control diet throughout pregnancy; folic acid supplementation at 2.5× the control during the 1st, 2nd or 3rd week of gestation only; or folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy. The brain, liver, kidney and colon from newborn pups were analyzed for folate concentrations, global DNA methylation and gene expression of the Igf2, Er-α, Gr, Ppar-α and Ppar-γ genes. Folic acid supplementation during the 2nd or 3rd week gestation or throughout pregnancy significantly increased brain folate concentrations (P<.001), while only folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy significantly increased liver folate concentrations (P=.005), in newborn pups. Brain global DNA methylation incrementally decreased from early to late gestational folic acid supplementation and was the lowest with folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy (P=.026). Folic acid supplementation in late gestation or throughout pregnancy significantly decreased Er-α, Gr and Ppar-α gene expression in the liver (P<.05). The kidney and colon were resistant to the effect of folic acid supplementation. Maternal folic acid supplementation affects tissue folate concentrations, DNA methylation and gene expression in the offspring in a gestation-period-dependent and organ-specific manner. PMID:27152636

  19. Maternal folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methylation and gene expression in the rat offspring in a gestation period-dependent and organ-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Ly, Anna; Ishiguro, Lisa; Kim, Denise; Im, David; Kim, Sung-Eun; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2016-07-01

    Maternal folic acid supplementation can alter DNA methylation and gene expression in the developing fetus, which may confer disease susceptibility later in life. We determined which gestation period and organ were most sensitive to the modifying effect of folic acid supplementation during pregnancy on DNA methylation and gene expression in the offspring. Pregnant rats were randomized to a control diet throughout pregnancy; folic acid supplementation at 2.5× the control during the 1st, 2nd or 3rd week of gestation only; or folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy. The brain, liver, kidney and colon from newborn pups were analyzed for folate concentrations, global DNA methylation and gene expression of the Igf2, Er-α, Gr, Ppar-α and Ppar-γ genes. Folic acid supplementation during the 2nd or 3rd week gestation or throughout pregnancy significantly increased brain folate concentrations (P<.001), while only folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy significantly increased liver folate concentrations (P=.005), in newborn pups. Brain global DNA methylation incrementally decreased from early to late gestational folic acid supplementation and was the lowest with folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy (P=.026). Folic acid supplementation in late gestation or throughout pregnancy significantly decreased Er-α, Gr and Ppar-α gene expression in the liver (P<.05). The kidney and colon were resistant to the effect of folic acid supplementation. Maternal folic acid supplementation affects tissue folate concentrations, DNA methylation and gene expression in the offspring in a gestation-period-dependent and organ-specific manner.

  20. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4–14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  1. Specific endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonism does not modulate insulin-induced hemodynamic effects in the human kidney, eye, or forearm.

    PubMed

    Rab, Anna; Dallinger, Susanne; Polak, Kaija; Pleiner, Johannes; Polska, Elzbieta; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2004-05-01

    There is evidence that hyperinsulinemia may stimulate endothelin-1 (ET-1) generation or release, which may affect diabetic vascular complications. BQ-123, a specific ET(A) receptor antagonist, was used to investigate if insulin-induced vascular effects are influenced by an acute ET-1 release. Two randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over studies were performed. In protocol 1, 12 healthy subjects received, on separate study days, infusions of BQ-123 (60 microg/min for 30 min) during placebo clamp conditions, BQ-123 during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (3 mU/kg/min for 390 min), or placebo during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia. Fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) was measured to assess pulsatile choroidal blood flow, and mean flow velocity (MFV) of the ophtalmic artery was measured by color Doppler imaging. In protocol 2, eight healthy subjects received, on separate study days, intra-arterial infusions of BQ-123 (32 microg/min for 120 min) during placebo or insulin clamp. Forearm blood flow was measured with bilateral plethysmography, expressing the ratio of responses in the intervention arm and in the control arm. Insulin alone increased FPA (+10%, p < 0.001) and forearm blood flow (+19%). BQ-123 increased FPA, MFV, and forearm blood flow ratio in the absence and presence of exogenous insulin, but this effect was not different between normo- and hyperinsulinemic conditions. ET-1 plasma concentrations were not affected by insulin. In conclusion, these data do not support the concept that hyperinsulinemia increases ET-1 generation in healthy subjects. Our results, however, cannot necessarily be extrapolated to diabetic and obese subjects.

  2. Isolation of Modulators of the Liver-Specific Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptides (OATPs) 1B1 and 1B3 from Rollinia emarginata Schlecht (Annonaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Megan; Araya, Juan J.; Timmermann, Barbara N.

    2011-01-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 (OATP1B1 and OATP1B3) are liver-specific transporters that mediate the uptake of a broad range of drugs into hepatocytes, including statins, antibiotics, and many anticancer drugs. Compounds that alter transport by one or both of these OATPs could potentially be used to target drugs to hepatocytes or improve the bioavailability of drugs that are cleared by the liver. In this study, we applied a bioassay-guided isolation approach to identify such compounds from the organic extract of Rollinia emarginata Schlecht (Annonaceae). Fractions of the plant extract were screened for effects on OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated transport of the model substrates estradiol-17β-glucuronide and estrone-3-sulfate. We isolated three compounds, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, and 8-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-α-terpineol, which inhibited estradiol-17β-glucuronide uptake by OATP1B1 but not OATP1B3. In addition, a rare compound, quercetin 3-O-α-l-arabinopyranosyl(1→2) α-l-rhamnopyranoside, was identified that had distinct effects on each OATP. OATP1B1 was strongly inhibited, as was OATP1B3-mediated transport of estradiol-17β-glucuronide. However, OATP1B3-mediated uptake of estrone-3-sulfate was stimulated 4- to 5-fold. Kinetic analysis of this stimulation revealed that the apparent affinity for estrone-3-sulfate was increased (decreased Km), whereas the maximal rate of transport (Vmax) was significantly reduced. These results demonstrate a mechanism through which the hepatic uptake of drug OATP substrates could be stimulated. PMID:21846839

  3. Isolation of modulators of the liver-specific organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) 1B1 and 1B3 from Rollinia emarginata Schlecht (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    Roth, Megan; Araya, Juan J; Timmermann, Barbara N; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2011-11-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 (OATP1B1 and OATP1B3) are liver-specific transporters that mediate the uptake of a broad range of drugs into hepatocytes, including statins, antibiotics, and many anticancer drugs. Compounds that alter transport by one or both of these OATPs could potentially be used to target drugs to hepatocytes or improve the bioavailability of drugs that are cleared by the liver. In this study, we applied a bioassay-guided isolation approach to identify such compounds from the organic extract of Rollinia emarginata Schlecht (Annonaceae). Fractions of the plant extract were screened for effects on OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated transport of the model substrates estradiol-17β-glucuronide and estrone-3-sulfate. We isolated three compounds, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, and 8-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-α-terpineol, which inhibited estradiol-17β-glucuronide uptake by OATP1B1 but not OATP1B3. In addition, a rare compound, quercetin 3-O-α-l-arabinopyranosyl(1→2) α-L-rhamnopyranoside, was identified that had distinct effects on each OATP. OATP1B1 was strongly inhibited, as was OATP1B3-mediated transport of estradiol-17β-glucuronide. However, OATP1B3-mediated uptake of estrone-3-sulfate was stimulated 4- to 5-fold. Kinetic analysis of this stimulation revealed that the apparent affinity for estrone-3-sulfate was increased (decreased K(m)), whereas the maximal rate of transport (V(max)) was significantly reduced. These results demonstrate a mechanism through which the hepatic uptake of drug OATP substrates could be stimulated.

  4. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Swaggerty, Christina L; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4-14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  5. Stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes.

    PubMed

    Campeau, Serge; Liberzon, Israel; Morilak, David; Ressler, Kerry

    2011-09-01

    This review summarizes the major discussion points of a symposium on stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes, which was held during the 2010 workshop on the neurobiology of stress (Boulder, CO, USA). The four discussants addressed a number of specific cognitive and affective factors that are modulated by exposure to acute or repeated stress. Dr David Morilak discussed the effects of various repeated stress situations on cognitive flexibility, as assessed with a rodent model of attentional set-shifting task, and how performance on slightly different aspects of this test is modulated by different prefrontal regions through monoaminergic neurotransmission. Dr Serge Campeau summarized the findings of several studies exploring a number of factors and brain regions that regulate habituation of various autonomic and neuroendocrine responses to repeated audiogenic stress exposures. Dr Kerry Ressler discussed a body of work exploring the modulation and extinction of fear memories in rodents and humans, especially focusing on the role of key neurotransmitter systems including excitatory amino acids and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Dr Israel Liberzon presented recent results on human decision-making processes in response to exogenous glucocorticoid hormone administration. Overall, these discussions are casting a wider framework on the cognitive/affective processes that are distinctly regulated by the experience of stress and some of the brain regions and neurotransmitter systems associated with these effects.

  6. Stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes.

    PubMed

    Campeau, Serge; Liberzon, Israel; Morilak, David; Ressler, Kerry

    2011-09-01

    This review summarizes the major discussion points of a symposium on stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes, which was held during the 2010 workshop on the neurobiology of stress (Boulder, CO, USA). The four discussants addressed a number of specific cognitive and affective factors that are modulated by exposure to acute or repeated stress. Dr David Morilak discussed the effects of various repeated stress situations on cognitive flexibility, as assessed with a rodent model of attentional set-shifting task, and how performance on slightly different aspects of this test is modulated by different prefrontal regions through monoaminergic neurotransmission. Dr Serge Campeau summarized the findings of several studies exploring a number of factors and brain regions that regulate habituation of various autonomic and neuroendocrine responses to repeated audiogenic stress exposures. Dr Kerry Ressler discussed a body of work exploring the modulation and extinction of fear memories in rodents and humans, especially focusing on the role of key neurotransmitter systems including excitatory amino acids and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Dr Israel Liberzon presented recent results on human decision-making processes in response to exogenous glucocorticoid hormone administration. Overall, these discussions are casting a wider framework on the cognitive/affective processes that are distinctly regulated by the experience of stress and some of the brain regions and neurotransmitter systems associated with these effects. PMID:21790481

  7. Addressing the water budget with SMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Y. H.; AlBitar, A.; Tomer, S. K.; Merlin, O.; Pellarin, T.

    2012-12-01

    SMOS, a L Band radiometer using aperture synthesis to achieve a good spatial resolution, was successfully launched on November 2, 2009. It was developed and made under the leadership of the European Space Agency (ESA) as an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission. It is a joint program with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France and the Centro para el Desarrollo Teccnologico Industrial (CDTI) in Spain. SMOS carries a single payload, an L band 2D interferometric,radiometer in the 1400-1427 MHz h protected band. This wavelength penetrates well through the vegetation and the atmosphere is almost transparent enabling to infer both soil moisture and vegetation water content. SMOS achieves an unprecedented spatial resolution of 50 km at L-band maximum (43 km on average) with multi angular-dual polarized (or fully polarized) brightness temperatures over the globe and with a revisit time smaller than 3 days. SMOS as been now acquiring data for almost 2 years. The data quality exceeds what was expected, showing very good sensitivity and stability. The data is however very much impaired by man made emission in the protected band, leading to degraded measurements in several areas including parts of Europe and of China. However, many different international teams are now addressing cal val activities in various parts of the world, with notably large field campaigns either on the long time scale or over specific targets to address the specific issues. In parallel different teams are now starting addressing data use in various fields including hydrology. It requires coupling with other models and or disaggregation to address soil moisture distribution over watersheds. Significant new results were obtained for floods and drought events, together with new potential applications in terms of precipitation monitoring This paper thus gives an overview of the science goals of the SMOS mission, a description of its main elements, and a taste of the first results including

  8. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  9. A region addresses patient safety.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Karen Wolk; Grunden, Naida; Harrison, Edward I

    2002-06-01

    The Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative (PRHI) is a coalition of 35 hospitals, 4 major insurers, more than 30 major and small-business health care purchasers, dozens of corporate and civic leaders, organized labor, and partnerships with state and federal government all working together to deliver perfect patient care throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania. PRHI believes that in pursuing perfection, many of the challenges facing today's health care delivery system (eg, waste and error in the delivery of care, rising costs, frustration and shortage among clinicians and workers, financial distress, overcapacity, and lack of access to care) will be addressed. PRHI has identified patient safety (nosocomial infections and medication errors) and 5 clinical areas (obstetrics, orthopedic surgery, cardiac surgery, depression, and diabetes) as ideal starting points. In each of these areas of work, PRHI partners have assembled multifacility/multidisciplinary groups charged with defining perfection, establishing region-wide reporting systems, and devising and implementing recommended improvement strategies and interventions. Many design and conceptual elements of the PRHI strategy are adapted from the Toyota Production System and its Pittsburgh derivative, the Alcoa Business System. PRHI is in the proof-of-concept phase of development. PMID:12032502

  10. Gender: addressing a critical focus.

    PubMed

    Thornton, L; Wegner, M N

    1995-01-01

    The definition of gender was addressed at the Fourth World Conference on Women (Beijing, China). After extensive debate, the definition developed by the UN Population Fund in 1995 was adopted: "a set of qualities and behaviors expected from a female or male by society." The sustainability of family planning (FP) programs depends on acknowledgment of the role gender plays in contraceptive decision-making and use. For example, programs must consider the fact that women in many cultures do not make FP decisions without the consent of their spouse. AVSC is examining providers' gender-based ideas about clients and the effects of these views on the quality of reproductive health services. Questions such as how service providers can encourage joint responsibility for contraception without requiring spousal consent or how they can make men feel comfortable about using a male method in a society where FP is considered a woman's issue are being discussed. Also relevant is how service providers can discuss sexual matters openly with female clients in cultures that do not allow women to enjoy their sexuality. Another concern is the potential for physical violence to a client as a result of the provision of FP services. PMID:12294397

  11. Addressing Educational Needs of Children with HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, Hendrina; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews medical and neuropsychological effects of HIV/AIDS in children and relates these findings specifically to educational difficulties. It then proposes an instructional delivery framework for these children that stresses the importance of addressing their educational needs and includes specific suggestions for reading instruction,…

  12. Addressing the Needs of Students with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ellenburg, Jennifer S.; Acton, Olivia M.; Torrey, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses symptoms of students with Rett Syndrome, a disability in females characterized by the development of multiple specific deficits following a period of normal functioning after birth. Specific interventions for students with Rett syndrome are provided and address communication, stereotypic movements, self-injurious behaviors,…

  13. Assuring Equal Access in Recruitment, Enrollment and Placement of Handicapped and Disadvantaged Students in Vocational Programs. Missouri LINC Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Coll. of Education.

    This module addresses the issue of ensuring equal access to recruitment, enrollment, and placement of handicapped and disadvantaged students in vocational programs. Specific guidelines are offered as well as suggested resources. The guide includes a list of definitions and uses a question-and-answer format to provide information on equal access,…

  14. Combined Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulations Unlock Unprecedented Temporal Elasticity and Reveal Phase-Specific Modulation of the Molecular Circadian Clock of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Andrew P.; Chesham, Johanna E.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian oscillator encoding time-of-day information. SCN timekeeping is sustained by a cell-autonomous transcriptional–translational feedback loop, whereby expression of the Period and Cryptochrome genes is negatively regulated by their protein products. This loop in turn drives circadian oscillations in gene expression that direct SCN electrical activity and thence behavior. The robustness of SCN timekeeping is further enhanced by interneuronal, circuit-level coupling. The aim of this study was to combine pharmacological and genetic manipulations to push the SCN clockwork toward its limits and, by doing so, probe cell-autonomous and emergent, circuit-level properties. Circadian oscillation of mouse SCN organotypic slice cultures was monitored as PER2::LUC bioluminescence. SCN of three genetic backgrounds—wild-type, short-period CK1εTau/Tau mutant, and long-period Fbxl3Afh/Afh mutant—all responded reversibly to pharmacological manipulation with period-altering compounds: picrotoxin, PF-670462 (4-[1-Cyclohexyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]-2-pyrimidinamine dihydrochloride), and KNK437 (N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidine-gamma-butyrolactam). This revealed a remarkably wide operating range of sustained periods extending across 25 h, from ≤17 h to >42 h. Moreover, this range was maintained at network and single-cell levels. Development of a new technique for formal analysis of circadian waveform, first derivative analysis (FDA), revealed internal phase patterning to the circadian oscillation at these extreme periods and differential phase sensitivity of the SCN to genetic and pharmacological manipulations. For example, FDA of the CK1εTau/Tau mutant SCN treated with the CK1ε-specific inhibitor PF-4800567 (3-[(3-Chlorophenoxy)methyl]-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine hydrochloride) revealed that period acceleration in the mutant is due to inappropriately phased

  15. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  16. Addressing Global Data Sharing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Alter, George C.

    2015-01-01

    This issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics highlights the ethical issues that arise when researchers conducting projects in low- and middle-income countries seek to share the data they produce. Although sharing data is considered a best practice, the barriers to doing so are considerable and there is a need for guidance and examples. To that end, the authors of this article reviewed the articles in this special issue to identify challenges common to the five countries and to offer some practical advice to assist researchers in navigating this “uncharted territory,” as some termed it. Concerns around informed consent, data management, data dissemination, and validation of research contributions were cited frequently as particularly challenging areas, so the authors focused on these four topics with the goal of providing specific resources to consult as well as examples of successful projects attempting to solve many of the problems raised. PMID:26297753

  17. Addressing Global Data Sharing Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alter, George C; Vardigan, Mary

    2015-07-01

    This issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics highlights the ethical issues that arise when researchers conducting projects in low- and middle-income countries seek to share the data they produce. Although sharing data is considered a best practice, the barriers to doing so are considerable and there is a need for guidance and examples. To that end, the authors of this article reviewed the articles in this special issue to identify challenges common to the five countries and to offer some practical advice to assist researchers in navigating this "uncharted territory," as some termed it. Concerns around informed consent, data management, data dissemination, and validation of research contributions were cited frequently as particularly challenging areas, so the authors focused on these four topics with the goal of providing specific resources to consult as well as examples of successful projects attempting to solve many of the problems raised. PMID:26297753

  18. Addressing Global Data Sharing Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alter, George C; Vardigan, Mary

    2015-07-01

    This issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics highlights the ethical issues that arise when researchers conducting projects in low- and middle-income countries seek to share the data they produce. Although sharing data is considered a best practice, the barriers to doing so are considerable and there is a need for guidance and examples. To that end, the authors of this article reviewed the articles in this special issue to identify challenges common to the five countries and to offer some practical advice to assist researchers in navigating this "uncharted territory," as some termed it. Concerns around informed consent, data management, data dissemination, and validation of research contributions were cited frequently as particularly challenging areas, so the authors focused on these four topics with the goal of providing specific resources to consult as well as examples of successful projects attempting to solve many of the problems raised.

  19. Addressable-Matrix Integrated-Circuit Test Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayah, Hoshyar R.; Buehler, Martin G.

    1991-01-01

    Method of quality control based on use of row- and column-addressable test structure speeds collection of data on widths of resistor lines and coverage of steps in integrated circuits. By use of straightforward mathematical model, line widths and step coverages deduced from measurements of electrical resistances in each of various combinations of lines, steps, and bridges addressable in test structure. Intended for use in evaluating processes and equipment used in manufacture of application-specific integrated circuits.

  20. Development of a Scale to Assess the Demand for Specific Competences in Teachers after Graduation from University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landmann, Mareike

    2013-01-01

    Universities in Germany show an increasing need for specific information on professional demands encountered and addressed by graduates training to become teachers. To provide information on demands and abilities in teaching graduates, a specialised teacher module was developed in the framework of the German Cooperation Project for Graduate Tracer…

  1. Addressing the vaccine confidence gap.

    PubMed

    Larson, Heidi J; Cooper, Louis Z; Eskola, Juhani; Katz, Samuel L; Ratzan, Scott

    2011-08-01

    Vaccines--often lauded as one of the greatest public health interventions--are losing public confidence. Some vaccine experts have referred to this decline in confidence as a crisis. We discuss some of the characteristics of the changing global environment that are contributing to increased public questioning of vaccines, and outline some of the specific determinants of public trust. Public decision making related to vaccine acceptance is neither driven by scientific nor economic evidence alone, but is also driven by a mix of psychological, sociocultural, and political factors, all of which need to be understood and taken into account by policy and other decision makers. Public trust in vaccines is highly variable and building trust depends on understanding perceptions of vaccines and vaccine risks, historical experiences, religious or political affiliations, and socioeconomic status. Although provision of accurate, scientifically based evidence on the risk-benefit ratios of vaccines is crucial, it is not enough to redress the gap between current levels of public confidence in vaccines and levels of trust needed to ensure adequate and sustained vaccine coverage. We call for more research not just on individual determinants of public trust, but on what mix of factors are most likely to sustain public trust. The vaccine community demands rigorous evidence on vaccine efficacy and safety and technical and operational feasibility when introducing a new vaccine, but has been negligent in demanding equally rigorous research to understand the psychological, social, and political factors that affect public trust in vaccines. PMID:21664679

  2. Addressing concerns and achieving expectations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    Approximately 2-1/2 years ago many of us were gathered here in Prague at a similar conference with a similar name, {open_quotes}Energy and Environment: Transitions in Eastern Europe.{close_quotes} Over 300 professionals from 26 nations attended. The objective of the conference was to: Facilitate the Solution of Long and Short Term Energy and Environmental Problems in Eastern Europe by Bringing Together People, ideas and technologies which could be applied to specific problems in a logical step-by-step manner. It was conceded at the time that the long term solution would consist of thoughtfully integrated steps and that the conference was the first step. We are here in the Czech Republic again this week to continue what was started. As before, this conference continues to: (1) Provide a forum to identify and discuss cost-effective environmentally acceptable energy and environmental technology options and their associated socioeconomic issues. (2) Stimulate the Formation of business partnerships (3) Identify key barrier issues hindering technology applications and identify implementation pathways that eliminate or avoid obstacles to progress.

  3. Addressing the vaccine confidence gap.

    PubMed

    Larson, Heidi J; Cooper, Louis Z; Eskola, Juhani; Katz, Samuel L; Ratzan, Scott

    2011-08-01

    Vaccines--often lauded as one of the greatest public health interventions--are losing public confidence. Some vaccine experts have referred to this decline in confidence as a crisis. We discuss some of the characteristics of the changing global environment that are contributing to increased public questioning of vaccines, and outline some of the specific determinants of public trust. Public decision making related to vaccine acceptance is neither driven by scientific nor economic evidence alone, but is also driven by a mix of psychological, sociocultural, and political factors, all of which need to be understood and taken into account by policy and other decision makers. Public trust in vaccines is highly variable and building trust depends on understanding perceptions of vaccines and vaccine risks, historical experiences, religious or political affiliations, and socioeconomic status. Although provision of accurate, scientifically based evidence on the risk-benefit ratios of vaccines is crucial, it is not enough to redress the gap between current levels of public confidence in vaccines and levels of trust needed to ensure adequate and sustained vaccine coverage. We call for more research not just on individual determinants of public trust, but on what mix of factors are most likely to sustain public trust. The vaccine community demands rigorous evidence on vaccine efficacy and safety and technical and operational feasibility when introducing a new vaccine, but has been negligent in demanding equally rigorous research to understand the psychological, social, and political factors that affect public trust in vaccines.

  4. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  5. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family. PMID:27497456

  6. Drupal Contributed Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Samuel B.; French, Shelane

    2014-10-01

    These Drupal Modules extend the functionality of Drupal by including specific styles for dates and tabs, publishing options for scheduled and immediate publication of content modes, field visibility in content forms, keyword block filters (taxonomy based), adding content nodes to a specified queue for display in views, and status display of workflow settings.

  7. Packaging of electronic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzin, L.

    1966-01-01

    Study of design approaches that are taken toward optimizing the packaging of electronic modules with respect to size, shape, component orientation, interconnections, and structural support. The study does not present a solution to specific packaging problems, but rather the factors to be considered to achieve optimum packaging designs.

  8. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    eruptions, earthquakes and the associated tsunamis can lead to destruction of seafloor structures potentially capable of releasing hydrocarbon pollutants into Mediterranean waters, and damage to a dense telecommunication cables net that would cause severe economic loss. However, the most devastating effect would be that of earthquake or landslide-induced tsunamis. When compared to other basins, the Mediterranean has larger vulnerability due to its small dimensions, resulting in close proximity to tsunami sources and impact areas. Recent examples include the 1979 Nice airport submarine landslide and tsunami and the 2002 Stromboli volcano landslide and tsunami. Future international scientific drilling must include submarine geohazards among priority scientific objectives. The science advisory structure must be prepared to receive and evaluate proposal specifically addressing submarine geohazards. The implementing organizations need to be prepared for the technological needs of drilling proposals addressing geohazards. Among the most relevant: geotechnical sampling, down-hole logging at shallow depths below the seafloor, in situ geotechnical and physical measurements, capability of deployment of long-term in situ observatories. Pre-site surveys will often aim at the highest possible resolution, three dimensional imaging of the seafloor ant its sub-surface. Drilling for submarine geohazards is seen as an opportunity of multiplatform drilling, and for Mission Specific drilling in particular. Rather than turning the scientific investigation in a purely engineering exercise, proposals addressing submarine geohazards should offer an opportunity to scientists and engineers to work together to unravel the details of basic geological processes that may turn into catastrophic events.

  9. CCCC Chair's Address: Representing Ourselves, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the text of the author's address at the fifty-ninth annual convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) in March 2008. In her address, the author picks up strands of previous Chairs' addresses and weaves them through the fabric of her remarks. What she hopes will give sheen to the fabric is her…

  10. 32 CFR 516.7 - Mailing addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mailing addresses. 516.7 Section 516.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION General § 516.7 Mailing addresses. Mailing addresses for organizations referenced...

  11. 47 CFR 13.10 - Licensee address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensee address. 13.10 Section 13.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS General § 13.10 Licensee address. In accordance with § 1.923 of this chapter all applications must specify an address where...

  12. 75 FR 49813 - Change of Address

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... COMMISSION 11 CFR Parts 9405, 9407, 9409, 9410, 9420, and 9428 Change of Address AGENCY: United States... Assistance Commission (EAC) is amending its regulations to reflect a change of address for its headquarters. This technical amendment is a nomenclature change that updates and corrects the address for...

  13. 77 FR 48429 - Commission Address Change

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION 29 CFR Parts 2700, 2701, 2702, 2704, 2705, 2706 Commission Address Change AGENCY... to inform the public of the address change. DATES: This final rule will take effect on August 27... because the amendments are of a minor and administrative nature dealing with only a change in address....

  14. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  15. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  16. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  17. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  18. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  19. Cell-specific activation and detoxification of benzene metabolites in mouse and human bone marrow: Identification of target cells and a potential role for modulation of apoptosis in benzene toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.; Siegel, D.; Schattenberg, D.G.

    1996-12-01

    The role of cell-specific metabolism in benzene toxicity was examined in both murine and human bone marrow. Hemopoietic progenitor cells and stromal cells are important control points for regulation of hemopoiesis. We show that the selective toxicity of hydroquinone at the level of the macrophage in murine bone marrow stroma may be explained by a high peroxidase/nicotanimicle adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced [NAD(P)H]:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) ratio. Peroxidases metabolize hydroquinone to the reactive 1,4-benzoquinone, whereas NQO1 reduces the quinones formed, resulting in detoxification. Peroxidase and NQO1 activity in human stromal cultures vary as a function of time in culture, with peroxidase activity decreasing and NQO1 activity increasing with time. Peroxidase activity and, more specifically, myeloperoxidase, which had previously been considered to be expressed at the promyelocyte level, was detected in murine lineage-negative and human CD34{sup +} progenitor cells. This provides a metabolic mechanism whereby phenolic metabolites of benzene can be bioactivated in progenitor cells, which are considered initial target cells for the development of leukemias. Consequences of a high peroxidase/NQO1 ratio in HL-60 cells were shown to include hydroquinone-induced apoptosis. Hydroquinone can also inhibit proteases known to play a role in induction of apoptosis, suggesting that it may be able to inhibit apoptosis induced by other stimuli. Modulation of apoptosis may lead to aberrant hemopoiesis and neoplastic progression. This enzyme-directed approach has identified target cells of the phenolic metabolites of benzene in bone marrow and provided a metabolic basis for benzene-induced toxicity at the level of the progenitor cell in both murine and human bone marrow. 60 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Structural and Kinetic Insights Reveal That the Amino Acid Pair Gln-228/Asn-254 Modulates the Transfructosylating Specificity of Schwanniomyces occidentalis β-Fructofuranosidase, an Enzyme That Produces Prebiotics*

    PubMed Central

    Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Sainz-Polo, M. Angela; González-Pérez, David; González, Beatriz; Plou, Francisco J.; Fernández-Lobato, María; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Schwanniomyces occidentalis β-fructofuranosidase (Ffase) is a GH32 dimeric enzyme that releases fructose from the nonreducing end of various oligosaccharides and essential storage fructans such as inulin. It also catalyzes the transfer of a fructosyl unit to an acceptor producing 6-kestose and 1-kestose, prebiotics that stimulate the growth of bacteria beneficial for human health. We report here the crystal structure of inactivated Ffase complexed with fructosylnystose and inulin, which shows the intricate net of interactions keeping the substrate tightly bound at the active site. Up to five subsites were observed, the sugar unit located at subsite +3 being recognized by interaction with the β-sandwich domain of the adjacent subunit within the dimer. This explains the high activity observed against long substrates, giving the first experimental evidence of the direct role of a GH32 β-sandwich domain in substrate binding. Crucial residues were mutated and their hydrolase/transferase (H/T) activities were fully characterized, showing the involvement of the Gln-228/Asn-254 pair in modulating the H/T ratio and the type β(2–1)/β(2–6) linkage formation. We generated Ffase mutants with new transferase activity; among them, Q228V gives almost specifically 6-kestose, whereas N254T produces a broader spectrum product including also neokestose. A model for the mechanism of the Ffase transfructosylation reaction is proposed. The results contribute to an understanding of the molecular basis regulating specificity among GH-J clan members, which represent an interesting target for rational design of enzymes, showing redesigned activities to produce tailor-made fructooligosaccharides. PMID:22511773

  1. 14th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells& Modules: Materials and Processes; Summary of Discussion Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Sinton, R.; Swanson, D.

    2004-10-01

    The 14th Workshop discussion sessions addressed funding needs for Si research and for R&D to enhance U.S. PV manufacturing. The wrap-up session specifically addressed topics for the new university silicon program. The theme of the workshop, Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Leapfrogging the Barriers, was selected to reflect the astounding progress in Si PV technology during last three decades, despite a host of barriers and bottlenecks. A combination of oral, poster, and discussion sessions addressed recent advances in crystal growth technology, new cell structures and doping methods, silicon feedstock issues, hydrogen passivation and fire through metallization, and module issues/reliability. The following oral/discussion sessions were conducted: (1) Technology Update; (2) Defects and Impurities in Si/Discussion; (3) Rump Session; (4) Module Issues and Reliability/Discussion; (5) Silicon Feedstock/Discussion; (6) Novel Doping, Cells, and Hetero-Structure Designs/Discussion; (7) Metallization/Silicon Nitride Processing/Discussion; (8) Hydrogen Passivation/Discussion; (9) Characterization/Discussion; and (10) Wrap-Up. This year's workshop lasted three and a half days and, for the first time, included a session on Si modules. A rump session was held on the evening of August 8, which addressed efficiency expectations and challenges of c Si solar cells/modules. Richard King of DOE and Daren Dance of Wright Williams& Kelly (formerly of Sematech) spoke at two of the luncheon sessions. Eleven students received Graduate Student Awards from funds contributed by the PV industry.

  2. Field testing method for photovaltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gerber N.

    For remote areas, where solar photovoltaic modules are the only source of power, it is essential to perform preventive maintenance to insure that the PV system works properly; unfortunately, prices for PV testers range from 1,700 to 8,000. To address this issue, a portable inexpensive tester and analysis methodology have been developed. Assembling a simple tester, which costs $530 and weighs about 5 pounds, and using the Four-Parameters PV Model, we characterized the current-voltage (I-V) curve at environmental testing conditions; and then employing radiation, temperature, and age degradation sensitivity equations, we extrapolated the I-V curve to standard testing conditions. After applying the methodology to three kinds of silicon modules (mono-crystalline, multi-crystalline, and thin-film), we obtained maximum power points up to 97% of the manufacturer's specifications. Therefore, based on these results, it is reasonably accurate and affordable to verify the performance of solar modules in the field.

  3. Second generation SLAC modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.; Cron, J.C.; Hanselman, R.R.

    1986-06-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory has undertaken the construction of a single pass electron-positron collider. In order to reach required beam energy 235 new klystrons needed upgraded modulator systems. The collider will use 50 GeV electrons and positrons. The increase in accelerator energy from the present 30 GeV necessitates the replacement of existing 35 MW klystrons with new 67 MW units. The doubling of klystron output power required a redesign of the modulator system. The 67 MW klystron needs a 350 kV beam voltage pulse with a 3.7 ..mu..s pulse width. A new pulse transformer was designed to deliver the increased voltage and pulse width. Pulse cable design was evaluated to obtain increased reliability of that critical element. The modulator, with the exception of its power supply, was rebuilt to produce the required power increase while enhancing reliability and improving maintainability. An investigation of present thyratron switch tube performance under the new operating conditions resulted in agitation and some warranted panic but these conditions were mitigated after several successful experiments and some evolutionary narrowing of the klystron pulse width. The discussion will cover the upgraded modulator system specifications and some details of the new pulse transformer tank, pulse cable, modulator, and modulator switch tube.

  4. An addressable cell array for a platform of biosensor chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seungkyoung; Choi, Soo-hee; Jung, Moon Youn; Song, Kibong; Park, Jeong Won

    2013-05-01

    In order to detect interested matters in fields, various lab-on-a-chips where chemical, physical, or biological sensors are loaded have been developed. eNOSE can be a representative example among them. Because animals can sense 300~1000 different chemicals by olfactory system - smell -, the olfactory system has been spotlighted as new materials in the field of sensing. Those investigations, however, are usually focused on how to detect signals from the olfactory neurons or receptors loaded on chips and enhance sensing efficacy of chips. Therefore, almost of those chips are designed for only one material sensing. Multi-sensing using multi-channels will be needed when the olfactory systems are adopted well on chips. For multiple sensing, we developed an addressable cell array. The chip has 38 cell-chambers arranged in a circle shape and different cell types of thirty eight can be allocated with specific addresses on the chip without any complex valve system. In order to confirm the cell addressing, we loaded EGFP-transfected and empty vector-transfected HEK293a cells into inlets of the cell array in a planned address and those cells were positioned into each chamber by brief aspiration. The arrayed cells were confirmed as a specific pattern through EGFP and nuclei staining. This cell array which can generate address of sensor materials like cells with their own specification is expected to be applied to a platform for a biosensor chip at various sensing fields.

  5. Dual-frequency addressed hybrid-aligned nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-Qing; Liang, Xiao; Wu, Yung-Hsun; Du, Fang; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2004-10-01

    Dual-frequency addressed hybrid-aligned nematic (HAN) liquid crystal cell is demonstrated as a variable optical attenuator at 1.55μm wavelength. By controlling the low- and high-frequency electric field, the dual-frequency liquid crystal (DFLC) molecules can be reoriented parallel or perpendicular to the substrates so that the maximum obtainable phase modulation is doubled. In comparison to a homogeneous cell, the DFLC HAN cell shows a lower operating voltage and faster response time. Furthermore, the DFLC HAN cell exhibits three stable states that have some applications such as ternary photonic devices.

  6. IPv6 Addressing Proxy: Mapping Native Addressing from Legacy Technologies and Devices to the Internet of Things (IPv6)

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Antonio J.; Moreno-Sanchez, Pedro; Skarmeta, Antonio F.; Varakliotis, Socrates; Kirstein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sensors utilize a large number of heterogeneous technologies for a varied set of application environments. The sheer number of devices involved requires that this Internet be the Future Internet, with a core network based on IPv6 and a higher scalability in order to be able to address all the devices, sensors and things located around us. This capability to connect through IPv6 devices, sensors and things is what is defining the so-called Internet of Things (IoT). IPv6 provides addressing space to reach this ubiquitous set of sensors, but legacy technologies, such as X10, European Installation Bus (EIB), Controller Area Network (CAN) and radio frequency ID (RFID) from the industrial, home automation and logistic application areas, do not support the IPv6 protocol. For that reason, a technique must be devised to map the sensor and identification technologies to IPv6, thus allowing homogeneous access via IPv6 features in the context of the IoT. This paper proposes a mapping between the native addressing of each technology and an IPv6 address following a set of rules that are discussed and proposed in this work. Specifically, the paper presents a technology-dependent IPv6 addressing proxy, which maps each device to the different subnetworks built under the IPv6 prefix addresses provided by the internet service provider for each home, building or user. The IPv6 addressing proxy offers a common addressing environment based on IPv6 for all the devices, regardless of the device technology. Thereby, this offers a scalable and homogeneous solution to interact with devices that do not support IPv6 addressing. The IPv6 addressing proxy has been implemented in a multi-protocol card and evaluated successfully its performance, scalability and interoperability through a protocol built over IPv6. PMID:23686145

  7. IPv6 addressing proxy: mapping native addressing from legacy technologies and devices to the Internet of Things (IPv6).

    PubMed

    Jara, Antonio J; Moreno-Sanchez, Pedro; Skarmeta, Antonio F; Varakliotis, Socrates; Kirstein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sensors utilize a large number of heterogeneous technologies for a varied set of application environments. The sheer number of devices involved requires that this Internet be the Future Internet, with a core network based on IPv6 and a higher scalability in order to be able to address all the devices, sensors and things located around us. This capability to connect through IPv6 devices, sensors and things is what is defining the so-called Internet of Things (IoT). IPv6 provides addressing space to reach this ubiquitous set of sensors, but legacy technologies, such as X10, European Installation Bus (EIB), Controller Area Network (CAN) and radio frequency ID (RFID) from the industrial, home automation and logistic application areas, do not support the IPv6 protocol. For that reason, a technique must be devised to map the sensor and identification technologies to IPv6, thus allowing homogeneous access via IPv6 features in the context of the IoT. This paper proposes a mapping between the native addressing of each technology and an IPv6 address following a set of rules that are discussed and proposed in this work. Specifically, the paper presents a technology-dependent IPv6 addressing proxy, which maps each device to the different subnetworks built under the IPv6 prefix addresses provided by the internet service provider for each home, building or user. The IPv6 addressing proxy offers a common addressing environment based on IPv6 for all the devices, regardless of the device technology. Thereby, this offers a scalable and homogeneous solution to interact with devices that do not support IPv6 addressing. The IPv6 addressing proxy has been implemented in a multi-protocol Sensors 2013, 13 6688 card and evaluated successfully its performance, scalability and interoperability through a protocol built over IPv6. PMID:23686145

  8. IPv6 addressing proxy: mapping native addressing from legacy technologies and devices to the Internet of Things (IPv6).

    PubMed

    Jara, Antonio J; Moreno-Sanchez, Pedro; Skarmeta, Antonio F; Varakliotis, Socrates; Kirstein, Peter

    2013-05-17

    Sensors utilize a large number of heterogeneous technologies for a varied set of application environments. The sheer number of devices involved requires that this Internet be the Future Internet, with a core network based on IPv6 and a higher scalability in order to be able to address all the devices, sensors and things located around us. This capability to connect through IPv6 devices, sensors and things is what is defining the so-called Internet of Things (IoT). IPv6 provides addressing space to reach this ubiquitous set of sensors, but legacy technologies, such as X10, European Installation Bus (EIB), Controller Area Network (CAN) and radio frequency ID (RFID) from the industrial, home automation and logistic application areas, do not support the IPv6 protocol. For that reason, a technique must be devised to map the sensor and identification technologies to IPv6, thus allowing homogeneous access via IPv6 features in the context of the IoT. This paper proposes a mapping between the native addressing of each technology and an IPv6 address following a set of rules that are discussed and proposed in this work. Specifically, the paper presents a technology-dependent IPv6 addressing proxy, which maps each device to the different subnetworks built under the IPv6 prefix addresses provided by the internet service provider for each home, building or user. The IPv6 addressing proxy offers a common addressing environment based on IPv6 for all the devices, regardless of the device technology. Thereby, this offers a scalable and homogeneous solution to interact with devices that do not support IPv6 addressing. The IPv6 addressing proxy has been implemented in a multi-protocol Sensors 2013, 13 6688 card and evaluated successfully its performance, scalability and interoperability through a protocol built over IPv6.

  9. Assessing what to address in science communication.

    PubMed

    Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Bostrom, Ann

    2013-08-20

    As members of a democratic society, individuals face complex decisions about whether to support climate change mitigation, vaccinations, genetically modified food, nanotechnology, geoengineering, and so on. To inform people's decisions and public debate, scientific experts at government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and other organizations aim to provide understandable and scientifically accurate communication materials. Such communications aim to improve people's understanding of the decision-relevant issues, and if needed, promote behavior change. Unfortunately, existing communications sometimes fail when scientific experts lack information about what people need to know to make more informed decisions or what wording people use to describe relevant concepts. We provide an introduction for scientific experts about how to use mental models research with intended audience members to inform their communication efforts. Specifically, we describe how to conduct interviews to characterize people's decision-relevant beliefs or mental models of the topic under consideration, identify gaps and misconceptions in their knowledge, and reveal their preferred wording. We also describe methods for designing follow-up surveys with larger samples to examine the prevalence of beliefs as well as the relationships of beliefs with behaviors. Finally, we discuss how findings from these interviews and surveys can be used to design communications that effectively address gaps and misconceptions in people's mental models in wording that they understand. We present applications to different scientific domains, showing that this approach leads to communications that improve recipients' understanding and ability to make informed decisions.

  10. Assessing what to address in science communication

    PubMed Central

    Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Bostrom, Ann

    2013-01-01

    As members of a democratic society, individuals face complex decisions about whether to support climate change mitigation, vaccinations, genetically modified food, nanotechnology, geoengineering, and so on. To inform people’s decisions and public debate, scientific experts at government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and other organizations aim to provide understandable and scientifically accurate communication materials. Such communications aim to improve people’s understanding of the decision-relevant issues, and if needed, promote behavior change. Unfortunately, existing communications sometimes fail when scientific experts lack information about what people need to know to make more informed decisions or what wording people use to describe relevant concepts. We provide an introduction for scientific experts about how to use mental models research with intended audience members to inform their communication efforts. Specifically, we describe how to conduct interviews to characterize people’s decision-relevant beliefs or mental models of the topic under consideration, identify gaps and misconceptions in their knowledge, and reveal their preferred wording. We also describe methods for designing follow-up surveys with larger samples to examine the prevalence of beliefs as well as the relationships of beliefs with behaviors. Finally, we discuss how findings from these interviews and surveys can be used to design communications that effectively address gaps and misconceptions in people’s mental models in wording that they understand. We present applications to different scientific domains, showing that this approach leads to communications that improve recipients’ understanding and ability to make informed decisions. PMID:23942122

  11. Assessing what to address in science communication.

    PubMed

    Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Bostrom, Ann

    2013-08-20

    As members of a democratic society, individuals face complex decisions about whether to support climate change mitigation, vaccinations, genetically modified food, nanotechnology, geoengineering, and so on. To inform people's decisions and public debate, scientific experts at government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and other organizations aim to provide understandable and scientifically accurate communication materials. Such communications aim to improve people's understanding of the decision-relevant issues, and if needed, promote behavior change. Unfortunately, existing communications sometimes fail when scientific experts lack information about what people need to know to make more informed decisions or what wording people use to describe relevant concepts. We provide an introduction for scientific experts about how to use mental models research with intended audience members to inform their communication efforts. Specifically, we describe how to conduct interviews to characterize people's decision-relevant beliefs or mental models of the topic under consideration, identify gaps and misconceptions in their knowledge, and reveal their preferred wording. We also describe methods for designing follow-up surveys with larger samples to examine the prevalence of beliefs as well as the relationships of beliefs with behaviors. Finally, we discuss how findings from these interviews and surveys can be used to design communications that effectively address gaps and misconceptions in people's mental models in wording that they understand. We present applications to different scientific domains, showing that this approach leads to communications that improve recipients' understanding and ability to make informed decisions. PMID:23942122

  12. Racism and the Conspiracy of Silence: Presidential Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sue, Derald Wing

    2005-01-01

    This presidential address focuses on a specific and daunting assumption about racism that many find disturbing--a belief that no one born and raised in the United States is free from inheriting the racial biases of their forebears. It states explicitly that it is impossible for anyone to not to have racist, sexist, and homophobic attitudes,…

  13. Addressing Cultural and Native Language Interference in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, Daniele; Bourdeau, Jacqueline; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of cultural and native language interference in second/foreign language acquisition. More specifically, it examines issues of interference that can be traced to a student's native language and that also have a cultural component. To this effect, an understanding of what actually comprises both interference and…

  14. Using Short Stories to Address Eating Disturbances in Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Lone, Jeffrey S.; Kalodner, Cynthia R.; Coughlin, Janelle W.

    2002-01-01

    Short stories can be an effective group-level intervention for addressing disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. This technique may be used in eating-disorder themed groups or in any group in which members present with eating problems. The authors provide specific guidelines for the use of short stories in group work. An example is provided to…

  15. State Laws and Policies to Address Bullying in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limber, Susan P.; Small, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    This article focuses on the recent flurry of legislation in states to address bullying among school children. The primary purpose is to describe, compare, and contrast current state laws about bullying. Specifically, a description is provided of legislators' definitions of bullying and legislative findings about the nature and seriousness of…

  16. Learning Environments: An Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Ann L.

    This self-instructional module includes learner objectives, text, practice exercises and answer sheets addressing developments in research on learning environments and why instructional technologists should take the lead in applying the resulting knowledge to the design of training areas. Favorable learning environments are described in general…

  17. On staggered indecomposable Virasoro modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytölä, Kalle; Ridout, David

    2009-12-01

    In this article, certain indecomposable Virasoro modules are studied. Specifically, the Virasoro mode L0 is assumed to be nondiagonalizable, possessing Jordan blocks of rank 2. Moreover, the module is further assumed to have a highest weight submodule, the "left module," and that the quotient by this submodule yields another highest weight module, the "right module." Such modules, which have been called staggered, have appeared repeatedly in the logarithmic conformal field theory literature, but their theory has not been explored in full generality. Here, such a theory is developed for the Virasoro algebra using rather elementary techniques. The focus centers on two different but related questions typically encountered in practical studies: How can one identify a given staggered module, and how can one demonstrate the existence of a proposed staggered module. Given just the values of the highest weights of the left and right modules, themselves subject to simple necessary conditions, invariants are defined which together with the knowledge of the left and right modules uniquely identify a staggered module. The possible values of these invariants form a vector space of dimension 0, 1, or 2, and the structures of the left and right modules limit the isomorphism classes of the corresponding staggered modules to an affine subspace (possibly empty). The number of invariants and affine restrictions is purely determined by the structures of the left and right modules. Moreover, in order to facilitate applications, the expressions for the invariants and restrictions are given by formulas as explicit as possible (they generally rely on expressions for Virasoro singular vectors). Finally, the text is liberally peppered throughout with examples illustrating the general concepts. These have been carefully chosen for their physical relevance or for the novel features they exhibit.

  18. Interconnections For Stacked Parallel Computer Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannesson, Richard T.

    1996-01-01

    Concept for interconnecting modules in parallel computers leads to cheaper, smaller, lighter, lower-power computing systems for aerospace, industrial, business, and consumer applications. Computer modules stacked and interconnected in various configurations. Connections among stacks controlled by switching within gateways and/or by addresses on buses.

  19. Parabolic dish module experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-03-01

    A development test model of the 8-meter Solar Brayton Parabolic Dish Module has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The test model consists of five major subsystems: Sanders ceramic honeycomb solar receiver; LaJet LEC460 solar concentrator; AiRsearch SABC MKIIIA engine, Abacus 8 kW ac inverter; and a Sanders designed and built system controller. Goals of the tests were to integrate subsystem components into a working module, demonstrate the concept, and generate 5 kWe (hybrid) and 4.7 kWe (solar only) input. All subsystem integration goals were successfully achieved, but system performance efficiency was lower than expected. Contributing causes of the lower performance efficiencies have been identified. Modifications needed to restore performance to the required levels and improve the system life cycle cost have been addressed and are the subject of this final report.

  20. Novel Duplicate Address Detection with Hash Function

    PubMed Central

    Song, GuangJia; Ji, ZhenZhou

    2016-01-01

    Duplicate address detection (DAD) is an important component of the address resolution protocol (ARP) and the neighbor discovery protocol (NDP). DAD determines whether an IP address is in conflict with other nodes. In traditional DAD, the target address to be detected is broadcast through the network, which provides convenience for malicious nodes to attack. A malicious node can send a spoofing reply to prevent the address configuration of a normal node, and thus, a denial-of-service attack is launched. This study proposes a hash method to hide the target address in DAD, which prevents an attack node from launching destination attacks. If the address of a normal node is identical to the detection address, then its hash value should be the same as the “Hash_64” field in the neighboring solicitation message. Consequently, DAD can be successfully completed. This process is called DAD-h. Simulation results indicate that address configuration using DAD-h has a considerably higher success rate when under attack compared with traditional DAD. Comparative analysis shows that DAD-h does not require third-party devices and considerable computing resources; it also provides a lightweight security resolution. PMID:26991901